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OBSERVATION OF TEACHER PRACTICE

Teacher Name:
Angela Martin
Year: 2014-15
Target Behavior
and Sources of
Evidence for
Evaluation
PLANNING FOR
EFFECTIVE
TEACHING
1. Develop specific,
measurable and
ambitious annual
student achievement
goals for class
Possible Evidence:
review of goal
statement(s) and
teachers rationale for
selection; review of
data; student
interview.

2. Implement, adapt
and/or create,
standards-based unit
plans and assessments
Possible Evidence:
review of unit plans
and assessments.

Teacher Practice
Unacceptable

Assignment: K-2 Math Specialist

Teacher Practice
Novice

Teacher Practice
Proficient

Teacher Practice
Advanced
(Includes all elements of
effective teacher
practice rating)

Teacher does not


develop annual student
achievement goal(s) for
his/her class or develops
annual goal(s) that is not
specific, not measurable
or neither specific nor
measurable.
Less than half the
students can explain the
goal(s) in
developmentally
appropriate manner and
how it will be assessed.

Teacher does not create


or adapt standardsbased unit plans or fails
to implement units that
have been created; does
not articulate welldefined essential
questions or use those
questions when

Teacher develops annual


student achievement
goal(s) that is specific
and measurable but
lacks grounding in prior
data or is not ambitious
for students to achieve
up to but no more than
predicted growth based
on prior achievement

Teacher develops annual


student achievement
goal(s) that is specific,
measurable, and
grounded in prior
student performance
data; goal is for students
to achieve at level better
than what is predicted by
past academic
accomplishment

Teacher develops annual


student achievement
goal(s) that is ambitious,
measurable and well
grounded in prior
student performance
data; goal is for students
to achieve at level well
beyond what is predicted
by past academic
accomplishment

Half the students are


able to explain the
goal(s) in
developmentally
appropriate manner and
how it will be assessed.

Most students are able to


explain the goal(s) in
developmentally
appropriate manner how
it will be assessed.

Teacher creates and/or


adapts standards-based
units that identify
learning objectives from
the adopted scope and
sequence and articulate
relevant essential
questions.
Teacher may struggle

Teacher creates and/or


adapts standards-based
units that identify
learning objectives from
the adopted scope and
sequence; articulates
relevant essential
questions; develops
rigorous assessments to

All or nearly all students


can clearly explain the
goal(s), what they are
doing to reach the
goal(s), and how it will
be assessed.
Teacher creates and/or
adapts standards-based
units by identifying
learning objectives from
the adopted scope and
sequence; articulates
well-designed essential
questions; creates well
designed assessments

3. Create objective
driven lesson plans
Possible Evidence:
review of random
sample of lesson plans.

implementing the plan;


Unit plans fail to align
with assessments;
Assessments fail to
measure adopted grade
level objectives and/or
scoring of assessments
does not align with grade
level expectations.

with creating rigorous,


assessments that yield
information relevant to
grade level objectives;
designs sequences of
objectives that build on
prerequisite skills;
correctly anticipates
amount of time needed
for students to master
each objective most of
the time; implements
units as designed.

For any given unit, less


than half the students
can communicate the
essential questions of
the unit in a
developmentally
appropriate manner.

For any given unit, half


of the students can
articulate the essential
questions of the unit in a
developmentally
appropriate manner.

There is little or no
evidence of daily lesson
planning based on unit
plans.

