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The Constitution of Raenicco

Ministry of Justice,
Office of the President of the Republic,
Raenicco
Approved by a Plenary Session
Of the Parliament of Raenicco
On March 29, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I - INTRODUCTION AND RIGHTS


Chapter the first - Fundamental provisions
Section the first - Introduction
Section the second - Democracy and the rule of the law
Section the third - Branches of government and the division of power
Section the fourth - Citizenship
Chapter the second - Basic rights and liberties of the person
Preamble
Section the fifth - Safeguards on general liberty
Section the sixth - Safeguards on legal liberty
Section the seventh - Safeguards on financial liberty
Section the eighth - Safeguards on educational liberty
Section the ninth - Safeguards on civil rights
Section the tenth - Responsibility for the environment
Section the eleventh - Protection and exercise of the fundamental rights

Part II - THE GOVERNMENT


Chapter the third - Parliament and representatives
Section the twelfth - Composition and term of parliament
Section the thirteenth - Parliamentary elections
Section the fourteenth - Eligibility and qualification
Section the fifteenth - Suspension of the office of a representative and release or
dismissal from office
Section the sixteenth - Conflict of interest
Section the seventeenth - The Speaker and the Speakers Council
Section the eighteenth - Committees of Parliament
Chapter the fourth - The President of the Republic and the Government
Section the nineteenth - Election of the President of the Republic
Section the twentieth - The presidential term
Section the twenty-first - Decisions of the President
Section the twenty-second - Substitutes of the President
Section the twenty-third - The Cabinet
Section the twenty-fourth - Formation of the Government
Section the twenty-fifth - Resignation of a Minister
Section the twenty-sixth - Duties of the Government
Section the twenty-seventh - Duties of the Prime Minister
Section the twenty-eighth - Decision-making in the Government
Section the twenty-ninth - The Ministries
Section the thirtieth - The Chancellor of Justice of the Government
Chapter the fifth - The judiciaries and the administration of justices
Section the thirty-first - Courts of law
Section the thirty-second - Duties of the Supreme Court and the Supreme Administrative
Court
Section the thirty-third - Composition of the Supreme Court and the Supreme
Administrative Court
Section the thirty-fourth - High Court of Impeachment

Section the thirty-fifth - Appointment of judges


Section the thirty-sixth - The right of judges to remain in office
Section the thirty-seventh - The prosecutors
Section the thirty-eighth - The presidential pardon
Chapter the sixth - Supervision of legality
Section the thirty-ninth - Primacy of the Constitution
Section the fortieth - Duties of the Chancellor of Justice of the Government
Section the forty-first - The right of the Chancellor of Justice to receive information
Section the forty-second - Supervision of the lawfulness of the official acts of the
Government and the President of the Republic
Section the forty-third - Criminal liability of the President of the Republic
Section the forty-fourth - Prosecution of Ministers
Section the forty-fifth - Initiation of a matter concerning the legal responsibility of a
Minister
Section the forty-sixth - Preconditions for the prosecution of a Minister
Chapter the seventh - Administration and self-government
Section the forty-seventh - State Administration
Section the forty-eighth - Municipal and other regional self-government
Section the forty-ninth - Universities and other educational providers
Section the fiftieth - Delegation of administrative tasks to others than the authorities
Section the fifty-first - General qualifications for public office and other grounds of
appointment
Section the fifty-second - Appointment to State Offices
Chapter the eighth - National defence
Section the fifty-third - National defence obligation
Section the fifty-fourth - Commander-in-chief of the defence forces
Section the fifty-fifth - Mobilisation

Part III - SPECIAL, TRANSITORY, AND FINAL PROVISIONS


Chapter the ninth - Special provisions
Section the fifty-sixth - Definition of terms
Chapter the tenth - Revision of the Constitution
Section the fifty-seven - Amendments to the Constitution
Chapter the eleventh - Transitory provisions
Section the fifty-eighth - Election of the first President of the Republic
Chapter the twelfth - Final provisions
Section the fifty-ninth - Coming into force
Section the sixtieth - Final provisions

PART I - INTRODUCTION AND RIGHTS


Chapter the first - Fundamental provisions
Section the first - Introduction
The form of government is that of a parliamentary republic.
Popular sovereignty is the foundation of government.
All powers derive from the People and exist for the people and the nation; they shall be exercised as specified by the
Constitution.
Respect and protection of the value of the human being constitute the primary obligations of the State.

