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Kimberly Grigg

Passionate learning, everyday I fully believe that as educators, we can never stop learning. As our
Passionate learning, everyday
I
fully believe that as educators, we can never stop learning. As our
students write, explore and dream, we should be doing the same beside
them. I want to create that experience of allowing myself to learn with
my students. I want to show students that learning doesn't stop after
graduation, but continues on throughout life.
know I have a lot of work ahead of me, I will have to work long
hours, and I will have to refine my teaching, everyday, but I want to do
that. I want to be the best teacher I can be in order to inspire,
encourage, motivate, and teach my students.
I
Kimberly Grigg Passionate learning, everyday I fully believe that as educators, we can never stop learning.
krgrigg@mtu.edu 906.204.9224
krgrigg@mtu.edu
906.204.9224

Table of Contents

1. Cover Page 2. Table of Contents 3. A Bit About Me 3.1 Autobiography 3.2 Resume
1. Cover Page
2.
Table of Contents
3.
A Bit About Me
3.1
Autobiography
3.2
Resume
3.3
List of Courses Taken
4 What My Classroom Looks Like
4.1
Educational Philosophy
4.2
Hands-on Instruction
4.3
Instructional Technology
4.3.1
Twitter Example
4.3.2
World Doctor Example
4.4
Classroom Management
4.5
Knowledge of Assessment
4.5.1
Biology Test Example
4.5.2
Persuasive Essay Example
4.6
Planning, Instruction, and Measurement
4.6.2
Poetry Unit Example
5.
My Experiences
5.1
Extra Curricular Activities
5.2
Research in Education
5.2.1
Case Study Example
5.2.2
Of Mice and Men Example
5.3
Professional Development

A Bit About Me

Every child deserves a champion—an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the
Every child deserves a champion—an adult
who will never give up on them, who
understands the power of connection and
insists that they become the best they
possibility be—Rita Pierson

Autobiography

It was in my first year of college that I realized I wanted to be a
It was in my first year of college that I realized I wanted to be a teacher. In my first
year, I had the opportunity to tutor several students in my residence hall. It was such
a great and rewarding experience! I loved seeing the light bulb go off in their heads!
It was always a victory when someone I tutored learned a new concept!
This love of teaching overflowed into my studies when I switched my major from
communication and culture studies to English with a focus in secondary education
and a minor in biology. I was able to continue tutoring not only at the University lev-
el, but in high schools and middle schools as well. There is a specific student I will
always remember. He was a middle school student and struggled in math, English,
and science. I went in one day to help him with his English homework. He brought
his reading questions in and said, "Ms. Grigg, I don't think I can do this." It broke my
heart to hear him say something like that. I told him, "You might not be able to now,
but you will be able to." We worked hard on that assignment. We re-read passages,
inferred information, and worked on reading comprehension. Eventually he was able
to do similar projects on his own. I was so proud of him.
That is the kind of mentality I bring to my classroom at Escanaba High School. I
teach Jobs for Michigan's Graduates at the school. In the class we learn about em-
ployability skills, career exploration, financial literacy and entrepreneurship. The stu-
dents involved in the class are mainly students involved with special education or at-
risk of dropping out. It has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. I
am also the adviser of the career association. The career association is a student or-
ganization dedicated to learning more about various careers and building employabil-
ity skills. Finally I organize and run the Summer Youth Employment Opportunity
program. In this program I organize summer employment for students in business and
careers they are interested in. These programs have allowed students to build skills to
lead to eventual employment and being successful in higher education programs.
Resume Education and Certification Michigan Technological University BS: English, Minor: Biology - GPA: 3.37 Michigan Provisional
Resume
Education and Certification
Michigan Technological University
BS: English, Minor: Biology - GPA: 3.37
Michigan Provisional Teaching Certification
Certified Workforce Development Professional
Houghton, MI
Graduated: May 2015
Obtained: June 2015
Obtained: September 2015
Teaching Experience
JMG Specialist
Michigan Works! Escanaba, MI
August 2015-Present
Taught employability skills, financial literacy, and entrepreneurship to high school
students who are at-risk or involved with special education
Maintained a grant that funded hands-on experiences for students
Tutored in various subjects including, English, chemistry, biology, and math.
Student Teaching
Hancock Public Schools, Hancock, MI
January 2015-May 2015
Planned and implemented classes in English, communications, and biology at multi-
ple grade levels
Prepared students for state mandated testing and taught basic study skills
Extra Curricular Experience
Career Association Advisor
Escanaba Senior High School
August 2015-Present
Arranged speakers from a local judge to an art expert to talk about various career
opportunities.
Planned 6 field trips for students to visit trades, manufacturing, schools, and STEM
careers.
Organized students to the Career Association Conference in Lansing, where they
were able to compete in employability and financial literacy competitions.
Provided opportunities for student-led career development, community service,
and other projects.
Summer Youth Employment Opportunity
Michigan Works!
August 2015-Present
Organized, implemented, and supervised a robotics camp day camp for younger
youth
Trained and employed students to become counselors at the robotics camp.
Placed and supervised students in other work environments
Student Council Supervisor
Hancock Middle School
January 2015-May 2015
Chaperoned and volunteered for various student council and school events
Assisted planning and implementing various events and fundraisers
Helped maintain the club for the students
Technology experience
•Windows •Linux •Apple •Microsoft •Google •Skyward •Powerschool •Adobe
Suite •Finalcut Pro •Edmodo •Dropbox •Prezi •Lego Robotics
Resume Leadership Experience Currently sit on the Mu Beta Psi National Scholarship Committee to help design
Resume
Leadership Experience
Currently sit on the Mu Beta Psi National Scholarship Committee to help design the
scholarship and choose a recipient
Trained, supervised and assist hiring as well as planning, implementing and hosting
various events, as the Student Philanthropy Supervisor
Taught music to the clarinet section of Michigan Tech’s pep band as the clarinet co-
section leader
Managed finances, expanded the community service and rushing programs as the
Mu Beta Psi treasurer, rushing chair, and community service chair
Created the first accapella group, Vocal Achord, at Michigan Tech
Additional Work Experience
Student Philanthropy Supervisor
Michigan Tech
Houghton, MI
September 2013 - July 2015
Library Student Assistant
Michigan Tech
Houghton, MI
January 2011 - July 2015
Lab Assistant
UP Health Systems
Marquette, MI
Summer 2011 and Summer 2012
Lode Staff Writer
The Lode
Houghton, MI
August 2010 - May 2011
Professional Organizations
•Copper County Reading Council •National Earth Science Teacher Association •National
English Teachers Association

List of Courses Taken

English Michigan Department of Education HU 2110 HU 2130 HU 2540 The Writer’s Craft Introduction to
English
Michigan Department of Education
HU 2110
HU 2130
HU 2540
The Writer’s Craft
Introduction to Rhetoric
The Spoken Word
HU2548 Young Adult Literature
HU2820 Communication and Culture
Google for the classroom
Leadership - Leading a Culture of Change
Intro to Design Thinking
Gamification
Introduction to Literacy and Technology
HU2830 Intro to Speech Communication
HU2920 Language and Society
HU3517 Literary Theory and Criticism
HU3515 Shakespeare
HU3545 Literature Across Borders
HU3555 Modern and Contemporary British Literature
HU3605 Grammar and Usage in Society
HU4693 Science Writing
Biology
BL1040 Principles of Biology
BL2010 Anatomy and Physiology I
BL2011 Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
BL2100 Principles of Biochemistry
BL2160 Botany
BL2170 Zoology
BL2200 Genetics
Education
ED3100 Educational Technology
ED3110 Psychological Foundations of Education
ED3210 Foundations of Education
ED3410 Clinical Experience
HU4140 Methods of Teaching English
HU4150 Literacy in the Content Areas
ED4700 Fundamentals of Instruction
ED4720 Methods of Teaching Science
ED 4910 Directed Teaching

