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© 1927,1933,1953 BOSTON MUSIC CO., 116 Boylston St., Boston, Mass.

02116 Copyright Renewals Effective 1955, 1961



International Copyright Secured Made in U.S.A. All Rights Reserved

ATune a Day

A First Book

for

Violin Instruction

By

c. PAUL HERFURTH

BOOK ONE-ELEMENTARY BOOK TWO-INTERMEDIATE BOOK THREE-ADVANCED TEACHER'S MANUAL

A complete guide lor teachl11j/ "A TUNE A DAY" containinq plano accompaniments for books 1 & 2 and the seperate numbers noted In book J. A ('erg convenient book for home practice.

PUPIL'S PRACTICE RECORD
SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. JAN.
1 2 3 " 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE
I 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5 I 2 3 4 5
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Always Record Practice Time in Minutes. All Practice Time Lost Must Be Made Up. WEEKLY GRADE

NAME

TEL.

SCHOOL

ADDRESS

CRADE

Feb.

Tests

1st Week

Jan.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

2nd Week

Mar.

I

Apr.

May

June

3rd Week

4th Week

E-ExceUent; G-Good; M-Medium, Distinctly Above Passing; L-Low, Doubtfully Passing; F-Vcry Poor, Failure.

FOREWORD TO TEACHERS

IN compiling this course the objective has intentionally been not to cover too much ground; but rather to concentrate on the acquisition of a thorough musical background and a solid foundation in good violinplaying. These two requisites are inseparable.

A brief section is devoted to the simpler rudiments of music which should first be thoroughly understood. Another introductory section discusses the holding of the violin and bow, since, without the correct position of the left hand, and the proper drawing of the bow, good violin playing is impossible. With this in mind, considerable material has been given for the open strings before attempting the use of the fingers.

The accurate placing of each finger should be insisted upon.

Cultivate In the pupil the habit of careful listening. The familiar hymns and folk-songs have been selected because of their melodic interest as pieces, and because, in addition, in each appears some technical point to be mastered.

The value of learning to count aloud from the very beginning cannot be over-estimated. Only in this way can a pupil sense rhythm. Rhythm, one of the most essential elements of music, and usually conspicuous by its absence in amateur ensemble playing, is emphasized throughout. For instance, Lesson 12 emphasizes an essential step in rhythmic development.

Many teachers do the thinking for their pupils, instead of helping them to think for themselves. Insisting upon the mastery of each point will not dull their interest.

What greater joy, whether it be child or adult, than to accomplish, achieve, and gain more power.

Lessons ma-rked "Supplementary Material" .may be given as a reward for well-prepared work.

Class teaching should be a combination of indi vid ual instruction and ensemble playing. At every lesson there should be individual playing so that all the necessary corrections can be made. Never allow pupils' mistakes to go unnoticed, since only in constant correction will they develop the habit. of careful thinking and playing.

A decided advantage of group-teaching is that it provides experience in ensemble playing and gives every pupil the opportunity of listening to the others, of observing; their mistakes, and of hearing the corrections.

For the best results each class should not be made up of more than sixfor a half-hour lesson, and twelve for an hour lesson. Irrespective of the numbers, the teacher must see to it that there is individual instruction as .well as general directions to the class.

'Classes should be regraded whenever necessary so as' not to, retard the progress of the brighter .students.: nor to discourage the slower ones. ·It also. acts as an incentive for greater effort on the part of the pupils.

It is recommended that every student practice, fortyfive· minutes a day. This course provides one lesson a week for a school year.

The eventual success of each pupil depends on the regular and careful home practice, according to directions.

If possible it would be wellFor the teacher to fk~ep in touc-h with the parents.

Grateful acknowledgment is marie' by the author for the assistance of many teachers under. whose direction this course has been used.

C. PAUL HERFURTH Director of Instrumental Music East Orange, N. J.

FOREWORD TO THE REVISED EDITION

Although the outstanding success of "A TuNE A DAY" in its original form has far exceeded the author's expectations, its use in many school systems throughout this country and Canada has prompted the author' to consult with a number of these teachers, to discuss the possibility of improvement.

