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Latino Cultural Guide

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Latino Cultural Guide

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Front Cover (clockwise): General view of Gala Theatre at the Tivoli, in Columbia Heights; a collection of Andean pan pipes; Orquesta Ashe; dancers from Centro Cultural Bolivia.

 

About This Guide

 
   

Page 1: Dancer at the Caribbean Festival in D.C.

       
   

Photo Credits: Most of the photos were provided by groups or artists or downloaded from their Web sites. Although these came generally courtesy of the respective

Rafael Crisóstomo, Kenia Lobo,

T his publication is intended as an introduction and guide to the Hispanic perfor- mance arts in the Washington, D.C. area, especially within the nation’s capital

 
   

artists, in some cases we were able to identify the individual photographer's name. Other photographs came from Fiesta DC's archives and contributors:

Gilberto Meza, José Sánchez and Dr. Oswald Cameron.

itself. By “Hispanic” in this context we mean from countries in Latin America and the Caribbean where Spanish and Portuguese are predominant, and also, in the case of flamenco, from southern Spain. Africa and Native America, impor- tant sources of our culture, are represented here through folk ensembles of special focus, but influences from three continents—America, Africa, and Europe—are noticeable throughout the spectrum of Latin American music.

 

Next pages: Dancer of Maru Montero Dance

 

PHONE

 

The Guide is a reference for anyone looking for artists to perform at venues as varied as home and office entertainment, dances and concerts, and folkloric festivals; it also lists some schools and instructors, and describes our two his- toric bilingual theaters, both known internationally. The Guide includes a few groups and performers from the English-speak- ing Caribbean, which shares a common spirit with other Caribbean nations

 

Company and a

 

E-MAIL

 

whose languages may be Spanish, French, Creole, Garifuna, or Dutch. The Guide lists the genres and styles, and, where applicable, national fo-

 

Bolivian girl participating in an Arlington festival.

 

WEB SITE

 

cus, of the respective groups, as well as contact information and links to Web sites for each group or performer. Information concerning the groups comes principally from the groups themselves. Fiesta DC does not evaluate or rank the different artists.

 
 

Executive Editor:

Art Director:

José Sánchez

 
 

Editor:

Alfonso Aguilar

Additional Research: Kenia Lobo

 

The groups and performers are organized in sections by general catego-

 
 

Research:

Luis Rumbaut Ligia X. Muñoz

Photography:

Oswaldo Camerón

ries. However, a section on special genres, from flamenco to tango, lists those

 
   

Gretta A. Rivero

Rafael Crisóstomo

genres first in alphabetical order, while folk dance and music groups are or-

 
     

Kenia Lobo

 

dered first by national origin. Groups and performers then appear, always in

 
     

Gilberto Meza

 
     

José Sánchez

alphabetical order. In addition, a general index of performers appears towards the end of the Guide.

 
   

Distribution:

Horacio Olivas

     

4

About this guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

About this guide

5

   

Fiesta DC’s

Fiesta DC’s

       

6

Letters

Latino Cultural Guide

Latino Cultural Guide

GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Letters

7

From the Chairman

Rodrigo B. Leiva Board Chair & President Fiesta DC, Inc.

F iesta DC's 2008 Cultural Guide is a compila- tion of the rich cultural contributions of our

is a compila- tion of the rich cultural contributions of our Latino artists in the Washington,

Latino artists in the Washington, D.C. metropoli- tan region, including additional groups from the English-speaking Caribbean and from Spain. In so doing, the Guide becomes a cornerstone in support of Fiesta DC's mission, "To contribute to the preserva- tion, diffusion and promotion of Latino culture in the Washington metropolitan area, as well as to enhance, promote and assist the artistic cultural expressions of the Latino community residing in Washington, D.C." The Guide also serves to connect potential clients with the featured artists. It

will come to play an important role in our local history as a snapshot in time that documents the multi-cultural tapestry of our family of artists, whose dedication and talent have enriched our lives.

I extend my sincerest gratitude to the Mayor of Washington, Adrian Fenty,

who has been an unwavering supporter of Fiesta DC's numerous year-round programs. I would also like to convey special thanks and recognition to our key partners, Mercedes Lemp, Director of the Mayor's Office of Latino Affairs, George Escobar, Deputy Director, Ward 1 D.C. Council Member Jim Graham,

and D.C. Council Member at Large Kwame Brown. Without their support this guide would not have become a reality.

I want to thank Alfonso Aguilar, the Executive Director of Fiesta DC, who

spearheaded this important project, and his staff and the consultants and con- tractors of Fiesta DC. To our Board of Directors: thank you for providing the vision and leadership to ensure that Fiesta DC fulfills its mission (Roland Roe- buck, Vice Chair; Leda Hernández, Treasurer; Elizabeth Schrader, Secretary; and Directors Ted Loza, Nitza Seguí, Pedro Avilés, and Ingrid Gutiérrez.) To our public: we hope that you enjoy the Cultural Guide as a true reflection of the deep cultural roots of our proud community and as a bridge of cross- cultural understanding. Our goal is that you, our readers, will use this guide as a means to support and promote our local artists!

guide as a means to support and promote our local artists! EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE MAYOR

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE MAYOR OFFICE ON LATINO AFFAIRS

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE MAYOR OFFICE ON LATINO AFFAIRS Adrian M. Fenty Mayor Director Mercedes Lemp

Adrian M. Fenty Mayor

Director
Director

Mercedes Lemp

On behalf of the Mayor of the District of Columbia, I would like to congratulate the

staff and board of directors of Fiesta DC for compiling the first ever Latino Cultural

Guide for Washington, DC.

The Office on Latino Affairs (OLA) has long partnered with and supported Fiesta

DC’s mission to contribute to the preservation, diffusion, and promotion of Latino

culture in Washington, DC. Fiesta DC’s commitment to this mission has never been

more evident than through what we witness today in this complete, first of its kind,

guide highlighting the artistic contributions of over 150 groups and individual

performers located throughout our city and metropolitan area. Never before have

these performers been presented in such a comprehensive and accessible manner.

It’s our hope that this guide will help residents and visitors alike enhance and enrich

their understanding of the rich cultural heritage brought to our city by the vibrant,

diverse and ever growing Latino community residing here in Washington, DC.

Please enjoy this wonderful guide!

Saludos!

Washington, DC. Please enjoy this wonderful guide! Saludos! Mercedes Lemp Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd

Mercedes Lemp

Director

enjoy this wonderful guide! Saludos! Mercedes Lemp Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC,
enjoy this wonderful guide! Saludos! Mercedes Lemp Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC,
enjoy this wonderful guide! Saludos! Mercedes Lemp Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC,
enjoy this wonderful guide! Saludos! Mercedes Lemp Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC,

2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC, 20009 - Telephone (202) 671-2825 - Fax (202) 673-4557 OLA.DC.GO

Director 2000 14th Street, NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC, 20009 - Telephone (202) 671-2825 - Fax

8

Letters

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Letters

9

       

It is my pleasure to welcome this first edition of Fiesta DC’s Latino Cultural Guide, the latest project of an organization with which we work every year to make possible the Latino Festival of the District of Columbia.

 
       

I hope that this introduction to Latin American and Caribbean music and culture will add to the mutual understanding and appreciation of the people of our very diverse Ward 1, the multiracial and multicultural ward at the center of the District of Columbia.

 
       

Congratulations to the Board of Directors and staff of Fiesta DC, and to all of those who contributed to the making of this outstanding publication.

 
       

Jim Graham

   
       

Councilmember

   
       

Ward 1

   

10

Letters

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Letters

11

             

Dear Fiesta DC:

Congratulations on publishing the first edition of the Latino Cultural Guide. LEDC is very proud to support this effort. As the D.C. area’s premier economic development corporation working to improve the capacity of the Latino community to build wealth, we are thrilled at how this guide showcases the many artistic talents of our community.

The Latino Cultural Guide is an excellent tool to introduce the broader community to hundreds of talented Latino artists, actors, and musicians. We hope that it will help them market to the non-Latino community and strengthen the ties that bind all of us as Washingtonians.

Thank you for all your hard work and commitment to the Latino community.

Saludos,

hard work and commitment to the Latino community. Saludos, Manuel Hidalgo Executive Director Dear Friends: When

Manuel Hidalgo Executive Director

Latino community. Saludos, Manuel Hidalgo Executive Director Dear Friends: When we think about the Latino community,

Dear Friends:

When we think about the Latino community, the first thing that comes to mind is its culture and traditions. The Washington, DC metropolitan region is fortunate to experience the international confluence that makes it one of the most dynamic regions of the country.

This new publication, “The Latino Cultural Guide”, by Fiesta DC aims to extol the talents and creativity of the Latino community. As President & CEO of the Greater Washington Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, I consider this our newest tool to boost the economic development of the community at large.

The Latino Cultural Guide has two purposes: First, to introduce all residents and visitors to the richness of Latino talent in the region and, second, to direct our efforts in supporting those included in the publication.

For Washington, DC to become a world-class city, it must incorporate the array of cultures that makes the city their home. With this book, Fiesta DC has given us a starting point.

I encourage you to use this guide to support our unique artistic talents. I hope that you find the information useful today and in the years to come.

Sincerely,

useful today and in the years to come. Sincerely, Ana Recio Harvey President & CEO Greater

Ana Recio Harvey President & CEO Greater Washington Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

and in the years to come. Sincerely, Ana Recio Harvey President & CEO Greater Washington Hispanic

12

Introductions

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Introductions

13

 

History and Acknowledgements

our Latino artists and their non-Latino colleagues who enrich our culture.

 
 

Alfonso Aguilar Executive Editor of the Guide

 

In these pages you will discover talented musicians who have shared the stage with international figures in a variety of musical genres. You will learn of dance groups and instructors with numerous presentations in countries from Argentina to Mexico to Germany to Japan. And you will also enjoy a tour of two existing

 
 

I

n 1997 a group of activists re-established in Washington, D.C., the Centro de Arte, a cultural entity founded in the 1970s that sooner or later, directly or indi-

theaters of international renown. I extend my appreciation to the consultants and staff responsible for the produc-

 
 

rectly, attracted all the local Latino artists to its programs in music, dance, theatre, ceramics, sculpture, photography, and painting, including of murals. The new Centro de Arte was short-lived, but it should be remembered that at the re-opening ceremony a complete inventory of local productions by Latino art- ists was unveiled. The collection included recordings from the first documented LP

tion of this Guide. A special mention is due Luis Rumbaut, a familiar name in our community’s history, who assumed the weight and responsibility of editing the publication. His vast knowledge of Latin America’s culture and his experience as a member, and in some cases, founding member, of a variety of folkloric and per- forming groups is easily perceived and enlivens these pages.

 
 

in

1971, “Los Internacionales de Washington,” to “La Chanchona de Moncho” of

Our creative Art Director José Sánchez needs no introduction, as these elegant

 
   

1977.

 

and imaginative pages so dearly demonstrate.

 
 

During that time there were numerous musical groups such as La Tribu, Izalco, Liberación, Esmeralda, Banda Angélica, Alborada, Sonora Nuevo Amanecer, Am-

Ligia X. Muñoz and Gretta A. Rivero, our principal researchers, completed their tasks promptly and intelligently without neglecting their daily responsibilities as

 
 

nistía 87, Eclipse, Laya, Estrellas de El Salvador, Generación 2000, Lilo y los de

Administrator and Marketing Director, respectively.

 
 

la

Mt. Pleasant, and los Hermanos Villavicencio, and soloists like Luciano Santa-

Special mention must be made of Kenia Lobo, a 15-year-old student who under-

 
 

maría, Humberto Antonio, Lesly Daily, Julio Coco Sosa, Tony Gil, and Zully de Venezuela, most of them with at least one recording. With the passing of the years most of these soloists and groups merged with oth- ers, became inactive, or simply disappeared. Nonetheless, many of the “old guard” are still performing: María Isolina, Jorge Anaya, José Reyes, Amín Segundo, Charro

took the research for our section on Norteña groups and on various soloists. Finally, we give special thanks to all of the artists and groups whose years of work give substance to this Guide, and whose interest and ideas helped bring the project to life.

 
 

Javier, Gustavo Nieto, and Miguel Chacaltana, and bands like Zeniza, Rumba Club, Mystic Warriors, and Dúo América. At the same time, folkloric dance groups became regular participants in festivals, independence day celebrations, and a wide variety of local and nationals events.

       
 

A

quick look back brings to mind groups such as El Pulgarcito, Ballet Folklórico

       
 

Dominicano, Viva Flamenco, Grupo Folklórico de Paraguay, Acuarelas Peruanas, Pallas de Corongo, Asociación Folklórica Negritos de Huánuco, Raíces del Perú, Danzas Peruanas Matices, Unión de Instituciones Peruanas and Unión Cultural

       
 

Huancayo. Most of these groups are now inactive or no longer in existence. During the 70s and 80s there were at least two ground-breaking theatrical com-

       
 

panies that have since dissolved: Teatro Nuestro, in its early stages under the aus- pices of Centro de Arte, and LatiNegro, under the leadership of Quique Avilés. We bring to mind these recollections of our cultural past with the hope that one day there will be time and resources to analyze and document the artists and groups which gave form and substance to our community’s artistic expressions from 1970

photo: ALFoNSo AGUILAR

     
 

to

2000.

       
 

For now, Fiesta DC and its research team for the Cultural Guide take pleasure in pre- senting this first effort to document, in a single publication, the work of, and to promote,

Above: A collection of recordings by local Latino artists exhibited in 1997 at Centro de Arte de Washington.

