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ll

The King: Indian Attack!

Copyright 1993. A & D Publishing. All Rights Reserved.


ISBN 1-883358-02-7
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form, or by any means: electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tapes,
mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior and current written
permission from the publisher.
A & D Publishing
A Division of 4M Data Systems
Box 133
Hagerstown, MD 21741
{800) 524-3 527 (Orders only)

Cover Art: Gary Ferster


Cover Layout: Dawn Maddox
Typesetting: JM Productions

lll

The KinK\- Indian Attack!

WHAT IS "P<lWER PLAY!"??


amateur chessplayer has more superiority ? n the

The modern
been bombarded with thousands of
examples of chess literature aimed at
instructing the student in ways to
conduct the opening and middlegame in
chess. How many of us have not rushed
to the bookstore to purchase the latest
"System against the... " or "Encyclopedia
of..." or "Complete Repertoire against..."
in our quest to improve our knowledge
and (hopefully) our results, only to find
that we must wade through a mass of
variations and complete games, a
time-consuming and intimidatin g
method of study that often defeats its
own purpose. While we at ChessBase
University acknowledge the importance
of the traditional literature, we hope to
tackle the two most fundamental and
important problems that the chess
amateur faces when he reaches the
critical transition between the "opening"
and the "middlegame"

How do I get there??


What do I do after I'm there??

The concept of "Power Play!" is that


chess openings and the middlegames
derived from them can be broken down
into a number of critical positions, and
that study of these positions in an
interactive playing environment will
confer on students a deeper, more
resilient understanding of the problems
that confront them on the chessboard.
These "Power Play!" positions have
been carefully selected from thousands
of master games and are the key element
of this book's structure. As in ice hockey
where "Power Play" implies a man or

ice, "Power
I Play! .. adds a senous weapon
to the
chess arsenal of the prepared student.

This "Power Play!" book was originally


developed in electronic format to be
u s e d with C h e ssBase USA's
master-strength playing program
KnightStalker (or Fritz), and that still
remains the most convenient, efficient
way to apply the Power Play! method.
But "Power Play!" can be used effectively
by anyone who w a n t s to really
understand chess, whether you have
access to any one o f a number of
chessplaying programs and dedicated
machines, to an avid sparring partner at
the l o c a l c l ub , o r t h e s i m p l e,
old-fashioned expedient of piece
shuffling in the convenience of your
study. Either way, "Power Play!" will
make you a stronger, better informed
player.

STRUCTURE OF THE POWER


PLAY! BOOK-ON-DISK
If you own an MS- DOS co mpatible
computer, you might want to consider
the additional investment in ChessBase
University and the "Power Play!"
books-on-disk series. In addition to the
wealth of useful information provided to
you in this book, the disk provides a set
of computer-specific tools to make your
study task even easier. "Power Play!"
disks include:
1. Document files which contain material
that can be viewed in Hypertext. The
Hypertext. will present an overview of
each of the "Power Play!" positions from
the opening under study, discussing

The King:'i Indian

White's and Black's plans and allowing


access to the critical position in the game
files. Additionally, you will find references
to "Key Games" in the game file, also
accessible from Hypertext.
2. A ChessBase games file (.cbf) typically
containing an Index, 30-50 "Power Play!"
positions and 40-80 "Key Games" lightly
annotated with study material related to
the critical positions.
3. Comprehensive "Opening Book(s)"
(.fbk) which when utilized by Fritz or
KnightStalker, allow the student to
practice using his new knowledge
against a well-armed and always
available adversary. We warn you that we
have D E LIBERAT E LY incorporated
some inferior lines and blunders into
these "Opening Books" By allowing
KnightStalker the option of playing
"weakly" we have provided an additional
test for your tactical alertness and

Attack!

lV

opportunism. Some of the forthcoming


"Power Play!" books will require the use
of more than one "Opening Book" - on
such occasions, you will be provided
with instructions on how to engage the
necessary "book" before doing battle.
4. A rudimentary "Opening Key" that will

speed the process of searching for


specific entries in the games file when
viewing material from within Access or
ChessBase.
If you're interested in "Power Play!"
computer products, contact:

ChessBase USA
P. 0. Box 1 33
Hagerstown, MD 21741 USA
Tel: 301-733-7 54 1
(800-524-3527 - Orders only)
Fax: 301-797-6269

The King's Indian Attack!

TRAINING TIPS
After reviewing the "Power Play!"
instructional material on each position
and and examining some of the relevant
"Key Games", you should try out what
you have learned against any available
sparring partner- computers are ideal for
the intricate trial-and-error of training
games, but people make good training
partners too. The important thing is to go
over your games once they're finished,
check them against the principles you've
studied in the book, and keep a record
of what you've learned. This is the key
ingredient of the "Power Play!" learning
experience. This way you will build a
private log of your progress and amass
a wealth of new material unique to you,
eventually developing your own
repertoire of critical positions.

Under test conditions, one member of


the "Power Play!" editorial board has
played over 200' games(!) against Fritz
using the "Power Play!" method. During
Nov-Dec 1992, IGM Ron Henley tested
the prototype of CBU250pp and as a
result discovered a considerable number
of theoretical novelties. This technique is
now a cornerstone in Henley's training
methodology.
Naturally, you should play these critical
positions with both white and black to
deepen your understanding of the
opening. As new titles in this series
appear, you will be able to assemble an
opening/middlegame repertoire that has
been thorough l y tested
and has
thoroughly tested you!- before you risk it
in live combat.

About the Authors


by Don Maddox
Ron Henley
Born: 12/5/1956

Houston, Texas

Grandmaster: 1982

The most important thing to remember is


that Ron Henley is a Texan. I'm almost
tempted to leave it at that. It explains a
lot.
But Ron Henley is also an accomplished
businessman, a member of the American
Stock Exchange, and one of America's
finest chessplayers, the only American
ever selected to serve as second to a
S o vie t player during a World
Championship match, assisting former
World Champion Anatoly Karpov during
his 1990 title bout with Garry Kasparov.

Today, Ron is one of fewer than 40


International Grandmasters living in the
U.S. He started playing chess in 1972,
one of a generation of talented young
players to emerge in America during the
decade following Bobby Fischer's
spectacular world championship bid. He
was 16 at the time. Ten years later he was
a Grandmaster himself.

Paul Hodges
Born: 12/6/1957

Cardiff, Wales (UK)

National Postal Master: 1984

(USCF

Postal Master 1993)

World ICCF Master Sections: 1992-

Paul Hodges was coming off a seven


Ron earned his Grandmaster title in year hiatus as a chessplayer when I met
S u r a k a rt a-Denpasa r 1 982,
an him in 1991. In the interim he had
Indonesian
sup e r-Grandmaster completed a Doctorate at the University
tournament in which he scored 17.5 of 25 of Wales and his Post-Doctoral work at
to tie with International Grandmaster the University of Montreal in Canada, and
Walter Browne for a surprise first place established himself as a Senior Research
finish. With such recognized Chemist for Merck Labs in New Jersey.
int r ationa l supe rstars a s Larry . A brutal perfectionist as a postal player
_ . Hort
_
Chnst1ansen, Tony Miles,
Vlast1mll
and a veritable caveman over the board
and oltan Ri ?li slated to play, little Paul quickly earned a spot on a smali
attent1on was directed to an unheralded ChessBase USA team _ as a friend as a
International Master from Texas before sparring partner, and as a test bd for
the tournament.
new ChessBase University ideas and
"Confidence is the key," he told me years products.
later. "Confidence and preparation. I Ron and Paul hit it off immediately.
knew I had a chance. I had done my Impressed by Paul's analytical skills
homework, and I was ready. Everyone away from the board, Ron was equally
w a s sur p r i s e d when I w o n the amazed by his sparring partner's
tournament except 111e. Of course, you reckless style across the board.
can't know you're going to win a
tournament, but it's important to believe "Paul's in trouble now," he would joke,
rolling his eyes when the position
you have a chance."
became blocked. "There are no pawns
left to sacrifice."

A v e r y s u c c e s s f u l i n t erna tional
correspondence player before entering
graduate school in 1984, Paul has
become one of America's leading
correspondence players and is one of
the w o rld's m os t experienced
ChessBase users.
Hi s years a s a scholar and a
correspondence chessplayer make him
uniquely qualified to teach chess to new
and experienced players. He knows how
to put his finger on the critical position
that makes a variation "tick" and how to
prepare for it over the board or through
the mail; he knows how to explain what's
going on in clear, simple English; and he
knows how to make sure that loose ends
are tied up before you risk a line in live
combat.
You're in good hands with Hodges or
Henley with Henley and Hodges
t o g e t h e r, you're guaranteed a
rip-roaring-roller-coaster-of-a-ride! (And
you'll learn something, too.)

Fonvard
"book-on-di sk" for ChessBase
University, "Murder o n the Long
Diagonal: The Archangel Variation of the
Ruy Lopez."

The idea for "Power Play!" emerged from


a s e r i e s o f meetings between
International Grandmaster Ron Henley,
Correspondence Masters Jon Edwards
and Paul Hodges, and myself. Our goal
was to combine Ron's experience as a
player and world-class trainer with the
research and analytical skills of top level
correspondence players and my years
as a chess coach and teacher to produce
a new kind of training material.

"What I'd like," said Ron, "is a convenient


way to use KnightStalker as a training
tool to practice my openings. The most
important thing a writer can do for a
player, in my opinion, is to point out
what's important and help cut through
the maze of material that's available."

A l l o f u s , from Gr and master to


Grandpatzer, agreed that traditional
opening manuals are fine as reference
books, but do little to help players
actually understand an opening. We sat
down to compare notes.

We sat down that very evening and


carved out the prototype for this first
"Power Play!" project. and Ron and Paul
set out to test the idea. More than two
hundred games later, Henley declared
the experiment a roaring success:

W h a t we found w a s a s t a r t ling
commonality, at different levels, in the
way we each approached our own study
of openings. In his own preparation, Ron
focused on critical positions, making
sure he thoroughly understood a variety
of plans and ideas before adding a line
to his repertoire. In postal chess, Jon and
Paul made a point of identifying target
positions and thoroughly preparing for
the kind of unresolved tension necessary
to create winning chances in the test
tube a t m o s p h e r e of top-flight
correspondence chess. As a teacher
working with new students and high
school kids, I had always found that
concentrating on a few key ideas and
plans from key positions was the
quickest way to break my kids of the bad
habit of trying to play good chess by rote.

"This is the way chess should be studied.


The point Is not to smother yourself in
reams of analysis and variations, but to
build up experience position by position
until you thoroughly understand what's
going on at the board. The computer
makes i t even ea sier and more
convenient, but I wish someone had
done this for me 20 years ago, even in
book form. It would have saved me 1 0
years hard labor."

The most amazing thing of all is that what


I wanted for my kids - a well-defined
repertoire of carefully selected critical
positions in an opening was exactly
what Ron wanted for his own training. We
were just finishing work on a repertoire

In the interim, I tested this new approach


on my students. To my delight and
amazement, I found that the same
material Ron was finding useful at the
GM-Ievel helped cut the learning curve in
half for my beginners. In fact, at an
intermediate level, I found the same
material useful in my own study. The
difference between one student and
another lies simply in the level of
guidance required to direct their study. A
grandmaster s not much interested in
explanations, a beginner wants help
understanding why a move is interesting
'

and what to think about in a given


position.

Acknowledgments

No matter how you study - at home with


your computer or at the club with your
friends you're going to find "Power
Play!" the ultimate tool for improving
your chess.

No project like this is ever executed in a


vacuum. Power Play! is especially
dependent on the support and good will
of Paul's wife Josee Audet. Thanks is also
due t h e ChessBase USA s taff i n
Maryland - Sharon Richmond, Steve
Lopez and Ron Maddox. But perhaps the
most important thank you of all goes to
our mothers - Muriel Hodges and Belva
Maddox - without whom Power Play!
might still be a shimmering light dancing
at night on a moonlit pond in Wales. And
we don't want to forget Sister Syra who
quieted a restless Welsh boy by sending
him to a corner with a chessboard almost
30 years ago.

The Archangel Variation of the Ruy


Lopez lends itself beautifully to "Power
Play!" treatment, with clear, forceful
tactical lines and strategic ideas. Little
known and even less understood at the
club level, this variation draws a great
deal of the venom from the dreaded
"Spanish Torture."
We hope you enjoy this book as much as
we enjoyed putting it together. As a team,
we take pride in the launch of a series of
chess books designed to be USED by
chessplayers of all levels.
Good luck- and good chess!
Don Maddox
Manasquan 1993

Contents
What

IS
.

...
. ...........................Ill

"P ower PI ay"??


..

Training
. .
T.1 ps

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

About the Authors .................................vi


Forward

1 l.e4 Variations

vtn

2 l.Nf3 Variations

43

Chess Informant Symbol Guide ..................... 65

Index of Players and Opponents


Index of Power Play! Positions

65
.

67

Power Play! Positions


Systems With l.e4
One of the most interesting features of
the King's Indian Attack is the ability to
transpose into it after 'fishing' with 1. e4
for a pet opening system. Sometimes
you're interested in playing a specific
line, perhaps against 1 . e5, and black
varies immediately with ...e6, ...d6, ... c6
or ...cs. An early d2-d3 instead .of the
usual d2- d4 against each of these moves
instantly transforms the opening into a
KIA. With the King's Indian Attack in your
repertoire, you have almost absolute
control over the range of monsters black
can throw at you - no more Caro-Kanns,
no more French Winawers, no more
Dragons, until you're ready for them!

5 . . . Nf6
Black's strongest continuation- applying
pressure to the e4-pawn. Less active is
5 . .Ne7.
.

. .

6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 - D IAG RAM


Co mpleting the s t a n d a r d K I A
development although 7.h3 merits
some consideration.

CARO-KANN KIA, 3... e5


CBU253pp #1
1.e4 c6 2.d3 d5 3. Nd2
By using this sequence to reach the KI A
formation, white avoids the exchange of
queens should black play 3 ... dxe4.
3 ... e5

( 1)
Black occupies the center and prevents
a later e4-e5 advance by white.
4.Ngf3 Bd6
Black defends the e-pawn. Instead
4...Nd7 would be passive (interferes with
the Bc8) and allows white to open the
position favorably with 5.d4!
5.g 3
Co n t i n u i n g to e s t a b l i s h t h e KIA
formation.

Lj ubojevic- Karpov
B uenos Aires, 1 980

1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 e5 4.Ngf3 Bd6


5.g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 ReS 8 . R e1
Nbd7 9.c3 dxe4 1 0.dxe4 Qc7 1 1 .Qc2
a5 1 2.Nc4 Bf8 13.a4 b5 1 4. Na3 Bas
1 5 . Bf 1 R eba 1 6. b3 h 6 1 7. h3 b x a 4
1 8.bxa4 B x f 1 1 9.Kxf1 N b 6 20. Kg 2 N fd7
2 1 .Nd2 Od 6 22.Nac4 Nxc4 23.Nxc4
Oe6 24.0e2 Nb6 25.N b2 Qb3 26.B e3
Qxc3 2 7. N d 3 N c 4 2 8.R e c 1 N x e 3 +
29.Qxe3 Qd 4 30.0xd4 exd 4 31. Rxc6
Rb3 32. Rd1 Rc3 33.Ne5 f6 34. N c4 d3

The

King's Indian Attack!

35.Nxa5 Rxc6 36.Nxc6 Rxa4 37.Rxd 3


Rxe4 -
(2)

Ljubojevic Seirawa n
R otterdam World Cup, 1 989

1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd 2 es 4.Ngf3 Bd6


S.g3 Nf6 6.Bg 2 0-0 7.0-0 Res 8.R e 1
B g 4 9.h3 BhS 1 0.Nf 1 N bd7 1 1 .g4 Bg6
1 :.!.Ng3 dxe4 1 3.dxe4 Bcs 1 4.Nd2 NfS
1 5.g5 N 6d7 1 6.h4 h6 1 7. N b3 hxg5
1 S.Nxc5 Nxc5 1 9.0xd S RexdS 20.h5
Bh7 2 1 . Bxg5 f6 22.Be3 Nfe6 23.b3 b6
24.Rad 1 Kf7 2S.f3 N a 6 26.c3 Nac7
27.B h3 NbS 28.Ne2 Ke7 29. Kf2 Rxd 1
30.Rxd 1 Nd6 3 1 .Ng3 Rd8 32.Rg 1 Rg8
3 3.Bg4 Ng5 3 4.Bxg5 fxg5 35.Ke3 Rd8
36.N h 1 N bS 37.Rc 1 Bg8 3S.Nf2 Bf7
39.N h 1 c5 40.a4 Nd6 4 1 .c4 N b7 42.Ng 3
Na5 43.R b 1 Nc6 44.Nf5 + Kf6 45.Ke2
N d 4 + 4 6 . N x d 4 e x d 4 47.a S R b S
48.axb6 Rxb6 49.Kd 2 aS 50.Ra 1 Ra6
S 1 .Bcs Ra7 52.Bg 4 Ke5 53.Kd 3 Be8
S4.Kd2 RaS 55.Kd 3 a 4 56. Ra3 Bc6
S7. bxa4 Rxa4 SS.Rb3 Rb4 S9.Ra3 Ba4
60.Ra 1 Rb3 + 61. Kd2 Rb2+ 62.Ke 1
B b 3 6 3 . R a 5 d 3 6 4 . R x cS + K d 4
65.Rd5 + Ke3 66.Kf1 Bxc4 0- 1
(3)

Fritz
Henley
BONUS GAME # 1 , 1 993

1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 e5 4.Ngf3 Bd6


5.g 3 Nf6 6.Bg2 0-0 1.0-0 Res [Here I
develop my rook and overprotect my
central e-pawn.] 8.b3 [Fritz prepares to
fianchetto his dark-squared bishop to
exert pressure on my e5-pawn.] s...Bg4
[Black has very smooth development, as
all of my pieces flow naturally to good
squares. Note the similarity to the Keres
system, except the black e-pawn has
pushed to e5 in one move.] 9.h3 Bh5
[9.. .Bxf3 1 O.Qxf3 Bb4 11.Nb1 Nbd7
12.a3 Bc5 13. b4 Bb6 14.Bb2 NfB=
Todorcevic - lvanovic, Yugoslavia 1989]
1 0. B b 2 N bd7= 1 1 .c 4? ! [A d ubious

strategic move , as Fritz surrenders


permanent control of the d4 square.,
1 1 . R e1 !? M aintaining the central
tension; 11.Qe1 !? Breaking the pin, and
preparing Nf3-h4-f5.] 1 1 ... d x e 4 [With
this capture I am able to fix the center
and create favorable prospects for my
minor pieces.] 1 2.Nxe4 Nxe4 1 3.dxe4
Oen 1 4.Qe2 a 5 ! [Here I continue the
pursuit of my dark square policy and
s e c u r e t h e c 5 -s q u a r e . Anoth e r
reasonable plan i s 1 4...Ba3!? followed
by ...Bh5 x ..Nf3. I could the maneuver
my knight to the inviting d4-square with
favorable prospects. ] 1 5 . R ad 1 B c s
16.g4 Bg6 1 7.Nh4!? Qxh4! [At first it
may seem generous to allow Fritz's rook
onto the seventh rank. However, this can
be neutralized, meanwhile my queen has
infiltrated the kingside and I can begin to
exploit the white pawn weaknesses.
Interesting is 17...Nf8!? 18.Nf5 Qc7
(18...Bxf5 19.exf5 e4 20.Bd4!) 19.Rd2
Ne6 20.Rfd1-] 1 S.Rxd7 R e7 [This and
my next move seek to neutralize the
white rooks.] 1 9.Rfd 1 R a e s 20.R d 8
[Having achieved nothing on the
seventh rank, Fritz moves on to the
eighth.] 20 ... h5! t [Creating "extended
luft'' while also attacking the white
g4-pawn.] 2 1 .RxeS + (21.gxh5? Bxh5
22.Bf3 Qg3 +- +] 2 1 ...R x e 8 22.R d 7
[He's back!] 2 2 . . . h x g 4 2 3 . h x g 4
[23.Qxg4? Qxf2+-+ ] 2 3 R e 6 !-+ [It
turns out the weaknesses of white's
kingside (g4-pawn, f2-pawn, passive
Bg2) are far more important than his lone
active R.] 2 4 . B c 1 [Fritz hurries to
neutralize my killer Bc5, but I have been
allowed too much infiltration on the
kingside. Black is still better after 24 .Rd1
Rf6 25 . Rf1 Rf4 26 .Bxe5 Rxg4- + . ]
24 Rf6+ 25. Be3 Bxe3 26.fxe3 [Holding
on grimly to his g4-pawn, but shredding
his kingside No better is 26.0xe3 Qxg4
27.Rxb7 Q d1 + 28.Bf1 (28.Kh2 Bh5
.

..

...

The King:'i lntliun Attack!

29.Rb8 + Kh7 30.Qg5 Rh6-+) ... Bxe4


29.Qxe4 Rg6 + 30. Kh2 Qxf1 31. Rb8
Kh7-+ .] 26 . . . Qg31 [Further infiltration,
with the threat of 27.. .Be4.] 27.Rxb7
[27 . Kh1 Rf2-+ ] 2 7 .. . B x e 4 2 8 .g 5
[Desperation. ]
2 8 . . . B x g21- +
[28... Qxg5-+ ] 2 9 . R b 8 + (29. Qxg2
Qxe3 + 30.Kh1 Qe1 + 31. Kh2 Rf2- +)
29 . . . Kh7 30.Qh5 + R h 6 D [HENLEY)
[30 ... Rh6 31 .gxh6 Bh3 + 32.Kh 1 Qg2#)
0- 1

CARO-KANN KIA 3... g6/8.b4


CBU253pp #2
1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 g 6
Black's most common response in the
KIA Caro-Kann. He will defend a pawn on
e5 with his fianchettoed Bg7.
4 .g 3
W h i t e enters the K I A formation .
Transposing is 4.Ngf3.
4 ...Bg7 5.Bg2 e5
Preventing a later e4-e5 advance by
white.
6. N gf3 Ne7
A necessary development so as not to
interfere with the Bg7.
7.0-0 0-0 8 . b4 -

DIAGRAM

The sharpest continuation and a great


favorite of the late Soviet GM Leonid
Stein . Now black's most a c t i v e
continuation is 8 ... a5.

{ 4)

Stein - Hartoch
I B M , Amsterd a m , 1 969

1 .Nf3 d5 2.g3 c6 3.Bg2 g6 4.d3 Bg7


5 . N bd 2 e5 6.e4 [We have reached the
KIA versus Caro-Kann by transposition.]
6 . . . N e 7 7 . 0 - 0 0 - 0 8 . b4 N a6 [Too
passi ve, and d oes nothing to meet
white's ambitions on the q ueenside.
Better is 8 ...a5! Stein - Haag , Tallinn
1969.] 9.a 3 N c7 1 0. B b2 [The bishop
exerts pressure on e5 and the black
k nights are misplaced to defend. White
can also entertain thoughts of opening
the center with d3-d4.) 1 0 .. . d 4? ! [As this
central advance lacks adequate support,
it must be considered dubious. Note the
white b4-pawn prevents black's c-pawn
from supporting this advance. Another
try is 1 O...f6 11. d4!? c reating favorable
central tension or 1 o ... Qd6 1 1.d4t .]
1 1 . c3!;t [Immediately undermining the
advanced black center pawn.] 1 1 . . . Bg4
[Perhaps b l a c k's best co urse is
1 1 ...dxc3!? 1 2. Bxc3 Qxd3 13.Bxe5;!;
when white has mobile center pawns,
and the dark-squared bishop will be
exchanged, but at least the remainder of
black's pieces function.] 1 2.Qc2 Ne6
1 3.cxd4 Bxf3 1 4.Nxf3 Nxd4 1 5.Nxd4
exd 4 16.f4 [With the bishop pair and the
flexible e4/f4 central duo, white has one

The

King's Indian Attack!

of Stein's bread and butter positions.]


16... Q d 7 17.Q c 5 b6 18.Qc 4 R a c s
19.f5
Qd 6
2 0. R a e 1?
[An
uncharacteristic mistake by Stein, which
allows black to form a blockade. The
immediate build up on the f-file would
have led to a much quicker decision:
20.Rf2! A) 20.. . Be5 21.f6 {21.fxg6 hxg6
22.Raf1 Qe6 23.Qxe6 fxe6 24.Bh3 + -)
...Bxf6 22.Raf1 ; B) 20 ...g5 21.f6! Bxf6
22.Raf1.] 2 0 ... g51 [Black correctly
decides his best chance is to barricade
in on the dark squares.] 2 1 . Bf3 Be5
2 2 . R e 2 b5 23. Qc 1 f6 2 4 . R c 2 Rc7
25.Rc5 NcB!! [Black reroutes his knight
to d7 where it lifts the blockade of his
c-pawn.] 2 6 . K g 2 [26.Bd 1 ? Bxg3=]
26 . . . Nb6 27. Bd 1 Nd71 28. Bb3+ Kg7
29. R c 2 R a 8?1 [Perhaps here black
missed his best chance for counterplay:
29 ... c5! ? 30. Be6 (30.bxc5 Nxc5+Z)
...RfcB {30...c4 31.dxc4 bxc4 32.Rxc4
Rxc4 33.Qxc4 d3oo) 31.Bxd7 (31.bxc5
Rxc5+Z) . ..Qxd7 32.bxc5 Oe7 33.c6
Qd6oo.] 30 . Q d 1 Q e 7 3 1 . 0 d 2 Rh B
[Preparing to play . . .h7-h5 to keep the
white queen off hS. However, this also
weakens the kingside futher. Perhaps
31...c5 32.Rfc1 Rae? 33. Be6 t .] 32.Rfc 1
N b S ? [This allows Ste i n to make
"forwa rd prog ress" After the solid
32... 0d6!, it would have been instructive
to see Stein crack black's position.]
33. Be6 h5 34.h4!t [With his bishop
eyeing g8, an open g-file can only favor
white.] 34 . . . g4 [Still hoping to draw by
keeping the position blocked.] 35.Rc5!
[Here is the "forward progress" we
spoke of.] 35 . . . Qd6 [Played to prevent
the exchange sacrifice 36.Rxe5, but the
s t a g e is set for a n o t h e r S t ein
masterpiece.] 3 6 . R x e 5 !! + - Q x e 5
[36 . .. fxe5 37.Qg5 + Kf8 (37 . .. Kh7
38. 0g6#) 38.0f6+ +-] 37. R c 5 Q d 6
3 8 . e 5 1 [The c u lmination o f white's
attack, as he blasts open the long

diagonal and his pieces come pouring


in.] 3 8 ... Q d 8 3 9.exf6 + Kf8 [After
39...0xf6 40.0f4+- the dual threats of
41. 0c7 and 41.Bd4 prove decisive;
39 ... Kxf6 40. 0g5#.] 4 0 . Q f 4 N a 6
4 1 .Bxd 4 ! (The bishop pair is really
slicing, dicing and s plicing now! ]
4 1 ... Nxc5 42.Bxc5 + Ke8 43.Qe5 Rhh7
44. Bd7 + ! [HENLEY] (44.Bd7 + Kxd7
(44 ... Kf7 45.Qe6#) 45.Qe6#] 1- 0

(5)

Stein - Haag
Tallinn, 1969

1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d5 3.N d 2 g 6 4.g3 Bg7


5.Bg 2 e5 6. Ngf3 Ne7 7.0-0 0-0 8.b4!?
[White expands on the queenside and
prepares Bc1-b2 with pressure on e5.)
8 . . . a5! [Black challenges white on the
queenside. Not 8 . . . Na6? Stein-Hartoch,
Amsterdam 1969, which is too passive to
meet the demands of the position.]
9.bxa5 Rxa 5 [9... 0xa5!?] 10.Bb2 Qc7
1 1 .0e2 d 4? ! (This allows white to
undermine the black center. A better try
is 11...dxe4!? 12.Nxe4oo.] 12.c3 dxc3? 1
[Again 12 . ..c5 13.Nc4 Ra6 14. cxd4
exd4oo leads to a n unb alanced
strategical battle.] 13. Bxc3! [Now white
has good play against black's eS-pawn.)
1 3 . . . R a 4 14. N c 4 b 5 1 5 . Qc2 !t [The
precarious position of black's Ra4
creates tactical possibilities for Stein.
Not 15.Ncxe5? f6-+ .] 1 5... Be6?! [The
alternative 15 .. .f6 weakens the a2-g8
diagonal, but defends the e5-pawn:
16 . Nb2 Ra7 17.a4t (17. d4 ! ? ) . The
interesting 15 . . .Nd7!? also defends the
e5-pawn and keeps the Bg7 working a
little better. The only negative is it keeps
the Bc8 boxed in.] 16.Ncxe5! [Stein now
embarks on a "stategic combination"
which leaves him with two bishops on an
open board.] 1 6 . . . 16 1 7 . N c4 ! Bxc4
1 8.dxc4 Rx c4 [Black has regained his
pawn, and even has a passed c-pawn,
but the loose nature of his position will

The King's Indian Attack!


prove too costly.) 1 9. N d 2 [Stein now
demonstrates what the initiative plus
bishop pair in an open board can
accomplish.)
1 9. . . Ra4
(19...Rc5?
20.Qb3 + Kh8 21.Bb4] 2 0 . N b 3 N a 6
2 1 . Rfd 1 c s (Black tries t o set his passed
pawn in motion.] 22.0e2 c4? ! [Planning
to follow with ...Na6-c5-d3, but this plan
is never realized. The text invites white's
kn ight in for a visit. Interesting is
22...Rb8!?.) 2 3 . N d 4 Q b 6 2 4 . R a b 1
[ N ow t h e b 5 - p awn comes under
observation.] 24 . . . Nc7 25.B b41 [Note
how in Stein's games, once he has the
initiative, one tactical problem always
seems to lead to anot h er for his
opponents.) 25 . . . Re8 (Now the stage is
set for a typical Stein combinational
breakthrough.) 2 6 . N x b 5 1 1 + - [This
works because black has so many loose
pieces in his disorganized camp.]
26 . . . N x b 5 2 7 . Qxc 4 + K h 8 [27...Kf8
28.Bxe7 + Rxe7 29.Qxa4 + -] 2 8 .0f7
Nc7 [After 28... Raa8, Stein would have
the pleasant choice between 29.Rd7,
29.e5 or 29.Be7.) 29.Bd6! [HENLEY)
[29.Bd6 Qa7 30.Bxc7+-] 1 -0

( 6)

Fritz - Henley
BONUS GAME #2, 1 993

1 .e4 cs 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 g6 4.g 3 Bg7


5.Bg2 es 6. Ngf3 N e7 7.0-0 o-o s. b41?
Bg41? [A seldom seen alternative to the
more common 8 ...a5. ) (8 . . .Nd7; 8...d4?!;
8...b6?!] 9 . B b 2 [9.h 3! ? Bxf3 1 0.Nxf3
(10.Qxf3!? f5!t) ...a5 +2 ) 9 ... f5 +2 1 0.h3
Bxf3 1 1 . Nxf3 Od6 1 2.exd 5 e4 !?+ [In
general it is not a good idea to go in for
tactical melees with computers, but
oc c a s i on a l ly, ju st to see w h a t
happens.... Unclear is 1 2 ... cxd5oo.)
1 3.dxc6!? [ 1 3.Bxg7 exf3 14.Bxf8 fxg2
15.Kxg2 Kxf8 16.dxc6 Nbxc6 With a
position similar to the game.] 1 3 . . . N bxc6
[13... 0xc6? 1 4.Bxg7 exf3? 15.Bxf3 + -]
1 4 . B x g 7 (14 .dxe4? Qxd1 1 5.Rfxd 1

Bxb2-+] 1 4 . . . e xf 3 1 1 5 . B x f 8 fxg 2
16. Kxg 2
( 1 6 . Bx e7 g x f 1 Q +-+ ]
16... Rxf8 11.c3 [The smoke has cleared,
and Fritz evaluated the position as a .25
pawn advantage .for white. In a strict
material sense rook and two pawns is
greater than two knights; however. by
using Nimzovich's methods of restraint
and blockade, the knight pair triumphs.]
1 7 . . . Rd81 t [Attacking and restraining
the central pawns before white is able to
consolidate.] 1 8 . d4?1 [After this the
white central pawns lose their flexibility.
More accurate is 18.Qb3 + Qd5 +!
1 9.Qxd5+ Rxd5 20.Rfd 1 Ne5!: A) 2 1 .c4
Rd7 ! + (21 ... Rxd3 22. R e 1! N 7c6 23. b5 ) ;
B) 2 1 . d 4 Nc4+.) 1 8 . . . N d 5 1 9 . Q f 3
(19.Qb3! ? KgTt] 1 9 . . . N b 6 ! [Now I
secure the c4-square for a knight and let
the other pieces control d5.) 20. b 5 ! ?
[This "lashing out" just loosens white's
queenside pawns further.] 20 . . . N a 5 t
[Strategically black can b e very happy
as d5 and c4 beckon to the black
knights.) 2 1 . Rfc 1 Qd5! (The exchange
of queens reduces any chance white has
for counter play and h ighlights t h e
importance o f the pawn weaknesses
white has created on the queenside.]
22.0xd5 + Rxd 5 ! 23. Ra b 1 Rd7 24. Kf3
Kf7 25.Rb4 Rc7! [It is critical to keep the
c-pawn restrained. Once the c4-square
is occupied, then we can occupy d5 with
the other N.) 26.g4 Nac4 27.gxf5 gxf5
28. Rd 1 [28. Kf4? Nd5+-+ 29. Kxf5 Nxb4
30.cxb4 Nd6 +!) 28 . . . Nd 5 + (At last both
knights are occupying their outposts
and the white rooks become passive
protectors of the weak white pawns.]
2 9 . R b 3 [29.Ra4? Nb2-+] 2 9 . . . R e 7 !
[Now the black knights are securely
anchored in we can activate our R.)
30.Rd3 [White is gradually running out
of useful .moves: 30 . Rg1? Nd2+- +;
3 0.Kg3 Re2.] 30 . . . R e 1 ! [This deprives
white's rooks of the first rank.) 3 1 .a 3

17ze King's Indian Attack!

Rg 1 1- + [Now the white king can't move


except to e2 which allows a ...Nd5-f4+
fork.) 32.b6 a61 33.h4 hS 34.a4 Ke6
35.a5 Kd6 [Total domination of the white
rooks!] [HENLEY] 0- 1
CARO-KANN KIA 3 ... g6/8.c3
CBU253pp #3
1 .e4 c6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 g 6 4.g3 Bg7
5.Bg2 eS 6.Ngf3 Ne7 7.0-0 0-0 8.c3 DIAGRAM
Less active than 8.b4. White prefers a
slower buildup.

( 7)

Stein - Hort
Los Angeles, 1 968

1. e4 [Annotations to this game are


largely based on GM Raymond Keene's
fine work in Leonid Stein, Master of
Attack (page 69). I consider this and

Aron

Nimzovich:

Reapraisal

recommended reading and Raymond's


best work.] 1 ...c6 2.d3 d S 3.Nd2 g 6 4.g3
Bg7 5.Bg2 e5 6.Ngf3 Ne7 7.0-0 0-0 8.c3
[Stein later played the sharper B.b4! with
excellent wins versus Portisch, Hartoch,
and Haag.] 8 ... N d 7 9 . b 4 [Stein
pioneered in playing this space-gaining
q u e e ns i d e ad v a n c e a g a i n s t the

Caro-Kann.] 9 ...b6 1 O.B b2 Bb7 1 1 .Re1


ReS 1 2. Bh3 [This indirectly increases
the pressure on e5, while also making cB
a bit awkward for black's rook.] 1 2 . . . Qc7
1 3.exd 5!? [Stein undertakes operations
in the center before black completes his
development (...RadB).] 1 3... cxd 5!?
[Offering to sacrifice the e5-pawn for
activit y . Another try is 13 ... N x d 5
14.Qb3.) 1 4.c4 [1 4.Bxd7 Qxd7 15.Nxe5
Bxes 16.Rxe5 Nc6 (16 ...d4!? Opening
the b7-g2 diagonal.) 17.Rxes+ Axes
1 8.d4 Ba6oo] 1 4 . . . d 4 [Now white has
achieved a "Benoni Reversed" where his
queenside pawn majority is mobilized,
and black's center is under pressure.]
1 5.Rc 1 ! [Risky is 15.Bxd7? ! ceding the
initiative and parting with this valuable
bishop, even though it wins the e-pawn
by doing so: 1 5...Qxd7 16.Nxe5 Qf5!?
(16...Qh3 1 7.f3 Nf5-+) 17.Ndf3 (1 7.Qg4?
Bxe5 1 8.Qxf5 Nxf5-+; 17.Nef3?! Qxd3
18.Qb1 Qxb1 19.Raxb1 Nf5; 17.g4 Qf4;
17.Bxd4 RadB 18.Bc3 f6oo): A) 17 ... 0h3
18.Nh4 {1 8.0e2 Bxe5- +) ...NfS! (1 8... g5
19.Nhf3 Ng6+-) 1 9.Qg4 Qxg4 20.Nxg4
Nxh4 21.gxh4 hS- + ; B) 17...Nc6 18.Nh4
Oh3-+.] 1 5 ... f5 1 6. Bg 2 Bf6 [ 1 6 ...0d6
17.0b3t (Black has problems on the
b3-g8 d iagonal.) 17 ... a5 (17 ... Kh8
18.Ng5 Qf6 1 9.Bxb7 RabB 20.Nge4! +-;
17 .. .Rac8 1 8.c5 + Od5 1 9.Nxd4! Qxb3
20.N4xb3+ -) 1 8.a3t ) 1 7.c51 [Threatens
1 8.c6 Bxc6 1 9.b5 winning a piece due to
the pin on the c-file.] 1 7. . . b5 [Now white
has a protected passed c-pawn, but for
the time being the c6-square is well
occupied by black. Also possible is
17 ... bxc5 18.bxc5 BdS (1 B . .. Nxc5?
19.Nb3 + -) 1 9.Nc4t, when black must
either surrender the BdS, or allow the
white knight into d6.] 1 8 . N b31 [The
knight heads for the powerful outpost at
aS to do his part in l ifting black's
blockade of c6.] 1 8 . . . Bd 5? 1 [Hart has a
natural desire to keep his bishop active

'17w King:'l Indian Attack!

before playing 18 ... Nc6. However, this


creates tactical problems a s the BdS is
unp rotected later. Unclear is 18...Nc6!? .)
19.a4 as (19... bxa4? 20.NaS Rab8
21.Qxa4 ) 20.Na5 Nc6 ( VIastimil wants
to exchange off w hite's actively posted
k n i g h t . The only problem is he
temporarily leaves his Bd S unprotected.
This gives the eve r-vigilant Stein the
opportunity t o play tactically. Removing
the black king f rom va rious diagonal
checks wit h 20 ...K g 7 ! ? d eserved
consid eration : 2 1 .c6 A) 2 1 ... Nb8?
22.Nxd4! exd4 (22...Bxg2 23.Ne6+ +-)
23.Bxd5+- : B) 21...Nb6!oo.] 2 1 .axb5
axb5 (Now the stage is set for another
Stein combination! White is still better
after 21 ...Nxa5 22.b6 Qc6 23.bxa5 Nxc5
24.Ba3+- ] 22.Nxe5 ! 1 (This is possible
due to the many loose pieces in the
black camp. Not 22.Nxc6? Qxc6.)
22 ... Nxb4 [Avoiding the real "test" of
w h i t e's com b i n a t io n : 22 ... A xeS
23.Bxd5 + Rxd5 24.Qb3 Nxb4 25.Ba3!
(Keene) A) 25 ... Nxc5 26.Rxc5! Qxc5
27.Bxb4+-; B) 25...Rxa5 26.Bxb4 Qc6
27.Re8 + B1) 27 ...Kf7 28.Rc8! Qe6
(28 ... Qxc8 29.Qxd5 + + -) 29.Bxa5 +-;
B2) 27...Kg7 28.Bxa5 Ne5 29.Rc8 Qe6
(29...Qxc8 30.Qxd5 Nxd3 31.Rc2 NeS
32.c6 d3 33.Rc5 + -) 30.c6 ! (30.Bd8
Keene. Nxd3!) ... Qxc8 (30... Nxd3?
31 .Rc7+ +-) 31.Qxd5 Nxd3 32.Rc2+NeS 33.Qxb5 d3 34.Rc1 d2 3S.Bxd2
Nf3+ 36.Kg2 Nxd2 B21) 37.c7!? Ne4
(37 ... Qa8 + 38.0c6 QcB 39.Rd 1+-)
38.Qb8 {38.Rd1 Qxc7 39.Rd7 + Qxd7
40.Qxd7+ oo ) ... Nd6 39.Rd1 + - ; B22)
37.Qb7+ Qxb7 38.cxb7 Be5 39.Rc8+-:
C) 25...Qxa5 26.Bxb4 Qa2 27.Qxa2 Rxa2
28.c6 Ra8 ! (28 ... Nb6 29.Re8 + Kf7
30.Rb8a5) 29.cxd7 Rxd7 30.Re6 Bg7
31.Rb6 Rd5 32.Rc5 (Ke en e - 32.Rc7!?
As often is the case, "a rook on the
seventh is worth a pawn'".) ... Ra1 +
33.Kg2 Rxc5 34.Bxc5 Rd 1 35.Rb8 +
.