Because the material has been subjected to the routine of actual classroom teaching, it has been constantly revised and improved in the light of thi~ experience, until in its present form it represents a thoroughly.workable course of study for violin class teaching.

In this revised edition the author has eliminated certain exercises for which no immediate need was necessary, and has incorporated additional material in the form of new melodies, and secondary teacher violin parts.

The addition of :1, piano book t.o aid the pupils in ear-training and rhythm will greatly enhance the value of this course.

C. P.H.

Il. M. Co. 8fHlO

[ iii 1

RUDLMENTS OF MUSIC

Music is represented on paper by a combination of characters and signs) all of which it is necessary to

learn in order to play the violin intelligently.

Characters called notes are written upon and between five lines I I which is called the staff.

The character I' I placed at the beginning of the st aff is called tbe tr eb Ie or G clef. The staff is divided by bars into measures as follows:

Bar Bar Bar

Meas !:Ire Measure Measure Meastlre

II

These measures, in turn) are equal in time value) according to the fractional numbers) (Time signature) placed at the beginning of each piece.

The time signature indicates the number of notes of equal value in each measure. The upper figure gives the number of beats or counts in a measure, and the lower figure indicates what kind of a note has

one boat, such a s ! or C equa l s I' t J J ~ J II four quarter not"4or the equivalent I' d J J II

half note and two quarters in each measure, "4 equals 2 quarter no te sj 8" equals 4 eighth notes) etc.

There are different kinds of notes, each variety representing a certain time value as follows:

I'~ I J j I J ::j J J I;DJiJJJJJJ II
" •
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Whole Note equals) Two Half Notes) Four Quarter Notes, or Eight Eighth Notes.

The count for the above would be, four to the whole note: two to each half note: one to each quarter note and one to each group of two eighth notes.

The notes are named after the first seven letters of the alphabet, i.e., (a, b) c) d, e) f) g)) according to the line on or space in which they are placed.

The G clef ~ which encircles the second line, estab l ishes the note G on this line, from which the other lines and spaces are named as follows:

I' () 0 0 II
0 I) 0
0 I) 0 II
0 0
G A B C D E F G G F E D In addition notes are written upon and between short lines above and below the staff. called ledger lines.

14 0

These lines are

II

o

II

G

A

B

c

D

D

~ C

-rr B

-eA

-rr G

B.M. Co. 8860

IV

~ 94 05 n8 04 II
09 112
01 02 .,t
Every Good Boy Does Finely F - A - C - E A rest indicates a pause, or silence for the value of the note after which it is named, such as

- -

I '1 ¥ wtc.

Whole Rest

Half Rests

Quarter Rests

Eighth Rests

The end of a piece is indicated by a light and heavy line~ ~~E~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I

When a section or part of a piece is to be repeated it will be shown by a double bar with two dots.

:1

Key Signatures

The Sharps or Flats found after the Clef at the beginning of each line is called the Key Signature. These Sharps or Flats effect all the notes of the same name throughout the piece, except when changed by a new Key Signature or temporarily by an accidental. An Accidental is a Sharp or Flat which does not belong to the Key Signature. An Accidental applies only to the measure in which it is placed.

Sharps, Flats, and Naturals

A Sharp (#) raises the Dote to which it applies by one-half tone. A Flat (b) lowers the note to which it applies by one-half tone.

A Natural (q) takes away the effect of a sharp or flat and restores the note to its original pitch.

The Violin and Bow

CHIN·REST __

,

FINGERBOARD

TAIL·PIECE"

STICK

-SCREW

TIP- ~~~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;;:::::::::::~================~~~~~

FROG

HAIR

B.M.Co 8!!80

I v I

HOLDING THE VIOLIN

Take the violin, the strings a way from the body, and hold it under the right arm.

(Rest Position)

RE!lT POSITION

(I)

Stretch the fingers of the left hand out s t r aig h t , t h. e t h u rub pointing up.

(2)

Place the side of the knuckle at the base of the first finger. against the lower edge of the neck, so that the back of the hand is in line with the nut, or saddle, at right angles to the strings.

(3)

Let the thumb (joint not bent ) rest against the tipper side of the neck about one inch from the nut. The fleshv part of the hand bet ween tho thumb and first finger must not touch the neck.