 

14

Introductions

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Introductions

15

 

Our Music and Folklore

The Andes

   
 

Luis Rumbaut

 

Andean folk music has ancient roots, with an original instrumentation—wooden and

The Caribbean

 
 

Editor

 

reed flutes, pan pipes, sea shells—supplemented by the Spanish guitar and its unique

 
 

I t would take a book to cover adequately the scope of Latin American cultural tra- ditions. Geography has served to separate and to give a distinct sound to regions

derivative, the charango, a small string instrument made from wood or from armadillo shells. A great many forms exist within the general category of Andean music, extend- ing from northern Chile and Argentina through Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador into Colom-

 
 

defined by mountains and valleys, rain forests, great plains, and coasts. History and demography also have come into play: Latin American culture shows influences from hundreds of original American as well as African tribal and language groups,

a combination of Portuguese and African, as well as sounds from an Amazonia that

bia and Venezuela.

 
 

and from an assortment of European national and intra-national cultures. Spain brought different languages and cultures besides those of the Castilians, including those of the Celts in northwest Galicia and Asturias, the Basques in the mountainous north, the Catalans on the upper Mediterranean coast, and the Roma (gypsies), not to mention the results of 800 years of occupation by the North African Moors, especially in the southern province of Andalusia, named after the Arabic Al-Andalus.

The Caribbean has produced a variety of rhythms that, perhaps because of the re- gion’s nearness to the U.S., became well known here, even turning into popular fads. Cuba and the Dominican Republic, small island nations, have generated a dispropor- tionate share of the Latin American music familiar to U.S. Americans, such as meren- gue, cha-cha, conga, rumba, bolero, and, more recently, bachata. Mexico and Puerto Rico adopted the bolero and contributed greatly to its development, while Mexico did likewise with the Cuban danzón.

 
 

Colonial-era African slaves came from regions such as present-day Guinea, Gha- na, Benin, Nigeria and Cameroon, down to Congo and Angola. The greatest Native

Salsa

   
 

American civilizations arose in the Andes, where the Incas became the dominant empire; and in Mesoamerica, the region comprising today’s Mexico and Central America, where the Olmec gave way to the Maya and the Toltec and finally the Aztec as successive dominant civilizations before the Spanish arrived. Brazil adds

is shared by the nations that surround Brazil. Portuguese fadó and a touch of jazz blended with Brazilian samba, famous at carnival time, into the now equally-famous bossa nova.

Cuba in particular has had a long history of musical interchange with the U.S., be- ginning in New Orleans at the very birth of jazz, of which it was part. Later on, island greats like Machito, Mario Bauza, and Arsenio Rodríguez brought Afro-Cuban rhythms to New York, giving rise to Latin jazz. The break in relations between the two coun- tries in the 1960s isolated the Cuban sound from the U.S. The son, the heart of Cuban popular music, then evolved in New York, the eternal Iron Babel, into salsa, blending with Puerto Rican bomba and plena and rhythms from Panama and Colombia as well as from the local jazz scene. The resulting sound was taken up enthusiastically around

Colombia

 
 

Similarities and Coincidences

 

the Caribbean and then elsewhere. The Dominican merengue (also from Haiti), guar- anteed to get people up and dancing, does not fit into the family tree of son/salsa, but

 
 

The plains of Argentina and Uruguay, like the plains where Colombia and Ven- ezuela meet, are a region of open spaces and distant horizons, cattle, and asados (outdoor grills), home to the self-reliant gaucho and llanero, respectively. Argentina and Uruguay compete for the championship in tango, which sounds the same in both countries. There is no difference between the Colombian and the Venezuelan music

it was unavoidably present in a city with a growing Dominican population, and it was played alongside salsa by the same bands. Today’s Latin dance bands and orchestras play mainly salsa and merengue.

 
 

of the plains, defined on both sides by the joropo and its variants. The original zamacueca became the cueca in Chile and Bolivia, the marinera in Peru, with a more distinct African influence, and the melancholic zamba in Argen- tina (which is nothing like the Brazilian samba). The harp appears, in hopscotch fashion, in Mexico’s Gulf coast, the Colombian- Venezuelan plains, Paraguay, and high in the Andes. Peruvians and Bolivians may claim for themselves the origin of established An- dean genres like the huayno, but people from both countries also point out that it does not matter much, as that music developed long before the current national bor- ders were set, and spans both countries.

Colombia, too, has been a musical powerhouse. Among its very many styles, two have stood out in the US: the slow and sinuous cumbia and the faster vallenato, or born-in-the-valley, so called because of its origin in Valledupar (Valley of Upar), where the northern Andes point to the Caribbean Sea. Vallenato was built originally around an accordion player/singer, a caja or drum, and a scraper (guacaracha), but now has expanded to a fuller format. The cumbia, originally in a simple format of drums and hand percussion, later adopted the native wooden flutes (gaitas) and subsequently, like vallenato, a larger format. It expanded to Central and South America, especially to El Salvador and to Ecuador and Peru, in local versions called cumbia and cumbión, whose roots are evident but with less of the coastal-African cadence of the original.

 

16

Introductions

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Introductions

17

 

Mexico and Central America

Farther north on the continent, Mexico dominates the sounds of Central America. Mexican corridos and rancheras, and songs from the northern states, norteñas, are also favorites in the rural areas of many other countries in the region, including the Caribbean. The mariachis, characterized by violins and trumpets in combination with unique Mexican guitars, are said to derive from string ensembles that during the French occupation entertained at marriages, a word with the same meaning in French as in English. Mexico is best known for the son of Jalisco, and also the son of Veracruz (birthplace of the original La Bamba). Along the U.S. border, the traditional norteña (northern) small ensemble typically includes a 12-string guitar, snare drum, and accordion. Across the southern border, in Guatemala, the national instrument is the marimba. Its tuned wooden staves, struck with mallets, produce a gentle sound that today typifies Guatemalan music. Salvadorans have brought to the US not just their version of norteñas and cumbia, but also of merengue and, more recently, Dominican bachata, a modern favorite.

 

as those played in abakwa ceremonies, the hourglass-shaped batá drums, and, on the eastern end of the island, drums that first came from Haiti, made in sets. The Dominican tambora, a small two-sided drum played horizontally with one hand and a striker, is at the heart of the merengue; the Puerto Rican plena uses a set of three tuned hand drums, the pleneras. Venezuelans celebrate San Juan Day with very long drums, the minas (also from the Congo), placed on supports parallel to the ground, over which the players stand, and with other, smaller, drums. The traditional cumbia makes use of specific drums: the alegre, or lead hand drum, the llamador, a smaller hand drum, and the tambora, a double-skinned bass drum played with drumsticks. In the currulao, one musician plays a drum known as a cununo, striking the drumskin with one hand and tapping the side of the drum with a small stick, while a second musician keeps time on a shaker known as a guasá or guache, a hollow cylinder made of metal, wood, or guadua bamboo, filled with light seeds and sometimes rice. Other musicians play a syncopated melody on paired marimbas, one in the lower register and one in the high register.

Parade Contingents

 
 

Small Guitars

   

A Brazilian batucada or parade percussion group, an assault on the senses, re- quires a small store’s worth of drums of varying sizes, from small hand drums to large cylinders hung from the shoulders. For sambas there is also the cuica, the

 
 

Every region has its own version of small guitars. The Puerto Rican cuatro is emblematic of the island’s identity; similarly, the Cuban tres, although there is also a Cuban cuatro. That one is different from the Puerto Rican version, which sounds much more like the pear-shaped Cuban laúd. Venezuela, too, has a cuatro, also rep- resentative of the nation, but it is smaller than the island cuatros, with nylon rather than steel strings. It is played also in parts of Colombia, as is the related bandola, which comes in different flavors. Beyond the cuatro, Venezuelans have taken the time to develop the cinco, cinco y medio, and seis. Colombia, for its part, is known for the tiple, a kind of small 12-string guitar. There is a tiple in Chile, too. Mexico’s son jarocho, from Veracruz, uses the small four-string jarana and re-

Drums

 

small drum that makes a squeaking sound when a rod attached to the inside of the drum’s skin is rubbed. The snare drum—like the tambourine, very much an import from Europe—is used in norteñas in Mexico and with other percussion in Brazil. In the Andes and northern Argentina, the deep-voiced bombo rules. It’s made from wood, with goat or a similar skin still with the fur on it. Its position, hung from the shoulders and to the side, may indicate an adaptation from European military drums, which of necessity were to be played while in motion.

 
 

quinto. But different requintos, which look like standard six-string guitars but smaller, are widespread throughout the continent. Mariachis use the vihuela, with a back that protrudes sharply, and its king-size cousin, the guitarrón, a bass guitar held horizontally in front of the performer. Panama has two related instruments, the mejorana and the socavón, which differ in the number of strings but share a very small fingerboard of only five frets. Brazil

 

Folk expressions are common at festivals like Fiesta DC’s own annual Latin American Festival. The highlight at many festivals is the parade of comparsas, or groups that combine music and traditional dances with costumes that match the theme or story of each comparsa. The roots of these are found partly in ancient European carnivals, but in modern festivals the contents present the mixed cultures of Latin America, in which indigenous and African elements feature prominently.

 
 

has the strange viola de cocho, which uses only two or three frets, as well as the popular little guitar, the cavaquinho. The Andes have produced several styles and sizes of charangos. Various mandolins, bandolins, and bandurrias make the rounds of the continent.

 

The largest ensembles in this area are those from Bolivia. Parade groups com- pete with dazzling large-scale costumes imported from the home regions, rep- resenting characters and stories that reappear in such parades everywhere from Oruro, Bolivia to Stockholm, Sweden and, of course, Washington. Musicians, especially percussionists, often perform live during the parades. Uruguay’s par-

 
 

As with small guitars, Latin Americans use a startling variety of drums. The best known in the U.S. are surely the dance-band congas and the bongos of Ricky Ricardo and beatnik fame, both from Cuba (indirectly, in the first case: the conga drum comes originally from the Congo region), and then the timbales, made famous here by the Puerto Rican Tito Puentes. But even in Cuba there are a variety of other drums, such

 

ticipation typically comes in the form of candombe, an African inheritance of that country. Other nations with large populations of African descent, like Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, Brazil, Panama, and Venezuela, also bring percussive contin- gents, while a different music is heard from the contingents that represent coun- tries such as Guatemala, Mexico, or Paraguay.

 
   

Fiesta DC’s

Fiesta DC’s

     

18

Choral and Symphonic Music

Latino Cultural Guide

CONOZCA

Latino Cultural Guide

Choral and Symphonic Music

19

   

SUS

       
   

DERECHOS

   
       

Choral and Symphonic Music

We begin with what may be the unexpected: choral and symphonic music. Coral Antigas' repertoire ranges from folk and popular songs to orchestral and sacred works, music that is both ancient and

 
 

Yo hablo

español

modern, sung in various European and Native American languages. Coral Antigas has collaborated with a remarkable number of other musical groups and appeared at

 
 

¿Sabía usted que las agencias gubernamentales del Distrito de Columbia deben proporcionarle servicios en su idioma sin ningún costo?

   

a variety of local, national, and international venues. It has presented the local and U.S. premieres of significant works. The Pan American Symphony Orchestra, a resident program of Trinity University in the District of Columbia, showcases orchestral works of Latin American composers and

 
 

Para obtener más información sobre sus derechos, visite www.ohr.dc.gov

   

is known especially for its performances of symphonic tango. Its director, who

 
 

O cina de Derechos Humanos de D.C.

teaches music at the University, has conducted in Agentina, Honduras, and Russia as well as in Washington. These two organizations remind us of the many dimensions of Latin American music and of the multiple talents and interests of performers who reside in Washington and its surroundings.

 
 

ADRIAN M. FENTY, ALCALDE

   

20

Choral and Symphonic Music

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Choral and Symphonic Music

21

Coral Cantigas

F ounded in 1991, Coral Cantigas is the only chorus in the Washington, DC area that spe-

cializes in music from Latin America, Spain,

and demonstrate performance styles from Latin America, Spain, and the Caribbean.

Pan American Symphony Orchestra

T he PASO is dedi-

in America. They

and the Caribbean. Through performances and workshops, Coral Cantigas shares the artistic

The choir has presented the area and U.S. premieres of Paco Peña's Misa Flamenca, An- tonio Mir's Misa Coral, Luis Morales Bance's

cated to promot-

and cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world and serves as a bridge between the Span- ish-speaking and non-Spanish-speaking com-

oratorio Berruecos, Ernani Aguiar's Cantilena and the anonymous colonial Bolivian work, Misa Encarnación.

ing new symphonic works by Latin Amer-

ican composers and to

A

native of Rosa-

     

performed a special program featuring tenor Placido Do-

munities. The choir performs in Spanish, Portu- guese, and a variety of American languages and dialects such as Nahuatl, Quechua and Creole,

In 1996, Coral Cantigas represented North America at the "IV Encuentro Coral José An- tonio Calcaño," one of the premier international

showcasing new His- panic music talent.