K f 7 3 6 .Rb 7 + K e e n e also gives


22 ...RxeS 23.Bxd S + Rxd 5 24.Qf3! ?
Nxb4 2S.Ba3: A) 25 ...RxaS 26.Bxb4 Qc6
(26.. .Re5 27.RxeS NxeS 28.QdS+ Nf7
29.BxaS QxaS ao.c6t Notice in how
m any variations t h e l ifting of the
b l o c k a d e f o r t h e passed c-pawn
becomes the deciding factor.) 27.Bxas
N es 2 8 . A xes B x e 5 29. Re1! B f 6
(29...QxcS 30.Bb4! Qc6 31.Rxe5 Qc1+
32.Re1 +-) 30.Re8+ Qxe8 (30 ...Kf7
31 .Rc8 Qxc8 32.Qxd5+ Qe6 33.Qb7+
Be7 34.c6+- : 30...Kg7! ? 31.Rc8 Qxc8
32.QxdS) 31.Qxd5+ Qf7 32.Qd6 Qa2
33.Qxf6 QxaS 34.Qb6 Qe1 + 35.Kg2
Qe5 36.Qxb5; B) 25 ... Ne5 26.Rxe5 B1)
26 ...Rxe5 27.Qxa8++-; B2) 26. . .Qxe5
27.Bxb4 Rxa5 B21) 28.Re1!? Ra4oo
(28 ... Qxe1 + ? 29.Bxe1 +-); B22) 6.
28.Bxa5! A xeS? 2 9 . Q a 8 + K g 7
30.Qa7 ++ -; B3) 26 ... BxeS 27.Bxb4
Rdd8 28. N b 7 ( " W h i t e maintains
tremendous pressure for the exchange"
-Keene.) 28 . ..Re8 29.c6 Qf7 30.Bd6 (The
fight to l ift the blockade of the passed
c-pawn is an ongoing stuggle.) 30...Bg7
31.c7 Rec8 32.Qc6 Oe6 33.Nc5 Qe2
34.Nd7 Ra2 35.Rf1 (Safety first!) 3S...Rc2
36.Qd5+ Kh8; B31) 37.Nb6!; B311)
37 ...R2xc7 38.Bxc7 Rxc7 39.Qd8 + + - ;
B3 1 2) 37 ...Re8 38.Bc5 Qxd3 39.c8Q
( 3 9 . Q d 7!) ... Rxc8 4 0 . N x c 8 Q c 4
41.Qd8+ Qg8 42.Qc7 Qd5 {42...Bf8?
4 3 . B x d 4+ +-) 43.N e 7 ! +- A x e s
(43 ... Qxc5 44.Qd8+ BfB 45.Qxf8#)
44.0b8 +! +-: B313) 37 ... Qe8 38.Nxc8
Qxc8 39.Qxb5 + - ; B32) 37.Ne5 h5
38.0e6+ -; C) 25 ...Qxa5 26.Bxb4 Qa2
27.Ra1! Ne5 (27...Qxa1 28.Qxd5++ -)
28.Qg2! + -) 23.Nxd7 [Now the loose Bf6
forces black ' s play.] 2 3 . . . Q x d 7
(23... Rxe1+ 24.Qxe1 Qxd 7 25.Qxb4 +-]
24.c61 [Nimzovich - "The passed pawn's
lust to e xpand ."] 24 ... Qf7 25.Rxe8 +
Rxes 26.Nb7! Be5 [Covering the d6
fork square. Not 26...Qe7? 27.Ba3+-.

The King's Indian Attack!

Possible is 26 ... Bxc6 27.Bxc6 Nxc6


28.Rxc6 Q xb7 29.Rxf6 + -.] 2 7 . Bxd 5
Qxd 5 (27...N xd5 28.f4!? Ne3 29. Qd2
Bc7 {29... Bf6 30.Nd6 +-) 30.Bxd4+ - ]
28. Rc5 Qf7 (After 2B. ..Oe6 29.c7 Rca
30.0e2 The pins are becoming serious:
3J...Nc6 3 1 .Rxc6 Qxc6 32.Qxe5 Qxb7
{32 . . . Qxc7 33.Qxd4! Qxb7 34.Qh8+ Kf7
35.Qxh7++ -) 33. 0e6 +: A) 33...Kf8
34.Ba3 + Kg7 {34...b4 35.Bxb4+;!)
35.Qe7 + KgB {35... Kh6 36.Bc1 + Kh5
37. Qg5#) 36.Bd 6 + - {The threat of
37.B e 5 is d ead ly . ): A 1) 36 ... Qc6
37. Q e 6 + {37 . Q d 8 + OeB) ... Kg7
38.Be5 + +-;A2) 36 ...Qd5 37.Qd8 + Kf7
38.Qd7 + +-;B) 33...Kg7 34.Bxd4 + + -.)
29.0f3 g 5?! (Driven by a desire to play
... g5-g4 and drive the queen off the long
diagonal, this move weaken the black
kingside further. Better is 29... Na6
30.Rxb5 Nc7 31.Rb4 +- Keene.] 30.c71
[Stein offers his valuable passed c-pawn
to maintain the initiative and expose
black's kingside.) 30 . . . g4 3 1 .0d1 Bxc7
32.0d21 [With dual threats of 33.Qg5+
and 33.Qb4.) 3 2 B b 6 ? [32... Na6
33.Rxb5t {The b l a ck pieces are
disorganized, and the black pawns at d4
and f5 are exposed.); ;J2...Nd5 33.0g5 +
KfB (33... Kh8 34.Bxd4 + Be5 35 .'Nd6!
Qe7 36.Bxe5+ Qxe5 37.Nf7#) 34.Rxd5!
Qxd5 35.Ba3+ b4 {35... Kf7 36.Qh5 +
Kf6 37.Qxe8 Qxb 7 38.Qe7 + Kg6
39.Bd6+-) 36.Bxb4+ Kf7 37.Qh5+: A)
37... Kf6 38.Qxe8 Qxb7 39.Be7 +! +- Ke6
(39...Kg7 40.Qf8+ Kg6 41.Qf6+ Kh5
42.Qg5#) 4 0 . Bg5 + Kd6 (40 ... Kd5
41.Qd7+) 41.Bf4+ Kc5 42.Qf8+ Kc6
(42 ... Kb5 43.Qxf5 + ) 43.Qf6 +! Kb5
44.Qxf5+; B) 37...Kg7 38.Qxe8 Qxb7
39.Bf8+ Kf6 40.Qe7+ Kg6 41.Qg7+
KhS 42.Qh6#; 32...Be5!? : A) 33.Nd8 Oe7
(33...Rxd8 34.Qg5 + + -) 34.Qxb4 RxdB
35.Qxb5; B) 33.Qxb4 Qxb7 34.Rxb5]
33.Rxb5 Nxd3 (33... Qxb7 34.Rxb4!
(34. Qxb4 Qf3!)] 3 4 . N d 6 Od 7
. .

35 .0g 5 + (35.Rxb6 Re1 + 36.Kg2+ -)


35 . . . Kh8 36.016 + Kg8 37.Qg5 + Kh8
[Stein repeats moves to gain time on the
clock.) 3 8 . Nxe 8 Q xe 8 [38...Qxb5
39.Qg7#) 39.Qxl5 Ne 1 40. Rxb6 Nl3 +
41. Kg2 Oa8 42.016+ Kg 8 43.Qe6 +
Kh8 44.0c61 [HENLEY] 1 -0
SICILIAN KIA 2 ... d6/ ... g6, . . . e5
CBU253pp #4
1 .e4 c5 2. NI3 d 6
Black's goal may b e to reach the Najdorf
or Dragon Variations - two of the most
theoretically demanding systems in the
Sicilian Defence.
3.d3

White avoids the open Sicilian positions


arising from 3.d4 and steers the game
into KIA channels.
3 . . . Nc6
A flexible response - not revealing his

kingside setup just yet.


4. g 3

One advantage of the KIA is that white is


not really concerned with black's choice
of setup since the white formation is
organized the same way against virtually
every variation.
4 g6
..

Fianchettoing is a solid way for black to


proceed and also the most flexible - a
decision on the black e-pawn and Ng8's
roles is delayed.
5.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 e5- DIAGRAM

1 he Kmg's lndwn

Attack!

'7

30.85 d5 31.exd5 Qxd5+ 32.Kh3 Qf5+


33.Kg2 Qc2+ 34.Qd2 Qxc3 35.Qxc3
Bxc3 36.Be7 Bb2 37.Kf3 Kg7 38.Bc5
Kf7 39.Ke4 Ke6 40.h3 Be5 41.g4 c3
42.Kd3 Kd5 43.gxh5 gxh5 44.Be3 Kc6

45.Kc4 c2 46.Kb l Kb5 0-1


(10)

Henley- Fritz
BONUS GAME #3, 1993

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7


5.0-0 Nc6 6.d3 e5 7.c3 Nge7 8.Nh4 0-0

(10 ...f5!? ] 11.Nd2


[This gives me a connected passed
e -pawn.]
12.e5
b6
(Deserving
consideration is 12...g5! ?, undermining
Black elects a formation similar to a the e-pawn before I can secure it.
reversed "Botvinnik English"- his most 13.Nhf3 (13.fxg5 Nxe5 14.Ndf3!) ...gxf4
l ike l y course involves completing 14.d4 cxd4 1 5.cxd4 Ng6 1 6. Nb3oo.]
development with . . .Nge7 and ...0-0.
I 13.Re1 (Removing my rook from the
a6-f1 d iagonal.] 13 ... Ba6 14.Ndf3!
Geller - Tukmakov
(8)
(Now with my e-pawn well secured, I
USSR, 1980
have a definite positional plus. ] 14...Re8
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7
15.a31 [Preparing to gain space on the
5.0-0 Nc6 6.d3 e5 7.c3 Nge7 8.a3 b6
queenside. This idea comes up often
9.b4 o-o 10.b5 Na5 11.Ra2 f5 12.exf5
versus black systems with ...b7-b6.]
Bxf5 13.c4 Qd7 14.Ng5 Rad8 15.Nc3
15...Rc8 16.b4 Qd717.d4!? (This might
h6 16.Nge4 Bg4 17.f3 Be6 18.f4 exf4
be premature as it does surrender the
19.Bxf4 g5 20.Be3 Nf5 21.Bc1 Rf7
c4-square. Perhaps building up with Kh1
22.84 Rdf8 23.Re2 Ne7 24.Rxf7 Rxf7
and Bb2 deserved attention.] 17...cxd4
25.Re1 d5 26.cxd5 Nxd5 27.Nxd5 Bxd5
18.cxd4 NdBI [The idea of putting the
28.Qh5 Nb3 29.Be3 Nd4 30 .Bxd4
knight on the e6 blockading square is
Bxd4+ 31.Kh1 Kg7 32.Qe2 Bb3 33.g4
excellent strategic planning for a
Qe 6 34.Rf1 Rxf1 + 35.Qxf1 Qxg4
computer. The alternative is 1 8.. . Bc4!?.]
36.Ng3 Qd1 0-1
19.a4 Ne6? (In his rush to place his
knight, Fritz allows me to stuff his Ba6.
(9)
Frolik - Stoll
Better is 19 . .. Bc4! .] 2 0 . b 5! B b 7
Bundesliga, 1988
21.Ng5! (Once I remove the N e6,
Fritz's remaining minor pieces are
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d3 Nc6 4.g3 g6
cramped and far from e6.] 21...Nxg5
5.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 e5 7.Nc3 Nge7 8.Nd2
Be6 9.Nc4 0-0 10.Ne3 Qd7 11.Ncd5 f5
22.fxg5 (It is true I have given Fritz a
connected passed f-pawn, but I have
12.f4 Rf7 13.c3 Raf8 14.Nxe7+ Nxe7
i n creased m y s p a c e ad v a n t a g e
15.Nd5 fxe4 16.dxe4 exf4 17.Bxf4 Be5
(g5-pawn), and secured the powerful
18.Nxe7+ Qxe7 19.Qd2 Bc4 20.Bg5
f4-square. for my own knight.] 22...86
Qe6 21.Rxf7 Rxf7 22.b3 Bb5 23.Bf1
Bxf1 24.Rxf1 Rxf1+ 25.Kxf1 c4 26.b4
[Fritz tries to break the queenside bind.]
23.Bf1I [It is crucial to maintain the
h5 27.Kg2 Kh7 28.a4 Bg7 29.Qe3 a6
9.f4 exf4 10.gxf4 d5
f5?1

The

10

King's Indian Attack!

b5-pawn, as it deprives four (!) black


pieces of the c6-square.] 23 . . . axb5
24.axb5 Rc7 [Fritz threatens to double
rooks on the open c-file; however, by
placing my bishops on d2 and d3, I
patrol all of the entry points anyway.]
2 5 . N g 21 [Heading for the excellent
outpost at f4.] 25 ... Ra8 [Fritz fights for
the a-file.] 26.Bd21 [I temporarily allow
the black rook to c2, knowing he will
eventually be evicted. OK for black is
26.Rxa8+ Bxa8 27.Ba3 Ra7.] 26 ... Rxa 1
27.Qxa 1 Rc2 28.Bb41 [This bishop has
found a beautiful diagonal (a3-f8).]
2B . . . Nc8 [This move is indicat ive of the
lack of scope for the black minor pieces.]
29.Bd3 [Sending the rook back to his
side of the board.] 29 ... Rc7 30.Qa3
[Increasing the grip on the a3 -f8
diagonal.] JO . . . Od B 31 .h4 Qd7 [After
31...h6 the attempt to break out of "the
mold" backfires: 32.Nf4! Oe8 33.h5!-+.}
32.Nf4 [From here the knight is shielded
from attack while it can a) pressure the
d5-pawn, b) support the e5-e6 pawn
push, and c) support the h4-h5 pawn
push.] 32 . . . Bh8 33.Kg2! [Here I improve
t h e p o s i t i o n o f m y king before
undertaking any definitive action. It also
could be important' to advance my
e-pawn without m y d pawn being
captured with a check (...Bh8 x d4 +).]
33 . . . Bg7 34.Kg3 KhB 35.Rc 1 [Finally I
decided that by exchanging rooks the
combination of threatening to penetrate
at c7 and the advance of my e-pawn
should overload Fritz's defensive
capabilities.] 35 . . . R xc 1 36.0xc 1 KgB
37.h5!-+ Qea [Defending the g6-pawn,
but allowing my queen to penetrate to
c7.] 38.0c7 Baa 39. h61 - + [All of Fritz's
pieces are pushed to the back rank.]
39 ... Bh8 [39...Bf8 40.Bxf8 Qxf8 41.Ne6
f4 + 42.Kf3] 40. N xg 6 ! [40.Kh4! This
simple zugzwang would also be
picturesque.]
40 . . . f 4 +
[40...hxg6

41.h7#; 40 ... Qxg6 41.Qxc8 + Kf7


42.0f8 + Ke6 43.0e7#] 4 1 . Kf3 B b7
42.Qxh7 +!! [This leads to a pure mate.]
42 ... Kxh 7 43. N e 7 + Qg 6 44. Bxg 6#
HEN LEY 1 -0
SICILIAN KIA 2 ...d6/...g6, ... e6
CBU253pp #5
1 .e4 cs 2.Nf3 d6 3.d3 Ncs 4.g3 g 6
5.Bg2 B g 7 6. 0-0 e6 - DIAGRAM
A solid system of defence with the
continuation . Nge7 and . .0-0 in mind.
With 6...e6 black does not permit a "hole"
at d5 as in the 6...e5 variation. He may
play for a later ...d6-d5 advance.
. .

{1 1 }

Geller - Spassky
Moscow, 1 975

1 .e4 [Commentary to this game is based


in part on notes by Efim Geller in his
book, "The Application of Chess Theory"
Pegammon Press {Pages 230-233).]
1 ... c5 2.Nf3 es 3 . d 3 [Geller
"After
black's second move in this game I
decided, contrary to my preparations, to
transpose into the Closed Variation
(KIA). This is explained by the sudden
thought: "With white Spassky does not
like playing against the KID."] 3 ... Nc6

The King's Indian Attack!

4.g3 d6 5.Bg2 g 6 6.0-0 B g 7 7.c3 e 5 [At


t he t i me, it was thou g h t t h i s was
necessary to prevent 8.d4. Also possible
is 7...Nge7 8.d4 cxd4 9.cxd4 Qb6!?.]
8.a3 Nf6? ! (8...Nge7 (fhis would be a
more harmonious development, and
leave the black f-pawn free to advance.
However, in view of the advancing white
b-pawn, Spassky felt he should leave e7
available for his other knight.) 9.b4 b6co )
9.b4 0-0 1 0.b5 Ne7 1 1 .a4 aS [Boris tries
to initiate counterplay on the queenside.
Preparing the counter-blow in the center
(...d6-d5) with 11 . .. Qc7 is too slow:
1 2.c4!;!; (Geller) The white knight will
advance to d5 (Nb 1 -c3-d5) at the
appropriate moment, whereas the black
kn ig hts have practically no way of
reac h i ng t h e corresponding d4-.
outpost.] 1 2.Na3 axb5 1 3.Nxb5 N c6? (A
positional mistake, which allows Geller
to further his light square plans. M uch
better is 13... h6! preventing 1 4.Bg5!.]
1 4.Bg 5 ! ;!; h 6 1 5 . B xf 6 [A fa miliar
positional motif white surrenders the
bishop pair for control of d5 . Note this
also leaves black with a dark-squared
bishop that has trouble finding a useful
role.] 1 5 . . . B xf6 1 6 . N d 2 ( Preparing
Nd2-c4, increasing pressure against the
fixed black d6-pawn. White also frees his
f-pawn for kingside action.) 1 6 ... Na7
[ 1 6 ... Be6!? (Geller.) 1 7.Nc4 Bxc4
(1 7...d5? 1 8.exd5 Bxd5 1 9. Bxd5 Oxd5
20.Nb6 +-) 18.dxc4 Be7! (White retains
certain positional advantages, including
the superior opposite-colored bishop Geller.) 1 9.h4 h5 20.Bh3t] 1 7 .Na3 Nc6
1 8.Rb 1 1 [Now the black Bc8 is tied to the
defence of the b7-pawn: 18.Nb5 Na7;
1 8.Nac4 Na5 Black tries to neutralize the
position with exc hanges.] 1 8 . . . B g 7
[ A ft e r 1 8 . . . Q a 5 1 9 . N a c 4 ! O x a 4
20.Nxd6 , the weak black pawns at b7
and c5 are on the menu. Not 1 9 ... 0xc3?
20.Rb3 Od4 21 .Nf3 + -.] 1 9. N dc4 Ra 6

11

[Planning to meet 20.Nb5 with 20... Na5


s o the Ra6 defends t h e d6- pawn
laterally.] 20.Ne3! [The Na3 heads for
c4, all the while maintaining the pressure
against the b7-pawn.] 20 . . . N e7 (20...f5
21 .exf5 gxf5 22.f4t ) 2 1 . N a c 4 Bd7 22.a5 1
[ G eller maste rfully m aintains t h e
pressure. After 22.Rxb7 Bxa4 23.0e2
Bc6 24.Rb3 Qc7, Black has achieved a
respectable regrouping, but even here
after 2 5 .Nd5 white looks b ette r . ]
2 2 . . . B c 6 2 3 . 0 b 3 h 5 [ B oris quite
naturally wants to activate his Bg7 to h6,
but his best chance was 23...d5 24.exd5
Nxd5 25 .Nxd5 Bxd5 26. Bxd5 Qxd5
27.0xb7 Qxb7 28.Rxb7 : A) 28... e4!?
(The resulting 4 pawn versus 3 pawn
rook ending is a theo ret ical draw.)
29 . dxe4 Bxc3 30. Rb5 (30.Rb6 Ra7
31. Rb5 Rfa8 32. Axes Bxa5 ) Rfa8?
3 1 .Rxc5 Bxa5 ; B) 28...Rd8 Hoping for
counterplay after 29 Rd1 e4! 29.Rfb1 ! +
Geller With a decisive march of the
a-pawn.] 2 4. N d 5 B h 6 2 5 . f4 ! t e xf 4
26.gxf4 Bxd5 ( I n time pressure, Spassky
decides to sacrifice the b7-pawn for
activity.] 27. exd5 Nf5 28. Be4? (Also in
time pressure, Geller makes a m istake.
Stronger is 28.Qxb7!, when accepting
the offered pawn sacrifice would allow
white to retain all of h is pos itional
trumps, plus obtain a passed a-pawn.]
28 . . . Bxf4! 29.Bxf5 (29.Rxf4? Qg5 +
30.Kh 1 Oxf4 31 . Qxb 7co) 29 . Qg 5 +
(29...0h4 30.Rxf4 Oxf4 31 . Be4) 30.Kh 1
Qxf5 3 1 .Qxb7 ReS? (Boris is tempted by
the exposed nature of the white king. The
" The
right idea is 31 ...Ra7! (Geller
correct idea, as this diverts the white
q u een f ro m the protection of the
d5-pawn" : A) 32.0c6?! Re7co (32 ...Rc7) ;
B) 32.0 xa7 Oxd5 + 33.Kg 1 Qg5 +
34.Kh 1 ! (34.Kf2?! Oh4 + 35. Ke2 Og4+
36.Kf2 OM + = ) ... Qd5+ = ] 32.Rf2! +
[Not 32.0xa6? ? Re2 33.0 a8 + Kg7
34.Rb2 Oh3! -+ ] 32 ... g5 (32. ..Ra7 (Now
.

l L.

1 ne

J\.tng s

1 nwun r. . u uu t :

this idea is not feasible.) 33.Qxa7: A)


33 . ..Qxd5 + 34. Kg1 Og5 + (34... Qxd3
35.Rbf1 + -) 35. Kf1 + - ; B) 33 . . . Qxd3
34.Rbf1 Qxd5+ 35.Kg1 g5 36.0a6 + -]
3 3 . R g 1 ? 1 [33.Qxa6! Oxd5 + 34.Kg 1
Qxd3 35. Qb5 + -]
33. . . Reas??
[ 3 3 ... Q x d 3 ? 34.Rxf4 + - ; 3 3 ... h4!
34.Q x a 6 ? O x d 5 + 35 .Rfg2 h3- + )
34.Nxd6 + - Rxd6 [34. . . 0f6 35.Ne4+-]
35.Qxaa + Kh7 36.c4 Rf6 [36 . ..0xd3
37.Rxf4! gxf4 38.0gB + Kh6 39. 0h8 +
Oh7 40.Qf8+ Qg7 41.0xg7#) 37. Q b71
Qh3 [37...Qxd3 38.0b1! +- Exchanging
queens into a winning endgame . ]
3 a . Q b 2 1 [ More lateral defense, to
prevent perpetual checks. A terrible
blunder is 38.a6? ? Bxh2 39.Rxh2
( 3 9 . R x f 6 Bg 3#) Qf3 + 40 .Rgg2
Of1 + = .]
3a . . . B e 5
39. Qe2 +
[ H E N L E Y ] At t h i s poi n t , black
overstepped the time limit. 1 -0
( 1 2)

have shown that the KIA approach is


most effective when the black Bc8 is
locked in behind the pawn wall.
3 . . . Nc6 4.g3 g 6 5.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 Nge7
7. N bd2 d5
Now the position takes on some French
Defence characteristics. After 7... d6,
play transposes to positions arising from
CBU253pp #6.
a.Re 1

DIAG RAM

White p repares the adv a n ce of a


"spearhead" pawn to e5. Now 8 ...0-0
transposes directly to CBU253pp #10
(arising from the French), but to be
considered is 8...b6!?

Fra nco - Yudasin (25aO)


Seville Open, 1 992

1 . e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d3 Nc6 4.g 3 g 6


s . Bg 2 B g 7 6.0-0 e6 7 . c 3 Q b 6 s.Na3
Nge7 9 . N c4 Qc7 1 O.a4 0-0 1 1 . N h 4 RdS
1 2 . Q e 2 b 6 1 3 .f4 dS 1 4 . N e 5 N x e s
1 5. fxes d4 1 6.Qf3 N c6 1 7. Bg 5 Nxes

1 a. Qf4 Rd7 1 9. Rad 1 dxc3 20. bxc3 Ba6


2 1 .c4 Rea 22.Bf6 Nxd3 23.Qg 5 Bxf6
24. Q xf6 Bxc4 25.Qc3 Ba6 26. Rf6 N f4
27.Qc2 Ne2 + 0- 1
S ICILIAN KIA
2 . .. e6/7 .Nbd2/8. Re1

CBU253pp #6
1 .e4 cs 2. Nf3 e6
Black offers white the "Scheveningen"
3.d3
The KIA has been played most often
against 2...e6 in the Sicil ian. Statistics

( 1 3)

Ljubojevic - Petrosian
M i lano (m/4), 1 975

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6


5.g3 Nge7 6. Bg2 g6 7.0-0 Bg7 a.Re1
b6 9.a3 h 6 1 0 . R b 1 a s 1 1 . h 4 Ba s
1 2.exd 5 Nxd 5 1 3. N c4 0-0 1 4. Nce5 Rca
1 5. Nxc6 Rxc6 1 6. c4 Ne7 1 7. Bf4 b5
1 8. Q c 1 h5 1 9 . N e5 Rca 20. b4 cxb4
2 1 .axb4 a 4 22.Qe3 Nf5 23.Qa7 Raa
24.Qc5 Rca 25.Nc6 Qd7 26.cxb5 B b7
27. B e 5 B x e 5 2 8 . N x e 5 Qd a 29. N c 6

Q x d 3 3 0 . B e 4 Qd 6 3 1 . Qx d 6 N x d 6
3 2.Ne7 + Kg7 33. NxcB Nxe4 34.N b6
N d 2 3 5 . N x a 4 R b B 3 6. R b c 1 N f3 +
3 7.Kf1 Nxe 1 38.Kxe 1 Ra8 39.Ne5 B d 5
40. b6 Rb8 4 1 . Nd7 Ra8 42. Re7 Ra 1 +
43.Kd2 Ra2 + 44. Ke3 es 45.b7 RaJ +
46. Kd 2 Ra2+ 47.Ke3 1 -0
( 1 4)

Ljubojevie - Kasparov
N i ksie, 1 983

1 .e4 es 2.Nf3 e6 3.d3 Nes 4.g 3 d5


s . N bd2 g6 [Garry selects a flexible
system of development for black.) 6.Bg2
Bg7 7.0-0 Nge7 8. R e 1 [8.exd5 ! ? See the
theoretical game Dvoretsky-Vulfson,
USSR 1 986. ) 8 . . . b 6 [8 ... 0-0? ! (It is
important for black not to commit his
king prematurely as this would give white
a clear target.) 9.e5t b6 10.Nf1 Bb7
1 1.Bf4t)
9.h4
[Anticipating the
possibility of h4-h5 should black castle
kingside.) 9 . . . h 6 1 0 . e 3 ! [A useful
prophylactic move as h4-h5 can be met
by . ..g6-g5 and white will have achieved
nothing tangible.) 1 0 . . . a5!? [This gains
space on the queenside, and allows
black to develop his Ra8 to a7. On the
negative side of the ledger is the weak
square created at bS.) 1 1 .a41 [White
secures control of the bS square.)
1 1 . . . Ra7 [This removes the rook from
the g2-a8 diagonal and allows it more
scope along the second rank.) 12.Nb3? 1
[12.exd5 ! ? exd5 (12...Nxd5 13. Nc41)
1 3. Nb3! Yudasin-Jukic, Bern 1 989.)
1 2 ... d4! [Seizing space in the center
and limiting the scope of white's pieces.)
1 3. exd 4 exd 4 1 4.Bd2 (1 4.e5!?] 1 4 . . . e5
[Black completes his grip on the center.]
1 5. N e 1 Be6 1 6. Re2 [White's last two
moves are a clear indication that things
have gone awry.) 1 6 . . . 0-0 1 7. B e 1 f5
[Garry prepares to conquer space on the
kingside.) 1 8 . N d 2 f 4 ! + [Assuming
control on the kingsid e . ] 1 9. f3 fxg 3
2 0 . B x g 3 g 5 ! 2 1 . hxg 5 N g 6 ! [A very

inviting pawn sacrifice which allows the


black pieces to flood into the kingside.]
22.gxh6 Bxh6 23. N f 1 [I once asked
"Lj ubo" what happened in this game and
his reply was, "Occasionally you have
one of those games where the pieces
j ust turn in against themselves " .]
2 3 . . . R g 7 2 4 . R f 2 B e 3 1 - + [Decisive
penetration into white's position. ] 25.b3
[25.Nxe3 dxe3: A) 26.Rf1 QgS 27.Ne2
Nf4-+ (27 ...Nd4 28.Nxd4 exd4 29.Qe1
Nf4 30. Kh2 Nxd3- + ) ; B) 26. Re2 Qg5
27.Qe1 Nd4 28.Rxe3 Nc2- + ] 25 . . . Nf4
[HENLEY) 0- 1
( 1 5)

Dvoretzky - Khalifman
USSR, 1 987

1 .e4 es 2.Nf3 e6 3.d 3 d5 4. N bd 2 Ne6


5.g3 g 6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7.0-0 Nge7 8.Re1
0-0 9.e5 Qe7 1 O.Qe2 b6 1 1 . h4 Ba6
1 2.Nf1 Nd4 1 3.Nxd4 exd 4 1 4. B14 Ne6
1 5 . a 3 Qd7 1 6. N h 2 RaeB 1 7 . N g 4 16
1 8. exf6 Bxf6 1 9. Nxf6 + Rxf6 20.Bh3
Rx14 2 1 .gxf4 Be8 22.0f3 Of7 23.0g 3
KhB 24. Re2 R fB 25. R a e 1 N d 8 26.f5
gxf5 27.Qe5 + Qg7 + 28.Qxg7 + Kxg7
2 9 . f4 Kf6 3 0 . R g 2 B d 7 3 1 . Kf2 Nf7
32. Ke2 N h8 33.Rf1 Ng 6 34. h5 N e7
35.h6 Ng6 36. Kd2 ReS 37. Rg3 BeB
38. R12 817 39. B 1 1 Rc7 40. Be2 ReS
41 .Rg 1 Ke7 42. Bh5 Kd 6 43.e3 dxe3 +
44. bxc3 Ke7 45.Bxg 6 Bxg6 46. a 4 Kd6
47. R b 1 Kc5 4B. R b 5 + Kc6 49.Ke3 Kd 6
50.Kd4 RgB 5 1 . Rg 2 1 -0
(1 6)

Benja min - E ing orn


Sa int John Open, 1 988

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 c5 3. N13 Nc6 4.g3 d5


5 . N bd2 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7.0-0 N g e7 8.Re 1
h6 9.h4 b6 1 O.c3 aS 1 1 .a4 BaS 1 2. exd5
exd 5 1 3. N b3 0-0 1 4.d4 c4 1 5. N bd 2 Be8
1 6.N11 Be6 1 7. Bf4 Qd7 1 B. b 3 cxb3
1 9.Qxb3 16 20. 0 xb6 g 5 2 1 . hxg5 hxg 5
22. B e 1 R1cB 23.Qb5 RabB 24.Qe2 N d B
25.Bxg 5 1xg 5 26. Nxg5 R b6 27.0d 3 Oes
28 . N e 3 Oh5 2 9 . 14 817 3 0 . Bf3 Qg 6

J l i te

l 'f

J"\ l f l!:)

H I U Hl l l

3 1 . Qx g 6 R xg 6 3 2 . R a 3 R d 6 3 3 . Nxf7
Kxf7 34. R b 3 N e 6 35.Kg2 Rcc6 36. Rb7
N c 7 3 7 . B h 5 + K g B 3 8 . R b 8 + B f8
39. N g 4 N f5 40. R e 5 Ng7 4 t . R g 5 Nce6
42. N f6 + K h 8 43. R g 6 Nxf4 + 44.gxf4
Rx f 6 45. R xf8 + Rxf8 46. Rxc6 N x h 5
47. R h 6 + Kg7 48.Rxh5 ReS 49.Rxd5
Rxc3 50.Rxa5 Rc4 5 1 . K f3 Rxd4 52.Kg4
1 -0

1 . e4

( P l a y ed at t h e Casa d e

E s pa n a

+
Ke8 + )
( 2 1 . Rxd 8 Nxd8 22. Nxb7 Nxb7
2 3 . B f 1 a6 = ) . . . N x a5 2 2 . bx a 5 + KeB
Nxa5
1 9.Na5
A d ?+ ]
23 .Rc7
[ 1 9 . . . Rxd 1 + t 20. Rxd 1 R d 8 ! B l a c k is O K . )
2 0 . bxa 5 + K e B 2 1 . R d c 1 a 6 2 2 . R e 7
Bxe4? [Aft e r p l a y i n g so wel l for so l o n g ,
Jay f i n a l l y g ives Garry a n open board

R d 8 ! ? {20 . . . N xa5 2 1 . b x a5

with tactical possibil ities. T h e right move

i s 22 . R d ? t , a nice sa fe sol id defensive


m ove , after w h i c h it i s ha rd to see w h ite
break i n g t h rou g h . ) 23. N h 4 ! ! [With t h i s
stroke, G a r ry f inal l y is a b l e to u n l ea s h t h e

in a

e n e rgy fr o m h i s p i e c e s . ) 2 3 . . . R a e 8 ?
(23. . . Bxb 1 24. Bc6 + R d ? 25 . Nxg6

s i m u l a g a i n s t t h e s t r o n g e s t of 3 2

o p p o n e n t s t hat Garry f a ced . T h e World


C h a m pion won 2 9 g a mes and d r ew 3 i n

1 . . . e6 2 . d 3 d S
I
3 . N d 2 c5 4.g 3 N c 6 5 . B g 2 g 6 6.Ngf3
B g 7 7.0-0 Ng e7 8 . R e 1 (It i s i n t e r e st i n g !
t hat G a rry prefers 8. R e 1 . ] 8 . . . b6 9.N f 1 1? 1
l e s s t h a n t h ree h o u rs . ]

[A not h e r i n t e rest i n g m o ment , a s Garry


allows blac k t o play for a n end ga me . ]

1 1 < / l. l\ .

2 1 . Rc 1

Kasparov (2785) - Bonin (2450)


N ew York [Sim ulta neous) , 1 992

( 1 7)

'

(2 5 . B x d 7 + Kd 8 2 6 . B d 6 B e 5 ) : A)
2 5 . . . B x g 6 2 6 . R x d 7 R c 80 2 7 . R d 6 + !
(2 7 . R c 7 + ) . . . K e 7 (2 7 . . . Kf8 2 8 . R d 8 # )

28. B b7 i R c 3 2 9 . R d 3 + K e 8 30 . R x c 3
B)
Bxc3 3 1 . Bxa6 Bxas 3 2 . B x b5 +
25 . . . R a d 8 2 6 . B e 7 B x g 6 2 7 . B x d 8 t - ;

I 2 3 . . . B x g 2 2 4 . N xg6 ! A) 24 . . . Be4 25 . R e 7 # ;
9 . . . Bb7 1 0. c 3 h6 1 1 . R b 1 ( N ow black w i l l I B ) 24 . . . fx g 6 2 5 . R x g 7 ! ( 2 5 R e 7 + K f 8
26 . R x e6 + Kg8 2 7 . Kxg2 R d 2 oo ) . . . B e4
be d i sc o u raged from . . . 0 -0 - 0 , as b2 - b4 is
26
. R e7 + K f 8 2 7 . R xe 6 + + - ; C) 24 . . . Rd 7 !
in prepa rat ion. ] 1 1 . . . d x e4 (T h i s seems to
2 5 . Rxd 7 Kxd 7 2 6 . Kxg2 fx g6 2 7 . R d 1 t oo ]
be correct. The R b 1 makes l it t l e sense i n
24.Rxe8 Axes 25.Bxe4 g x h 4 ( N ow t h e
th e endga m e . ] 1 2. d x e4 Qxd 1 1 3. Rxd 1

g5!? [Jay plays an

interest i n g plan he re ,

bishop pa i r and t h e weakness of t h e

a6- paw n, m o re t h a n offset t h e pawn


to keep h i s k i n g i n t h e c e n t e r f o r t h e
ef i cit f or w h i t e . ] 26. B b7 R e 3 27. Bb4
d
e nd g a m e . Al so poss ible i s 1 3 . . . R d 8 ! ? ,
1
R
e 2 2 8 . B x a 6 B d 4 ( A n a t t e m pt f o r
1
1 4 . B f4 ( 4_. R x d 8 + Kxd 8 1 5 . Bf4 Kc 8
quickly
is
which
1 6 . N 1 d 2 g 5 <=! ) . . . g 5 1 5 . B d6? ( 1 5 . B c 7 Rd 7 1 c o u n t e r p l a y .

7. e5 g4- + )
1 6 . B c7 Rd 7- + . ]

. . . NcB
1 4. N e3
[The k n i ght h ead s f o r t h e wea ke ned
d 6 - sq u a r e . ] 1 4 . . . N g 6 1 5 . N c 4 K e 7
1 6. b4 ! ? [Garry manages to create play

1 6. Bd6 NcB 1

(1 5

..

N d 4 ! ?)

based on t he l o c a t i o n of b l a c k ' s king .


gi v en t i m e t o p l a y . . . Rhd8,

N ote t hat,

a f i n e p o s i t i o n . N ot
1 6. . . cxb4l [With pre c i se

b l a c k w i l l have

1 6. Nd6?

R h d 8. ]

d efence, black should

h av e

and then

( 1 8 . . . R xd 1
+

the

1 7.cxb4 RhdB t B. B a J bS
+ ! 1 9 . R x d 1 b 5 ! ( 1 9 . . . Rd8
+ - ) 2 0 . N a 5 (20 . N d 6 R d 8 - + )

endga m e . )
2 0 . b5

hold

t h e b e t t e r s t r u c t u r e for

n e u t ra l i z e d .

2 9 . B x b5

N o b e t t e r i s 2 8 . . . R xa 2

Kd 8 30 . B c 5 ' + . T h e e s c o rt

is prepari ng for the tri u m phant


29. Bxb5 + KdB
30.Rd 1 e5 3 1 . R d 2 ! + - Rxd 2 32.Bxd2
hxg3 33.hxg3 f5 34. Ba6 f4 35.Bd3 Ne7
36.gxf4 exf4 37. Bxf4 N d 5 38.Bd2 Kc7
39.Kg2 Kd6 40. Kf3 Ke5 4 1 .a6
[ H E NLEY] 1 -0
service

march of t h e a-pawn . )

( 1 8}

H enley - Fritz
B O N U S GAM E # 4 , 1 993

1 . e4 c s 2 . N f3 e6 3.d3 N c 6 4.g 3 g6
5 . B g 2 Bg7 6. 0-0 Nge7 7. N bd 2 d 5 8 . Re 1

b 6 9 . h 4 h 6 1 O . c 3 d x e 4 N [ 1 0 . . . a5
B e nj a m i n - E i n g o r n . S t . J o h n 1 98 8 ]
1 1 .dxe4 Ba 6 1 2.0a4 Bd3 1 3 . Bf 1 ! ? 0-0
1 4. e51 Bxf1 1 5. N x f 1 Qc7 ( 1 5 . . . 0d3 ! ?
1 6. Kg2 Rfd 8 1 7. Bf4 w i t h t he idea of
Ra d 1 . ) 1 6. Q e 4 R fd 8 1 7 . N 1 h 2 N d 5
1 8 . N g 4 h5 1 9. N h 6 + 1 t [ N ormally 1
would be reluctant to put a knight in such
an extended position. I n chess however
we should look at each case on a
concrete basis. Here the knight w i l l b e
joined by the other white forces in the
attack.) 1 9 . . . K h8 [ P a r t i n g with h i s
da rk-squared bi shop with 1 9 . . . Bxh6? !
would be begging to be mated on the
kingside : 20. Bxh6 N d e7 2 1 . BgS AdS
22. Bf6. White will follow with moves
s u c h as O e 4 - f 4 - h 6 , or g 3 - g 4 i f
necessary. ) 2 0 . g 4 1 .... R d 7 (20 . . . hxg 4
2 1 . Nxg4-+ ] 2 1 .gxh5 gxh5 22. N g 5 ! ? [ A
d i rect b u t ext r e m e l y d o u b l e - ed g ed
m e t h od of c o nd u c t i n g t h e atta c k . )
22 . . . 15 1 0 2 3 . e x f 6 B x h 6 1 ? [23 Nxf6
24. 0xe6 Re7 25 . N gf7 + Kh7 26 . 0f5 # )
24.N xe61 (24.0 g6 Bxg5 25. hxg5 Rg 8 !
26. 0 x h5 t R h7+) 24 . . . Nx f61 (24 . . . R g8 +
2 5 . K f 1 O h 2 2 6 . B x h 6) 2 5 . Q f 5 1
(2 5 . N x c 7 R g 8 + ! 26. 0g2 R xg2 +
27. Kxg2 Bxc 1 28. R axc 1 (28. Re6 Bxb2 i )
. . . Rxcn . ] 25 . . . Rg7 + 26. Kf 1 1 [26 . Kh 1
O b 7 2 7 . 0 x f 6 N d 4 + ;:!] 2 6 . . . Q h 2 1 ;::t
27. Qxf61 [Now the black B h6 can't move
as he is responsible for protecting the
Rg7.) 27 . . . Qg 2 + ( Fritz's only chance is
to harrass my own exposed K.) 28. Ke2
Qe4 + 29.Be3 (29 . Kd 1 ?? Od3 + 30. Bd2
Oxd2 # ) 29 . . . Q c 4 + 3 0 . Kd 1 Q d 5 +
3 1 .Bd41 Kh7 (3 1 . . . cxd4 32. 0xh6 + Rh7
33. 0f6 + Kg8 34. R g 1 + + -] 3 2 . N xg 7
Nxd4 (32 . . . cxd4 33.015 + ! Oxf5 34. Nxf5
d x c3 3 5 . bxc3 + - ] 3 3 . c x d 4 B x g 7
34. R e7 1 O x d 4 + 35. Qxd4 c x d 4
36. Kd2 + - Kh6 37. R c 1 Rf8 3 8 . R c6 +
Rf6 39. Rxf6 + Bxf6 40.Re6 Kg6 4 1 . Kd3
Kf5 42. Rxf6 + I? [ R educing to a won
king and pawn ending. Also good is
. . .

