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WRITING

Celebrate our
shared history
Aboriginal &

Torres Strait
Islander
cultures

Alwayswas,
Alwayswillbe

art
Competition
meet the

CURRICULUM
requirements

eng
Age

2016 Schools'
Reconciliation Challenge

Publication & Copyright 


This publication is copyright NSW Reconciliation
Council, January 2016. Apart from any fair dealing
for the purpose of private study, research, criticism
or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no
part may be reproduced without permission with
the exception of photocopying for use by teachers
with reproduction maintaining original format
and text. This Kit makes use of material produced
by the Board of Studies Teaching and Educational
Standards NSW (BOSTES). The BOSTES Standards
should be consulted separately on the issues
of reproduction.

Partners 

Note to Reader 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers
are warned that this publication may contain
references to deceased persons.

Effort has been undertaken to ensure that the


information contained in this book is correct,
and the NSW Reconciliation Council regrets any
offence that errors or omissions may cause.
Throughout this publication, the terms Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander are used wherever
possible. In the interests of readability we use the
terms Indigenous and non-Indigenous to refer to
the relationship between Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islanders and non-Indigenous Australians.
The authors intend no disrespect.

Acknowledgements & Contributors 


The NSW Reconciliation Council would like
to thank the Sydney Story Factory for their
contribution to this Kit and for their ongoing
support of the Schools Reconciliation Challenge.

Enquiries 

We would also like to thank BOSTES and Peter


Minter from the University of Sydney for advice
and support throughout the writing of this Kit.
Telephone: (02) 8095 9600
Email: schools@nswreconciliation.org.au
This Teaching Kit is available online:
www.nswreconciliation.org.au
We acknowledge and pay respect to Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander ancestors, Elders and
the diversity of traditional owners across this
ancient land.

Design 

www.-l-design.com.au

2016 Schools'
Reconciliation Challenge

Alwayswas,
Alwayswillbe
2

Entry Info

Learning Outcomes

Past Entries

The Toolkit
9
10

Getting started
Exploring the 2016 theme

12

Reconciliation
eline
Always Was, Always Will Be: A tim

20

Creating art!

22

Creating stories!

11

24 Reconciliation Road Map


25 Significant Dates
26 Further Resources
27

Culturally Appropriate Teaching

29 Entry Form: Art


30 Artist Statement
31

Entry Form: Writing

32

Writer's Reflection

33

Terms and Conditions

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 1

Entry Info
What?
The Schools Reconciliation Challenge is an annual writing
and art competition for young people across NSW.

The Schools Reconciliation Challenge


is one way for students to learn
about Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Australia and contribute
positively to Australian society,
whilst meeting the objectives of the
NSW K-6 and 7-10 syllabuses.

Who?
All young people in Years 5-9 (or of equivalent age), Indigenous
and non-Indigenous, of all abilities. Young people may enter the
competition through their school or independently.

When?
The competition runs from 22 January to 10 June, 2016. Selected
works will be exhibited in Sydney during 2016. It is free to enter and
selected artists and writers will be sponsored to travel to Sydney for
the exhibition launch.

The New South Wales


Reconciliation Council
The NSW Reconciliation Council is a
non-government, not-for-profit organisation. It is
the peak representative body for reconciliation in
NSW. Our purpose is to advance reconciliation
by promoting the development of equitable and
just communities that acknowledge and respect
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,
cultures and values.

How?
Register for the competition by emailing
schools@nswreconciliation.org.au with your name, school and
position and whether you would like to receive a hard copy of the
Teaching Kit.
Then, use the activity ideas, case studies and other resources in this
Teaching Kit to inspire and inform lessons about Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander issues.
Use these lessons to assist students to develop artworks or stories
which reflect their ideas about reconciliation and the theme
Always Was, Always Will Be.
Submit the artworks and stories to the New South Wales Reconciliation
Council by 10 June 2016.

Remember:
All art entries MUST include a complete artists statement and entry form
(found at the back of this Kit). The artwork and artists statement are judged
together so it is important that the statement is sufficiently detailed and
explanatory. Entries without an artists statement will not be accepted.
Artworks should be 2D and a maximum size of A1.
Similarly, all writing entries MUST be submitted with a completed reflection
and entry form (found at the back of this Kit). Entries without a reflection or
entry form will not be accepted.
Writing entries must be original creative pieces that explore the theme
Always Was, Always Will Be, and reconciliation more broadly. Entries over
500 words will not be accepted.
2 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Througho
ut this kit
we refer
to differe
nt
Aborigina
l and Tor
res
Strait Isl
ander na
tions
and langu
age grou
ps.
Check ou
t this lin
k to
see wher
e they all
are
in Austra
l
ia
:
http://m
gnsw.org
.au/
sector/ab
original/
aborigina
l-languag
e-map/

Learning Outcomes
This Teaching Kit has been developed in consultation with the Board of Studies Teaching
and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) to ensure that the competition meets various
NSW curriculum outcomes for Stages 3 & 4.

English: Stages 3 & 4


The aim of English in years K-10 is to enable students to understand and use language effectively; appreciate, reflect on
and enjoy the English language and to make meaning in ways that are imaginative, interpretive, critical and powerful.
Through responding to and composing a wide range of texts and through the close study of texts, students will develop
knowledge, understanding and skills in order to:
A Communicate through speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing and representing.
B Use language to shape and make meaning according to purpose, audience and context.
C Think in ways that are imaginative, creative, interpretive and critical.
D Express themselves and their relationships with others and their world.
E Learn and reflect on their learning through their study of English.

Stage 3 objectives met by participating in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge


Objective A

Objective B

Objective C

Objective D

Objective E

Writing and representing

Reading
and responding

Thinking
imaginatively,
creatively,
interpretively and
critically

Expressing
themselves

Reflecting on
learning

Speaking and listening


Reading and viewing
Spelling

Grammar, punctuation
and vocabulary

Stage

Stage 4 objectives met by participating in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge


Objective A

Objective B

Objective C

Objective D

Objective E

Responds to and
composes texts
for understanding,
interpretation, critical
analysis, imaginative
expression and pleasure.

Use and describes


language forms,
features and structures
of texts appropriate
to a range of
purposes, audiences
and contexts.

Thinks
imaginatively,
creatively,
interpretively and
critically about
information,
ideas and
arguments to
respond to and
compose texts.

Demonstrates
understanding
of how texts
can express
aspects of their
broadening
world and their
relationships
within it.

Uses, reflects
on and
assesses their
individual and
collaborative
skills for
learning.

Effectively uses a
widening range of
processes, skills,
strategies and
knowledge for
responding to and
composing texts in
different media and
technologies.

Makes effective
language choices
to creatively shape
meaning with accuracy,
clarity and coherence.

Identifies
and explains
connections
between and
among texts.

Identifies,
considers and
appreciates
cultural
expression in
texts.

Stage

Links to direct outcomes


For Stages 3 and 4 English syllabuses
http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/
Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 3

Visual Arts: Stages 3 & 4


In Visual Arts, students develop knowledge and understanding, skills, values and attitudes in making and appreciating by
engaging with the concepts of artists, artworks, the audience and the world.
In Visual Arts, students develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in making artworks informed by their investigations
of the world as subject matter, use of expressive forms, and consideration of the audience for their works. They also develop
their knowledge, skills and understanding in appreciating their own artworks and those of others, recognising some
relationships between artists, artworks, audiences and how the world is interpreted.
It also assists students to participate in and contribute to cultural life, to become informed consumers of the arts and culture,
to empathise with others, and to consider a range of career paths.
Creative Arts in K6 is designed to enable students to gain increasing understanding and accomplishment in the visual arts,
music, drama and dance and for students to appreciate the meanings and values that each of the art forms offer personally,
culturally and as forms of communication.
In Visual Arts, students will develop knowledge, skills and understanding:
in making artworks informed by their investigations of the world as subject matter, use of expressive forms, and
consideration of the audience for their works.
in appreciating their own artworks and those of others, recognising the roles of artists, audiences and how the world can
be interpreted.

Stage 3 objectives met by participating in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge


Making

Appreciating

Stage

VAS3.1
Investigates subject matter in an
attempt to represent likenesses
of things in the world.

VAS3.2
Makes artworks for different
audiences, assembling
materials in a variety of ways.

VAS3.3
Acknowledges that
audiences respond in
different ways to artworks
and that there are different
opinions about the value
of artworks.

VAS3.4
Communicates about the
ways in which subject matter
is represented in artworks.