What My Classroom Looks Like

The classroom should be an entrance into the world, not an escape from it.—John Ciardi
The classroom should be an entrance into
the world, not an escape from it.—John
Ciardi

Educational Philosophy

Why Do I Want to be a Teacher? I had many teachers who inspired me throughout
Why Do I Want to be a Teacher?
I had many teachers who inspired me throughout my educational career. They taught me
lessons both inside and outside of the classroom. When I was in highschool I never under-
stood what joy teaching brings to a teacher. After spending time in the classroom I realized
that one of the best feelings in the world is seeing success for your student. I love being
able to see my students discover new ideas and concepts, especially in English and science.
Writing gives students the chance to explore without leaving the classroom. Literature is an
exploration of ideas and is a chance to escape the mundane. It can inspire change, self dis-
covery, raise questions about morality, and so much more. Science can also do the same
things for students. A simple lab can ignite a student’s wonder or a demonstration can
cause students to raise questions. Sharing this escape and teaching students what is
waiting for them after graduation is what I want to do. Every student has a future after high
school. I want to help students explore and learn by exploring
Success
Through my experience with my students, I have come to realize that every student has the
ability to accomplish great things and every student deserves an opportunity to figure that
out. As teachers it is our job to help students realize their potential. Every student should
be able to learn in an accepting environment. I think that acceptance of all students is not
only a thing that should be practiced by all teachers, but should also be taught across sub-
jects. I understand that many students will need more attention, but I believe as educators
we should be accommodating to the needs of all students. In my classroom there will al-
ways be a place for every student to grow, explore, learn and succeed.
What I Expect from my Students
I want the students to be able to learn what respect is, what it entails and how to show it.
This will be a requirement in my classroom, not a suggestion. My students will learn how to
be responsible and accountable. I plan on making the students be accountable and respon-
sible for both their assignments and their actions. I want students to feel comfortable ask-
ing for help. I want them to know I am here to help them succeed. My students will be-
come bold enough to ask questions and curious enough to demand an answer. Most of all, I
expect my students to be dreamers, creators, and questioners. I want them to dream big
enough to change to world, create magnificent pieces of art and question everything they
learn. I have high expectations for my students and I will give them all of the resources to
surpass them.

Hands-On Instruction

I try to include hands-on experiences for my students as much as possible. I think it
I try to include hands-on experiences for my students as much as possible. I think it is im-
portant for students to not only learn the theories of a subject, but explore the subject by dis-
cussing it with experts, doing experiments, having them model real life situation, and going
on field trips. This has been extremely important to my teaching and has made my classroom
extremely effective.
Of course hands-on teaching needs to be on a budget. Most of it will have to be done in the
classroom. This can involve asking various people to come in and speak or have discussions
with your students. During our career exploration unit we had twelve speakers come in and
talk about their careers, why they decided to go into their career, and what made them suc-
cessful. This allowed students to ask questions about careers they are interested in and see
what characteristics makes a person successful in the workplace.
Another way to bring hands-on learning in the classroom, is to set up real life situations. For
example, in our employment unit our test was to complete an application process. Students
were required to find a job posting, then do a mock job application process. They also had
the opportunity to complete a job interview.
It is an amazing opportunity for students to go on a field trip. This past year I took my stu-
dents on five different field trips. One of them was to a local truck driving school, Midwest
Truck Driving. We went during the career exploration unit. Many of my students were inter-
ested in learning more about truck driving and what kind of certifications you need to do cer-
tain jobs. The students had the opportunity to learn about the certification process, what cer-
tifications the school offers, the the types of truck driving jobs, what the outlook for truck
drivers is like, and what a day is like for a truck driver.
When students have the ability to learn in a hands-on manner, it gives them the opportunity
to engage with the material on a deeper level. It can help ignite their curiosity and give them
skill sets that they can easily take beyond the classroom. Students will gain confidence in the
knowledge they gain and in themselves through this process.

Instructional Technology

Innovation. Technology has lead us to become more creative, more innovative, and more critical about teaching
Innovation. Technology has lead us to become more creative, more innovative,
and more critical about teaching practices. Technology has given us the ability
to communicate with other teachers, to have students utilize their creativity in
new ways, and to help students learn how to adapt to new learning environ-
ments. I want my students to be able to adapt to use any technology that they
encounter in life.
Of course technology is not needed for everything. Sometimes a pencil and pa-
per is much more efficient than a laptop. We need to find the best way to utilize
technology. Using technology in an efficient manner and in a way that
enhances the content is more important than having students use technology.
I co-taught a class called Communication and Technology. This course really
tested my abilities to use a variety of technologies. In this course students creat-
ed videos and audio recordings for a variety of purposes and audiences.
Below is an excellent example of a mock Twitter one of my students created. I
created an assignment in which my eighth grade students were required to read
a biography. After they read the biography, they needed to create a mock twitter
for the subject of their book. The students were required to think critically
about what the subject might post, who the subject would follow, who would
follow the subject, and what their about me section would look like. This creat-
ed an excellent opportunity to talk about how to use social media safely, what
people can see on our social media websites, and why it is important that ap-
propriate information is posted.
Another example is a research project my high school biology students did.
These students were required to research a type of bacteria or virus. These stu-
dents did an excellent job at showing the class why their research is important.
They scoured the news, looked at scientific journals, and found a variety of
sources. This group learned how to do scientific research and how a specific
pathogen affects our world.

Classroom Management

I want to make sure that my students are accountable and responsible for themselves. My only
I want to make sure that my students are accountable and responsible for
themselves. My only classroom rule is trust. I will trust in my students to do
their work on time, respect other students, respect me, etc. This gives my stu-
dents the responsibility to meet my expectations. It also lets my students learn
about how trust works. If they break my trust, then it can be problematic for
them. One instance of this happening was when I sent three of my students to
the library. I had told these students that I am trusting them to go to the library,
get their books, and come back in a quick and efficient manner. These three
students did not do that. I received a call from the librarian saying that this
group of students were goofing off at the library. After class I pulled these boys
aside and told them that they had broken the one classroom rule. They
apologized and I told them that they weren’t allowed to go to the library again,
until they earned my trust back. This group of students felt bad that they had
broken my trust, but they worked hard to try and earn my trust back. They were
constantly turning in work in early or on time, helping other students, and par-
ticipating more in class. Eventually these students earned my trust back and
were able to go back to the library.
Recently I attended a professional development that talked about how to
facilitate respectful discussions within a classroom. This has really helped me
within my classroom, because it has given me some great skills to use within
my classroom. It also helps me teach students how to participate in a respectful
discussion with their peers.
Most importantly, I strive to have a classroom environment that strives for each
student and myself to be honest, kind, helpful, accountable, and independent. I
want students to work together and gain teamwork skills. My students will
know that they need to be honest with everyone who enters the room. I will re-
quire my students to be accountable for what they do and know how to work
independently. My students feel comfortable enough in my classroom to be
themselves, because that there will always be someone who cares for them as a
person in my room.