4 2 . R e4 b5 43.f3

- . ] 42 . . . Kxf6 43. Kxd4

: Kf5 44 . K e3 Kg4 45.f41 (A bit of finesse


1

is still req u i red . ] 4 5 . . . K x h 4 (45 . . . Kf5

I 4 6 . Kf3 a6 4 7 . a 4 b5 4 8 . ax b 5 a x b 5
1 49. b4 + -I 46.Kf31 [ Fri t z now finds the

I promotion of his h-pawn is impeded by


1 his own king ! ) 46 . . . a 6 47. b41 + - [Now it
is simply a matter of running Fritz out of
! m o v e s . Al s o w i n n i n g is 4 7 . a 4 ! + )
I 47 . . . b5 48 . a 3 K h 3 49.f5 h4 50.f6 K h 2
I [ N ote how the black k i n g cost Fritz so
I many val uable tempi . ] 5 1 . f7 h3 52.f8Q
Kh 1 53.Kg3 h2 54. Qf 1 # [ H E N LEY) 1 -0
- .

S I C I LIAN KIA
2 . . . e6/7. N bd2/8 . exd5
C B U253pp #7
!
1

I
[

1 .e4 cs 2.N f3 e6 3 . d 3 N e G 4.g 3 g6


5 . B g 2 B g 7 6 . 0-0 N g e 7 7. N bd 2 d 5
s. exd 5
An interesting idea of Dvoretz ky's
i nvolving t h e sa crifice o f a pawn t o
ca pita l i ze o n w h it e ' s l ead i n
devel o pment.
s.

..

exd5 - DIAG RAM

' P ro bably best. After 8 Nxd5 9. N b3 b6


1 0 . c4 Nde7 1 1 .d4, white gains a strong
I initiative. Now white should continue with
Dvoretzky's id ea with 9.d4 ! ? .
I

1
1

. . .

10

( 1 9)

Ill:

material deficit (queen vs. two rooks). )

1\tng S I nlHllll

D voretzky - Vu lfson

U S S R , 1 986

1 . e4 cs 2. Nf3 es J.dJ Ncs 4_ 9 3 d s


5 . N bd 2 gs 6 . B g 2 Bg7 ?. O-O N g e?
s.exd 5 1 ? N s . . . exd 5 [8 . .. Nxd5 9 . Nb3 b6

1 o .c4 Nde7 1 1 .d4 cxd4 1 2. Nfxd4 Bb?


t 3. Bg5t ] 9 . d 4 ! [White temporarily
sacrifices a pawn to capitalize on his lead
in development.] 9 ... cxd4 [9 ... c4 t O . c3
0-0 1 t . b3 b5 1 2 . a4 t ] 1 0 . N b J O b S
[ 1 0 . . . 0-0 1 1 .Nfxd41; 1 0 . . . Bg4 ! ? (The
other method of trying to hold the pawn.)
1 1 . h3 Bxf3 1 2. Qxf3 o - o 1 3. R e t Re a
1 4 . Bf4 Qb6 1 5. Rad t Rad 8 oo ] 1 1 _ 89 5
[1 1 . Bf4!? 0-0 1 2 . Bd6 Bg4 1 3_ BcS QbS
1 4. Re1 &] 1 1 . . . N f 5 [ t t . . .O-O 1 2_ Nfxd4
Nxd4 1 3. Bxe7 Nxb3 1 4. B xf a Nxa t
1 5. Bxg7 Kxg7 1 6.Qxa1 d4 = ] 1 2. R e 1 +
B e 6 1 3 . g 4 N d 6 1 4 . N f x d 4 1 [White
regains his pawn with a good position.
Black gets cou nterpla y a fter 1 4. c3
Ne4! >!.] 1 4 . . . B x d 4 ( 1 4 . . . Nxd4 1 5. Be3
N6b5 1 6.a4! t ] 1 5. Nxd4 Q xd4 [ 1 5 . . . Nxd4
1 6 . B f6 0 -0 1 7 . B x d 4] 1 6 . B x d 5 1
[ 1 6.Qxd4 Nxd4 1 7. Bf6 Nxc2- + ] 1 6 . . . 0-0
[ 1 6 . . . Qxd 1 1 7. Raxd t N bS ( 1 7 . . . Kd 7
1 8. Bf4! ) 1 8. Bf6: A ) 1 8 . . . R f8 1 9.Re3
Dvoretzky ( 1 9.f4 ! ? Nc7 20 . f5 ) ; B )
1 8 . . . 0-0 1 9. Rxe6 fxe6 20. Bxe6 + Rf7
2 1 . Rd7 Raf8 22. c3 ,!l;] 1 7 . B x c 6 Qc5
[ 1 7 . . . Qxd t l 8. Raxd 1 bxc!) 1 9. Rxd6 Bxg4
20. Rxc6 + -] 1 8 . B f 3 [ 1 8 . B e7 Qxc6
1 9.0xd6 Qxd6 20 . Bxd6 Rfd8 2 1 . Be7
Rd2 ] 1 8 . . . Qxg 5 1 9 . 0xd6 R a c s 20. c 3
Ob51 [20 . . . Bxg4? 2 1 .0g3 h5 22. h3 + - ;
20 . . . Rfd 8 2 1 .0e5 Qxes 22.Rxe5 Rd2
23. Rb5! b6 24.a4; 20 . . . h5 2 1 . h3 hxg4
22 . hxg4 Bxg4 23.Qg3 f5 24. Bxb7 Rb8
25. 8 d5 + ] 2 1 . R a d 1 [2 1 . R e2 R fd 8
2 2 . 0 e 7 Bc4 2 3 . R e3 R d 2 2 4 . b3 t ]
2 1 . . . B x a 2 [ 2 1 . . . Qxb2 22. Axe6 fxe6
2 3 . Q x e 6 + K h 8 2 4 . 0 e 5 + Kg 8
25. Rd7 + -] 22. Rd 2 R fd S I ? 23. Qxd 8 +
Rxd8 24. Rxd8 + Kg7 25.Rd2t h5 1 [In
general, it is a good defensive idea to
exchange pawns when faced with a

/-

/ I C I CA .

26. h 3 Be6 27.Re4 a S 28.Red4 hxg 4


29.hxg4 Og s 30. Kg2 b6 3 1 . Re2 Ocs
32. Kg3 Ob5 33.Rdd2 Og 5 34. Re3 Ocs
35 . B e2 Oc6 3 6 . f3? ! [36.f4! (Gaining

mo e space for white and creating the


opt 1 on of f4-f5 or g4-g5 at the right
moment.) . . . O h 1 37.Rd 1 ! t (37. Bf3??
O g 1 + - + ) ) 36 ... g 5 ! [A good defen sive
move, as black builds a barricade. ]
37.Rd4 0c7 + 38. Kg2 Kf6 39. Bd 3 0c5
40.Be4 Obs 4 1 .Rd2 Oe5 42. Ree2 Qb5
43. Bb7 Qc5 44. Rd4 b5 45. Red2 [White

ho es to exchange bisho ps with 46 . Bd5 ,


wh1ch would then allow his rook pair to
seek targets (f7 or g5) .] 45 . . . K e 5 1 =
[Black prevents the bishop exchange,
after which w ite does not have any way
t o make senous progress. ; HEN LEY]
. .

' -

(2 0 )

Henley . Fritz
BONUS GAME # 5 , 1 993

1 . e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3 . d 3 Nc6 4.g3 g 6


5 . B g 2 B g 7 6 . 0-0 N g e7 7. N bd 2 d 5
8 . e x d 5 8 . . . e x d 5 9 . d 4 ! ? [Dvoretzky. ]
9 . . . N x d 4 1 O . N x d 4 c x d 4 [ 1 0 . . . Bxd4
1 1 . Nb3 Bg7 1 2. Nxc5 b6 1 3.Nd3 Bb7

1 4 . Re1 Rc8 1 5 . Bg5 Rc7 1 6. Bf4 Rc6


1 7 . 8 e5 t f6 1 8. 8 d4 Rd6 1 9.Nf4 Bc8 20.c3
0-0 21 .0b3 Bg4 22. h3 Bf5 23. Rad 1 Qd7
24.g 4 B e6 25 . Nxe6 Rxe6 26.c4! T Rxe1 +
27 . Rxe1 d xc4 28.Qxc4 + Rf7 29. Bc3
b5? 1 30 . 0 b3 ! h6 3 1 .Rd t _, Oc8 32. B b4
O c7 33.0e6 a5 34. Rd7! O e5 35.Bd5! + O xe6 36 . B xe6 Nc6 37.Rxf7 Nd4 38. Rf 8 +
Kh7 39. Bg8 + Kh8 40. Rd8 Nc6 4 1 .Ra8!
Nxb4 42.a3! (XNb4). 1 -0, Henley-Fritz.
C B U 253pp # 7, Training game.] 1 1 .Nb3
O b 6 1 2. R e 1 Be6 1 3.Bg5 d 3 1 4.0xd3 [I
offer my b-pawn to gain time and the
half-open b-file. White has a slight edge
after 1 4.c3t.] 1 4 . . . Bxb2 1 5. Ra b 1 Bg7
1 6. Bxe7 Kxe7 1 7.Bxd5! [Now I have
recovered my sacrificed pawn. and th e
b l a c k k i n g i s s l i g h t l y e x p os ed ]

1 1 .. Rad8

.
[1 7 ... Rhd8!?) 1 8 . c 4
1 9.Nd2 Qa6?1 [ Based on greed y ta

t ica l
(idea

( t h re at 20 . . . Rd5) and m a t e r i a l
. . . O a 6 x a2) considerations, but 1 9 . . . 0 c7
1 . e4 cs 2. NfJ es J.dJ NeG 4 _ 9 3 96
se ems more rudent . ) 20.Qf3.1 t [ N w 1. 5.Bg2 Bg7 6 . 0- 0 Ng e7 7.c3 - D IA G RAM
the threats agarnst e6 and b7 force Fntz
to give me a powerful passed d-pawn for
A fl ex . b le move - remov1. g the d4-square
the m idd l e gam e . ) 2o . . . BxdSD 2 1 _c x d S I from t h e scope of blacks m inor pieces.
b6 [This does protect the b-pawn and
close the b-file, but it also opens the
f3-a8 diagonal and takes the black queen
,1 - .t_ ' .. W,,
out of play (X0a6). White has a st ro n g
position after 2 1 . . . 0xa 2 22. Rxb7 Oxd5
:a; A . A r A W" J1
:,
S I C I LIAN 2 . . . e6/7.c3

KfB :

'

C B U253pp #8

I
1

?fjj.
&jpj
"=fA]"J
..
,
"""';; ;{
.fj
-

}-.,.,-.

IJ.

5
1
8
f- d-:: i; ; 2! 1
immune due to the poor
the bl ac k forces and
ed
-

'

ft ! n

22 . . . Q x a2 [ G a i n i n g a
s e c u r i n g t w o c o n n e c t ed passed
queenside pawns , an d pressunng my
d5-pawn. However, time and space a re
important elements in chess, a nd Fritz
soon frnds hrmself in a bind. No b ett e r is
22 . . . Rxd5 23.Nd6! R xd 6 2 4 . 0a 8 + + -. )
23.Nf61 [ P utting F ritz in the "box" ! My

;;,W

pawn,

coord i nation of

th e expos

can't exchange it (23 . . . B xf6 24 . 0xf6) or


evict it. N ot 2 3 . N g5? Q x d 5 2 4 . N e6 +
(24.Rbd 1 Q x g5 - + ) . . . Kg8- + . ) 2 3. . . Qa4
u p h i s p ieces, while bl a c k

- W'tfi g;
Q

m
)l! 'P2
.

r
"'1

ld[d
- 'if:'
---- (iJ
;
,. , . ,

/'

and putting a rook b e h i d my passed


pawn' M e a nwh i l e I also prevent a n y i
att em pt by black to remove my k n i g ht I

24.Rbd 1

I'

A fflt
0 J

knig h t bott l e s

...!if?

p
W'fi

"w"'}JA
}fij
'!rJiffiw-w

. fJW%&!

bl ac k

king. )

[Completing my central ization


n

(2 1 )

?
i

L X

,:z
"'

Fischer _

wrz.:i,

-Z>7<i

:<

ourao

H a va n a , 1 9 66

e6

2.d3 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4 . g 3 g 6


1 . e4
5. 8 g 2 Bg7 6. 0-0 Nge7 7.c3 0-0 8 . d 4
b6 9 . 4
O . cxd4 d5 1 1 . e 5
Ba6 1 2 R e 1 Nb4 1 3
ReB 1 4 . Od2 :t

(8. Be3!?

d cxd4 1
Nc3
B x b5 1 6 . 0x b 4 B d 3 )
a s ive

1 5 N b5 !
S . . . d 6? 1 (Too p s

Oc 7

8 . . . cxd4

with . . . Oa4-d 4 . ) 24 . . . a5 [F r itz ca n ' t f i nd 9 . cx d 4 Ob61 . ) 9 . d xc 5 1 [Thi s fa vo ra b l y


any wa y to improve his pieces. No better c l a r ifies the pawn s t r u ct u r e ) 9 . . . d x c 5
I 1 0 . 0 e2! b6 1 1 . e5 ( F i s c h e r e sta blishes
i s 2 4 . . . 0 c 2 2 5 . R d 2 ! O c 5 (2 5
+
#
xd
7.
+
.
R
26
)
Rd6
. d e2
2 0 6
) j h i s spearhead at e5 w h i c h underlines the
26.Qa3

... 0x d2

Better is

t to weak f 6 - s q u a r e . ] 1 1 . . . a 5 ? 1 [This
I we a k e n s t h e b 5 - s q u a r e . a n d t h e
e x pa n d . ] 2S ... h 6 26 . d7 hS 27.Qa 3 + 11
b6- pawn . ] 1 2 . R e 1 B a s 1 3 . Q e 4 R a 7
[ A d e fl ec t i on motif 1 q u e e n sac t o
c o m p l ete t h e p i c t u r e
2 7 . . . 0 x a 3 1 4. N bd2 B d 3 [ I n this structure. black
28. Re8 + AxeS 29 . d x e8 0 # ) [HENLEY) wo ul d like to occupy this s q uare w i t h a
knight) 1 5 .Qh4 N d 5 [ B l a c k offers the
1 -0
ex c h an ge of q u eens before white starts
I. " c a m p i ng o u t " o n the kingside dark
sq ua res . H owever. after the q u e e n trad e .
Bobby's 1 7 . a 4 w i l l fix t h e q u ee n s id e

25.d6 + -

[The

passed

paw n ' s l u s

pawn s. Unfortunately black doe s not


have enough ti m e to f ight for squares on
the q ueenside with 1 5 . . . a4: 1 6. Ne4 ! Nf5
( 1 6 . . . N xe5 1 7. Nxe5 Bxe5 1 8. N g 5 + - ;
1 6 . . . N d 5 1 7 . B g 5 -+ ) 1 7 . Q x d 8 R x d 8
1 8. B g5 Bxe4 (1 8 . . . Rdd7 1 9 . Nf6 + Bxf6
20. Bxf6!) 1 9. Bxd8 Bxf3 20. Bxf3 Nxd8
2 1 . A ad 1 ! + - (Black's poor coordination
allows white to gain a decisive material 1
advanta ge. ) 2 1 . . . N b7 22. Rd7. ] 1 6 Q d !

RxdS 1 7.a41

. x8

[ Bobby surrenders a bis h o p for a knight ,


lea v ing Black with a Bg7 that has no
f uture . ]
[I must have
seen t h ree or fou r games in which
Fischer performed this rook maneuver
w i t h t h i s p a w n s t r u c t u r e on t h e
queenside . ] 24 . . . R c 7 [24 . . . R ed 7 25. Ne4
Kf8 26. R b3 R b7 27. Nxa5 Ra7 2 8 . Nc6 + -]
2 5 . R b 3 Res (Black has managed to
defend for the moment, but his pieces,
one by one, are becoming tied down. ]
1 26. N
[ aving
[ F i x i n g t h e b l a c k c 5 - b 6 - a 5 p a w n black bottl ed up on t h e queenside ,
complex. The next step is to exchange Bobby begins to expand on the kingside.
the light -squared bishops. after which This is quite in keeping with Tarrasc h ' s
the c4- and b 5 - square will be under principles of utilizing an advantage in
[Bobby
white's con t rol . ] 17 ... R a d 7 1 8. B f 1 1
1 spa c e . ]
prepares t h e ma neuver R e 1 -f 1 -f3 - h 3
1 9. Kxf 1 [Bobby re cap t u r e s with the
k i ng as t h e N d 2 is h ead ed f o r c4. ] a ft e r w h i c h b l a c k m u st d efe nd h i s
h - pawn. Eventually black's d efensive
1 9 . . N d e 7 2 0 . N c 4 [The fixed target
comes under attack. ] 20 . . . Nc8 2 1 . B g 5 task will c re a t e a circuit ov e rl oad . ]
3 0 . R f 1 AdS
N6e7 [An ugly pin to be sure, but after
AdS [With
21 . . . Rf8 2 2 . R ad 1 , white adds the d-f i le to no " leg a l " pawn breaks, bl ack can't
his other positional trumps . ] 2 2 . N fd 2 1 unde rtake anyth in g posit ive . ] 3 2 . R h 3
[This knight heads for e 4 t o complete the Bf8 3 . N x a 5 +- ["Tactics flow n atu rally
clampdown on black's position.] 22 h6 from st rategically superior positions"
R obert Fische r. ]
. . . R c 7 (33 . . . bxa5
34. Nf6 + Ke7 3 5 . R b7 + Rc7 36 . Rxc7 +
R d 7 37 . Rxd 7 # ] 34. Nc4 [ H it and run, as
the knight comes back around for a
se c ond hel p i ng . ]
. .Ra7 35.Nxb6

23 ... Rxe7 24.Ra3!

e4 BfS 27.Ke2 Be7 28.f41 H


28 . . . Kf8 2 9 .g 4 1

Bxf1

29 ... Ke8
3

23.Bxe71

..

31 .Rf3

33

34 .

Nxb6

36.Rxb6

R d a 8 [36 Rxa4
Ke7 38.Rb7 + Rd 7 39.Rxd7#;
36 R e7 (As sugested by Fritz an
_
showmg
a ertam see of humr.
Perhaps this Is the ngh t move )
37.Nf6# He l pmate ] 37.Nf6+ KdB
. . .

37.Nf6 +

. . .

(23)

Yurtaev- Dolmatov
USSR, 1984

1.e4 e6 2.d3 cs 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.g3 g6

s.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 Nge7 7.c3 d5 8.Nbd2


. b6 9.Re1 h6 10.e5 Qd7 11.d4 cxd4

1
I

12.cxd4 Ba6 13.a3 g5 14.Nf1 Nf5 15.g4

Nfe7 16.Ng3 0-0-0 17.b4 fS 18.gxf5

Nxf5 19.Nxf5 exf5 20.e6 Qd6 21.a4 g4


22.Nh4 Nxd4 23.b5 Nf3 + 24.Nxf3 Bxa1
25.Nd4 Bb7 26.Nxf5 Qc7 27.e7 1-0

SICILIAN KIA 2 .
.

e6/7 .Re1

CBU253pp #9

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 eG 3.d3 NeG 4.g3 gG


,
'5 .8g 2 B g 7 6 . 0-0 Ng e 7 7.Re 1

DIAGRAM

Another flexib le move, which may


transpose t o

C B U 253 pp #7 or #8
proceeds.

depending on how black


38.Rc61

[As

usual, Bobby

is precision

personified to the very end.]


39 . R d 3 +

Kc 8

41.Rd7 + Kc6 42.Rxf7


(22)

38...Rc7

40 .Rx c 7 +

[HENLEY]

Kxc7
1-0

Ljuboje vic - Timman

Hilversum, 1973

1.e4 e6 2.d3 cs 3.Nf3 Ncs 4.g3 gs


5.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 Nge7 7.c3 0-0 8.d4
cxd4 9.cxd4 d5 10.e5 Nf5 11.Nc3 f6

12.Re1 fxe5 13.dxe5 Bd7 14.814 h6


15.h4 Be8 16.Qd2 Qb6 17.Rad1 Rd8
18.Na4 Qb5 19.b3 Kh7 20.Bf1 Qb4
21.Qxb4 Nxb4 22.Nc5 Bf7 23.a3 b6
24.axb4 bxc5 25.bxc5 Rb8 26.Rb1 aS
27.Bd2 Rfc8 28.Rec1 g5 29.Bd3 g4
30.Nd4 Bg6 31.Nxf5 Bxf5 32.Bxf5+
exfS 33.Bxa5 Bxe5 34.b4 Rb5 35.Rd1
d4 3G.Kf1 ReS 37.Re1 Re7 38.Rbd1
KgG 39.Rxd4 Bxd4 40.Rxe7 KfG 41.Bd8
1-0

(24)

Petrosian- Pachman
Bled, 19G1

1.Nf3 c5 2.g3 NeG 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


S.d3 es 6.e4

[Thus we reach a KIA


versus Sicilian Defence.] G...Nge7 7.Re1
[P r epa r i n g eith er e4-e5. or c2-c3
followed by d3-d4.) 7...0-0 [Or 7 d6!?
leading to normal play for both sides.]
. . .

8.e51! [This familiar spearhead thrust

1 ne

Jvng s

J nwun r..uac.x:

brings attention to the d6- and f6- dark 22.f4 + Kg4 23.Ne3 + Kh5 24.Bf3#]
squares.] s . . . d 6 [If black does not 1 8 . . . Rd8? [Pachman tries to maintain
challenge the advanced e-pawn, white material equality. Fortunately he did not
will clamp down on the dark squares with play the prosaic 18 ... Ng8 allowing
9.Bf4, 10.Nbd2 and 11.Nc4 followed by P e tros i a n to grab t h e exchange
12.Qd2 and 13.Bh6, etc.) 9.exd6 Qxd 6 (19.Bf8+).] 1 9. Qxf6+1 ! [Leading t o a
1 0. N bd2 (Threatens to win the c-pawn , beautiful, but brief king hunt. This
with 11.Ne4 Qd5 12.c4!] 1 0 . . . Qc7 [The concept is possible because so many
white knight harassing the queen has black pieces have left the kingside. With
become annoying for black. With this stroke Petrosian removes the
1o...b6!? black bolsters up the c-pawn, defender of the kingside dark squares,
but weakens the long diagonal (g2-a8). leaving the Emperor "without clothes"!]
Even so, this may have been black's best 1 9 . . . Kxf6 20.Be5 + Kg 5 21 .Bg71 ! [This
chance to equalize.] 1 1 . N b31 [Tickling brilliant touch, sealing off the black K's
the c5-pawn.) 1 1 . . . Nd4 [11...b6 (Now escape (h6), is what really lends a touch
this loses an additional tempo.) 12.Bf4t] of class to this game. [HENLEY] 21...Nf5
12.Bf4t[lt is clear that black has lost too 22.f4+ Kg4 23.Ne5+ Kh5 24.Bf3#;
much time in the opening,and therefore 2 1 . B g 7 e5 22 .h4+ Kh5 (22 ... Kf5
his normal patterns of development have 23.Bh3#) 23.Bf3+ Bg4 24.Bxg4#] 1 -0
been severely disrupted.] 1 2 . . . Qb 6
[Now t h e companion (25) Fische r - Panno
1 3.Ne5 1
B uenos Aires, 1 970
caballero joins the dance.] 13 .. .Nxb3
1 4 . N c 4 1 [An excellent "in between 1 .e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d3 Nc6 4.g3 g&
move".] 1 4 . . . Qb 5? 1 [An ugly queen 5.Bg2 Bg7 6. 0-0 N g e7 7.Re 1 [ The
placement, brought about by a desire to major alternative is 7.c3!?.] 7 . . . d6 8.c3
stay in "touch" with his beleaguered 0 -0 9.d4? 1 cxd4 1 o.cxd4 d5?1 [After this
c - p a w n . Af ter 14 . .. Qd8 15.axb3 white obtains a firm grip on the center.
threatens 16.Bd6 winning the c-pawn. Be t t e r i s 1 o ... Q b6!, a sharper
Black solves the immediate threat with counterattack against the white center
15...Nf5, but how will black complete his introduced by Huebner in 1978. Quite
development with white's bishop pair, possibly this proves that Fischer's 9.d4
knight, and Ra1 bearing down on his is premature.) 1 1 .e5i Bd7 1 2.Nc3 R es
queenside?] 1 5.axb3 [Introducing the 1 3 .Bf4 Na5 1 4. R c 1 b5 1 5.b31 [Bobby
threat 16.Ra5! winning the c-pawn.] wants to play Qd2 & Bh6 (exchanging
1 5 . . . 85 1 6.Bd61 Bf6 [One has the feeling the dark-squared bishops) without being
that black is holding his position together harassed by ...Na5-c4.) 1 5 . . b4 1 6.Ne2
with flour and water. No better is 16... Re8 Bb5 [16...Rxc1 17.Qxc1 Bb5 18.Bh6t;
17.Bc7! forcing at least the gain of one 16 ... R xc1 17.Nxc1!? Bb5 18.Nd3
pawn.] 1 7. Qf31 [The mark of the really (Practically forcing black to give up a
great players is their ability to put a finger bishop for a knight as otherwise the
on the vulnerable point in a position.] knight goes to c5.) 18...Bxd3 19.Qxd3i]
1 7 . . . Kg7 1 8. Re4 [18.Qxf6+!! (A slight 1 7. Qd2 Nac6?1 [Panna allows Bobby to
flaw in this gem by Tigran is that his pursue his plans pretty well without
wonderful concept could have been interruption. Better is 17...Bxe2 18.Qxe2
executed one move sooner.) ... Kxf6 Qb6i (18 ... Rx c1 ?! [Pr ematurely
19.Be5+ Kg5 20.Bg7 e5 21.Rxe5+ Bf5 surrendering the c-file.] 19.Rxc1 Ob6
.

2 0 . 0 c 2 R c 8 ? ? 2 1. Q x c 8 + N x c 8
2 2 . c 8 + Bf8 23 .B h6 + -.) ] 1 8 . g 4 1
[Ga1 1ng space o n the kingside, and
mak1ng room on g 3 for his knight.]
1 8 ... a5? [This was the l ast chance to
play . . . BbS x Ne2. After this the knight
t ravels to g3 where it "e scapes the
i nfluence" of black's pieces.) 1 9.Ng31-+
Qb6 20. h 4 N bS 2 1 .Bh6 [After these
b i s h o p s a r e exc h a n g e d , t h e d a r k
squares around black's king will have
very littl e protection.] 2 1 ... Nd7 22.0g51
(The white pieces are flood i n g the
king side, and now motifs l ike 23.Bxg7
Kxg7 followed by 24. N h5 + are in the
air.] 22 ... Rxc 1 23.Rxc 1 Bxh6 24.0xh6
ReS (Panna hopes that by exchanging
off pieces he will obtain some relief.
While in principal this is the correct
strategy in a cramped position, there
was really no way to repair the inherent
weaknesses of his kingside.] 25.Rxc8 +
Nxc8 26.h5-+ [Fischer presses on, even
w i t h red u c e d mat e r i a l .] 2 6 . . . 0 d 8
27.Ng51 [It i s important to force the
black knight to f8 so the black queen is
p revented from playi n g t h e r e a nd
bolstering black's d efenses. ] 27 ... Nf8
28. Be41 1 [Fischer conducts the attack
with crystal clarity.] 28 ... 0 e7 (28 . .. dxe4?
2 9 . N 3 x e 4 Q e 7 3 0 .N f6 +
Kh8
31 .Ngxh7 + -1 29.Nxh71 [The hits just
keep coming! ] 29 ... Nxh7 30. hxg6 fxg6
[30 ... Nf8 31.g7 + -; 30 ... dxe4 31 . Qxh7 +
Kf8 32.Qh8#] 31 .Bxg6 Ng5 (3 1 . . . Be8
32. Bxh7 + Qxh7 33.Qxe6 + Kf8 34. 0xc8
O b 1 + 35. Kg2 Qxa2 36. Nf5 + - {The
q u e e n and kn i g h t make a d ea d l y
atta c k i n g c o m b i nati o n . ) 3 6 .. . Qxb3
{36 ... Qe2 37. Nd6) 37. 0c7 Bf7 38.0d8 +
Be8 39.Qe7 + Kg8 40.Qg7#) 32. N h5
Nf3 + 33. Kg 2 N h 4 + 34. Kg3 Nxg6
3 5 .N f 6 +I Kf7 3 6. 0 h 7 + [H ENLEY:
36 . . . Kf8 37. 0gB# Another cla ssic by
Bobby! ] 1 -0

(26)

H e nley Fritz
BON US GAME #6, 1 993
-

1 .e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d3 Nc6 4.g3 g 6


5. Bg2 B g 7 6.0-0 Ng e7 7.Re1 0- 0 8.c3
d5 [This allows White a favorable pawn
structure. More flexible is 8 . . . d6. ] 9. e5 b6
(9 . . . f6 1 O.exf6 Bxf6 11.Bf4! By keeping
control of e5, w h ite g a i n s a clear
p o s i t i o n a l a d va nt a g e . ]
1 o. d 4 ;!;
[Esabl i shing the same pawn structure
as 1n the classic game, Fischer-Panna
Buenos Aires 1 970 .] 10 ... cxd4 1 1 .cxd 4
Bb7? 1 (Black' s problem is that while
white has a clear pl an on the ki gside,
.
he h as to fmd meaningful counterplay.
The text, wh1l_ d evel oping a piece,
merely places it on a passive square.
Better is 1 1 . . . Ba6! ? . ] 1 2. Bf4 a6 1 3.h4
( M y l a st two m oves are aimed at
improving my grip on the king side dark
squares.] 1 3 ... RcS 1 4.0d21 [With the
d ual purpose of preventing . .. Nc6-b4
a n d s u p port i n g the t h r u st Bf4 - h 6 .
1 4 . . . N f5 1 5 .N c 3 Od7? 1 [This move
seems to strengthen Fritz on the l ight
squares, but they are not the complex 1
am taking control of. Al so the text allows
me to kick the knight from f5. ] 1 6.g41 t
Nfe7 1 7.h5 gxh5 [One positional threat
was h5-h6 and g4-g5 to bury the black
bishop on h8.] 1 8.gxh5 RfdS? I [This
r e m ove s a n o t h e r p i e c e f r o m t h e
endangered sector. For better o r worse
Fritz should try for cou nterplay wit h
18 . . . f6!?.] 1 9. B h61 (Depriving the black
king of a key defend er.] 1 9 . . . Bxh6
20.0xh6 N f5 2 1 . 0f4 Oe7 22. Bh 3 1 -+
[Now the black knight gets pushed to the
rear edge of the board.] 22 ... Ng7 23.h6
N e8 [This knight now cuts his own rooks
from protecting the black king.] 24. Kh2
( Here not fore seeing any immed iate
tactical probl e m s , Frit z c o n s i d e red
wh ite's advantage to be merely .35
p a w n . An e x p e r i e n c e d h u m a n
opponent , however, sees black has no

22

The King's Indian Attack!

counterplay, passive pieces and weak


squares.] 24 ... Kh8 25.Rg 1 [Now, thanks
to the poor communication between
Fritz:s forces, I can double and triple or
t h e g -f i l e u n c o n t e st e d . ] 2 5 . . . R c 7
26.Rg31 [Of course doubl ing rooks is
clearly the next step, but the choice of
square is worth noting. By not going to
g 2 , I l eave open the possi bil ity of
Bh3 -f 1-d3.] 2 6 .. . B c 8 2 7. Ra g 1 O f 8
28.Qg5 [Threatens 29. 0gB + leading to
mate.] 28 . . . Ne7 29.N e 2 [Now that Fritz
is in the "box", I bring my knight to h5 to
a s s i st in t h e execut i on . ] 29 . . . B b 7
[ U n a b l e t o f i n d a n y c o n st r u ct ive
counterplan, Fritz awaits events. Even
here he considered white's advantage to
be less than a pawn. ] 30.Nf4 [Threatens
3 1. B x e 6 ! fxe6 3 2 . N x e 6 w i n n i n g
material.] 3 0. . . Bc8 31.Bf1 1 [How many
games have we seen where our KIA
bishop rel ocates via f1 to either d3 or c4
w i t h d e c i s ive effect? ] 3 1 . . . B b 7
[3 1. . . Rc2? 32. Qxe7! ! + - This deflection
queen sac refutes black's a ttempt to
activate his rook.] 32 ... Rxf2 + 33. Kh1
Qxh6 + 34.Nh3 + -) 32. Bd3 [From its
new perch, the bishop suddenly eyes the
critical h7-pawn.] 3 2 , .. Rdc8 [32 . . . Ng6?
33. Bxg6 hxg6 3 4. Qxd8 + -] 33.N h5 b5
[33 . .. Ng6 [ Blocking the g -file.] 34. Nf6: A)
34 . . . Q e 7 3 5 . N x h 7 ! Qxg5 (35 . . . Kxh 7
3 6 . B x g 6 + + -) 3 6 . N h x g 5 + - N f 4?
37. Nxf7 + Rxf7 38. Rg8#; B) 34 . . . Nxf6
3 5 . Qxf6 + Kg8 36. Bxg6 hxg6
(36 . . . Qxh6 + 3 7 . Bh5 + ! ) 3 7 . Rxg6 + !
(3 7 . h 7 + + -) . . . fxg6 3 8 . Rxg6 + R g 7
( 3 8 . . . K h 7 3 9 . N g 5 # ) 39. Rxg7 + K h 8
40. Rh7 + ! Kxh7 41.Ng5 + Kg8 42. h7#]
34.0g 7 + I I + - [This q ueen sacrifice
concludes the game, as Fritz's king is
overwhelmed by the onslaught of white
pieces. ] 34 ... Qxg 7 [34. . . Nxg7 35. hxg7 +
Qxg7 (35 . . . Kg8 36. Nf6#) 36. Rxg7 + -]
35. hxg7 + Kgs 36.Bxh7 + I [This bishop
is reward ed by sacrificing itself to decoy

the black king onto the h-file.] 36 ... Kxh 7


3 7. N f 6 + I N x f 6 3 8 . R h 3 + N h 5
39.Rxh5 + Kg a 40.Rh8# [HENLEY] 1 -0

FRENCH KIA 6 ... Bg7/7... Nge7


CBU253pp #1 0
1 .e4 e6 2 .d3 d5 3.Nd 2
As in the Caro -Kann, white adopts this
move order in the French KIA to prevent
the exchange of queens after 3 .. . dxe4.
3 . . . c5
N o w t ra n s p o s it i o n s to " S i c i l i a n "
positions are possible - but here we will
only consider ind ependent " French"
positions.
4.Ngf3 Nc6 5 .g3 g6 6.Bg2 Bg 7 7.0-0
Nge7 8.Re 1 0-0 - DIAGRAM
T h i s position could also arise from
C B U 2 5 3 p p # 6, d e m o n st rati n g t h e
relationship between some of the French
and Sicilian lines in the KIA.