Closely observes details


of things in the world and
seeks to make artworks
about these using various
techniques, such as
proportion, perspective,
composition, foreshortening.

Examines a range
of concepts and
their relationships to
selected forms.

Recognises that an artist


may have a different
view about the meaning
of the work he or she
has made, to the view
of an audience who
responds to it.

Identifies and describes


the properties of different
forms, materials and
techniques in artworks
and comments on how
these are employed in
the representation of
subject matter.

Uses different artistic


concepts (eg colour, tone,
light, scale, abstract), and
explores how symbols may
be used in their interpretation
of selected subject matter.
Explores subject matter of
personal and social interest
from particular viewpoints
including issues, activities
and events in the community
and global environment,
places and spaces, people,
objects and fantasies.

Recognises how
an audience has an
influence on the kinds
of works they make,
and seeks to clarify the
purpose of their works,
and suggests alternatives
about how they
may proceed.
Discusses the conditions
and requirements of
artworks that are made
for particular purposes,
sites or events and how
those conditions and
requirements can affect
how they might go about
their own artmaking.

4 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Recognises that views


about artworks can
change over time and
are affected by different
theories and beliefs.

Discusses the artists


intention and/or the use
of styles and techniques
in selected works and
considers the possible
meanings of these works.
Suggests how subject
matter can mean different
things in artworks
and seeks to explain
meanings by developing
reasoned accounts that
take into account such
things as the artist, work,
world and audience.

Stage 4 objectives met by participating in the Schools Reconciliation Challenge


Objective

Area of content

Outcomes

Students will:

A student:

Develop knowledge, understanding


and skills to make artworks informed
by their understanding of practice, the
conceptual framework and the frames

Practice

4.1 uses a range of strategies


to explore different artmaking
conventions and procedures to
make artworks

Conceptual framework

4.2 explores the function of and


relationship between artist artwork
world audience

Frames

4.3 makes artworks that involve some


understanding of the frames

Representation

4.4 recognises and uses aspects of the


world as a source of ideas, concepts
and subject matter in the visual arts

Conceptual strength and meaning

4.5 investigates ways to develop


meaning in their artworks

Resolution

4.6 selects different materials and


techniques to make artworks

Practice

4.7 explores aspects of practice in


critical and historical interpretations
of art

Conceptual framework

4.8 explores the function of and


relationships between the artist
artwork world audience

Frames

4.9 begins to acknowledge that art


can be interpreted from different
points of view

Stage

Develop knowledge, understanding


and skills to critically and historically
interpret art informed by their
understanding of practice, the
conceptual framework and the frames

Links to direct outcomes


For Stage 3 Visual Arts syllabus
http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/
ce0d0525-fb53-44db-b4bb-f9d252549824/k6_creative_
arts_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES
For Stage 4 Visual Arts syllabus
http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_sc/
pdf_doc/visual_arts_710_syl.pdf

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 5

Stage

History: Stages 3 & 4


Participating in the SRC also addresses a number
of criteria for the BOSTES curriculum, including
particular modules.

Stage 4 objectives met by


participating in the Schools
Reconciliation Challenge

A student:

Historical concepts
Continuity and change:some things change over time
and others remain the same.
Cause and effect:events, decisions or developments in
the past that produce later actions, results or effects.
Perspectives:people from the past will have different
views and experiences.
Empathetic understanding:an understanding of
another's point of view, way of life and decisions made in
a different time.
Significance:the importance of an event, development
or individual/group.
Contestability:historical events or issues may be
interpreted differently by historians.

Historical skills

Research

Stage

A student:
Describes and explains the significance of people,
groups, places and events to the development
of Australia
Describes and explains different experiences of
people living in Australia over time
Identifies change and continuity and describes the
causes and effects of change on Australian society
Describes and explains the struggles for rights and
freedoms in Australia, including Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander peoples
Applies a variety of skills of historical inquiry and
communication
Modules in Stage 3 that align with the content
of the Schools Reconciliation Challenge

6 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Describes and explains the causes and effects of


events and developments of past societies over time
Identifies the meaning, purpose and context of
historical sources
Uses evidence from sources to support historical
narratives and explanations

Uses a range of historical terms and concepts when


communicating an understanding of the past

Explanation and communication

Australia as a nation

Describes and assesses the motives and actions of


past individuals and groups in the context of past
societies

Locates, selects and organizes information from


sources to develop an historical inquiry

Analysis and use of sources

The Australian Colonies

Describes major periods of historical time and


sequences events, people and societies from
the past

Identifies and describes different contexts,


perspectives and interpretations of the past

Comprehension

Stage 3 objectives met by


participating in the Schools
Reconciliation Challenge

Describes the nature of history and archaeology and


explains their contribution to an understanding of
the past

Selects and uses appropriate oral, written, visual and


digital forms to communicate about the past
Modules in Stage 4 that align with the content
of the Schools Reconciliation Challenge
Depth Study 1 Investigating the Ancient Past
Depth Study 6 Expanding Contacts 6D
Aboriginal and Indigenous Peoples, Colonisation and
Contact History

Links to direct outcomes


Link to History outcomes
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/outcomes/
Links to Stage 3 History modules
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/
content/804/
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/
content/805/
Links to Stage 4 History modules
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/
content/1044/
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/hsie/history-k10/
content/807/

Past Entries
In schools across NSW, young
people are speaking up about
reconciliation, and telling their
stories. Below are some of
the outstanding and inspiring
artworks from the 2015 Schools'
Reconciliation Challenge. The
theme was Homegrown Heroes".

Indigenous S
oldier

Mar y Bradhur
st
Avalon Public
School
Second Prize,
Primar y Scho
ol 2015

My ar twork is
about recogn
ising the Indige
fought in the
nous soldiers
war. Somethi
that
ng that inspire
sculpture in Sy
d
m
e to do this is
dney that has
the
5 bullets stan
it is the first sc
ding and 2 fa
ulpture in Sydn
lle
n,
ey that recogn
Indigenous so
ises the fallen
ldiers that foug
ht
in the war. In
there is an Ab
my ar twork
original flag on
the face of th
that the Abor
e soldier to sh
iginal people
ow
were the first
to be in Austra
lia.

f Heroes
The House o
ens and
Auraiha Hew
Billie Brennan
Public School
Tacking Point
ended,
Highly Comm
2015
ol
ho
Primar y Sc
owing Eddie
n Heroes by sh
w
ro
eg
om
H
table patch
relates to
Our ar twork
ng from a vege
gi
er
em
ri
ia
cause
ent Ling
are heroes be
Mabo and Vinc
heroes". They
n
w
ro
shows
eg
It
s.
om
hts and land
as they are "h
rig
r
ei
th
r
fo
To
ng and hard
g difference.
they fought lo
can make a bi
ns
lia
ra
most
st
d
Au
us
t of love, an
that Indigeno
cape, just a bi
a
ed
ne
t
n'
u do
be a hero, yo
urage.
co
,
tly
importan

Shared Reme
m

brance

Ella Burke
Moruya High
School
Highly Comm
ended,
Secondar y Sc
hool 2015
My ar twork is
about the reco
gnition that Ab
also went to
original peop
war along with
le
people of no
backgrounds.
nAb
original
It represents
a shared resp
hands give on
ect as the two
e another a po
ppy and som
represents re
e rosemar y. It
conciliation as
the hands are
to share the tw
coming toge
o items of rem
ther
embrance. Th
sleeves like th
ey have green
at of the sold
iers who wen
representing
t to war before
Australia toge
us,
th
er in an act th
home the ab
at's given our
ility to be safe
and free for us
all.

Australian Historical
Edition of Snakes
and Ladders
Mikayla Li
Reddam House
First Prize, Secondary School 2015
My artwork is an adaptation of the board
game Snakes and Ladders. The spaces
symbolise homegrown heroes progressing
through Australian History. The snakes
represent Aboriginal dreamtime serpents
and the ladders are the industrialisation
of Europeans coming to this nation.
Traditional painting methods such as dot
painting and weaving and stitching have
been incorporate along with a European
understanding of painting. This shows the
2 cultures coming together to form their
own unique perspectives of history.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 7

Photo by Ryan Pierse/City of Sydney/Getty Images

The
Toolkit
AwE
SOME

8 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Getting started
We encourage teachers to begin by readin
g through the timeline on pages
12 to 19 to familiarise themselves with the
content. Then, check out the
Creating Art (p.20) and Creating Storie
s (p.22) pages and decide which
option you think would suit your students.
These two pages contain a number
of activities focused on their respective
mediums. The table below is a
general guide to help you develop lessons
around the theme Always Was,
Always Will Be, and to assist in turning stu
dent ideas into art and stories.
Session guide
Sessions

Activities

1-2

Session 1:
Use the content from Explorin
g the 2015
Theme (p.10) and What is Reconc
iliation?
(p.11) to begin a class discussion
about
Reconciliation and our theme Alw
ays Was,
Always Will Be.
Pick at least four of the historica
l moments
from the timeline provided on pag
es 12-19 to
generate class discussion. Ask you
r students
why they think this event or mom
ent is
important, and how it might carr
y different
meanings for different people. The
re are also
additional discussion questions prov
ided
throughout the timeline.