Teacher develops written


daily lesson plans that
identify objectives that
are based on unit plans.
Identified strategies,
resources and/or
activities may not align
with intended learning
outcomes.

evaluate students
mastery of content and
skills standards and to
allow students to
demonstrate
understanding of
essential questions;
designs sequences of
objectives that build on
prerequisite skills;
correctly anticipates
amount of time needed
for students to master
each objective.
Implements units as
designed.
For any given unit, most
of the students can
communicate the
essential questions of
the unit in a
developmentally
appropriate manner.
Teacher develops
thorough, written daily
lesson plans that identify
objectives for lessons
based on unit plans;
selects relevant
strategies, resources and
activities for lessons that
will help students
achieve the intended
learning outcomes; uses
end-of-lesson
assessments to measure
student learning and
identify need for reteaching or additional
instruction.

that yield valuable


information regarding
mastery of grade level
objectives;
mentors/supports
colleagues in the
development of
standards-based unit
plans and assessments;
provides leadership to a
team in developing
standards-based units
and assessments.
For any given unit, all or
nearly all students can
communicate the
essential questions of
the unit in a
developmentally
appropriate manner.

Teacher develops
thorough, written daily
lesson plans that identify
lesson objectives based
on unit plans and
connected to prior
learning; matches
instructional strategies
to the lesson objectives;
designs daily
assessments that
measure progress
towards mastery; serves
as a mentor to
colleagues in the
development of daily
lesson plans; provides

4. Use student
performance data in all
planning activities

There is little or no
evidence of teacher
analyzing data or using
conclusions to adjust
instruction.

Teacher gathers and


reviews data, but data is
insufficient or unused.
Teachers conclusions
are not supported by
available data; and/or
teacher does not use
conclusions to adjust
instruction.

ELEM SCHOOL

ELEM SCHOOL

ELEM SCHOOL

Teacher effectively uses


data from daily
assessments, quizzes,
unit tests, and interim
assessments to adjust
future goals and plans.
Teacher takes active role
in analyzing grade-level
outcomes, using results
to plan for effective
Academic Coaching
sessions, tutoring,
InterSession and
Summer School
interventions.
ELEM SCHOOL

5. Develop strategies
to implement the
adopted school-wide
behavior management
system and/or program
for social development.

Teacher is unable to
explain how he/she will
implement adopted
school-wide behavior
management system;
fails to provide visual
cues for students; shows
little to no evidence of
plans to teach and
provide students
practice in structures
and procedures; does
not provide parents with
explanatory materials;
fails to use planning
resources provided; fails
to ask for help in
planning; fails to take an
active role in
team/school planning to
implement school-wide

Teacher is able to explain


how he/she will
implement adopted
school-wide behavior
system; provides visual
cues for students but
they may be unclear or
difficult to see; learning
studio procedures and
policies do not fully align
with school adopted
approach and
philosophy; insufficient
time allocated to teach
and provide practice;
does not demonstrate
clear and complete
knowledge of system
with policies and
procedures set up;
resorts to non-aligned

Teacher is able to explain


how he/she will
implement adopted
school-wide behavior
management system;
provides clear and easily
accessible cues to
students; provides clear
and cohesive
explanations to parents;
all learning studio
policies and procedures
fully align with school
adopted approach and
philosophy; provides
sufficient time for
students to learn and
practice expected
behaviors; immediate
responses to student
behavior are selected

Possible Evidence:
teacher explanation
using data to inform
instructional
adjustments for
individual students and
entire class.

Possible Evidence:
review of learning
studio set up, lesson
plans, parent
communication;
teacher explanation of
behavior management
system and
implementation
strategies.

daily lesson plan


exemplars for
colleagues use/learning.
Teacher mentors others
in using data to make
instructional
adjustments; provides
exemplars for others to
use; provides leadership
in data analysis and use
of results during gradelevel and staff meetings.

ELEM SCHOOL
Teacher mentors others
in developing effective
practices and
procedures; serves as a
model for others to
observe to support their
planning; provides
leadership in developing
grade-level-wide or
school-wide policies and
procedures.

behavior system; does


not provide written
directions to guest
teachers.

SECONDARY SCHOOL

SECONDARY SCHOOL

5. Develop behavior
management
strategies that align
with school adopted
philosophy, protocols
and procedures.

Teacher is unable to
explain how he/she will
implement strategies
that align; fails to
provide visual cues for
students; shows little to
no evidence of plans to
teach and provide
students practice in
structures and
procedures; does not
provide parents with
explanatory materials;
fails to use planning
resources provided; fails
to ask for help in
planning; fails to take an
active role in
team/school planning to
implement school-wide
behavior system; does
not provide written
directions to guest
teachers.