(2 7)

Lj u bo je vic - H ulak
Rovi nj/Zag reb, 1 975

[This the matic b i s h o p d evel opment


overprotects my e5-pawn, and helps to
strengthen my grip on the dark squares.]
1.e4 es 2.d3 c5 3.Nf3 Ncs 4.g3 d5
16 ... Bb7 [Fritz relocates his bishop to a
5.N bd2 Nge7 6.Bg 2 g 6 7.0-0 Bg7 8.R e1
m o re promising d iagonal . ] 1 7. 0d 2 1
o-o 9.c3 Qc7 1 0. exd5 Nx d5 1 1 .Nc4 b6
[Here 1 pursue a pla n which i s familar to
1 2.Ng5 Bb7 13.0g4 Ra d8 1 4. Rx e6 h6
K I A s t u d e nt s
t h e e x c h a n g e of
1 5. Nxf7 Oxf7 1 6.0 e2 Nxc3 1 7.bxc3
dark-squared bishops. Consumation of
Bxc3 1 8. Bx c 6 Bxc6 1 9 . B b2 Rd eS
t h i s p l a n w i l l l eave F ri t z ' s f6- a n d
20.Bxc3 Rx e6 2 1 .N e5 Bf3 22.Qf 1 Of5
h6-sq uares vul nera bl e. A n interesting
23. R e 1 RfeS 24.d4 cxd4 25. 0c4 dxc3
st rateg ical concept t h at fal l s s h ort
26.Nxf3 Oc5 27.0b3 K f7 2 8. R d1 Kf 8
against accurate defence is 1 7. g4 N h6
29. R d5 Qc 7 30.Nd4 R e4 3 1 . N b5 Oc4
1 8. Bxh6!? Bxh6 1 9. g5 Bg7 20. N g4. Here
32.Nxc3 R e1 + 33.Kg2 Of1 + 34. Kf3
white has some attacking chances, but
R 1 e3 + 35. Kg 4 Qxf2 36. Oc4 Of3 +
by delaying any exchange on f6 and
37. K h 3 Rxc3 3 8. 0h4 Qf1 + 39.Kg4
bringing h i s knight to the excel l e nt
Rc4 + 0 -1
d ef e n s ive s q u a re o n f5 bla c k c a n
d efend. ] 1 7... Rg 8 18.g4 Nfe7 1 9. Bh61
(2 8) Hen ley Fritz
[Of course the benefits of this exchange
BONUS GAME #7, 1 993
are of the long term nature.] 1 9 ... Bxh6
1 .e4 es 2.d3 d5 3.N d2 c5 4.Ngf3 Nc6 20.Qxh6 N b4 2 1 .Ra d1 1? [Here I offer
5.g3 g 6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7.0-0 Nge 7 8.R e1 the a2 -pawn as bait to gain time for my
o-o 9. 0e2 b6 1 0. Nf1 Bas 1 1 . e5 i [ I n kingside plans. Certain ly 2 1 . Qd2 was
princi pl e I am doubtful o f variations reas o n a b l e as t h e b l a c k k i n g s id e
where black plays ... e6 and . . . g6 while wea knesses are not easily repaired . )
allowing white a spearhead pawn on e5. 2 1 ... Nxa2 [ Fri tz i s a material ist at heart
This creates long term dark-square (chip? ) , especially when he can't see any
problems for black and gives white some immediate tactica l response. ) 22. Ng5
clear targets. ] 1 1 . . . 0 d7 1 2. h 4 Raes Rg 7 [Threatening 23 ... Ng8 trapping my
1 3.N 1 h 2 Nf5 [Threatening to obtain Oh6. ) 23. Ne4 Ng 8 [23 ... Bxe4 24. Bxe4
counterplay with a knight going to d4.) Here Frit z could el iminate one of my
14 .c3 [Preventing the black knights from knights, but this bishop on e4 looks like
entering d4 with tempo, but this does a decent a ttacking piece also.] 24. Qf4
weaken my d3-pawn.] 1 4 ... d4 [After this RbB 25.Nf61 Nxf6?1 [This al lows me to
the center is locked and I have a free transform my KIA e5 spearhead pawn
h and to pursue my king side ambitions. into a l ittle monster on f6. ) 26.exf6!
I nteresting is 1 4 . . . f6!? . This central pawn [This l ittle guy now has the black king
break would be the logical follow to the sealed off i n the corner. ] 26 ... Rgg 8
black piece placement : 15. exf6 Bxf6 27.Re5 [With the text I wan ted to clamp
1 6. Ng4 Bg7 1 7. Bf4i. As l ong as white down on the g5-square, but 27. Bxb7 was
can control the e5 -square he has a clear p r o b a b l y a s m o o t h e r a p p r o a c h :
positional plus. At least here, however, 27. Bxb7 !? Qxb7 28. Nf3 N b4 29. Re4 ! ?
th e black pieces are all actively posted .]
with t h e plan of Qf4-h6 a n d Nf3-g5.]
15 .c4 KhB [Now 15 . . f6? ! would be 27 . . . Bxg2 2 8. Kxg 2 N b4 29.Nf3 O d8
positionally h opeless as the e4-square [Fritz delays my q ueen entry at h6 by
falls i nto wh ite's hands. I n a ddition the kee ping an eye on my f6-pawn. Also
Bas woul d n ow be out of play.) 16.Bf4
-

24

The King:5lndian Attack!

possible i s 29 . . .Qd6 3 0. Q h6 Qc6, trying This system i s u sually arrived at by the


to prevent Nf3-g5 by pinning my pieces French Defence move order.
with his queen (3 0. . . Qf8 3 1 . Ng5! ! + -) :
3 1. K g 3 Q d 6 3 2 .N g 5 ! ( 3 2 . K h 3 + - ) 6 . B g 2 N g e 7 7 .0-0 0 - 0 8.Re1
. . . Q x e5 + 3 3 . Kg 2 Q x g 5D 3 4 . h x g 5 ! DIAGRAM
(Opening the h-file. ) 3 4. . . b5 35.Qxh7 +
Kxh7 36. R h 1 # . ) 30.Ng5t R b7 [3 0. . . Qf8
3 1 . R x e 6 ! fxe6 (3 1 . . . h 6 32 . R e 7 ! + -)
32.0c7! +- R b7 33.Qxb7 Oaa 34. Nf7# ;
3 0 . . . Rf8 3 1 .Ne4 ! (Protecting the f6-pawn
so the q ueen can go to h6.) 31 . . . Rg8
3 2 . Q h 6 ! QfB 33 . N g 5 ! ! (A t h e matic
variation which shows the white pieces
obtaining maxim um util ization of the
dark square s.) 33 . . . Qxh6 34.Nxf7#.)
3 1 . h 5 1-+ [Stronger than 3 1 . Rxe6 fxe6
( 3 1 ... h6 3 2 . Re4 hxg5? 33 . hxg5 Rea
34.R h 1 + KgB 35.Qh2 +-) 32.f7 Qe7 0
(3 2 . .. Rf8? 3 3 . Q e5 + + -) 3 3 . fx g 8 0 +
Kxg8f. ] 3 1 . . . h6 [Fritz tries to lock the
king side pawn structure. White still has
an attac k after 3 1 . . . gxh5 32.0e4 ! + (29) Katz - Va lvo
Mc Cor mick Fut uri ty, 1 99 1
Rxg5 33.Rxg5 Qxf6 34.f4 R b8 35. Rh1
Rg8 36. R hxh5 h6 (36 ... Rg7 37. Qa8 + + -)
1 .Nf3 d 5 2.g3 c5 3.d3 Nc6 4.Bg 2 e 6
37.Qe5! Rg6 (37 . . . Qxe5 3 8 . R xh 6 # )
5.0-0 Bd S S. Nbd2 Ng e7 7. e4 0 -0 8.R e 1
3B. Rxg6 + - Qxe5 39. Rhxh6# ; 3 1 . . . Nc6! ?
[ 8 . N h4
b6
( 8 . .. B e5 ! ?
32. R h 1 -+ . ) 3 2 . R h 1 11 + - [ T h e r o o k
Zuckerman -Va syukov, P olanica Zdroj
prepares t o greet the black king on the
1972. ; B . . .f5 ! ? H u g-lvkov, Palm a de
h-file.] 32 ... Nxd3 33.Nxf7 +I [Th is_ knight
1 9 7 2 .;
8 . . . B d 7 !?
M a l l o rca
sacrifices i tsel f to break down the black
Hard i n g -Penrose, England 1 972 and
kingside pawn structure and allow my
Ciocaltea-Pad evsky, I stanbul 1 975 .;
queen to enter h6 with tempo.] 33 ... Rxf7
8 .. . 0 c 7! R i g o - Sax , H u n ga r i a n Ch.
34.Qxh 6 + R h 7 35.h xg61 1 [Offering th e
1 976.) ] s . . . Qc 71 [Valvo
I b e l i e ve
queen to open the h-file.) 35 . . . Qa 8+
D 'Amore effect ivel y refuted 8 . . . B c 7:
[ 3 5 . . . R g g 7 36. Q x g 7 # ; 3 5 . . . 0 d 7
9 . exd5 N x d 5 1 0 . N e 4 b6 (
J ohn
3 6 . Q x h 7 + Qxh7 37. Rxh7 #] 36. R d 5 1
Watson) 1 1 .d4! cxd4 1 2. Nxd4 Bb7?!
[3 6 .f3 + - ] 3 6 . . . N f 4 + 3 7 . K f 3 R x h 6
( 1 2 . . . Nxd4 13.Qxd4 B b7 ! w ould be
[ 3 7 . . . R g g 7 3 8. Q x g 7 # ) 3 8. R x h 6 #
better) 13 . B g5 Nde7? ? 1 4. Nf6 + ! +
[HENLEY] 1 -0
(1 -Q, D 'Amore-Valvo, NY Open 199 0 . )
1 4 . . . gxf6 (14 . . . Kh8 15.Qh5 h6 16.Bxh6
FRENCH KIA 5...Bd6/6 ... Nge7
g xf6 1 7 . B g 5 + K g ? 1 8 .Q h 6 + KgS
CBU253pp # 1 1
1 9. Bxf6 Nf5 20 . 0 h8 # ) 1 5 . B xf6 QeS
16. Nxc6 Bxc6 17.Qd2! Bxg2 18.Qg5+
1 . e4 e 6 2.d 3 d5 3 .Nd2 c5 4 .Ngf3 N cs Ng6 19.Qh6 + -] 9.c3 [9.b3?! Calvo de
5.g3 Bd6
M inguez-Karpov, Madrid 1973.] 9 .. . B d7
1 0.b3 N
[ 1 0 . Qe2 !
f6
11.a3
=

1he Kmg 's lndwn /ltrack!


Fischer-D iCamil l o, Log Cabin CC 1 957;
1 1 .Nf1 Caldwell-Sax, London 1 990 and
Zaitsev-Gufeld, USSR Ch. 1 969; 1 1 . b3
Marti n ovsky-Lindsay , I l l inois 1 98 8. ) ]
10 ... b5 1 1 . Bb2 f6 1 2.Q e2 b4?1 [ Perhaps
l ulled by his opponent's passive play,
M ik e was a b it hasty h e re . E i t h e r
1 2 . . . Rae8! ? or 1 2 . . . Rab8!?, removing the
rook from the long diagonal (g2 -a8) and
protecting the b5-pawn , feels rig ht. )
1 3. c4 1 ? [ 1 3.d4! bxc3 1 4. Bxc3 cxd4
1 5. Nxd4 Nxd4 1 6. Bxd4 e5 =] 13 ... d4
[1 3 . . . Rae8 1 4. exd5 exd5 1 5. cxd5 Nxd5
1 6.Qf1 oo] 14.Kh 1 ? 1 [A bit too passive.
Stron g er is 1 4. e5 ! ? Bxe5 (1 4 . . . fxe5
1 5. Ne4 ii!l Probably equal ) 15. Nxe5 Nxe5
1 6. Bxa8 Rxa8 1 7.a3 !!.] 14 .. es; [Now
black has a large space advantage , and
white suffers without counterplay for a
long time. This is the danger of playing
the w h ite side of the KI A and n ot
aggressively pursuing logical strategic
plans. ] 15 . N g 1 Oc al [Mi ke prevents
1 6.Bh3 and the subsequent exchange of
h is good B.] 16.Rf1 Ng 61 [Nimzovich
restraint, as white is denied the f2-f4
pawn push.] 1 7 f3 a5 1 8.a4? 1 [Hoping
to block up the queenside, so he can
concentrate on defending the kingside.
Much stronger is 1 8. Rf2 ! followed by
Qe2-f1 and Bg2-h3. This was Katz's
original idea and preferable.] 18 .. . bxa31
[With a large space ad vantage, black
can maneuver back and forth (from
queenside to kingside) , much easier
th an white can. Therefore, Mike correctly
doe s n ot allow White to c l ose t h e
queenside.] 19. Rxa3 N b41 [The knight
t h r e a t e n s t o i nvad e f u rt h e r w i t h
.. Nc2-e3 . ] 2 0 . Rc 1 Rf7 2 1. Bf 1 B e6
22.0d1 Rfa71 [Excellent play, as M ike
keeps the threat of ... a5-a4 hanging over
Wh ite's head . ] 23 .Rca 1 B d7 24. Kg 2
N fSI [Mike relocates the knight and frees
h is kingside pawns for action. This game
i s an excellent study in the Tarrasch
.

.<..,

principles of u tili zing a space ad vantage


with play on both sides.) 25.Be2 g 61 [A
m ulti-purpose m ove, a s black prepares
t o play . . . f6-f5 , and the relocation of his
Bd6.] 26.h4?1 (When you stand worse,
such pawn moves g enerally have a
weaken ing effect o n your position . ]
26 . . . N e 6 2 7 . N h 3 N g 7 1 [Excellent
maneuvering, as the knight heads for h5,
where it will keep an eye on g3. ) 28.Nf2
Qe81 [Giving added protection to the
h5-square, before placing his knig ht
there, and lending support to a potential
. . .a5-a4 pawn push . ] 29.Qc1 h5 [Mike
decides to restrain white on the kingside,
and relocate his Bd6. This shows nice
flexi bil ity i n t h i n k i ng . ] 3 0 . B d1 N e6
3 1 .Nf1 Bf81 32. 0d2 [ So as to m eet
32 . . . Kh7 with 33. Bc1 , preventing black's
intended ... Bf8-h6.] 32 ... g5!t [At last,
black breaks on the kingside.] 33.hxg5
fxg 5 34. N h 3 Qg6 3 5 . N h 2 Nf4 + 1- +
[Fo rc in g a d ec i s ive breakt h ro u g h . ]
36.Nx f4 [36.gxf4 gxf4 + 37.Ng4 hxg4
38.fxg4 Bxg4- + ] 36 ... g xf4 37.g4 Qg 51?
[White is so bottl ed up that 36 .. . Be6 &
37 . . . Rh7 seems l ike it should force a
decisive result on the kingside. Black
can even play 37 . . . Nc6 (to protect aS) if
he really wanted to deny the wh ite rooks
any activity. ] 38. B e2 hxg 4! [ M i ke is
tactically alert, and combines play on
both sides of the board. Who would
imagine this pawn capture on the g-fil e
will result in a knight fork on rooks on the
a-file?] 39.fxg4 f3 + I [The point, as after
t h e queen exchange, the c2-square will
b e u n p rot e c t e d ! ] 4 0 . N x f 3 Qx d2
41.Nx d2 Nc2 42.g5 Nxa 3 43.Rxa3 a4
44.Nf3 B d6 45. N h4 Rb7 46.Nf5 Bxf5
[46 . . . Bf8 ! 47. Bd 1 R aa7! 48. B c 1 axb3
49. Rxa7 Rxa7 50.Bxb3 Ra1 5 1 . Bd2 Rb1
52. Bc2 Rb2- + Dom ination by the rook
over t h e b i s h op s . ] 47. exf5 Rxb 3
48.Ra 2 a3 4 9.Ba 1 e4 [49 . . . Rab8! 50. Kf2
Kg7 -+] 5 0 . 16 e x d3 51.Bf3 Real- +

The

26

King's Indian Attack!

5 2. g S [52. Bd5 + Kh7! O n e point of


5 1 . . .Re8! is black now threatens Kh7-g6,
and white does not have 53 Be4 + to
d rive black back.] 52 . . . Re5! [Threatens
53 . . . Rg5 +, thus forcing white to allow
black to return the exchange and break
up the g6 & f6 pawn d uo.] 53 .B d5 + D
[53.g7 Rg5 + 54. Kf2 (54.Kh1 Rb1 + - + )
R f 5 - + ( 5 4 . . . B g 3 + ! ? ) ] 53 . . . R x d 5
54.cx d5 d21 [ Black also sacrifices his
forward passed d-pawn to destroy the
duo.] 55. Rx d2 [55.f7 + Kg7 56. R xd2
Kxg6- + 57. Rf2 Bf8 58. d6 Rb6 59.d7
Rd6- + ] 55 ... Rg 3 + 5 S.Kf1 Rxg S 5 7.Rf2
Kf7 58. Ke2 Rxf S [ VALVO/HE NLEY] 0- 1
(30)

Sznapik - Ka rp ov
Skopje Olympiad,

1 9 72

1 8.Bxc6 Qxc6 1 9. Rxe5 B b 7 20.f3 +-)


1 8. Bxa8 Rxa8 1 9. Bf4 Nc6 20. Bxc7 Qxc7
2 1 .Rxe6 + -. ] 1 5 ... gxf S=i= 1 S.Ng4 [ 1 6.Bh3
Nf5 1 7. Ng4 Kh8] 16 . . .e51 [Now Karpm
has a grip on the center and it is white
who must search for play.) 1 7. B h 3 Qee
[ 1 7 . . . Qd6!?] 1 8.BhS R f 7 1 9 . B d2
[1 9. Bg5 fxg5 20. Nh6 + Kh8 2 1 .Nxf7 +
Q xf7 2 2 . N xg 5 O g 6 2 3 . Qf3 B b 7 +
Eventually the black minor pieces wil l
push white back.] 1 9 . . . Kh 8+ 20.Kh 2
Bc8 [This creates the possibility of
21 . . . h5, sending the Ng4 to h6 where h
could easily be corralled . ] 2 1 . Qe2 Bd 7
22. Ng 1 f5 [Karpov goes for central
expansion after which whi te is graduall y
strangled.] 23.Nh S Rg 7 24. Bg 5 Qg 6
25.Bg2 Ng 81 26.Nxg 8 [Otherwise the
knight may never have another chance
to escape. This exchange allows blac k
t o t r i p l e o n t h e h a l f - o p e n g -f i l e . ]
2 6. . . Raxg 8-+ 27.0 d 2 f4-+ [The Bg5
find s itself trapped behind enemy pawn
lines. Karpov once told me his greatest
contribution to chess was play against
an opponent's misplaced piece.] 2 8. Be 4
Qd6 29.Qe2 Be 81 [Preparing to play
. . . h7-h6, but first preventing Oe2 -h5.]
30. B d5 Rf8 3 1 .gxf4 [3 1 . Nf3 h6 32. Kg 2
Hoping for some play on the open h-fil e
s h o u l d b l a c k c a pt u r e t h e B g 5.
32 .. .Bh5 ! - + ] 3 1 ...h SI [With preparations
compl ete, Karpov captu res his prey. Not
3 1 . . . exf4?? 32. 0xe8 Rxea 3 3 . R xe8 +
R g 8 3 4 . R xg 8 # . ] 3 2 . fxe 5 Qxe5 + I
33.Qx e5 Nxe5 34.f4 [34. Bxh6 Ng4 +
35. Kg2 Rxf2 + 36. Kh3 Rh2#) 34 ... Ng4 +
3 5 . K g 3 Ne3 [KARPOV/HE N LEY. The
Bg5 is falling.) 0- 1

1 . e4 c5 2.Nf3 es 3.d3 Ncs 4.g3 d5


5 . N bd 2 B dS S. Bg2 Ng e7 7.0-0 0 -0
8. Re 1 [8. Nh4!?] 8... Bc 7? 1 [The idea of
this move is to take the sting out of e4-e5
by white. ] 9.c3 b S [9 . . . Ng6!? (To prevent
e4-e5 . ) ] 1 0.h4 [Planning to chase the
Ng6. ] 1 0 ... b S [Planning to focus on the
d3-pawn. ] 1 1 .h5 Nge5 1 2.Nxe5 Nxe5
1 3.Qe2 B a St ) 1 o. es as [ 1 0 . . . Ng6? !
(Now this idea is too late.) 1 1 .d4 cxd4
1 2. c xd4 Nb4 1 3. Nf1 , and white has a
large space advantage in the center.]
1 1 . N f 1 B a s 1 2. h 4 d 4 1 3 . c 4 Od 71
[ 1 3 . . . Ng6 1 4. h5 Ngxe5 1 5. Nxe5 Nxe5
1 6.Bf4! (This in-between t empo on the
Ne5 forces a retreat to a less active
square.) 1 6 .. . Nd7 (1 6 . . .f6 1 7. B xa8 Oxaa
1 8. Bx e5 Bxe5 1 9.f4 Bc7 20 . R xe6 + -)
1 7 . B x a 8 B x f 4 1 8 . B g 2 ] 1 4 . N 1 h 2
[ 1 4. h5 ! ? ] 1 4 ... f5 [ 1 4 . . .f6!? 1 5.exf6 gxf6
1 6 . Bh3 Nf5 ! 1 7. B h 6 Rf7 1 8 . 0d 2 oo;
1 4 . .. Ng6 1 5. Ng4 h5 1 6. N g5 oo] 1 5.exf S?
(3 1) Calvo Minguez - Ka rpov
[ With the queenside locked . black's only
Madrid , 19 73
counterplay after 1 5.a4! is to attack the
e5 -pawn. This however is insuffic ient. 1 .e4 c5 2 .Nf3 e6 3. d3 Ncs 4.g 3 d5
Therefore white would be able to build 5. N bd 2 Bd6 6.Bg2 N g e 7 7.0-0 0 -0
up for a kings ide attack: 1 5 . . . Ng6 1 6.h5! 8. R e1 Qc7! [Black restrains white frol11
N g x e 5 1 7 . N x e 5 N x e 5 ( 1 7 . .. B x e 5 ? an a u t omatic k in g s i d e bu i l d up.

The

King's Indian Attack!

be gi n n i n g with 9 . e5 . N ot 8 . . . B c7? !
Sz n a p i k-Karpov, Sko p je 01. 1 972 . )
9.b3?! [A bit passive.] 9... Bd7 10.Bb2
d 4 ! [Anatoly prevents 1 1 . e5 , while
securing a large space advantage even
at the cost of surrendering his Bd6.
However, with t he center blocked , the
bishops have to fight for meaningful
activity.] 1 1. Nc4 e5f 1 2.a4 b6 1 3.Qd2?
[I n this gam e , Calvo fails to find a
coord inated st rategic plan to obtain
counterp lay. The logical result of this is
that Karpov slowly assumes control of
the whole board. Better is 1 3 .Nxd6 Qxd6
14. Rf1 ! with the plan of moving the Nf3
and playing f2 -f4 to obtain counterplay.]
1 3 . . . f6 1 4.h4? 1 Qb8 1 5. Ba 3? 1 [Calvo
misinterprets the requirements of the
position , and plays for b3-b4 only to
change his mind a few moves later.
Much st ronger is 1 5. Nxd6! . This was the
l ast chance to t ake this bishop and
regroup for f2-f4.] 1 5 Bc7 1 6 .Reb 1? 1
[Even if you have an Imperfect plan,
sometimes it is better to follow through
than to vacillate back and forth and do
nothing. Better is 1 6. b4!? cxb4 1 7.Bxb4
Nxb4 1 8.Qx b4 N c6: A ) 1 9. Q b3 Be6
(1 9 ... Kh8!?) 20. Bh3! Bf7 2 1 . Nfd2 f Black
has the bishop pair,bu tat least all of the
white pieces function; B ) 1 9. Qb5 with
some counterplay. ] 1 6 ... Be61 + [ Ka rpov
is extremely dangerous when he knows
exact l y w h at you wa nt in a c h e s s
po sition. Here he makes the intended
b3 -b4 push a bit less appetizing for white
- e . g . , 1 7. b4? ! Bxc4 (T he point of
1 6 . . . B e 6 is t h e fol l ow i n g s e ri e s of
exchanges which leave the white pawn
st ru ct u re w i t h fixed w ea k n e s ses . )
1 B.dxc4 cxb4 1 9.Bxb4 Nxb4 20.Qxb4
B d6+. ] 1 7.Kh2 Qcs 1 8 .Qe2?1 ( 1 8. b4
cx b4 1 9 . B x b 4 N x b4 20.Qxb4 Nc6
21 .Qb5 Qd7+] 1 8. ..B g 4 19.Qf1 f51t
[Karpov prevents the intended 20. B h3
and expands on t h e kin gside.] 20.Ncd2
.

27

[ N ot 2 0 . B h 3 ? f x e 4 - + . ] 2 0 . . . f4- +
[Securing a spearhead at f4, it i s now a
matter of time before Karpov brings the
rest of the troops to the kingside to finish
white off. 2 1 . Bh3 h 5! Now anytime white
exchanges bishops on g4, the black
h-pawn will recapture on g4. Note how
so often when things have gone wrong
strategically, it seems the solution to one
problem leads to another. ] 22.Qg2 Ng6
23.Ng5 BdB 24. Ngf3 Be7! [Now b2-b4
by white is completely ruled out.] 25. Rg 1
Qe6 26 . Raf1 Rf7 27.Rh 1 RafB 28.Kg 1
Q d6 29.Kh2 a6 3 0. Kg 1 [White can no
longer undertake anything active as he
is hog-tied , as we say in Texas.] 3 0.. . Rf6
31.Bxg4? 1 [Finally Calvo gets tired of
waiting for Karpov to come and get him,
but thi s just hastens the end : 3 1 . Kh2 (If
white keeps passing, one plan is for
black to o rganize the g7-g5 pawn break.)
... NhB!? 32.Kg1 Nf7 33. Kh2 Rg6 34. Kg 1
Rh6 35. Kh2 Qe6 36. Kg 1 g 5 37. hxg5
(37. Kh2 Bxh3 38.Qxh3 g4- + ) ... Bxg5!
3B.Nxg5 Nxg5 (This way the reserve Nd2
can't come to f3 to bolster the white
k i n g s i d e . ) 39. Bxg4 hxg4 4 0 . R x h 6
(40 . g xf4 R xf 4 -+) . . . Q x h 6 4 1 . g xf4
(41. Rd 1 N h3 +- +) N h3 +- +] 3 1 . ..hxg 4
3 2 . N g 5 f3 [Wh ite is hopel essly
entombed on the kingside. This game
serves as a lesson for peopl e who want
to play the KIA without proper strategical
planning.] 3 3 . Qh 2 Nh BI 3 4 . R c 1 ?
[34. R b1 R h6 35. Nc4 Qc7 36. B c 1 Bxg5!
37. Bxg5 R h5 38. Kf1 Nf7 39. Bd2 b5 This
too is just a matte r of time, but at l east
whi t e d o e s n o t l o s e m a t e ri a l
immediatel y.] 34 .. . R h 6 3 5 . N c 4 Qc7
[HENLEY; 3 5 . . . Q c7- + T h e N g5 is
stranded (36 . . . Bxg5) . ] 0-1

( 32)

Ka va le k - Henley
Cha mpionship, 1 984

U.S..

1.e4 e6 2. d3 d 5 3.N d2 cs 4.Ngf3 N c6


5 .g 3 B d6 6. Bg2 N g e7 7. 0-0 0-0 8 . R e 1

The King:\

28

Indian Attack!

Bc7 9.Nh4 R b8 10.f4 f S 1 1.Nhf3 b 5


1 2. a 4 a s 1 3 . Kh 1 c 4 +! 14 .ax b 5
[HENLEY; Here Lubosh offered a draw.
feeling white had no advantage, and the
resulting liquidation woul d leave l ittle for
either s i de to play for. When I was a boy,
I lost on the bl ack side of a KIA vs
Caro-Kann to L ubosh in a ph one match:
14 . . axb5 15.exd5 exds 16.dxc4 dxc4
( 1 6 . . . bxc4 1 7. N f 1 t) 1 7 . N e4 Qxd1
18. Rxd 1 Bf5 1 9.Nh4 Bg4 20. Bf3 Bxf3 +
21.Nxf3 Rfd8 22. B e3 Nd5 2 3 B f2 Ndb4+t]
.

Jf-Jf

{33)

Henley - Fritz
BONUS GAME #8, 1993

1.e4 es 2. d3 d5 3 .Nd2 c5 4.Ngf3 Ncs


5 .g3 Bd S S.Bg 2 Ng e7 7 .0 0 0-0 8. Re1
Oc7 9.c3 Bd7 1 o.Oe2 Ngs [1o . . f6]
11.a3!? RfdS 12.b4 b6 13.d4! cxd4
14.cxd4 RdcS [1 4 ... dxe4 1 5.Nxe4;t]
1 5.e 5 [Now I h a ve a h uge spacE:
advantage.] 15 . B e 7 16.h 4 1 [My
h-pawn gains time at the expense of the
Ng6. ) 1S... a S?I 1 7 .h5 Nf8 1 8. Nt1 [lh is
knight heads ov e r to the kin g side where
I can bui ld up for a thematic KIA king side
attack.] 18 ... N d8 [Moves such as this
are the result of lack of' space.] 19.h 6
[Secu ring d ark s quares on the kingside. ]
19 . g 6 20.Bg51 [After the exchange of
bishops, Fritz will be hard p ressed to
defend his f6- a nd g7- points.] 20 . . Bxg s
2 1 .Nxg 5 Bb5 2 2 . Q g 4 Nb7 23 . 0 f4
[Threatens 24.Qf6 winning Immedi ately. ]
23 . . 0e 70 24. Ne3 [This knight heads
for f6 via g4.) 24 ... Rc3 ? 25.Bxd51-+ [A
petite comb inat ion to win a valuable
c e nt e r paw n ] 25 . . R xe3 0 [25 . . . exd5
26. Nxd5 + ; 25 . . . Rb8 26. Bg21dea 27.d5]
2 S. B x b 7 Rxe1 + 27. Rxe 1 RbS [T he
point of 25.8xd5! Is the bi sho p can't be
c a p tured due t o t h e ki n g si d e
weaknesses. W h i te i s w i n n i ng after
2 7 . . . 0xb7 28. Qf6 + ) 28. B g2 Rca
29 . N e 4 [29 . d 5 ! ? exd5 30.Bxd5 Be8
-

. .

..

-.

3 1 .Qf6! ? Qxf6 32. exf6 Rd8 33.Rxe8!


Rxd5 (33 . . . Rxe8 34.Bxf7 + +-) 34.f4 Rd3
35. Kf2 Rxa3 36. N f3 Ra4 37.Ne5 Ra2 +
38 . Kf3 Rd2 39. Nc6 Rd7 40 Ne 7 + + -]
29 . . . Rc2 30 .d5 1 [This the mat i c pawn
breakthrough in t he center continues the
pro cess of expos i n g the bla ck K.]
30 ... ex d5 3 1.NfS + Kh8 32.N xd 5 Qe 6
[F r itz s queen m ust keep a close e ye on
f6. ) 3 3. Re3 [33.Bh3?! tS!D] 33 . . Nd7
34 . Q g 5 1
[ T hr e a t e n s 35.Qd8 + .]
3 4 . . .R c 1 + 3 5 . K h 2 Q e 8 [35 ... Rc8
3 6 . B h 3 ! Qxd5 37. B xd7 + - Q x d7
38.Qf6 + ] 3 S.Bh3 Rc2 37. 0f4 Res [Fritz
us e s the rook to protect agai n st Qf4-f6 +
(after Bh3 x Nd7). This however create s
a t err ib l e l ack of co o rd inati on among the
black pieces.] 38.e6! + - [This totally
dest roys the h armony Fri tz's pieces and
exposes his king by opening the d 4-h8
diag o n al A lso strong is 38.Bxd7 Qxd7
.

'

39.96 Rxe6 40Rxe6 Oxe6 41.Qd4+ f6

4 2 .Nxf6 B e 8 4 3 . Qd8 + . ] 3 8 . . . fxe 6


3 9 . 0 d4 + e5D [39 . Kg8 40.Qg7#)
-

4C.Bxd7! Qxd7 41.Qxe5 + Kg8


42.Ne7 + J\f7 43.Qg7 + Ke3 44.Qg8#

[HENLEY] 1-0

FRENCH KIA 8 Qc7


CBU253pp #12
...

1 .e4 es 2. d3 ds 3 .N d2 Nfs

Black's m o s t fre q u ent s ys tem of


development in the French KIA involves
. Nf6 at some p o i nt (in combination with
. . Be7 and .. 0-0).
..

4. Ngf3 Be7 5. g3 c5 6. Bg2 o-o 7.o-o N c6


8 .Re 1
Preparing e4-e5.
8 . . . Qc7-

DIAGRAM

Prevents 9.e5, but less al:tive tl1an the


quee nside expansion begi1111ing with

t h e " L o n g V ar i a t i o n " of
a . .. b5
CBU253pp # 14-1 6.

30. cxb3 Oc6 3 1. Rae1 Qd5 32.0d8 Qd 4


33 . R xd 6 Q xd 6 (33 . . . R xd6 34. Q xfa#:
34.Qxd6 Rxd6 35. Re8+ -; B) 28 . . . Qxa
29 . Re6 axb3 (29 . . . Ra8?? 30. Rxd6 +
30.cxb3 Q xd 3 3 1 . Qd8 Qd4 (3 1 . . .Rxfi
32. Q xd 6 + -) '32. Rxd6 ! (32 . Rae1 Rd7
Oxa 1 + 33.Rd1 (33.Kg2 Rxf7
. . . Q xd 1 + D 34.Qxd1 Rxf7 35.Qa1 + Kg l
3 6 . Qe 5 N d 7 ( 3 6 . . . Rf5 3 7 . Q e7 + 3 7 . Q e 8 + N f 8 3 8 . Q c 8 (A n o r m a
triangulation i n q ueen v s roo k & m in e
pi ece e n d i n g s . ) 3 8 . . . Rf5 39. Q c 7 +
b.Ne6 40. 0e7! ReS 4 1 .Qe8 + ] 1-0
-

(35)

(34)

1.e4 e6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 c5 4.Ngf3 Nc6


5.g3 Nf6 6 . Bg2 Be7 7.0-0 o-o 8.Re1
Qc7 9.e5 Nd7 10.0e2 b5 1 1 .Nf1 as

Kozma

Sochi, 1963

1.e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4.Ngf3 Nc


593 Nfs 6892 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 S.Re
Oc7 [In the 1 960 's, it was po pula r 1

Vasyukov- Uhlmann
Berlin ' 1962

Ciocaltea

place the q ueen here.]

9.e5 Nd7

1 0. 0E

bS 11.Nf1 as 12.h4 b4 [12 .. . Nc

Fis ch e r-G e l l e r, U , Nathanya 196 1


13.Bf4 [ This b ish op overprotects tt
1 2. h4 b4 1 3 .Bf4 Ba6 1 4. Ne 3 !;!; a 4 e5 -pawn and peers at the black Qci
[ 14 ... Ra7?! Ciocaltea Kozma, Sochi 13 . . Ba6 14.Ne31;!; [ C r eatin g tac ti c
1 963; 14. . . Nb6 Spi ri di nov-Radulov, Sofia I possibi lities of Nxd5.] 1 4 ... Ra7 [14 . .. N I
1969] 15.b3!? [ White d ec ides to prevent Spiridinov-Radulov, Sofia 1969 ; 14 . . . <
black from pla ying ... b4-b3.] 15 ... Ra7 Va s y u k ov - U h l m a n n , Berlin 196
1 6 . h 5 Rfa8 [16 . . . h6 1 7 . N g 4 Rf a 8 1 4 . . . Ndxe5 1 5. Nxe5 N xe5 1 6. Nxd5 exc
1 8.Qd 2oo P iece sacrfices of unclea r 1 7. Bxe5 B d6 (1 7 . . . Qc6 1 8.B xg7 Kx'
1 9. Q xe 7 + - ) 1 8 .Bxd 5 Raea 1 9 . Bx
co nsequence loom on h 6.] 1 7. h6 g6
Rc
1 5.h5
18.Nxd51 [ One of the first, and most Oxd6 20 . 0x e 8 + -]
il l ust rative, g a m e s with t h i s classic [ 1 5 ... Ncxe5 16.Nxe5 N x es 1 7 . N
sacrifice.] 1 8 ... exd 5 19. e 6 Qd 8 ( 1 7 . Nxd5 exd5 1 8.Bxe5 Q c6;!;)
18. Nxe5 fxe5 19. Bxe5;!;] 16.h6 !
20.exf7+1 Kh8 [20 .. . Kxf7 2 1 .0e6+
Kfa 22.Ng5! {2 2 .Q x c 6 + -) . . . B x g 5 17 .Nxd51 [T h i s t h e ma t i c s a c rifi
23. Bd6 +! Ne7 2 4 . B xd 5 + -) 21.Ne5 unleashes the full fury of white's assau
17 . .. exd5 18.e6 Ods 19.exf7 +I [ML
Ncxes 2 2. 0x e 5 +II Bf6 [22. . . Nxe5
23. Bxe5 + B f6 2 4 . B xf6 + Q xf6 25. Re8 + more powerful than merely rega inin g 1
Rxea 26. fxe8Q + + - : 22 .. . Nf6 2 3 . Bg5 +- k night with 1 9.exd7. With the te xt, wt
6Bb5 24. Q xe7 ! ! Qxe7 25 . R xe7 Rxe7 e xp o s e s th e b l ack K . ] 19 . . . K
26. B xf6#] 23.0e8 + Nf8 24.Be5! Ob6 [ 1 9 . . . K x f 7 2 0 . 0 e 6 + Kf8 2 1 . N
25.Bxd5 Res 26.Be6 Bxe5 (26 . . . 0xe6
(Offering the second knight i n o rde r
2 7. Qxe6 N xe6 28.Bxf6 + Ng7 29.hxg7#] bring the killer K IA bishop into
27.Bxc8 [HENLEY 27.Bxc8+- Bd60 a t ta'c k . ) 2 1 . .. B xg 5 2 2 . B xd 5 t
23.Bd6 + ! +- (23. Bxg5 Qxd5 24.0xn
28.Bxa6 : A) 28 ... Rxa6 2 9 . R e6 axb3

The King's Indian Attack!

30

Qf7 25.Qh8 + Qg8 26. Qf6 + Qf7! )


Qxd6 (23 . . . Re7 24. Qf7#) 24. Qxd6 + Ne7
25. Rxe7 Rxe7 26. Qxa6 Nxd5 27.Qxc8 + ;
1 9 . . . Kf8 20. Ng5! (This time, offering the
second knight in order to promote the
passed f7-pawn.) 20 . . . Bxg5 2 1 . Bxg5
Q x g 5 2 2 . Q e 8 + A x es 2 3 . fx e 8 Q # )
20. Ne51 Nf6 [20 . . . Bb5 2 1 . Nxd7 Rxd7
22 . B e 5 + N x e 5 2 3 . Q x e 5 + Bf6
2 4 . Q xf6 + Q xf6 2 5 . R e 8 + R x e 8
26.fxe8R + Qf8 2 7 . R xf8 #) 2 1 .N xc6
Rx c6 22.Qe51 [White simply threatens
2 3 . B x d 5 p r o t e c t i n g t h e va l u a b l e
f7-pawn, after which black will never
u n r av e l h is k i n g s i d e . ] 22 . .. Rd6
23.Bxd5!! +- [An yway!] 23 .. . Bb5
[Putting a nother guard on the sensi tive
eB -s q u a re. A l s o g o od is 23 . . . Rxd5
24.0xf6 + ! Bxf6 25. Re8 + + -. ) 24.Bg5
[ T h r e a t e n i n g a c i r c u i t o v e r l oad
beg i n n ing with 2 5 .Bxf6 + . ) 2 4... Bc6
2 5 .Bxc 6 [ H E N LEY; 2 5 . B x c 6 R xc6
26. Bxf6 + Rxf6 27.Qxf6 + Bxf6 28. Re8 +
QxeB 29.fxe8Q#] 1-0
=

(36)

Fischer - Geller
Natha nya, 1968

d5 3.Nd2 c5 4 . g3 Nf6
0-0 7.0-0 Nc6 8 . Re 1
Qc7 [ 8 . . . b5 !? A major alternative.] 9 .e5
N d7 1 o. ae2 b5 11.h4 as 1 2 . N f 1 Nd41?
[Black hopes to achieve counterplay on
the c-file after the exchange of knights.
If black plays this idea too early, his
d4-pawn can become a l iability. A ma jor
alternative is 1 2 . . . b4! ?. ] 13.Nxd4 cxd4
14.Bf4 [A thematic but powerful pos t for
t h i s B , as it overp r ot e c t s t h e e5
strongpoint (Nimzovich) . The bishop
also "peers" through the e5 -pawn at the
black queen. As we will see, this creates
various tactical possibilities.] 1 4...Ra61?
[An interesting idea, as black wants to
bring the rook to c6 to build pressure on
the c2-pawn.] 1 5. N h2! [At this point
Fischer considers white's prospects on
1 .e4 e6 2.d3

5 . Bg2 Be7 6.Ngf3

the kingside to be slightly preferable to


b l a c k's c o u nt e r c h a n c e s on t h e
q u ee n s i d e . Ot h e r m oves: 1 5 . Bxd5
Bb4!+! 1 6 . R ec 1 ? exd5 1 7 .e6 R xe6 !
18 . Qx e 6 Qxf4 ! 1 9 . Qx d 7 Q x c 1 ! -+
Fischer. ; 1 5. Bxd5? ! Bb4! 16. Red 1 ? exd5
1 7. e6Rxe6! 1 8.Qxe6 Qxf4 ! 1 9.Qxd7Qf3 !
20. N h2 (20.Qxb5 Bh3- + ) . . . Qxd 1 + ! - +
Fischer. ; 1 5 . Bxd5? ! Bb4! 1 6. R e b1 !
(Fischer.) 1 6 . . . Bb7! (1 6 . . . exd5? ! 1 7. e6
R xe6? 1 8 . Qxe6 Qxf4 1 9 . Qxd7 Qf3
20. Nh2 ! ) 17. Bxb7 Qxb7 1 8. N h2 Qd5 =
Followed by doubling rooks on the
c-file.] 1 5...Rc6 1 6.Ra c 1 Bas? [This
a l l ows a th emat ic c o m b i nat ion t hat
results in a clear strategic edge for white.
It was h igh time to get the queen away
from the "peering" bishop at f4 with
1 6 . . . Q b6 ! . Then 1 7 . Q g4 ! t prepares
1 8 . B h6 c reat i n g some dark s q uare
weaknesses around the black king .]
1 7.Bxd5 1 e xd5 [Declining the bishop
sacrifice with 1 7... Rc5 while hoping to
gain a tempo to play 18 . . . Rc8 and regain
the lost pawn, by captur in g on c2, leads
to 1 8 . B e4 ! ( 1 8 . B g 2 R e B +!) . . . R e B
(1 8 . . . Nxe5 ? 1 9. Bxe5 Rxe5 20 . Bxh7+
Kxh7 2 1 . Qxe5 + - ) 1 9. Nf3 (Fischer.)
19 ... Rxc2 20. Rxc2 Qxc2 21. Nxd4 Qxe2
22.Rxe2 Nc5 23.Rc2! , after which black
has good chances of simply being a
pawn down in a few moves: 23 . . . Nxe4
(23 . . . a4 24. Nxb5! Bxb5 25.d4 Nxe4?
26. R x c B + B fB 2 7 . f 3 ! + - ; 23 . . . R d B ?
24. Nc6 + -) 24. Rxc8 + BxcB 25.dxe4 Bb7
(25 . . . b4 26. Nc6 + -; 25 ... Bd 7 26. Be3 )
26. Nxb5.] 18.e6+- [Fischer actually
considers black's position already lost!
When the smoke clears, the black Ba6
will find itself a spectator. ] 18 ... Qd8
19.exd7 Re6D [19 . . . Bb4: A) 20 .Bd2
Bxd2 2 1 .Qxd2 Qxd7 22. Qf4 Rfc8 23 .Re2
Qa7 (23 . . . Qc7 24. Qxc7 R6xc7 25.Nf3 b4
26. Rd2 The d-pawn is lost for black.
This represents one o f the potential
drawbacks to the 1 2 . . . Nd4 variation for
=

24. Nf3 b4 25.Rd2! Rf6 26.Qxd4!


Again t he d -pawn is lost for black; B)

black.)