Knowledge of Assessment

I like to use a variety of ways to assess my students. I think that it
I
like to use a variety of ways to assess my students. I think that it is only fair
that we give students a variety of ways to show that they have learned the
content. Students will find some assessments easier than other assessments. I
like to give my students a variety of informal assessments to help them learn
the content. This way I know my students are prepared for the test or prepared
for a project. One of my favorite ways to give 3-2-1 exit slips. At the end of the
class students must give me an exit slip that has three things they learned today,
two questions they think they have, and one way in which they participated
well or did not participate well. This shows me exactly what the students
learned that day, what they still have questions about, and how well they think
they’ve participated. This information lets me tailor my next lessons to allow
for better student understanding.
I
like to help my students know what will be on assessments. I remember back
in high school and early in college I had trouble studying. I never knew what to
study, what could be on the test, or how to study. I like to go over with my
students how to study for a test. I hand out my students a study guide and I
have them complete it. After everyone is done with it, then we have a
discussion about what they think is important on the study guide and why. This
allows students to understand how to figure out what will be on the test and
what might not be on the test. After that exercise I have the students brainstorm
ways to help them study for the test. This allows students to hear other
strategies students use and how they can incorporate those strategies into their
study sessions.
Attached below is a test I created for my biology students. Before this test I did
the activity listed above. This was the third test I had given in the class. Usually
I
would have a variety of students struggle on the test. After the activity, the test
scores jumped from previous scores. This activity allowed students to better
their study skills and allow them to understand what they need to be studying.
Another assessment that I did was with my seventh grade English students. We
learned about arguments. We talked about ethos, pathos, logos, and kairos. At
the end of the unit I assessed my student’s knowledge by assigning them a
project that we worked on in class. It was a great opportunity to understand
Chapter 19 Test Name: ____________________________________________________________ Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer for the question. (18 points)
Chapter 19 Test
Name: ____________________________________________________________
Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer for the question. (18 points)
1.
What is a prokaryote?
A.
Bacteria
B.
Virus
C.
Fungi
D.
Protista
2.
Which of the following is not a way scientists classify prokaryotes?
A.
Shape
B.
Movement
C.
Cell wall
C.
Cell membrane
3.
Which of the following is not a shape of bacteria
A.
Spirilla
B.
Cocci
C.
Circle
D.
Bacilli
4.
What are gram-negative bacteria?
A.
Bacteria that have no cell membrane
B.
Bacteria that contain no peptidoglycan
C.
Bacteria that contain peptidoglycan
D.
Bacteria that have a cell membrane
5.
What are gram-positive bacteria?
A.
Bacteria that have no cell membrane
B.
Bacteria that contain no peptidoglycan
C.
Bacteria that contain peptidoglycan
D.
Bacteria that have a cell membrane
7. Which of the following is not a way bacteria release energy? A. Cellular Respiration B.
7.
Which of the following is not a way bacteria release energy?
A.
Cellular Respiration
B.
Fermentation
C.
Infections
D.
Both A and B
8.
What are obligate anaerobes?
A.
Bacteria that does not require a constant supply of oxygen and may be
poisoned by oxygen.
B.
Bacteria that can survive with or without oxygen.
C.
Bacteria that requires a constant supply of oxygen.
D.
Bacteria that needs a constant supply of nitrogen
9.
What are facultative anaerobes?
A.
Bacteria that does not require a constant supply of oxygen and may be
poisoned by oxygen.
B.
Bacteria that can survive with or without oxygen.
C.
Bacteria that requires a constant supply of oxygen.
D.
Bacteria that needs a constant supply of nitrogen.
10.
What are obligate aerobes?
A.
Bacteria that does not require a constant supply of oxygen and may be
poisoned by oxygen.
B.
Bacteria that can survive with or without oxygen.
C.
Bacteria that requires a constant supply of oxygen.
D.
Bacteria that needs a constant supply of nitrogen
11.
What is binary fission?
A.
The exchange of genetic information without producing a cell
B.
The exchange of genetic information with producing a cell
C.
The general way bacteria produce new cells.
D.
The way bacteria reproduce in hard times
12.
What is conjugation?
A.
The exchange of genetic information without producing a cell
B.
The exchange of genetic information with producing a cell
13. What is an endospore? A. The exchange of genetic information without producing a cell B.
13.
What is an endospore?
A.
The exchange of genetic information without producing a cell
B.
The exchange of genetic information with producing a cell
C.
The general way bacteria produce new cells.
D.
The way bacteria reproduce in hard times
14. Which of the following is not a way humans use bacteria
A.
Waste water treatment
B.
Cleaning up oil spills
C.
Making pickles
D.
Making metals
15.
Which of the following is a way we control bacteria?
A.
Canning
B.
Pickling
C.
Wiping objects with water
D.
Gardening
16.
What can we do for someone who has contracted a virus?
A.
Give them a vaccine
B.
Give them antibiotics
C.
Treat the symptoms
D.
Nothing
17.
What is a retrovirus?
A.
A virus that has DNA
B.
A virus that has RNA
C.
A virus that has both DNA and RNA
D.
A virus that is old
18.
What is a prion?
A.
A type of disease causing virus
B.
A type of disease causing bacteria
C.
A type of disease causing protein
D.
A type of disease causing DNA
18. Which of the following is a type of prion A. Cancer B. HIV C. Mad
18. Which of the following is a type of prion
A.
Cancer
B.
HIV
C.
Mad Cow Disease
D.
A bacterial infection
Essay Section. Completely answer the following questions. Remember to justify all of
your answers to the questions and use complete sentences. (27 points)
19. What are the characteristics of archeabacteria? (2points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
20.
What are the characteristics of eubacteria? (2 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
21.
What are phototrophs, chemotrophs, and photoheterotrophs? (3 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
22.
What are antibiotics? Why are they important? What is the problem surrounding antibiot-
ics? Why might some people need antibiotics more than others? (3 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
23. What are the two ways bacteria cause disease? (2 points) ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
23.
What are the two ways bacteria cause disease? (2 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
24.
What is a virus and why is it not considered to be alive? (2 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
25.
Draw the lytic cycle (4 points)
26.
Draw the lysogenic cycle (4 points)
27.
What are vaccines? What is the controversy surrounding vaccines? (2 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
28.
What are 2 things you learned another group’s presentations? What is one question you
still have from another group’s presentation? (3 points)
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Persuasive Essay Rubric 145 Points 1. A topic that is approved by Ms. Grigg (5 points)
Persuasive Essay Rubric
145 Points
1.
A topic that is approved by Ms. Grigg (5 points)
2.
A completed persuasion map (20 points)
A.
Persuasion map is completed with all the correct information in all of the boxes
3.
Your persuasive essay vocabulary sheet (10 points)
A.
The vocabulary sheet is completed with all of the examples discussed in class
4.
Your minimum 3 page long persuasive essay. Typed 12-point times new roman font
with 1 inch margins and double spaced. (45 points)
A.
Easy to understand
B.
Uses ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos
C.
Grammatically correct
D.
Is convincing
E.
Contains Research
F.
Has a properly constructed introduction and conclusion
G.
Has a clear thesis statement
5.
A bibliography that contains at least 3 credible sources (15 points)
A.
Bibliography is completed correctly and uses the correct MLA formating
6.
A page description of where you used ethos, logos, pathos and kairos (25 points)
A.
Easy to understand
B.
Grammatically correct
C.
References the essay directly
7.
Finally 2 peer reviews of your persuasive essay. (25 points)
A.
Constructive and useful
B.
Helpful to the writer
C.
Are not mean