3-4

Session 2:
Turn to Creating Art or Creatin
g Stories
(p. 20 & 22) and use the content
provided to
explore your chosen medium in
the context
of reconciliation.
Encourage students to create
their own
artwork or short stor y based on
what they
have learnt and discussed about
the theme
Always Was, Always Will Be and reco
nciliation.
We d particularly love to see wor
ks that
demonstrate students considering
historical
events from more than one pers
pective.
Make sure students write either
an artists
statement or writers reflection exp
laining their
work, and complete the entr y form
(p. 29-32).

Session 1:

Session 2:

Use the above


guide for session 1.

Session 3:

Choose a further two


historical moments
from pages 12-19
and discuss using the
questions provided.

Session 4:

Use the above


guide for session 3.

Use this session to


continue to work
on and complete
artworks and/
or stories.

Alternatively, research
your own historical
moments and
discuss in groups.

Make sure students


write an artists
statement or writers
reflection explaining
their work (p.30 & 32)

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 9

Photo by Fairfax

Reclaiming ou

r Rights March he

ld 20 July 2005

Exploring the 2016 theme


Always Was, Always Will Be
This year, the Schools Reconciliation
Challenge is based around the theme
Always Was, Always Will Be. This
phrase holds particular significance
in Australia and is commonly
used to describe Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander peoples
ongoing connection to country.
This Teaching Kit will encourage
students to consider our uniquely
Australian history and to celebrate the
continuity and resilience of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander cultures.
Australias history stretches back
tens of thousands of years and long
before Captain Cooks ship first sailed
into what we now know as Botany

Bay. Current estimates suggest


that Aboriginal people first arrived
in Australia approximately 60,000
years ago.
This Teaching Kit touches on just
a few of the significant events in
Australias extensive history and
encourages students to consider
them from different perspectives. We
also urge classes to undertake their
own research into historical moments
not covered in the Kit. We hope that
by working through the exercises
provided, students will recognise that
our interpretations of history, events
and the world we live in are informed
by our own past experiences, culture

Brainstorming questions:

What events do you think of when you think about significant


moments in Australias history?
Why do you think they are important?
What do you think reconciliation means?
Why do you think it is important to consider other peoples
perspectives when we are learning about history?

10 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

and education. We have deliberately


chosen moments in Australias history
that will be both age-appropriate
and engaging for students. Included
throughout the Kit are a number of
classroom exercises and discussion
points to assist teachers translate
the theme Always Was, Always
Will Be into artworks and creative
writing pieces.
Please remember that in order for an
artwork or written piece to be eligible
for the Schools' Reconciliation
Challenge, students entries must be
submitted with a completed entry
form as well as an Artist Statement or
Writers Reflection (p. 29-32).

Reconciliation
What is reconciliation?
Reconciliation is important not
only to Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander peoples but also to
Australias future as a unified nation.
Reconciliation means acknowledging
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
peoples as the traditional owners of
this land and recognising that this fact
is still important today.
At the heart of reconciliation is the
relationship between the broader
Australian community and Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander people. To
achieve reconciliation, we need to
develop strong relationships built on
trust and respect, and that are free of
racism. All Australians must also be
aware of not only our colonial history,
but the rich Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander cultures that were here
long ago and that still exist in the
present time.
Reconciliation is often best
understood as a journey. We
take important steps towards
reconciliation every day but it is a

long and slow process. There have


been some significant events that
stand out in Australias journey
to reconciliation, such as the
Reconciliation Walk in 2000 when
over 250,000 people marched
across the Sydney Harbour Bridge
to show their support for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander peoples
and their desire to see a reconciled
Australia. While big events such
as this are vital in the journey to
reconciliation, its also important to
remember that even small actions
in local communities, such as
acknowledging Traditional Owners
at school assemblies and flying
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander flags, are meaningful steps
towards reconciliation.
Sharing history is crucial for
reconciliation. The timeline in this
Teaching Kit will help you develop
your understandings of Australias
history and to consider it from
different perspectives.

We need to include
Aboriginal people and
Torres Strait Islanders in
our communities so that
we can all learn from one
another and develop a real
awareness, understanding,
appreciation and respect
for the culture and history
of Indigenous Australia
Its basis is the inclusion
of the Indigenous peoples
of Australia, not their
exclusion. And that is
healing for all of us.
Flora Macdonald from the
ACT Branch of Australians for
Reconciliation.

Looking f
or ideas
about ho
w your
school c
an suppo
rt
reconcili
ation?
Check ou
t th e
Reconcil
iation Ro
ad
Map on p
age 24

Artwork from 201 5 Com

petition

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 11

,
s
a
W
s
y
a
w
Al
:
e
B
l
l
i
W
Always
A timeline
PRE
Colonisation

Approximately
60,000 years ago
Indigenous people arrive on
what is now known as Australia.

42,000 years ago

remains were found


ungo Man die. Their
Mungo Lady and M
ctively, and are
in 1969 and 1974 respe
in Lake Mungo in NSW
yet found
ns
ains of modern huma
some of the oldest rem
tion in the world,
earliest known crema
outside of Africa. As the
of humanit ys
ts the early emergence
Mungo Lady represen
spiritual beliefs.
Research activity:

30,00010,000
years ago
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait
Islander peoples lived
through massive chan
ges in
climate and landscape
in the
thousands of years tha
t they
inhabited Australia pri
or to
colonisation, which req
uired
significant resilience an
d
adaptation to their wa
ys of
living. For example, so
me
30,000 years ago a vo
lcano
erupted in South-West
ern
Victoria, the resulting
lava
flow completely chan
ging
the drainage system of
the
landscape. The Gund
itjmara
people of the area ad
apted
quickly and constructed
an extensive aqua cultu
re
system to channel wa
ter
into low-lying areas,
trapping fish and eels.
Class discussion:
Imagine that changing
weather patterns
mean your town is no
w
under-water six month
s
of the year. What kind
of
adaptations would the
people of your town ha
ve to
make? What aspects of
your
lives would change?

ve been
haeology, scientists ha
Thanks to modern arc
Lady and
out the lives of Mungo
able to discover a lot ab
rch what life
m up online and resea
Mungo Man. Look the
o.
ag
rs
NSW 42,000 yea
might have been like in

8,000
years ago
40,000 years ago
The Brewarrina Aboriginal Fish Traps are built. This complicated network
of rock weirs and pools stretches half a kilometre along a river bed and
was carefully designed to trap fish as they swam upstream. It is believed
to be one of the oldest manmade structures on earth.

12 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

The Torres Strait Islands are


formed when land between
Australia and New Guinea is
partly submerged by rising
sea levels.

1606
1400 AD
Trading occurred between
the Yolngu people from
north-eastern Arnhem
land and the Macassans
(Sulawesi Indonesians) from
as early as 1400, although
conservative estimates
believe regular trade started
in the 1700s and continued
until 1907. The Macassan
people were very fond of
trepang or sea cucumber,
and sailed to Australia once
a year to trade for them. The
Macassans introduced many
new items to Australia such
as cloth, tobacco, rice and
knives. Interaction with the
Macassans also influenced
the art style of the Aboriginal
people in Arnhem land
and many Macassan words
filtered into Aboriginal
languages of the area.
Art activity:
The Yolngu people
arranged stones to tell
future generations about
their experiences trading
with the Macassan people.
Using naturally found
elements in the playground
such as rocks, leaves and
bark, create a picture that
records a story or event.
Have a look at what your
classmates have created and
try to guess the meaning
behind their picture? Dont
forget to photograph
your picture!

Dutch explorers on the ship


Duyfken arrive and star t to
chart part of the Australian
coast line. Between 1606
and 1770, approximately
fifty-four European ships
make contact with Australia.

Did you know?


Before 1788
there were over
700 languages and
dialects spoken
throughout Australia.