     

mingo at the Orga- nization of Ameri- can States. He has

     

also invited talented

with bilingual concert program notes and texts. Coral Cantigas has appeared at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Mex- ican Cultural Institute, Strathmore Hall, Wash-

choral festivals, held in Caracas, Venezuela. In 2001, the choir opened its 11th season with a tour of Puerto Rico. The choir is named after cantigas, Spanish

rio, Argentina, Maestro Sergio Alessandro Bus- lje studied music from an early age and won the prestigious Alberto Williams Award for Young

Japan to study music with major national art-

tor in Argentina, and, since 1999, the principal

musicians from the area's high schools to per- form in selected concerts of the Pan American Symphony Orchestra, giving young musicians

ington National Cathedral, Capital Children's

homophonic songs of the 13th Century that

Musicians when he was only ten years old. He

a

rare opportunity to showcase their skills with

Museum, and performed under the auspices of

develop from both folkloric music and sacred

continued his studies in conducting, piano, vio-

a

full orchestra. In addition, Maestro Buslje is

the Washington Performing Arts Society, the

chant. Coral Cantigas' repertoire ranges from

loncello, and tuba at the Universidad Nacional

a

favorite guest conductor of the National Youth

In Series, the National Council of La Raza, the American Choral Directors Association and the American Guild of Organists. Coral Cantigas has also performed in collaboration with the Pan American Orchestra, The Men- delssohn Club of Philadelphia, the Cathedral Choral Society, New Century Singers, VOCE Chamber Choir, Tepuy folk ensemble, and The Chamber Singers of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges. In addition, the choir has hosted area perfor- mances by "Coral del Banco Industrial de Vene-

folk music and popular song performed with folk instruments to classical works with orches- tra. The choir performs sacred and secular mu- sic of many traditions. The members of Coral Cantigas, its board of directors, and its audiences demonstrate the organization's commitment to serving as a bridge between the Spanish-speaking and non- Spanish-speaking world, with half being native Spanish speakers and half being from other cul- tures. Coral Cantigas has been awarded grants

de La Plata, Facultad de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. In 1986, he was the Boronda Scholar of Hartnell College in California, which took him to the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and

ists. Before founding the Pan American Sym- phony Orchestra in 1991, Maestro Buslje was Assistant Conductor of the American Univer- sity Symphony Orchestra and conductor of the American University Camerata. Since 1990, he has been frequently featured as guest conduc-

Orchestra of Honduras and hosted their visit to Washington, D.C. in the Fall of 2003. Maestro Buslje teaches music at Trinity Uni- versity in Washington and is a regular advisor to the Maryland State Arts Council. He has been the creative force behind the Pan American Symphony Orchestra, bringing to Washington audiences a refreshing alternative to mainstream orchestral repertoire. The Washington Post described his pro- gramming as “utterly unlike anything else that is likely to happen in Washington this season”

zuela," the Argentine group "Opus Cuatro," and "Cantaré", a local Latin American ensemble for children. Guest artists for previous years include Tina Chancey and Scot Reiss of the early-music group Hesperus, and the Children's Chorus of Silver Spring, among others. Coral Cantigas also hosts a workshop led by outstanding Latin American scholars and performers, who teach

from the Arts and Humanities Council of Mont- gomery County, Bank of America Foundation, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, the Marpat Foundation, the Maryland State Arts Council, The Eugene & Agnes E. Meyer Foun- dation, the Executive Ball for the Arts and Hu- manities, the Cultural Office of the Embassy of

guest conductor of the National Symphony Or- chestra of Honduras. In 2001, he was a Ful- bright Scholar to Honduras, where he conduct- ed the National Symphony Orchestra of Hondu- ras and developed its season programming. In June 2001, he conducted the Sochi Symphony Orchestra in Sochi, Russia.

(1996). With his “sure command of the music’s expressive scope” and his sensitive balancing of orchestral commentary (Washington Post 1998), Maestro Buslje has “quietly created a valuable Washington institution” (Washington Post 1999).

Contact:

Diana V. Sáez, Founder, Director

Spain, and the WGMS 103.5 Performing Arts Fund.

In

May 2002, he conducted the

Contact:

 

Sergio Alessandro Buslje, Founder, Director

 

301-424-8296

 

Youth Orchestra of the Americas,

 

202-884-9008

 
 

coralcantigas@comcast.net

 

a new ensemble made up of tal-

 

info@panamsymphony.org

 
 

www.cantigas.org

 

ented musicians from across Lat-

 

www.panamsymphony.org

 

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Bands

         
 

and

         
 

Orchestras

         
 

The largest section of this Guide is on bands and orchestras (orquestas). For these purposes, a band is simply a musical group composed predominantly of related instruments such as percussion, brass, woodwinds, or strings. An orquesta, however, has a more specific meaning for dance music from the Caribbean area. It is composed of several sections: 1) congas, timbales, bongos; 2) keyboard, bass, electric guitar; 3) trumpets and saxophones, or violins; 4) voices (with the singers often accompanying with hand percussion such as claves, maracas, or scrapers); and 5) varied instruments such as flute, clarinet, tres or cuatro. Some groups use “Orquesta” as part of their names; others don’t. The Guide follows their preferences. In broad terms, bands and orchestras correspond to small and large formats, respectively, although some bands are large. This section includes two bands from the English- speaking Caribbean, Image Band and Panmasters Steel Orchestra.

       
   

Preceding pages:

     
   

Bolivian dancers at Fiesta DC 2007.

     
   

Right: Pedestrians crossing at the heart of Georgetown neighborhood.

     
 

Fiesta DC’s

Fiesta DC’s

     

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Bands and Orchestras

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27

   

Antoni809

 
     

The band plays not just merengue, but also salsa, bachata, reggaeton and Latin jazz

 
     

M usical director and lead saxophonist Antonio Carr created Antoni809 in 2003 with the sole purpose of re-inventing the image of meren-

   

Eclipse, a famous Latin rock band made up of Salvadorans and Peruvians, was one of three groups with three records each in the 90s:

Mundo metal

gue. Merengue, from his native Dominican Republic, has taken a back seat in the past five years due to the hype and publicity of reggaeton and bachata music. These new genres, with their great beats and fresh new images, have attracted more audiences all over Latin America, Europe, and the United States. It has been decades since stars Johnny Ventura and Wilfrido Vargas

photo: GILbeRto mezA

 

(1992), American Way (1994), and Asesinos en el

took merengue music to that level of popularity. Antoni809 is about to take it a step further. Antoni809 is currently working on its first CD, with completion expected by Fall 2008. Simultaneously, the band is performing all over the East coast

 

Above: Afro Nuevo at

a Fiesta DC event in

2008.

tiempo (1997). Dúo América was another group with

entertaining audiences of all cultures and backgrounds. Antoni809 is made up of 14 musicians, most of whom live and work in the Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. areas. The band members are most-

Afro Nuevo

three productions at

Below: The band at a rehearsal.

that time: Cantando a Latinoamérica (1993), Cantando al

ly Dominican, while four others come from Puer-

 

Traditional Cuban rhythms and up-beat Latin jazz

 

Corazón (1994), and Dúo América por siempre (1995). Mystic Warriors also had three records in the market: Mystic

to Rico, Haiti, Nicaragua, and the U.S. Most of the musicians have played with

 

F ounded in 2006, Afro Nuevo focuses on traditional Cuban rhythms

and up-beat Latin jazz. The band has performed at private events,

 

Warriors (1993), The

otherwell-known

 

restaurants such as Havana Village and Mag- giano's, and other settings in the DC-Baltimore area. Its current members are Roberto Dominich

Contact:

Benito López, Booking Contact

301-343-6182

 

Shadow of the Sun (1995), and Beyond Reality (1997). While Eclipse disappeared years later, Dúo América,

Latin artists such as La Cocoband, Fernando Villa-

lona, Los Hermanos Rosario, Mannikomio, Oro Sólido, La Artillería and La Banda Loca. The set-up, or layout, of the band is typical of other merengue

bands--but with a twist: three vocalists, four horn players, three percussion-

Contact:

Anthony Carr, Musical Director

202-276-0309

(congas, back-up vocals), Trey Charles (piano), Américo Méndez (bass and lead vocals), Benito López (timbales and back-up vocals), and Tila (trumpet).

 

although not listed in this guide, is still active, as well as Mystic Warriors.

ists, piano and bass. Antoni809 plays not only merengue, but also salsa, bachata, reggaeton and Latin jazz. Antoni809 is dedicated to entertaining audiences all over the world for a very long time. With their hip

blopezx@hotmail.com

   

Tonysaxxo@yahoo.com

new image and powerful performance ethic, they are sure to succeed!

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photo: JoSe SANChez

     

Fiesta DC’s

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Bands and Orchestras

Armonía Latina

Latino Cultural Guide

Latino Cultural Guide

 

Bands and Orchestras

31

               
 

The band plays a wide variety of tropical, Caribbean and South American Latin rhythms and traditional Afro-Peruvian music

           
       

The first Latin

Ashe

     
       

American LP by local group was

a

       
       

recorded in 1971. Los Internacionales named their

historical recording

in

The musicians want to introduce their audiences to a

photo: JohNY LeYVA

     

Los Internacionales de Washington. César Donald (below), who died

different style of salsa

     

a

the mid-90s, was member of the

S ignifying life force and energy in Yoruba language and culture, Ashe is also a powerful concept in Cuban popular and folkloric culture. Timba,

     

band.

or modern Cuban music at its most energetic and multifaceted, is an urban

set/timbales, congas, and bongos), bassist, pianist, saxophonist, flute player,

Contact:

Aramis Pasos, Director

 

Brazil, the sixth most-

F ounded in 2008. Under the musical direction of Francisco Aguayo, Armonía Latina plays a wide variety of tropical, Caribbean and South

American Latin rhythms such as salsa, merengue, cumbia, bachata, reg-

Contact:

expression that fuses native African and Cuban rhythms, as well as Afro- American funk, jazz, soul, and go-go. Aramis Pazos Barrera, a native of the

 

populous country in the world with approximately 185 million people, has decided to teach Spanish as a regular subject. That is proposed to happen also in the Philippines.

uetón, cha-cha-chá, bolero and even traditional Afro-Peruvian music. The group also caters to non-Spanish speakers with a repertoire of songs from the 50s to current dance hits. Armonía Latina has been performing in clubs, weddings, anniversa- ries, birthdays, and corporate and special events throughout Virginia, Washington and Maryland.

neighborhood El Cerro in Havana, Cuba, has formed his own group to con- tinue to promote this tradition in the United States. He and his musicians want to introduce U.S. Americans to another style of salsa, different from Puerto Rican salsa and "salsa romántica." Orquesta Ashe is composed of three singers, three percussionists (drum

trombonist, and trumpet players. Although Ashe appeals to young popular audiences, it celebrates

   

Francisco Aguayo, Artistic Director

   

202-689-5015

 
 

Preceding pages:

301-275–8700, 703-968–6340

the traditions that are

César Donald.

 

info@tumbaoproductions.org

 
 

Dancers at Mexico Lindo Night Club in Va.

armonialatina@armonialatina.com www.armonialatina.com

nostalgic for older audi- ences as well.

 

www.tumbaoproductions.org

 

photo: KeNIA Lobo

photo: ChRIS SmIth

photo: RAFAeL CRISoStomo

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Batala

 

Bio Ritmo

 

The band is open to anyone with an interest in learning the samba-reggae beat from Brazil

an interest in learning the samba-reggae beat from Brazil W ashington, D.C.’s Batala is part of

W ashington, D.C.’s Batala is part of a larger Batala family created in 1997 by Giba Gonçalves. Born and raised in Salvador, Bahia in Bra-

zil, Giba was living in Paris when he first had the idea for the band. Open to anyone with an interest in learning the samba-reggae beat, the band

started off with 60 people. From Paris it spread to other cities in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom. In 2003, the band finally made its way back to its origins, brought to Brazil by Paulo Garcia, also the founder of the Portsmouth Batala.

A composer and musical director, Giba en- listed the help of friends from the bands and from Salvador in order to create the visual iden- tity of the band. The instruments and clothing are all manufactured in Salvador, Bahia, where the band has a social program that gives jobs to many families. From there they are shipped to the bands around the world. In 2007, the newest branch of the Batala band was created in Wash- ington, D.C., expanding the reach of the band’s music to the United States. Today, the band has over 300 percussionists worldwide.

Above: Batala at International Women’s Day in 2008 .

Below: Band members at a street parade in the Latino Festival 2007.

Band members at a street parade in the Latino Festival 2007. Contact: Juliana, Patricia 202-361-8993, 202-361-8992
Contact: Juliana, Patricia 202-361-8993, 202-361-8992 www.batalawashington.com
Contact:
Juliana, Patricia
202-361-8993, 202-361-8992
www.batalawashington.com

They bring salsa "into the now" through skillful layering of jazz, urban, electronic and global sonic influences

of jazz, urban, electronic and global sonic influences Spanish ranks second or third in the world-
of jazz, urban, electronic and global sonic influences Spanish ranks second or third in the world-

Spanish ranks second or third in the world- -after Mandarin and, sometimes, English or Hindi/Urdu--in lists of the languages most used as native tongues.

T he ever-evolving sound of Richmond, Virginia-based eight-piece salsa powerhouse Bio Ritmo is proudly rooted in the great Afro-Cuban &

Puerto Rican salsa traditions. It is their vision for bringing salsa "into the now" through skillful layering of jazz, urban, electronic and global sonic influences while maintaining the integrity of their foundation, and unusu- ally profound and introspective lyrics, that have allowed the band to create a body of music and range of audiences. Since its origin as a percussion ensemble in 1991, Bio Ritmo has released four critically-acclaimed full-length albums:

Bio Ritmo (2004); Rumba, Baby Rumba (Mercury, 1998), Salsa Galáctica (1997) and Que siga la música (1996).