20. 0e8!? (G iving up the exchange to


utilize the advanced pa ssed d- pawn. )
. . . Bxe1 2 1 . Rxe1: B1) 2 1 . . . Re6? 2 2 .Rxe6
fxe6 23. Qxe6 + Rf7 (23 . .. Kh 8 24. Bg5 !
Qa a 2 5 . d 8 0 R x d 8 2 6 . B xd 8 Q x d 8
27. 0xa6 + -) 24.Qxa6 Qxd7 25.Qxa5 + -;
B2) 2 1 . . . R g6? 2 2 . B c 7 ! {22 . Qxd 8 + -)
. . . Qxc7 23.Qxf8 + ! Kxf8 24.Re8#; B3)
21 . . . Rxc2 22. Qxd8 Rxd8 23. R e8 + + -]
2 0 . Q g 4 1 f5 [20 . . . Qxd7 2 1 . B e5 ! g6
(2 1 . . . Bf6?? 22 . B xf6 Rxe1 + 23 . Rxe1
Qxg4 24. Nxg4 + -) 22. Bxd4 + ]
- 2 1 .Qh5
Ox d7 22.Nf3 gs 23.0h S BfS [Now it
appears that black has managed to h o l d
his po s i tion together at the cost of
creat i ng weak squares arou nd his king]
.
24. Rx e S Qxe S 2 5 . B e 5 1 1 [With this
tactical motif, Fischer exc han ges the
dar k- squa red bishops, which al l ow s h im
t o e x plo i t the recently c reated weak
point s In black's camp. Not 25.Re1 ??
Qxe1 +! ! 26. Nxe 1 B g 7 2 7 . Qg5 Bf6
2 8 . Qh6 B g 7
Fisc her] 25 . . . Bxe5
2 S. R e 1 f41 [B lack seizes his on ly chance
of d i s r up ti n g white's rh ythm. Le ss
effec tive is 26 . . . Q c 6 2 7 . Rxe5 ReB
(27 . . . Qxc2 2 8 . Re7 Rf7 29. R e8 + + - )
28. Nxd4! Qd7 29. Qe3 + -. White has an
extra pawn plus c omplete control of the
d ar k s qu a res.] 2 7. Rxe5 Qd7 28.h51
[Fisc her does not settle for 28. Nd4, but
instead goes for the throat.] 28 . . . fxg3
[ 2 8 . . . g x h 5 2 9 . R g 5 + + - ; 2 8 .. . Q h 3?
29 . R e 7 Rf7 30 . R e8 + + -] 29.hxg611
gxf2 + [29 . . . Rxf3 30. Re8 +! (S ac rificing
a rook & knight for a pawn promotion . )
3 0 . . . Qxe8 3 1 .0xh7 + Kf8 32.g7+ Ke7
33. g80+ +-] 30.Kxf2 hxg6 31.Qxg6+
O g7 3 2 . Rg 51 [ N ow the unfort unate
position of the loose Ba6 comes into
ta ct i c a l play!] 32 . . . Rf 7 [HEN LEY:
32 . .. Qxg6 33 . Rxg6 + Kf7 34 . R xa6 + -;
32 ... Rf7 33.Q h6!] 1 -0
=

(37)

Sp iridinov - Rad ulov


Sof ia , 1 9 S9

1 .e4 es 2. d3 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4.Ngf3 Ncs


5.g3 NfS S. Bg2 Be 7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Re 1
Oc7 9.e5 Nd 7 1 0. Qe 2 b5 1 1 .Nf1 a s
1 2.h4 b4 1 3. Bf4 B a S 1 4. Ne3!;!; N b S
[ 1 4 . . . Ra7? ! Cioca ltea -Kozm a , Sochi
1 963] 1 5 . N g 5 1 ? h 6 1 6. Q h 5 1 h x g 5
1 7. hxg5 g 6 1 8 . 0 h 6 [ 1 8.Q h 4!?]
1 8 . . . Rf c8 [ 1 8 .. . N x e 5 1 9 . N f5 e x f5
20. Bxe5 + - ] 1 9. N g 4 N d 7 2 0 . N f6+
N x f S 21 . g xf 6 B f8 2 2 . Q h 3 N d 4
23.Kh2+- [As usual, once the Kg8 is in
the "box " , it is just matter of bringing a
rook to the h-file.] 23. . . c4 [23 . . . Nxc2
24.Rh1 Nxa1 25. K g 1 + -] 24.Rh1 Ne2
[Desperately trying to keep the white
king on the h-file. No better is 24 . . . cxd3
25. Kg 1 Ne2 + 26 . Kf 1 + -.] 25.Bf3 N xf4
2 S.gxf4 B g7 [Trying to buy his way out
of trouble by ret ur n i ng the sacrificed
piece. ] 27.Kg21 [Cont ro ll i ng the ope n
h-file is worth far more t han a me re
bishop! B l a c k has counterplay after
27. fx g 7 Kxg7 28 . K g 3 R h8.] 27...Kf8
[The black king tries to flee, but it is to
late.] 2 8 . Q h 8 + I [HENLEY: 28 . .. Bxh8
29. Rxh 8 #] 1-0
(38)

Henley - Fritz
BON US GAME #9, 1 993

1 .e4 e s 2. d3 d5 3.Nd2 c 5 4 . N gf 3 Ncs


5.g3 Nf6 S. B g 2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Re 1
Oc7 9.0e2 b 5 1 O.e5 Nd7 1 1 .Nf1 Bb 7? 1
[Today's specialists with black would
prefer 1 1 . . .a5 foll owed by 1 2 . . . Ba6. )
1 2.Bf4 [The bishop a ssu me s i ts natural
po st, ove rpr ot ec ting e5 and keeping an
" eye " on the bl ac k Q c 7. ) 12 . . . Rfb8? 1 [An
ove rly ambitious r ook d e p l o ym e n t . )
13.h4;!; [I pursue th e normal white plan s
as outlined in the Bluebook G uide to the
KIA. ] 1 3 . . . b4 [ B l a c k p u r s u e s h i s
q uee n s i de a m bit ion s . ] 1 4 . N e 3 a s
[ 1 4 ... Ncxe5? 1 5. Nxe5 Nxe5 1 6. N g 4! f6
1 7. Nxe5 fx e5 1 8 . Bxe5 Bd6 1 9. Bxd6

The King:'l Indian A/lack!

32

9.e5

Qxd6 20. Qxe6 + ] 1 5. h 5 Res 1 6.h6


a 4? 1
[ 1 6 . . . g6!?] 1 7 . N x d 5 1
[T his

thematic sacrifice has been in the air for


some time. ] 1 7 . .. exd5 1 8 . e6 Bd 6
1 9.exf7 +

Kxf7 2 0 . N g 5 +

T h e m at i c a l l y

K f80

[ 2 0 . . . K g 6 2 1 . N e 6 N f 6 {2 1 . . . B x f 4
22.Qg4 + Kxh6 23 . Qx g 7 + KhS 2 4 . Bf3 # ;
2 1 . . . Rx e6 2 2 . Qxe6 + Nf6 23. Bxd6 + -)
22. Nxc7! + - (22 Be4 + ? ! d:xe4 23. Nxc7
B x c 7 2 4 . B x c 7 N d 4 ! ti) ; 20 . . . Kf6
21.Qe6 + ! Rxe6 22. Rxe6 + Kf5 23 . B h3 #;
2 0 . . . Kg 8 2 1 . Qxe8 + Rxe8 22. Rxe8 + Nf8
23 . B xd 5 +
K h 8 2 4 . B xd 6 Q x d 6
25. Nf7 + +- ] 2 1 .Bxd 5 1 [Idea 22.Nxh7#;
2 1 . Q e6 ! +-]
2 1 . . . N f6
[21 . . . Rxe2
22. Rxe2 + - ! d ea 23. Nxh7# o r 23.Ne6 + ;
21 . . . Nde5 22. Nxh7 + Ke7 2 3 . B g5 + Kd7
24 . hxg7 + - Be7;

Nce5 22. N xh7 +


K e 7 2 3 . B g 5 + N f 6 2 4 . h x g 7 Bxd S
25. Nxf6 + -] 2 2 . Q e 6 1 1 B e 5 [22 . . . Bxf4
23 . Q g 8 + ! ! Nxg8 24. Nxh7# ; 22 . . . Nxd5
23 Nxh7# 2 2 . Rxe6 23 N xe6 + + -]
23. Rxe51 [ Fig hting to keep the e-file
(23 . . . R xe6
23. . . Nxe5
open.]
24 Nxe6
+ -] 24 J:!xe5 B>:dS [24 . . . Qxs5
25 . Qf7 # ] 25.Nxh7 + I (This unnasks the
weakness at g7, as the white h-pawn
21

25 . . . Nxh7

26. hxg7 +

26 . . . Qxg7 27 . Bxg7 +
1 -0

[HEN LEY:

Kxg7 28. Qxd5 + -]

FR E N C H KIA LONG
VAR IATION 1 2 . . . a4

CB U253pp #1 3

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 Be7


5.g3 c5 6.Bg2 o-o 7.0-0 Nc6 8.Re 1 b5

A l l o w i n g 9 . e5 b u t s t a rt i n g a c t ive
queen s id e counterplay. Careful study of
the games of German G M Wolfgang
Uhlmann - the l ead i n g practitioner of the
black side of this line - is recommended
(see e.g. , CB U 3 0 1 o) .

the

prel ude to

9 . . . Nd7 1 0.Nf1

Clearing a path for the B c 1 . The Nt1 will


rejoin the fray with a lat er Nf1 -e3 (aiming
for g4 or potential sacrifices on d5) or
Nf1 - h2 -g4 (aiming at f6 and h6) after
playing h2-h4.
1 0. . .a 5

Gaining more space on the queenside.

...

becomes the decisive unit in the attack! ]

establ ishing

e5 -"spearhead" pawn
a
white's kingside ambitions.

1 1 . h4

D efend ing the g5-square in preparation


a Nf3-g5 invasion and preparing the
route for the ot h er Nf1 ( N f 1 - h 2 - g4) .

for

1 1 b4

More queens ide expansion. Black hopes


t o d e ve l o p p re s s u r e o n t h e a 6 - f 1
d iagonal after a subsequent . . . B c8 -a6 .
1 2 . B f4

Ove rprotecti n g the e5-pawn i n the


manner of N imzowich.
1 2 .. . a4 - DIAGRAM
Black's seventh pawn mcv e ! The sGene
is set for a s harp middlegame. The
appeal for KIA players in this type of
position is that white's attack is aimed at

w h ere it hurts the most (black's king) .

'/7w King \' Indian

A ttack!

33

the initiative, even at the cost of a

pawn:

1 8. Nxd4 ( 1 8 . dxc4 Nxc4 1 9. Qxd4


Nxa3+!) . . . cxd3 1 9. cxd3 N c5 m White will
c e rt a i n l y be s i d et r a c k e d f r o m h i s
ki ng sid e pursuits for a while.] 1 8. Ng 5
N d 5 [ 1 8 . . . h6 1 9. Ne4 Nd5 20 . Bd 2 c4
2 1 . Qg4 Kh7oo ] 1 9. B d 2 Bxg 5? 1 [After
surrendering this bishop, black's dark
squares around his king begin to suffer.
Black gets counterplay with 1 9 . c4ii .
Not 19 ... h6? 20. Nxe6 fx e6 2 1 . Bx e6 +
K h 7 2 2 . B xa s Q xa s 2 3 . B x d 5 + ]
. .

- .

20.Bxg5 Qd7 2 1 .Qh5 Rfc8 22.Nd2!

Fischer

(39)

Miag masurn

Sousse Interzonal, 1967

1.e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.g3 c5


s.Bg2 N c6 6. Ngf3 Be7 7.o-o o-o a.es
Nd7 9.Re 1 [If a student had time to l earn
only one game thoroughly in the KIA, I
woul d recommend this game. Fischer's
play in this game became the standard
to which other games are compared ! ]
9 b 5 1 0. Nf1 b 4 11.h4 a 5 1 2. Bf4 a 4
1 3.a 3 1 N [Fischer's idea i s t o spend a
tempo to prevent black from playing
... a4-a3. White hopes to hold black back
l o n g enough on the queenside to f?rce
a favorable decision on the k _1 n gsid e . ]
13
b x a 3 1 4 . b x a 3 N a 5 ? 1 [This
decentralizes the knight. Both 1 4 . . Nd4
& 1 4 . . . Ba6 h ave b e e n s u g g e st e d . )
1 5.Ne3 Ba6 1 6. B h 3 1 t [A thematic idea
in th is structure is to prevent . . .f7 -f6
whereby black would hope to eliminate
t h e s p e a r h e a d e5-pawn . ] 1 6 . d 4
[ 1 6 . c4 1 7.d4 With white having such a
grip on the center, black would h ave far
less play than in the game.) 11. Nf1 17
[ Playe d with more finesse than the
" obvious" 1 7. Ng4. The text leaves the
d 1 -h5 diagonal open for the white queen
to enter the kingside attack. ] 17 . Nb6
[A n ot h e r b l a c k p i e c e d e parts t h e
k ingsi d e Sharper is 1 7 . . . c4 ! ? , fighting for
...

. .

..

[The knight reenters via e4. Giving white


the use of the e4-square as a pivot poin1
for bringing pieces to the kingside i
som ethi n g black should always thinl
about before pushi n g . . . d 5 -d 4 ] 22 Nc
23. Bf61 + - 2 3 Qe8 [23 . . . gxf6 24.exff
K h 8 {24 . . . Kf8 25 . Q x h 7 + - ; 2 4 . . Qel
25 . R e5 Qf8 26. Ag5 + Kh8 27. R g7 + 2 5 . N f3 N d 5 (2 5 . . . R g 8 2 6 . N e 5 + 26. Ng5! Nxf6 27.Qh6 Qe7 28. Bf5! Rg8
A) 29.Nxh7 R g6 ! 30. Bxg6 NgBl 3 1 .Qg:
(3 1 . 0h5? fxg6- + ) fxg6 32. Qxe7 Nxe
3 3 . Axe5 N d 5 oo ; B ) 2 9 . B x h 7 ! R g f l
{29 . . . Rxg 5 30 . B e4 + Kg8 3 1 . Qxg5 + Kf:
3 2 . B x a 8 + ; 2 9 . . . N g 4 3 0 . Q h 5 Nfl
3 1 . Nxf7 + Kg7 32.Qg6 + Kf8 33. Bxg:
Nxg8 3 4 . N g 5 + ) 30.Bf5 + Kg8 3 1 . RxeE
fxe6 3 2 . B x e 6 + R f 7 3 3 . Q g 6 + Kf
34. Bxf7 Qe5 {34 . . . N c6 35. N h7 + ! Nxh
36. 0gB#) 35. Ba2-+ ] 24. N e 4 g 6 25.Qg
[25.Qh6 Qf8 ) 25 . . . Nxe4 26.Rxe4 [At thi
point you can divide the board in twc
king s ide & queenside. Now focus on th
kingsid e and count the number of piece
each side has in this sector. It is nc
surp r ising the black king soon get
tagged.] 26 . c4 27 . h 5 1 cxd 3 28 . R h
Ra7 [28 . . dxc2 29. hxg6: A) 29 ... c 1 Q
30 . Rxc 1 Rxc 1 + 3 1 . Q xc 1 ( 3 1 Kh2 ! i
. . . fxg6 32 A x h7 ! Kxh7 3 3 . Qc7 + Kh
34 . Q g 7 + Kh5 3 5 . g4 # ; B ) 2 9 . . . fxg
30 . Rxh 7 Kxh 7 {30 . . c 1 Q + 3 1 . Ax c
Rxc 1 + 3 2 . 0 x c 1 + - ) 3 1 . Q h 4 + K g
.

..

. . .

. .

The King's Indian A ttack!

J4

32.0h8 + Kf7 33.Qg7 # ] 29. Bg21 1 dxc2?


[29 . . . Qf8 30. Be4! dxc2 3 1 . hxg6 fxg6
32. Bxg6 + -; 29 . . . Bb7!? (With the logical
idea of exchanging off one of the killer
b i s h o p s . ) 30. hxg6 fxg6 3 1 . Rxh7!
(Possible beca use t h e R a 7 lost its
communication with h7 for a moment.)
3 1 . . . Kxh7 32.Qh4 + Kg8 33.0h8 + Kf7
34.Qg7#.] 3 0 . Q h 6 Of8 3 1 . 0 x h 7 + I
[ H E N LEY: 3 1 . . . Kxh7 32. hxg6 + Kxg6
(32 . . . Kg8 33. R h8#) 33. Be4# ] 1 -0
(40)

G heorg hiu - U hlm a nn


Bul garia , 1 968

1 . e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Ncs


5.g3 Nf6 6.Bg2 Be7 7. 0-0 0-0 8.Re1 b5
9.e5 Nd7 1 0.Nf1 a5 1 1 . h4 b4 1 2. Bf4
a4?1 [The mark of a serious player is that
he has faith in his opening system. After
this stunning defeat, we see Uhlmann
improve his play later with 1 2 .. Ba6. Too
many p l ayers would a bandon their
opening after such a loss.] 1 3.a31? [(!)
Fischer & G heorghiu, (? ! ) U hl mann.
Uhlmann seems to feel this idea opens
l i n e s on t h e q u e e n s i d e to blac k ' s
advantage. ] 1 3 . . . b x a 3 1 4. bxa3 B a 6
1 5.Ne3 Nd41? [Another inaccuracy, a s it
was probably better to remov the Ra8
from the eye of the KIA bishop: 1 5 . . . R b8!
1 6.c4!?] 1 6 . c 4 1 ! [ W h i t e ta kes t h e
initiative in the center by opening the KIA
d iagonal (g2-a8) .) 1 6 N b3 [ 1 6 . . . Nb6
1 7.cxd5 Nxd5 (1 7 ... exd5 1 8. Nxd4 cxd4
1 9.Nf5) 1 8. Nxd5 exd5 ( 1 8 . . . Qxd5?
1 9. Nxd4 + -; 1 8 ... Nxf3 + 1 9. Qxf3! exd5
20. Qxd5 Qxd5 2 1 . Bxd5 Rad8 22. Bc4 ! )
1 9. Nxd4 cxd4 20. Qxa4 Bxd3 2 1 . Qxd4]
1 7 . cxd 5 1 [ G heorg h i u sac rifices the
exchange to activate his minor pieces,
the e5-pawn, and open the KIA d iagonal
(g2-a8) . ] 1 7 . . . Nxa 1 1 8 .0xa 1 lZ [Pause a
moment to look at the central mass of
white pieces just waiting to explode.)
1 8 ... exd5 [ 1 9.d5-d6 was threatened.]
1 9. Nxd5 Bxd 3? 1 20.e 6 1 [With this
. .

pawn push white unleashes the Bf4 , Rel


and Qa1 , and vacates e5 for the Nf3. This
is what Nimzovich was talking about
when he said your pieces would gain
strength from overprotection of your
stro n g po i nt ( e 5 - pawn ) . ] 2 0 . . . N f 6
2 1 . N xe7 + Qx e7 22.N e51 Bgs [22 . . . Bb5
23 . Bxa8 Rxa8 24.exf7 + t - ] 23 . N c6!
[Florin goes for the j ugular, rather than
settl i n g for m e r e l y r e c o u p i n g t h e
exchange (23. Bxa8) . I n his prime, the
Rumanian Grand master was d efinitely a
Wor1d Class player.] 23 ... Qb7 24. Bd61
[ P utting another exc hange (Rf8) en
p r i s e , w h i l e t h re at e n i n g 2 5 . N d 6 +
winning black's Q.] 24.. . Be4 [In a l ost
position, Uhlmann tries to confuse the
issue. ] 2 5 . Rx e 4 1 1 + - [Wit h an open
board and the initiative, Florin shows that
bishops are more powerful than rooks.]
2 5 . . . 0 x c 6 [25 . . . N x e4 26. Bxe4 Q b3
27. Bxf8 Rxf8 28. Ne7 + Kh8 29. Nf5 f6
30. e7 ReB 3 1 . Bc6 + -] 26. Bxf8 [HENLEY:
A) 26 . . . Nxe4 27. Qxg7 # ; B) 26 . . . Kxf8
27. Rf4 Qa6 28. Rxf6 gxf6 29. Qxf6 Ra7
(29 . . . Qa7 30 . B xa8 + -) 30 . e7 + Ke8
(30 . . . Rxe7 3 1 .Qh8#) 3 1 . Bc6 + + - ; C)
26 . . . Rxf8 (This position is given in many
textbooks on tactical combinations. It is
consid ered a feature example of the
power of discovered attack (Bg2 versus
Q c 6 ) ) . 2 7 . Q x f6 ! ! Q x e 4 ( 2 7 . . . g xf6
28. Rg4 + Kh8 29. Bxc6 + -) 28. 0xf7 + !
Rxf7 29. exf7 + + - .) 1 -0
FRENCH KIA LO NG
VAR IATION 1 3 .h5
C B U253pp # 1 4

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 Be7


5.g3 c5 6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 Nc6 8.Re1 b5
9.e5 Nd7 1 0.Nf1 a5 1 1 .h4 b4 1 2.Bf4
Bas

More active than 1 2 . . . a4. Black hurries to


complete his development.

'l1w

King \ Indian Attack!

1 3.h5 - DIAGRAM

An active a n d d a n g e r o u s t h rust
threatening 1 4. h6 breaking up the black
king's pawn shelter. lf black allows 1 4. h6,
and defends the kingside with . . . g6, the
dark squares around the black king
beco m e s e r i o u s l y wea k e n ed . N ow
1 3 . . . h6 is likely best.
(4 1 )

Myers - Fidelity
Davenport, Iowa, 1 99 1

1 .Nf3 [Notes are based o n those by


H ugh Myers.] 1 ... d5 2.g3 c5 3.Bg2 Nc6
4.0-0 es s.d3 Nts s. N bd2 Be7 7.e4 o-o
8.Re 1 b5 [We have reached the "Long
Variation" of the KIA versus French
Defence.] 9.e5 Nd7 1 0.Nf1 aS 1 1 . h4 b4
1 2 . B f 4 B a s 1 3 . h 5 1 ? [ 1 3 . N g 5 See
Bronstein-Uhlmann, Moscow 1 971 and
B rowne - U hlmann, Amsterdam 1 972 ]
1 3 h6 [An i nteresting and proba bly
co r rect strate g i c d e c i s i o n by t h e
computer t o prevent the white pawn
from going to h6. The d rawback is the
black h6-pawn can be the target for a
White sacrifice.] 1 4. Ne31? [This knight
route to g4 has the virtue of d iscouraging
1 4 . . . Qc7 since white has the thematic
1 5 . Nd5 exd5 1 6. e6 idea. However, had
th e knight taken the f1 -h2 route, it might
. . .

35

delay black from playing . . . Nd4 since


white could play Nf3xd4 and N hf3. ]
1 4. . . R b8 1 5.Qd2 [Already lining up for a
piece sacrifice on h6.] 1 5 ... a 4 1 6.a3!?
[ U hl m a n n , our l ead i ng specia l i st in
handling the black pieces, consid ers this
Fischer idea overrated. Judging by his
notes he seems to feel that white is
helping black by opening lines in the
sector where black has the initiative.]
16 ... Nd4!? [This i s thematic black
counterplay. Also good i s 1 6 . . . bxa3
1 7. bxa3 Nd4] 1 7. Nxd4 cxd4 1 8.Ng4
bxa3 [ 1 a ... b3! ? Creating a target at d3,
and following the N imzovich principle of
undermining the base of the pawn chain
(c2) ; 1 a . . . Rea 1 9.axb4 Bxb4 20 . c3]
1 9. bxa3 R b2! 20.Qc 1 (The white queen
is brought to a less ideal square. Black
is good after 20. Rab1 Rxb1 2 1 . Rxb1
Bxa3 22. Bxh6 gxh6 23. 0xh6 Be7 24.f4
(24. Bxd5? Bgs- + ) . . . Rea. ] 20 . . . Qb6?
[Virtual ly t h e losing move, as black
understandably underestimates white's
coming assault. Up until this point black
has conducted the position well , and
with a l ittle more caution (protecting the
k i n g s i d e) ,
he
wo u l d
r et a i n
c o u ntercha n c e s . M uc h stro n g e r i s
2 0 . . . R b6 ! foll owed b y . . . Rea & . . Bfa to
reduce the threat of a piece sacrifice on
h6. Only then should the black queen
pursue the queenside initiative. Another
defensive scheme would be to offer
exchanges with . . . Bg5 as the endgame
offers black chances.] 2 1 . Bxh61 gxh6
22.Qxh6 Res 23. Be4 1 1 [Reminiscent of
F i s c h e r g a m e s w i t h M i a g m a s u re n
(3 3 . B e 4 # ) a n d P a n n a (2 a . B e 4 ! ) .
P robably this is the continuation the
computer overlooked. Either the Be4 or
the Re1 will participate in the attack on
the black king. N ot 23. N f6 + ? Nxf6
24.exf6 . Bta 25. Qg5 + Kh7+.] 23 . . dxe4
(23 .. .f5 24.exf6: A) 24 . . . Nxf6 25.Qg6 +
Kfa (25 . . . Kha 26. Nxf6 + -) 26. N e5 + ; B)
.

36

The

King:c; lnJiun A ttuck!

24 . . . Bxf6 25.Nxf6 + Nxf6 26.Qg6 + Kf8


2 7 . 0 xf6 + KeB (27 . . . Kg8 2 8 . h6 Rc7
2 9 . 0 d 8 + Kf7 3 0 . h 7 + - ) 2 8 . B g 6 +
( 2 8 . B x d 5 + -) . . . Kd 7 2 9 . Qf7 + Kd 8
30. Rxe6 + -] 24.Rxe4 R b 1 + 25.Kh21 +[White conducts the attack beautifully,
realizing that tempi are more crucial than
material considerations. Now the threats
of Nf6 + and Rg4 + leading to mate are
unstoppable. Not 25. Kg2? Bb7- + ; or
25 . Rxb 1 ? Qxb1 + 26. Kh2 Qd 1 !
(Covering the crucial rook check on g4.)
27. Nf6 + Nxf6 28. ex16 Bf8 29.Qg5 + Kh7
3 0 . R g4 B h6! - + .] 25 . . . Rxc2 26. N f6 +
NxfS 27.exf6 Rxf2 + 28.Kh3 [HENLEY:
2 8 . . . R h 2 + { 2 8 . . . B xf6 29. R g 4 + + - ;

2 8 . . . Rxf6 29 . R g4 + R g6 30 . h xg6 + -)
29. Kxh2 Ob2 + 30. Kh3 Black wil l be
mated . ) 1-0
(42)

H enley -

Fritz

B O N U S GAME # 1 0,

1 .e4 e6

2.d 3 d S 3.Nd2

1 99 3

cs 4 . N f3 Nc6

34.Rxe6!

[34. Nxe6 + -]

[34 . . . Q c5 3 5 . R xf6 ! Oxd4

36. Rxf8#] 3 5 . R x f 6 1 Rxf6 3 6 . Qxf6 + I

l H EI LE:r 36 . . . Q x f6 3 7 . R b 6
3B.Rxf8 # J 1 -0

spearhead pawn. ] 9 ... Nd7 1 0. Nf1 (This

B xg 5

33 . . . f x e 6

3 4 . . . Qd8

5 .g 3 Nf6 6.Bg2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Re1 b5


9 . e5 [White establishes the familiar e5

knight comes over to join the kingside


buildup.) 1 0 . . . a s [ B l ac k correctly
c o nt i n u e s h i s co u n t e rattack o n the
queenside.) 1 1 . h 4 b 4 1 2 . B f 4 B a 6
1 3 . h 5 1? Rb8N - [Fritz decides to allow
me to push on to h6. ] 1 4.h6 g6 [ 1 4 . . . g5
1 5 . Nx g 5 Bxg5 1 6 . 0 g 4 Ndxe5
1 7. 0xg5 + 1] 15.Qd2 [I have secured a
grip on the dark squares, but penetrating
Is another matter.) 1 5 .. .0c7 1 6. N 1 h2 a 4
1 7. Ng4 Kh8 [ 1 7 b3? 1 8.axb3J 1 8.b3 a3
1 9. Bg 5 1 ;t; [Exchanging the dark-squared
bishops is a thematic strategic goal for
white. Black will then be vulnerable on
his kingside dark squares.] 19 . . .
2 0.Qxg 5 [ 2 0 . N xg5 Nd4 ! (20 . . . Ncxe5
2 1 . N x e 5 N x e 5 2 2 . Qf4)} 2 0 . . . R b 6
2 1 . Nf6 NebS! [An excellent defensive
move as Fritz retreats his knight to parry
the th reats on the dark sq uares. Not

2 1 . . . 0d8? 22. Nxd7 Qxd7 23.Qf6 + + -.)


22. 0f4 O d 8 ! (Ti mely d efence, as I
threatened 23. N g5 crashing through on
the kingside.] 23. Nxd7 [23 . Nxh7? ! Kxh7
24. Ng5 + Kg8 25. h7 + Kg7 26. h8Q +
RxhB 27. Qxf7 + Kh6 28.N xe6 Qg8! +;
23. Ng5? ! Nxf6! 24.exf6 Nd7+] 23 . . . Nxd7
2 4.Ng 5 Qe7 2 5 .Re 21 [I saw Petrosian
overprotect his e5-pawn l ike this before
brea k i n g t h rough on the king side.)
25 . . . R b 7 [ 2 5 . . . c4 2 6 . b x c 4 d x c4
27.dxc4] 2 6 .Rae1 Rc7 2 7 . Q g 4 c4
[Fritz attempts counterplay.] 28.bxc41
[This gives black a queenside maj ority,
but I get a d-pawn to blow open the
center. ] 28 . . . dxc4 29.d4t Bb7 30.d51
B x d S 3 1 . Bxd 5 exd 5 3 2 . e 6 (This
unleashes the stored up energy of my
pieces (two rooks, N g 5) . ] 3 2 . . . Nf6
33.Qd41 +- [Und erlining Black's dark
square weaknesses around his king.]

(4J)

Hodges

TEST

-r

Qf8

Fritz

(G/30),

1 993

1 . e4 e6 2 . d 3 d5 3. N d2 c5 4.Ngf3 Nc6
5.g 3 Nf6 6.Bg2 Be7 7.0-0 o-o 8.Re 1 b5
9.e5 Nd7 1 0. Nf1 a 5 1 1 . h4 b4 1 2 . B f4

Ba6 1 3.h5!? [Time control was G30 from

this point.] 1 3 . . . Rb8 [Better must be


1 3 . . . h6.) 1 4. h 6 1 ! a 4 N
[Fritz allows
1 5. hxg7 - an unlikely idea as the dark
s q u a r e s a b o ut h i s k i n g b e c o m e
seriously weakened. For 1 4 . . . g6, see
H e n l ey-Fritz , BO N U S G A M E # 1 0
(CBU253pp/92)] 1 5. hxg7 Kxg 7 1 6. Qd2

[Now I am prepared to invade on the


dark squares by using the transparent

threat of 1 7. B h6 + . ] 1 6. . . Rg 8 1 7. B h6 +
Kh8 [Not 1 7 . . . Kg6? (Stick your neck out
l ike this and you can expect to l ose your
h e ad . ) 18 . 0 1 4 N d 4 1 9 . N x d 4 c x d 4

1 ne

1\.ut;;

.\ u t 1 u u "

20.Bxd5! (A th e m at ic sacrifice - clearing I El iminat ing black's tact ical defe n c e and
the way for an e5-e6 pawn thrust. ) preserving white's advantage.] 27.Nf51
2 0 . . . e x d 5 2 1 . e6 (W h i t e h a s t h e [Allowing my KIA bishop to reach the
advanta g e in all va riati on s . The loose b 1 - h7 d i a g o n a l . ] 27 . . . e x f 5 [ Fo rc ed :
Ba6 comes into ta ctical p l ay . ) 2 1 . . . Nc5 2 7 . . . R fg 8 2 8 . N x g 7 Rxg7 2 9 . Qxg7 + !
(2 1 . . . fxe6 22 . R xe6 + Nf6 23. Rxa6 a3 Kxg7 30 . N e 8 + + -.] 2 8 . B xf 5 N x e 1
2 4 . b x a 3 b x a 3 2 5 . R e 1 -+ ; 2 1 . . . N f6 ?
[ 2 8 . . . Nxa 1 2 9 . N x h 7 Kg 8 30. Nf6 + NxfE
22.Qg5# Dark squares. ; 2 1 . . . Nf8 22. exf7 3 1 . exf6 R x g 3 + 32. Kh1 R g 6 33. BxgE
Rh8 23. Bxf8 Rxf8 24 . R e6 + K g 7 2 5 . Rxa6
fx g 6 3 4 . Q x g 6 + K h 8 3 5 . R e7 + - i !
Rxf7 26. Qxd4 + ) 22. exf7 R h 8 23. Re5 A)
d e c is ive . ; 28 . . . N xf6 29. exf6 R x g 3 +
23 . . . B f 6 2 4 . Q g 4 + Kxf 7 (24 . . . Kxh6 30 . Kh 1 ! + - M at e f ol l ows . ( 30 . f x g 3'
25 . R h 5 # ) 2 5.Q h 5 + Kg8 26. Rxd5 + -; B)
Qxg3 + 3 1 . Kh 1 Qf3 +
g iv e s blacl
23 ... Qd7 24.f8(N) + R hxf8 25. Bxf8 Rxf8 p e r p et ual check.) ] 29.Nxh7 [ N ot e tha
(25 . . . B xf 8 2 6 . R g 5 + Kh6 2 7. Q h 4 # ) the l o o s e Ba6 may a l so be i mpo rta nt il
26. 0xd4] 1 8.Qf4 RgS [ 1 8 ... Qe8 (Too this situation.] 29 . . . Nf3 + 30.Kg2 Kg ;
p a s s i v e . ) 1 9 . N 1 h2)
1 9 . N 1 h 2t
3 1 . R h 1 1 -+ [White has sacr if i c ed a rook <
[Commenting on t hi s game, R on H e nl ey knight to generate a dea dl y attack on th
noted that, despite the concessions t h at h-file. The t h reat is s i m pl y 32. Nf6 + Nxf
black has mad e on the kin g side, t h e 3 3 . Q h 8 # . Black m u st j etti so n materia
black kin g po s iti o n is a surprisingly Also g ood is 3 1 . N f6 + Nxf6 32 . exf6 R g
tough n ut to c rack.] 1 9 . . . a 3 20. b3 1. (32 . . . Nh4 + 33. Qxh4 Rg6 34. R h 1 +
[Sealing up the queenside now the , 3 3 . B x g6 Nh4 + ! 34. Qx h 4 fxg6 3 5 . R r
game will be decided on the kingside.] R cB 3 6 . Qh 8 + Kf7 37.Rh7 + Ke6 38. Rxc
20 ... Qc7 [So b l ack can bring his i na ctive R x h 8 3 9 . R c 6 + K f 5 4 0 . R xa6
R b 8 into play on the kingside.J 2 1 .Ng4
31 . . . N e 1 + 32. Rxe 1 B b 7 [Retrieving t t
Rbg B 22.Bh3 B f 8 [You can loo k at this hanging bi s h o p . Crushing is 32 . . . R<
exc h ang e of bishops from both sides' 33. Rh 1 + -. ] 3 3 . R h 1 1 + - [ R egeneratir
point of vi ew . Black wis h es to eliminate t h e threat on the h-file. Now black m u
one o f t h e attackers and w h it e I s h appy return more wo od . ] 3 3 . . . d4 + 34.
to be rid of the dark square defender. ) Bxf3 + 35. Kxf3 Nxe5 + 3S. Ke2 [Final!
2 3 . B x f 8 [ N o t 2 3 . B g 5 ? N d 4 ! a n d Now black must meet 3 7 . N f6 # . ] 3 6. . .
sud d e n ly b l a c k i s a c t i v e . ] 23 . . . Rxf8 37. N g 5 ! [The clincher - the fol l owing
24 . N h 4 R g 7 2 5 . Nf6 Nd4 [25 . . .
forced . ] 37 . . . Nf7 [37 . . . fxg5 38. B e6 + I'
26.exf6 Oxf4 27.fxg7 + Kxg7 28. gxf4 + -] ; 39. 0h8 # ) 38.Qxg7 + I [Wi n n in g a pie
2S. Oh6 Nxc2 [Tru e to f o rm - Fritz goes and the game.] 38 . . . Kxg 7 39. N e6 + K
after the mat erial . Be tter is 26 . . . N xf6
40.Nxc7 + - [HODGES] 1 -0
2 7 . exf6 R g g 8 {2 7 . . . R x g 3 + 2 8 . f x g 3
Qxg..,
"9 p ,.., .., -1- ' 'A' ) 2P..... ' Ka 2?. Nxc2
FR ENCH KIA LO NG
v ,"'- . - :::t ''
29. R h 1 (With accurate play black ca n
VAR IATIO N 1 3.Ng5
f e n d t h i s a H a c k off . ) 2 9 . . . B xd 3 ! +
C B U253p p #1 5
(2 9 . . . Nxa1 3 0 . Bf5 ! ! exf5 3 1 . Nxf5 +
mati n g . ) 3 0 . N f5 ? N xa 1 (30 . . . B xf5? 1 . e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 NfS 4. Ngf3 E
=

Nxf6?' 1

3 1 . B xf5 N e3 + 3 2 . Kf3 !
u navo id a bl e . ; 3 0 . . . exf5?
Kx h 7 3 2 . B x f 5 # )

Be4

+-

+ ) . . . Be4

1- -

31

3 1 . B g4

-1

; B)

M a t e is

Qxh7

t '

(3 1 . Rx a 1
2 8. R a c 1 !

5.g3

S.e5

c5 6. Bg2 0-0 7. 0- 0 N c6 8 . Re1


N ci 7

1 O. Nf1 a S 1 1 . h4

Oa6 ' 1 3.Ng5 - DIAGRAM

b4 1 2. 1

'J he Kmg's Indian A ttack!

J6

sq uares arou nd t h e b l a c k k i n g ;
1 4 . . . Kh8(!) Recommended b y S mith &
Hall.] 1 5. Nxe6! + [HENLEY: 1 5 . . .fxe6
1 6. 0xe6 + Kh8 1 7.Qxc6 + -] 1 -0
(45}

T h e usual continuation. White clears a


path to the kingside along the d 1 -h5
d iagonal for the white queen to enter the
battle at g4 or h5.
1 3 . .. Qe8

U hl mann's defence. Now 1 4.0h5 can be


met by 1 4 . . . h6! 1 5. Nf3 f5! when 1 6. exf6
en passant will not be possible because
th e Qh5 would find itself undefended.
A n o t h e r p o s s i b i l i t y is U h l m a n n ' s
refinement 1 4 . . . Bxg5! .

{44 )

Bronstein - .U hlmann
Moscow, 1 97 1

1 . e4 e 6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4. Ngf3 c5


5.g3 Nc6 6.Bg2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Re1 b5
9.e5 Nd7 1 0.Nf1 aS 1 1 . h4 b4 1 2.Bf4
B a S 1 3 . N g 5 N [T h i s m o v e w a s
Bronstein's invention. A pat h i s cleared
for the white queen to immed iately swing
to the kingside (either g4 or h5) without
making the customary pit stop at e2. ]
1 3...Qe8
1 4.0g4
[1 4.Qh5
B rown e - U h l mann, Amsterdam 1 973. ]
1 4 . . . a 4 ? [ A g ross b l u n d e r, w h i c h
overlooks white's tactical threat. Better
was 1 4 . . . R c 8 ! ? ; 1 4 . . . Nd 4 ! ? ; 1 4 . . . g6:!
Suggested by Kotov in l nformator 1 2,
t h i s v o l u n t a r i l y wea k e n s t h e d a r k

Browne - U hlmann
Amsterdam, 1 972

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 c5


5.g3 Nc6 6.Bg2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.e5 Nd7
9.Re1 b5 1 0.Nf1 a 5 1 1 .h4 b4 1 2.Bf4
Ba6 1 3.Ng5 Qe8 (The point of . . . Qd8-e8
is to meet Qh5 by white with a timely
defensive shot .. .f7-f5 as white will be
unable to capture e5xf6 en passant, due
to the q ue e n s b e i n g on t h e s a m e
d iagonal (e8-h5) .] 1 4. Q h 5 [1 4.Qg4!?
Uhlmann, Moscow 1 97 1 .]
Bronstein
14 .. . Bxg 5 ! ? [An accurate and flexible
Idea. Uhlmann parts with his val uable
dark-squared bishop forces white to
recapture with the queen. Black is then
able to utilize the gain in time to pursue
h i s queenside p l a n s . ] 1 5. Qxg 5
( 1 5.Bxg5? Ncxe5 Losing this pawn can
take a l ot of the thrill out of white's
positi o n ; 1 5 . hxg5 f5 ! The p o i n t of
1 3 . . . 0e8 is to play this at t he right
m o m e n t . H e re, w i t h t h e k i n g s i d e
blocked, black will clearly have the upper
hand on the queenside whether white
excha n ges q ueens or not . ] 1 5 . . . a 4
1 6.Ne3? 1 [The knight makes very l ittle
sense here, as it cuts off the Re1 from
protecting the important e5-pawn. Better
is 1 6. b3 axb3 1 7.axb3 Nd4 1 8. Rac1 Bb5
1 9. Qg4 oo. This looks more logical for
white, as he can still pursue his kingside
plans (h4-h5-h6, or Bf4-h6, or Nf1 -h2-g4
etc) . ) 1 6 ... Kh8 1 7. Rad 1 ? 1 ( 1 7. N g4 ! ? h6
( 1 7 . . . Nd4 1 8. Rac1 b3 1 9. axb3 axb3
2 0 . c3
N c 2ao)
1 8 . Nxh6
gxh6
1 9. Qxh6 + ] 1 7 h61 [White's failure to
adequately support his e5-pawn allows
Uhlmann to force an endgame. N ote that
in a general strategic sense, this is a
good idea for black white's primary
..