Section the second - Democracy and the Rule of the law


The powers of the nation are vested in the people, who are represented by the Parliament.
Democracy entails the right of the individual to participate in and influence the development of society and his or
her living conditions.

Section the third - Branches of government and the division of power


The legislative powers are exercised by the Parliament, which shall also decide on State finances.
The executive powers are exercised by the President of the Republic and the Government.
The judicial powers are exercised by independent courts of law, with the Supreme Court and the Supreme
Administrative Court as the highest instances.

Section the fourth - Citizenship


A child shall gain citizenship upon birth on the grounds of the citizenships of their parents. Any child of two citizens
is themselves a citizen.
Citizenship may also be gained through a process of application and review, to be detailed by law.
Withdrawal of citizenship shall be permitted only in case of voluntary acquisition of another citizenship or of
undertaking service contrary to national interests in a foreign country, under the conditions and procedures more
specifically provided by law.

Chapter the second - Basic rights and liberties of the person


Preamble
The primary purpose of this Constitution being the preservation of individual rights, we do extend these rights and
freedoms to all people, regardless race, sex, gender identity, sexuality, ethnicity, class, disability, et cetera.

Section the fifth - Safeguards on general liberty


The government shall defend the freedoms of speech and press, and the rights to of the people peaceably assemble
and to petition the government.
One has the right to have a religion, and to peaceably practice ones religion without impediment by the
government.
All people have the right to own property, and to be secure in ones person and property against unreasonable
searches and seizures. Similarly, people have the right to privacy, and to be secure in their homes and online unless
with probable cause for suspicion, under guidelines to be detailed by law.
The government shall not infringe upon the right for any person of age to engage in consensual and reciprocal
marriage with whomever they will. This includes marriage between those of the same sex.
Also, persons have the right to have access to birth control and abortion if they should wish.

Section the sixth - Safeguards on legal liberty


All people have the right to be secure against arbitrary arrest, detention, or exile, as well as the right to not be
detained without trial unless it is leading up to a trial, with sufficient cause to believe they may be a danger to others,
to themselves, or to the general welfare.
Also, one accused of a crime has the right to a fair trial before an impartial judge and a jury of their peers defended
by an attorney, to be provided for them should they require.
All people shall be equal before the law, and shall be innocent until proven guilty.
One found guilty of a crime shall not be subjected to excessive bail or fines, or to cruel or unusual punishment.

Section the seventh - Safeguards on financial liberty


All people, as members of society, have the right to any required social services, as well as any financial assistance
as needed.
All those of age have the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and
to protection against unemployment.

All people have the right to equal pay for equal work, free of discrimination.
Every person has the right to receive fair and just remuneration, ensuring prosperity for them and their family, to be
supplemented as necessary by the federal government.
All working people have the right to join a trade union for the protection of their interests.
Persons have the right to leisure, including reasonable limitation of work hours, and occasional holidays with pay, as
well as paid maternity and paternity leave.
All people have the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of one and of ones family,
including food, clothing, housing and medical care, and necessary social services, and the right to security in the
event of unemployment, sickness, disability, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond ones
control.

Section the eighth - Safeguards on educational liberty


All people have the right to free and quality education, which shall be directed to the full development of the human
personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote
understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities
of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. It shall also create and strengthen skills and qualities required to
be an educated and active member of society. Parents have a right to choose the kind of education that shall be given
to their children.

Section the ninth - Safeguards on civil rights


There shall be no slavery in any form, and all people shall be free from forced or involuntary labour.
All people have the right to be secure against discrimination in any form in work, in education, in public, and before
the law.
All people over eighteen years have the right to engage in our democracy and vote in any and all general elections,
regardless of race, sex, gender identity, sexuality, ethnicity, class, et cetera, and to have an equal voice and equal
representation.
No person shall be fired, receive less of an education, have social services kept from them, et cetera, on the grounds
of race, sex, gender identity, sexuality, ethnicity, class, disability or any other factor to do with their person.
No person shall be discriminated against on the grounds of disability, and all necessary provisions shall be made to
allow those with disabilities to engage in our government and society. This may include adding Braille signs to
public places, providing documents in Braille, providing sign language interpreters, et cetera, and shall be detailed
by law.