Contact: Entour Entertainment Gabo Tomasini 888-547-7418 salsa@bioritmo.com www.bioritmo.com
Contact:
Entour Entertainment Gabo Tomasini
888-547-7418
salsa@bioritmo.com
www.bioritmo.com
     

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Bands and Orchestras

Cabasa

 

Latino Cultural Guide

Latino Cultural Guide

 

Bands and Orchestras

35

             

Latin jazz, bossa nova, samba, salsa, cha cha, bolero

         

T he group starts as a trio for cocktail hour, but to fit a specific affair can add horns,

Cabasa performs weekly in local restaurants and bars in the Washington area.

       

a singer, and a conguero, and turn any event into a salsa dance party. Led by Salvadoran piano master Samuel Munguía, and compris-

Contact:

Ken Lewis, Manager

         

ing some of the best local professional mu-

202-302-1721

         

and

can

kennylewis@aol.com

         

www.myspace.com/cabasaband

       

sicians, Cabasa always entertains even play quietly.

THE SONS OR DAUGHTERS of many musicians and singers are now members of others groups or

         
 

play with their parents or relatives. Marimba Xelajú and Marimba Mi Pequeña Internacional have always been family groups, with parents playing with their children or other relatives. Lilo González’s son, known as “Lilito,” is a founding member of Machetrés, a Latin rock group listed in this guide. María Isolina’s two boys, Daniel and

Furia Band

 
 

Miguel, usually perform along with her in Sol y Rumba Band, also listed in this guide. Amín Segundo, Carlos Arrien, and Daniel Sheehy,

On the radio and on the road, Furia Band plays cumbia, merengue and bachata

 
 

among many others, also have musical children. Segundo’s son, Jaime

T he Furia Band has been going strong since its founding in 2004. It has been featured on

 
 

Rafael, is co-founder of Los Grandes de El Vallenato; Arrien is a member of Los Rumis, where his son Mariano plays various

instruments, and Daniel

“Danny” Sheehy, Jr. performs with the band that his father created in the 70s, Mariachi Los Amigos. Peruvian signer Vicky Leyva is a special case. Two of her daughters, Vannesa Díaz and SuleyD, are lead

María Isolina’s sons, Daniel and Miguel.

just about all the Latin radio stations in the area, and also out of state. The band has traveled to Florida, New York, Texas, Massachusetts, and California, among others places. The eight members of Furia Band are from El Salvador. Its first CD, Alegría total is due at the end of this year.

 
 

vocalists for the orchestras La Tremenda and Armonía Latina, respectively. Surely, talent is passed down from generation to generation.

Contact:

Danny López, Manager

   
         

202-409-6489

   
         

danny@furiaband.com

   
         

www.furiaband.com

   

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Gato + the Palenke Music Co.

The band that best

           

represents the fusion that is Washington–deep Latin folklore meets classic salsa, with equal parts tropicalia and rock

Image Band

     
     

The versatility of the members, enables them to play various musical genres, including R&B, hip-hop and dancehall, but soca is the heartbeat of this band

 

W hile no one was looking, Washington, D.C. became one of the most dynamic cities in the

world for Latin music. With hot musicians pouring into the capital from Peru, Colombia, and Venezu- ela, not to mention North America, it was simply a matter of time until something new and crucial began taking root. During countless knock-down-drag-out Fri- day and Saturday nights, Washingtonians have been sweating to one of the greatest party bands

Salazar–“Gato”–has been searching for a musical way to represent the incredible diversity and vital- ity of the latest round of immigration in the Ameri- cas. His lyrics are mostly related to the feeling of many emigrants who leave their country in search of new opportunities; they speak of wanting and longing, reconciliation and hope. And the music behind it simply kicks. Palenke Music Company crystallized this vi- sion the only way it could–by honing its live sound

W ith harmonious rhythms and dynamic vocals, this electrifying group of musicians has shattered all traditional notions of success in the Ca-

ribbean entertainment industry. The band fulfills regular engagements in numerous cities of the U.S. East Coast, Canada and the Caribbean. In St. Croix, Virgin Islands, the group is host to the largest New Year’s Eve events. Their live act is so mesmerizing, it has been repeated consecutively and grows larger each year. In the Washington, D.C. Carnival arena, the group’s home base, the Im- age Band participates in highly-competitive contests and against some of

Shakira, the hugely successful Colombian artist, was born in Barranquilla from a Colombian mother and a Lebanese

father. That explains her name, Shakira Mebarak, and why

in America, without knowing they were getting

in countless bars, weddings, concerts, embassies,

the Caribbean's most revered bands. The Image Band was the first to win the

in

school she was

 

an earful of original Latin fusion–brand new Latin

and festivals and learning to keep everybody, from

1994 Best Musical Band Award presented by the DC Carnival Committee.

known as the “belly

rhythms designed to pay homage to Latin Ameri-

every country, dancing for hours.

In 1998 and 1999, they were crowned as Baltimore's Brass-O-Rama cham-

dancer girl.” There is

ca’s culture while keeping America dancing until it’s sweaty and spent. Gato + the Palenke Music Co. is the band that best represents the fusion that is Washington–deep Latin folklore meets classic salsa, with equal parts tropicalia and rock thrown in for good measure–,both Americas collide, and everybody is having a great time. Since 2002, singer and composer Jaime Andrés

Now, as a testament to this infectious energy, Palenke releases La Situación, a completely original blend of music in twelve tracks. This newly-released record is an elaborate blend of diverse Latin Ameri- can rhythms, such as salsa, merengue, seis chorreado, festejo, bomba, cumbia, merecumbé, punta, gaita as well as blues and reggae. No band has ever combined

pions by the TNT Day in the Park Association of Baltimore. These accom- plishments reflect the group's pursuit of musical excellence and encourage the members to continue striving for more. Yo ready? Le meh see yo! Those are the words pumping through the sound system as the lights come up and soca/dancehall powerhouse Image Band hits the stage again for another foot-stomping show. Every journey to the stage is an opportunity to make a musical statement. Pulsating percussive rhythms, throb-

huge statue of her in her home town.

a

Contact:

Jaime Salazar, Artistic Director

240-426-7174

gato@palenkemusic.com

www.palenkemusic.com

these rhythms, which, together with Salazar’s heartfelt songwriting, simply soar.

bing guitar and bass riffs, steady keyboard patterns, and the oily-smooth preci- sion execution of live horns complement the group's presentations. The versatil-

Contact:

     
 

Palenke was nominated to compete at Burger King’s "Tu Ciudad, Tu Música" at the 116st NYC Festival.

ity of the musicians enables them to play various musical genres, including R&B, hip-hop and dancehall, but soca is the heartbeat of this band.

See Web site

www.imageband.com

 
   

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Bands and Orchestras

JCJ Band

Latino Cultural Guide

Latino Cultural Guide

Bands and Orchestras

39

         

Playing to please Latin American and Anglo-American audiences

         
audiences           T he band was founded in 1990 by Camilo Toledo,

T he band was founded in 1990 by Camilo Toledo, bass player and arranger, with the

objective of forming a professional yet totally unique band. Musicians from a wide variety of backgrounds create an eclectic flavor and evolv- ing sound that can only be distinguished as its own. In 1990, JCJ Band played for the first time at New York, New York, the best Latin club at the time. The same year the band was asked to perform at Washington, D.C.'s annual Latino

Contact: Camilo Toledo, Artistic Director 301- 933-8648 www.myspace.com/jcjband
Contact:
Camilo Toledo, Artistic Director
301- 933-8648
www.myspace.com/jcjband

Festival, the largest Hispanic festival in the capital city. This performance marked the offi- cial debut of the band, attracting the attention of local Hispanic media and pleasing an audience of 20,000. JCJ band has played from 1990 until the present in almost all of the Hispanic clubs in southern Maryland, Washington, and northern Virginia, providing night after night some of the best entertainment found in the area. The band demonstrates at every performance that playing several styles of music is the only way to please not only a Hispanic audience comprising a wide variety of nationalities but an Anglo- American audience as well. For years, JCJ Band's popularity has never declined, considered "the icing on the cake" when hired by local promoters as the open- ing band for international stars. Currently, JCJ Band is also performing in New York, Philadel- phia, New Jersey and Boston.

stars. Currently, JCJ Band is also performing in New York, Philadel- phia, New Jersey and Boston.
stars. Currently, JCJ Band is also performing in New York, Philadel- phia, New Jersey and Boston.

photo: JoSe SANChez

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Joe Falero and DC Latin Jazz All Stars

Since 2002 the band has not stopped playing mambo, cha-cha, salsa and more…

La Kumbia

Cumbia, merengue, salsa, rock

E dson Zenteno is the founder of and guitar player for La Kumbia. He started the band in 2006, playing interna-

 
 

tional rhythms, Bolivian traditional music, Latin rock, classic rock, and cumbias argentinas called villeras and norteñas. The band has two keyboard players, a bass player, a lead guitar player, a drummer, a female singer and a male singer. In addition to presentations in the Washington region, the band has participated in musical events in places like Mi- ami, South Carolina, New York and New Jersey. The band is available for private events like weddings, Sweet Fifteens and birthdays.

In the late 80s there was a group of young musicians named Grupo Las Américas, pictured here outside a house in Columbia Heights, Washington, where they

 
     

Contact:

Edson Zenteno

rehearsed. Later on, some of them joined other groups.

 
       

703-929-0053

 
       

edsonzenteno@hotmail.com

 

Above: Joe Falero,

M aster percussionist, salsa teacher, composer and DJ Joe Falero was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico, where he started dancing and playing

     

master percussionist, salsa teacher, composer and DJ at one of his performances.

instruments. He began playing with groups of bomba and plena, salsa and merengue. Once he moved to New York City he learned to better appreciate Latin jazz, with thanks to his musical idol Tito Puente and his childhood friend Giovanny Hidalgo. He continued his musical career in New York City and then moved to

     
 

Washington. Joe played with several groups in the District until November of 2002, when Joe Falero and DC Latin Jazz All Stars was born. Since then they have not stopped playing mambo, cha-cha, salsa and more…They have given more than 1,500 performances in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Washington Convention Center, Lincoln Theatre, Maryweather Post Pavilion and many hotels restaurants, clubs, music

     
 

Contact:

Joe Falero, Band Leader 202-270-9220 Cell mrjoefalero@comcast.net

festivals and private parties on the East Coast. They won the Stuck on Salsa Award in 2007 and they are working on their first CD.

     
     

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Bands and Orchestras

 

Latino Cultural Guide

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43

       

Los Rumis

   
           

Folk–Fusion from Bolivia

 
       

A new version of Rumisonko, Los Rumis is a Latin American folk ensemble based in

Washington. Its members are originally from Bolivia and the United States. The group’s music is a combination of traditional Andean music and other influences from Latin America folklore and The New Song movement. The group’s members have performed in

more Folk Festival, and the Takoma Park Folk Festival, among many others. Rumisonko means “heart of stone” in the language of the Quechua, a culture that spans the breadth of the Andes Mountains in South America. It is meant to express the enduring strength of the cultures that are the root of An- dean music.

       

venues such as New York’s Lincoln Center and

Contact:

Carlos Arrien

 
       

the Kennedy Center. They have also appeared

202-340-9420

 
       

carlos@arrien.com

 

in the Smithsonian’s Folk Life Festival and in such events as the DC Latino Festival, Balti-

Los Grandes de El Vallenato

   

The group was made up of Hugo Moreno Sr. and Jr., Pedro Miguel Pájaro, and five other musicians who had played with famous vallenato artists in Colombia

       

T his vallenato band was formed in 2000 when the musical director and talented artist, Jaime

Amín Segundo's older son, Jaime Rafael, is a masterful accordionist. Jaime has learned

       

Rafael, arrived for first time in Washington, D.C. He founded this band with his father, Amín Se- gundo, along with other local artists of the area. Los Grandes de el Vallenato was made up of Hugo Moreno Sr. and Jr., Pedro Miguel Pájaro, and five other musicians who had played with fa- mous vallenato artists in Colombia. Amín Segundo has been a prodigious singer since he was 12 years old. His is a powerful voice with the strong and special tone used in vallenato songs. He is popular not only as a singer but also as a professional journalist with

also how to play all the other instruments used in vallenato, such as caja, congas and other drums, battery, timbales, güiro, and strings. He also teaches percussion to a group of musicians and percussionists at Montgomery College con- ducted by professional musician and Grammy nominee Dr. Dawn Avery. The third CD of Los Grandes de el Vallenato, Triunfando por el mundo: Jaime and Amín Se- gundo, is one of the most popular on Colombian radio programs.

       

his own radio company who enjoys working hard to provide excellent service to the Hispanic community in the metropolitan area.

Contact:

Jaime Rafael 301-768-0039, 240-671-9314 aminsegundo@yahoo.com

       

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Luz de Luna

 

MelazaJazz

 

One of the better groups in the Virginia area, its repertory includes salsa, merengue, bachata, cumbia, reguetón

includes salsa, merengue, bachata, cumbia, reguetón T his is without a doubt one of the bet-

T his is without a doubt one of the bet- ter groups in the Virginia area. Despite its

members' short trajectory together, they have been able to make themselves the favorites of the public in general, with a broad and varied repertory for all tastes. If you are looking for the best live music for your party, look no further. We are your best option!

