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EDMA310/360 Mathematics unit planner

S00153907 Ben Frater

Unit Overview
Unit title: Statistics and Data representation and interpretation in grade 3
Content maths area: Statistics & Data
Grade/year level:

Grade 3

Learning Focus (ideas extrapolated from AusVELS):


Data representation and interpretation
Identify questions or issues for categorical variables, by using appropriate methods to
source, plan and collect data. (ACMSP068)
Use collected data to organise into relevant categories and create graphical displays using
picture and bar/column graphs with and without the use of digital technologies
(ACMSP069)
Interpret and compare data displays (ACMSP070)
Rationale:
Provide a meaningful context for promoting problem solving, critical thinking and developing
number sense as well as providing meaningful connections to other areas of the curriculum as
well as the wider world which statistics and data play a major role.
Assumed prior knowledge of students:
It is assumed the students have prior knowledge on categorical variable, and have been
introduced to the concepts of collecting, checking and classifying data. As well as being able to
create table and picture graphs to interpret them in accordance with the year 2 curriculum.
Grouping strategies to support learning:
The unit of work will combine strategies of both individual and group learning. There is a strong
emphasis on group work as Garfield and Ben-Zvi 2008, state that students appear to work better
in small groups and learn to argue an approach or idea and experience new methods and ideas
when engaging in statistics. It also presents as an opportunity to express their ideas both in
writing and orally helping them become more involved in their own learning (Garfield & BenZvi, 2007). Furthermore the activities provide students with active learning opportunities with
real and authentic data that they will understand and value while fostering the culture of enquiry
into the statistical process (Bill & Watson, 2007).
Overview of assessment:
Short answer, individual and group projects, open-ended questions.
The assessment strategies that will be used are a combination of assessment for learning at first
to gauge student knowledge and guide further teaching for the activity and allow the teacher to
make informed professional judgements on student progress (Reys, Lindquist, Lambdin, Smith,
Rogers, Falle, Frid, Bennett, 2013) and allow the teacher to give back critical feedback to student
to aid in their performance (Garfield & Ben-Zvi, 2008). The final activity will be an assessment
of learning using an open ended task with a rubric which will aid in informing on students
learning and knowledge on the topic and for informing and reporting purposes at a later date
(Van de Walle, Karp & Bay Williams, 2014).

Word Count: 373


References:
Bill, A., & Watson, J. M. (2007). Three student tasks in a study of distribution in a best
practice statistics classroom. Mathematics: Essential research, essential practice
(Proceedings of the 30th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group
of Australasia, pp. 123-132). Hobart, TAS: MERGA
De Klerk, K. (2007). Illustrated maths dictionary (4th ed.). Port Melbourne, Vic, Pearson.
Garfield, J., & Ben-Zvi, D. (2007). How students learn statistics revisited: A current review of
research on teaching and learning statistics. International Statistical Review / Revue
Internationale De Statistique, (3), 372-396
Garfield, J., & Ben-Zvi, D. (2008). Developing students' statistical reasoning: Connecting
research and teaching practice. Springer Verlag.
Reys, R. E., Lindquist, M. M., Lambdin, D. V., Smith, N. L., Rogers, A., Falle, J., Frid, S., &
Bennett, S. (2013). Helping children learn mathematics (1st Australian ed.). Milton, Qld.:
John Wiley & Sons.
Van de Walle, J., Karp, K., Bay-Williams, J. (2014). Elementary and middle school mathematics:
Teaching developmentally (Eighth ed.). Harlow, England: Pearson

MATHEMATICS UNIT PLANNER


Topic: Statistics
Key mathematical understandings

Information can be collected and


represented in many different ways
Surveys are an important tool to collect
data to display as a bar graph or picture
graph
Graphs help in analysing and
interpreting information which allow for
inferences and justifications to be made
on the data.

