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Joely Ramos

Activities Portfolio #10

LEI 4724

Activity Title: Frozen Bean Bag Game


Source: Dattilo, J., & McKenney, A. (2011). Facilitation Techniques in
Therapeutic Recreation (2nd e.d.). State College, PA: Venture Publishing.
Equipment: bean bags, spacious room
Activity Description: Sometimes you find therapeutic benefits in even the
simplistic things, like play time. This activity uses play therapy to develop
important skills such as improved cognition, social interaction, and physical
skills of children with disabilities (Dattilo & McKenney, 2011). First, give
each participant a bean bag. Second, ask them to balance it on their heads
and practice walking in a straight line without having it fall. Third, have them
walk around the room wherever they want. Then, they will follow your
instructions as the game goes on as to how fast, slow, or in what direction
you want them to walk. For example, the leader can ask them to jog in place,
hug someone, walk quickly, skip around, go backwards, and etc. If at any
point the participants bean bag falls from their head, they must freeze. The
only way to unfreeze is if another participant picks up the bean bag and
places it on the head of the frozen person without dropping their own. The
point of the game is to try to keep everyone unfrozen and to help as many
people as possible.
Leadership Considerations: A therapeutic recreation (TR) specialist is
adequate for leading this activity, but anyone with leadership skills can
facilitate this activity. Leaders should consider emphasizing the objective of
the game as something positive that encourages cooperation, rather than
winning or competition. Making sure there are no obstructions or unsafe
protrusions that participants could bump into is essential for a safe game
area. Having additional adult or leader figures present is best when playing
group games in big spaces.
Adaptions: Participants with Aspergers Syndrome: Asperger
syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder considered to be on the high
functioning end of the spectrum (Autism Speaks, 2016). Symptoms
associated with this disability are limited social interactions, lack of eye
contact, challenges with nonverbal communication, and so on (Autism
Speaks, 2016). Dattilo & McKenney (2011) studied a case study where
someone used verbal and physical prompts to encourage appropriate
behavior when a child with Aspergers syndrome demonstrated
perseveration or inappropriate verbal outbursts. To better adapt this
activity, the facilitator should both say what he/she wants the participants to
do but also show them by doing it. If they want the participants to job, the
leaders should job in place. The more something is repeated the more likely
the group will follow. In addition to this, Packer (n.d.) says that an effective
adaptation is when presenting multi-step directions, pause between
instructions on multi-step tasks and check for comprehension. So facilitators

Joely Ramos

Activities Portfolio #10

LEI 4724

should not just say and show what they want participants to do, but they
should also pause and continue only when everyone understands. If the
leader wants the participants to clap and walk, everyone should understand
before they start walking and clapping as a group.
Participants with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD):
ADHD is a highly genetic, brain-based syndrome that has to do with the
regulation of a particular set of brain functions and related behaviors
(Attention Deficit Disorder Association, 2015). Seeds (n.d.) of ADDitude
Magazine said an effective skills that increasing focus in kids with ADHD is to
encourage your child to use the self-coaching technique of talking to
himself. She mentioned having them say what they are doing as they are
doing it, and in that way they will think of what comes next while still being
engaged in what they are doing presently. For this activity, participants can
be encouraged to talk out loud and say Ill help or I can get that if they
are going to unfreeze someone. They can also speak up and say what they
think is happening with their bean bag. If it is falling, let them freely express
themselves. They can say things like its falling, Im doing a good job at
balancing it, that person needs helps, I like picking up the blue bean
bags, and so forth. Another adaptation is to add music to your activity in
order to stimulate different parts of the brain while participants with ADHD
are playing (Batt, 2016). Playing upbeat music will keep the participants with
ADHD intrigued and into the game for a longer time than they would be
without the music. Using loud, neon colored bean bags can also keep them
more involved subconsciously.
Adaptation References
Attention Deficit Disorder Association. (2015). ADHD: The Facts. Retrieved
April 11, 2016, from https://add.org/adhd-facts/
Autism Speaks. (2016). Asperger Syndrome. Retrieved April 11, 2016, from
https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/asperger-syndrome
Batt, J. (2016). Great Activities for Kids with ADHD. Retrieved April 11, 2016,
from http://www.parenting.com/gallery/activities-for-kids-with-adhd?
page=6
Dattilo, J., & McKenney, A. (2011). Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic
Recreation (2nd e.d.). State College, PA: Venture Publishing.
Packer, L. E., PhD. (n.d.). Classroom Tips for Students with Asperger's
Disorder. Retrieved April 11, 2016, from
http://www.schoolbehavior.com/disorders/aspergers-nld/classroom-tipsfor-students-with-aspergers-disorder/

Joely Ramos

Activities Portfolio #10

LEI 4724

Seeds, P. (n.d.). Games That Increase Attention and Focus in Children with
ADHD. Retrieved April 11, 2016, from
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/7829-5.html