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Three_word verbal expressions

The first three_word verbal expression that we will show is come down upon. It
means to criticize, reprimand severely. 1 It is inseparable three_word verbal expression that is
used idiomatically. In the sentence from the book is used like this: Indeed, he almost knocked
her easel over, coming down upon her with his hands waving shouting out, Boldly we rode
and well, but, mercifully, he turned sharp, and rode off, to die gloriously she supposed upon
the heights of Balclava. (Woolf, 1994, p. 13)
The second three_word verbal expression is bear down on. It means to move quickly towards
someone or something in a threatening or determined way. (Cambridge, 2006, p. 10) Bear
down on is inseparable three_word verbal expression that has idiomatic meaning. It is shown
in this example from the book: Now, for instance, when Ramsay bore down on them,
shouting, gesticulating, Miss Briscoe, he felt certain, understood. (Woolf, 1994, p. 13)
Make up for is three_word verba expression that means to replace something that as
been lost, or to provide something good in order to make a bad situation better. (Cambridge,
2006, p. 203) Make up for is inseparable three_word verbal expression with idiomatic
meaning. It is shown in an example: Nothing made up for the loss. (Woolf, 1994, p. 42)
Fall back on means to use something when other things have failed, or when there
are no other choices. (Cambridge, 2006, p. 99) Fall back on is also inseparable three_word
verbal expression that has idiomatic meaning. In a book this example is used in sentence like
this: he had always his work to fall back on. (Woolf, 1994, p. 43)
Go up to means to reach as far as a particular place. (Cambridge, 2006, p. 143) Or
in another words to approach someone or something.2 It is inseparable three_word verbal
expression with literal meaning. As shown in: Then the door sprang open and in they came,
fresh as roses, staring, wide awake, as if this coming into the dining room after breakfast,
1 UsingEnglish.com Ltd. (2002-2013). usingEnglish.com. Retrieved February 7,
2013, from Dictionary of English Phrasal Verbs :
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/
2 Ibid.
1

which they did every day of their lives, was a positive event to them, and so on, with one thing
after another, all day long, until she went up to say good-night to them, and found them
netted in their cots like birds among cherries and raspberries, still making up stories about
some little bit of rubbishsomething they had heard, something they had picked up in the
garden. (Woolf, 1994, p. 43)
When we think that someone is less important than us, or we think that something is not good
quality for us to use then we can use three_word verbal expression Look down on or upon.
(Cambridge, 2006, p. 197) Look down on or upon is inseparable three_word verbal
expression that has idiomatic meaning. As shown in an example: And, like some queen who,
finding her people gathered in the hall, looks down upon them, and descends among them,
and acknowledges their tribute silently, and accepts their devotion and their prostration
before her (Paul did not move a muscle but looked straight before him as she passed) she
went down, and crossed the hall and bowed her head very slightly, as if she accepted what
they could not say: their tribute to her beauty. (Woolf, 1994, p. 59)
Go on with is three_word verbal expression that means to continue doing. 3 It is
inseparable three_word verbal expression with an idiomatic meaning. As shown in example
from the book: Well then, well then? She asked, somehow expecting the others to go on with
the argument, as if in an argument like this one threw one's own little bolt which fell short
obviously and left the others to carry it on. . (Woolf, 1994, p. 74) or in another example from
the page 129: But to go on with their storythey had got through the dangerous stage by
now.
Get along with is usually used to explain that someone is having a good relationship with
someone but it also can mean to deal with, handle. 4 This second meaning is what this
three_word verbal expression means in our example. Get along with is inseparable
three_word verbal expression with idiomatic meaning. In a sentence from a book is used like
this: She watched her son scything. He was a great one for workone of those quiet ones.
3 UsingEnglish.com Ltd. (2002-2013). usingEnglish.com. Retrieved February 7,
2013, from Dictionary of English Phrasal Verbs :
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/
4 Ibid.
2

Well they must be getting along with the cupboards, she supposed. The hauled themselves up.
(Woolf, 1994, p. 105)
Next three_word verbal expression is be down on. It means to have negative feelings toward
someone5. It is, also, inseparable three_word verbal expression with idiomatic meaning. In the
book To the Lighthouse it is used in this sentence: She could not see the colour, she could not
see the lines; even with his back turned to her, she could only think, But he'll be down on me
in a moment, demandign- something she felt she could not give him. (Woolf, 1994, p. 112)
If something or someone close in on it means that it is getting near someone. 6 It is inseparable
three_word verbal expression with idiomatic meaning. In the book it is used in a sentence like
this: What is the meaning of life? That was alla simple question; one that tended to close in
on one with years. (Woolf, 1994, p. 120)
If you stand up to a powerful person or organisation, you state your opinions forcefully and
refuse to agree with them or do what they want. (Cambridge, 2006, p. 315) This inseparable,
three_word verbal expression have idiomatic meaning like all other mentioned three_word
verbal expressions. As shown in an example: She had felt, now she could stand up to Mrs
Ramsaya tribute to the astonishing power that Mrs Ramsay had over one. (Woolf, 1994, p.
131)

5 UsingEnglish.com Ltd. (2002-2013). usingEnglish.com. Retrieved February 7,


2013, from Dictionary of English Phrasal Verbs :
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/
6 Ibid.
3

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