Possible Evidence:
review of learning
studio set up, lesson
plans, parent
communication;
teacher explanation of
behavior management
system and
implementation
strategies.

responses when under


stress; does not request
help when difficulties
arise in planning or
understanding;
explanations to parents
and students may be
unclear, incomplete,
incorrect or non-existent.
Written explanation for
guest teacher is
insufficient, unclear
and/or not fully aligned.
SECONDARY SCHOOL

from aligned, identified


strategies; is able to set
up plans for
implementation with
little or no coaching;
written explanation for
guest teacher provides
clear direction on
maintaining school-side
behavior management
system.
SECONDARY SCHOOL

SECONDARY SCHOOL

Teacher is able to explain


how he/she will
implement strategies
that align; provides
visual cues for students
but they may be unclear
or difficult to see;
learning studio
procedures and policies
do not fully align with
school adopted approach
and philosophy;
insufficient time
allocated to teach and
provide practice; does
not demonstrate clear
and complete knowledge
of system with policies
and procedures set up;
resorts to non-aligned
responses when under
stress; does not request
help when difficulties
arise in planning or
understanding;
explanations to parents

Teacher is able to explain


how he/she will
implement strategies
that align; provides clear
and easily accessible
cues to students;
provides clear and
cohesive explanations to
parents; all learning
studio policies and
procedures fully align
with school adopted
approach and
philosophy; provides
sufficient time for
students to learn and
practice expected
behaviors; immediate
responses to student
behavior are selected
from aligned, identified
strategies; is able to set
up plans for
implementation with
little or no coaching;
written explanation for

Teacher mentors others


in developing effective
practices and
procedures; serves as a
model for others to
observe to support their
planning; provides
leadership in developing
grade-level-wide or
school-wide policies and
procedures.

6. Develop effective
learning studio
procedures and
routines
Possible Evidence:
review of learning
studio set up, lesson
plans, parent and
guest teacher
communication;
teacher explanation of
behavior management
system and
implementation
strategies; notes or
observed participation
in staff, grade-level or
mentor meetings.

7. Utilize environment
beyond school walls to

There is little to no
evidence of clear
expectations, that
routines are set and
reinforced so that
students are safe;
teacher fails to provide
clear directions as
shared with students;
lesson pacing does not
demonstrate effort to
ensure students will be
engaged for all
instructional time
available; lacks plan to
ensure that students are
meaningfully engaged
throughout lesson; does
not have additional
meaningful work if
planned work completed
early; Lacks plans or
ineffective plans for
completing noninstructional duties or
transitions which
minimize loss of
instructional time; lacks
clear plan of how to
teach or practice; no
clear plan to reward or
hold kids accountable.
There is little to no
evidence of plans to use

and students may be


unclear, incomplete,
incorrect or non-existent.
Written explanation for
guest teachers is
insufficient, unclear
and/or not fully aligned.
Teacher cannot explain
plan for class-specific
and/or school behavior
expectations; plans may
not align with schooladopted behavior
management philosophy;
does not provide clear
tools for guest teachers
regarding expectations;
plan to implement is
weak, insufficient due to
gaps in describing how
to handle critical
routines; does not
include sufficient time to
teach kids how to meet
the expectations; unclear
or incomplete
description of the
expectations;
inconsistent plans for
students to engage in
meaningful activity if
they finish assigned
tasks early.

