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iTeachAZ

Lesson Plan Template (Direct Instruction)


Teachers: Robyn Tober

Subject: 5th Grade Social Studies

Common Core State Standards:

SS - Strand 1 American History. Concept 6 Civil War and Reconstruction.


PO 1. Describe factors leading to the Civil War: a. role of abolitionists and
Underground Railroad b. sectionalism between North and South c. westward
expansion

ELA - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and
organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (5.W.4)

ELP Listening and Speaking - Standard 2: The student will express orally his or
her own thinking and ideas: The student will communicate orally by: B-2: reciting
simple poems and repeated-patterned speech with appropriate rhythm, rate and
phrasing.

ISTE-S - 2. Communication and collaboration a. Interact, collaborate,


and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital
environments and media
Objective (Explicit):

SWBAT create a dialogue poem with a partner representing two sides of


a slave narrative (Southern slave / Northern free man/woman / Southern slave
owner / Northern supporter or opposer of slavery).
Evidence of Mastery (Measurable):
Include a copy of the lesson assessment.
Provide exemplar student responses with the level of detail you expect to see.
Assign value to each portion of the response

Students will fully complete poem planning worksheet, write a dialogue poem, and perform
it to other students. Students must have at least 10 statements for each perspective they
are writing the poem from, including the statements said at the same time. Less than ten
lines each will result in a deduction of points.
*there will be a rubric here explaining expectations in using examples of quality of life,
social class differences, struggles, and similarities in their poems
Sub-objectives, SWBAT (Sequenced from basic to complex):
How will you review past learning and make connections to previous lessons?
What skills and content are needed to ultimately master this lesson objective?
How is this objective relevant to students, their lives, and/or the real world?

Students will:
- Understand different perspectives from the North and South during the 1800s
regarding slavery
- Write poems using similes, metaphors, and other figures of speech
Key vocabulary:

Perspective point of view, how someone


see a situation or event
Dialogue - conversation between two or
more people

Materials:
Class blog/Padlet

Chart planning sheet for poem


Examples of dialogue poems:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/oiszM2VSAbU/UuMKw1Al8XI/AAAAAAAAIrk/7

iTZk6Rhp0U/s1600/Untitled.png
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/MirtPOTJ0D4/Tw_EgKHPbeI/AAAAAAAABEY/b
Y0_mPAD99k/s1600/Screen+shot+2012-0112+at+9.44.49+PM.png
Opening (state objectives, connect to previous learning, and make relevant to real life)
How will you activate student interest?
How will you connect to past learning?
How will you present the objective in an engaging and student-friendly way?
How will you communicate its importance and make the content relevant to your students?

Ask students What different perspectives have we been discussing in regards to


slavery? (Expected student responses of: Southern slaves / Northern free
men/women / Southern slave owners / Northern supporters or opposers of slavery).
Teacher will write down responses on the board.
Pick one of those perspectives and take a moment to think about how they may
have felt about their life, and what they were experiencing. After giving the
students time to think, have them turn to their shoulder partner or group and share
what perspective they chose and what their thoughts were.
Have some groups share out what they talked about
Explain the objective for the lesson SWBAT create a dialogue poem with a

partner representing two sides of a slave narrative


I
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Teacher Will:

I
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How will you model/explain/demonstrate all


knowledge/skills required of the objective?
What types of visuals will you use?
How will you address misunderstandings or
common student errors?
How will you check for understanding?
How will you explain and model behavioral
expectations?
Is there enough detail in this section so that
another person could teach it?

Explain that dialogue poems are


poems where there are two
perspectives being shown,
normally by two different
characters speaking, sometimes
they say phrases at the same
time, and they are really useful at
comparing two things, people, or
perspectives.
Teacher will show the examples of
dialogue poems on a projector or
printed out, and will read the
examples with a student
volunteer.
The teacher will highlight the
important parts of the dialogue
poem: the individual lines that are
comparing the two characters to

Student Will:
What will students be doing to actively capture and process
the new material?
How will students be engaged?

Listen and ask questions if


explanation is not clear.