1770

Australia in his ship


charts the east coast of
ok
Co
es
Jam
nt
na
Lieute
of the east coast of
possession of the whole
s
im
cla
d
an
ur
avo
de
the En
Crown.
Australia for the British
t Australia was terra
on the assumption tha
al
This claim was based
one. In reality, Aborigin
land belonging to no
d
ha
d
nullius, which means
an
nds of years
in Australia for thousa
d
people had been living
met their needs for foo
ich
management wh
d
lan
of
s
tem
sys
d
lex
comp
ople living a noma
ths about Aboriginal pe
and shelter. Despite my
re sophisticated
e to show that there we
nc
de
evi
ar
cle
is
re
the
existence,
long before European
utilised across Australia
al
forms of farming being
s are marked by natur
tween different group
s is
rie
rito
arrival. Boundaries be
ter
of
owledge
and mountains, and kn
n
cla
nt
ere
divisions such as rivers
storytelling. Diff
songs, dance, art and
gh
ou
thr
wn
do
of
d
ts
sse
ec
pa
that contain asp
n are linked by songs
groups across the natio
vival skills.
logy, mapping and sur
cultural heritage, mytho

1788
to 1988
1788
The First Fleet arrives in Sydney Cov
e,
establishing the first British colony
in Australia.
Activity:
Look up Screen Australias video
of the Kev Carmody song This Lan
d is
Mine on YouTube and answer the
following questions:
Who are the two characters in
this song?
How does their understanding
of land ownership differ?
What is the message of the son
g?
Write a short stor y inspired by this
song, considering the perspectives
of
both characters.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 13

1901
1802
Pemulwuy is killed. He was
a courageous Aboriginal
warrior who fought against
the British by leading
raids against farming
settlements. Between
1790 and 1900 there were
numerous instances of
Indigenous resistance
to British settlement and
expansion, often referred
to as the Frontier Wars.
These were a serious of
conflicts fought between
Indigenous Australians and
British settlers.

The Commonwealth
of Australia
is established as a self-g
overning
nation. The Australian
Photo by Fa
irfax Fede
Constitution,
ration
celebrations
which remains to this
Sydney
day the
foundation for the leg
al power in the Comm
onwealth, came into for
on the 1st of January
ce
1901 and establishes the
government, defining
structure, power and
its
procedures. This mome
nt is known as Federat
as it is when the indep
ion
endent colonies (which
we now know as states
came together under
)
a federal system of go
vernment.
While Federation was
a time of celebration for
most non-Indigenous
Australians, for Indige
nous Australians little
ch
an
ged. The power
to make laws relating
to Aboriginal and Torre
s
Str
ait Islander
people remained with
the states and Indigeno
us
people were
excluded from voting,
pensions, employmen
t in public offices and
maternit y allowances.
Research questions:
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander cultures
already had their own
system of laws prior to
British arrival. Research
some of these laws an
explore how they could
d
be recognised today.

1909
borigines
T h e NSW A
en
Board is giv
Protection
riginal
o
b
A
move
powers to re
ilies
m their fam
children fro
.
g
in
urt hear
without a co

1909
Aboriginal children are excluded from
public schools in NSW and instead are
sent to Aboriginal-only schools where
the syllabus focuses on manual activities
rather than literacy and numeracy.

1938
1914-1918
World War I. Despite
the prohibition against
non-European people
enlisting, Aboriginal soldiers
are among the Australian
troops at Gallipoli.

14 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

On the 150 year anniv


ersary of the arrival of
the First Fleet, a
re-enactment of the lan
ding of Captain Arthu
r Phillip is planned in
Sydney. Aboriginal pe
ople from the area ref
use
to take part in the
re-enactment and ins
tead men from Weste
rn
NS
W are brought to
Sydney and locked up
in the Redfern stables
un
til
they were forced to
take part in the re-enac
tment. A protest, in the
for
m
of a conference
exclusively for Aborigin
al people, is organised
by Jack Patten, William
Ferguson and William
Cooper, and declares
the 26 January a Day
Mourning. This was the
of
first national gathering
of Aboriginal Australia
protesting against the
ns
prejudice and discrimi
nation that was a daily
of their lives.
part

1939

ginal Station in the


Cummeragunja Abori
the
ve
lea
d
an
up
ckople pa
el treatment and
Over 150 Aboriginal pe
They protest their cru
.
alia
str
Au
in
le
op
pe
ult
Aboriginal
gunja walk-off is the res
first ever mass strike of
station. The Cummera
the
of
nt
,
me
nts
ge
na
ide
res
ma
unbearable for
exploitation by the
the station increasingly
on
ng
livi
de
er
ma
oth
t
to
tha
equipment
of a series of events
t of essential farming
children, the leasing ou
of
al
ov
rem
ges from 1929. Jack
the
wa
ing
id
includ
d the ending of pa
an
es
pli
sup
ter
wa
te
equa
r before, spoke
stations, the lack of ad
y of Mourning the yea
Da
al
gin
ori
Ab
the
ise
d organ
er Aboriginal
Patten, who had helpe
the conditions on oth
about their rights and
nts
ide
res
nja
idents the
gu
res
era
mmerajunga
to the Cumm
this speech gave the Cu
t
tha
d
ste
ge
sug
en
be
reserves. It has
ce their protest.
looking for to commen
inspiration they were
Writing activity:
the Cummeragunja str
Imagine you are one of
y you are on strike.
newspaper outlining wh

ikers. Write a letter to

the local

1965
1939-1945

Charles Perkins leads a freedom ride by Aboriginal people


and students through NSW in support of Aboriginal rights.

World War II.

Activity:
Research the Freedom Rides and create a map
showing where the bus went. Write a story from the
perspective of one of the students on the journey.

1948
For the first tim
e, Aboriginal
and Torres St
rait Islander
people are m
ade official
citizens of Au
stralia.

1959
Margaret Williams becomes
the first Aboriginal person to
graduate from an Australian
University.

1963
The Yirrkala Ba
rk petitions ar
e tabled in Au
documents, si
stralian Parliam
gned by twel
ent. These
ve clan leader
of the Nor ther
s
from the Yoln
n Territory, ca
gu
region
ll for the Hou
reconsider its
se of Represen
decision to al
tatives to
lo
w
30
0 square kilom
be excised fo
r mining and
etres of land
to
to send a com
Aboriginal elde
mittee to spea
rs of the area
k
to
th
e
.
Th
e petitions in
in ochre depi
clude designs
cting Yolngu
painted
law and conn
typed docum
ection to the
ent written in
la
nd
,
an
da
two Yolngu la
translation.
nguages with
an English

1962
The right to vote is extended to all
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 15

1966
kO
Wave-Hill Wal

ff.

1971
Neville Bonner becomes
the first Aboriginal member
of the Australian Federal
Parliament.

1971

Photo by Fairfax Faith Bandler

at Sydney Town Hall Referendum

27 May 1967

1967
Australia votes in a referendum to enable the Commonwealth to create
laws for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and to enable
them to be included in the census. A referendum is the only way to
make changes to Australias constitution. Many Aboriginal people
considered these changes to the constitution to be essential in gaining
formal recognition of their existence as people of their own country.
Over 90% of voters supported the changes, making this the most
successful referendum in Australias history.
Questions:
Why do you think this referendum was so successful? Do
you think this event is a significant moment in Australias
history? Why/why not?

Aboriginal Artist Harol


d
Thomas designs the
Aboriginal flag. The bla
ck
represents the Aborigin
al
people, the red repres
ents
the red earth, red ochre
used in ceremonies an
d the
spiritual relationship wit
h
the land, and the yellow
represents the sun, the
giver
of life and protector.
Art activity:
Why do you think it is
important for people
to have
a flag that they identify
with?
Have a go at creating
a new
Australian flag that refl
ects
the theme Always Wa
s,
Always Will Be.

1972

brella on
men setup a beach um
Four young Aboriginal
a with
ment House in Canberr
the lawns outside Parlia
nths that
al Embassy. In the mo
a sign reading Aborigin
ssy becomes
n the men. The emba
follow, 2000 people joi
al people
of the way that Aborigin
a physical expression
untry. The
co
n
eigners in their ow
feel like outsiders or for
prominent
ssy is one of the most
Aboriginal Tent Emba
d continues
of traditional lands an
protests for the return
to this day.
Photo by Fair fax
sy
Aboriginal Tent Embas

16 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

1976

1985

Aboriginal La
nds Right
Act (Nor thern
Territory)
passed. This is
the first
attempt by an
Australian
government
to legally
recognise the
Aboriginal
system of land
ownership.