Section the tenth - Responsibility for the environment


Nature and its biodiversity, the environment and the national heritage are the responsibility of everyone.
The public authorities shall endeavour to guarantee for everyone the right to a healthy environment and for everyone
the possibility to influence the decisions that concern their own living environment.

Section the eleventh - Protection and exercise of the fundamental rights


All people as individuals and as members of the society are guaranteed by the State and all agents of the State shall
be obliged to ensure the unhindered exercise thereof.
The recognition and protection of the fundamental and inalienable rights of all by the State aims at the achievement
of social progress in freedom and justice.
The abusive exercise of rights is not permitted.
The State has the right to claim of all citizens to fulfil the duty of social and national solidarity.

PART II - THE GOVERNMENT


Chapter the third - Parliament and representatives
Section the twelfth - Composition and term of parliament
The Parliament is to consist of one hundred (100) elected members, who are elected for a term of four (4) years at a
time, one person serving a maximum of three (3) terms.

Section the thirteenth - Parliamentary elections


Parliamentary elections are, as stated prior, to be held every four (4) years, and shall be direct, proportional, and
secret vote. All peoples with the right to vote are to be given equal suffrage.
Each district is to elect two (2) representatives.

Section the fourteenth - Eligibility and qualification


Anyone eligible to vote who is not under guardianship can be a candidate in parliamentary elections. Anyone
holding any military or federal government office however, cannot be elected to parliament. If one is elected or
appointed to such an office, they shall cease to be a Representative.

Section the fifteenth - Suspension of the office of a Representative and release or dismissal from office
The tenure of office of a Representative is suspended for the duration of military service. During that time a deputy
of the Representative shall replace the Representative.
The Parliament may grant a release from office for a Representative upon his or her request if it deems there is an
acceptable reason for granting such release.
If a Representative essentially and repeatedly neglects his or her duties as a Representative, the Parliament may,
after having obtained the opinion of the Constitutional Law Committee, dismiss him or her from office permanently
or for a given period by a decision supported by at least two-thirds () of the votes cast.
If a person elected as a Representative has been sentenced by an enforceable judgement to imprisonment for a
deliberate crime or to a punishment for an electoral offence, the Parliament may inquire whether he or she can be
allowed to continue to serve as a Representative. If the offence is such that the accused does not command the trust
and respect necessary for the office of a Representative, the Parliament may, after having obtained the opinion of the
Constitutional Law Committee, declare the office of the Representative terminated by a decision supported by at
least two-thirds () of the votes cast.

Section the sixteenth - Conflict of interest


A Representative is disqualified from consideration of and decision-making in any matter that concerns him or her
personally. In addition, a Representative shall be disqualified from the consideration in a Committee of a matter
pertaining to the inspection of his or her official duties.

Chapter the seventeenth - The Speaker and the Speakers Council


The Parliament elects from among its members a Speaker and two Deputy Speakers for each parliamentary session.
The election of the Speaker and the Deputy Speakers is conducted by secret ballot. The Representative receiving
more than one half () of the votes cast is elected. If no one has received the required majority of the votes cast, the
Representative receiving the most votes is elected.
The Speaker, the Deputy Speakers and the chairpersons of parliamentary Committees form the Speaker's Council.
The Speaker's Council issues instructions on the organisation of parliamentary work and decides, as specifically
provided in this Constitution or in the Parliament's Rules of Procedure, on the procedures to be followed in the
consideration of matters in the Parliament. The Speaker's Council may put forward initiatives for the enactment or
amendment of Acts governing parliamentary officials or the Parliament's Rules of Procedure, as well as proposals
for other provisions governing the work of the Parliament.

Section the eighteenth - Committees of Parliament


For each electoral term, the Parliament appoints the Grand Committee, the Constitutional Law Committee, the
Foreign Affairs Committee, the Finance Committee, the Audit Committee and the other standing Committees

detailed by law. In addition, the Parliament appoints Committees ad hoc for the preparation of, or inquiry into, a
given matter.
The Grand Committee shall have twenty-five members. The Constitutional Law Committee, the Foreign Affairs
Committee and the Finance Committee shall have at least seventeen members each. The other standing Committees
shall have at least eleven members each. In addition, each Committee shall have the necessary number of alternate
members.
A Committee has a quorum when at least two-thirds () of its members are present, unless a higher quorum has
been specifically required for a given matter.