Planning, Instruction, and Measurement

I like to spend quite a bit of time planning for both instruction and assessments. I
I
like to spend quite a bit of time planning for both instruction and assessments.
I
want to be able to know that my assessments and my instruction are aligned,
so that my students have the ability to succeed. I try my best to create unit
plans that allow for my students to be interested in the content. This way
students stay motivated with the class and do their best work in the class. I
think that we should try and make the content relevant to their lives.
I
know that my effort shows through my instruction. I plan my instruction for
high participation and very fast paced. That way my students are always doing
something and are never left with nothing to do. I also like to have opportuni-
ties for my students to work together and show their work off. It is important to
students to not only be able to collaborate, but to have an audience for their
work.
I
do everything I can to align my assessments with my instruction. I believe
that it is only right to assess students on content that we have talked about in
class. I don’t want to confuse my students or give them any misconceptions. It
would not be fair to the students if I assessed them on something we did not
talk about. I use all of my assessments to not only measure my student’s under-
standing of the content, but also my instruction as well. With each assessment I
try to improve my instruction to help increase student understanding.
I
have included a unit plan on poetry. During this unit I allowed my students to
explore different kinds of poetry and practice their writing and reading skills.
At the end of the unit I required them to create a portfolio for an assessment.
This unit took a lot of planning on my part, but the instruction for it allowed
students to understand poetry and learn how they want to interpret poetry.
Topic: Who Am I? poems MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):W 10 Write routinely over extended time frames
Topic: Who Am I? poems
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):W 10 Write routinely over extended time frames
(time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or
two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will learn how to write in a basic poetic structure,
students will become more comfortable with sharing their work with others. Work on being
more concise, use specific observable be
Purpose of Lesson: Students will be able to create a poem that they can use in their final as-
signment and will learn a basic poetic structure
Introduction
Time
Procedures
10
Student will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes.
minutes
5
Hand out portfolio assignment and explain it.
minutes
5
Hand out what we will be working on today, Who am I poems? Show
one you made as an example.
minutes
Body of Lesson
Time
Procedures
24
minutes
Have students work on Who Am I? poems. Walk around have students
tell you how their poem is going, if they need help, if they have titled the
poem, etc. If students complete the poem, have them share the poem with
their neighbor
Closure
Time
Procedures
10
minutes
With about 10 minutes left see if anyone wants to share the poem they
wrote with the class
Collect the poems that are finished
Poetry Portfolio ELA 7 Due Date TBA At the end of this unit you will create
Poetry Portfolio
ELA 7
Due Date TBA
At the end of this unit you will create your own portfolio. You will be working
on the portfolio throughout the unit and will have several of your own poems in
the portfolio. Your portfolio must include the following items
1.
An ode that you wrote
2.
A list poem that you wrote
3.
Two poems in the form of your choosing. These poem must contain at
least two of the poetic devices we discussed in class.
4.
Two peer reviews for each of the poems listed above. Along with at least
one previous version of each of your poems.
5.
A summary of a poem you enjoyed reading, along with a list of the poetic
devices the author used. You must include the name of the poem and the au-
thor’s name.
6.
Your completed vocabulary list
Name ________________________________________________ Who am I? Poem Title: I’m and and ________________ (3 adjectives) I and and
Name ________________________________________________
Who am I? Poem
Title:
I’m
and
and ________________
(3 adjectives)
I
and
and ________________
(3 verbs)
I
sound like _______________________
I
feel like _________________________
I
move like _______________________
and I look like _____________________
I’m as
____________________________
as _____________________________
and
______________________________
as ______________________________
I
wait for __________________________________________________________
I
long for _________________________________________________________
I
hope for _________________________________________________________
I
dream of _________________________________________________________
My name is _________________________________
I am Ms. Grigg I’m gentle, punctual, and busy I sing, write, and boogy! I sound
I
am Ms. Grigg
I’m gentle, punctual, and busy
I
sing, write, and boogy!
I
sound like a corny old mix tape
I
feel like summer’s first sunset
I
move like a dirt bike in a race
and I look like a nerd coming from the library
I’m as imaginative as a nonsensical story told by a toddler
and curious as National Geographic
I
wait for the next episode of Parks and Recreation
I
long for swing dancing with my friends
I
hope for another good book
I
dream of the sea splashing on the shore
My name is Ms. Grigg
Topic: Needed Vocabulary MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RL 4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as
Topic: Needed Vocabulary
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RL 4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases
as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of
rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem
or section of a story or drama.
L 6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words
and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to com-
prehension or expression
Class: 7th Grade ELA
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO):
Students will know the definitions of vocabulary words needed for the poetry unit
Purpose of Lesson:
To teach students the vocabulary for the poetry unit
Introduction
Time
Procedures
10
minutes
Students will start the hour by reading for ten minutes
While students are reading hand out the vocabulary sheets.
5
minutes
Get the students in teams and give them 1 minute to come up with a team name
and team captain. Put the team names on the board
5
minutes
The game is called the dictionary game. Explain these rules:
There will be a word up on the powerpoint and a sentence using the word. The
groups will then have 1 minute to work in a team to make up a definition to the
word. The team captains will then give me their definition to the word. If the
definition is not school appropriate, then teams or they are goofing off then they
will get minus 1 point. After I receive all of the teams answers, I will then
change the slide. It will contain the word, the sentence and the definition from
the dictionary. The teams that correctly defined the word will get 1 point. Dur-
ing this time I will have the students copy down the correct definition onto their
vocabulary sheet. At the end of the game the winning team will either get a fab-
Body of Lesson
Time
Procedures
29
Play the game! The words are on the document labeled “dictionary game”
minutes
Closure
Time
Procedures
5
minutes
End the game with 5 minutes left in the hour. Tell the students the winning
team. Give the extra credit or the prize
Vocabulary for Poetry Unit 7 ELA Name ____________________________________________________________ 1. Poem 2. Figurative Language 3. Similes 4.
Vocabulary for Poetry Unit
7 ELA
Name ____________________________________________________________
1.
Poem
2.
Figurative Language
3.
Similes
4.
Metaphor
5.
Imagery
6.
Alliteration
7.
Personification
8.
Stanza
9.
Refrain
10.
Meter
11.
Couplets
12.
Octave
13.
Scansion
14.
Ode
15.
Narrative poem
16.
Elegy
17.
Requiem
18.
Haiku
19.
Lyric
20. Sonnet
Topic: Rhyme Schemes MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s) RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as
Topic: Rhyme Schemes
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s) RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases
as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of
rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem
or section of a story or drama.
RL 5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to
its meaning
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will know the difference between free verse and
rhyme poems, students will be able to figure out the rhyme scheme in each poem
Purpose of Lesson: Students will learn how to identify rhyme schemes
Introduction
Time
Procedures
10
minutes
students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
During this time pass out a green literature book from the back bookshelf to each
student.
5
minutes
Start by asking who knows what a rhyme scheme is and if they can define it. If
someone defines it, then ask another person in the room if they can put that in their
own words or if they agree with the definition. If no one can tell them it is the pat-
tern of the rhyme a in poem.
5
minutes
Ask the students if they know what free verse is and if they can define it. If some-
one defines it, then ask another person if they can put it in their own words or if
they agree with the definition. If no one can define it, then tell them that it is a
form of poetry that does not have a rhyme scheme.