Hand back of Uluru to


its traditional owners.

1988
to 2015

1992
The High Court recognises
Native Title in what has
become known as the
Mabo decision and
overturns the legal narrative
of terra nullius.

Photo by Fair fax Bic

entennary Australia day

protests

1988

rs
its bicentenary, 200 yea
ry Australia celebrates
ua
Jan
of
th
26
the
the
d
On
nts held aroun
First Fleet, with huge eve
since the arrival of the
chanism to highlight
me
sur vival, and as a
of
t
en
tem
sta
a
As
.
country
ices, more than
excluded Aboriginal vo
s
ha
y
tor
his
n
alia
str
the way Au
le stage a march in
d non-Indigenous peop
40,000 Indigenous an
the crowd telling them
st Gary Foley speaks to
er in
Sydney. Aboriginal activi
ite Australians, togeth
ent to see black and wh
that "...its so magnific
uld be like".
Australia could and sho
harmony. This is what

1992
Prime Minister Keating
delivers his Redfern
Address to a predominatelyAboriginal crowd in Sydney.
It is the first time that an
Australian political leader
has publicly acknowledged
the impact of colonial and
contemporary government
policies on Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people.

Writing activity:

the resilience
way to celebrate both
Do you think there is a
tor y on the
d Australias colonial his
of Aboriginal culture an
alia Day)? As a
we currently call Austr
the
26th of January (what
g two diary entries for
nge, have a go at writin
the
at
creative writing challe
ter
tes
tive of a pro
one from the perspec
the
26th of January 1988:
tive of a performer in
ec
rsp
entry from the pe
er
oth
the
d
an
,
rch
ma
l of the First Fleet.
enactment of the arriva

1992
The Torres Strait Islander flag is designed by Bernard Namok.
Research challenge:
What do the different symbols and colours in the Torres
Strait Islander flag represent?

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 17

"There comes a
time in the history
of nations when
their peoples
must become fully
reconciled to their
past if they are
to go forward
with confidence
to embrace
their future."

2007
Australias first national
24-hour Indigenous television
service, NITV, launches.

2008

Prime Minister Rudd


Photo by Fair fax Cro

wd gather to watch the

apology

Australian Prime Minis


ter, Kevin Rudd, offers
an apology to Australia
Indigenous people for
s
the Stolen Generation
s. The Stolen Generat
refers to the Aboriginal
ion
and Torres Strait Island
er children who were
forcibly removed from
their families by gover
nment, welfare and ch
authorities and placed
urch
into institutional care
with non-Indigenous
families. These forced
fos
ter
removals began in the
mid-1800s and continu
as late as 1970. Stolen
ed
children were often ab
used and neglected in
homes and institutions
the
they were sent to and
denied contact with the
families. The Apology
ir
was a ver y important
step in Australias journe
to reconciliation.
y
Class discussion:

2009
The National Centre of
Indigenous Excellence
opens in Redfern.

What do you think Pri


me Minister Rudd me
ant in the above
quote? Do you agree?
Why/Why not?

2014

ity leader
ayer and commun
Aboriginal AFL pl
of the Year
named Australian
is
es
od
Go
am
Ad
suppor t
t in programs that
for his involvemen
pt
ce ance
h. He uses his ac
Indigenous yout
m:
s the issue of racis
speech to addres
hether we like it
all connected w
I believe we are
me in so many
equal and the sa
or not. We are all
n can break
that we as a natio
is
pe
ho
y
M
s.
ay
w
k down those
tween races, brea
be
os
sil
e
th
n
w
do
ns, Indigenous
inority populatio
stereotypes of m
groups. I hope
all other minority
populations and
gardless of the
of our heritage re
we can be proud
be Australian.
and be proud to
colour of our skin

18 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

2015
Yininmadyemi-Thou Didst
Lets Fall, a sculpture by
Indigenous artist Tony Albert
is unveiled in Hyde Park. The
sculpture acknowledges the
contribution of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander
men and women who served
in the nations military.

Into the
Future

Eddie Mabo
Photo by Fairfax

2015
As part of Mabo Day
celebrations on June 3rd,
the Sydney Observatory
honours Eddie Mabo by
naming a star in the
Southern Cross after him.

2016
Aboriginal languages will
become a subject in the
HSC for the first time, as part
of a renewed effort to keep
Aboriginal languages alive
in NSW.
Class discussion:
Languages are an
expression of culture
and a vehicle through which
to keep culture alive. Why do
you think having Aboriginal
Languages in our HSC is
important for reconciliation?

2017
2017 is the propos
ed year for a refe
rendum on cons
recognition. Curre
titutional
ntly the Australian
Constitution does
Aboriginal and To
not recognise
rres Strait Islande
r peoples as Austr
despite their histo
ali
as
first people,
ry and connectio
ns to this country
60,000 years. Ev
da
tin
g back over
er y Australian ov
er the age of 18
to vote to recogn
will get the chan
ise Aboriginal an
ce
d Torres Strait Isl
in the Constitutio
ander people
n. This change w
ill be an importa
reconciliation be
nt step to help
tween Indigenous
and non-Indigeno
us Australians.

Future
Together we are responsible
for continuing the journey
of reconciliation into the
future. This land always
was, and always will remain
sacred for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander
people. It is important we
celebrate these rich cultures,
while also learning from
our mistakes. Through
understanding and
acknowledging what has
happened in the past, we
can shape a better future for
all Australians.
Activity:
Draw or write about the
Australia you would like
to see in 100 years time.
What has changed and what
is still the same? Where do
we live, what do we do, and
how do we relate to each
other? Brainstorm ways
that we can each shape
the future for our country
what can individuals do
to make positive changes
in society?

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 19

Creating art!
What do you think of when you think of Aboriginal Art?
For many, the image that comes to mind is of dot paintings. The truth is, Aboriginal art comes in a range of forms and styles
there is no single type of Aboriginal art. An artwork will look very different depending on where it was made, when it was
made, what it is about and the artist themselves.
When we look at an artwork it is always important to think about the artists aim when they created it. In other words why
was this artwork made? or what is the artist trying to say?. For example, many artworks by Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people focus on their relationship with the land and connection to country. Often when we create art, we are
showing something about our own identity and what is important to us.

Reko Rennie

Yvonne Koolmatrie

Why is it harder to collect sedge


grass than it once was?
What does Yvonne Koolmatrie
think are her responsibilities as
a weaver?
What is Yvonne Koolmatrie's
process for creating a
new weaving?

Research activity
Indigenous artists today may choose
to work in a more traditional or
modern style of artmaking. Reko
Rennie is a Kamilaroi man living in
Sydney, who draws on his Aboriginal
heritage to recreate traditional
images using modern tools such as
neon, projection, installation and
spray paint. His 2012 art installation
Always Was, Always Will Be is a
celebration of Aboriginal Australians
ongoing connection to country
as well as a reflection on modern
Indigenous identity. Rennies artwork
could be said to belong to the
urban Aboriginal art movement,
which often includes a social or
political message.
Questions
What meaning do you think Reko
Rennie is trying to convey with
this artwork?
Look-up a picture of Reko Rennies
other public mural, Welcome to
Redfern. What are the similarities
and differences between these
two works?

20 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Yvonne Koolmatrie is a Ngarrindjeri


woman who is also inspired by the
traditions of her culture. As an adult
Koolmatrie attended a workshop on
traditional methods of harvesting,
preparing and weaving Murray River
sedge grass. Koolmatrie found that
weaving helped her to overcome
personal grief and gave her a
portal to tell her story. Koolmatrie
is probably best known for her eel
trap weavings. These have aspects
of traditional weaving forms with
her own added innovations. She
also depicts her peoples Dreaming
stories of Wuluwan (River Bunyiip),
Prupi (Child Stealer) and the Rainbow
Serpent into woven forms. Koolmatrie
sees weaving as a sustaining part
of Ngarrindjeri culture and hopes
to keep the practise alive through
her work.

Research one of the following


traditions or movements of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander Art.
Arnhem Land Styles (including
X-ray and Rarrk)
Hermannsburg School
(watercolours)
Kimberly Wandjina
Shell Art- NSW South Coast
North Queensland and Tiwi Island
Bark paintings
Papunya Tula Art Movement
Tjanpi Desert Weavers
Utopia Style (including bush
medicine leaves and colour blocks)
Answer the below questions
What are the features of this style?
How did this style develop?

Questions
Research Yvonne Koolmatrie on
the Art Gallery of NSW website and
answer the following questions:

Who are some of the well-known


artists of this style?
Find an example of an artwork in
this style that you like. What about
it appeals to you?