The King :'i Indian Attack!


g oal of checkmate is then harder to
ac hieve.] 1 8 . Q h 5 [ 1 8 . Qg4? N cxe5 =!= )
1 8 ... f51 + 1 9.Qxe8 Raxes 20.Nc4 Nd41
2 1 .Nd6 Nxc2l t [This exchange sacrifice
c r i p p les white's pawn structure and
gives black the i n it iative . ] 22 . N xe 8
Rxe81? [ A good pract ical d ecision as
white's most active piece is eliminated,
while black retains his powerful Nc2:
22 . . . Nxe1 23. Nc7 Nxg2 A) 24. Nxa6 Nxf4
25. gxf4 K g 8 (25 . . . R a 8 2 6 . N c 7 R e S
27.Nxe6+2) 26. R c 1 Kf7! 27. Nxc5 ReS
28.d4 Nxc5 29. Kf1 Ke7 30. Ke2 Kd7
31 .dxc5 Kc6 32. Kd3 Kb5 33. Kd4 Rc7
34. h5 Rc6 35. Rc2 = ; B) 24. Kxg2? B b 7
25. Nxe6 d 4 + 2 6 . f3 R e B ! 2 7 . R c 1 D
Kg_B- + ) 23.Re2 b31 !! [By anchoring the
kmght 1n at c2, the activity of the white
rooks is red uced to nil. ] 24.axb3 axb3
25.Red2 Bb5 26.Rc1 Ra8 [With only
one rook, it is black who seizes the only
open fil e ! ] 2 7 . B f 3 [27. R d xc2 bxc2
28. Rxc2 Bxd3- + ] 27 ... Ra2 28. Bd 1 Ba41
[Black secures his advan ced steed.]
29. R b 1 [29. Bxc2 bxc2 30. R cxc2 Bxc2
3 1 . Rxc2 Kg8+ Black has the superior
pawn structure and good knight versus
passive b i s h o p . ] 2 9 . . . K g 8 3 0 . g 4
[ B rowne looks to create some scope for
his b ishop pair. ] 30 . . . fxg4 3 1 .Bxg4 Kf7
32.Kg2 Bb51 [Uhlmann focuses on the
sensitive d3-pawn. ] 33. B g 3? [33 . Bd 1
Bxd3! 34. Rxd3 N e 1 + 35. Kf1 Nxd3- + ]
33 . . . N b6- + [With the decisive threat of
3 4 . . . N a 4 c o l l e ct i n g t h e b 2 - p a w n . ]
34. Bd 1 Bxd31- + [Now the black central
pawns roll through to victory. ) 35 . Rxd3
N e 1 + 36.Kf 1 Nxd 3 3 7 . B x b 3 Rxb2
38.Rxb2 Nxb2 39. Ke2 c4 40.Bc2 d4
41 . Be4 d3 + 42.Kd2 N 6a 4 43. Ke3 NcS
4 4 . B f 3 N b 3 [ H E N LE Y : T h e escort
se rvice is set, and the c- and d-pawns
are unstoppable.] 0-1

(46)

Henley - Fritz

BON U S GAME

39
# 1 1 , 1 993

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d 5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 Be7


5.g3 0-0 6.Bg2 c5 7.0-0 NeG 8.Re1 b5
9.es Nd7 1 0.Nf1 as 1 1 . h4 b4 1 2. Bf4
Ba6 1 3.Ng5 [First introd uced by David
B ronstein. White immed iately makes
way for his queen to enter the kingside
on g4 or h5. Also g ood i s 1 3. h5 ! ? . ]
1 3. . . Qe81? [Considered t o b e black's
best defence. Now the straightforward
1 4 Oh5? ! is repulsed by 1 4 . . . h6! 1 5. Nf3
f5! with a good g a me for black.] 1 4.Qg4
[ 1 4.0_h5 h6! ? 1 5. Nf3 f5+2 ; 1 4. 0h5 Bxg5 ! ?
typ_1cal U l mann d efensive technique
1n th1s vanation is to surrender this
valuable bishop in order to impede the
w h i t e a t t a c k . B row n e - U h l m a n n
A m st e r d a m 1 9 7 3 . ]
1 4...Nd4!?
[ E nt e r p r i s i n g p l a y by F r i t z as h e
c o m b i n es atta c k ( 1 5 . . . N x c 2 ) w i t h
defence of his sensitive e6 - pawn . Not
1 4 . . . a 4_? ?
1 5 . Nxe6!
(1 -0,
Bronstein-Uhlmann, Alekhine M emorial
1 9 7 1 . ) 1 5 . . . fx e 6 1 6 . Q x e 6 + K h 8
1 7. Qxc6 + - . A little better for white is
14 . . . Bxg5 1 5. hxg5i] 1 5. Ne3 ! [Covering
the c2-pawn, while not al l owing the black
knight to retreat to the good d efensive
s q u a r e o n f5 . ] 1 5 . . . B x g 5 ? 1 [Thi s
exchange, when white can recapture
with his h-pawn, is known to be d u bious
from the games of Botvinnik. It g ives
white the h-file and the possibility of
Ne3-g4-f6 + blast i n g open the black
kingside. Not 1 5 . . . N c6? 1 6. Nxe6! txe6
1 7. 0xe6 + Kh8 1 8. Qxc6 + -. ] 1 6. hxg 5t
Nc6? 1 [ F r itz is counting on 1 7. Nf1 (to
protect m y e 5- pawn) , when he repl ies
1 7 . . . Nd4.) 1 7. Nxd 5 1 [A sacrifice in the
true sense of the word , as the white
c o m p e n s at i o n t a k e s t h e f o r m of
mobil ization a nd initiative. As this is
based on intuition and judgement, we
can see wh y Fritz d id not consider this
possibil ity seriously. ] 1 7 .. . exd 5 1 8. e61

The King :<; Indian Attack!

40

N b & 1 9 . B c7 N c 8 2 0 . B x d 5 N 8e7
2 1 .exf7 + Rxf7 22.Qe6 Bb5 23.84 bx83
24.c4 8xb2 25.R 8 b 1 Ba4 [The bishop
contin ues to protect the Nc6 and in
some cases covers the vital e8-square. ;
2 5 . . . Ba6 2 6 . Rxb2 B c 8 2 7 . Q d 6 Ra7
28. R be2 Rb7 29. Rxe7 Nxe7 30. Rxe7
Rb1 + 3 1 . Kg2 Re1 32. Rxe1 Qd7 33.g6
hxg6 34.Qxg6 Bb7 35. Bxb7 Re7 36. Rxe7
axe? 37. Bd5 + Kfa 38. Bd6 a4 39.0f7#
1 -0 , H e n l e y - F r i t z , T ra i n i n g g a me . ]
26. Rxb2 R87 27.8d61 [I ncreasing the
pressure on the Ne7, and making the
f8-square an unpleasant haven for the
black king or Q . ] 27 . . . Rd7 28. Bxc5
[Collecting a second pawn which gives
me cont rol of the center. ] 28 . . . Rc7
29.Rbe21 [Tripling on the open e-file,
after which every piece Fritz owns is
either pinned or defending a pinned
teammate! ] 29 ... Kf8 30.f41 [My f- and
g-pawns hurtle forward to break down
the defence. ] 30 ... g 6D [Otherwise 3 1 .f5
and 32. g6 is crushing. The text only
d elays matters.) 3 1 .g41 [Reinforcing the
f4-f5 pawn p u sh . ] 3 1 . . . Kg 7 3 2 . f 5 1
[Possible, thanks to the pin o n the e-file.]
3 2 . . . g x f 5 3 3 . g x f 5 Q f 8 [33 . . . Rxf5
34.Qh6 + (34 . Qxf5 t-Jxf5 35. Rxe8 + -)
. . . K h 8 35. R xe7 Axe? 36. Rxe7 N xe7
37. Bd4 + + -; 33 . . . Qg8 34.Qh6#) 34.f6 +
Rxf6 (Fritz surrenders a R, but this still
l eaves his king exposed . ] 35.gxf6 +
Qxf6 36.Rg2 + (Now we have an old
fashioned Khunt!] 36 ... Ng60 37.Qg8 +
K h 6 3 8 . B e 3 + K h 5 3 9 . R h 2 + Kg 4
[39 . . . N h4 40. Bf3 + ! Qxf3 4 1 . Qg 5 # ]
4 0 . Q e 6 + Q x e & [40 . . . Qf5 4 1 . Rg2 + )
4 1 . 8xe6 + Kg3 42.Rh3# [HENLEY] 1 -0
(47)

Hodges - Fritz
TEST (G/30), 1 993

1 .e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 Be?


5.g3 0-0 6.Bg2 c5 7.0-0 Nc6 8.Re 1 bS
9.e5 Nd7 1 0. N f 1 as 1 1 .h4 b4 1 2. Bf4
886 [Ron Henley and I sat down to look

1 at t h i s p o s it i o n o n e W i n t e r

1 993
aft e r n o o n at C h e s s B a s e U S A i n
Manasquan. Never have I learned so
much so quickly and cleanly about a
s i n g l e position before. Henley i s a
premier teacher.] 1 3.Ng5 [Based on this
game, I now prefer 1 3. h5 ! ? . ] 1 3 . . . 0e8
[T i m e c o nt r o l w a s G 3 0 f r o m t h i s
position.] 1 4.Qg4 [ I think this i s probably
stronger than 1 4.Qh5, when black can
respond 1 4 . . . h6 1 5. Nf3 f5! or 1 4 . . . Bxg5!?
(Uhlmann) .]
1 4. . . Nd4
[ 1 4 ... a4??
1 5. Nxe6! + -] 1 5.Ne3 h&I?N [ (Hodges)
I forced Fritz to play this move. This
game was played before I had created
the Opening Book for Fritz (cbu253.fbk)
- who to this point was pretty insistent on
pl ayi n g 1 5 . . . Bxg5? ! 1 6 . hxg5 N c6? !
1 7. Nxd5 ! exd5 1 8. e6 ! !! Henl ey-Fritz,
CBU253pp # 1 5 BONUS GAM E # 1 1 . A
trap black m ust avoid i s 1 5 . . . N c6?
1 6. Nxe6! + -. ] 1 6. Nf3 ( 1 6. N h3 Kh8:j: , and
I have misplaced the Nh3. Far better to
challenge black's potential monster on
d4. ] 1 6 . . . Nxf3 + 1 7.Bxf3 Kh8 1 8.Qh31?
[Clearing a path for the advance of the
g-pawn. Now Fritz organizes an attack
against the e-pawn. Easily repul sed is
1 8 . Bxh6 gxh6 1 9 . Q h5 Kg7 2 0 . N g4
Rh8- + . Possible is 1 8. h5 ! ? . ] 1 8 . . . 8d81?
( 1 8 . . . Qd8!?] 1 9.g4 Bc7 20.Qg 3 QbS
( Laying siege to e5.] 2 1 .Ng21 (Best,
further reinforcing the e5 spearhead
pawn. Probably inadequate is 2 1 . g5? !
Nxe5 : A) 22. Bxd5? exd5 (22 . . . Nf3 +
23.Qxf3 ! exd5 24. Bxc7 Qxc7 25.Qxd5
nets a pawn.) 23. Nxd5 f6 24. Nxc7 Qxc7
25. gxf6 gxf6 26. Rxe5 Of?! (I saw this so
I shied away. Not 26 . . . Rg8? 27.Rg5 hxg5
28. Bxc7 gxh4 29.Qxg8 + Rxg8 +
30. Kh2! with a p u l l i n t h e e n d i ng .)
27. Rxc5 Rg8 28. Bg5 hxg5 29. hxg5 RxgS
3 0 . R x g 5 fxg 5 - + ; B) 22 . B g 2 Nf3 +
23. 0xf3 Bxf4 24. gxh6 Bxh6+ White has
insufficient compensation for the pawn. ]
2 1 . . . 84 [Fortunately, Fritz steered clear

'J he

Kmg s Jnatan Attack!

of 2 1 . . .f6? ! (which at first sight looks


g o o d , as w h i t e ' s st r o n g p o i n t i s
e liminated). This was just a s well as I had
no idea what was going on: A) 22. exf6??
(My original concern was that I had to
drop material after 21 . . . f6, as 22.exf6
loses quickly.) . . . Bxf4 23.Qxf4 (23.Nxf4
Rxf6- + ) . . . Qxf4 24. Nxf4 R xf6- + ; B)
22. g5 ! (The consistent continuation to
White's kingside attack, as we later
d iscovered at C h essBase U SA) 8 1 )
22 . . . fxe5 2 3 . g x h 6 : 8 1 1 ) 2 3 . . . Rf7
24. hxg7 + Rxg7 25.Bg5 ; 8 1 2) 2 3. . . gxh6
24. Bxh6 Rg8 25. Bg5 e4 26.Qg4-+ exf3
(26 . . . Qe8 27.dxe4-+) 2 7 . 0 h 5 + Kg7
28.Qh6 + Kf7 29. Qxe6 + Kg? 30. Qh6 +
Kf7 3 1 . Re7# ; 8 1 3) 23 . . . Rg8 24. hxg7 +
Rxg7 25. Bg5 e4 26.Qg4 exf3 {26 . . . Qe8
27.dxe4-+; 26 . . . Rh7 27.dxe4-+) 27. Rxe6!
fxg2 28. R h6 + Rh7 (28 . . . Kg8 29. 0e6 +
R f 7 3 0 . R g 6 + K f 8 3 1 . B h 6 + + -)
29. Rxh7 + Kxh7 30. Qxd7 + Kg6 3 1 .Re1 !
Be5D { 3 1 . . . K h 5 3 2 . Q f 7 +
Kg4
33. Kxg2 + - ) 32.Qe6 + Kg? 33. Rxe5 + - ;
82) 22 . . . Bxe5 23 .gxf6 gxf6D 24. Qg4
Bxf4 (24 . . . Rg8 25.Qxe6 Bxf4 26. Qxd7)
25. Nxf4 Rg8 26. Ng6 + Kh7 27.h5 Nf8
(27 . . . N e5 2 8 . R xe5 ! fxe5 2 9 . Qxe6-+)
28. Rxe6 Nxe6 (28 . . . Nxg6 29. hxg6 + + -)
29. Qxe6-+ ; B3) 22 . . . Nxe5 23. gxh6 B3 1 )
23. . . Nxf3 + 24. Qxf3 e5 25. hxg7 + Kxg7
26.Qg4 + Kf7 (26 . . . Kh7 27.Qh5 + Kg8
2 8 . Q g6 + K h 8 2 9 . B h 6 + - ; 26 . . . K h 8
27.Qh5 + Kg8 28.Qg6 + K h 8 29. B h6 + -)
27. Qd7 + Kg8 (27 . . . Kg6 28. h5 + Kxh5
29 . Qf5#) 28. Qxd5 + + -; B32) 23 . . . gxh6
24. Bxh6 Rg8 25. Qf4 Nxf3 + 26. 0xf3 Be5
27 . Be3 Ra7 28. Bxc5 Rag7 29. Kh 1 !
Rxg2? {29. . . Bxb2? 30. Rab1 Be5 3 1 .d4
O c7 32.dxe5 Qxc5 33.exf6 + ) 30.Qh5 +
Kg7 3 1 . Kxg2 + -] 2 2 . g 5 U [A m u st . ]
2 2.. . R g 8 [22 . . . hxg5? ! 23. hxg5 t i s risky
for black.] 23.g6? 1 [Overly optimistic. It
i s this kind of game replete with errors or
mi ssed opportunities that I (Hodges)
derive the most l earning from when
-

using Power Play! . Always study your


game immediately after its compl etion.
Possible is 23.Qh2!, exercising some
patience - Henley.] 23 ... fxg6 [Or 23 . . . f6
or 23 . . . f5 24. exf6 which transposes. This
is no longer so effective with the rook on
g8: 24.exf6 Bxf4 25. Nxf4 Nxf6 26. Rxe6
Rd8 27. Rae1 : A) 27 . . . b3 28.axb3 axb3
2 9 . c4 B b7 (29 . . . B c 8 3 0 . R xf6 g xf6
3 1 .g7 + Kg8 32. Bxd5 + + -) 30. R b6 Ra2
(30 . . . Qc7 3 1 . Nxd5 Qxg3 + 32.fxg3 Bxd5
33. cxd5 Nxd5 34. Rxb3 + -) 3 1 . Rxb3 Qc7
32.Ne6 Qxg3 + 33.fxg3 R b8 34. Nxc5
Ra7 35 . R e7 + - w i n n i n g material ; B)
27 . . . Bb7 28. Kg2 with an extra pawn for
wh ite.] 24.0xg 6 B x e5 25 . B x h6 Bh2 + ? I
[This will only leave the bishop loose on
h2 in some variations. B ut not 25 . . . gxh6?
26.Qxh6#. Best is 25 . . . Nf6! - defend ing
the h5-square and l eaving the position
unclear again: 26. Bg5 Ra7!? oo (26 . . . Qc7
27.Re2 Bxb2 28. Rae1 t Bc3? 29. Rxe6!
Bxe1 30. Rxf6! + - winning. ; 26 . . . Bxb2??
27. Bxf6 + -) ; 25 . . . Bxb2? ! Risky. 26. Bc1
Bxc1 D (26 . . . Bxa 1 ?? 27.Qh5#) 27. Raxc 1
Qea (27 . . . Nf8 28.Qh5 + Nh7 29. Rxe6)
28.Qxe6 Qxe6 29. Rxe6 Nf6 30. Rxf6 gxf6
31 . Bxd5 wins a pawn. ] 26. K h 1 Nf8? [A
m o re s e r i o u s m i sta k e . U n c l ea r i s
2 6. . . Ne5 ! 27. Bxg7 + (27 . Q h5 g6! - + )
. . . Rxg7 28. Qh6 + : A) 28 . Kg8 29.Qxe6 +
Kh8 (29 . . . Kf8 30. Bxd5 Raa7 3 1 .f4 ! -+ is
strong.) 30.Qh6 + Kg8 3 1 . Bxd5 + Nf7
(3 1 . . . Kf8 32 .Qh8 + + -) 32. Qc6! + - ; B)
28 ... Rh7 29. Qf6 + Rg7 30. Q h6 + Rh7 =
Draw.] 27. Qh5 1 gxh6 [27 . . . g6 28. Qg5 ;
27 . . . Nh7 28. Rxe6 gxh6 29. Bxd5 Ra7
(29 . . . Bb7 transposes to the g a m e . )
30. Rae1 Bb5 3 1 . Qxh6-+ with an attack i s
o n e po s s i b i l ity . ] 2 8 . R x e 6 N h 7
[28 . . . Nxe6? 29. Qxh6#] 29. Bxd 5 Bb7
( 2 9 . . . Ra7 3 0 . R a e 1 B b5 3 1 . Q x h6-+]
3 0 . R b 6 ! + - [ A k i l l i n g p i n . ] 30 . . . a 3
[30 . . . Ra7 31 . Bxg8 Bxg2 + (3 1 . . . Qxg8
32 . R xb7 R x b 7 3 3 . Kx h 2 + -) 3 2 . Kxg 2
Qxb6 33. Bxh7 Kxh7 34. Kxh2 + -. and
.

The King 's Indian A ttack!

44

[I mmed iately occupying the blockade


square, so black d oes not have time to
c o u nt e r - s a c r i f i c e w i t h . . . e 5 - e 4 ! )
1 4 . . . 0-0-0 1 5.Qg4t [Wit h t h e d ual
threats of 1 6.f6 + and 1 6.Qg7, white will
regain his pawn.] 1 5 ... Kb8 1 6.Qxg7
(Now white has a passed f-pawn to go
with his beautiful Ne4 and his g2-b7
d iagonal. ]
1 6...Bh5
[Threatens
1 7 . . . Be2.] 1 7.Rf2 h6 1 8.Bd2 [Botvinnik
decides to complete his development. A
bit sharper than the game continuation
is 1 8. Nf6!? , and it is hard to see what
black d oes about h i s B h 5 : 1 8 . . . e4
(1 8 . . . Be8? 1 9.Qxh8; 1 8 . . . Bd 1 1 9. Bxh6
Ba4 20. b3) 1 9. Nxh5 (1 9.Bxe4? Rdg8;
1 9 Nxe4 Bxh2 + 20. Kh1 Be5 21 .f6 Rdg8;
1 9.dxe4 Bxh2 + 20. Kh 1 Be5.Z) ... Bxh2 +
20. Kh 1 e3.Z 2 1 . Re2 RdgB 22.Qf6 Nb4
23. N g6 + - Nxg6 24.fxg6 Be5 25.Qf5 + . )
1 8 ... R d g 8 1 9.Qf6 N c 8 20. Ng6 Bxg6
2 1 .fxg6 Be7 22.0f7 Nd8 23.0f5 Bh4
24.Rf3 Ne7 (Black "wins" the g6-pawn,
but white has fully mobilized his forces. ]
25.0h3 Nxg6 26. Nf6l ll0 Bxf6 [26 .. Rg7! ?
27. b4 t Blast i n g open the b-fil e will
i n c rease the pressure a g a i nst b7. ]
2 7 . R xf6 Qe7 [27 . . . Nf4 28. Bxf4 exf4
29. Rf1 Rf8 30. Rh6 Rxh6 31 .Qxh6 Oe7
32. Be4 ! (32 R xf4? ? Qe3 + - + ) ; 27 . . . Ne7
28. Rxh6 (28.Kh 1 ! ? Black's weaknesses
are not going away, and unpinning the
Bg2 avoi d s tactical t r i c k s . ) . . . Rxh6
29. Qxh6 Nf5 30. Qh3 + -] 28.R a f 1 Nf4?
[In a bad position, black walks into an
o n c o m i n g M a c k T r u c k . B et t e r i s
2 8 . . Qg7! ? 29. Kh 1 (29 . b4? ! N h4.Z))
29. R 6xf4! +- exf4 30. Bxf4 + [HENLEY:
30 ... Ka8 31 . Qc8# A pretty example of
d iagonals . ] 1 -0
.

Now on a subsequent . . . c7-c5, we will 1


reach another solid black system a
Reversed Fianchetto variation of the KID.
4.0-0 Bg 7 5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 Nc6
Omitting . . . c7-c5, in order to erect a two
pawn center with . . . e7-e5 - similar to a
Reversed P i rc Defence.
7.e4 dxe4 8.dxe4 e5 9.c3
Taking away the d4-square from black's '
Nc6.
9 . 0e7
.

Preparing to occupy the d-file.


1 0.R e 1

b6

To develop the Bc8 (to a6) .


1 1 .84 85 1 2.Nc4 - DIAG RAM
Freeing the Bc1 and atta ck in g e5.

6 . . . Nc6
FIANC H ETTO D E F E N S E

C B U253pp #1 7

1 . Nf3 d 5 2.g3 Nf6 3 . Bg2 g 6

lvkov - Golombek
Venice, 1 966

(49}

1 . Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 g6 4. 0-0 Bg7


5 d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 Nc6 7 . e4 dxe4 8 . dxe4
e5 9 c3 Qe7 1 0. R e 1 b6 1 1 .a4 a s 1 2 . N c 4
.

The King \ Indian A ttack!

45

AdS 1 3.Qb3 Ba6 1 4.Qa2 h6 1 5.Ne3 d5-square.] 1 6 . . . Qxf6 1 7. N fd2 B hS?


Q c 5 1 6 . N h 4 B d 3 1 7 . N xg 6 Bx e 4 [Totally irrelevant, as the bishop needs
1 S. Bxe4 Nxe4 1 9. Nh4 Ng5 20. Qc4 I to relocate to c5 via f8. Thus 1 7 . . . BfB was
Qx c 4 2 1 . Nx c 4 R d 3 2 2 . B xg 5 hxg 5 necessary to keep Fritz in the game
23. Nf5 f6 24. Rad 1 RadS 25. Rxd3 Rxd3 strategically.) :1 8 . N e 3 1 [Offering the
26. Kf 1 BfS 27. Ke2 Rd8 2S.Rh 1 Kf7 exchange of light-squared bishops and
29. h4 Kg& 30. Nce3 gxh4 3 1 .gxh4 Ne7 preparing t o i nvad e d5 ] 1 S . . . B b7! ? .
32.h5 + Kh7 33.Rd 1 Rxd 1 34. Kxd 1 c6 [Surprisingly, Fritz avoids the exchange
35.Nxe7 Bxe7 36.Nf5 Bf8 37.Ke2 Bc5 I of bishops, but c4 is a very attractive
38.f3 Kg 8 39. Kd 3 Kf7 40. Ke4 Bf2 location for my own bishop.] 1 9.Bc4t
4 1 . Nd 6 + Kg7 42.Kf5 1 -0
[Fritz evaluated this position as an 0. 1 3
pawn adva ntage for white. With the
(50) Henley - Fritz
benefit of strategic "feel, " intuition and
BONUS GAM E # 1 2, 1 993
experience, GMs consider black to be
1 .Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d 5 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7 almost lost!] 1 9 . . . Ne7 [Protecting the
5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 Nc6 7.e4 dxe4 8.dxe4 d5-square, for the time being. ] 20.Rad 1
e5 9.c3 Qe7 1 0. R e 1 b6 1 1 .a4 a5 1 2.Nc4 c5? [A hopeless strategic move as the
AdS [A logical move to make the white b l a c k q u e e n s i d e p aw n s b e c o m e
queen commit herself.] 1 3.0c21 [This permanently fixed . ] 2 1 .Ndf1 ! [ I now
keeps my e4-pawn p rotected while win the fight to gain control of the
p r e pa r i n g t h e m a n e uv e r B c 1 - g 5 , d5-square for my knights.] 21 . . . RaaS
followed by Nc4-e3-d5, with good play 22.Kg21 [At first it may seem strange to
on the d5 square. In another training place my king on the same d iagonal with
ga m e , I p l a y e d 1 3 . Q e 2 . T h i s the Bb7, however, after f2-f3 and my
continuation allows 1 3 . . . Ba6 with an invasion of d5, there is no danger.
uncomfortable pin on the Nc4.) 13 ... Ba6 Meanwhile I keep the black queen out of
1 4 . B f 1 1 [Th i s way I k e e p my N c4 f3. ] 22 . . . Bg7 23.f3 RacS 24. Re2! [With
protected , while preparing the future this maneuver I gain control of the d-file. )
exchange of l ig ht-squared bishops . ] 2 4 Rxd 1 2 5 . Qxd 1 h 5 [ H o p i n g to
1 4... Ra7? 1 [One of those inexplicable activate his bishop with . . . Bg7-h6 . )
moves F ritz occas ionally spits out. 26.Rd2t [The threat of 27. Rd6 does not
P robably this one is d ue to the fact that g ive black t i me to play . . . Bg7-h6. )
there are no tactics in the position, and 26 . . . Rc6 27.Nd5 Nxd 5 2S. Bxd 5 ! ? [01
Fritz is unable to form a strategic plan. ) cause it was tempting to take with the
1 5.Bg 5 1 ;!; [My l ong term plan i s to rook and keep this bishop to attack f7
exchange minor pieces until I am left with When your opponent has the bishop pail
It is often a good idea to exchange one
a knight versus the black Bg7. A close
off,
and in addition my knight will have
l ook at the pawn structure shows black
no
minor
piece left on the chessboard tc
h as four pawns on dark squares. Thus I
match
it
. ] 2S . . . R c 7 2 9 . B x b 7 R x bi
h ave g o od p ot e nt i a l o n t h e l i g h t
3
0
.
R
d
6
Qe7
3 1 . Qd 5-+ [Threatenin
sq uares.) 1 5 . . . h 6 [An u nderstandable
3
2
.
R
xg6
winning
a pawn . ) 31 . . . Khj
attempt to break the annoying pin, but
try
for
counterplay
is 3 1 ... b!
[Another
th is places a fifth black pawn on a dark
3
2
.
R
x
g
6
!
b
x
a
4
3
3
.
N
e
3
!
R x b 2 -t
s q uare.) 1 6.Bxf6 [Consistent with my
34.
Kh3
+
Qb7
35.
0d8
+
Kh7
36.
Rxg7 -t
previous play, surrendering the bishop
Kxg7
37.
Nf5
+
Kg6
(37
.
.
.
Kh7
38
Qf6 + .
for this knight to take control of the
'

. .

The King'l lndian A ttack!

42

white should consol idate to w i n the I


ending.) 3 1 . Rxb7 axb2 [After surviving a
sc ra ppy middlegame, I wrap up with a
c l ean f i n i s h . ] 3 2 . R x h 7 + I [Fo rci ng
mate. ) 3 2 K x h 7 3 3 . Be 4 + K g 7
[33 . . . Kh8 34. Qxh6#) 3 4 . Q g 6 + Kf8
3 5 . Q f 6 + K e 8 3 6 .Bc 6 # [A fitting
conclusion as the K I A bishop delivers
mate " U ncle Ron" would be proud
HODGES.] 1 -0
. .

'l he Kmg :'i lmltan A ttack.!

Power Play! Positions


Systems with 1 .Nf3

These variations are rarer, and more


quiet than 1 . e4 lines. The reason s clear
- white bides his time before stak1ng out
territory in the center : black has no
targets to organize his play against. Not
surprisingly, the vast maj ority of KIA
games begin with 1 . e4, but with 1 . Nf3
white reserves the right to play on the
queenside with c2-c4 instead of e2-e4,
and if you have no pet e4-l ines, it's not a
bad idea to keep black guessing for a
while longer.
Reversed

King's I n d ia n Defence
C BU253pp # 1 6

(48)

1 .Nf3 d 5 2.g3 c5

1 .g3 d 5 2. Nf3 c5 3.Bg2 Nc6 4.d3 es

E nt e r i n g a R eve rsed Ki n g ' s I nd i a n


Defence.

3.Bg2 Nc6 4.d3 e5 5.0-0 Bd6


Bla ck's most solid line in the Reversed
KI D - a reversed Saemisch setup. More
passive is 5 . . Nf6, and dubious is 5 . f5
a tempo down on the Four Pawns Attack
in the KI D.
.

. .

6.e4 d 4 7.Nbd2 Nge7 8.c4


W h ite bl ocks the q u e e n s i d e before
com mencing his kingside operations - a
sensible use of his "extra tempo"
8 . f6 9.Nh4
..

White prepares f2-f4, foll owed by a pawn


st orm with f4-f5 and g2-g4.
9

...

Be6

1 0.f4 - DIAG RAM

Botvinnik - Pomar
Varna Olympiad, 1 962

s.o-o Bd6 6.e4 d 4 7. N bd2 Nge7 8.c4 f6

[We have n ow reached a Saemisch


Variation of the King's Indian Defence,
with colors reversed. ] 9.Nh4 [Botvinnik
prepares the thematic f-pawn break.)
9 . Be6 [9 . . g5? 1 0. Qh5 + --+] 1 0.f4 exf4
[ 1 o . . 0- 0 1 1 .f5 Bf7 1 2. g4-+ White will build
up for the powerful g4-g5 pawn push,
lead ing to a kingside attack. ] 1 1 .gxf4
Qc7 [Black hopes to castle queenside,
followed by . . . g7-g5 with good prospects
against white's king.] 1 2.e51 [With this
excellent positional pawn sacrifice, white
secures the e4-square for his pieces,
opens the long d iagonal (g2-b7) and
blocks the c7-h2 d iagonal, while
depriving the black pieces the use of e5. ]
1 2 . . . fxe5 1 3.f5 1 [Nowadays this motif
is c o n s i d e red " t h e m at i c " T h at i s
because the g reat chess masters of
history paved the way for us to follow.
This is w h y a study of their games is
important. )
1 3. . . Bf7
1 4.Ne4
. .

46

The King 's Tndian A ttack!

38.0h8! f6 39.0 gB + + -.] 32.Ne3 b5


33: axb5 Rxb 34. N c4 Now the white
kmght h as arrrved a t th e Impregnable c4
o ut p o st w h e re h e : a ) Attacks t h e
e5-pawn, b ) Attacks t h e aS-pawn, c ) Ca n
bounce into d6 o r back t o e 3 t o join the
attack on the black king . ) 34. . fS? [A
horrible move, as Fritz weakens both the
seventh and eighth ran ks. Fritz still
eval uated the white advantage as less
than a pawn.] 35.Rd7 +- Qf8 36.Rd8
Q e 7 37 . h 4 1 [ ZAP ( Z u g z wa n g - i n g
Advance of Pawns) , a s m y kingside
pawns advance to hem in the black king.
Still winning is 37.0gB + Kh6 3a. Nd6
Rxb2 + 39. Kh3 + - as black is forced to
part with the exchange (39 . . . R b7) to
prevent 40. Nf7 + .] 37 ... Qc7 [This allows
me to win the f6-pawn, but Fritz was
running out of moves. Not 37 . . . 0 b7?
3 8 . 0 g B + Kh6 39. Nd6! Rxb2 +
40. Kh3 + -.] 38.Rd7 Qc8 39.Qf7 Qh8
[39 . . . 0gB 40. 0xf6 + - a4 41 . Nxe5 Rxb2 +
42. Kh3 + -) 40.g41 [My kingside pawns
continue their assault on the black king.
The primary goal is to open the fS-square
for my knight. Also good is 40 . 0xf6 + -]
4 0 . . . K h 6 4 1 . g x h 5 Q h 7 [41 . . . gxh5
4 2 . Nd6 Rxb2 + 43,Kg3 a4 (43 . . . R b8
4 4 . N f5 +
Kh7 45. 0xh5 +
KgB
46. 0g6 + -) 44. Nf5 + Kh 7 45. 0xh5 +
KgB 46 . R d B + Bf8 47. 0g6 + + -;
4 1 . . . Kx h5 42 . 0xg7 + -] 4 2 . K h 3 a 4
4 3 N e 3 1 [The knight comes over to
d el iver t h e knockout p u n c h o n the
kingside. ] 4 3 . . . R b 6 4 4 . h x g 6 Q x g 6
45.0gB! [Now the threats of 46. Rxg7 or
46. Nf5 + will cost black heavy material .
The final position represents a n ice
conclusion to the strategy of play on the
light squares and good knight versus
bad bishop. HENLEY] 1 -0

6 . . . c5/8.Re1 d4
FIANCH ETTO DEFENSE
C B U253 PP #1 8

1 .NfJ dS 293 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5.d3 0-0 6.N bd2 cs 7.e4 Nc6 B.Re1

A normal Reversed Fianchetto


of the KI D.
8 . . . d4

Variation

- DIAGRAM

Black expands in the center. This yields


a knight outpost at c4 to white.

(5 1 )

Ruehrig - Podzielny
Bundesliga, 1 982

1 . Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 g 6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.0-0 0- 0


5.d3 dS 6.Nbd2 cs 7.e4 Ncs s.Re1 d4
9.Nb3? 1 [This knight should be directed
towards the outpost at c4. Better is 9.a4
b 6 (9 . . . e 5 1 0 . N c 41) 1 0 . N c 4 B a 6
1 1 . Nfe5! ? (1 1 . c3!?) Nxes 1 2. Nxe5 Bb7
1 3.f41 Henley/Hodges.) 9 . . . b6 1 0.a4 e5
1 1 .Nfd2 NeB 1 2.a5 Rb8 1 3.axb6 axb6
1 4.f4 Nd6 1 5.f5 Qc7 1 6.g4 N b4 1 7. Nf1
c4 1 8. Bd2 Na6 1 9. N c 1 N c 5 20. N g 3 Bd7
2 1 . R f 1 Ra8 22. R b 1 RfcB 23. Qf3 Ba 4
2 4 . b 3 c x b 3 25. Nxb3 BeB 26. N xc5 bxc5
27.Ne2 Ra2 28. Rbc 1 Ba4 29.Qh3 Rxc2
30. Rxc2 Bxc2 3 1 . 1 6 BfB 32.Bh6 Qd8

The King :'l lndzan


33. Bxf8 Ox f8 34.0g 3 Qe8 35.Rc 1 Bb3
36 . B h 3 c4 37.Nxd4 Nxe4 38.dxe4 exd4

39.e5 AdS 40.e6 Qxe&

( 52)

4 1 .g 5

Qb& 1

Henley - Fritz
BON U S GAM E # 1 3, 1 993

1 .Nf3 d 5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg 2 g 6 4.0 Bg7


5.d3 o-o 6. N bd 2 cs 7.e4 Nc6 e.Re1
d 4? 1 [ I n g e n e ra l I a m o pposed to
releasing the central tension without
obtaining something tangible in return. )
9 . a 4 [T h e m a t i c al l y s e c u r i n g t h e
c4-square for a knight.] 9 . . . b 6 1 0. Nc4
Ba6 1 1 . Nfe51? [One of many reasonable
alternatives white has at his disposal.
With the text I aim to activate my Bg2 and
clear the way for my f-pawn to advance.
Ot h e r t r i e s : 1 1 . c 3 ! ? ; 1 1 . Nfd2 1 ? ;
1 1 . Bd2 ! ? ; 1 1 .e5 Henley-Fritz, Training
game.] 1 1 . . . Nxe5 1 2.Nxe5 Bb7 1 3.f4;!;
[White has progressed on the kingside
while black has not obtained anything of
significance on the queenside.] 1 3 . . . Nd7
1 4.Nc41 [Naturally, when our opponent
has a cramped position, we don't want
to ease his task by exchanging pieces Tarrasch. ] 1 4... 0c7 1 5.Qe2 a6 [ 1 5 . . . e5
1 6.f5 gxf5 1 7. exf5 Bxg2 1 8 . Qxg2)
1 6. Bd21 [Now 16 . . . b5 allows 1 7. Na5 !
and white gains control of the g2-a8
diagonal. ] 1 6 . . . R fd 8 1 7 . b 3 [Further
i mpeding black's . . . b6-b5 and . . . c5-c4
pawn roller. However this does give up
th e possibility of c2-c3 at a later date, as
the wh ite queenside pawns become
rig id. ] 1 7 ... Racs 1 8.g4t [At some point,
we have to get on with the business of
trying to win the game on the kingside
where we have more space.] 1 8 . . . Bc6
1 9. h41? [This move also has a defensive
function in some variations when I push
e4 -e5, I don't have to worry about being
u n d e rm i n ed with . . . g6-g5 . ] 1 9 . . . e 6
2 0.e51 [Establishing the famous KIA e5
sp earhead pawn.] 2 0 . . . Bxg2 2 1 .0xg 2
Oc6 22. Re41 [One of the disadvantages

AttacK!

.... ,

of pushing . . . d5-d4 with black is that


white is often able to utilize the e4-square
as a jumping-off poi nt for h i s pieces to
launch a kingside assault.] 22 . . . Rc7
[After 22 . . . b5 ! ? 23 . axb5 axb5 24. Nd6
Ra8 25. R ee 1 ! Qxg2 + 26. Kxg2, white
will enjoy a huge space advantage in the
ending. Safer is 22 . . .f5 23. exf6 Nxf6
24. Ne5 Qd5 25.Re2 ;!; . ] 23.Rae1 h &? l
[ U na b l e t o s ettl e o n a pl a n , F ritz
u n n ecesarily weakens his kingsid e . ]
24. Qg 3 [Removing the queens from
b e i n g v is-a-v i s in a n t i c i patio n of a
k i n g s i d e bre a kt h o ug h . ] 2 4 . . . R a 7
[24. . . b5! ? ] 25.h51 [Taking advantage of
the weakening pawn move 23 . . . h6? ! .
Now I a m able t o destroy the integrity of
b l a c k ' s k i n g s i d e p a w n s t r u ct u re . ]
2 5 . . . b 5 [25 . . . gxh5 26.f5 ! -+] 2 6. N d 6 1
[Here I offer some queenside pawns as
bait to l ure the black queen away and
g a i n t i m e to p u r s u e my k i n g s i d e
attacking ambitions. Wh ite has other
moves: 26. axb5 axb5 27. Nd6 R a2+!;
26. N b2 ! ? . ] 2 6 . . . b x a 4 27 . h xg & fxg &
28.bxa4 Oxa4 29.f5 1 -+ Qxc2 30.Nc4!&
[ P a rt o f m y c o m p e n sat i o n i s t h e
unassailable c 4 outpost for m y N . ]
30 . . . gxf5? 1 [30 . . . N b6 ! ? co ] 3 1 .gxf5 exf5?
[This temporary gain of a third pawn by
black just gives white too much - the
open g-fi l e and a powe rful passed
e-pawn. ] 3 2. R4e2 Qb3 33.Bxh6 +- Nf8
3 4 . e 6 1 [The passed paw n ' s l u st to
expand .] 34 . . . R e 7 3 5 . R g 2 O b 8
[35 . . . Q b7 36. Nd6 Qc7 37. Nxf5 Qxg3
38. Rxg3 + -] 3 6 . 0xg 7 + ! I [A pseudo
queen sacrifice to strip the black king of
defenders.] 36 . . . Rxg7 37. Rxg 7 + Kh8
38.Ne51 [The final touch, as the threat of
39. Nf7# forces black to return the queen
or or regn. HEN LEY] 1 -0

The King's Indian Attack!