Teacher plans to use


guest experts, field

guest teachers provides


clear direction on
maintaining school-side
behavior management
system.
Teacher plans set and
reinforce clear
expectations and
routines so that all
students are safe, on
task, responsive and
respectful; provide stepby-step directions for
attendance, passing out
and storing materials,
bringing the class to
attention, working with
peers collaboratively,
lining up, using
restroom, transitioning to
a different space or
activity, turning in
papers or homework;
plans address responses
for off-task behavior;
lesson plans are paced
to progress such that
students should almost
never be disengaged or
left with nothing
meaningful to do; plan
establishes efficient
systems for performing
non-instructional
routines (e.g.
attendance, returning
work).
Teacher invites guest
experts into learning

Teacher plans develop


students to assume
responsibility for
reinforcing and
implementing routines
and procedures that
address both individual
behaviors, teamwork and
non-instructional
responsibilities.
Teacher mentors others
in developing effective
practices and
procedures; serves as a
model for others to
observe to support their
planning; provides
leadership in developing
common policies,
protocols and procedures
that contribute to a
school-wide system.

Teacher seeks out and


develops new field

promote learning
Possible Evidence:
review of lesson plans,
communication notes,
partner contact
database entries,
completed trip
paperwork.

TEACHING FOR
STUDENT SUCCESS
1. Implement well
organized, objective
driven lessons.
Possible Evidence:
observation of
delivered lesson,
comparison to lesson
plans provided,
observation conference
and student
interviews.

resources beyond school


walls to enrich learning
(e.g. guest experts, field
studies, partnerships,
technology).

Teacher implements
lesson objectives that
lack specificity, are not
measurable and/or do
not align to content
standards or there may
be no clear objective;
stated or posted
objective may not
connect to the lesson
taught; objective of the
lesson may not be
posted or stated;
importance of the
objective may not be
explained; no effort or
ineffective effort to
connect lesson to prior

studies partnerships and


technology to enrich
learning, but plans are
weak, superficial or
incomplete; develops
strong plans but fails to
allow sufficient lead time
to implement effectively;
fails to communicate or
coordinate with others
necessary for effective
implementation of plans.

studio to enrich learning;


teacher effectively uses
field studies to promote
learning; teacher makes
good use of partnerships
and community
resources; uses
technology to access
environment beyond
school walls; planning
occurs with sufficient
time for effective
implementation; and,
planning includes
communicating and
coordinating with key
stakeholders to secure
appropriate approvals.

studies and partnerships


to enhance learning;
supports individual field
study opportunities for
students.

Teacher implements
lesson objectives, but
they may lack specificity,
not be measurable
and/or not align to
content standards;
teacher might state or
post the objective but do
so in way that is not
understood by students;
teacher may explain
importance of objective
but in way that is not
understood by students;
teacher may state how
lesson connects to
previous learning but
lesson does not build on

Teacher implements
lesson objectives that
are specific, measurable
and aligned to
standards; the majority
of students can identify
and explain the lesson
objectives; students can
describe why the lesson
objective is valuable; the
lesson builds on
students prior
knowledge in a
significant and
meaningful way; the
lesson is well organized;
all parts of the lesson are
connected to each other

Students can
authentically explain
what they are learning
beyond simply repeating
the stated lesson
objective; students can
authentically explain why
they are learning what
they are learning beyond
parroting teachers
explanation; students
understand how the
objective fits into the
broader unit or course
goals; the teacher
actively and effectively
engages students in
connecting the lesson to

Teacher mentors others


in developing effective
practices and
procedures; serves as a
model for others to
observe to support their
planning; provides
leadership in developing
common policies,
protocols and procedures
that contribute to wide
and effective use of
resources beyond the
school walls.

learning; lesson may be


generally disorganized.

2. Engage all students


at all levels in rigorous
work.
Possible Evidence:
observation of teacher
instruction, review of
student materials.