Chapter the fourth - The President of the Republic and the Government
Section the nineteenth - Election of the President of the Republic
The President of the Republic is elected by direct vote for a term of six years. The same person may be elected
president only twice consecutively.
The candidate who receives more than half (>) of the votes is elected president. If no candidate reaches the
required votes, another election is held in between the two candidates receiving the most votes. Whoever receives
more votes is elected.

Section the twentieth - The presidential term


The President of the Republic assumes office on the first day of the calendar month following his or her election into
office.
The term of the President ends when the President elected in the next election assumes office.
If the President dies or if the Government declares that the President is permanently unable to carry out the duties of
the presidency, a new President shall be elected as soon as possible.

Section the twenty-first - Decisions of the President


The President of the Republic makes decisions in Government on the basis of motions proposed by the Government.
If the President does not make the decision in accordance with the motion proposed by the Government, the matter
is returned to the Government for preparation. In such a case, in matters other than those concerning confirmation of
an Act or appointment to an office or position, the Government may present to the Parliament a report on the matter.
Thereafter, the matter will be decided in accordance with the position adopted by the Parliament on the basis of the
report, if this is proposed by the Government.
The appropriate Minister presents matters to the President.

The President makes decisions on matters relating to military orders in conjunction with a Minister, as provided for
in more detail by law. The President makes decisions on military appointments and matters pertaining to the Office
of the President of the Republic as provided by law.

Section the twenty-second - Substitutes of the President


When the President of the Republic is prevented from carrying out of his or her duties, these are taken over by the
Prime Minister or, if the Prime Minister too is incapacitated, by the Minister acting as Deputy Prime Minister.

Section the twenty-third - The Cabinet


The Cabinet consists of the Prime Minister and the necessary number of Ministers. The Ministers shall be citizens
known to be honest and competent.
The Ministers are responsible before the Parliament for their actions in office. Every Minister participating in the
consideration of a matter in a Government meeting is responsible for any decision made, unless he or she has
expressed an objection that has been entered in the minutes.

Section the twenty-fourth - Formation of the Government


Upon their election to office, the President of the Republic shall nominate a candidate for Prime Minister. The
Parliament must then ratify the candidate in an absolute majority. If the candidate fails, another is nominated. If this
fails, any Parliament member may nominate an eligible candidate, and one is voted in by a relative majority.
The President then appoints a Minister from each Ministry to serve in the Cabinet according to recommendations by
the Prime Minister.

Section the twenty-fifth - Resignation of a Minister


The President of the Republic grants, upon request, the resignation of a Minister. The President may also grant the
resignation of a Minister on the proposal of the Prime Minister.
If a Minister is elected President of the Republic or the Speaker of Parliament, he or she shall be considered to have
resigned the office of Minister as from the day of election.

Section the twenty-sixth - Duties of the Government


The Government implements the decisions of the President.

Section the twenty-seventh - Duties of the Prime Minister

The Prime Minister directs the activities of the Government and oversees the preparation and consideration of
matters that come within the mandate of the Government. The Prime Minister chairs the plenary meetings of the
Government.
When the Prime Minister is prevented from attending to his or her duties, the duties are taken over by the Minister
designated as Deputy Prime Minister and, when the Deputy Prime Minister is prevented from attending to his other
duties, by the most senior ranking Minister.

Section the twenty-eighth - Decision-making in the Government


The matters within the authority of the Government are decided at the plenary meetings of the Government or at the
Ministry to which the matter belongs. Matters of wide importance or matters that are significant for reasons of
principle, as well as matters whose significance so warrants, are decided by the Government in plenary meeting.
More detailed provisions relating to the decision-making powers of the Government are laid down by an Act.
The matters to be considered by the Government shall be prepared in the appropriate Ministry. The Government
may have Committees of Ministers for the preparation of matters.
The plenary meeting of the Government is competent with a quorum of five Ministers present.