Contact: Polo Rodríguez 703-496-0978 Prodriguezd25@peoplepc.com www.grupoluzdeluna.tk
Contact:
Polo Rodríguez
703-496-0978
Prodriguezd25@peoplepc.com
www.grupoluzdeluna.tk
Prodriguezd25@peoplepc.com www.grupoluzdeluna.tk Latin jazz, bossa nova, son montuno F ormed in the summer

Latin jazz, bossa nova, son montuno

F ormed in the summer of 2004 by five or six musicians, MelazaJazz group was con-

gratulated by Poncho Sánchez in one of their presentations at Havana Village in Washington. This represents a huge success, as Sánchez is

one of the best percussionists in the world for this kind of music. Contact: Louis
one of the best percussionists in the world for
this kind of music.
Contact:
Louis Noboa
240-462-8820

Miguel Chacaltana y Grupo Renacimiento

Noboa 240-462-8820 Miguel Chacaltana y Grupo Renacimiento C hacaltana formed his Group Renacimiento in 1998 with

C hacaltana formed his Group Renacimiento in 1998 with members Alex Chacaltana (brother), Marlon Chacaltana

(nephew), Jorge Gallo, Didia Córdova and Víctor Padilla. Unlike with his second group, which focuses only on Peru-

vian music, with this second group he sought to expand the mu- sical offer in varied Latin American genres.

Grupo Renacimiento has two CDs to its name, Basta de jugar and Que rico festejo, both with lyrics and music by Miguel Chacaltana.

Contact: Miguel Chacaltana, Artistic Director 703-544-3244, 703-338-4130 chacaltaneando@hotmail.com
Contact:
Miguel Chacaltana, Artistic Director
703-544-3244, 703-338-4130
chacaltaneando@hotmail.com
www.youtube.com/mikechacaltana

Miguel Chacaltana y Amanecer Criollo

F ormed in Falls Church, Va., in 1990, the en- semble Amanecer Criollo now includes a

classic or creole guitar, electric bass, congas, Peruvian cajón (wooden percussion box played by a seated performer), and vocalist. It began playing at Latin American embassies and restaurants such as La Granja de Oro, Machu Picchu, El Tazu- mal, El Majahual, Cecilia's, El Puerto, El

Sabroso, El Chalán and Rincón Español. Cur- rently, Amanecer Criollo plays exclusively Afro-Creole music from the Peruvian coastal, mountain, and rain forest regions.

Contact: Miguel Chacaltana, Artistic Director 703-544-3244, 703-338-4130 chacaltaneando@hotmail.com
Contact:
Miguel Chacaltana, Artistic Director
703-544-3244, 703-338-4130
chacaltaneando@hotmail.com
www.youtube.com/mikechacaltana

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Bands and Orchestras

Movimiento

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The group’s name reflects a conviction that music and dance are inseparable, blurring the line between performer and audience

       

Right: Movimiento, a new D.C.-based Latin

Preceding pages:

This famous mural of

A new D.C.-based Latin band, Mo-

vimiento features vo-

           

band. The nine-piece band consists of two lead vocalists, two horns, three percussionists, piano and bass.

cals, ripping horns, and a hard-driving rhythm sec- tion. The group’s name reflects a conviction that music and dance are in-

           

Marylin Monroe looms over the corner of Connecticut Avenue and Calvert Street, NW Washington.

separable and that the best art is made when the line between performer and audience blurs. Movimiento has per-

           

formed at music festivals (Brookland Music Fest

 

Mystic Warriors

The Andean charango

 

is

often made from the

Contact:

2007) at conferences (American University

Washington School of Law conference on Hu-

man Rights and Trade in Colombia), fundraisers (for victims of the Peruvian earthquake) and private parties. It also has performed at “Artomatic,” the ac- claimed D.C. Arts Festival, and at Karma

Universal peace and harmony transmitted through ancient and modern instruments

shell of the armadillo

(“little armored one,” in Spanish). Chajchas are paired clusters of the dried hooves of animals such as goats, sheep, or alpacas. They produce

Gregory Wierzynski, Artistic Director 202- 299-4343 wierzynski@yahoo.com www.myspace.com/movimientodc

bar restaurant. The nine-piece band con- sists of two lead vocalists, two horns, three percussionists, piano and bass.

T he Mystic Warriors are dedicated to exposing the essence of Andean Mu- sic in a completely unique way. While their music style appears to fit into

a

short, wooden sound.

Our City

 

the “New Age” category, it often sounds like world music, contemporary jazz, Latin or mainstream popular. They believe their music is a fusion that crosses over all of these without leaving the boundaries of Andean music. More im-

   
   

portant than categorizing their style is their ability to deliver a message of uni- versal peace and harmony transmitted by the combination of Andean ancient flutes and panpipes with contemporary instruments. Joining the ancestral sounds of the Incas with today’s newest sounds,

   
   

Mystic Warriors is dedicated to expos-

Contact:

   

Left: View of Georgetown University.

ing the essence of Andean Music in a completely unique way.

Marco Mallea 301-929-8796, 1-800-604-6832 mysticwarriors@aol.com www.mysticwarriors.com

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Nayas

         

Nayas’ music is like a shaman's bag, with songs covering a variety of styles a repertory that includes reggae roots-style, rock, frenzy-dancing ska, poetic South American roots

T he group was born in 2001 when Soy López and Luis Torrealva met in Washington, D.C. Sharing similar musical interests they started writing

songs in a backyard, surrounded by the aroma of asaditos (meaning BBQs), the taste of cold beers, good friends with a nostalgic reminiscence of their homes… After years of playing and having some reincarnations, Nayas’ members are now: Soy López, lead vocals/rhythm guitar; Luis Torrealva, lead vocals/base guitar; Joey Carrasquillo, vocals/percussion; and Names Thompson, drums/percussion. The members of Nayas are lovers of all music. They continually welcome guests from fellow local bands to collaborate and enjoy the sounds of good mu- sic. Nayas has now become renowned in the Washington area, playing in com- munity festivals, large performance venues, and intimate settings. They have shared the stage with Vilma Palma, Amigos Invisibles, El Gran Silencio, Kinky, Volumen Cero, Yerba Buena, Calle 13, Papa Grows Funk, Marc Anthony, and fellow local bands. Their first self-titled album is already available and they are currently recording their second. Nayas’ music is like a shaman's bag, with songs covering a variety of

styles. Their lyrics come from very personal visions of the world that are shared among people longing for happiness, simplicity, relationships, community and friend- ship. Everything is spiced with good humor sending a positive message. Nayas’ members are from Uruguay, Peru, Puerto Rico and the United States. You might see them in the neighborhood drinking pisco sours after midnight…

Right: Nayas at a performance.

Below: The cover of Nayas’s first self- titled album. They are currently recording their second.

titled album. They are currently recording their second. Contact: Joey Carrasquillo, Manager 703-615-2129
Contact: Joey Carrasquillo, Manager 703-615-2129 www.nayasmusic.com
Contact:
Joey Carrasquillo, Manager
703-615-2129
www.nayasmusic.com

photo: LIz pReoboLoS

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Onda Mix

Cumbia, merengue, bachata, norteña, and romantic

S ince 2007 the band has played for important community groups like Fraternidad Guate-

They are available to perform at birthdays, wed-

Orquesta La Romana

La Romana is the dancers’ and promoters’ choice for any activity

malteca. With a varied repertoire they put peo- ple to dance: cumbias, merengues, bachatas,

dings and other private parties in the Washing- ton area.

F ounded in 1985, Orquesta La Romana has the longest history of any orchestra in the area.

   

Contact:

Rafael Cruz, Director

Known for its hard-hitting classic salsa sound, La

   
 

202-558-8140

   

norteñas and romantic music. They are formed by seven Salvadorans and one Puerto Rican.

Orquesta La Leyenda

Romana is the dancers’ and promoters’ choice for any activity. La Romana has shared stages with some of the greatest acts in salsa history. Current- ly, La Romana serves as the Tito Puente, Jr. (son of the late king Tito Puente) Orchestra on his tours

   

Brings back the best in classic Latin dance music and Latin jazz

from New York City to Richmond, Virginia. The band has backed up solo artists such as Tito Allen, Cano Estremera and Lalo Rodríguez.

   

L a Leyenda returns to the “old school” of traditional Latin big-band dance music. It's

love with traditional Latin music in the early 1990s. An avid student of the music and its his-

Current members of this salsa orchestra in- clude Edwin López, band leader; Polin, saxophone; Herbie, trombone; Tony,

Contact:

Edwin Ortiz, Artistic director

 

rooted in the repertoire of the New York City

tory, especially the music of Cuba and of the

bass; El Guapo, congas; Andy, timbales;

240-498-5083

Information@orquestalaromana.com

Latin bands that thrived during the exciting times when the U.S. first became enthralled by the music of its neighbors to the south. Small

early years in New York, Ted has played with merengue-cumbia bands Ramón Lara y sus Profesionales and Zafiro, and with salsa bands

Harvey, bongo; Pilo, trumpet; Robert, trumpet.

www.orquestalaromana.com

 

combos, medium-sized conjuntos, and big bands played the hotels and Catskills resorts where America learned to dance the mambo, cha-cha- chá and rumba and first saw tango dancers. They

brought with them an element from the streets of Spanish Harlem: a rhythm that is insatiable in urging its listeners to dance until the sun is well into the sky. The music–in truth, the music of the street– grew into an industry that fostered the birth of salsa and witnessed the arrival of new immi- grants who brought with them a love for the me- rengue and cumbia and uncountable other dance rhythms from the Caribbean and from Central and South America. D.C.-born saxophonist and flutist Ted David started playing and fell in

and flutist Ted David started playing and fell in Zeniza, Peligro, Grupo Latino Continental and Melao.

Zeniza, Peligro, Grupo Latino Continental and Melao. He has shared the stage with Celia Cruz, Willie Colón, Joe Ar- royo, Grupo Niche, José Alberto “El Canario”

and others. He is a respected arranger who has written many arrangements for various local and national bands. La Leyenda brings back the best in classic Latin dance music and Latin jazz. From the original big-band format, Ted has ex- panded the group’s concept to include two other bands: a seven-piece combo that specializes in Latin jazz and a ten-piece conjunto whose forté is salsa, merengue and cumbia.

Contact: Ted David, Founder and Artistic Director 301-864-3065 ted.davis@verizon.net www.orqlaleyenda.com
Contact:
Ted David, Founder and Artistic Director
301-864-3065
ted.davis@verizon.net
www.orqlaleyenda.com

Orquesta La Sensual

The band provides some of the best salsa, merengue, cumbia and even Tex-Mex music around

T he passionate rhythms and expressive per- formances of La Sensual have made this

band popular with Central and South American communities. Band director Rolando Marcos is a native of Peru, where he was a member of the well-known group La Clave del Callao. The band moved to the United States in 1990 and, citing creative differences, eventually split. Marcos performed with various other bands before moving from New York to D.C., where he met Brenda Lee, his partner in La Sensual. Brenda, a native of Puerto Rico, has been

performing in the area for the last 20 years with different groups. She studied music at the Uni- versity of Puerto Rico and plays guitar, flute and saxophone. Marcos and Lee describe La Sen- sual’s music as truly international. It is a fusion of the modern sounds of electric guitars with drums and the traditional sounds of tropical Latin music. The unusual combination provides some of the best salsa, merengue, cumbia and even Tex-Mex music around.

Contact: Brenda Li, Owner 703-786-4996 blbonano@yahoo.com
Contact:
Brenda Li, Owner
703-786-4996
blbonano@yahoo.com

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Orquesta Salsaley

 

Salsaley is known for its covers of songs from salsa artists such as Héctor Lavoe, Grupo Niche, Marc Anthony, Joe Arroyo, and Rey Ruiz

Lavoe, Grupo Niche, Marc Anthony, Joe Arroyo, and Rey Ruiz Contact: Julian R.H., Manager 240-461- 4719
Contact: Julian R.H., Manager 240-461- 4719 www.myspace.com/sondedc
Contact:
Julian R.H., Manager
240-461- 4719
www.myspace.com/sondedc

S alsaley is one of the youngest musical groups in the Washington area. In 2007 two friends

whose passion is salsa started looking for musi- cians to join them. After a long process there were eleven in the band. Months of hard work and preparation led to their first gig. Since then, they have been playing for night clubs, festivals and private parties. Currently they are working on their first single, Bacílame, a song that is getting stronger every day. Salsaley is known for its covers of songs from salsa artists such as Héctor Lavoe, Grupo Niche, Marc Anthony, Joe Arroyo, and Rey Ruiz, but they also play merengue and Co- lombian cumbia.

Ruiz, but they also play merengue and Co- lombian cumbia. Orquesta Melao The group was recognized

Orquesta Melao

The group was recognized by The Washington Post as one of the best orchestras in the local area

photo: JoSe SANChez

F ormed in 1996, Orquesta Melao has opened for well-known international artists such as

Olga Tañón, Grupo Niche, Gilberto Santa Rosa, José Alberto “El Canario,” Conjunto Clásico,

Maná, and many others. The group, made up of 11 experienced musicians, also

was recognized by The Wash- ington Post as one of the best

Left: Dancing in the street at the Latino Festival.

orchestras in the local area. Orquesta Melao was invited to play at the White House, and also has played at the Kennedy Center, Carter Baron Am- phitheatre, Merriweather Post Pavilion, organiza- tions of great prestige and many local salsa clubs.

Contact: Luis Noboa 240-462-8820
Contact:
Luis Noboa
240-462-8820
 

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Orquesta Verny Varela

     

Verny just released his new album Gracias, written and arranged principally by him

       

Contact:

Verny Varela, Artistic Director 202-291-5731, 202-329-2751 vernymacace@hotmail.com www.vernymusic.com

         

F ounded in 2003. Verny Varela is an arranger,

composer, singer and flutist with a bachelor’s

Colombia. The album got reviews in Italy and

     

degree in music from the Universidad del Valle in Cali, Colombia. He was born in Cali and grew up in the “barrio obrero,” where he started singing and playing with his father’s band, “El Nuevo Son.” In 1996 in Cali and in Tulua he sang with Ismael Miranda, Adalberto Santiago and Pete

Germany. Now, Verny Varela is a student in the Jazz Studies Program at the University of the Dis- trict of Columbia. Verny just released his new album Gracias, written and arranged principally by him.