The lesson/task is not


accessible to most
students too hard in
one way or another.
Lesson/task does not
engage students by
being too easy or below
skill level.
There is little to no
evidence that teacher
knows different levels of
students and/or uses
specific strategies to
ensure lesson meets
students where they are;
majority of lessons are
dominated by teacherdirected instruction so
that students have few
opportunities to apply.
There are clear gaps,
misconceptions and/or
incorrect understandings
in the teachers

students prior
knowledge in significant
way; some parts of the
lesson may not be
closely connected to
each other or aligned to
the objective, or some
parts may not move
students towards
mastery of the objective.
Teacher may reference
academic vocabulary
and/or discourse, but
less than half of students
are able to use
The lesson is accessible
to less than half of the
students either too
hard or too easy for
majority of students
during particular
task/lesson.
There is evidence that
teacher knows the
different levels of the
students and makes an
attempt to differentiate,
but the attempts are not
effective. Teacher uses
some student-directed
learning, but relies
predominantly on
teacher-directed
instruction. Students
have some opportunities
to practice, apply and/or
demonstrate their own
learning.
There is evidence the

and to the lesson


objectives.

their prior knowledge.

Teacher makes the


lesson/task accessible to
almost all students.

Teacher makes the


lesson/task accessible to
all students at different
levels.

There is evidence that


teacher knows the
students levels and uses
specific strategies to
ensure lesson meets
almost all students
where they are
(differentiated content,
questioning process or
work product); There is
an appropriate balance
between teacherdirected instruction and
student-centered
learning such that
students have adequate
opportunities to practice,
apply and demonstrate
their learning.
The teacher is fluent
with his/her discipline-

The teacher makes the


lesson challenging to all
students at different
learning levels. Students
regularly direct and have
significant opportunities
to practice, apply and
demonstrate their own
learning.
Teacher is highly fluent
with his/her disciplinespecific content and
skills; incorporates clear
opportunities for
students to pursue
individual interests in
content field. Students
naturally include
academic vocabulary in
class interactions, and

3. Utilize effective and


efficient instructional
strategies to
accomplish identified
objective(s).
Possible Evidence:
observation of teacher
instruction

discipline-specific
content knowledge and
skills. Student work
(written or verbal)
demonstrates similar
inaccuracies and
limitations.

teacher knows his/her


discipline-specific
content and skills; works
to have students use
academic vocabulary
and participate in formal
academic and/or civic
discourse. Students do
not incorporate
vocabulary or participate
in discussions without
significant intervention.

specific content and


skills. Students use
academic vocabulary
correctly with limited
teacher support;
participate in formal
academic and/or civic
discourse in a structured
setting and with some
teacher facilitation.

promote and participate


in critical discussions
with high level of
independence.

Teacher routinely uses


activities that are not
relevant to identified
objectives; Does not
elicit evidence of student
understanding and/or
doesnt adjust teaching
when student
misunderstanding
occurs; Does not use
effective questioning to
promote higher-level
thinking

Teacher is inconsistent in
use of relevant and/or
effective activities,
checking for student
understanding, adjusting
instruction based on
results, using of effective
questioning to promote
higher thinking; may not
effectively use
scaffolding techniques to
promote gradual release
of responsibility for
learning to students.

Teacher provides student


more than one way to
engage with content,
and all ways are
matched to lesson
objectives; teacher
checks for understanding
at almost all key
moments and makes
adjustments in
instruction based on
results; teacher responds
to most student
misunderstandings with
effective scaffolding;
teacher uses scaffolding
techniques that enable
students to construct
their own understanding
and/or apply skills with
increasing levels of
independence; teacher
frequently develops
higher-level
understanding through
effective questioning;
nearly all of the

The ways students are


provided to engage with
content all significantly
promote student mastery
of the objective; students
respond positively and
are actively involved in
the work; teacher checks
for understanding at all
key moments; uses a
variety of methods to
check for understanding;
seamlessly integrates
information gained from
the checks by making
adjustment to the
content or delivery of the
lesson, as appropriate;
teacher responds to
almost all student
misunderstanding with
effective scaffolding;;
teacher anticipates
student
misunderstandings and
preemptively addresses
them, either directly or

questions used are


effective in developing
higher-level
understanding; the
teacher uses a variety of
questions.