(4)

Bend the first finger so that its tip falls on the A string (third string from you) about one irrch from the nut. This will vary according to the size of the violin.

(5)

With the help of the right hand, without changing the position of the left hand, raise the violin so that it rests on the left collar-bone. the chin over the chin-rest.

(6)

Bring the left elbow well under the »ioiin. to the right, allowing the thumb to draw slightly under the neck. the hand also turning toward the side of the neck (not touching). rounding the other fingers over the strings in position to strike. Release the right hand.

(7)

By this position of the elbow, the left shoulder is brought under the violin to give support and counteract the pressure of the chin and jaw-bone. The violin should thus be held firm without the aid of the left hand.

[ vi 1

Things to Watch

The violin should slant about 45 degrees to the right, and at such a height that the scroll of the violin is in line with the eye. Left elbow well under the violin. The nail of the first finger (left hand) should face you. This applies to the A and E strings only. The tip of the thumb should point out. Space between under side of neck and fleshy part of hand between thumh and first finger. From the knuckles of the left hand to the elbow should be a straight line.

Holding the Bow

Take the bow in the left hand, and hold at the extreme end below the frog, in such a position that the hair is facing up and the tip of the how is pointing away from you. (1) Place the TIP of the thumb (right hand), slightly curved at the joint, against the stick so that it touches the raised part of the frog on the stick. The joint should he about % inch from the hair. (~) Allow the middle finger to curve around the stick at the first joint (from the tip) opposite the thumb. (3) Place the third, or ring-finger. next to the middle finger so that it curves around the stick at the first joint, and rests against the side of the frog. (~) Allow the first finger to 'rest on the stick in the first joint. (:3) The tip of the little finger rests on the stick in a natural position. Release the left hand.

The fingers should he close together. (Touching)

Silent Exercises for the Bow

With the violin in position, place the how on the A string at different points, i. e., at the middle (Fig. 1), tip (Fig. 2), ami frog (Fig. J). At each point hold the how perfectly still for 2 minutes, Take notice of the position of arm. wrist, etc .• as follows: The how must always be at right angles to the strings, i. e., parallel with the bridge, and midway between the fingerhoard and bridge. When the bow is at the point the wrist should be sunk in (very slightly) and when at the frog, should be curved up (not too much). The back of the hand always flat, and always in the same relative position to the OOW. Do not allow the fingers to move on the bow-stick. When placing the bow 011 the strings, the stick is turned slightly towards the fingerboard, so that only the edge of the hair touches the strings. This rule varies according to the dynamic effect desired. Practice this on all strings. Notice that the elbow is slightly higher when playing on the D and G strings, out never should the elbow be higher than the hand. Raise the hand to the level of the string desired, keeping the elbow entirel ... · relaxed. Anv exertion of the upper arm muscles is very harmful to a good tone.

Fig. 1

Fig. !t

Fig. 3

Signs and Abbreviations for Bowing

M means Down Bow V means Up Bow

w.n, means Whole Bow

M.H. means Middle half of Bow

[ vii 1

Tuning Your Violin

, I
1 ¥ i
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-a I
I
I I
I , ,
I _., __ . P" (A llri",) I
PIt (D lIti.,) - -I I I
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P •• IG .Ir;n,) - I I
,
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'Q ,
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~ <lj-<:'
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,
" DIRECTIONS

Hold the violin by the larger end between the knees, supporting it by the left hand at the neck. Strike the note A on the piano (see diagram), or blow it on the pitch-pipe. With the thumb of the Iftt hand pick the A string to compare it with the

piano. If the string sounds lower (Hat) the pitch

of the string must hI.' raised by turning the A peg away from you wittfthe right hand. Turn the peg slowly while picking the string with the left thumb until it sounds in unison with the piano or pitch-pipe. If the string sounds higher (sharp) than the piano it must be lowered by turning the peg slowly toward you until the pitch of the string is the same &S the piano. Tune the E string, in the same manner as the A string.

To tune the D and G strings, by reversing the hands, ! he right hand holding the neck of the violin, plucking the strings with the thumb. The pegs for these strings will be turned by the left hand the same as you did with the right hand for the A and E strings.

While turning the pegs always press them into the holes so that they will stay in position when you take your hand away.