Oscar Allauca y su Grupo Ritmo y Sabor

 

“El Conde” Rodríguez, mem- bers of the Fania All Stars. In 1997 Verny was the lead singer in the Gabino Pampini Band. Later, he went on tour in Europe

 

Since 2000, Ritmo y Sabor has been the source of Latin American music at Havana Village

 

and in the United States with Tito Gómez. Verny wrote and sang for Thievery Corporation on the albums

 

T he group was born in 2000 in the heart of Washington's Adams-Morgan neighbor-

chorus); Ronal Mendoza (timbales, battery).

The Richest man in Babylon and The Cosmic Game. Also, he wrote for and recorded on the Hip Hop CD The 51st State. In New York in 2002 Verny sang on the 40th Anniver- sary CD of the outstanding charanga Orquesta Broad- way. In 2004 Verny released his album Amar de nuevo, which made it to the Latin

 

hood under the leadership of Oscar Allauca. Since then, it has been the source of Latin American music at Havana Village. It has ap- peared also at other events including the fol- lowing: the Latino Festival in Mt. Pleasant; Hispanic Heritage Month celebration of 2004 and 2005 at the AARP; the celebration of 5 de mayo in 2007; and the celebration of the Latino Economic Development Commission (LEDC) in May 2008. The musicians, all of them born in Peru, are:

Oscar Allauca can be contacted at P.O. Box 21124, WDC 20009.

Grammy list of the best

 

Oscar Allauca (bandleader, bass, voice);

Charles Marston (piano and voice);

Contact:

Oscar Allauca, Manager

tropical albums 2005. Songs like Matilde and He vuelto a amar became hits in Cali,

 

Laura Sosa (voice); Hilder Cancho (trombone); Angel Urquiza (congas,

202-387-3915, 202-486-6177 (Cell) oscarallauca@hotmail.com www.gruporitmoysabor.com

   

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Pan Masters Steel Orchestra

 
     

The Orchestra brought Caribbean culture to Virginia, Washington, and Maryland

 
     

T he Orchestra was born in 1985 composed of performers formerly with the Trinidad

 

Pablo Antonio y La Firma

and Tobago Steelband of Washington. The original members include Frankie Baltazar, St. Clair Baltazar, Roland Barnes, Robert Barnes, Patrick Belle, Don Cumberbatch, Malcolm John, Lennard Jack, Stephen Lan- drigan, Joseph Lewis and Brian Solomon. The band has traveled north as far as Brooklyn and south to North Carolina. Pan Masters won the 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998 Steelband Champion award in the Baltimore Panorama Competition, and the judges’ award for outstanding perfor- mance at the 1993 through 2002, 2004 and 2006 DC Caribbean Carnival celebrations on Georgia Avenue. It was chosen 1998 champion in the New York J'Ouvert compe- tition, and gave several command performances at the Bluemont Concert Series. It was the only participating steelband at the inaugurations of President Bill Clinton and

The steel pan was a wonderfullly inventive adaptation of African percussion traditions using the once-plentiful steel drums of the oil industry in Trinidad, before the age of supertankers. Through heating and hammering, artisans deformed areas of the curved bottom of the barrel, obtaining different notes when the

It was a major accomplishment for the band to work with a Grammy award-winning producer

F ounded in 1999, this 12-piece band, based in the Washington area, comprises musicians

from North, Central, and South America, as well

Contact:

Pablo Antonio, Director

703-587-3776

tracks that were recorded at Jampr Studios in Puerto Rico and produced by three-time Gram-

other parts of the country. One of its biggest

Performing for various charitable or-

Mayor Marion Barry. Pan Masters continues to participate in community outreach per- formances at local schools, nursing homes, hospitals and churches.

The band also has been featured on the children's music CD Bon Appetit! by local duo Cathy Fink and Marcy Marxer, which won the 2003 Grammy for Best Children's Album. Pan Masters has produced four recordings, the latest in 2005 (On De Road), and celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2005 with a concert featur- ing world-renowned pan performer, composer, and arranger Robert Greenidge. A DVD of this concert is the latest addition to the band's releases.

301-864-2610

respective plates or areas were struck. The 13 different instruments of the pan family are made today by modern methods.

as the Caribbean. This eclectic combination of musicians enables Pablo Antonio y La Firma to infuse and incorporate individual flavor and style

my winning producer Freddie Méndez, who has worked with great merengue artists such as El- vis Crespo, Grupo Manía and Tonny Tún Tún, among others. It was a major accomplishment

Over the years, through Peter Dunning and the Bluemont Concert Series, Pan Masters has brought Caribbean culture to areas of Virginia such as Win- chester, Warrenton, Leesburg, Culpepper, Luray, Lansdowne and Reston. The Orchestra has played also at Caribbean Summer in the Park, Hispanic Festival,

Above: Steel drum marked to show where notes are struck.

 

into its repertoire, while allowing all nationalities to enjoy its music. In 2000, Pablo Antonio y La Firma released their first independently-produced compact disc, currently available on the Internet, at se- lect stores, and via live performances. Their latest production, Mi Princesa, includes two

for the band to work with a Grammy award- winning producer! The group has performed in important fes- tivals such as Calle Ocho in Miami, and other events throughout the Washington area and

achievements has been to stay together as a band for nearly a decade.

Brenda Liz Cintrón, General Manager

Potomac Riverfest, City of Fairfax Parks and Recreation, Montgomery County Ethnic Festival, Smithsonian Institute, the Cherry Blossom Parade, Musikfest in Bethlehem, PA, the Institute of Musical Traditions concert series, and the Folklore Society of Greater Washington. Pan Masters has expanded its community programming with an annual "Pan Jamboree" which brings together steelbands in the area in an open atmosphere similar to the open air pan performances held in the Caribbean. Pan Masters also hosts an annual Junior Pan Solo Competition to encourage young pan- nists throughout the area to strive for excellence. Additionally, Pan Masters has increased its involvement in the DC Carib-

   
 

brenda@lafirma.com

www.lafirma.com

ganizations and events is important to the band, as well as giving something back

bean Carnival by organizing and hosting the an-

panmasters@hotmail.com

www.panmasters.com

 
 

to the community.

nual DC Calypso Monarch Competition.

 
   

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Bands and Orchestras

Patrick Alban

Acoustic rock, salsa,

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y Noche Latina

 

Raymi

   

Cuban, blues

 

Traditional instruments such as zampoñas, mosceños, quenas and tarkas are used in context with the classic band instrumentation

   

F or two succesive years, 1999 and 2000, Pat- rick Alban and Noche Latina were nominated

           

by WAMA (Washington Area Music Association) for Best Latin Band and Best Latin Vocalist. They also performed live at the 2000 WAMA awards ceremony, which was covered by the Washington Post as well as Public Television. On April 12, 2000, Patrick and his band per- formed at the Kennedy Center. The group has released four CDs and one video. Its latest is Ojos Verdes. For details about the band and Patrick as well as their show dates, check out www.gabi- records.com.

           

Contact:

Patrick Alban, Karen Perc

         

photo: beRNALDo bALD

 

410-241-0392

         
 

palban@gabirecords.com

         
 

www.myspace.com/patrickalban

         
          BY 1997 THERE WERE at least 44 recordings by local

BY 1997 THERE WERE at least 44 recordings by local musicians, according to research presented by the now-defunct Centro de Arte de Washington. The titles included Cantor de Oficio (Camboy Estévez y Primitivo Santos), El Huerto (Rumisonko), Ritmo y Melodía (Tulio Arias), Going Home and Cipote (Izalco), El Abandonado (José Reyes), Canciones inolvidables (Zuly de Venezuela), Ritmo y Sabor (Zeniza), Ucachita (Julio Sosa), y Estás en mi (Lesly Daily).

inolvidables (Zuly de Venezuela), Ritmo y Sabor (Zeniza), Ucachita (Julio Sosa), y Estás en mi (Lesly

F ounded in 2004, the band is based in Washington, D.C. Its music brings the haunting sounds and mystic power from the Andes to the rest of the Americas

and the world. Raymi uses traditional instruments such as zampoñas, mosceños, quenas and tarkas in context with the classic band instrumentation, exploring the possibilities that the bass, guitars, keyboards and trap drums can have together with the Andean tradition. Raymi, which means feast or celebration in the Quechua language, is a new musical language for many, a place from which contemporary universal music can be seen through to a dimension of unity and under- standing. Raymi’s passion for its roots is reflected in its music; its love for tradition and knowledge can be heard in its sound. Raymi's commitment to the people of the world is the seed that will grow and will be harvested by future gen- erations so that the new world can enjoy the

fruits of Raymi’s focus on human creation. Raymi’s members are Gustavo Vargas, Alejandro Lucini and Juan A. Cayrampoma.

Above: Raymi explores the possibilities that the bass, guitars, keyboards and trap drums can have together with the Andean tradition.

Contact: Juan A. Cayrampoma, Manager 703- 593-7587 contact@raymimusic.com www.raymimusic.com
Contact:
Juan A. Cayrampoma, Manager
703- 593-7587
contact@raymimusic.com
www.raymimusic.com

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photo: ALFoNSo AGUILAR

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Rudy González y Su Lokura Band

The band’s members, from Cuba, Colombia, Peru and El Salvador, play salsa

F ounded in 2006. Well known

Rumba Club

The band continues to forge its own synthesis of jazz and instrumental Latin dance music described as "a style of their own making”

T his 18-year-old East Coast ensemble "has joined the pantheon of great Latin jazz groups,"

After performing together and sharing the

and tropical music

for its versatility, “Rudy

says the 52nd Street Review. Veteran members have performed, recorded, and toured extensively with jazz and Latin greats of the past and future:

stage with Latin greats like Tito Puente, the group caught the attention of Andy González, considered one of Latin jazz's greatest bassists. Andy has produced and

The use of violins in Cuban music in charangas and in genres such as danzón and cha-cha most likely dates back to the arrival in eastern Cuba of French settlers escaping from the revolution in nearby Haiti. Many of the most popular rhythms of Cuba —son, bolero, conga, trova, danza—originated in the eastern end of the island and traveled west to the capital, Havana.

Preceding pages:

Dancers perform

González y Su Lokura” has been playing every Friday night for the last two years at Guarapo in Ar- lington, Va. The band has had the privilege of performing at the Kennedy Center, Washington Convention Center, Essex House (New York City), Wolf Trap, local festi- vals, and private parties. “Rudy González y su Lokura” was named by the Kennedy Center the 2007-2008 “Best Latin Revelation Band”. The band’s members come from Cuba, Colombia, Peru and El Salvador. The band just recorded its new promo video and is currently working on its “Live” album. Born in El Salvador, Rudy González and his family moved to the U.S. in 1984. Here he picked up the saxo- phone when he was 14 years old. After graduating from D.C.'s Duke Ellington School of the Arts he won a full scholarship to the prestigious Oberlin Conserva- tory of Music, where he majored in Jazz Studies (saxophone). Currently, González is the Music Department Chair Person at Thurgood Mar-

Sr., Jimmy Owens, Calvin Jones, and J.J Johnson. He has performed with Tito

Contact:

Rudy González, Artistic Director

202-309-1218

Lionel Hampton, Mon- guito Santamaria, Manny Oquendo, Miles Davis' sideman Gary Thomas, Avishai Cohen's Inter- national Vamp Band and Lonnie Plaxico, to name a few. Each of their four recordings on the prestigious Palmetto record label was produced by Latin jazz lu- minary Andy González of Fort Apache Band fame. Their latest release, Radio Mundo, played to raves from Downbeat, Jazz Times, Washington Post, Latin Beat, and the L.A. press. The CD received extensive airplay and awards from some of the most widely- listened-to jazz and Latin radio stations from coast to coast, like WBGO in New York and KLON in Los Angeles. This legendary nine-piece ensemble features members who live and perform in New York City, Washington and Baltimore. They have

is a featured guest on each of their recordings. Mamacita, its second CD, was a breakthrough success, receiving gener- ous amounts of airplay on jazz and Latin sta- tions around the country. In one month in 1998, Mamacita made Top Ten on radio stations in L.A., San Francisco, Puerto Rico and Miami simultaneously, according to polls in Latin Beat magazine. Public Radio In- ternational honored the group by selecting Ma- macita as one of the ten best recordings of 1997. Their third release, Espiritista, was chosen by WBGO in New York City as one of the ten best Latin records of 1999. Their latest 2001 release, Radio Mundo, has received outstanding critical acclaim and was recently selected as one of last year's ten best CDs by JAZZIZ Magazine. The band continues to forge its own synthe-

Contact:

Michael Cherigo

410-243-7530

punta at La Ceiba, Honduras, during Afro-Honduran Heritage Month.

shall Academy in Washington, where he resides. González has studied jazz saxo- phone with Jack Wilkins, Donald Walden, Joe Henderson,Yuseff Lattif, Andrew White, and David S. Yarborough, and classical saxophone with Paul Cohen. He has also studied composition and arranging with Wendell Logan, Alfredo Mojica

performed all over the U.S. in the West, includ- ing a week's stint at the Jazz Bakery in L.A., and Midwest, and continue to frequent jazz and dance clubs around the eastern seaboard

sis of jazz and instrumental Latin dance music described as "a style of their own making." Meanwhile, they continue to make what Latin Beat magazine has called "the finest dancing

Puente, Celia Cruz, Ozomatli, Jon Secada, Winton Marsalis, Jimmy Owens, Ricky Loza, “Free Spirit”, and Billy Taylor, and has received numerous awards as a jazz composer and performer.

including the Blue Note in Manhattan and Bird- land, "the jazz corner of the world." This sum- mer they will appear at jazz festivals including the San Jose Jazz Fest in California and Lake

and listening music possible."

rudygonzalez1234@hotmail.com

www.myspace.com/rudygonzalezysulokura

Currently Rudy continues perform- ing and teaching in the D.C area as

George Jazz weekend in upstate New York. The band made its international debut last summer

mcherigotalent@webtv.net

 

a freelance musician.

at the Ottawa International Jazz Festival.

www.rumbaclub.com

 
   

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La Familia Univision-Telefutura

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67

     

Saoco

           
               
     

The group is the perfect alternative to a larger band

 
     

able for private events.