Body of Lesson
Time
Procedures
10
minutes
Have the student turn to page 363 have someone read Wild Stallion.
The poem is also written a google doc. Project it onto the screen. Label the rhyme
scheme using the google doc.
15
minutes
Have the students turn to page 377. Have another student read the The Hearth Fire
aloud. On a separate piece of paper have them write the rhyme scheme to the po-
em. Let students know they only have about 10 minutes to do this and you will be
collecting them at the end of the hour.
Closure
Time
Procedures
9
Have ask a student if they figured out they rhyme scheme to the poem. It is:
minutes
AABBCCDDEEFFGGHHIIJJKKLLMMNN
Ask students if this was a difficult task to do. Ask them if they think it is hard for
poets to write in this rhyme scheme.
Topic: Figurative language MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological
Topic: Figurative language
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):
Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to write and identify metaphors and simi-
les, students will know the difference between metaphors and similes.
Purpose of Lesson: Learn about similes and metaphors
Time
Procedure
10
Students will read for 10 minutes
minutes
Write up on the board “Life is like” ask the students to complete the sentence with a
5
minutes
variety of responses. Then ask the students what this type of phrase is called. If no
one knows remind them that this is one of their vocabulary words.
Introduction
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Ask students if anyone remembers what a metaphor is and if they can define it without
looking at their vocabulary. Be sure to have multiple students participate by asking if
people agree or if anyone can put the definition into their own words. Once it is de-
fined ask the students if we can come up with any metaphors about life.
10
minutes
Read Willow and Ginkgo with the students. Have someone read the poem aloud. Ask
the students if they can see any similes or metaphors in the poem and what he similes
and metaphors are.
10
minutes
Read Road not taken with the students. Have someone read the poem aloud. Ask the
students what the metaphor could be in this poem. Get multiple people involved. Ask
if students if they can repeat, come up with a new metaphor, or agree with other stu-
dents
Time
Procedure
9
minutes
Tell the students that they have until the end of class to create 3 original metaphors
and 3 original similes and write them down. Tell students that you will collect them at
the end of the hour. Walk around and help students
Collect the papers at the end of the hour. If a student did not finish and was not talk-
ing, then it can be due tomorrow for them.
Body
Conclusion
Topic:Theme and Mood MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RI 2 Determine two or more central ideas in a
Topic:Theme and Mood
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RI 2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text
and analyze their development over the course the text; provide an objective summary of the
text.
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will understand what the theme and mood of a poem
means, students will understand how to summarise a poem
Purpose of Lesson: For students to learn about mood and theme in poetry.
Time
Procedure
10
The students will start the class by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
5
minutes
Ask students to define theme. Tell students to rephrase the definitions, if they agree
with the definition, and if they think the definition is complete
5
minutes
Ask students what a mood is. Tell students to rephrase the definitions, if they agree
with the definition and if the definition is complete. Have students if they can give ex-
amples of moods
Body
Time
Procedure
20
minutes
Tell students that poems can have moods and themes as well and that is what we will
be exploring. Put the students into groups of 3-4. Hand the poems: Snowball and Start-
ing Today, along with the worksheet for this lesson. Tell the students that they have
fifteen minutes to fill out the worksheet, before we come back together as a class and
you collect the worksheet
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
14
Bring the class back together as a large group. Ask the students what their answers
were for each question. Be sure to get multiple answers from various students.
minutes
Collect the worksheet from all of the groups.
Name: _________________________________________________________ Summarise Snowball. Describe the mood(s) of Snowball. What are the theme(s) found in Snowball.
Name: _________________________________________________________
Summarise Snowball.
Describe the mood(s) of Snowball.
What are the theme(s) found in Snowball.
Summarize Starting Today.
Describe the mood(s) of Starting Today
What are the theme(s) found in Starting Today
What are three similarities between the two poems?
What are three differences in the poems?
Topic: Imagery MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): 3B Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pac- ing, and
Topic: Imagery
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): 3B Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pac-
ing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will understand what imagery is and how to effec-
tively use it in poetry
Purpose of Lesson: To introduce and discuss imagery
Introduction
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
Pass out the green literature books in the back corner during this time.
Have these words written on the board “Sight, Touch, Smell, Taste”
6
minutes
Have students get out a piece of paper. At the top of the paper have the student write
their name and their favorite place. Tell the students that they have 5 minutes to de-
scribe their favorite place and it must contain what they can see, what they can feel,
what the place smells like and if they can taste anything. They cannot talk to their
neighbor during this time.
6
minutes
When the students are done writing have them exchange their paper with their neigh-
bor. Their neighbor must draw their partner’s description to the best of their abilities
and then sign their drawing. They will have about 5 minutes to do this. During this
time they still cannot talk to their neighbor.
Body
Time
Procedure
15
minutes
Tell the students that they just practiced a poetic devices called Imagery. Tell students
that they will now be looking at a poem that uses this device very well. Have the stu-
dents turn to page 404 in the green books. Have a student read the poem aloud. Ask
the students where in the poem that they can see imagery. See if students all agree on
the same instances of imagery.
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
7
minutes
See if students have any questions about imagery. Ask students if they can remember
if we’ve seen imagery in any of the poems we have read so far. If not give the exam-
ple of Willow and Ginkgo. In that poem the author describes in detail both the Wil-
low and Ginkgo trees.
Topic: Alliteration and assonance MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 4 Determine the meaning of words and
Topic: Alliteration and assonance
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases
as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of
rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem
or section of a story or drama.
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to identify alliteration and assonance
and effectively use these two poetic devices in their poetry
Purpose of Lesson: To learn about alliteration
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
During this time pass out the poem “The Titanic”
15
minutes
Have one of the students read the poem titanic aloud. Ask the students if they noticed
that there are times when the author repeats consonant sounds in some of the lines. If
not give the example in line 1 of where water. Ask the students if they can find similar
instances in the poem. After the responses see if students agree or if they can find an-
other one. If they cannot find any instances, then read the poem to the students one
more time and ask again. When the students are able to find their own instances of re-
peating consonant sounds, then ask them if anyone know what we call this. Tell the
students it is called alliteration. Ask students if someone can define alliteration and ask
someone to put it in their own words.
Body
Time
Procedure
15
minutes
Ask the students if they can find any instances of repeating vowels in the poem. If they
cannot then give the example of water falls in line one. Ask the students if they can
find any instances of repeating vowel sounds in the poem. If they cannot read the po-
em to them again. After the responses see if any of the student know what we call
this. Tell the students it is called assonance.
10
minutes
Hand out the poem “Silver” to the students. Have them circle the instances of allitera-
tion and underline the instances of assonance. Tell the students that they have ten
minutes until we will go over it in class and that you will be collecting it at the end of
the hour. If students do not finish, then they may take the poem home was homework
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
4
minutes
Quickly ask the students if they found instances of alliteration or assonance and if
they can give an example of either one. Collect the poems.

Name: ________________________________________________________________ Directions: Circle the instances of alliteration (repeating consonant sounds) and under- line the instances of assonance (repeating vowel sounds) in the following poem. This assignment is due at the end of the hour.