Tune the strings in the following order, AD-G-E.

When you become more advanced you will be able to tune your violin in the playing ponlioR.

IT is quite easy to tune your violin with the aid of a piano, and you should learn as soon as possible. If no piano is available use a violin pitch-pipe.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR VIOLIN

Your violin will not sound its best, nor will your learning to play it be as easy unless everything pertaining to the instrument is kept in perfect condition.

If your violin is not a new one it should be taken to a violin repairer for all necessary adjustments. Your teacher will tell you what is needed to put your violin in good playing condition,

Always keep your violin in the case when not practicing.

NEVER loosen the strings on your violin but ALWAYS loosen the hairs on the bow when not playing. Rosin the bow-hair a little each day. Never allow rosin to collect on the violin or on the bow-stick; AL WAYS keep them cleaa.

Take a pride in the way your violin looks as well &8 in how it sounds. Use good strings, and ALWAYS have aD extra set in your violin-case.

( viii ]

FOREWORD FOR OPTIONAL LESSONS ONE THROUGH FIVE

Although the outstanding success of "A TUNE A DAY" in its present form has far exceeded the author's expectations, its use in many school systems throughout this country, Canada, and Australia has prompted the author to consult with a number of these teachers, to discuss the use of the quarter note approach.

The thinking of string teachers seems to be about equally divided between the whole note and the quarter note approach for beginning string instrument students.

In order to make the "TUNE A DAY" string class method more valuable to those teachers who prefer the quarter note approach, the author has compiled optional material for the first five lessons with this objective in mind. These optional lessons appear in the violin, viola, 'cello, and bass books, thus providing for the teaching of these instruments in one group through the class procedure.

In order to simplify the learning ofvholding the instrument and bow at the same time, the first lesson uses the pizzicato approach through employing open string letter names only, thus eliminating the holding of the bow and the reading of pitch names on the staff.

With this approach in 2/4 rhythm the beginner is better able to think and feel the pulsation of this marching rhythm.

The whole and half note approach remains the same as before, starting with the regular Lesson One (1) on Page 1 for those teachers who prefer this procedure.

The author believes that, with these first five optional lessons included in the series of "A TUNE A DAY", it now covers the needs of all discriminating string teachers.

C. PAUL HERFURTH.

IX

LESSON 1 (OP:I'IONAZ)

The Open Strings Pizzicato

o 0 0 0 G D A E

rm I \

Pizzicato (pi zz.) : Plucking the strings.

After learning the left hand position in ho ldirig the violin (page VD, the names and positions of the open strings should be understood. See diagram at right showing p izz. position as follows: Place the tip of the thumb (right hand) against the upper right hand corner of the fingerboard under the E string. With the right hand in this position, pluck the strings (about two inches down on the fingerboard) with the first finger.

Additional exercises for open strings G, D, A, Pizz., may be written on the blackboard.

CD PizZo A- A 1 Count: 1 - 2

® Pizzo A- A Count: 1- 2

® Pizzo D-D G-G D-D G-G D-D G-G D-D G-~ :11 if-H
Count: 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2
2
@ Pizzo D-A D-G D-A D-G D-A D-G D-A D-G :11 G-~ ~
Count: 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 NOT IN UNISON

® Pizzo A-A I E-E 1 A-A Count: 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2

E-E 1 - 2

A-D 1 - 2

A-E 1 - 2

A-D 1 - 2

A-E 1 - 2

NOT IN UNISON

'7" PizZo G - G \ G - G \ G - GIG - G \ G - GIG - D \

\!_) Count: 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2 1 - 2

G-G 1 - 2

:\1 G - ~

1 - 2

'I

I

G-D 1 - 2

2D-D

A-A

Ten Little Indians

D - D

Pizzo

1 - 2

A-A

Count:

4: 1 - 2

1 - 2

1 - 2

American Folk-Tune

B.M. Co. 8860

[x)

G D A E i =:::J:,I= 0 n th e

W .,. i staff

~ '[ : i Holding and Drawing the Bow

g g ~ ~ ~:i?~ After acquiring the feeling for holding the bow correctly (P. VII) (in the beginning this can be done much easier with a pencil) try playing on the open strings.* The right arm must be completely relaxed to permit the bow to be drawn freely.