     
     

G rupo Saoco was founded in 2007 with sal- sa as its specialty. With eight expert musi-

Manager

Luis

Noboa

also

manages

the

     

cians, the group is the perfect alternative to a

Melao and MelazaJazz groups.

   
     

larger band for experiencing the great sound of

Contact:

Luis Noboa, Manager

 
     

240-462-8820

   
     

salsa. Currently the group performs at the Ha- bana Village Club in Washington, and is avail-

Sin Miedo

         
     

“A truly international group that makes the Afro- Cuban rhythms of Salsa and Mambo jump into your bloodstream and move your hips around”

 
     

T he band’s name means “fearless” in

           
     

Spanish. Its the name of one of the best salsa bands in Washington. Led by French pianist Didier Prossaird, the name sums up the band

leader's attitude toward music “(Washington Post, Oct.12, 2001–EricBrace). “Sin Miedo is a truly international group that makes the Afro-Cuban rhythms of salsa and mambo jump into your bloodstream and move your hips around” (Washington Flyer, Oct. 2002). The repertoire includes the classic salsa hits from the 70s to today as well as cha-cha, bolero,

Contact:

         
     

and original music with a French twist. Because

Didier Prossaird, Director

 
     

of its versatility, the band can switch from dance

301-483-3307

   
     

didier_p@msn.com

 

Entravision Communications / 101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Suite L-100 - Washington, DC 20001 / (202) 522-8640

music to listening music with a large repertoire of Latin jazz.

www.sinmiedo.us

   
     

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Son Quatro

 
       

The band plays the classic salsa sounds from the 70s and includes covers from Tito Puente, Ray Barreto, Rubén Blades, Fania, etc.

 
       

A Latin band from Richmond, Va., Son

   

Sol y Rumba Band

Quatro has been perform- ing for corporate events, private parties, and clubs since 2001. Son Quatro has the experience nec- essary to make your event a huge success. The band consists of seven to eight members

Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Colombia, and Cuba all use an instrument called cuatro. Except for the instrument shared by Venezuela and Colombia, they are all different. The Puerto Rican version

Its wide-ranging repertoire includes soft ballads such as boleros as well as cha-cha-chá, salsa and merengue.

from Colombia, Puerto Rico, Peru, Mexico, and USA, including Kevin Ortiz (timbales), Mario Duque (piano), Jhon Acevedo (bass), Pedro Zamora (conga), Oscar Bravo (bongo), Benjamin Arrendondo (güiro and güira), Scott Frock (trumpet), and Rob Qualich (trumpet). Son Quatro plays the classic salsa sounds from the 70s and includes covers

has five courses of double strings.

 

T he band has been playing in the Washington area for over 15 years in

from Tito Puente, Ray Barreto, Rubén Blades, Fania, Ismael Rivera, Cheo Feli- ciano, El Gran Combo, Pete “El Conde” Rodríguez, and

also more modern artists like Fruko y Sus Tesos, Buena

Contact:

Jhon Acevedo, Director

804-938-0518

www.sonquatro.com

 

At the center of the

school assemblies, gatherings, weddings, festivals, and other settings.

 

merengue are the

Vista Social Club, and Afro Cuban All Stars.

 

tambora, the two- headed drum played with one bare hand

Its wide-ranging repertoire includes soft ballads such as boleros as well as cha-cha-chá, salsa and merengue. Lead singer and Director María Isolina has traveled for promotion purposes to the Festival of La Tonada in Tunayan,

Our City

   

and a striker in the other hand, and the güira, a cylindrical metal scraper with a handle. Their rhythmic patterns make the merengue immediately identifiable. The saxophone and the accordion also became with time

Argentina, La Paz, Bolivia, Mexico City, Mexico, and her own native coun- try, Honduras. Isolina is a songwriter with two albums on the market along with two music videos from her original songs Oro y Arcilla and Significado de Mujer. The Washington Post has called Maria Isolina a “talented singer, composer, and songwriter…her strong clear voice is filled with fire and passion.” She has opened for singers John Secada and Cachao. She has also al- ternated with Celia Cruz and has sung with other famous singers and groups such as Leo Dan, Barry Manilow, La Sonora Dinamita and Willy Chirino.

Contact:

     

typical instruments

 

Daniel Amaguana 301- 990-9677

Right: Tourists

       

for merengue

 

solyrumba@hotmail.com

sightseeing in

       

ensembles.

 

www.solyrumbaband.com

downtown Washington.

     

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The Latin Sound Band

Tropikiimba

 

The band’s goal is to be a “one stop shop” when it comes to Latin entertainment

a “one stop shop” when it comes to Latin entertainment There is no difference in how

There is no difference in how Colombians and Venezuelans play and dance the joropo, a musical genre of the plains shared by the two countries. The wide plains in some ways are their own country, irrespective of national borders.

are their own country, irrespective of national borders. L ed by Kris (Pupi) Díaz and based

L ed by Kris (Pupi) Díaz and based in Wash-

ington, D.C., the band consists of well-known performers who represent the new musical culture developed in the capital of the United States. Latin Sound mixes the flavors and roots of Latin music with American soul to cre- ate a unique sound with musicians from Puerto Rico, Colombia, Peru, the United States, France, Haiti, and Cuba, featuring a variety of hard-core salsa, reggaetón, bachata, Latin

jazz, merengue, cumbia, U.S. music, boleros and R&B Latino. Since its founding by Jessica Díaz in 2006, Latin Sound Band has performed

at events and venues all over the U.S. and abroad. Recently returning from a tour in Puerto Rico, they are now performing locally in the Washington area.

The band’s goal is to be a “one stop shop” when it comes to Latin enter- tainment, by providing not only talent in different styles of music but also all event-support services. Jessica has directed videos for different artists in New York and around the world. Some of her music videos have aired on BET and Video City New York. Her work has won “Video of the Year” awards in Korea. Kris Díaz started working in music at the age of 14. He is also an event promoter in the area. Kris believes that Latin music is not limited to Latinos and has integrated talents

music is not limited to Latinos and has integrated talents Contact: Kris “Pupi” Díaz, Director 703-731-0475
music is not limited to Latinos and has integrated talents Contact: Kris “Pupi” Díaz, Director 703-731-0475
Contact: Kris “Pupi” Díaz, Director 703-731-0475 www.thelatinsoulband.com
Contact:
Kris “Pupi” Díaz, Director
703-731-0475
www.thelatinsoulband.com

Right: A partial view of an exhibition area at National Geographic in D.C.

from different countries and different ethnic back- grounds.

The band’s specialty is Afro-Latino music guaranteed to get people on their feet and dancing

W hat is the music of the Caribbean Islands? There's much more to it than what most

people perceive. Each style is distinctly differ- ent and more exciting than the next. Tropikiimba's specialty is Afro-Latino mu- sic, which is guaranteed to get people on their feet and dancing; For example: salsa, timba, songo, bolero, danzón, cha cha chá, charanga, rumba, bachata, merengue and vallenato. The band can also play other Afro-Caribbean styles (calypso, soca) if needed for special events. Tropikiimba is one of few authentic Caribbean orchestras in the Washington area. Band mem- bers are from countries such as Cuba, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Panama, Colombia, Mexico, Dominican Republic, St. Thomas and the Unit- ed States.

Dominican Republic, St. Thomas and the Unit- ed States. 202-465-4371 info@tropikiimba.com www.tropikiimba.com Our
202-465-4371 info@tropikiimba.com www.tropikiimba.com
202-465-4371
info@tropikiimba.com
www.tropikiimba.com
Our City
Our City
 

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photo: bARRY WheeLeR

             
 

Un Mundo

       

photo: meDIA644

The group plays mainly classic salsa from the 60s, 70s and 80s and Afro-Puerto Rican plena and bomba

U n Mundo is a 12-piece salsa band from Fredericksburg, Va. The group plays main-

ly classic salsa from the 60s, 70s and 80s and Afro-Puerto Rican plena and bomba. This style is also known as Salsa Dura or Nuyorican Salsa. It celebrates the golden era in salsa from both Spanish Harlem (El Barrio) and Puerto Rico, with a repertoire of music by artists such as Ed- die Palmieri, El Gran Combo, Héctor Lavoe, Grupo Niche and more. Un Mundo has several original tunes along

with many improvised descargas—jams—that burn right through the dance floor. Past venues include the University of Maryland Multicul- tural Fair, Latino Festival of Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg Country Club, and, as headlin- ers, the monthly Salsa Night at the Loft Club.

Contact: Johnny Valencia, Manager 646-594-3139 unmundo_salsa@yahoo.com myspace.com/unmundosalsa
Contact:
Johnny Valencia, Manager
646-594-3139
unmundo_salsa@yahoo.com
myspace.com/unmundosalsa
unmundo_salsa@yahoo.com myspace.com/unmundosalsa Panamanian Rubén Blades is known worldwide as a salsa

Panamanian Rubén Blades is known worldwide as a salsa singer and composer of songs with acerbic social content, but he also leads a Latin jazz orchestra, holds law degrees from the University of Panama and Harvard School of Law, and collected 18 per cent of the vote when he ran for president in 1994. In 2004 he became minister of tourism.

of Law, and collected 18 per cent of the vote when he ran for president in
of Law, and collected 18 per cent of the vote when he ran for president in

Vanessa Díaz y La Tremenda

The dynamism and originality of its members in playing a variety of rhythms make their music undeniably full of life

T he group was founded in 2007 in Virginia. A native of Peru, Vanessa Díaz united with now-director Polín Alfaro, also from that country. Af-

ter working together for some time they found that their passion for salsa and Latin rhythms could not be denied, and worked very hard to make the band what it is today. Their music includes the Cuban timba sound, Puerto Rican rhythms, and of course the Peruvian flavor. Vanessa's family, of a pronounced musical vocation, had a decisive in-

fluence in her choosing a career as a singer. Vanessa y La Tremenda made their first public debut in 2007, on a Latin radio station within the D.C. metropolitan area. Since then, the group has been a great hit! The dyna- mism and originality of its members in playing a variety of rhythms make their music undeniably full of life. Recently they have become renowned

for their tune Esa Noche, composed by Vanessa.

Above: Vanessa Díaz y La Tremenda. Their music includes the Cuban timba sound, Puerto Rican rhythms, and of course the Peruvian flavor.

Contact: Polín Alfaro, Manager 703-344-3275 info@vanessadiazylatremenda.com www.vanessadiazylatremenda.com
Contact:
Polín Alfaro, Manager
703-344-3275
info@vanessadiazylatremenda.com
www.vanessadiazylatremenda.com
flavor. Contact: Polín Alfaro, Manager 703-344-3275 info@vanessadiazylatremenda.com www.vanessadiazylatremenda.com
         

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Zafra

Venezuela, Colombia , Ecuador,

           

It selects as its repertoire the best of a variety of genres, offering The Best Live Music

and Perú each can be divided roughly into three parts: the Pacific or Atlantic coastal areas, the Andean region, or mountainous

Villa-Lobos Brothers

   

backbone of the continent, and the Amazonian rain forest to the east of the Andes. This geography shaped the character of the people and of their music. Afro- descendants and African traditions became more concentrated along the hot coastal areas where the ports of entry for the slaves were located.

The brothers now boast a number of special appearances under their belts, including a once-in-a-lifetime showdown at the Latin Grammys

 

Ancient indigenous civilizations made their home in the cold, dry, windy Andean highlands, while the peoples

T he best parties always happen at the beach.

lifetime showdown at the Latin Grammys, and

F ounded in Bolivia in 1983, Zafra now celebrates its 25th anniversary. The original members stayed together for nine years, but subsequent-

of Amazonia lived in hot humid lowlands

And when these three brothers hit the stage,

a

champagne smash for the 60th Anniversary of

with the unceasing

you will swear there's sand under your feet. Tall, dark and have-some, the Villa-Lobos deliver a consistently sunny breed of music. Shredding all over New York for years now, and frequent visitors to D.C., with performaces in several Fiesta DC events, their mainstream appeal has helped them secure shows at bigger- than-life shrines like Carnegie Hall and Shea

wreaking havoc in their native Veracruz, the

the United Nations. Invitations to play and record with elusive legends and superstars followed, from such icons as Eddie Palmieri, Dan Zanes, Amadou et Miriam, Morley, Itaal Shur, Simply Red, Jorma Kaukonen and Pierre Boulez. This year they recorded a CD with Dolly Parton. Having just wrapped up their second studio col-

ly there have been substitutions as its musicians are recruited into other groups due to their quality and experience. The band, which by now has produced a number of gold records, made the Washington area a perma- nent home in 2000. Early in its trajectory the band was contracted to play in Germany, leading to a tour of five European countries where the members met numerous Eu- ropean artists and became familiar with the music business in that continent. While on tour, Zafra was hired by a large Swedish company to play twice

sounds of the rain forest in the background.