It's time to start your


artwork!
Here are some ideas to get
you started.
Have a think about your previous
experiences creating art. What
are your favourite methods? What
do you like to use (textas, collage,
paint etc.)? You might like to try
blending a few styles together.
Read through some of the key
moments in Australias history
touched on in pages 12-19 of this
Kit. Imagine you are a bystander at
one of these events and paint what
you see. In your artist statement,
explain why this moment is
significant. Do you think this
moment means the same thing for
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
Australians? Why/why-not?
Following British settlement,
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people were frequently
forcibly removed from their
traditional lands but their cultural
connection to country remains
unchanged. Create an artwork
that represents a place that is
important to you. Think carefully
about the colours and symbols
you want to use to represent the
people and things that you love.
In your artist statement, explain
why you chose this place. Do you
think this place will always remain
special for you?

Alternatively, use your


own ideas to create your
artwork. Make sure it
represents the theme
Always Was, Always
Will Be and explores
reconciliation in
Australia.

Art work from 201 5 Com

petition

Artwork from 2015 Competition

Dont forge
t to comple
te
an artist st
atement
and entry f
orm after
completing
your artwo
rk!

Art work from 201 5 Com

petition

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 21

Creating stories!
The Longest
Dreaming in History
Why Stories?
The sharing of stories has been
an intrinsic part of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander cultures for
over 60,000 years. Storytelling
is a way of teaching and sharing
the importance of culture, and is
a mechanism to pass on ways of
looking after family, culture and
country. Not all stories are written
down; often they are shared much
like friends telling a good yarn,
or through song and dance, or
even through artworks. Stories
continue to be an intrinsic
part of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander cultures and
are shared through traditional
means as well as contemporary
ways that reflect the ever
evolving nature of Australian
Indigenous cultures.

Photo by Fairfax

22 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Harbour Bridg

Always Was, Always Will Be


writing task
The team at the Sydney Story Factory
have put together a lesson plan designed
to help students turn their discussions
about the theme Always Was, Always
Will Be, into creative writing pieces. The
Always Was, Always Will Be writing task
provides students with the opportunity
to explore Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples culture, Australian
history and the connection Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander peoples have
to country.
Students will create individual stories
which represent their understanding of a
characters experience of living through
a particular time period or significant
event. The character created by students
has lived through all the amazing
historical events outlined in the timeline
(p. 12-19); one day he or she might be
collecting fish in Brewarrina, the next day
in the crowd at the Corroboree 2000
Bridge Walk. As your class completes
the writing activities, the stories can
be joined together to create a single
real life personal journey through the
historical events.

e Walk

1. Pre-writing Activities
from the timeline, or
Each student selects a moment
selves, that they
one that they have researched them
want to explore.

The Warm Up: Three Tableaux


representations of
Tableaux are silent, motionless
a freeze-frame of
events, where performers create
r bodies to make a
a moment. Students will use thei
still image.
work in groups
During this activity students will
x investigating
to create three (or more) tableau
or time periods
and representing incidents/events
es 12 to 19.
introduced in the timeline on pag

ents.
Each tableau will consist of 4-5 stud

choose to take the role


In the tableaux students may
of people, animals, trees etc.
Pre-activity discussion
of being in the place?
What is the physical experience
will students show
Is it hot, cold, rainy, crowded? How
this in their tableu?
Ask the students to focus on the

key character:

How is he/she feeling?


ts that are occurring
How does he/she view the even
around them?
Who are they speaking to?
Who are they with?
Why are they in this place at this

time?

Each tableau should reveal:


er
the emotions felt by the charact
racters and
the relationships with other cha
the environment

ut your
The Yarning Game: Yarning abo
Tableaux
vity, students will
After completing the tableau acti
were aiming
they
t
describe to other groups wha
cover in the
to
to reveal. Key points for students
discussion are:
the event?
What do students know about
racters were feeling
What do students believe cha
during the event?
ld happen as a result
What do students imagine cou
of the event?

2. The Writing:
Writing your Yarn
uld be encouraged
In the writing section students sho
they have explored
to include details and information
in the warm-up activities.
for students to imagine
The aim of the writing activity is
chosen to explore.
they are part of the event they have
vity students should
For the duration of this writing acti
a real event, and
imagine they are a real person at
their characters
ct
refle
uld
their piece of writing sho
to share their
aim
uld
view of the event. Students sho
t.
characters unique stor y of the even
wing points in their
Students should include the follo
stor y:
discovery or event?
1. The Key Moment. What is the
ething important
Does the character discover som
ut the world,
about their view of the world, abo
about other people?
in a particular place
2. The Place. The character is
ents to focus
at an important moment. Ask stud
time, place and
on the sensory experience of the
being at the
event. Describe the experience of
place and time.
character react to
3. The Emotions. How does the
? What does the
all that is happening around them
How will students
character feel about the events?
ts to the event?
show the way their character reac
does the discovery and
4. What Happens Next? How
Do they star t to
the event change the character?
What does the
see the world in a different way?
t?
character do as a result of the even

Each student should end up with a


creative writing piece (500 words
or under) from the perspective of a
character involved in or witnessing one
of the moments in the timeline.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 23

Reconciliation Road Map


Building reconciliation in your school shows your respect for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander peoples and culture.
You can take the Schools' Reconciliation Challenge further by evaluating reconciliation in your school and developing your
own Road Map to Reconciliation.
SCHOOL NAME:
To Do

Doing

Done

Action: We Will.
Develop and implement a Reconciliation Statement
Develop and implement a Narragunnawali Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP)
(see p.26 for website details)
Fly the Aboriginal Flag
Fly the Torres Strait Islander Flag
Celebrate NAIDOC Week
Celebrate Reconciliation Week
Participate in National Apology Day
Participate in National Sorry Day
Enter the Schools' Reconciliation Challenge
Make a mural in our school to represent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
culture, stories or history to the school community
Invite Aboriginal Artists, story tellers and cultural practitioners to visit our school
Develop and display a plaque to recognise the Traditional Custodians/Owners at the
entrance of our school
Connect with Elders in our local community and invite them to talk at our school
Organise school excursions to local Aboriginal sites of significance
Invite a Traditional Owner to perform a Welcome to Country in School for important
assemblies and events
Conduct an acknowledgement to Country at the commencement of important school
events and assemblies
Investigate and learn about our local Aboriginal languages with the assistance of the local
Aboriginal community, and consider re-naming parts of our school environment

24 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Significant Dates
Survival Day
26 January
The 26th of January marks the
anniversary of the arrival of the
First Fleet in Australia and is also
known as Australia Day. However
for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people this is a day
to acknowledge their survival
rather than celebrate British
colonialisation. Events are held
all around Australia showcasing
different aspects of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander
cultures including dance,
literature, music, food, language
and history.

National
Reconciliation Week
27 May 3 June
The dates of Reconciliation Week
commemorate two significant
milestones in the Reconciliation
Journey the anniversaries of the
successful 1967 Referendum and
the High Court Mabo Decision. It is
a time to celebrate and learn about
our shared histories, cultures and
achievements, and explore how
each of us can contribute to the
national Reconciliation effort.

National NAIDOC
Week
310 July
NAIDOC stands for National
Aborigines and Islanders Day
Observance Committee. Held
from the first Sunday to the
second Sunday in July, this week
celebrates the history, culture
and achievements of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander people.

National Apology
Day

National Close the


Gap Day

13 February

19 March

To mark the anniversary of the


formal apology by the Parliament
of Australia to Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people,
particularly the Stolen Generations,
for past injustices.

This is the annual event held


to raise awareness about the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander health crisis in Australia,
and promote equality in life
expectancy and health status
between Indigenous and nonIndigenous people.

Harmony Day
21 March
This is a day of cultural respect
for everyone that calls Australia
home. The purpose is to promote
belonging and cultural diversity,
and to reaffirm Australia as an
inclusive nation.

Mabo Day
3 June
This marks the anniversary of the
High Court's historic decision,
led by Eddie Koiki Mabo, which
overturned the legal fiction of
terra nullius and recognised
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people as the original
custodians of this land.

National Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander Children's Day
4 August
This is a day to reflect on the
human rights of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander children:
their right to be educated, cared
for, protected, and to have the
opportunity to understand and
practise their culture.

National Sorry Day


26 May
On Sorry Day thousands of
Australians from all walks of life
participate in memorial services,
commemorative meetings,
survival celebrations and
community gatherings to honour
and commemorate the Stolen
Generations.