4. Maximize
Instructional Time
Possible Evidence:
observation of teacher
instruction

There is no evidence of
routines or procedures
for managing time;
Routines and procedures
do not run smoothly,
even with extensive
prompting by teacher;
transitions are lengthy
and messy; students are
idle for significant
portions of time;
inappropriate or off-task
student behavior
routinely delays
instruction or students
individual work; teacherdirected instruction
greatly outweighs

Routines and procedures


and transitions are
inconsistently
implemented, poorly
designed, and often
require multiple prompts
by teacher; inappropriate
or off-task behavior
interrupts instruction
regularly; students have
regular periods of
inactivity while waiting
for teacher direction;
transitions are require
strong teacher direction.

Routines and procedures


f run smoothly with some
prompting from teacher;
students generally know
their responsibilities;
transitions are generally
smooth with some
teacher direction;
students are only idle for
very brief periods of
time; teacher spends an
appropriate amount of
time on each part of the
lesson; the lesson
progresses at a quick
pace, such that student
are almost never
disengaged or left with

through the design of the


lesson; teacher is able to
address student
misunderstanding
without taking away from
the flow of the lesson or
losing the engagement
of students who do not
understand; teacher asks
higher-level questions at
multiple levels of
Blooms Taxonomy;
students are able to
answer higher-level
questions with
meaningful responses,
showing that they are
accustomed to
answering these types of
questions; students pose
higher level questions to
the teacher and each
other.
Routines and procedures
run smoothly with
minimal prompting from
the teacher; students
know their
responsibilities and do
not have to ask
questions about what to
do; transitions are
orderly, efficient, and
systematic, and require
little teacher direction;
students are never idle
while waiting for the
teacher; students share
responsibility for the
operations and routines
in the learning studio;

student-directed learning
and work time.

6. Maximize use of
space, furniture and
materials for optimal
learning
Possible Evidence:
review of learning
studio layout, visual
displays; observation
of teacher instruction
and student behavior.

Furniture is not safely


arranged and/or not
suited to lesson
activities; furniture is
never rearranged to
meet learning needs or
goals; learning resources
are poorly used and/or
not used for learning
purposes;
materials are
inaccessible to students
or access disrupts
instructional flow
significantly; learning is
not accessible to some
students because of the
arrangement of
resources and or
students; no student
work displayed; there is
little to no evidence of
using bulletin boards or
other public displays to
support student learning.

nothing meaningful to
do; inappropriate or offtask student behavior
rarely interrupts or
delays the lesson.

Room and furniture are


safely organized;
furniture arrangements
change with lesson
activities and/or goals,
but the arrangement
may not be effective;
learning resources are
adequately used and at
least essential learning is
accessible to all
students;
materials are accessible,
but access creates some
distraction to the
instructional flow;
student work is
displayed, but does not
serve as a tool for
improved student
learning; bulletin boards
and public displays
provide some evidence
of promoting student
learning.

Teacher organizes the


room and furniture so
that it is a resource for
learning activities; alters
arrangement of room to
support different
activities; organizes
materials so they are
accessible to students
without disrupting the
instructional flow;
bulletin boards, posters
and displays support
student engagement and
learning, provide
examples of key
instructional strategies
and samples of student
work; teacher uses
resources skillfully; all
learning and resources
are accessible to all
students.

the lesson progresses at


a rapid pace such that
students are never
disengaged, and
students who finish
assigned work early have
something else
meaningful to do; the
flow of the lesson is
never impeded by
inappropriate or off-task
student behavior, either
because no such
behavior occurs or
because the teacher
efficiently addresses it.
Students adjust furniture
to meet goals and own
learning needs; students
navigate the learning
environment with high
level of independence,
gathering supplies as
needed; students are
highly involved in
creating public displays
that support learning;
Teacher mentors
colleagues in effective
use of space; learning
studio serves as
exemplary use of space
for others, tours, site
visits, etc.