Stadium, while also establishing a network of

daily aboard its cruise ships, where the entertainment included names such

laboration with The Shul Band, and on the heels of

 

smaller venues like Joe's Pub, Queens Theater

a

as Phil Collins and the Back Street Boys. Zafra took the place of the band

New York Times whatchamacallit, the Villa-Lo-

 

in the Park and the Orensanz Foundation. Once a pack of violin-toting beachbums

brothers now boast a number of special appear- ances under their belts, including a once-in-a-

bos brothers are on the road again, this time with long time friend Sammy Zabaleta on the drums.

Contact:

Ernesto Villa-Lobos, Director

917-679-8231

then completing its tour, Pink Floyd. Zafra has a permanent stage at a local club, playing twice a week. It se-

lects as its repertoire the best of a variety of genres, offering The Best Live Music.

It plays for any type of occasion, and also offers sound engineering services and a recording studio.

Contact:

Fernando Alfaro, Director

703-685-0073

nanoalfaro@gmail.com

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Zeniza All Star

         

They have opened for the most renowned salsa artists, such as El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, Celia Cruz, Oscar D'León

El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, Celia Cruz, Oscar D'León E nrique Araujo, director and founder

E nrique Araujo, director and founder of the Zeniza All Star Orchestra, was born in the

town of Chincha, Department of Ica, in Peru. As a child he moved to Lima, where he was nourished by a rich current of music, and from a very young age he began playing the congas and the bass. Having finished his schooling he invited a group of friends to start their own mu- sical group. Enthusiastically, they all accepted. In 1978, Zeniza began to record such hits as Una Nueva Vida and Shanna, and, in 1992, Con los ojos del alma. Zeniza then traveled to Ven- ezuela and found equal success, working next to artists such as Celia Cruz, La Dimensión Latina, La Inmensa, La Salsa Mayor, and many others. Zeniza arrived in Washington in 1993. At an appearance with Oscar D'León, the King of Salsa said after listening to Zeniza, "It's been a long time since I've enjoyed an orchestra with such a feel-good rhythm," agreeing to become the orchestra's godfather. In Washington they have opened for the most

renowned salsa artists, such as El Gran Com- bo de Puerto Rico, Celia Cruz, Oscar D'León, Grupo Niche, Guayacán, Ismael Miranda, Jerry Rivera, Gilberto Santa Rosa, Víctor Manuel, Joe Arroyo, Tito Nieves, Roberto Torres, and La Sonora Carruseles. In 2003, Zeniza was invited to play at Calle 8 in Miami, with sonera Laura Mao as vocalist, establishing the group as one of the best salsa bands in Washington. Its most recent recording, which includes salsa tunes like Chachaguere y Banbarakatunga, was made with musicians who currently play with Zeniza All Star. Enrique Araujo believes that it is important to record with the original musicians, ensuring the same musical quality in subsequent live per- formances.

photo: ALFoNSo AGUILAR

Contact: Enrique Araujo 301-213-6952, 301-801-4366 www.zeniza.com
Contact:
Enrique Araujo
301-213-6952, 301-801-4366
www.zeniza.com

Right: Cartwheeling in Dupont Circle, Washington.

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Special Genres

79

     

Special

   
         

Genres

   
 

www.washingtonhispanic.com

 

These genres are defined by a particular combination of music, dance, instrumentation, and even costuming. For them, specialization rather than variety is the standard. Flamenco, for example, is performed only by flamenco groups. It uses special costumes and limited instrumentation, and in modern times has been fairly standardized in the range of styles it uses. Mariachi, similarly, has costumes and instrumentation used only by mariachi groups. A mariachi may play sones or boleros or romantic ballads or waltzes, but it will always sound and look like a

 

El periódico en español más influyente en el área metropolitana de Washington.

mariachi. A marimba group is built around a particular instrument, large enough that it can be played by more than one performer at once. Like flamenco

 

Todos los viernes en más de 2,500 lugares en Washington, Maryland y Virginia. Sirviendo a cerca de 200,000 familias.

and mariachi, a marimba group sounds and looks like a marimba group no matter what style of music it is playing. The same is true of norteñas, samba, and tango. Rock bands follow no particular

 
 

202-667-8881

 

standard or tradition, but are included in this section for convenience. Area residents can learn to dance

 
 

Fax: 202-667-8902

 

flamenco and tango with local instructors, some of whom are listed in this section.

 

2701 Ontario Rd., NW, Washington DC, 20009.

       
   

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Arte Flamenco

     

Flamenco

 

F lamenco is an art that explodes outward cap- turing the imagination of the spectator with its

     

T he musical influences of Spain in America (the continent) are many and varied. In the Wash-

 

fire and fury. Highly emotional and intense, it is above all the art of the individual. Arte Flamenco is based on the concept that each performer has a unique quality to contrib-

ever given at the Jazz Festival, bringing Manolo

Contact:

     

ington area, the most visible variant is that of flamenco, the passionate music of the south of Spain, which transparently shows the Moorish legacy of that area. The end of the 15th Century was accom- panied by major events in the former Roman province of Hispania, which had increasingly absorbed, and come to be dominated by, the Visigoths. The last Moorish bastion fell, the nation of Spain began to be unified around the kingdom of Castile, the intense nationalism of the times was accompanied by the Inquisition, with its expulsion of the Muslims and Jews, and the Spanish sailing expedition to China landed instead on a conti- nent previously unknown to Western European mari- ners. The Gypsies (Rom, or Roma), a nomadic peo-

ple who had traveled to Europe from India and were marginalized from mainstream Spanish society, did not share in the Hispanic-Cath- olic fever of the times, and took up the mix of Moorish, Hispanic, Jewish, and Gypsy music that became flamenco, adding their own intensity to the genre. Flamenco can be performed as simply as with one voice, or with the addition of hand claps, castanets, or one or more guitars; or, more recently, the Peruvian cajón, a wooden box played like a drum while held between the legs of a seated performer. Flamenco is also the name of the dance that the music accompanies.

 

ute to the ensemble. All of the artists, be they dancers, guitarists or singers, are highly experi- enced professionals, and are encouraged to en- gage in the creative process as both soloists and participants in ensemble pieces. NataliaMonteleóncreatedArteFlamencowhile residing in New Orleans. The group achieved wide success, and was invited to return three years in a row to the world-famous New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Under a grant from the Consul- ate of Spain the company was able to arrange for the first presentation of authentic cante flamenco

Leiva as guest singer. Relocating to Maryland, Ms. Monteleon re- created the company within the Washington area. Their first major concert, in February of 1998, was a sold-out performance at Howard University’s Smith Theater. Performances are given annually for the Federation of Hispanic Organizations' summer festival in Baltimore, the Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, Balti- more Artscape, the Columbia Arts Festival, the Takoma Park Folk Festival, James Rouse The- ater, the University of Maryland, the Mexican Cultural Institute, and other local venues. Because Flamenco is an art form rooted in a native culture, the company strives to present shows which both educate as well as entertain the audience. Great care is taken to retain au- thenticity and to use the highest caliber of tal- ent, culled from local dancers, musicians and

   

photo: toNY bRoWNphoto:

FeRRUCA

     

singers, as well as occasional invited interna-

Natalia Monteleón, Director

   
     

tional guests. The company, which uses live

301-617-0694

   
     

musical accompaniment exclusively, is known

natalia@arteflamenco.us

   
     

for its impassioned performances.

www.arteflamenco.us

   

photo: meLISSA

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Duende Camarón

 

Furia Flamenca

 
8 3 Duende Camarón   Furia Flamenca   T he duo was founded by the brothers

T he duo was founded by the brothers Cesar and José Oretea (Bolivia) in 1998. In 2000

they moved to the U.S. and since then they have performed in different clubs and events in the Washington area and recorded two CDs. Duende Camarón has performed in several

venues of the Smithsonian, Carter Barron, and Constitution Hall. Their flamenco is influenced by rumba artists like the Gypsy Kings and also by Latin American music. The name has a very important meaning to the flamenco world: "duende" is a especial phenomenon in which a flamenco musician can give the best of his or her art with much passion, while Camarón (“shrimp”) was the nickname of José Monje Cruz, one of the most important fla- menco singers of contemporary times, who died in 1992.

Contact: César Oretea 703-868-0919 duendecamaron@hotmail.com www.oreteamusic.com
Contact:
César Oretea
703-868-0919
duendecamaron@hotmail.com
www.oreteamusic.com
703-868-0919 duendecamaron@hotmail.com www.oreteamusic.com The list of the major and minor languages of Spain is long.

The list of the major and minor languages of Spain is long. Castilian, also called Spanish, is the principal language, which everyone must know and has a right to use anywhere in the country. Other major languages are Galician (galego), closely related to Portuguese; and Catalan, spoken in Catalonia and also eastern Aragon and the Balearic Islands, and its variant, Valencian, spoken in the Valencian Community. Basque (euskera), in use since before the Roman conquest, is still used in the Basque Country and Navarre. Aranese, with roots in the Middle Ages, is found in north- western Catalonia, in the Pyrenees. Among minor languages, Aragonese (from Occitan), Astur-Leonese, Extremaduran and Fala enjoy some recognition butare not official languages.

Aragonese (from Occitan), Astur-Leonese, Extremaduran and Fala enjoy some recognition butare not official languages.

Its choreographies have been selected for numerous shows including Joy of Motion’s Dance Project

B ringing the ferocity and passion of flamen- co to the stage, Furia Flamenca is unique in

that it combines flamenco's gypsy heritage with modern flamenco choreography to create an el- egant balance of motion and energy, making its performances absolutely enthralling and totally entertaining. Founded by director Estela Vélez in 2003, Furia Flamenca has taken the best elements of its dancers’ backgrounds (flamenco, ballet, Middle Eastern, modern, and tap to name a few) and melded them into a sumptuous feast for the eyes, ears, and heart with their range of expres- sion and ability to entice the audience. In January 2005 the company became a Resident Arts Partner with the Joy of Motion Dance Center. Furia Flamenca has performed in venues throughout the area including the Kennedy Cen-

ter's Millennium Stage, Jack Guidone Theatre, Carter Barron Theater, Mexican Cultural Insti- tute, and Ernst Community Cultural Center as well as numerous festivals including Dance D.C. Festival and Adams Morgan Day festival. In ad- dition, it has appeared on television programs such as Noticias Univisión and the Fox Morn- ing Show. Its choreographies have been selected for numerous shows including Joy of Motion's Dance Project and Dance Bethesda in 2007.

of Motion's Dance Project and Dance Bethesda in 2007. Contact: Estela Vélez, Artistic Director 703-568-4404
of Motion's Dance Project and Dance Bethesda in 2007. Contact: Estela Vélez, Artistic Director 703-568-4404
Contact: Estela Vélez, Artistic Director 703-568-4404 estela@furia-flamenca.com www.furia-flamenca.com
Contact:
Estela Vélez, Artistic Director
703-568-4404
estela@furia-flamenca.com
www.furia-flamenca.com

84

Special Genres

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Fiesta DC’s

Latino Cultural Guide

Special Genres

85

Flamenco is only

Requiebros

photo: ARCADIA CReAtIVe

Suspiro Andaluz

one of a variety of traditional Spanish dances, some with roots dating to the 15th Century. They survive, despite changes in tastes and despite the repression of regional differences

Vibrant and authentic costumes help to create a cheerful blend of energy and excitement that make a performance by the Requiebros a musical pleasure

Accompanied by a live guitarist, Suspiro Andaluz performs traditional subgenres of flamenco

The maracas from the plains of the Colombia-Venezuela border are smaller and lighter in sound than those seen in the U.S. They are played very

under the dictatorship of Francisco Franco. Among the better- known dances are the paso doble (the music heard at bull fights), the fandango, and

T he Requiebros Spanish Dance Group typifies the elegance and grace that distinguishes flamenco from other styles of dance. Under the tutelage

of choreographer and director Carmen de Vicente, the group showcases the

 

differently, too, and a musician used to the other maracas has to learn them like a new instrument. The right hand plays an upbeat in counter to

the bolero (which is not like the Caribbean bolero that took its

classical “Escuela Bolera” style of the 18th Century, as well as contempo- rary genres that include flamenco, rumbas, tanguillos, sevillanas and tradi- tional folk dances from various regions of Spain.

Vibrant and authentic costumes help to create a cheerful blend of energy and

F ounded in 2007, Suspiro Andaluz has been featured at the Annual Span-

ish Festival at the Strathmore Center for Performing Arts, as well as local

venues throughout the greater D.C. area.

the down beat on the left hand. They are played very fast

genres of flamenco, including alegrías and tangos, as well as the flamenco-style

Contact:

Maria

name).

excitement that make a performance by the Requiebros a musical pleasure.

Accompanied by a live guitarist, Suspiro Andaluz performs traditional sub-

and moved straight up and down, rather

The group consists of approximately 20 dancers from beginning to advanced levels. They have held recitals for diverse audiences and per-

partnerdance

than being tilted forward on the beats,

Contact:

Carmen de Vicente, Founder

703-684-1949

www.carmendevicente.com

formed in schools, international programs, area

541-515-0630

from Seville

and made to produce

festivals, nursing homes, and at private engage-

maria@dcflamenco.com

<