Participate in listening or reading of


the example dialogue poems

Be actively listening

Participate in formative assessment

each other and how they are


different, and the lines that are
said together in unison by the
characters.
Teacher will do a formative
assessment of understanding the
dialogue poems by having
students give a thumbs up,
thumbs down, or thumbs in the
middle based on how they
understand it. If more explanation
is needed, answer questions from
the students.

of thumbs up, down, or middle. Ask


questions if needed.

Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?

If needed, teachers can print out the example poems so students can read them and
have access to them during the whole lesson.
G
u
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Teacher Will:

Student Will:

How will you ensure that all students have multiple


opportunities to practice new content and skills?
What types of questions can you ask students as you
are observing them practice?
How/when will you check for understanding?
How will you provide guidance to all students as they
practice?
How will you explain and model behavioral
expectations?
Is there enough detail in this section so that another
person could facilitate this practice?

How will students practice all knowledge/skills required of


the objective, with your support, such that they continue to
internalize the sub-objectives?
How will students be engaged?
How will you elicit student-to-student interaction?
How are students practicing in ways that align to
independent practice?

Teacher will brainstorm with the


class two different perspectives
they can plan to write a dialogue
poem about to model how to plan
for writing it.
Teacher will take ideas from the
student for each category of the
chart, which has each perspective
in its own box, so the class can
decide the major ideas they want
to include for both perspectives,
as well as their similarities. If
students are struggling to
brainstorm ideas to include in the
poem, give them questions or
categories to guide them (social
class differences, struggles,
tensions, comparisons,
belongings, and lifestyle).

Participate in brainstorming and


discussion.

Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?
How can you utilize grouping strategies?

If students still cant think of ideas, give them more questions or write some of your
own ideas so that they can understand where to start in the process, or change the
two perspectives if needed.
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Teacher Will:

How will you plan to coach and


correct during this practice?

How will you provide opportunities


for remediation and extension?

How will you clearly state and model


academic and behavioral expectations?

Did you provide enough detail so that


another person could facilitate the practice?

-Explain that students will be doing their


own planning process for their poems
with a partner (assign pairs or let them
choose) with the perspectives we have
been learning about in our last few
lessons about slavery. Tell them they can
choose one of the ones they thought of
early, or can come up with their own
related ones (Southern slaves / Northern
free men/women / Southern slave
owners / Northern supporters or
opposers of slavery).
-Walk around and make sure students
are on task and understand what theyre
doing. During planning and writing, give
students the opportunity to use the
primary sources they previously studied
and other materials theyve collected
from the unit.
- As students finish up their planning,
have them write their poems out fully,
making sure each student chooses a
role to focus on. Explain that each poem
must have at least 10 lines for each
character.
- Once everyone is finished, pairs can
read out their poems to the class. Or
they can be published onto a class blog
or Padlet site for everyone to view.

Student Will:
How will students independently practice the knowledge
and skills required by the objective?
How will students be engaged?
How are students practicing in ways that align to
assessment?
How are students using self-assessment to guide their own
learning?
How are you supporting students giving feedback to one
another?

Choose or get assigned partner,


brainstorm what perspectives you
will decide on.
Start planning process, ask for help if
you have questions.

Write out the poems when done with


planning sheet. Choose a role to
focus on. Use primary sources and
other materials from the unit to
shape your characters perspectives.

Read out poem to class and/or


publish poem onto class blog or
Padlet.

Differentiation Strategy
What accommodations/modifications will you include for specific students?
Do you anticipate any students who will need an additional challenge?

Students that need an additional challenge can write more than ten lines for each
character in their poem. Students that need more quiet areas to focus can move to a

different spot of the room or different location with their partner.

Closing/Student Reflection/Real-life connections:


How will students summarize and state the significance of what they learned?
Why will students be engaged?

After reading all or some of the poems, teacher will conduct a discussion with the whole
class asking questions like What did you see that was similar or contrasting from the
different perspectives everyone used in their poems? What stood out to you during
planning and writing your poems? Was it hard to take on the perspective of another
person and why or why not?