10

INCREASE STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT
1. Assess student
progress
Possible Evidence:
review of varied
assessment tools,
lesson and unit plans,
student work.

2. Track student data


Possible Evidence:
review of PowerSchool
Inform folders,
individual database
and records.

Teacher does not


routinely use
assessments to measure
student mastery of
content standards,
assessments do not
provide for more than
one way to demonstrate
mastery and/or
assessments do not
accurately measure or
align with lesson
objectives or learning
goals.

Teacher routinely uses


assessments to measure
student mastery of
content standards;
assessments align with
lesson objectives and/or
learning goals.
Assessments may not
provide for more than
one way to demonstrate
mastery.

Teacher does not


routinely gather and/or
record student progress
data.

Teacher routinely records


the student progress
data gathered, but data
is not monitored and
used to form
conclusions.

Teacher routinely uses


assessments to measure
student mastery of
content standards and
provides students
multiple ways of
demonstrating mastery
(for example, selected
response, constructed
response, performance
task and personal
communication); Teacher
purposefully uses daily,
weekly and interim
assessments to track
student progress and
inform instruction;
Assessment methods
and items used
accurately measure
lesson objectives or unit
goals; teacher provide
multiple opportunities for
students to demonstrate
mastery over the course
of the year.

Teacher routinely uses


assessments to measure
student mastery of
content standards;
provides students with
multiple ways of
demonstrating mastery;
provides students with
multiple opportunities
during a unit to
demonstrate mastery.

Teacher routinely records


student progress data
gathered and uses the
PowerSchool Inform
system to analyze
student progress towards
mastery.

Teacher routinely records


the student progress
data gathered and uses
the PowerSchool Inform
system to analyze
student progress towards
mastery; at least 50% of

Teacher serves as a
mentor to colleagues in
construction of student
assessments; provides
assessment exemplars to
colleagues; provides
leadership to team in
developing grade
level/course
assessments.

11

Teacher regularly records


and monitors a variety of
other student
performance data such
as IEP goals, 504 plans,
attendance data,
observational data,
behavioral data.

3. Analyze data and


use conclusions to
inform instruction to
meet established
student goals

There is little or no
evidence that teacher
changes instructional
plans based on
conclusions of data
analysis.

Possible Evidence:
review of annual
student achievement
goals, match to
student performance
data, revisions to
unit/lesson plans,
grade-level team
meeting notes,
referrals to child study
teams or other student
support services.

___________________________________________

Teacher makes changes


to short-term
instructional plans,
activities and current
strategies based on
conclusions of data
analysis.

Teacher makes changes


to both short and longterm plans, activities and
current strategies as
needed, based on
conclusions of data
analysis.

students know their


progress toward mastery.
Teacher serves as a
mentor to colleagues in
analysis student
assessment and other
performance data;
provides exemplars to
colleagues; provides
leadership to team in
developing strategies to
track and use data
effectively.
Teacher makes changes
to both short and longterm plans as needed,
based on conclusions of
data analysis; modifies
practice as appropriate.
Teacher mentors
colleagues in use of data
analysis to inform
instructional planning;
leads grade
level/departmental team
in using data analysis to
inform instructional
planning and/or program
development.

_________________________________________
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Evaluator Signature

Teacher Signature

13

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS
Target Behavior
and Sources of
Evidence for
Evaluation
Professional
Development

School/District
Committee Work

Teacher Practice
Unacceptable

Teacher Practice
Novice

Teacher Practice
Proficient

Teacher does not


meaningfully engage in
professional
development activities;
there is a pattern of
absence on professional
development days or not
being engaged even
though physically
present; teacher makes
little or no effort to
improve practice through
professional reading,
courses, workshops, etc.
Teacher makes no effort
to participate in
school/district committee
work.

Teacher participates in
professional
development activities to
a limited extent; takes an
active role in
professional
development activities,
but there is little or no
evidence of attempts to
apply concepts or tools
to improve practice.