Breaking Stones Gillian Clarke Out in the dusk day after day breaking stones, summer and winter,
Breaking Stones
Gillian Clarke
Out in the dusk
day after day
breaking stones,
summer and winter,
aching bones.
Nothing but dirt tracks,
nothing but muddy ruts
for a horse and cart,
till they smashed stones
to smithereens.
Under the country lanes
where we dawdle in summer
picking blackberries,
swishing at nettles with sticks,
are their broken stones.
Under the tarmac of every road,
every motorway,
lie the old tracks
and the stones they broke,
the stones they sold.
Winter and summer
stones for bread,
and bread for stones,
till their old bones ached
from breaking stones.
Silver
Walter De La Mare

Slowly, silently, now the moon Walks the night in her silver shoon; This way and that she peers and sees Silver fruit upon silver trees; One by one the casements catch Her beams beneath the silvery thatch; Couched in his kennel, like a log, With paws of silver sleeps the dog; From their shadowy cote the white breasts peep Of doves in a silver-feathered sleep; A harvest mouse goes scampering by, With silver claws, and silver eye; And moveless fish in the water gleam, By silver reeds in a silver stream.

Topic: Concrete poetry MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RL 5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or
Topic: Concrete poetry
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s):RL 5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or
structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to understand the concrete form of poet-
ry and will be able to write their own concrete poem.
Purpose of Lesson: To introduce concrete poetry as a form of poetry and to have students create a
poem they can use in their portfolios.
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
9
minutes
Go over the concrete poems power point with the students. Read the poems to the stu-
dents. Ask students if they know what this kind of poetry is called. It is called concrete
poetry. Ask students how this adds to the poem’s meaning. Ask students how they
think the author is able to come up with a way to write a poem as a picture.
Body
Time
Procedure
20
minutes
Have the students get out a piece of paper. Tell the students to draw a fairly large out-
line of an object. It can be any school appropriate object they want, as long as it is
large enough to fit words inside. Have the students write a poem within the outline. It
can be about the object or something the object could represent. Let the students know
that they have about 15 minutes to work on these poems before we share some of them
in class.
10
Ask if there are a few students who might want to share their poem with the class and
show the class the picture their poem makes.
minutes
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
Tell the students that we just wrote one kind of concrete poem. There is another kind
that demonstrates the relationship between words. Show this poem to the stu-
minutes
dents:http://www.dichtung-digital.de/cms2012/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/fig-3.jpg
Explain to the students that we can see that the words slowly come together. This
demonstrates that the two words “like” and “like” are attracted to each other.
Collect the concrete poems. If students did not complete them, then they can turn
them in tomorrow
Topic: Repetition and sound MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1 Engage effectively in a range of
Topic: Repetition and sound
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discus-
sions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL 2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Student will be able to identify and effectively use repetition, students
will be able to analyze poems to understand how the author uses words to imitate sounds.
Purpose of Lesson: To introduce the topic repetition.
Time
Procedure
10
Students will read for 10 minutes
minutes
9
minutes
Pass out the transcript of the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wR8yzjKLKLU Ask
the students if they know who the author of this poem is. He is a famous hockey player and is
currently the assistant coach for the New Jersey Devils. Ask the students if they know who the
poem is about. Explain to them that the poem is about Pat Burns. Pat Burns was Mike Folig-
no’s coach when he played in the NHL for the Toronto Maple Leaves. Have the students
watch the video and follow along with the poem. After the poem is finished start by asking
students if they can see any places where there is repetition, then assonance and/or allitera-
tion. Next ask the students if they notice there is a beat or rhythm to the poem. Ask the stu-
dents what they think of it and if they think it adds to the poem. Ask them why they think this
way. Do they think it adds to a poem to have a rhythm or a beat? Why? Do you think it is hard
for a poet to do this? Why?
Body
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Next have the students watch this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oshjz97Edx0 Ask
the students why the author might have used the effect on his voice. Does it add to the poem
or does it detract? What if he only used it for pieces of the poem? Would it have been better
or worse? Why?
10
minutes
Have students watch hockey the musical Ask students why the author uses so many words
like boom koosh and such. What does boom and koosh mean? How do you know? Ask if any-
one knows what is the name for something like boom. Ask the students how creating a sound
in a poem adds to it. Does it create a cool effect? Does it help you visualize what is happen-
ing? Does it allow you to hear what is happening? Ask students if there is a name for this. Tell
the students it is onomonopia. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxiTnYJgmVc
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
4
minutes
Ask students how important is sound in poetry? Why? What adds to the sound in po-
etry? (onomatopoeia, repetition, maybe rhythm) Ask students if they have seen repe-
tition in other poetry we have read or written so far.
Topic: Personification MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): L5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative lan- guage, word relationships, and
Topic: Personification
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): L5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative lan-
guage, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to recognize personification in poetry,
students will be able to use personification in a poem they write
Purpose of Lesson: Allow students to learn about personification and practice using personifica-
tion in their writing
Introduction
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
minutes
Read Help to the students. Ask the students how the author describes the Snickers bar?
What human characteristics does the author give the Snickers bar? Who remembers
what we call it when someone gives an inanimate object human characteristics?
Body
Time
Procedure
29
minutes
Read a personification poem to the students. Make sure it is a silly one that you wrote.
Tell the students that they will be creating personification poems about an object they
draw out of a hat. Next have the students draw a verb out of the hat. Tell the students
that the first line must be of the object they drew doing the action that they drew. The
rest of the poem can be however they like. The poem needs to be at least 10 lines
long. Walk around and help students with their poems and read them as well. Com-
ment on the poetry being written and allow students to read their poems to each other
as well. Let the students how much time they will have to complete this assignment. If
the class is working on their poems and for some reason they cannot finish, then it
may be due the next school day
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
If there is time left at the end of the hour and most people have finished their poems,
then allow students to come up to the front of the class and share what they wrote.
Topic: Sound in Poetry and Review from last week MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1. Engage
Topic: Sound in Poetry and Review from last week
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts,
and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL 2. Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g.,
visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under
study.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to analyze poetry for meaning and
structure.
Purpose of Lesson: To get students to analyze poetry
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
minutes
Start by reading Fast break to the students. Model good poetry reading and what you
were thinking while you read the poem. Share with them what you thought about the
poem, what you liked about the poem, what confused you about the poem and how the
poem made you feel. After modeling this part of the proper reading for the students
point out some of the poetic devices in the poem
Body
Time
Procedure
35
minutes
Write-Pair-Share-Write
Next have the students watch this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtnEnEqjk0E before showing it tell the students
what TED is and that this girl is a seventh grader just like them and was invited to go
to this event to recite her poem. Also let them know what slam poetry is. After watch-
ing it have the students write down what they liked about the poem, what they didn’t
like about the poem and any poetic devices the poem used. They must do this quietly
and alone for about 5 minutes After they are done writing have them talk to the person
next to them about the poem. They must write down what the other person thought
about the poem. After they both have written down what the other thought about the
poem, then have them share what their partner thought about the poem. While people
are sharing, have the students write down 1 thing that surprised them about someone
else’s thoughts about the poem.
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
Finally after everyone has gone collect the papers, so you can review them and make
sure everyone followed directions fully and correctly.
Topic: Sound in Poetry and Review from last week MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1. Engage
Topic: Sound in Poetry and Review from last week
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): SL 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts,
and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
SL 2. Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g.,
visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under
study.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to analyze poetry for meaning and
structure.
Purpose of Lesson: To get students to analyze poetry
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
minutes
Start by reading Fast break to the students. Model good poetry reading and what you
were thinking while you read the poem. Share with them what you thought about the
poem, what you liked about the poem, what confused you about the poem and how the
poem made you feel. After modeling this part of the proper reading for the students
point out some of the poetic devices in the poem
Body
Time
Procedure
35
minutes
Write-Pair-Share-Write
Next have the students watch this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtnEnEqjk0E before showing it tell the students
what TED is and that this girl is a seventh grader just like them and was invited to go
to this event to recite her poem. Also let them know what slam poetry is. After watch-
ing it have the students write down what they liked about the poem, what they didn’t
like about the poem and any poetic devices the poem used. They must do this quietly
and alone for about 5 minutes After they are done writing have them talk to the person
next to them about the poem. They must write down what the other person thought
about the poem. After they both have written down what the other thought about the
poem, then have them share what their partner thought about the poem. While people
are sharing, have the students write down 1 thing that surprised them about someone
else’s thoughts about the poem.
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
Finally after everyone has gone collect the papers, so you can review them and make
sure everyone followed directions fully and correctly.
Topic: Emily Dickinson MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 6 4. Determine the meaning of words and
Topic: Emily Dickinson
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 6 4. Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the im-
pact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a
poem or section of a story or drama.
W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique,
relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
W3.a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a
narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
SL 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas
and expressing their own clearly.
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will understand how someone’s life affects poetry
and how their life affects their poetry
Purpose of Lesson: To have students examine and evaluate Emily Dickinson’s writing and life to
see how they relate.
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
minutes
Start by telling the students we are going to learn about Emily Dickinson and her life.
Give the students facts about her life.
Body
Time
Procedure
35
minutes
Read Sum-Sum-Summertime to the students. Tell the students that this is a list poem.
Ask the students if they have any guesses as to why it is called a list poem. Ask the
students what the poem is about. Ask them if they think Emily’s life influenced this
poem at all and how it influenced the poem. Ask them if they think that our lives have
influenced our writing and how our lives influence our writing.
Next have the students get a piece of paper out. On the top of the paper have them put
their names. Then have the students put their favorite superhero. The students will
then write a list poem similar to Emily Dickinson’s list poem. The poem must be at
least 20 lines long. Remind students that this is a poem that is going into their portfo-
lio, so they must do the best they can on the poem.
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
If there is time, then have the students share their poems with the class, if there is not
time then tell the students to put the poems in their folders or hang onto them until
next week.
Topic: Odes MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 6 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases
Topic: Odes
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): RL 6 4. Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the im-
pact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a
poem or section of a story or drama.
W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique,
relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
W3.a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a
narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
SL 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas
and expressing their own clearly.
Class:ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will understand how to write an ode, students will
write their own odes
Purpose of Lesson: Students will create an ode, students will create a poem they can use in their
portfolio
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
Read this ode with the students:
minutes
http://www.bowerpowerblog.com/2009/08/ode-to-bacon/ - Ode to Bacon Ask the stu-
dents what the poem is about. How is it different than any other poem we read? Why?
Tell students it is different, because it is a poem that honors something.
Body
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Have the students write down their favorite food. Then have the students write down
everything they can think of about the food. What is looks like, tastes like, smells like,
feels like, what it sounds like when it is cooking, what they wonder about it, what they
know about it etc.
30
minutes
Next have the students write an ode about the food. Tell the students it must be at
least 20 lines long.
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
If the students have time, then let them read their poems. If not then tell the students
that this is one of the poems that is due in their portfolio, so they need to hang onto it.
If they might lose it, then have them put it in their folders.
Topic: Portfolio Work Day Date: February 16, 2015 MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): W5. With some guidance
Topic: Portfolio Work Day Date: February 16, 2015
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): W5. With some guidance and support from peers
and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
(Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and in-
cluding grade 7 on page 53.)
L1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teach-
erled) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and ex-
pressing their own clearly.
Class: ELA 7
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will learn how to give useful and kind advice on po-
etry, students will practice reading their poems
Purpose of Lesson: To complete the portfolio assignment
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
10
minutes
Pass out the peer review assignment Tell the students that they will be working in
groups for their peer reviews. Let them know that you will be picking the groups and
that they are already predetermined. Tell the students that during this time they must
be respectful. If someone is becoming disrespectful, rude, or mean, then they will be
kicked out of their group and receive a zero on this part of the assignment. Tell the stu-
dents that they will go around the group and read their poems to each other. After a
poem is read, then they will fill out a peer review slip for the writer of the person.
Once the slip is filled out, then the students are to share their review with the writer of
the poem. Once that is done, then the writer gets to keep all of their peer reviews. THE
WRITER OF THE POEM WILL KEEP THE PEER REVIEWS FOR THEIR POEM.
THESE WILL GO INTO THE WRITER’S PORTFOLIO. They have today and to-
morrow to work on the peer reviews.
Body
Time
Procedure
30
Allow the students to do their peer reviews
minutes
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
5
minutes
With about 5 minutes left, have the students clean up put away all peer reviews and
see where they are at. If needed then the students can do peer reviews again tomor-
row.
Name of Reviewer: ____________________________________________________________ Name of Writer: _______________________________________________________________ Claim: ______________________________________________________________________ Introduction: What is the hook? Does
Name of Reviewer: ____________________________________________________________
Name of Writer: _______________________________________________________________
Claim: ______________________________________________________________________
Introduction:
What is the hook? Does it grab your attention? Why or why not?
What is the thesis statement? Can it be improved? Why or why not?
Body:
What are the main points of the argument?
Are the main points well supported? Does the writer include convincing research?
What could be improved about their argument?
Conclusion:
Does the conclusion restate the main points of the argument?
Does the conclusion wrap up the essay nicely?
Miscellaneous:
Does the author include ethos, pathos, logos and kairos? Where do they include it?
Are there any grammatical errors? If so mark it on their essay.
Is their essay easy to understand? Is it well-written and clear?
Is their essay convincing?