Section the twenty-ninth - The Ministries


There shall be a number of Ministries within the government. Each shall be headed by a Minister, who shall also
serve in the cabinet. At any time there shall be at least the understated ten Ministries, and parliament has the power
to create other Ministries as they see fit, as detailed by law.
(1) The Ministry of Internal Affairs
(2) The Ministry of Finance
(3) The Ministry of Defence and Security
(4) The Ministry of Employment
(5) The Ministry of Education and Culture
(6) The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health
(7) The Ministry of Justice
(8) The Ministry of Transport and Communication
(9) The Ministry of the Environment
(10) The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
(11) The Ministry of Science and Research

Section the thirtieth - The Chancellor of Justice of the Government


There shall be as well a Chancellor of Justice and a Deputy Chancellor of Justice, who are appointed by the
President of the Republic, and who shall have outstanding knowledge of law. In addition, the President appoints a
substitute for the Deputy Chancellor of Justice. When the Deputy Chancellor of Justice is prevented from
performing his or her duties, the substitute shall take responsibility for them.

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Chapter the fifth - The judiciaries and the administration of justice


Section the thirty-first - Courts of law
The Supreme Court, the Courts of Appeal and the District Courts are the general courts of law.
The Supreme Administrative Court and the regional Administrative Courts are the general courts of administrative
law.

Section the thirty-second - Duties of the Supreme Court and the Supreme Administrative Court
Justice in civil, commercial and criminal matters is in the final instance administered by the Supreme Court. Justice
in administrative matters is in the final instance administered by the Supreme Administrative Court.
The highest courts supervise the administration of justice in their own fields of competence. They may submit
proposals to the Government for the initiation of legislative action.

Section the thirty-third - Composition of the Supreme Court and the Supreme Administrative Court
The Supreme Court and the Supreme Administrative Court are each composed of the President of the Court and
eight Justices.
The Supreme Court and the Supreme Administrative Court have a competent quorum when five members are
present.

Section the thirty-fourth - High Court of Impeachment


The High Court of Impeachment deals with charges brought against a member of the Government, the Chancellor of
Justice, the President of the Republic, the Prime Minister, or a member of the Supreme Court or the Supreme
Administrative Court for unlawful conduct in office.
The High Court of Impeachment consists of the President of the Supreme Court, presiding, and the President of the
Supreme Administrative Court, the three most senior-ranking Presidents of the Courts of Appeal and five members
elected by the Parliament for a term of four years.

Section the thirty-fifth - Appointment of judges


Tenured judges are appointed by the President of the Republic in accordance with the procedure laid down by law.

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Section the thirty-sixth - The right of judges to remain in office


A judge shall not be suspended from office, except by a judgement of a court of law. In addition, a judge shall not be
transferred to another office without his or her consent, except where the transfer is a result of a reorganisation of the
judiciary.
Provisions on the duty of a judge to resign at the attainment of a given age or after losing capability to work are laid
down by an Act.

Section the thirty-seventh - The prosecutors


The prosecution service is headed by the highest prosecutor, the Prosecutor-General, who is appointed by the
President of the Republic. More detailed provisions on the prosecution service are laid down by law.

Section the thirty-eighth - Presidential pardon


In individual cases, the President of the Republic may, after obtaining a statement from the Supreme Court, grant
full or partial pardon from a penalty or other criminal sanction imposed by a court of law.

Chapter the sixth - Supervision of legality


Section the thirty-ninth - Primacy of the Constitution
If, in a matter being tried by a court of law, the application of a law would be in evident conflict with the
Constitution, the court of law shall give primacy to the provision of the Constitution.

Section the fortieth - Duties of the Chancellor of Justice of the Government


The Chancellor of Justice shall oversee the lawfulness of the official acts of the Government and the President of the
Republic. The Chancellor of Justice shall also ensure that the courts of law, the other authorities and the civil
servants, public employees and other persons, when the latter are performing a public task, obey the law and fulfil
their obligations. In the performance of his or her duties, the Chancellor of Justice monitors the implementation of
basic rights and liberties and human rights.
The Chancellor of Justice shall, upon request, provide the President, the Government and the Ministries with
information and opinions on legal issues.
The Chancellor of Justice submits an annual report to the Parliament and the Government on his or her activities and
observations on how the law has been obeyed.