Teacher actively engages


in professional
development activities;
works to apply concepts
and tools presented in
professional
development activities to
improve teaching
practice.

Teacher participates in
limited ways on school
committees when
specifically asked to do
so.
Teacher participates in
limited ways in
student/staff recruitment
activities when
specifically requested to
do so.

Teacher volunteers to
participate on
committees to improve
school and/or district.

Teacher finds limited

Teacher shares effective

Student/Staff
Recruitment

Teacher does not get


involved in student/staff
recruitment activities.

Professional Learning

Teacher makes no effort

Teacher volunteers to
participate in student
and/or staff recruitment
activities, making a
substantial contribution.

Teacher Practice
Advance

(Includes all elements of


effective teacher
practice rating)
Teacher participates in
planning and leading
professional
development activities;
makes presentations at
local, state and/or
national professional
meetings; publishes
professional articles.

Teacher volunteers to
chair or provide
leadership to committees
to improve school and/or
district.
Teacher volunteers to
plan/organize student
and/or staff recruitment
activities; assumes a
leadership role in
implementing student
and/or staff recruitment
activities; makes a
substantial contribution
to success of recruitment
efforts.
Teacher serves as a

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Community

to share
knowledge/materials
with colleagues; makes
little or no effort to care
for shared
materials/equipment;
actively rejects
professional feedback
from colleagues.

Participation in School
Activities Beyond the
School Day

Teacher rarely
participates in school
activities scheduled
beyond the school day;
avoids becoming
involved in school
events, school/district
projects.

ways to contribute to the


success of
colleagues/team and
only if it doesnt require
extra time or effort;
makes some
contributions in
team/staff meetings;
makes inconsistent effort
to care for shared
materials/equipment; is
not receptive to
professional feedback
from colleagues.
Teacher participates in
school activities beyond
the school day when
specifically requested to
do so; gets involved in
school events,
school/district projects if
specifically asked or
required to do so.

practices in grade-level
team and staff meetings;
cares for shared
materials and
equipment; Actively
engages in surfacing and
solving problems with
colleagues/teammates;
listens to and
incorporates relevant
professional feedback
from colleagues.

mentor in a systematic,
sustained relationship

Teacher volunteers to
attend many school
activities that are
scheduled beyond the
school day; volunteers to
make substantial
contributions of time and
effort to school events
and school/district
projects.

Teacher volunteers to
take an active role in
planning, leading and/or
preparing for school
activities that are
scheduled beyond the
school day; attends
almost all school
activities beyond the
school day, assumes a
leadership role in school
events and
school/district projects.

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES (If rated does not meet expectations, evidence must be included and a
plan of correction created immediately upon notice.)
Teacher Professional Behaviors

Meets
Expectati
ons

Teacher maintains accurate student and professional records (e.g. attendance, grade
books, sem/final assessments, discipline logs).

Teacher builds and maintains learning-focused relationships with families.

Does Not
Meet
Expectatio
ns

15

Teacher maintains strong personal attendance.

Teacher is on time for class, work and work-related assignments.

Teacher attends and is attentive during required meetings.

Teacher maintains professional language, dress and demeanor at all times.

Teacher safeguards school resources at all times (technology, instructional tools and
materials, learning studio).

Teacher responds to all requests for information from key stakeholders in a timely
manner (within 24 hours).

Teacher raises concerns in a respectful and direct manner.

Teacher attends and is attentive during professional development sessions.

Teacher performs assigned non-learning studio and non-instructional responsibilities


fully.

Teacher actively supports and implements school-wide policies and practices.

Teacher uses school-issued technology and instructional tools and materials for
intended purposes.

Teacher is actively engaged when facilitating instruction or leading activities in which


students are present.

Teacher makes decisions that reflect appropriate professional judgment.

Teacher demonstrates personal opinions and actions that ensure all students have a fair
opportunity to succeed.

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