Year Level: 3

Term: 3

Week: 9

Date: 7/9 11/9

Key AusVELS Focus / Standard (taken directly from AusVELS documents):


Content strand(s):
Statistics and Probability
Sub-strand(s):
Data Representation and Interpretation
Level descriptions:
Identify questions or issues for categorical variables. Identify data sources and plan methods of data collection
and recording (ACMSP068)

Collect data, organise into categories and create displays using lists, tables, picture graphs and simple column
graphs, with and without the use of digital technologies (ACMSP069)

Interpret and compare data displays (ACMSP070)

Proficiency strand(s):
Literacy

Problem Solving

Numeracy

Critical and Creative thinking

ICT Capability

Key skills to develop and practise

Key equipment / resources:

Analysing

Interactive Whiteboards

Classifying

Computers and or Tablet devices

Interpreting

Poster paper

Locating Information

Teacher generated hand outs

Visually representing

Student workbooks

Reasoning

Key vocabulary
Bar/column Graph: uses horizontal or vertical bars
or columns to represent various kings of
information
Mode: the score that appear the most
Median: middle measurement of the score when
the items are measured in size
Picture Graph: graph drawn with pictures that
represent real objects
Statistics: The study concerned with the collection
and classification of numerical facts. The
information collected is called data. Data can be
represented in a table or on a graph and
interpreted and analysed.
Variable: an element of data that is liable to vary
or change

Possible misconceptions
Misunderstanding of averages and centre
Problems with categorical data
Proportional and Statistical Reasoning

Learning
strategies/ skills

Analysing
Checking
Classifying
Co-operating
Considering options
Designing
Elaborating

MATHEMATICAL
FOCUS
(what you want the children
to come to understand as a
result of this lesson short,
succinct statement)

Session 1
Revisit and assess
prior knowledge of
graphs, introduce
key language of
the topic

Estimating
Explaining
Generalising
Hypothesising
Inferring
Interpreting
Justifying

TUNING IN
(WHOLE CLASS FOCUS)

Key probing questions


Why do conduct surveys?
Why are graphs important in statistics?
What are the key variables should we be
analysing?
Why should we compare different sets of
data?
Listening
Locating information
Making choices
Note taking
Observing
Ordering events
Organising

INVESTIGATIONS
SESSION

(a short, sharp task relating to the


focus of the lesson; sets the scene/
context for what students do in the
independent aspect. e.g., It may be a
problem posed, spider diagram, an
open-ended question, game, or
reading a story)

(INDEPENDENT LEARNING)
(extended opportunity for students to
work in pairs, small groups or
individually. Time for teacher to probe
childrens thinking or work with a small
group for part of the time and to also
conduct roving conferences)

Brainstorm by using a
KWL chart
What is data?
What are some ways to
display data?
What are some types of
graphs have you seen?
Demonstrate using what
is your favourite fruit
picture graph:
Students draw their
favourite fruit on a card
then place it on the board.
Using the picture graph
explain key terms:
Variable
Median
Mode
Largest variable
Smallest Variable
Analysis and Interpretation

Students independently
complete handout of AFL
Premierships.
Teacher rove around the
class observing and asking
questions.
What is the variable in
the graph?
Compare two of the
teams, who has won
more and why?

Performing
Persuading
Planning
Predicting
Presenting
Providing feedback
Questioning

Links to other contexts


Students own personal lives and local
environment
Current event (AFL)
ICT using computers/tablets to create
graphical displays (Instruction in basic use of
Excel to create graphs taught in these
lessons)

Reading
Recognising bias
Reflecting
Reporting
Responding
Restating
Revising

REFLECTION & MAKING


CONNECTIONS
SESSION
(WHOLE CLASS FOCUS)
(focused teacher questions and
summary to draw out the mathematics
and assist children to make links. NB.
This may occur at particular points
during a lesson. Use of spotlight,
strategy, gallery walk, etc.)

Recap the session and


reflect on the key terms on
the KWL chart. Go through
the answers by asking the
students:
What was the variable in
the bar graph?
What was the
largest/smallest variable,
name the teams?
What number appeared
most?

Seeing patterns
Selecting information
Self-assessing
Sharing ideas
Summarising
Synthesising

ADAPTATIONS

Testing
Viewing
Visually representing
Working independently
Working to a timetable

ASSESSMENT
STRATEGIES

- Enabling prompt
(to allow those experiencing difficulty to
engage in active experiences related to
the initial goal task)
- Extending prompt
(questions that extend students
thinking on the initial task)

(should relate to objective. Includes


what the teacher will listen for,
observe, note or analyse; what
evidence of learning will be collected
and what criteria will be used to
analyse the evidence)

Enabling Prompt
Point out to me which team
has won the most/lest?
How do you know?
Extending Prompt
Promote deeper analysis of
the data:
How many non-Victorian
Teams have won a
Premiership?
How many Premierships
have been won in total?
How do you know?