My Experiences

No matter what anyone tells you, words and ideas can change the world—John Keating
No matter what anyone tells you, words
and ideas can change the world—John
Keating

Extra Curricular Activities

It is extremely important that students have extra curricular options. It allows them to further their
It is extremely important that students have extra curricular options. It allows
them to further their learning, meet new people, and expand their knowledge
and skills. These activities also promote school pride and acceptance of differ-
ent people. We need to have extra curriculars in schools to insure a well-
rounded, good quality education. I have been privileged to assist and run extra
curricular programs in my student teaching and in my current position.
In my student teaching I was the supervisor for the student council. I was able
to help with fundraisers, events, and meetings. It was an amazing experience to
see the students work with people, they may not have before. I also loved being
able to help the students grow in their teamwork and social skills. This experi-
ence really opened my eyes to how important extra curriculars are to a stu-
dent’s education.
The biggest extra curricular I run, is the Career Association. This association is
dedicated to expanding students’ knowledge of careers and employment; com-
munity service, and civic engagement. I was blown away by my students with
some of the accomplishments that they had in this organization. The students
worked together to bring people like Judge Davis, a local circuit court judge,
and local credit union representatives to come and speak in the class. They put
on creative fundraisers, like a tye-dye t-shirt event and a minecraft competition.
My students also gave back to the community by running a anti-texting and
driving campaign that was featured on the radio and going reverse trick-or-
treating at the local nursing homes. My proudest moment with this organiza-
tion, was when three of my students qualified for state employability and finan-
cial literacy competitions. Although the students did not place, they represented
our association and school very well.
The other extra curricular I run is the Summer Youth Employment Opportunity,
or SYEO. This is a grant funded opportunity in conjunction with Michigan
Works, local businesses, and Bay Community College. The students have the
opportunity to be placed in paid work experiences in an industry that they are
interested in or as a councilor in a robotics camp. The students gain valuable
experience and skills that they can use in their future careers or school courses.

