Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 8

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan


Michelle Loding
Ft4405
Wayne State University
SW 4443
February 14, 2016

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

In order to fully get the feel for the type of work social work is, one must embrace the
lifestyle and immerse themselves into the field. One way to do this is by interning at an agency
that explores the social work turf. The agency I have been placed at for my intern experience is
CARE of Southeastern Michigan. CARE stands for Community Assessment Referral and
Education. As the name implies, that is exactly what the agency does for the communities within
Macomb county. From an outsider looking in, first glance shows that this agency really, truly
does care about what happens to the residents of the different communities. Everyone in the
agency, from the front desk support team to the peer recovery coaches, wants the best for those
who reach out for help with one problem or another. With this report, I can only begin to scratch
the surface of what CARE really does for Southeastern Michigan and the role CARE plays for so
many people.
Mission Statement: CARE of Southeastern Michigans mission is to educate, link and
support individuals, families, businesses and communities affected by family concerns,
workplace challenges, mental health conditions and the misuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other
drugs. (CARE History, n.d.). CARE was started in 1977 by a man named Charles Clay and
other various community officials. When the agency began it was known as The Substance
Abuse Information Center (SAIC) and was a place for people to go who had substance abuse
problems to get free services like recommendations for treatments and evaluations. The founders
of the agency realized there were more people in the community that needed help also, so SAIC
expanded their programs to include student assessments. This is when a school in the
community, who has a contract with the agency, sends referrals over to get a student the help
they need. This can be anything from one time classes to helping the student find a therapist. In
1992 the official change from SAIC to CARE was implemented and the non-profit agency

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

continues to use the new name today. Also, over the years many new programs and services
have been added to CAREs line up. One of the longest running programs is Paper People that is
for children from preschool to first grade. This program implements basic ideas of being safe
and what to do if there is trouble. Having seen this program in its entirety, I can say the children
really do love the lessons and respond very well to what is being taught. Another service CARE
provides is through WorkLife Solutions (WLS). This service is for various businesses in the area
who have a contract with CARE to provide counseling, or referrals if needed, to people and their
family members. Most of the time a person can get 5-6 free counseling sessions with a clinician
from CARE to work through many different life issues. This can be a very valuable service for
someone who is having a hard time coping with different aspects of life.
The building CARE of Southeastern Michigan is housed in contains 3 levels. The main
level is the clinical floor where the lobby/front desk/call center area is, and also the case
managers for the different services that are offered. CARE serves as a drop off/pick up point for
people who are entering rehab treatment or finishing detox. There, behind code opened doors,
the case managers for various substance abuse programs work to provide care to their clients.
The clinicians that are on this floor provide one time assessments to link a person with the proper
resources for any difficulties they are experiencing and drivers license restoration. There are
also case managers for women and family services and methadone programs. One of the bigger
projects that CARE works on throughout the year is the Parenting Conference that is typically
held in the spring. This year marks the 21st conference and it is required attendance for interns
and the prevention floor (2nd level). On the prevention floor are all the Public Information
Specialists and administrative workers. As a Public Information Specialist, one goes out into the
community, typically a school, to teach different programs to all ages of children. The programs

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

include lessons in saying no to drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, anti-bullying, and peer pressure. The
people who work on this floor are in and out of the agency all day long and have lots of help
from interns to get presentations ready and preform them in the community. The prevention
floor works with many different parts of the community from schools to DHHS to put on the
presentations. CAREs Public Information Specialist are the ones who educate the DHHS
workers on issues like marijuana and alcohol abuse. Also on this floor, screening are done for
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and meetings are held for Teens Talking Truth (T3), which is a
support group for teens who want to learn more about prevention for drug abuse and how to be a
leader in their school. The lower level of the building houses the Peer Recovery Program (PRP)
and the Peer Recovery Coaches (PRC). This service is provided by people who have had, and
overcome, addiction problems with various substances in the past. The PRC offer support and
resources for someone who wants to quit using their drug of choice. The coaches will meet with
people out in the community or in the office to give that help that someone with an addiction
needs. Also on the lower level is where there is supervised parenting time that is usually court
ordered. CARE used to house the Access center for Macomb county that provided substance
abuse screening, but about 1 years ago this service was transferred over to Macomb county
Community Mental Health because of government funding and regulations. To make up for the
lack of funding from this service, CARE is looking into providing more outpatient counseling for
various people in the community.
Since there are so many different facets to CARE, each section has a different way of
processing and terminating clients. For the clinicians who do the counseling for WLS clients
enter the system by referring themselves to the facility. This can be for any problem they have
happening in their lives. Like it was mentioned above, this service is also for the family