Coming of the Light


1 July
The anniversary of the day the
London Missionary Society arrived
in the Torres Strait for the first
time. Torres Strait Islanders people
mark this day by holding cultural
ceremonies.

International Day
of the World's
Indigenous People
9 August
This day affirms the importance
of protecting and promoting the
rights of Indigenous peoples all
around the world. It also celebrates
their unique contributions and
diverse, rich cultures.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 25

Further Resources
Find out more about any
of the specific events
highlighted in the timeline,
as well as information
about Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander
cultures and history
more generally, using the
following resources.

Check out
these websites
Australian history timelines
Indigenous Australian Timeline
BOSTES
teachingheritage.nsw.edu.au/
section03/timeindig.php
Timeline: Indigenous Rights
Movement SBS
sbs.com.au/news/
article/2010/11/08/timelineindigenous-rights-movement

Indigenous Law Centre


Featured Artists
ilc.unsw.edu.au/artists

Other useful teaching kits


and resources

The Indigenous Law Centre is based


at the University of New South Wales.
This webpage showcases a wide
range of colourful contemporary
Aboriginal art, with information about
the work and artists.

Reconciliation Australia
reconciliation.org.au/
schools/resources

The Little Red Yellow Black Book


lryb.aiatsis.gov.au
This website provides an entrypoint to Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander culture and history, written
from an Indigenous perspective.
The website contains mini essays,
teaching notes and other resources.
SBS First Australians
programs.sbs.com.au/
firstaustralians/content
This website includes interviews
with experts on different periods
and themes throughout Aboriginal
Australian history.
National Museum of Australia
Indigenous Rights Page
indigenousrights.net.au/home

Aboriginal and Torres Strait


Islander cultural resources

Overview of the land and


human rights struggles of
Indigenous Australians.

AIME
aimementoring.com/inspire/
library/tutorial

Creative Spirits
creativespirits.info/
resources/#axzz3uMVMSa5f

AIME Mentorings online tutorial


provides an introduction to
Indigenous identity, cultures
and history.

Has a great list of Indigenous books,


films and music for all ages.

The Australian Museum


australianmuseum.net.au/
Indigenous-Australia
This site gives a comprehensive
introduction to the diversity of
Indigenous Australia.

26 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Rediscovering Indigenous
Languages, State Library
indigenous.sl.nsw.gov.au
This incredible interactive website
enables students to access wordlist
and other resources in the Aboriginal
language of their chosen area.

Reconciliation Australias
Narragunnawalli program enables
schools to develop their own
personalised Reconciliation
Action Plans.
The Human Rights Commission
humanrights.gov.au/publications/
face-facts-2012/2012-face-factschapter-1#Heading86
The Human Rights Commission has
a vast collection of resources. This
link takes you to lesson plans and
classroom activities about Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander Issues.
My Place for Teachers
myplace.edu.au/home.html
Activities for the classroom based
around the ABC television series My
Place, includes sections on Australia
before the first fleet and at the time of
first contact.
My Place for kids
abc.net.au/abc3/myplace
Includes games and activities to make
learning about Australian history fun
for kids.
Eight ways of Learning
8ways.wikispaces.com
A free resource to assist your school
to implement Aboriginal pedagogies.
Barani
sydneybarani.com.au
A fantastic resource providing
histories of people, places and
events in the City of Sydney local
government area that are associated
with the histories of Sydneys
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
communities.

Culturally Appropriate Teaching


Considerations
when developing
teaching
programs
The following section is reproduced in its
entirety with permission from the Board
of Studies, Teaching and Educational
Standards NSW, and provides a guide for
teachers to develop inclusive and culturally
appropriate activities.
Discourage students from copying or
using Aboriginal signs or symbols in their
own artmaking. This not only causes
great offence to Aboriginal people, but
also infringes copyright. Students should
be encouraged to develop their own
symbolic visual language when learning
about the systems of symbolic meaning in
Aboriginal artworks.
Ensure that all resources used are culturally
sensitive and appropriate. If in doubt,
consult with Aboriginal people or the NSW
Reconciliation Council.
Integrate other aspects of Aboriginal art
and culture, such as the oral tradition,
the performing arts, song, and dance
wherever possible.
Avoid aspects of Aboriginal art containing
sacred or secret or inside information.
It is inappropriate to address this area in
classroom situations; most Aboriginal
people would find it offensive. However,
it is important that students are informed
about this issue and learn to respect it.
Aboriginal artists or advisors may provide
some background to this issue.
Encourage an understanding of Aboriginal
culture as a dynamic living culture, which,
like all cultures, adjusts to change and has
a history.
Avoid reference to traditional Aboriginal
culture as primitive, Stone Age, or simple,
as these terms are highly offensive.
Follow correct protocols when using
works by an Aboriginal artist who has died.
Students should be aware that in some
communities the mentioning of names
and display of photographs of people who
have died are signs of disrespect to them
and their families. Permission must be
sought from families to show images of
the deceased.

Discourage generalised or stereotypical


characterisations of Aboriginal art, artists,
culture or communities. Make specific
reference to place, time, people and
events, and draw attention to the rich
diversity that exists within Aboriginal
societies and the art produced.
Recognise how contemporary Aboriginal
art can adapt Western art forms and
new technologies and media, and still
communicate cultural knowledge and
express Aboriginality.
Keep informed of significant developments
and innovations in the ways Aboriginal art
practice, forms and media change over
time. There are numerous magazines,
catalogues and newspapers that have
current information.

Strategies for Teaching


Aboriginal Students
Wherever possible employ an Aboriginal
artist, dancer or storyteller to work with the
students in the classroom.
Acknowledge that Aboriginal students will
not necessarily be well informed about all
aspects of their cultural heritage. Some
will know a great deal while others might
know little.
Enrich the classroom environment
by displaying positive affirmations of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture
and art.
Provide Aboriginal students with
opportunities to enrich and affirm their
cultural identity if they choose to do so.
Do not assume that all students will have
the desire to do this. Teachers need to
recognise that Aboriginal students, like
other students, learn in a variety of ways,
have special needs and come from cultures
with very rich and diverse creative arts
traditions. Teachers need to be flexible in
their delivery of programs and in the way
they respond to Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander students learning styles.
Avoid stereotyping Aboriginal students
by their physical attributes or the way
they learn, as this will have negative
effects on them. It is best teaching and
learning practice to meet the needs of
all students as learners from a variety of
cultural backgrounds.

Acknowledge and recognise Aboriginal


English as the home language of many
Aboriginal students; use it as a building
block within the classroom.
Develop an awareness of otitis media and
other health problems affecting learning
outcomes for Aboriginal students.
Acknowledge that some Aboriginal
students will need time for family
commitments, cultural traditions and
events that affect their daily lives.
Encourage the Aboriginal Education
Assistant to participate in classroom
activities; they are able to offer support for
the students and teachers.

Terminology
Terminology changes over time within
Aboriginal culture and communities. The
following is a selection of terms to help
teachers with the sensitive implementation of
the units of work.
Aboriginal people is the preferred term.
Aborigine is an outdated term and can
often offend some Aboriginal people.
In any writing activity, the word Aboriginal
should always be written using a capital A.
It is unacceptable to use the terms
half-caste or full blood when referring to
Aboriginal people. This is highly offensive.
Use terms such as group, nation, language
group or cultural group rather than
the word tribe, as it is now outdated
terminology. Some Aboriginal people refer
to themselves as traditional, not tribal.
Avoid using words such as legends and
myths when referring to the Dreaming or
Dreaming stories. Dreaming is preferred
to Dreamtime as the latter refers to the
past, and is not inclusive of the present and
the future.
Torres Strait Islanders do not consider
themselves Aboriginal people.
There are similarities and differences
between Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander cultures.
Torres Strait Islanders refer to their
traditional stories as legends rather than
dreaming stories.
Aboriginal people will often refer to
themselves as Koori, Murri, Noonga etc.
These names refer to a particular group
or area to which they belong. They are
not general terms and should not be used
as such.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 27

Artwork from 2015 Competition

28 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Entry Form: Art


Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016
For teachers to complete and attach to artwork. Only one entry form should be submitted per artwork.
Please note this entry form is for ARTWORKS only. Please see over the page for the writing competition entry form.

Artwork details
Artwork title: 
Number of contributors:

Year:

How many students: Female

Male

Indigenous*Non-Indigenous*

*This information is optional.