Research in Education

As an educator, I am constantly doing research. Before I start a unit I like to
As an educator, I am constantly doing research. Before I start a unit I like to
research what students struggle with, what I can do to help struggling students,
and different ways to present the material. Doing this allows me to create unit
and lesson plans that are best suited to my students and my teaching practices. I
think that this helps improve my teaching abilities and allows me to see the
content from more than one perspective. This also helps my students learn
more about the topic and creates more meaning for them.
I also enjoy doing research on how to help struggling students. When I notice
one of my students is struggling with the content, then I like to know what I
can do to help. I usually will refer to academic journals, books, and other
teachers in order to help me find a solution to the problem. I have done this on
multiple occasions with students and then see what other teachers are doing to
help the student. I like to make sure that I am doing the right thing, before I
change what I am doing.
I have also done multiple case studies on students. I have been required to
create formal case studies on students to assess their learning and to understand
how students learn. This has given me some strategies to help me understand
what I need to do as an educator. This has allowed me to give my students
learning strategies and to give them resources to help them study, write, read
etc.
Below you will find a case study I did on a students who is learning Chinese.
She was an excellent student who was learning a foreign language. During this
study I was able to understand why a student might struggle with a second
language. During this study I had to observe, interview, and do academic
research in order to improve the student’s understanding of how they learn, as
well as understanding what the student could potentially need help with.
Attached below that is a lesson plan for the start of a unit involving Of Mice
and Men. According to various academic sources, students struggle with the
concept of homelessness within The Great Depression. Before starting a unit on
this book, I introduced this topic to the students and allowed them to
understand just want it meant to be homeless in this time period and how that
affected people.
In the beginning of the study the student was asked a series of questions about their
In the beginning of the study the student was asked a series of questions about
their learning and then given a multiple intelligence test. When observed the
student did not follow what the results said should happen. The results said that
she was mainly a visual learner, but she did not excel or use visual aspects of the
class as much as other ones. She also said she learned fairly well by visualizing. I
can only assume that she does more visual learning while study vs. visual
learning in the classroom. She tended to listen more while in class than watch
things happen. She even admitted this later on. She excelled at learning by
hands-on activities. The student rated herself quite high on learning by doing and
it is was her highest score on the multiple intelligence test. This was proven quite
so when she was speaking. She excelled very quickly at it and did not have much
problem doing it. The student very well knows how she learns and uses this
knowledge to help her study, but it does not seem like she uses it in the
classroom.
Johann Friedrich Herbart defines interest as the ability to retain and focus on an
idea in consciousness. The interest of this student in Chinese is fairly high
according to this definition. She regularly pays quite a bit of attention in class
and works extremely hard on her homework. The student also practices on a
daily basis. She consciously makes the effort to work hard at this making her
interest very high. Herbart also says that interest can be stemmed from other
subjects and that a network of ideas can create varied interests for a student. It
makes sense that wanting that her interest in chemical engineering is what started
her interest in Chinese. The student saw many Chinese students within her
department and wanted to be able to communicate better with them. The
connections she made between the two subjects were then very strong.
For the student most of the class is very much in the zone of proximal
development. According to Lev Vygotsky this is the proper zone that the student
needs to be in. She tends to be either very close to the zone that is too easy for
her or the zone that is too hard for her. There is not much in-between. The rate at
which she is learning to speak the language is very much on the lower end of the
zone. The difficulty of memorizing the phrases is on the verge of being too easy
for the student. It would be beneficial to increase the difficulty of the phrases for
this student. The application of the phrases is very much on the verge of being
too hard for the student. She very much has trouble using the phrases in new
situations. It can be very hard for her to memorize the new characters as well.
These are within her zone of proximal development, but they tend to be closer to
either the higher or lower end of the zone.
Topic: Homelessness and the Great Depression MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): CE 3.3.3 Draw on a variety
Topic: Homelessness and the Great Depression
MI Frameworks/Common Core Objective(s): CE 3.3.3 Draw on a variety of critical perspectives
to respond to and analyze works of literature (e.g., religious, biographical, feminist, multicultural,
political).
Class: ELA 10
Intended Learning Outcome (ILO): Students will be able to compare and contrast what homeless-
ness was like in the Great Depression and currently as well. Students will be able to characterize
the economic and cultural conditions of the Great Depression.
Purpose of Lesson: To give students background information
Time
Procedure
10
Students will start the hour by reading for 10 minutes
minutes
5
minutes
Ask students to then characterize what they think a homeless person looks like. Write
what they say on the board. Ask them if this has been the same throughout history.
Body
Time
Procedure
15
Show students this photograph
minutes
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-daRgxCLhzqY/TkRg39dKtyI/
AAAAAAAAAF0/8IwFpyUtnb0/s1600/great%2Bdepression%2Bhomeless%2B6.gif
Ask students when they think this photo was taken Tell them it was from the great
depression. Give them 10 minutes to write about it before you talk about it.
15
minutes
Ask students what they know about the Great Depression
Lead a discussion about how people lived during the great depression.
Points to Hit:
Many people were homeless
There were very few jobs
Economic situation was poor
 Show students these statistics
http://www.statisticbrain.com/homelessness-stats/
Conclusion
Time
Procedure
10
minutes
Ask students if they think homelessness has gotten better or worse recently and why
they think either way. Write a list on the board for why it has gotten better and why it
has gotten worse. Have students copy this list into their notebooks. Tell them it will be
for later use and to have them try and think of things to add at home. Assign the first
chapter in Of Mice and Men.

Professional Development

I love to learn. It is important to our profession to be the best we can
I love to learn. It is important to our profession to be the best we can be and to
do that we must learn all we can. I believe that we need to research inde-
pendently, network with others, experiment with new techniques, and revise
our curriculums. It is what makes us continue to be better and what will help us
make our students successful.
During my last year of teaching, I have taken it upon myself to obtain addition-
al professional development. I have independently taken six courses through
the Michigan Department of Education. It has been extremely important to me
to make sure I stay up to date on the latest research and techniques. One class I
have recently taken is introduction to literacy and technology. This course fo-
cused on the importance of integrating technology into literacy instruction.
Through this course I learned various techniques of how to better integrate
technology into my classroom and my literacy instruction.
I have also been able to actively participate on a scholarship committee through
Mu Beta Psi’s alumni association. This experience has given me the opportuni-
ty to learn more about the process of creating a scholarship and choosing a re-
cipient for a scholarship. This opportunity has given me the chance to help stu-
dents with the application process for other scholarships and gives me an insid-
er view of what a good scholarship application looks like.
The easiest way to teach students the importance of learning, is to model it our-
selves. When students see teachers taking the initiative to keep learning, then it
motivates students to do the same.