48

6 . . . C5/8.Re1 eS

FIANC HETTO DEFENSE


CB U253pp # 1 9
1 . Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g 6 4.0-0 B g 7
5.d3 o-o 6 .N bd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 s.Re1 e5

- D IAGRAM

P reve nt i n g a later e4-e5 b y white.

+ 5 9 . K e 2 R e 1 + 6 0 . Kf3 K c 5
6 1 . Be 4 Ra 1 62. Rxa 1 Bxa 1 63.Ke2 Bc3
64.Kd 1 84 65 . K c2 Kb4 66.Bf3 -
Rb1

(54)

Henley - Fritz
G MGYM GAME # 1 , 1 9 9 3

1 .Nf3 d 5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g 6 4. 0-0 Bg7


5 . d 3 0-0 6. Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc 6 8.Re1 e5
C B U253pp # 1 9. 9 . ex d51 ? [The text
seeks to open the position to allow white
to ca p italize on his l ead in development
before black can consolidate his gri p on
the center. For 9.c3 ! ? see H e nley- F r itz,
CBU253pp # 1 9 GMGYM GAM E # 4 . )
9 . . . Nxd5 1 0.Nc4 [ 1 0. Ne4 Fritz-H enley,
CB U253pp # 1 9 G M G Y M GAM E # 3 . ]

1 0 . . . Re8 [ 1 0 . . . Qc7? 1 1 . Nfxe5 ! Nxe5


1 2. Bxd5 Bg4 1 3.f3] 1 1 .a4

(53)

Wenner - Koerholz
B u ndesliga, 1 988

1.Nf3 Nf6 2 . g 3 g 3 . B g 2 Bg7 4. 0-0 0-0


5.d3 d5 6.Nbd2 c5 7 . e 4 Nc6 8 . R e 1 es
9 . exd 5 Nxd 5 1 0. Nc4 f6 1 1 . 8 4 Ndb4
1 2. Be3 Nd4 1 3. Bxd4 cxd4 1 4. Nfd2 Qc7
1 5.a5 B e 6 1 6. Ra4 Nd5 1 7.Ne4 Rac8
1 8. Qd2 Rfd S 1 9.h4 Qe7 20.Ra3 Rc7
2 1 .Rb3 Bd7 22.Ned6 Bc6 23. N b5 Bxb5

24.Rxb5 Rc5 25.Rb3 Qd7 26.Kh2 Bf8


27.Bh3 Qc6 28.h5 Rb5 29.Rxb5 Qxb5
30. Re4 Kf7 3 1 .0e2 Bh6 32.hxg 6 +
h x g 6 33.Qf3 Kg 7 3 4 . Re 2 Ne7 35.Bg2
N c6 36.0g4 N e7 37.0e4 N c 6 38.Re1
Rd7 3 9 . Kg 1 Nxas 4 0 . N x a 5 Qxa s
4 1 . Bh3 Rc7 42. K g 2 Qb6 43.Re2 Qxb2
4 4 . c 4 Ob6 45.Qd5 Qc6 46. Be6 Re7
47.Qxc6 bxc 6 48.Bc8 as 49 . R a 2 Ra7
5 0 . Ra 4 Kf7 5 1 . Bg4 Ke7 5 2 . B f 3 Kd6
5 3 . g 4 Bd2 54. B e4 R g 7 55. Kf3 Bc3
56. Ke2 R b 7 5 7 . Bx g 6 Rb2 + 58 . K f 1

[Thematically securing the c4-o ut post


for the white knight. ] 1 1 . .. b6? 1 [This
does bolst e r the potentially weak
c5 - p a w n , b u t i t we a k e n s the g2 -a8
diagonal and seems a bit slow. Other
moves: 1 1 . . . h 6 ! ? a nd 1 1 . . . Q c7
Fritz - H e nl e y , CB U253pp # 1 9 G M GYM
G A M E # 2 . ] 1 2 . c 3 B a S? ! [The
continuation of a poor plan, as black
virtually never wants to s u rre nde r his
light-squared b is h op for the wh ite N . ]
1 3. Ng 5 1 t [ A n i m po rt ant KIA motif in the

'T he King :'i

Indian A ttack!

fight fo r the initiative. We open the way


for au ac k s on f7 and d5. If auacked, the
Ng5 can either sacrifice itself or retreat
to e4. We saw this idea in many games
of t h e g reat Leon id Ste i n . ] 1 3 . . . f5
( 1 3 . . . h6 1 4.Qf3! hxg5 1 5. Qxd5 + -; 1 3 . . . f6
1 4 . Qb3 ! fx g5 1 5 . Bxg5 ! Qxg5 (1 5 ... Qd7
1 6 . N x b6 ! ax b6 1 7 . Q x d 5 + Q x d 5
1 8 . Bxd 5 + + -) 16. B xd5 + + -] 1 4.Qb3!
Bxc4 [An ugly temporary solution to
black's problems, as the pressure on the
diagonals is too much.] 1 5.Qxc4 Nce7
[Now at least it appea rs black h as
m a na g ed to p rotect eve ryt h i n g and
s ta v e off the worst . ] 1 6 .f4 1 -+ [We
continue to open l i n es before black can
consolidate. ] 1 6 . . . Q d 60
[ 1 6 . . . exf4
1 7. Rxe7 Rxe7 1 8 . Qxd5 + + -) 1 7. fxe5
B x e 5 1 8 . Rx e 5 1 + - [ T h i s exchange
sacrifice allows us t o ex pl oi t the activity
of our pieces with decisive effect. SeHer
is 1 8.d4! cxd4 1 9. cxd 4 + - . ] 1 8 . . . Qxe5
1 9 . Bf41 Q f6 2 0 . B x d 5 + Nxd 5
21 .Qxd5 + Kg7 [2 1 . .. Kh8 22. Qb7! Qg7

23.Be5! ! Rxe5 24. Qxa8 + QgS 25. Nf7 + !


Kg7 2 6 . Qx g 8 + + -] 2 2 . Q b 7 + Q e 7
[22 . . . Kf8 2 3.N x h7 + ; 2 2 . . . Kg8 23. Q xh 7 +
Kf8 2 4 . B d 6 + Re7 2 5 . B x e 7 + Qxe7
26.Qh8#] 2 3 . B e 5 + I K h 6 [23 ... Kg8
24 . Q d 5

+ Kf8 25 . Bd6 + -] 24. Nf7 + Kh5


25.Qf3# [ H E NLEY ] 1 -0

( 55)

Fritz - Henley
GMGYM GAM E #2, 1 993

1 .Nf3 d 5 2.g3 Nf6 3 . Bg2 g 6 4.0-0 Bg7


5. d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 s.Re 1 e5
CBU253pp # 1 9. 9.exd5 Nxd5 1 0.Nc4
Res 1 1 .a4 Qc71? (An interesting pawn
sa cr ifice to fight for the initiative. For
1 1 . . . b6? ! see Henley-Fritz, CBU253pp
# 1 9 G MGYM GAME # 1 . In the previous
game we saw how F ritz came under
heavy pressure after playing this move
(w e a ke n i n g t h e h 1 - g 8 d ia g o n a l ) . ]
1 2 . N fxe5? 1 [ C o m p ut e rs t e n d t o b e
somewhat materialistic. They tend t o

4Y

snatch material if no clear refutation i s


evident.] 1 2 . .. Nxe5 1 3. Bxd5 [ 1 3. Nxe5?
Rxe5- + ] 1 3 . . . Bg41 t [T h e point. Black
w i n s t h e b i s h o p p a i r , b u t m o re
i m porta ntly, t he a bsence of white's
light-squared bishop will play a key role
i n subsequent events on the kin g side . ]
1 4.Qd2 [ Not 1 4.f3?. White is unable to
fend off the Bg4 i n this manner because
of t h e fol l ow i n g s t ro n g rej o i n d e r :
1 4 . . . N xf3 + ! 1 5. Bxf3 Rxe1 + 1 6 .Qxe1
Bxf3 (Regaining the pawn and securing
t h e b i s h o p p a i r. Wh it e ' s k i n g h a s
become very exposed . ) 1 7. Bf4 Qd7+
1 8.Ne5? ! Od4 + 1= and has probl ems.]
14 . . . Nf3 + 1 5. Bxf3 Bxf3 [Black has
excellent compensation b i shop pair,
bette r m o b i l i zat i o n . ] 1 6 . R e 3 B h 6 !
[ F o rc i n g a f av o ra b l e e x c h a n g e . )
1 7. Rxe8 + D Rxea [ N ow white has back
rank problems as black takes the ope n
fi l e . ] 1 8. N e3D [Striving to block the
e -f i l e , b u t n ow w h it e ' s p i e c e s a re
Not
h o p e l es s y u n c o o rd i n at ed .
1 8 . Qx h 6 ? ? R e 1 # H a rd l y b ette r i s
1 8 . Q c 3 B g 7 1 9 . Q d 2 ( 1 9 . B f4 ? ! Qd 7

Q h 3 2 1 . N e3 B x b 2 2 2 . R b 1
Bc3 ! ! - + ( C rushing . Black defl ects the
first defender of g2. ) 23. Qxc3 Rxe3 (Now
he eliminates the second defender of
g2.) 24.fxe3 Qg2# T h i s illustrates the
dangers in parting with the KIA B g2 when
yo u r o p p o n e nt h a s a n active
light-squared bishop.) . . . Qd 7 - + W i th a
winning light square aHack. ] 1 8 ... Qd7
1 9. Ra2? [A poor move in a d ifficult
posit ion. Esse ntial was 1 9. 0 e 1 ! 0 , to
meet 1 9 . . . Qh3 with 20. Qf1 .] 1 9 . . . Re5!?
[The rook is ready to swin g over to h5 to
part i c i pate in the aHac k . Al so strong is
1 9 . . . Qh3- + .] 20. b3? [The last chance
was 20 . 0 e1 .) 20 . . . Qh3- + [Th ere is nc
d efe n c e a g a i n st t h e mate t h re at . ]
2 1 . 0a.5 Q x h 2 + I 2 2 . K x h 2 R h 5 +
23.Kg 1 Rh 1 # [The absence of white'
20.0d2

50

17ze King's

Indian A ttack!
3 5 . Q h 3 (35. Qg4 R g5- + ] 35 . . . R cf7
36.Ree 1 f31 37.Bh 1 Kh7 38. Rd2 Qc71
(38. . . Rg5 39.0c8] 39.Rdd 1 Rg5 40.Kf1
h5 4 1 .Rc 1 Kh6 42.Rcd 1 Rg4 43.Re3
(43. Rd2 Rg7 44.Re3 Nf4!- + ] 43 ... Qc5
44.Ra 1 Nf41 [The final breakthrough is
assured by this temporary return of
material. ) 4 5 . g x f4 R fg 7 4 6 . Qx g 4
[ P ro l o n g i n g the agony. ] 46 . . . h x g 4
47 . R xe5 Ob4 48.Rd5 Oc3 49.Rd 1 Qc2
50.Rd6 + Kh7 5 1 .Re1 Oxd3 + 52.Kg 1
N e 2 + 5 3 . K f 1 [53. Rxe2 O b 1 + - + ]
53 ... Ng3 + 54.Kg 1 Of1 + I [Sealing the
wh ite k i n g i n . ] 5 5 . Rxf 1 N e 2#

K I A b i s h o p i s k e e n l y f e l t h e re .
HENLEY/HODGES] 0- 1

(56)

Fritz - Henley
G MGYM GAME #3, 1 993

1 .Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5.d3 o-o 6.N bd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 s.Re1 e5
CBU253pp # 1 9. 9.exd51? Nxd 5 1 0.Ne4
[ Fritz depa11s from the previous game
where he played the stronger 1 0 . N c4 . ]
1 0 . . . b 6 [Defending the c-pawn. The
weakening of the h 1 -a8 diagonal is less
significant here than in H enl ey-Fritz,
CBU253pp # 1 9, G MGYM GAME # 1 as
black can qu ickl y evacuate the rook [HEN LEY/HODGES] 0- 1
f r o m a8._l 1 1 . B g 5 f 6 [ N o a re i
(57) Henley - Fritz
.
c o n c e s s i o n a s b a1 c k s o , I d I f 1. e s h I S
G M GYM G A M E # 4 1 993
.
e-pawn and forces the bishop to move
o n c e m o re . B l a c k w i l l a i m f o r a 1 .Nf3 dS 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7
s u bs e q u e n t . . . f6 -f5 adva n ce w i t h ! 5.d3 0-0 6.N bd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 8.Re 1 e5
attacking chances on t h e kingside.] CBU253pp # 1 9. 9.c3 [Here I all ow Fritz
1 2.Bd2 Be6 = [Biach has a comfortable the option of expanding his center with
g a m e . H e p l a n s t o c o m p l et e h i s 9 . . . d4 or exchanging with 9 . . . dxe4. For
mobil ization with . . . Qd7 followed by 9.exd5 see Henley-Fritz, CBU253pp # 1 9
developmE:nt of the Ra8.] 1 3.Qc 1 [Fritz 1 G lvi GY I-...1 GAME # 1 and F-ritz-Henley,
seeks to exchange his passive Bd2.] r CBU253pp # 1 9 GMGYM GAM ES #2-3.]
1 3 ... Qd7 1 4.Bh6 Rac8 1 5.Bxg7 Kxg 7 9 . . . d 4 Fritz prefers s pace. 1 0. cxd4
1 6.c3 [Trying to limit the scope of black's [Also possible is 1 0. Nc4.) 10 ... exd4!?
knights. but now the d-pawn becomes a [ 1 0 . . . cxd4 1 1 . Nc4 Nd7 1 2. a4;!; securing
.
l iab!l!ty. ) 1 S . . . R f d 8 1 7 . Q c 2 N d e n ! the Nc4 out post and g ivi n g white a
[ U ncovering a n attack on the wea k co mfo rta b l e K i n g ' s I nd i a n D e fe n c e
d3-pawn. ] 1 8.Rad 1 Bg4 [Pressuring the formation in reverse. ) 1 1 .a 3 b6 1 2. b4!?
Rd 1 .] 1 9. b3 fSI [Now the Ne4 is d riven [ O ffe r i n g a paw n and t h r e ate n i n g
t o a passive sq ua re (h3) . ] 20. N eg5 1 3 . bx c 5 c re a t i n g a target o n c5 . ]
(20: Ned2? Qxd3+ j ust blows a pawn.] 12 . . . cxb4 1 3.axb4 Nxb4 1 4.0b3 a5
20 . . . h6 2 1 .Nh3 Qd6+ [White must now 1 5. Ba 3 Be6 1 6.0b 1 &5 0d7 [By returning
be concerned with a possible pawn fork t h e pawn , F ri t z h o p e s to i n it i at e
( . . . g6-g5-g4) . ] 22. a 3 g 5 23.0e2 Ng6 exchanges and relieve the pressure on
24.b4 cxb4 25.axb4 Bxh31 [Winning a h i s q u e e n s id e . ] 1 7 . B x b 4 a x b 4
piece due to the previously mentioned 1 8. Qxb4;!; [White has some advantage
pawn fork.] 26. Bxh3 g 4 27.b5 gxf3 d ue to the weakness of the black b6- and
28.Qxf3 Nce7- + [Black has an easily d4-pawns.) 1 8 . . . R x a 1 1 9 . Rxa 1 R b 8
won game. He needs only to wear down 20. R a 6 Qb7 2 1 . 0a 3 R d B [21 . . . Bf8!?
any final resistance Fritz can m uster. ) 22.Qa1 !) 22.Ra7 Qc6 23. N b 3 ! [More
29.c4 Rf8 30.Bg2 Rc7 3 1 . Q h 5 f41? pressure on the d4-pavm.] 2 3 . ..Bxb3
32. Re4 Nf5 33.Rd2 Nd4 34.Rd 1 Rf5 {After 23 . . . 0c3 24.Nbxd4! 1 -, white cl ips

'

11ze

King 's Indian A ttack!

the pawn.] 24 . Qx b 3 (Aiming at another


weakness on f7. ] 24 . . . N d 7 25 . h 4 1 t
[P eparing Nf3-g5 with a dangerous
bw ldup on the kingside. Not 2s.NgS?
Oc1 + - + .) 2 5. . . b5 (Strong is 2 S .. Qc3
26 .0d5 ! . ] 26 . N g 5 R f 8 2 7 . B h J [Not
2 7 . e 5 ? O c 1 + 2 8 . K h 2 Nxe S + .)
27 . . Nc5? 1 [Fritz has defended well until
this move, which allows white to whip up
a strong attack. Better was 2 7 Ne5!
co m b ining counterplay with defence of
f7 : 28 .Kg2 (28.f4 Qc1 + 29. Bt1 ae3 +
with an attack for black; 28.Kh2!?) .. . ac3
29.Qxb5 Qxd3 30.Qd5;t with a small
edge for white.] 28.Qa2 N x d 3 29. Rxf?
.

. . .

Oc 1

30.Kg2 K h 8 J 1 . Rxf6 + BxfB

3 2 . 0 f 7 [A d e a d l y p e n e tration . )
32 Ne1 + 33. Kh2 [HENLEY/HODGES:
33 . Bg7 34.Qe8 + + -] 1 -0

(58)

Jansa - Forintos

Athens,

1 969

1 . Nf3 Nf6 2.g 3 c5 3 B g 2 Nc6 4.o-o g s


5.d 3 d 5 6. N bd 2 Bg7 7.e4 o-o s .Re 1 h s
9.c3 dxe4 1 0. d x e 4 B e6 1 1 . 0e2 Oas
1 2 . a 4 Rfd8 1 3.0b 5 Q b6 1 4.Bf 1 Nd7
.

1 5 . Nc4 Bxc4 1 6. Bxc4 Nde5 1 7.N x es


1 8 . B e 2 Q c 7 1 9. Be3 R a c a
20 . Red 1 Rd 6 2 1 . Rxd6 exd 6 22 . Rd 1
Nxe5

R d 8 23.f4 Nc6 24 Qc 4 Qe7 2 S. Od 5 Kh7


26. Kf2 ReS 2 7 . B f 3 Bf8 2&. R d3 a s
2 9. Qc4 Ofs 3 0. Kg 2 KgB 3 1 . 0d5 h s
d 2 Res 33. b4 cx b4 34. cxb4 Ob2
.

32.B

3 5.Qb 3 Ox b 3 3S. R xb3 Bg 7 37 .Rd3 Kta


38.f5 g xf5 39.exf5 ReS 4o . R xd 6 Rxts

4 1 . Bxc6 bxcs 42. Rxc6 Bd4 43.B f4 Rf6


44. Rxf6 1 -0

...

c5/8.Re1 h 6
FIANCH ETTO DEFENSE
CBU253pp #20
6

. . .

1 .Nt3 d5 2..g 3 1-4)6 J.BQ2 96 4.0-0 Bg7


0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7 . e4 Nc6 8.Re1 h6

S.d3

- DIAGRAM

A waiting move preventing a possible


Nf3-g5 so that black can d evelop his Bc8
to e6 (with or w ithout the advance
. e7-e5) .
-

(59)

Lukianov - Timo sh chen ko


Leningrad Champ ionship , 1 989

1 . Nf3 Nfs 2.g 3 g 6 3.B g2 Bg7 4 .0-0 0-0


5 . d 3 d 5 s.Nbd2 c s 7.e4 Nc6 s. R e 1 hs
9 .c3 d xe4 1 0.dxe4 Be 6 1 1 .0 e2 Oca
1 2. Nc4 Nd7 1 3 . N e 3 Rd S 1 4 .N d5 Nbs

Bh3

1 / .Bd2 Bxg 2
1 5. Ne3 as 1 6. Rf 1
20.Bf4 c4
b5
1
Rad
1 8 . N xg2 N d 7 1 9.
23. Bbs
Nxe5
xe5
2 1 . Be3 Nde5 22.N
5
Rxd 1 2 4 R xd 1 Q cS 2 . B d 4 Nd 3
.

2 S. Bxg7 Kxg7 27.Ne 1 Rd8

28. N xd3

Ods 29.f3 cxd3 30.0e3 e5 3 1 . Kf2 f5


32. exf5 gxf5 33.f4 e4 34. g 4 0d 5 35.Rg 1
fx g 4 3 6 . R x g 4 + K f 7 3 7 . 0 9 3 d 2
3 8. Rg 7 + Kf8 39 .Qg 6 Rd7 40.0f6 +
Kes 1 -0

(60}

j 1.Nf3

Henley Fritz
-

BON US GAME # 1 4,

1993

d5 2.g3 NfS 3 . Bg 2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5 .d 3 0- 0 6.N bd2 c s 7 .e4 Nc6 8.Re 1 h6
9 . c 3 b s 1 o . e 5 N d 7 1 1 . d 4 [1 1 .e6!?]

[ 1 1 . a6 H enley-Fritz, T rai nin g


game. ) 12. Nf1 cxd 4 1 3.cxd4 e6 1 4.h4;t
[Whit e has a nice g rip on the center, a
spearh e a d e 5 - paw n , a n d themat ic
prospects against th e bla ck kin g. The
1 1 . . . B b7

The King's Indian Attack!

52

burden is on black to find sufficient


counterplay.) 14 . .. Rc8 15.Bf4 Nb4
[Black's only counterplay is threatening
to penetrate at c2.] 1 6.Ne3 Qc7
[16 ... Ba6?! 17.0a4! Oe7 1B.a3 +-]
17.Ng4lt
h5 [17 ... Nc2 18.Rc1]
18.Nf6+ I [A thematic KIA "slam dunk"
taking advantage of the weakened dark
squares in the black camp.] 18...Bxf6
(18...Kh8 19.Nxh5! gxh5 20.Ng5-+ Oc2?
21.Qxh5+ Kg8 22.Be4! + ; 18...Nxf6?
19.exf6+-] 19.exf6 Qd8 20.Bd6! Nc2
21.Be71 [Protecting my MVP (most
valuable pawn) ! ] 21...Nxe11? [Black
sacrifices the queen in hopes of
barricading in. Less promising is
21... 0e8 22.Qd2! threatening 23.0h6
and 24.0g7#. 22... Kh7 23.Ng5 + KgB
24.Ne4! (renewing the aforementioned
threat.) 24 .Kh7 25.Nd6 + -.] 22.Bxd8
[22.0xe1 !? Qc7D {22 ..Qe8 23.Qe3 Kh7
24.Ng5+ KgB 25.Ne4! Kh7 26.Nd6 + -)
23.0e3 Kh7 24.Ng5+ Kg8 25. Bh3-.]
22 .. Nxf3 + 23.Qxf3 Rfxd8 24.Qa31
[ Here I offer to trade my f6-pawn for the
black queenside pawns, as this would
give me two passed queenside pawns.]
24 ... a6 [This saves the queenside
pawns, but allows tbe white queen to
penetrate.] 25.Qe71 [Semi-domi nation,
as black has to go through contortions
to evict the lady. For the remainder of the
game, the white queen is able to use the
dark squares as her "personal highway"
due to the absence of the black
dark-squared B.] 25...Ba8 26 Re11
[Introducing the threat of 26.Re6! fxe6
27.Qg7#.] 26 .Nf8 27.a3 Rd7 28.Qb4
Res 29.0d2 Nh7 30. 0f4 [Note the
triangulation of the white queen
Qe7-b4-d2-f4! ] 30 ... Rc8 31. B f11
[Another familiar KIA motif is the
relocation of this bishop via f1 to either
d3 or c4 to enhance white's attacking
prospects. Here the "tickle" on the
a6-pawn is incidental.] 31...Bb 7 32.Bd31
-

. .

[Covering c2 to prevent counterplay


f r o m t h e black roo ks, but more
importantly this bishop prepares the
knockout blow against the black king.]
32 ... Rdc7 33. g41 + - [The decisive
onslaught as the d3-h7 diagonal is
opened.] 33 ... hxg4 34.h5 Nxf6
[34...gxh5 35.Bxh7+! Kxh7 36.Qg5 Rg8
37.Qxh5#] 35.Qxf6 gxh5 36.0h6 g3
37.Bh7 + Kh8 38.Rxe6! [The rook
sacrifices itself to allow the queen &
bishop mating attack.] 38 ... gxf2 +
39.Kf11 [A little finesse as the black rook
will not interpose on f7 with check!]
39...fxe6 40.Bf5+ Kga 41.Bxe6 + Rf7
42.0g6+ Kh8 43.Bxf7 Rc1 + 44.Kxf2
[HENLEY] 1-0

6 c5/8.c3 d4
FIANCHETTO DEFENSE
CBU253pp #21
...

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5.d3 o-o 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 a.c3
Gives white the option of c3xd4 should
black push ...d5-d4. Development of the
queen to c2, b3 or a4 is now possible
(thematic in the Fianchetto KID).
8...d4 - DIAGRAM

..

Closing the center.

1 ne

(61)

Plaehetk8 - Pribyl
CSSR Ch., 1974

1\.Lng s Inatan /i.uuc:K:

J.J

Henley-Fritz, Training game.] 12 ...Bb7


13.Nb3;t [I play for squares on the
queenside, keeping my kingside pawn
1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.8g2 Bg7 4.0-0 dS
roller in reserve. It was GM William
S.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 es 7.e4 Ncs s.c3 d4
Lombardy who told me he had actually
9.exd4 exd4 10.84 es 11.Nc4 NeB
won more KID games on the queenside
12.b4 86 13.Bd2 Nd6 14.Nxd6 Qxd6
than by administering checkmate! ]
1S.bS Ne7 16.Qb3 8S 17.Be1 Be6
13...Re8?! [This falls right in with my
18.Qa3 Qd7 19.Ngs RfcS 20.Nxe6
plans as I now gain control of a5 and b4.
Qxe6 21.Qb2 BfS 22.Bd2 Res 23.Rac1
Better is 13...a5 14. Bd2! t] 14.Bd21 a6
NcB 24.Rxcs Bxcs 2S.Re1 Qd6 26.Qb3
1S.Bb4t [Eyeing c5 and the e7-pawn.]
Nb6 27.f4 Bb4 28.fxeS Qxe5 29.Bf4
1S...Nd7 16.Qd2 Clamping down a Ia
Qe6 30.Qxe6 fxe6 31.Bh3 Res 32.Re7
K8rpov.] 16 ...h6 17.f4 Res 18.BaSI
Nxa4 33.Rxb7 Nes 34.Ra7 es 3S.Bh6
[This creates an annoying pin on the
a4 36.b6 Rb8 37.b7 Nxb7 38.8e6 +
black knight, which in turn destroys the
Kh8 39.8dS a3 40.Bxb7 BeS 41.Ra6 1-0
harmony of the black forces. For 18.Na5
see
Henley-Fritz, Training game.]
(62) Nikolic (231 S) - Majerie (2320)
18
...
Nb6
19.Rae1 Rxe1 20.Rxe1 e5
Yugoslavia Ch., 1989
21.NeS Bes 22.fSI [Combining play on
1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 dS 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7 both wings. This is important, as the Kl
S.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 cs 7.c3 Nc6 s.e4 d4 player must utilize his prospects on all
9.exd4 exd4 1 o.h3 es 11.Ne4 Nes parts of the chessboard.] 22 ...gxfS
1 2.Qb3 Nd6 13.BgS Qe7 14.Nxd6 Qxd6 (Otherwise white has the advantage on
1S.Rfe1 h6 16.Bd2 Qc7 17.Bb4 Be6 both wings. ] 23.exfS BxfS 24.Nxa6
18.Qd1 RfeS 19.8e1 Qd7 20.Kh2 Ne7 (24.Nb7 Qb8! (24... Qf6 25.Af1 Qg6
21.a4 Rxe1 22.Rxe1 Res 23.Rxes + 26.Axf5 Qxf5 27.Nd6 Qe6 28.Nxe8 Qxea
Nxes 24.Nd2 Nd6 2S.f4 bS 26. fxeS 29.Bxb6 + - ) 25.Bxb6 e4] 24... Bf61?
Bxes 27.Nf3 Bg7 28.Bf2 bxa4 29.Bxd4 (Fritz activates his Bg7 and goes for
Bb3 30.Qg1 NbS 31.Bxg7 Kxg7 32.d4 counterplay by sacrificing the pinned
Bc2 33.Qe3 Qe6 34.Ne1 Bb3 3S.Qd2 knight.]
2S.Rc6
Bg5
26.Qe1
Qd6 36.Nf3 Qe6 37.d5 Qxe4 38.d6 Oe8 [26.Qd1! ?] 26...Be3+ 27.Kh1 Bxd3
39.NeS QdS 40.d7 Be6 41.Bc6 as [27 ...Ae6 28. Bxb6 + -] 28.Rx b6 Qe7
42.BdS Bxd7 43.Bg2 QgS 44.Qxg5 29.Rb7 Qg5 30.Ne7 Re7 31 .Rb8+ Kh7
hxg5 4S.Nxd7 a3 46.bxa3 Nxa3 47.Bf1 32.NdS Ra7 33.h4 (33.Bb6!?] 33 ...Qf5
Ne2 48.Bxa6 fS 49.Bc4 Ne3 50.Bb3 g4 34.Nxe3 d x e 3 3S.Bc3 [35.Bb6!?;
S1.h4 gS S2.hxgS Kg6 S3.Kg1 f4 35.Qxe3! ? Rxa5 36.Ab6-t: A) 36 ... f6
54.gxf4 Kf5 5S.g6 Kxg6 56.Kf2 1-0
37.Ab7 + Kg6 (37... Kg8 38.Qxh6 Qg6
39. Bd5 + + -) 38.g4! +-; B) 36 ... Kg8!
(63) Henley - Fritz
37.Qxh6] 3S . . . B e 4 1
3 6 .B x e 4
BONUS GAME #1 5, 1993
(36.Qxe3?? Qh3 + 37. Kg1 Qxg2#]
1 .Nf3 dS 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7 36...axe4+ 37.Kh2 Rxa2 38.Rxb5 f6
5.d3 0-0 s.Nbd2 es 7.e4 Ne6 B.c3 d4?1 39.Rb4 Qe2+ 40.Kh3 Qd3 41.Rb7+
[In general, I disapprove of releasing the Kg6 42.hS+I-t Kxh5? [42... Kf5 43.g4 +
(43 ... Kg5
44.Qh4 +
Kf4
central tension without good reason.] Ke6
9.exd4 Nxd4 (9... cxd4! ?] 1 O.Nxd4 exd4 45.Qxf6 + + - ; 4 3... Ke4 44.Ab4 + Kd5
11 .Ne4 bS 1 2 . N d 2 [12.Ne5! ?;t 45.Qh1+ e4 46.Ad4 + + -) 44.Ab6 + Kf7

54

The King., Indian Attack!

45.Qh1 e2+ 46.Kh4 Ra7 47.Qc6+-]


43.Rg7+ - [As GM John Fedorowicz
would say, "The black king is up the
chimney!") 43... e2 [43 ...f5 44.Kh2!?
(44.Bxe5 + - )
... e2
(44 ... Q e4
45.Qe2 ++-) 45.Qh1 e1 Q 46.Bxe1!
Rxb2 + (46...Qe4 47.Qxe4 fxe4 48.g4#)
47.Kg1+ +-]
44.0b111
e1 01D
[44...Qxb1 45.g4#) 45.Bxe11! [45.Qxe1
Ra4 46.Kh2! Rg4 (46... Re4 47.Qh1!! +
Fritz.) 47.Rxg4 Kxg4 48.b4 h5 49.b5!
Qxb5 50.Qe4+ Kg5 51.Bd2+ Fritz.]
45...Qf1 + [45...Qxb1 46. g4#) 46.Kh2
Qe2 + [46 ... Rxb2 + 47.Qxb2 Qxe1
48.Qg2 +-] 4 7 . K g 1 e4 [4 7...Qe3 +
48.Bf2+-]
48.g4++- [HENLEY:
48 ... Qxg4 + 49.Rxg4 Kxg4 50.Qxe4+
Kg5 (5 0 ... Kh3 51.0h4 #; 50 ... Kh5
51.Qf5#) 51.Bd2+ Kh5 52.Qf5 + Kh4
53.Be1 #] 1-0
6 ...c5/S.c3 es

FIANCHETTO DEFENSE
CBU253pp #22
1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7
5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 s.c3 e5 DIAGRAM

The "normal" continuation - establishing


the e5-strongpoint.

(64)

Popovic

- Kirov
1979

Wroclaw,

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 a.c3 e5
9.a4 h6 1 O.a5 dxe4 11.dxe4 Be6
12.Qe2 Qc7 13.a6 b6 14.Nc4 Nd7
15.Rd1 Rab8 16.Be3 b5 17.Nd6 c4
18.Nb7 Ra8 19.Nh4 Nd8 20.Nd6 Rb8
21.Nhf5 gxf5 22.exf5 Nc5 23.fxe6 fxe 6
24.Nxb5 Rxb5 25.Qxc4 Rxb2 26.Qxc 5
Qf7 27.Qxa7 Qf5 28.Qc5 1-0
(65)

Henley - Fritz

BONUS GAME #16, 1993


1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7
5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 s.c3 e 5
9.a4 [9. Qb3 Henley-Fritz, Training
game.] 9...Re8 [9... dxe4 Henley-Fritz,
Training game.) 1 O.Q b 3 [10.b3?!
Fritz-Henley, Training game.) 10 ... b 6
11.exd5 Nxd5 12.Ng51? [A thematic KID
motif to unleash the power of the Bg2
and expose the vulnerable Nd5.]
12 ... Q xg5 13.Bxd5 B e 61 [Fritz
neutralizes my light-squared bishop and
offers the exchange of bishops.]
14.Nc41 [This posting of the knight
avoids the unfavorable exchange of
bishops and forces the black queen to
t h e unfavorable f6- square. Afte r
14.Bxe6?! Rxe6f, the white d3-pawn
lacks protection, and the white king is
missing a key defender.) 14 ... Qf6D [A
tactical necessity to meet 15.Bxc6 with
15...Bxc4 avoiding the loss of a piece.]
15.Be4 [15.Bxc6!? Bxc4 16.dxc4! Qxc6
17 .Rd1 R adB 1 8.Rd5! ! White's
d5-outpost more than compensates for
the doubled c-pawn. If white follows up
with Be3, (Bg5! ?), and either Rad1 or
a4-a5, he should develop good pressure
against the black queenside.) 15...Rad8
16.Qb5 Bd7 17.Qb3 Bf5 [17...Be6!?
18.0c2oo) 18.a51t Rxd31 ? [18...Bxe4
19.dxe4 Qf3! 20.0c2! (20.axb6?? Nd4
2 1 . Qd1 Ne 2+-+ Thi s variation

The King: Indian Attack!


illustrates the dangers of parting with our
6 c5/8.c3 dxe4
King's Indian bishop.) ...bs 21.Ne3!
FIANCHETTO DEFENSE
Ne7oo) 19.Bxd3 Bxd3 20.axb61;!; [I
CBU253pp #23
return the exchange to destroy the black
queenside and fight for the initiative.
1N13 dS 293 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7
Black has some compensation after
5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 8.c3 dxe4
20.Re1 Qe6 21.Nd2 c4 22. abs NxaSlZ.)
20 ... Bxf1 [20 ... Qe6 21.bxa7! Nxa7!
{21...Bxc4 22.0xc4!! Qxc4 23.a8Q Rxa8 This exchange introduces symmetry into
24.Rxa8+ Bf8 25.Bh6+ ) 22.Nd2! c4 the p o s i t i o n (after 9.dxe4). This
{22 ... Qxb3 23.Nxb3 Bxf1 24.Kxf1) somewhat passive line for black lets
23.Qb7t) 21.Kxf1 Qf3 22.bxa7 Nxa7 white maintain a small, nagging edge.
(22 ... Nd4 23.a80! {23.cxd4 Qxb3 9.dx _ DIAGR
AM
e4
24.a8Q Qxc4 + 25.Kg2 Qb5 26. d5!)
... Rxa8 24.Rxa8 +: A) 24...Qxa8 25.cxd4
Qh1 + 2 6 . K e 2 Qxc1 27.dxc5 +
{27.Nd6!?) ; B) 24...Bf8 25.cxd4! Qxb3
26.Bh6 Qxc4+ 27.Kg1!+ -] 23.Rxa7
Qh1+ 24.Ke2 Qxc1 [On the surface it
now appears black is OK, and the white
king even looks exposed. In reality I have
retained control of the light squares, my
king is not as exposed as it appears, and
my q u e e n, rook and knight are
coordinated for a strike at f7.) 25.Nd61
c41 [Fritz tries to "buy" me off with a
pawn offering.] 26.0xc41-+ [Keeping our
eye on the "eight ball" (f7-pawn)! Also
strong is 26.Nxc4.] 26...Qxb2+ 27.Kf1
Rf8 28.Rxf7 Qc1 + 29.Kg2 Kh8
{6G) Petrosian - Reshevsky
30.RxfS+ BxfS 31.acs+ [We now
Switzerland, 1953
have a classic example of the powerful
queen & knight attacking combo. This 1.Nf3 NfG 2.g3 gG 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.0-0 0-0
type of ending has been a specialty 5.d3 d5 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 dxe4 8.dxe4
among Russian masters due to the Nc6 9.c3 hG 10.Qe2 BeG 11.Ne1 Ob6
examples of Mikhail Chigorin and Tigran 12.h3 RadB 13.Kh2 Nh7 14.f4 Na5
Petrosian.] 31. .. K g 70
[31...Qh6 15.Nef3 Bd7 16.Re1 Oc7 17.Nf1 b6
32.Nf7++-] 32.0d7 + Kh6 33.Nf7+ 18.Ne3 BeG 19.Ng4 Nf6 20.Nf2 Bb7
Kg7 (33...Kh5 34.Qh3#] 34.Ng5+ KhG 21.e5 Nh7 22.h4 h5 23.f5 Qd7 24.e6
35.h41 [The noose tightens around the Qd5 25.exf7 + Qxf7 26.fxg6 Qxg6
black K.] 35 .. . Bg7 36.Nf7 + K h5 27.Ng5 Bxg2 28.Kxg2 e5 29.Qe4 Rf5
37.Qd511 [A nice domination theme 30.Nxh7 Kxh7 -
threatening 38.Qf3#.] 37...0xc3 [37...g5
38.Qf3+ g4 {38 ... K g6 39.h5#)
39.Qf5 + +-] 38.0d 1+ [HENLEY) 1-0
...

56
(67)

The King:'i

Indian Attack!