Section the forty-first - The right of the Chancellor of Justice to receive information

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The Chancellor of Justice and the Ombudsman have the right to receive from public authorities or others performing
public duties the information needed for their supervision of legality.
The Chancellor of Justice shall be present at meetings of the Government and when matters are presented to the
President of the Republic in a presidential meeting of the Government.

Section the forty-second - Supervision of the lawfulness of the official acts of the Government and the President of
the Republic
If the Chancellor of Justice becomes aware that the lawfulness of a decision or measure taken by the Government, a
Minister or the President of the Republic gives rise to a comment, the Chancellor shall present the comment, with
reasons, on the aforesaid decision or measure. If the comment is ignored, the Chancellor of Justice shall have the
comment entered in the minutes of the Government and, where necessary, undertake other measures.
If a decision made by the President is unlawful, the Government shall, after having obtained a statement from the
Chancellor of Justice, notify the President that the decision cannot be implemented, and propose to the President that
the decision be amended or revoked.

Section the forty-third - Criminal liability of the President of the Republic


If the Chancellor of Justice, the Prime Minister or the Government deem that the President of the Republic is guilty
of treason or high treason, or a crime against humanity, the matter shall be communicated to the Parliament. In this
event, if the Parliament, by three fourths of the votes cast, decides that charges are to be brought, the ProsecutorGeneral shall prosecute the President in the High Court of Impeachment and the President shall abstain from office
for the duration of the proceedings. In other cases, no charges shall be brought for the official acts of the President.

Section the forty-fourth - Prosecution of Ministers


A charge against a Member of the Government for unlawful conduct in office is heard by the High Court of
Impeachment, as provided in more detail by law.
The decision to bring a charge is made by the Parliament, after having obtained an opinion from the Constitutional
Law Committee concerning the unlawfulness of the actions of the Minister. Before the Parliament decides to bring
charges or not it shall allow the Minister an opportunity to give an explanation. When considering a matter of this
kind the Committee shall have a quorum when all of its members are present.
A Member of the Government is prosecuted by the Prosecutor-General.

Section the forty-fifth - Initiation of a matter concerning the legal responsibility of a Minister
An inquiry into the lawfulness of the official acts of a Minister may be initiated in the Constitutional Law
Committee on the basis of:

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(1) A notification submitted to the Constitutional Law Committee by the Chancellor of Justice;
(2) A petition signed by at least ten Representatives; or
(3) A request for an inquiry addressed to the Constitutional Law Committee by another Committee of the
Parliament.
The Constitutional Law Committee may open an inquiry into the lawfulness of the official acts of a Minister also on
its own initiative.

Section the forty-sixth- Preconditions for the prosecution of a Minister


A decision to bring charges against a Member of the Cabinet may be made if he or she has, intentionally or through
gross negligence, essentially contravened his or her duties as a Minister or otherwise acted clearly unlawfully in
office.

Chapter the seventh - Administration and self-government


Section forty-seventh - State administration
In addition to the Government and the Ministries, the central administration of the State may consist of agencies,
institutions and other bodies. The State may also have regional and local public authorities. More detailed provisions
on the administration subordinate to the Parliament are laid down by law.

Section the forty-eighth - Municipal and other regional self-government


The nation is divided into municipalities, whose administration shall be based on the self-government of their
residents. These municipalities are then subdivided into districts, of which there are to be fifty (50).

Section the forty-ninth - Universities and other education providers


The universities are self-governing, as provided in more detail by law.
Provisions on the principles governing the other educational services arranged by the State and the municipalities, as
well as on the right to arrange corresponding education in private educational institutions, are laid down by law, in
accordance with guidelines provided in section the eighth of this Constitution.

Section the fiftieth - Delegation of administrative tasks to others than the authorities
A public administrative task may be delegated to others than public authorities only by an Act or by virtue of an Act,
if this is necessary for the appropriate performance of the task and if basic rights and liberties, legal remedies and
other requirements of good governance are not endangered. However, a task involving significant exercise of public
powers can only be delegated to public authorities.

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Section the fifty-first - General qualifications for public office and other grounds for appointment
The general qualifications for public office shall be skill, ability and proven civic merit.

Section the fifty-second - Appointment to State offices


The Government appoints state officials unless the appointment has been designated as a prerogative of the
President of the Republic, a Ministry or another public authority.
The President appoints the permanent secretary of the Office of the President of the Republic and the heads of
diplomatic missions abroad.