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

members of an employee whose business is contracted with CARE. For each individual issue a
person gets 5-6 sessions with a Masters level clinician for free. If a different problem arises for
that same person, they can get another round of counseling sessions for free using the services
provided. The CARE clinicians provide assessments for students who have been referred for
problems ranging from marijuana use to anger issues. The clinicians assess the situation and
then refer on to the proper resources. There are many classes that take place at the CARE agency
or other places within the community. These classes are for parenting, divorce, anger, and
trauma. The classes range for teens up to adults. There are several staff members who teach the
different classes, but it is mostly the prevention floor employees who host the classes. Some of
the classes are required by different places, like a school or court ordered, and some classes are
one time presentations, but usually anywhere from four to six weeks in length. At the end of the
particular class there is typically a certificate that is given to the participant and then that is
completed. For a service like PRP, a person is frequently referred by a treatment facility after
their intake there to help that person on their way to recovery. A PRC will meet with the
recoveree and help them with a plan to maintain sobriety. Too many times, though, contact will
be lost between the PRC and the recoveree for various reasons and the PRC will just close the
file for the time being. Sometimes a recoveree with reconnect with their PRC, and the case will
be reopened.
My place within the agency is all over the place. Since my task supervisor is on the
prevention floor, I was doing a lot with the programs in the community. I did not mind doing
this, but ultimately I want to focus my career in the more clinical realm of practice. Since my
field supervisor is the clinical director, I was able to transfer some of my duties in the agency to
the clinical floor. I am now helping to conduct surveys, which involves contacting people who

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

have received the services CARE has to offer and asking sets of questions to better evaluate the
programs. I am also helping in case management for the clinicians. For that duty I receive cases
where the parents have been non-compliant with the schools wishes to have their child evaluated
for various reasons. I contact the parents to find out why they have not complied with the school
and then provide resources if they wish. I have also been helping out with general office type
duties like stuffing envelopes for mailings, making copies of flyers, filing charts, data entry, and
making packets for different programs. I was able to participate in the Opiate Rx Abuse
conference held at MISD for free and received a certificate for being there. So far it has been a
good experience with so many different parts to see how a non-profit agency is run. Each
department there has its own part to make the agency run smoothly and efficiently. Moving
forward from here, I would like to go out into the field more with the case managers who get to
go to the court or jail to visit with clients. My field supervisor and I are working together to have
me be able to sit in on assessments and counseling sessions. I would also like to do more work
with the PRP and coaches to get a better feel for how that program is run. While I like to see the
different programs in the schools, like Paper People or Adolescent Anger Management, I am not
at my most comfortable in that kind of environment. I do think the programs are highly
valuable, but just not for me. I think it is important for me to see all the programs that CARE has
to offer so I have to best understanding of the agency.
As you can see, CARE of Southeastern Michigan has so much to offer the communities
of Macomb county. The communities are the reason CARE exists in the first place. Being a
non-profit organization provides a level of respect and empathy for the community that some
other agencies can not give. From my observations, the people who work there truly do want to
educate and provide the best resources for the people who live and work in the surrounding

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan

areas. I have heard over and over again that if you want to make any money in social work, a
non-profit is not where it would be done. While there might not be as much of a paycheck in the
non-profit sector of social work, there is certainly a much higher level of compassion for the job
at hand. At CARE, many of the individuals who work there have been personally affected by
substance abuse and have the drive to help out others in the community who may be facing the
same demons. From the parenting classes to the Peer Recovery Coaches, CARE gives the
community the resources it needs to educate and inform the citizens on many diverse aspects of
life.

Running Head: Field Placement Report: CARE of Southeastern Michigan


References
CARE of Southeastern Michigan website. (2016). http://www.careofsem.com