Shirov - Georgadze
Tbilisi, 1989

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c5 4.0-0 Nc6


5.d3 g6 6.Nbd2 Bg7 7.e4 0-0 8.c3 dxe4
9.dxe4 h6 10.0e2 Be6 11.Nc4 Res
12.Ne1 Od7 13.f4 Rfd8 14.Ne3 Bg4
15.Nf3 Bh5 16.e5 Ne8 17.0f2 Bxf3
18.Bxf3 e 6 19.h4 h5 20.g4 hxg4
21.Bxg4 Ne7 22.h5 Nf5 23.hxg6 fxg6
24.Nxf5 exf5 25.Be2 Of7 26.Be3 b6
27.Kh2 Nc7 28.Rg1 c4 29.0f1 Nd5
30.Rg3 b5 31.Bd4 Bh6 32.Rh3 Of8
33.Rh4 Bxf4+ 34.Kh1 Bg5 35.Rh2 0g7
36.Qf3 Bf4 37.e6 Be5 38.Bxe5 Oxe5
39.Rg1 Ne7 40.Qh5 Og7 41.Rxg6Nxg6
42.Rg2 Rc7 43.Rxg6 Rf8 44.Rxg7 +
Rxg7 45. Bf3 Rh7 46.Qxh7+ Kxh7
47.Bh5 1-0
(68)

Fritz - Henley
BONUS GAME #17, 1993

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.0-0 Bg7


5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 8.c3 dxe4
9.dxe4 Qc71? (An interesting defensive
plan, occupying the d-file and keeping
the white e-pawn under control. For
9...b6 see Henley-Fritz, Training game.]
1 o.Oe2 Ng41? [A maneuver aimed at
exchanging pieces; however, white does
gain time and space on the kingside.
Black has to be careful he doesn't get
steam rollered.] 11.h3 Nge5 12.Nxe5
Nxe5 13.f4 (Impressive looking, to be
sure, but now at least the white Bc1 can't
come to f4 with tempo.] 13... Nc614.Nf3
(14.e5! ? f6] 14...b6 [In the absence of
any immediate danger, black completes
his development.] 15.Be3 Bb7 16.Rad1
Rad8 17.a3?1 [This doesn't lead to
much. White does have a space
advantage on the klngside, but now he
needs to form a strategic plan. Notice
any time white plays f4-f5, he surrenders
control of the e5-square (plus the
g3-pawn is hanging). Better is 17.e5! ?.]
17...Nb81? [Unmasking an attack on the

e4-pawn, and contemplating ...c5-c4 or


... Bb7-a6.) 18.e5 f61+! [It is important to
chip away at the e5 spearhead pawn
before white can use it as a focal point
to build a kingside attack, as we saw in
many Fisc her g a mes.) 1 9 . e xf6?1
(19.Bc1! ? Bxf3! ? 20.Bxf3 fxe5
21.Bd5 + & White's bishop pair offers
compensation for the pawn, but black
has defensive chances a s well.]
19 ... e xf6 20.b4 (An unimpressive
strategic plan, as white is attacking in a
sector of the board where he has no
superiority.) 20 ... cxb4 21.cxb4 Rxd1
22.Rxd1 Res 23.0a2+ 017 24.Qxf7+
Kxf7= 25.Kf2 Re7 26.Nh4 (26.f5! ? gxf5
27.Nh4 Be4) 26... Bxg2 27.Nxg2 f5
(Now that the white Ng2 has become
passive, I fix the kingside pawns on the
color of my opponent's bishop, and
increase the scope of my own bishop.]
28.Kf3 Nc6 29.Bf2 Ke6 30.b5?1 [This
unjustified "attack" just lures the white
queenside pawns closer to the black
pieces.] 30...Na5 31.Re1+ Kd6 32.Ne3
[32.Rxe7 Kxe7 33.Ne3 Bb2 34.a4 Kd6
35.Be1 KcSf 36.g4 Nc4! ) 32...Rc7 [Now
both sides begin jousting for the
initiative. In my favor during this phase
of the struggle are the weaknesses of the
white a3- and bS-pawns, combined with
the slightly more active placement of my
pieces. Little things add up! ] 33.Rd1+
K e 6 34. Rd8 Rc3 35.Re8 + K f71
[35... Kd6? 36.Be1! Rc7D 37.Bb4+ Kd7
38.Re7+ KdB 39.Rxc7 Kxc7 40.Bxa5
bxa5 41.a4;!;) 36.Ra8 Rc71 [A temporary
retreat to protect our queenside pawns.]
37.Rd8 [37.Nd5 Rd7 38.Nb4 Bf8! 39.Nc6
Nxc6 40.bxc6 Rcn (The burden is on
white to make a draw.) 41.a4 Bb4! Black
threatens ... Kf7-e6-d5 plucking the
c6-pawn.] 37... Bf6 38.Rd6 Be7 39.Rd3
Nc41 :J: [After the exchange of knights,
the white rook and bishop will be forced
to passively defend the white queenside

The King's Indian Attack!


pawns.) 40.Nxc4 [40.Nd5 Rd7 41.a4
Nb2+) 40 ...Rxc4 41.Bd4 Ke6?1 [Here I
prematurely try to improve my king
position. I should first tie down the white
rook and bishop, as I do later. Strong is
41. . Ra4!] 42.Re3+ Kd7 43.Rd3 Kc8
44.Bg7 Ra4 45.Bb2 Ra51 46.Rb3 Bc5
47.g4 (47.Ke2! ? By heading for d3
immediately with 47.Ke2!? Fritz could
neutralize my king, and I would still have
to formulate a plan to break down white's
resistance: 47...Kd7 48.Kd3 Ke6 49.Kc4
Ra4 + 50 . Kd3 Kd5+) 47 ... Kd71
[Fortunately there has been no harm
done and I can now bring my king to a
dominant position at d5.] 48.gxf5 gxf5
49.Ke2 Ke6 50.Bc1 Kd5+ 51.Kd3 Ra4
52.Kc2 [52.Rc3 Rd4 + 53.Kc2 Rc4-+
The exchange of rooks would lead to a
winning bishop ending for me thanks to
my superior king position.) 52...Rc4+
53.Kd 1 [53.Rc3 Bd4! 54.Rxc4 Kxc4
55.a4 Kb4-+] 53...Ke4 54.Rg3 Rd4+
55.Ke2 Rd71 [Neutralizing the only
active white piece (his R), by not allowing
him to reach the seventh rank. Note how
the white Bc1 is tied to the defence of
both a3 and f4.] 56.Rg8 Re7 57.Rd81 [It
is important to cut the black king off from
the queenside pawns, but white still has
problems after 57.Rc8 Kd4+ 58.Kd2 Kc4
59.Rd8 Kxb5 60.Rd5 Rf7 61.Bb2 Kc4
62.Rd3 bS 63.Be5 as 64.Ba1 b4 65.axb4
axb4 66.Bb2 Re7 67.Be5 Ra7 68.Kc2
Ra3!-+. ] 57 ... B d 4 58. a 4 R c 71
[Threatening decisive penetration with
59... Rc2 +. ; 58...Rg7?? 59.Rxd4 +! Kxd4
60.Bb2++-] 59.Re8+ Kd5 60.Bd2
Kc4 61.Be1 Bc5 [61... Kb3 62.Rf8 Kxa4
63.Rxf5 Bc5+] 62.Re5 Rf7 63.Kf3 Kb3
64.Bf2 Bxf2 65.Kxf2 Kxa4 66.Kf3 Ka5
67.Kf2 a6 68.bxa6+ Kxa6 69.Ke3 b5
70.K d 4 Ka5 71.Rd5 Ka4 72.Ke5
(72 . Kc3 b4 + 73.Kb2 Rg7! 74.Rxf5
Rg2 + 75.Kc1 Kb3 76.Rf7 h5 77.f5 Rh2
78.f6 Rxh3 79.Rh7 Rh1 + 80.Kd2 Kb2
.

J/

81.f7 Rf1 82.Rxh5 Rxf7-+) 72 ... b4


73.Ke6 Rb7 74.Kxf5 [74.Rxf5 b3 75.Re5
b2 76.Re1 b1 Q 77.Rxb1 Rxb1-+]
74 ...Rb511-+ 75.Rxb5 Kxb5 76.Ke4
Kc41 77.Ke3 Kc3 78.f5 b3 79.f6 b2 80.f7
b1a a1.1aa a e 1 + a2.Kf4 a12 +
[HENLEY] 0-1

...

Bg4/6

...

es

KERES SYSTEM
CBU253pp #24

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6


A solid defensive move - strongpointing
the d5-pawn without locking in the Bee
(e.g., after 3...e6). Black hopes to blunt
the range of the white Bg2.
4.0-0 Bg4
Developing the bishop outside the pawn
chain (black will follow with . ..e7-e6).
Black may exchange this bishop for the
Nf3.
5.d3
Continuing with his KIA setup.
5...Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e5
The point of 5... Nbd7. Black plays the
more active ... e7-e5 as opposed to the
solid ... e7-e6.
7.h3 Bh5
After 7. . . Bxf3, white enjoys the two
bishops and a slight pull.
8.e4 dxe4 9.dxe4 Bc5 - DIAGRAM
The most active square for the Bf8

aiming at the f2-square.

58

The King's Indian Attack!


24.Nxf6+ Kf8 25.0xc4 bxc4 26.Nxe8
Kxes 27.Rac1 ReB 28.Bh3 Bxc1
29.Bxe6 fxe6 30.Rxc1 c3 31.Kg2 Kf7
32.Kf3 Rc4 33.Ke3 Kf6 34.Kd3 Rxb4
35.Rxc3 g5 36.h5 g4 37.Rc7 Rb3 +
38.Kd2 Rb2+ 39.Ke3 Rb3+ 40.Ke2
Rb4 41.h6 Rxe4+ 42.Kf1 Rb4 43.h7
Rb1 + 44.Ke2 Rh1 45.Rxa7 Kg6
46.Ke3 Kf5 47.Rg7 Kf6 48 . Rxg4 Rxh7
49.Ke4 Ra7 50.Rg8 Ra4+ 51.Kf3 Kf7
52.Rb8 -
{71)

(69}

Damljanovic - Hansen
New York Open, 1987

1.g3 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4


5.d3 Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e5 7.h3 Bh5 B.e4
dxe4 9.dxe4 Bc5 10.0e1 Bxf3 11.Bxf3
0-0 12.a4 Oe7 13.0e2 as 14.Nc4 NeB
15.Bd2 b6 16.Bg4 Nc7 17.Kg2 Ne6
1B.c3 g6 19.Bh6 RfeB 20.h4 f6 21.Rad1
NdfB 22.h5 RadB 23.Bc1 Rxd1 24.Rxd1
RdB 25.Rh1 Qd7 26.Qf3 Qd3 27.Qxd3
Rxd3 28.Kf1 RdB 29.Ke2 Kf7 30.f3 Ng7
31.h6 NeB 32.Be3 Bxe3 33.Kxe3 Nd6
34.Nxd6+ Rxd6 35.b4 axb4 36..cxb4
Rd4 37.Rb1 Ke7 3B.a5 b5 39.f4 Nd7
40.Rb3 NbS 41.BcB KdB 42.Be6 Na6
43.8gB Nxb4 44.Bxh7 Nc2+ 45.Kf2
Rd2+ 46.Kg1 Rd1 + 47.Kg2 Rd2+
48.Kh3 Kc7 49.fxe5 fxe5 50.Rb2 Rd7
51.8gB Nd4 52.h7 Rxh7+ 53.Bxh7 c5
54.Bxg6 c4 55.Bf7 c3 56.Rb1 Kb7
57.g4 1-0

(70)

Kindermann - G elfand
Munich, 1991

1.g3 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4


5.d3 Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e5 7.h3 Bh5 B.e4
dxe4 9.dxe4 Bc5 10.0e1 0-0 11.Nc4
Re8 12.a4 Qc7 13.Nh4 Bf8 14.Bg5 Bg6
15.Nxg6 hxg6 16.Qe2 Nc5 17.Bxf6 gxf6
18.h4 Bh6 19.b4 Ne6 20.c3 b5 21.axb5
cxb5 2 2 . N e 3 Oxc3 23.Nd5 Oc4

Henley - Fritz
BONUS GAME #1B, 1993

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4


5.d3 Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e5 7.h3 Bh5 8.e4
dxe4 9.dxe4 Bc5 1 O.a3!? [The idea is to
gain s p a c e o n the queenside. )
1 O ... Oc7?1 [10 ... a5! Fritz- Henley,
Training game, is an improvement. )
11.b4 [Gaining space on the queenside,
while preparing to develop with Bc1-b2.)
11...Bd4?1 [This temporary tempo gain
leaves the Bd4 ultimately exposed.;
11...Be7! ? 12.Bb2 a5] 12.Rb1 ! RdB
13.g4 Bg6 14.Nxd4 exd4 15.f4t [Now I
have displaced the black e-pawn and
gained a huge space advantage on the
kingside. ) 15 ... h6 16.e51 Nd5
17.Bxd51 [By surrendering my Bg2, I
secure the ultimate win of the black
d4-pawn. ) 1 7 ... cxd5 1 B. f51 [It is
important to lock this bishop out of the
game. My e5-pawn is not as weak as it
appears, d u e to b l a c k's la c k of
development.) 1B ...Bh7 19.Nf3 f61 ?
[Black takes advantage of the looseness
of white's queen position to chip away at
the white center. Not 19 .. . Nxe5??
20.Nxe5 Qxe5 21.Re1+-.] 20.Bf4 fxe5
21.Re1 0-0 22.Nxe5 [22.Bxe5!?
Henley-Fritz, Training game, is an
interesting alternative.] 22...g5? 1 [This
doesn't solve any of black's problems,
and weakens his kingside further.]
23.Bh2 Nxe5 24.Bxe5 Oc3 25.Rb3 Oc6

The King's Indian Attack!


26.Bxd4 a6?1 [Black spends a tempo to
prot ect his a7-pawn, but falls victim to
t h e attacking power of the
opposite-colored bishops.] 27.Rbe3
Rfe8 28.Re6 R x e6 29.Rxe6 Rd6
30.Re7 Rd7 31.0e11 +- [Decisive
penetration by the white queen cannot
be prevented.; 31.0e2 Qd6! {Xg3).]
31. Kf8 [31...Rxe7 32 .Qxe7 + -]
32.Re8+ Kf7 33.Rh81 (Xh78) ... Bg8
34.Rxg81 Kxg8 [34...Re7 35.Rg7 + +-]
35.Qe8+ Kh7 36.0h8# [HENLEY] 1-0
.

4...Bg4/6...e6
KERES SYSTEM

CBU253pp #25

5C)

A prelude to white's kingside attack,


forcing the exchange of knight for the
Bg6 and playing for e4-e5 and a kingside
pawn storm.

(72)

Roizman - I:Jhlmann
USSR, 1966

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4


5.d3 Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e6 7.e4 Be7 8.h3
Bh5 9.Qe2 0-0 10.g4 Bg6 11.Nh4 dxe4
12.Nxg6 hxg6 13.Nxe4 Nxe4 14.Qxe4
e5 15.b4 a5 16.b5 cxb5 17.Qxb7 Rb8
18.Qd5 Qc7 19.a4 b4 20.f4 Qxc2
21.Qxd7 Bc5+ 22.Kh1 Bd4 23.fxe5
Bxa1 24.Bg5 Bxe5 25.Be7 b3 26.Bxf8
Rxf8 27.d4 b2 28.Qb7 Bx d4 29.Bd5
Be5 0-1

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bg4


5.d3 Nbd7 6.Nbd2 e6

4... Bf5/5.b3
LASKER SYSTEM

CBU253pp #26

More solid than 6...e5.


7.e4 Be7 8.h3 Bh5 9.0e2

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bf5

Aiming to establish the KIA "spearhead"


at e5.

Black's positionally strongest move is


4 ... Bf5. The idea is simple if white
establishes an advanced pawn center on
d4 and e5, then black's Bh7 (or g6) will
control the beautiful h7-b1 diagonal.

9...0-0 10.g4
Breaking the pin on the d1-h5 diagonal.

5.b3
10...Bg6 11.Nh4- DIAGRAM
A "Hypermodern" approach - delaying a

decision on the central pawns and


aiming to control the dark squares {d4
and e5) by developing the bishop at b2.
5 e6 6.Bb2 Be7 7.d3
..

The knight is to be developed at d2.


7...h6
An importCj.nt move - allowing black to
tuck the bishop away at h7 in the event
of e2-e4 by white.

The King:'i Indian Attack!

60
8.Nbd2 0-0 - DIAGRAM
Black has a solid position.

25.Rde1 Rf8 26.h4 Kh8 27.0g3 Ra6


28.g5 Rb6 29.Bh3 Oe7 30.gxh6 gxh6
31.Ng6+ Bxg6 32.Rxe6 Rxf4 33.0xf4
Be4+ 34.Rxe4 dxe4 35.0xh6+ Oh7
36.0f6+ Qg7 37.0d8+ Kh7 38.Qxb6
Og3 39.Qxb7+ Kh6 40.Rf6+ Kh5
41.0h7+ 1-0
(75)

(73)

Kortchnoi - Reshevsky
Amsterdam, 1968

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 c6 4.b3 Bf5


5.Bb2 e6 6.0-0 Be7 7.d3 h6 8.Nbd2 0-0
9.0e1 Nbd7 1 O.e4 Bh7 11.0e2 85
12.a4 Qb6 13.e5 Nes 14.Bh3 Nc7
15.Kh1 Rae8 16.Nh4 f6 17.exf6 Bxf6
18.Bxf6 Rxf6 19.f4 Oc5 20.Ndf3 Qc3
21.Bg4 d4 22.Ne5 Nxe5 23.fxe5 Rxf1 +
24.Rxf1 Qc5 25.0f2 Rf8 26.Qxf8 +
Oxfa 27.Rxf8+ KxfS 28.Nf3 c5 29.Nd2
N d 5 30.Nc4 Nb4 31.Nxa5 Nxc2
32.Nxb7 c4 33.bxc4 Bxd3 34.Nc5 Bxc4
35.Bxe6 Bxe6 36.Nxe6+ Ke7 37.Nc5
Nb4 38.a5 Nc6 39.a6 Kd8 40.Kg2 g6
41.e6 Ke7 42.Kf3 Kd6 43.Ke4 g5 44.h4
g4 1-0
(74)

Polugaevsky - Addison
Palma de Mallorca, 1970

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 c6 3.Bg2 Bf5 4.d3 h6


5.Nbd2 Nf6 6.0-0 e6 7.b3 Be7 8.Bb2 0-0
9.0e1 Bh7 10.e4 85 11.84 Na6 12.0e2
Nb4 13.Ne1 Nd7 14.14 Bf6 15.e5 Be7
16.g4 ReS 17.Kh1 f6 18.Ndf3 fxe5
19.Nxe5 Nxe5 20.Bxe5 c5 21.Rd1 Nc6
22.Nf3 Nxe5 23.Nxe5 Oc7 24.0e3 Bd6

Fritz - Henley
BONUS GAME #19, 1993

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bf5


5.b3 e6 6.Bb2 Be7 7.d3 h6 8.Nbd2 0-0
9 . R e1 [White logically prepares to
execute. the e2-e4 pawn push. For 9.e3
see Henley-Fritz. Training game.]
9...Nbd7 10.e4 Bg6 [Even better is
10 ... Bh7! tucking the bishop away.]
11.e5 [Also possible is 11.Nh4!? Bh7
12 f4 ] 11...Ne8 12.h4 c5 [It is important
for black to und ertake counterplay
immediately lest white just build up on
the kingside ] 13.Bh3 b51 = [Dubious is
13...b6?! Henley-Fritz, Training game.]
14.Nh2 [14.Bg2?! Fritz-Henley, Training
game, is counterproductive.] 14...Nb6
[Here I aim for ...c5-c4 which will open
up the h7-c2 diagonal for my bishop.]
15.h5 Bh7 16.f4 [Fritz continues on the
kingside.] 16...c4! tz [This opens lines on
the queenside and keeps the focus of the
battle in that area.] 17.Qf3 [17.Ndf3! ?]
17...b41 [The threat of c4-c3 encourages
Fritz to open the position.] 18.bxc4?1
[18.Ndf1! ?] 18 ...dxc4 19.Nxc4 Nxc4
20.dxc4 Bc5+ 21.Kh1 Bxc2+ [As a
result of the last few moves, the d-file has
been opened, my bishops have become
active and I have a potential passed
b-pawn. Note the passed white c-pawn
is firmly blockaded by my control of the
beautiful c5-square.] 22.Rac1 Ba41 [Not
an automatic retreat, but from here my
bishop patrols the d1-square which will
allow me to be first on the d-file.] 23.Ng4
[This seems a bit slow, as Fritz will no
longer be able to muster up a kingside
.

The King's Indian Attack!


attack. Possible is 23.f5! ?.] 23...Qb61
[This strengthens my grip on the b6-g1
diagonal and prepares ...Ra8-d8 to seize
the d-file.) 24.Bg2 [24.Qxa8? Bc6+-+)
24 ... Rc8 [24 ... Rd8!?] 25.0b7 Qxb7
26.Bxb7 Rd8!t 27.Bg2 Nc71 [The
knight heads for the natural square at c5
and connects my rooks.] 28.Rb1 Rd3
[Using the tempo on the weak g3-pawn
to gain time to double my rooks. This
type of position illustrates the dangers in
the KIA of a failed kingside attack. The
resulting weaknesses create a virtually
impossible defensive task.] 29.Kh2 Rfd8
30.Bc1 aS! [Setting the queenside pawn
majority in motion.] 31 .Be3 [Fritz
naturally offers to exchange one of my
well-placed pieces. This does allow my
rooks an entry point at d2.] 31...Na6 (My
knight simply prepares to occupy the
powerful c5-square.) 32.Rbc1 Bxe3
33.Nxe3 Nc5l [From this unassailable
post, my knight covers e4 and the
planned advance of my a- and b-pawns.]
34.Re2 Rd2 35.Rce1 R8d3 [Further
infiltration to increase the pressure.]
3 6 . g 4 (Fritz resumes his belated
kingside advance, but without backup
support from the heavy artillery (queen
and rooks), this means little. Not 36.Bf3?
Rxe3! -+ Note the cross pins! ] 36. ..Kf8
37.Kg3 Rxe3 + I [A typical middlegame
motif sacrificing the exchange to secure
unstoppable passed pawns.] 38.Rxe3
Rxa2 [Now the path has been cleared
for the triumphant march of the dynamic
duo.] 39.Be4 Bc2 40.Bc6 a4 41.R1 e2
b3 42.Rd2 Ke71 [This way I don't allow
the white rook to infiltrate. Note how the
wonder knight (Nc5) even covers the
d7 -square thus preventing the white
rook from achieving counterplay. Not
42.. . a3?? 43.Rd8 + Ke7 44.Re8 #.)
43.Re1 (Fritz scurries back to stop the
little monsters, but as we all know, rooks
are the worst blockaders, not the best.)

(Jj

43...a 3 44.Rf1 b21- + [The bishop is


surrendered to gain time. White gets
some counterplay after 44 ... Be41?
45.Rxa2 bxa2 46.Bxe4 {46.Ra1 6,. Bb1-+
47.Kf3 Nb3) Nxe4 + 47.Kg2) 45.Rxc2
Ra 1 46.Rcf2 Rxf1 4 7.Rx f 1 a 2
[Touchdown! HENLEY) 0-1

5.d3/9.c4
"Fritz" LASKER SYSTEM
CBU253pp #27
1.Nf3 dS 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bf5
5.d3 es 6.Nbd2 h6
Again, making a hideaway for the Bf5.
7.Qe1
This strange looking move is played to
support e2-e4, so as not to commit the
Rf1. White will usually play Qe1-e2 later.
7 .. .Be7 8.e4 Bh7 9.c4 - DIAGRAM
A n a n t i p o s i tional
concocted by "Fritz"

(76)

c o n tinuation

Fritz - Henley
BONUS GAME #20, 1993

1 .Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bf5


5.d3 es 6.Nbd2 h6 7.0e1 Be7 8.e4 Bh7
9.c4?1 [A unique interpretation of the

The King's Indian Attack!

62

position. This shows how in closed


positions Fritz does not always form the
correct plan. For 9.b3 see Henley-Fritz,
Training game.] 9...Na61 ? [Hoping to
exploit the weaknesses at d3 and c2.]
10.cxd5 cxd5 11.Ne5 Nb4 12.0d1 0-0
13.a3 Nc6 14.Nxc6 bxc6 [My new
c-pawn strengthens my center.] 15.b3
Nd7!?+ [Contemplating ...Be7-f6 or
...Nd7-c5.] 16.Bb2 aS! 17.d4 Nf61?
[Trying to fix the central configuration.]
18.Rc1 Qb6 [My queen pressures d4
and b3.] 19.e5 [Tempting, but after this
black has an ideal French Defence
formation with his bishop developed on
h7.] 1 9 ... N d 7 2 0 . f 4 [This lo oks
impressive, but the hypermoderns
taught us that occupation of the center
does not mean you control it. Perhaps
20.Nf3 RfcB with the idea ...Rab8Xb3.]
20...c51 t [Not only undermining Fritz's
center, but securing a powerful passed
d-pawn.] 2 1 . d x c 5 [ 2 1.Nf3 a4!+]
21...Bxc5+ 22.Kh1 Be3 [Infiltration.]
23.Qe2 Racs 24.Ba1 d4 [Suddenly the
Bh7 is in his element as he will support
the d-pawn to d3.] 25.Rc4 d3 26.0e1
Bxd21+ [ Here by surrendering my
bishop for the blockadjng white knight, I
gain control of the c-file and secure the
further advance of my d-pawn.] 27.Qxd2
Qxb3 28.Rxc8 Rxca 29.Qxa5 [Fritz has
maintained material equality and even
has the bishop pair, However I have a
powerful passed d-pawn.) 29 ... Qc2
30.Bf3 d2 [One square to go! ] 31.Kg11
[31.Rd1? Be4!-+] 31 ... Qc11 32.0a7
[32.Rd1 Bc2! 33.Qxd2 Bxd1 34.Qxd1
Qxd1 + 35.Bxd1 Rc1-+] 32 Bd31
33.Rd1 Bc2 34.Rf1 Nc51 -+ [Now my
knight goes after the Ba1. 35.Bh5 A
temporary diversion which does not
affect much.] 35 g6 [It is OK to weaken
the kingside dark squares since Fritz is
not organized to take advantage.]
36.Bf3 Bd3 37.Rd1 Be4 38.Be2 Nb3

39.Bd4 Bd3 40.Bf3 Qc41 [Now the


threat to the Bd4 gains me time to lift the
blockad e with ... Bd3-e2! ) 41.Bf2
[41.Be3 Be2- +] 41...Be21 [This wins the
exchange.) 42.0e3D [42.Bxe2 Qxe2)
42...Bxd1 43.Bxd1 Qc211 -+ [Even my
queen offers herself to secure the pawn
promotion!] 44.Qxb31 [Fritz finds the
best chance. Even worse is 44.Bxc2
Rxc2 45.Qx b3 (45.0e2 Rc1 +- +)
. . . d1 Q +
46. K g2
Rxf2 + !- + . )
44 ... Qxd1 +I 45.Qxd1 Rc1 46.Kf1!
Rxd1 + 47.Ke2 Rf11 [A final sting!
HENLEY] 0-1

9.Qe2/1 o.es
LASKER SYSTEM

CBU253pp #28
1.Nf3 dS 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 Bf5
5.d3 e6 6.Nbd2 h6 7.Qe1 Be7 a.e4 Bh7
9.Qe2
Clearly superior to the bizarre 9.c4?!
(CBU253pp #27). White aims for e4-e5
after making a square for the Rf1 on e1
(which in turn makes a square for the
Nd2 on f1).
9...0-0 1 o.es Nfd7 11.h4
Grabbing space on the kingside.
11...cs
Black begins a queenside offensive
supported by the remote but well-placed
Bh7.

..

..

12.Bh3
White prevents ...f7-f6 (to eliminate the
e5-pawn) as e6 would be under attack.
12...Nc6

63

The King:< Indian Auack!

Good clean development.


13.a3- DIAGRAM
Prevents a ...Nc6-b4 invasion.

(77)

Fritz - Henley
BONUS GAME #21, 1993

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.o-o Bf5


5.d3 e6 6.Nbd2 h6 7.0e1 Be7 8.e4 Bh7
9.0e2 (For 9.c4?! see Fritz-Henley,
BONUS GAME #20.) 9...0-0 10.e5 Nfd7
11.h4 cs 12.Bh3 Nc6 13.a3 b51=
14.b31? (Fritz-Henley, Training game,
14.Re1 is a reasonable alternative.]
14...Ncxe51 15.Nxe5 Nxe5 16.Bxe61
[16.Qxe5 Bf6-+] 16 ... N x d 3!? [The
knight becomes a "desperado" to
maintain the material balance.) 17.cxd3
Bf61 18.Ra2 Res 19.Bxf7 + [Forced. ]
19... Kxf7:f (Black has the bishop pair,
more space and a superior pawn
structure. Meanwhile the black king is
only temporarily inconvenienced .]
20.013 KgB 21.Bb21 (Fritz correctly
seeks to neutralize black's bishop pair.]
21 ... Bxb2 22.Rxb2 Qd6 23.Rc1
[Seeking counterplay against the black
c5-pawn. ] 23... Re6 24.Rbc2 RfBt
25.Qd1 c4!+ (25... Bxd3 26.Rxc5 Bc4
27.b4oo) 26.dxc4 [Parting with the

exchange, but the alternative 26.bxc4 is


no help.] 26... Bxc2 27.Rxc2 dxc4
28.bxc4 Rfe8 [The battle enters a
technical phase with white scratching
about for drawing chances.] 29.Qf3 Re2
30.0dS+D Oxd5 31.cxdS RdB 32.Kf1
Res 33.Rc7 as 34.Nb3 a4 35.Nd4
Rdxd5 [The fall of the d -pawn leaves
white without any feasible compensation
for his material deficit. Another try is
35... Rexd5! ?.] 36.Nc6 Rd1 + 37.Kg2
Re2 38.Ne7 + Kf71 39.NdS + Kf8
40.Rcs + Res-+ [Th e rest i s
straightforward.] 41. Rxes + Kxes
42.Nc3 [42.Nc7 + Kd7 43.Nxb5 Rd3
44.Kf1 Rb3- + winning the a-pawn.]
42... Rd3 43.NxbS Kd7 44.Kf1 Rb3
45.Nd4 Rxa3 46.Nf5 Rf3 47.Nd4
[47.Nxg7 a3-+] 47...Rd3 4B.Nc2 a3
49.Ke2 Rb3 50.Kd2 a2 S1.Kc1 Rb1+
S2.Kd2 Rb2 [HENLEY/HODGES] 0-1
1 O.Kh1

(g3-g4 attack)

G U TMAN VARIATION

CBU253pp #29
1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 BfS
5.d3 e6 6.Nbd2 h6 7.0e1 Be7 s.e4 Bh7
9.0e2 0-0 10.Kh1
Lev Gutman's "caveman" approach to
the problem of cracking black's solid
position - the rook goes to g1 and white
plays for a swift attack with g3-g4!
1o...Nbd7 11.es
Displacing the black Nf6 while d7 is
unavailable.
11... Ne8 12.Rg1 Nc7
Defending the e6-pawn so that black can
counter in the center with ...f7-f6.
13.g4 - DIAGRAM

'171e King's Indian Attack!

64

Leading to an unbalanced position with


unclear chances.

{78)

Gutman - Leinov
Israel, 1980

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3 . Bg2 Bf5 4.0-0 c6


5.d3 h6 6.Nbd2 e6 7.e3 Be7 a.Qe2 0-0
9.e4 Bh7 10.Kh1 Nbd7 11.e5 NeB
12.Rg1 Nc7 13.g4 f6 14.exf6 Bxf6
15.Nf1 Oe7 16.g5 hxg5 17.Bh3 Bf5
18.Nxg5 Bxg5 19.Bxg5 Qf7 20 . Bxf5
Qxf5 21.14 d4 22.Ng3 Qd5+ 23.Rg2
Rf7 24.Ne4 e5 25.15 Rxf5 26.Bh6 Rf7
27.Rag1 Nea 2&.Ag5 Ndf S .29.Qg2
Nxe4 30.dxe4 Qd7 31.Qg3 Qe7 32.0b3
Kf8 33.Rh5 Kg8 34.Bxg7 Nxg7 35.Qh3
Rff8 36.Rh 8 + Kf7 37.Rxg7+ Kxg7
38.0h 7+ Kf6 39.Qf5+ 1-0
(79)

Henley - Fritz
BONUS GAME #22, 1993

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 c6 4.0-0 815


5 . d3 e6 6. Nbd2 h6 7.Qe1 [Gutman
actually played 7.e3 followed by 8.Qe2.]
7...Be7 S.e4 Bh7 9.0e2 0-0 10.Kh1
Nbd7 11.e5 NeB 12.Rg1 Nc7 13.g4
[Also playable is 13.Nf1 Henley-Fritz,
Training game. The most direct method,
however, is 13.g4.]
13...f6 [13... Bg6
Henley-Fritz, Training game.] 14 . exf6
Bxf6
1 5 . N f1
e5N
(15 ... Qe7

Gutman-Leinov, Israel 1980.] 16.g5!t


[The point of Gutman's plan is this
temporary pawn sac to activate our KIA

bishop and to open the g-file. ] 16. ..hxg5


17.Bh3 e4 18 . Nxg5 exd3 19.cxd3
ReS?I [This "tempo" merely encourages
the white queen to join in the kin gside
attack.] 20.Qh5-+ Nf8 21.Nxh7 Nxh7
22.Ne31 b6? [A waste of time in a
situation that has become critical, as the
white pieces are m a ss i n g on the
kingside.] 2 3 . Bf5 NfS 24.Ng4 Qe7
25.Nh6 + KhB 26.8141 [ M obil izing our
remainin g forces . ] 26 ... Bxb2 27 . Bd6 + 0e2 [27...0f6 28.Ng 4 + +-] 28.Qf7!
[Pl aying for mat e due to the many weak
square s around the black K.] 28... 0f3 +
29.Rg 2 Nfe6 [29. . . Qxg2 + 30.Kxg2 gxh6
31.Bxf8! +- Introducing 32.Qh7# to the
equation.] 30.0g8+11 [A c r ow ni n g
conclusion to the Gutman p l a n
beginning with 10.Kh1 and

12.Rg1.]

30 .. . Rxg8 3 1 .Nf7# [Black i s


"smothered" as his breathing hole on h7
is

plugged. HENLEY}

1-0

The King:r; Indian Attack!

6:

-------

CHESS INFORMANT
SYMBOL GUIDE
!

C) white (black) has a small edge

(l=) white (b lack) has a clear advantage

+- (-+) white (black) is winning


=

with equality

t with the initiative


--+

with an attack

+ with counterplay
/'

diagonal

IB center
file
1 endgame

X weak point
o

better is

0 more space

6 with the idea

queenside

kingside

oc

unclear

BS

with compen sation

#mate
l!il

111

White

Benjamin-Eingorn
Botvinnik-Pomar
Bronstein-Uhlmann
Browne-Uhlmann
Calvo Minguez Karpov
Ciocaltea-Kozma
Damljanovic-Hansen
Dvoretzky-Khalifman
Dvoretzky-Vulfson
Fischer-Durao
Fischer-Geller,U
Fischer-lbrahimoglu
Fischer-Marovic
Fischer-Miagmasuren
Fischer-Panno
Fischer-Seidma n
Franco-Yudasin
Fritz-Henley (7)
Frolik-Stoll
-

I Geller-Spassky

Geller-Tukmakov
Gheorghiu-Uhlmann
Gutman-Leinov
Henley Fritz (18)
Hodges-Fritz (2)
-

two bishops

1!1 bisho ps

CRU253pp Index of Players and


Opponents

of opposite color

bishops of the same color

0 fo rced move

lvkov-Golombek

Jansa-Forintos
Kasparov Bonin
Katz-Valvo
Kavalek-Henley
Kindermann-Gelfand
-

Korchnoi-Reshevsky
Ljubojevic-Hulak
Ljuboj evic Karp o v
-

Ljubojevic-Kasparov

Ljubojevic-Petrosian
Ljubojev ic S e irawa n
-

Ljubojevic-Timman

Lukial10v-Timoshchenko
M yers-Fid el ity (Designer Mach
Nikolic-Majeric

Ill)

66

The King's Indian Attack!

Petrosian-Pachman
Petrosian-Reshevsky
Plachetka-Pribyl
Polugaevsky-Addison
Popovic-Kirov
Roizman-Uhlmann
Ruehrig-Podzielny
Shirov-Georgadze
Spiridinov-Radulov
Stein-Haag
Stein-Hartoch
Stein-Hart
Sznapik-Karpov
Vasyukov-Uhlmann
Wenner-Koerholz
Yurtaev-Dolmatov
Black

Polugaevsky-Addison
Kasparov-Bonin
Yurtaev-Dolmatov
Fischer-Durao
Benjamin-Eingorn
Myers-Fidelity (Designer Mach Ill)
Jansa-Forintos
Henley-Fritz (18)
Hodges-Fritz (2)
Kindermann-Gelfand
Fischer-Geller,U
Shirov-Georgadze
lvkov-Golombek
Stein-Haag
Damljanovic-Hansen
Stein-Hartoch
Fritz-Henley (8)
Kavalek-Henley
Stein-Hart
Ljubojevic-Hulak
Fischer-lbrahimoglu
Calvo Minguez-Karpov
Ljubojevic-Karpov
Sznapik-Karpov
Ljubojevic-Kasparov
Dvoretzky-Khalifman
Popovic-Kirov
Wenner-Koerholz

Ciocaltea-Kozma
Gutman-Leinov
Nikolic-Majeric
Fischer-Marovic
Fischer-Miagmasuren
Petrosian-Pachman
Fischer-Panna
Ljubojevic-Petrosian
Ruehrig-Podzielny
Botvinnik-Pomar
Plachetka-Pribyl
Spiridinov-Radulov
Korchnoi-Reshevsky
Petrosian-Reshevsky
Fischer- Seidman
Ljubojevic-Seirawan
Geller-Spassky
Frolik-Stoll
Ljubojevic-Timman
Lukianov-Timoshchenko
Geller-Tukmakov
Bronstein-Uhlmann
Browne-Uhlmann
Gheorghiu-Uhlmann
Roizman-Uhlmann
Vasyukov-Uhlmann
Katz-Valva
Dvoretzky-Vulfson
Franco-Yudasin

The King's Indian Attack!

67

CBU253pp
Index of Power Play! Positions
KIA

Power Play!
King's Indian Attack
with1.e4

v.

French Dfence

1 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6


.

[3...c5 4.Ngf3 Nc6 5.g3 Bd6 (5...g6 6.Bg2


Bg7 7.0-0 Nge7 8.Re1 0-0 - CBU253pp
#10 ) 6.Bg2 Nge7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Re1
CBU253pp #11]

1.e4
CBU253pp Power Play!
Positions #1-15
1.e4
KIA v. Caro-Kann Defence

4.Ngf3 Be7 5.g3 c5 6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0 Nc6


a.Re1 b5

1...c6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 g6

[8... 0c7 - CBU253pp #12)

[3...e5 4.Ngf3 Bd6 S.g3 Nf6 6.Bg2 o-o


7.0-0 - CBU253pp #1]

9.e5 Nd7 10.Nf1 a5 ["Long Variation"]


11.h4 b4 12.Bf4 Ba6

4.g3 Bg7 5.Bg2 e5 6.Ngf3 Ne7 7.0-0 0-0


8.b4 - CBU253pp #2

[12 ... a4 - CBU253pp #13)

[8.c3 - CBU253pp #3]

13.Ng5
[13.h5 - CBU253pp #14]

KIA v. Sicilian Defence

13 Qe8 - CBU253pp #15]


..

1 c5 [note that the position may take


on some "French character" if black
plays ...dS]
...

Power Play!
King's Indian Attack
with1.Nf3

2.Nf3 e6 [2...d6 3.d3 Nc6 4.g3 g6 5.Bg2


Bg7 6.0-o eS - CBU253pp #4 (6 e6 CBU253pp #5) ]

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6

3.d3 Nc6 4.g3 g6 5.Bg2 Bg7 6.0-0 Nge7


7.Nbd2

[2. . c5 (Reversed King's Indian Defence)


3.Bg2 Nc6 4.d3 es s.o-o Bd6 6. e4 d4
7.Nbd2 Nge7 8.c4 f6 9.Nh4 Be6 10.f4 CBU253pp #16)

. ..

[7.c3
CBU253pp # 8; 7.Re1
CBU253pp #9]
7...d5 8.Re1 - CBU253pp #6
[8.exd5 exdS - CBU253pp #7]

3.Bg2 c6
[3...g6 (Fianchetto defensive systems)
4.0-0 Bg7 5.d3 o-o 6.Nbd2 c5 (6... Nc6
7.e4 dxe4 8.dxe4 eS 9. c3 Qe7 1O.Re1 b6

68

The King's Indian Attack!

11.a4 a5 12.Nc4 - CBU253pp #17) 7.e4


Nc6 and now,
A) 8.Re1 d4 - CBU253pp #18 {8...e5 CBU253pp #19; 8 ... h6
CBU253pp
#20);
B) 8.c3 d4 CBU253pp #21 {8...e5
CBU253pp #22; 8 ... dxe4 9.dxe4
CBU253pp #23)]
4.0-0 Bf5 [Lasker System]
[4 ... Bg4 Keres System 5.d3 Nbd7
6.Nbd2 e6 (6...e5 7.h3 Bh5 8.e4 dxe4
9.dxe4 Bc5 - CBU253pp #24) 7.e4 Be?
8.h3 Bh5 9.0e2 0-0 1O.g4 Bg6 11.Nh4 CBU253pp #25]
5.d3
[5.b3 e6 6.Bb2 Be? 7.d3 h6 8.Nbd2 0-0 CBU253pp #26]
5...e6 6.Nbd2 h6 7.0e1 Be7 8.e4 Bh7
9.Qe2
[9.c4 - CBU253pp #27]
9...0-0 10.Kh1 [Gutman Variation]
[10.e5 Nfd7 11.h4 c5 12.Bh3 Nc6 13.a3
- CBU253pp #28]
10...Nbd7 11.e5 Nea 12.Rg1 Nc7 13.g4
- CBU253pp #29
Please note the following nomenclature that will become standard in all future Power
Play! publications:
CBU253pp #34 indicates a Power Play! Position in ChessBase University publication
CBU253pp
CBU253pp/86 refers to Game no. 86 in the .cbf file in ChessBase University disk
publication CBU253pp