Chapter the eighth - National defence


Section the fifty-third - National defence obligation
Every citizen is obligated to participate or assist in national defence, as provided by law.
Provisions on the right to exemption, on grounds of conscience, from participation in military national defence are
laid down by law.

Section fifty-fourth - Commander-in-chief of the defence forces


The President of the Republic is the commander-in-chief of the defence forces. On the proposal of the Government
in situations of emergency, the President may relinquish this task to another citizen.
The President appoints the officers of the defence forces.

Section the fifty-fifth - Mobilisation


On the proposal of the Government, the President of the Republic decides on the mobilisation of the defence forces.
If the Parliament is not in session at that moment, it shall be convened at once.

PART III - SPECIAL, TRANSITORY, AND FINAL PROVISIONS


Chapter the ninth - Special provisions
Section the fifty-sixth - Definition of terms

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Chapter the tenth - Revision of the Constitution


Section the fifty-seventh - Amendments to the Constitution
Any group of people with the right to vote also holds the right to propose an amendment to the Constitution. Any
amendment requires five hundred (500) signatures before it can be submitted. Once the number is reached, the
amendment is submitted to parliament. The parliament then convenes a plenary session in which they vote to
continue consideration of the amendment, requiring at least one half () of votes to be in favour. If this passes, then
each district holds votes, and a two-thirds () majority of votes is required for the amendment to pass in the district.
At least three fifths () of the districts must ratify the amendment. The Government then convenes a plenary
session, and, after receiving the opinion of the Chancellor of Justice, at least seven of the ten members of cabinet
must vote in favour. Finally, the amendment must win by a simple majority in both the Supreme Court and the
Supreme Administrative Court. If at any point through the process the amendment fails to pass, the author is able to
revise the proposal and resubmit it.

Chapter the eleventh - Transitory provisions


Section the fifty-eighth - Election of the President of the Republic
The first presidential election shall take place at a date to be decided by the Speakers Council within one (1) year of
the coming into force of this Constitution.

Chapter the twelfth - Final provisions


Section the fifty-ninth - Coming into force
This Constitution, approved by the Parliament of Raenicco, is signed by its Speaker and Deputy Speakers and
published by the provisional President of the Republic by decree, and countersigned by the Cabinet, and shall enter
into force on the twentieth of April 2016.

Section the sixtieth - Final provisions


Respect towards the Constitution and the law concurrent thereto, and devotion to the nation and to democracy
constitute a fundamental duty of all.
Observance of the Constitution is entrusted to the patriotism of all, who shall have the right and the duty to resist by
all possible means against anyone who attempts the violent abolition of the Constitution.

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Signatures

Joseph Roland Hines


JOSEPH HINES,
SPEAKER OF THE PARLIAMENT OF RAENICCO

Lisa Elizabeth Guglielmo


LISA GUAGLIELMO,
DEPUTY SPEAKER OF THE PARLIAMENT OF RAENICCO

Joshua Adam Saver


JOSHUA SAVER,
DEPUTY SPEAKER OF THE PARLIAMENT OF RAENICCO

Rosalie Murphy
ROSALIE MURPHY,
PRIME MINISTER OF RAENICCO,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Chris Parker
CHRIS PARKER,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF INTERNAL AFFAIRS,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Charles David Ferranti


CHARLES FERRANTI,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF FINANCE,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Judy Diamond
JUDY DIAMOND,
MINISTER CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF DEFENCE AND SECURITY,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

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Joanne Julia Young


JOANNE YOUNG,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Isabelle Davis
ISABELLE DAVIS,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Anton Jones
ANTON JONES,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF SOCIAL AFFAIRS AND HEALTH,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

David Sullivan Lopez


DAVID LOPEZ,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Glenna Hess
GLENNA HESS,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Donna Sweeney
DONNA SWEENEY,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

Thomas V. Smith
THOMAS SMITH,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

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Maureen Victoria Morgan


MAUREEN MORGAN,
MINISTER OF CABINET, OF THE MINISTRY OF SCIENCE AND RESEARCH,
OFFICE OF THE PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENNICO

Jennifer J. Knupp
JENNIFER KNUPP,
PROVISIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF RAENICCO

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