Assessment for
Learning
Students will complete a
handout provided by the
teacher to complete
before the end of the
lesson. Teacher to use
answers to see students
current understanding
knowledge of the
mathematical concept
and alter or further
develop future lessons

Session 2
Formulating
Questions and
conduct a survey to
collect data.

Session 3
Organising and
representing data
from the survey

Ask the class some


questions?
Favourite animal, colour,
sport etc.
Students create a human
graph, with one student to
describe the key features
like Largest, smallest, most
common etc.
Brainstorm
Why do we ask
questions?
What methods can we
use to collect data?
What is a survey?
Can we think of any
examples when we filled
in a survey?
Add information to KWL
chart.

Students individually
decide what question they
want to ask from a list
provided by the teacher
(appendix 2)
Write the following
questions on the board for
the students to answer.
What question would you
like to answer and why?
How many people will
you ask?
How will I record the data
as I collect them?
Students begin collecting
data from the other
students.

Recap the lesson ask the


students
What were some of the
strategies you used
which worked best?
Was planning important?
Add information to KWL
chart.

Enabling prompt
Which question are you
most interested in finding
out?
Can we use a table to help
in collecting the data?
Extending prompt
Would asking more
questions allow for more
data?

Assessment for
learning
Through observation and
conferencing during the
activity. Workbooks
checked at the end of the
day to observe practice
and inform the next
lesson.

Why we ask questions


and collect data?
How can we represent
the data?
Show some examples of
graphs (Appendix 3)
What are the important
statistical features we
looking for? (Mode,
largest, smallest)
Add information to KWL
chart.

Students create either a


picture chart or bar graph
to show their results.
Teacher to rove around
having individual
conferences, asking:
Why have you chosen
that graph
What is the
largest/smallest
variable?
Which variable occurs
the most?

Students share their


findings with the rest of
class.
Compare any different
findings, find out why they
were different.
Why are graphs
important in statistics?
What are the key
variables should we be
analysing?
Why should we compare
different sets of data?
Add information to KWL
chart.

Enabling Prompt
What is one way of
displaying the data?
Which graph did we use in
the first lesson? (Picture
graph)
Extending Prompt
Can you show me another
way of representing the
data?
Find another person who
picked the same question
as and compare the data is
it the same?

Assessment for
learning
Through observation and
conferencing during the
activity.

Session 4
Open Ended
Students will
formulate a
question, conduct a
survey, collect,
organise, represent
and analyse the
data and produce a
poster display.
Session 5
Open Ended
Students will
formulate a
question, conduct a
survey, collect,
organise, represent
and analyse the
data and produce a
poster display.

Revise the steps of Data


representation:
Question, collect, organise,
represent and analyse.
Display the completed
KWL chart to aid students.

Working in pairs students


will formulate a question of
their own choosing.
Will the question provide
information that can be
analysed?
What method will you
use to help in collecting
the data?

Subject to teacher approval


students will conduct a
survey with other classes
in their cohort.
At the end of the lesson
students recount to class
any difficulties successes
they had collected the
information.

Enabling Prompt
Select pairs to enable
mixed ability pairing.
Revisit the KWL chart
Extending Prompt
Is there a more efficient
strategy to collect the
information?

Assessment of
Learning
During the task, observe
the students working,
using specially designed
rubric.

Revision on how to create


computer generated
graphs. (Learnt in a
separate ICT class)

Working in pairs students


will use the collected
information and construct a
graphical representation
using technology to help
analyse the data.
Which Graph have you
chosen and why?
What are going to
analyse and why?

After completion each pair


will present their findings to
class.
Verbally answering
What they found out?
Their Analysis and
interpretation of the
data?
Did they compare their
data with another group
who asked a similar
question?

Enabling Prompt
Mixed ability pairing
Revisit the KWL chart
Extending Prompt
What other forms of graphs
could you use?
What is the average
variable and do you know
how to find it?

Assessment of
Learning
After completion of the
task the teacher is to
gather all work and mark
it in relation to the
supplied rubric to gauge
students understanding of
the concept covered in
the unit of work for end of
year reporting.

Word Count including headings and other ancillary information already proved: (2200)