Artist's name/s:
(FOR CLASS ARTWORKS, ATTACH A CLASS LIST TO THIS FORM WITH THE NAMES OF ALL CONTRIBUTORS)
I declare the submitted artwork is original and I have read and agree to the competition terms and conditions of
entry on page 33 of the Teaching Kit.

School details
School name: 
Town/Suburb:

Postcode:

Contact teacher:

School phone number:

Teacher email:

Teacher mobile:* 

*Please provide teachers direct details, not the generic school information. Details will only be used to contact you in relation to the Schools' Reconciliation Challenge.

Parent/Guardian details
Parent/Guardian name: 
Email:

Mobile:

Survey
How did you hear about the competition?
Email

Received Kit in the mail

Social media

How many lessons were spent on this unit?

2-5

NSWRC websiteOther
5+

What parts of the Teaching Kit did you find most useful?
Activities/questions

Timeline

Art activities

Teaching protocolsOther

What else would you like to see included?

Send to:
NSW Reconciliation Council
Studio 213, 3 Gladstone St
Newtown NSW 2042

Or by email with digital artwork:


schools@nswreconciliation.org.au

CLOSING DATE
10 JUNE 2016

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 29

Artist Statement
Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016
For students to complete and attach to ARTWORK. Only one artist statement should be submitted per artwork.
Artist's name/s: 
Year: 
School: 
Teachers name:
Artwork title: 

Please address the following three points in your artist statement (max 100 words):
What is your artwork about?
How does it relate to reconciliation?
How does it relate to the theme Always Was, Always Will Be?

Reconciliation means...

Please note: Artists statements are judged as part of the artwork.


Consequently, artworks submitted without comprehensive artists statements
will NOT be accepted.

30 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Entry Form: Writing


Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016
For teachers to complete and attach to writing piece. Only one entry form should be submitted per writing entry.
Please note this entry form is for WRITING only. Please see the previous page for the art competition entry form.

Writing details
Story title: 
Number of contributors:

Year:


How many students: Female MaleIndigenous*Non-Indigenous*

*This information is optional.

Writer's name/s: 
(FOR CLASS WRITING ENTRIES, ATTACH A CLASS LIST TO THIS FORM WITH THE NAMES OF ALL CONTRIBUTORS)
I declare the submitted writing piece is original and I have read and agree to the competition terms and
conditions of entry on page 33 of the Teaching Kit.

School details
School name: 
Town/Suburb:

Postcode:

Contact teacher:

School phone number: 

Teacher email:

Teacher mobile:* 

*Please provide teachers direct details, not the generic school information. Details will only be used to contact you in relation to the Schools' Reconciliation Challenge.

Parent/Guardian details
Parent/Guardian name: 
Email:

Mobile:

Survey
How did you hear about the competition?
Email

Received Kit in the mail

Social media

How many lessons were spent on this unit?

2-5

NSWRC websiteOther


5+

What parts of the Teaching Kit did you find most useful?
Activities/questions

Timeline

Writing activities

Teaching protocolsOther

What else would you like to see included?




Send to:
NSW Reconciliation Council
Studio 213, 3 Gladstone St
Newtown NSW 2042

Or by email with digital artwork:


schools@nswreconciliation.org.au

CLOSING DATE
10 JUNE 2016

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 31

,
Writer s Reflection
Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016
For students to complete and attach to WRITING PIECE. Only one reflection should be submitted per piece.
Writer's name/s: 
Year: 
School: 
Teachers name: 
Writing entry title: 

Please address the following three points in your reflection (max 200 words):
How does your story relate to reconciliation?
How does your story relate to the theme Always Was, Always Will Be?
Describe the process you used to write your story. Were you able to put yourself in the shoes of the characters?
Why/why not?










Reconciliation means...




Please note: Reflections are considered in the judging of writing pieces.


Consequently, pieces submitted without comprehensive reflections
will NOT be accepted.

32 | Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016

Terms and Conditions


By completing and submitting the 2016 Schools Reconciliation Challenge entry form,
each participant agrees to be bound by the following terms and conditions:
Eligibility
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

To participate in the Schools'


Reconciliation Challenge, students
must currently be enrolled in Years
59 at a primary or secondary school
in NSW, or be the equivalent age of
a Years 59 student. Students may
participate independently or as part of a
class project.
Entries must be entirely the work of
the entrant and must never have been
published, self-published, featured on
any website or public online forum,
broadcast, nor have been entered or
won a prize in any other competition.
A completed entry form and Artists
Statement or Writers Reflection must
accompany the document or artwork to
indicate agreement to these terms and
conditions and to be eligible for entry.
Artists/writers who are placed First,
Second or Third may receive financial
assistance for travel to attend the
awards ceremony and exhibition launch
in Sydney for themselves and one
guardian. Collaborative entries will be
asked to delegate one representative
and their guardian to attend
the ceremony.
Artists/writers who are placed Highly
Commended may have their work
exhibited in Sydney but will not receive
sponsored travel.

6. The entries must reflect the 2016 theme


Always Was, Always Will Be in the
context of reconciliation.

10. Closing date for receipt of entries


is 10 June 2016 (or postmarked by
10 June 2016)

No corrections can be made after the


entry is received by the NSWRC.

9.

Entries which are not nominated may


be returned at the expense of the
artist or school within two months of
competition closing. Requests for return
of works must be made in writing within
one month of the competition closing.
Nominated entries may be held for up
to 12 months before being returned to
the artist.

Entries for the writing competition may


be submitted by post or email. For hard
copy submission, please ensure that
the students name, class and school is
clearly written on the document, and
that multiple pages are stapled together.

5.

For entries submitted via email, please


ensure that the entries are included as a
separate attachment with the file name
reflecting the title of the work. Pdf and
Word documents will be accepted.

11. Whilst all care will be taken to protect


original artworks, NSWRC takes no
responsibility for loss or damage.

Size and material of


artworks
1.

Artworks must be 2D. Students may use


any material for their artwork, such as
collage, paint, pencil or still digital media
such as photography or Photoshop.

2.

Entries may be a maximum of A1 size


(or 60 x 84cm).

3.

Artworks must be submitted on a


flat surface such as paper or board.
Submissions on canvas will NOT
be accepted.

Copyright
By signing a completed entry form, and
accepting the award offer, the nominated
authors/artists:
1.

Agree to grant royalty-free, worldwide,


nonexclusive, licence to reproduce and
publish work in all media of expression
now known or later developed and in all
languages in the nominated artwork and
writing pieces to the NSWRC without
reservation including, but not limited
to, all intellectual property rights to
reproduce and publish the nominated
entry on the NSWRC website and to
change and/or reproduce any part of the
nominated artwork or written piece in
relation to other promotional activities;

2.

Agree that the NSWRC may publish,


on the NSWRC website and in relation
to other promotional activities, any
personal information provided by the
nominated artist/writer in connection
with their entry including, but not limited
to, the nominated artist/writers name,
age, community and state/territory
of residence; and warrants that there
is no cultural or religious reason or
any other impediment that prevents
the nominated artwork or written
piece from being exhibited, published
or reproduced.

4. Clearly write name, class, school


and title of work on the reverse of all
artworks. Paper clip or Blue-Tack entry
form to artwork. Do not glue entry form
to the artwork.
5.

Artwork must not be framed or mounted


behind glass.

Digital art entries


1.

The filename of digital entries must be


the title of the artwork.

2.

Email either a digital photograph


or scanned version of the artwork.
Preferred file types are .jpg, .gif, or .bmp.

3.

The original artwork of entries must be


available and submitted to the NSWRC
office within seven days of notice (the
NSWRC will provide assistance with
these arrangements).

7. Entries must meet the competition


requirements and formats, outlined in
size and material of works below.
8.

4.

Writing entries
1.

Written entries must be creative, original


pieces that reflect the theme Always
Was, Always Will Be, and reconciliation
more broadly.

2.

Entries for the writing competition


cannot exceed 500 words.

3.

Both typed and hand-written entries will


be accepted.

Judging
All entries will be viewed and judged by a
subcommittee of the NSWRC. The decision
of the judges will be final and absolute. No
correspondence concerning decisions will
be entered into.

Schools' Reconciliation Challenge 2016 | 33

Artwork from 2015 Competition

Studio 213, 3 Gladstone St


Newtown NSW 2042
Phone: (02) 8095 9600
schools@nswreconciliation.org.au
www.nswreconciliation.org.au
www.facebook.com/nswreconciliation
NSW Reconciliation Council Inc. 2016
ABN 583 759 527 94
NSW Reconciliation Council grants permission for this resource to be copied for educational purposes only.