Silent bow arm exercises: With the left hand and arm holding an imaginary violin move the right hand and arm down and up as in actual playing until complete relaxation has been accomplished.When using the bow avoid all tension in the bow arm. r1 = Down Bow. V = Up Bow.

Study the names of the open strings in relation to the notes as written on the st aff (see diagram above). You are now playing quarter notes (one count to each note). COUNT ALOUD.

n V n V n V V '2"n V n V

~ A - - D ,., I6'A - D

CD ! J.J I J J I J J I J J :11: J J I J J I J J

Count: 1 2 t 2 1 2

,., V ,., V rA\'" V ,., V

*- D G D G \.¢JA D G DAD G D

®1~~I§J~J~ls3~~~I~J@J~ll~1~:mll:~~~J2~~~~~IJ~J§I~1~J~~

Count: t 2 • ~ .. ~ ~ ~ 1 2

LESSON 2*

(OPTIONAL)

A

D

I J J :~

NOT IN UNISON NOT IN UNISON

t~~~~~V~'~~~_~~A~~~~~~~6~~~~Y~~~~-~~E~_~~A~~~~ @:0 ! r r I r r I J J J J :11: r r I ~ J I F r I J ;J :11

Count: 1 2 1 2 t 2

Pupil

Baa! Baa! Black Sheep**

,., n V

Nursery Rhyme

Teacher

~Count: ~ ; fj- .101

.. ..

1 2

..

..

.. ..

.. ..

. ..

.. ..

- -

n V

.. .

..

.. ..
..
..
::
- • •••

-" -. -" -"

"Procedure for this lesson: (1) Recite letter names in rhythm. (2) Play pizzicato, counting one-two.

(3) Play using bow. The bow must be held firmly with the fingers of the right hand. Use the middle twothirds of the bow and play with a bold firm stroke. Be careful of any tension in the bow arm.

··Piano Ace. Teacher's Manual, Page 6.

B.M. Co. !)SIlO [XI]

LESSON 3

(OPT ION ALl

~ ,., V ,.,

<D{;IJ~IJ

Count. 1 1

2

Continuation of Open String Quarter Notes (One Count Each)

@,., V

J 1 J g :11: ~ :

V

J I J

2

,., V

1 J g 1 J J 1 J J :11

®

J J 1 J gll

2

Pupil

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star *

,., V ,., V

Nursery Rhyme

~

1. 2

.. ..

..

,~ .

, ,

: Fine I

: (=.End) l

'-
fl r'"l V
'- ~ .. .. i~ .. .. .. l~ ..
2
fl .. i
'- .. ! ~ ..

IJa Cap,0(oProm the beginning)

..

I I

Piano 1

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'-Count: ':' 2 .. .. .. .. .. f 2
1 2
fl ~
U ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . .-: ~ s ~
I
--- -d V

Oats and Beans

" V

Old English

Pupil

~ r'"l r'"l ,.,
'- .. .. ':' .. .. .. ~ '1 2 .. .. ..
f 2 2
,.. 10
t.J .. .,; -¥ .. .. ... ~ ~ :;: ~ ~ ~ :;
-,J .... I Y V

V

'Piano Acc. Teacher's Manual, Page Y

Home UlOTic: Write letter names above notes on this page.

B. M. Co. AA 60

[XII]

LESSON 4 (OPTIONAL)

Half Notes - Two Counts Each

A half note is equal to two quarter notes tied. When two notes on the same degree of the staff (line or space) are tied by a slur::::::::, they are to be played as one note.

USE A WHOLE BOW (W. B.) (FROG TO TIP, TIP TO FROG)

®

, i J I J I J mJljlJ_j J I

Count: 12 12

o 0

12

12

Introducing Four-Fourj'[] Time

Two me a sur e s of r wo-fou r time equal one measure of fo ur--f'our t i me , The count for each measure now becomes one-two-three-four. One-two for the first half not e, a nd three-four for the second half note.

v

J

,., Au Clair de la Lun~* V

IJ J J J iJ J I,) J 1,1 J IJ

French Folk Song

Pupil

I J J II

2 3

4:1234 : : :

iO rFFI~ ggiddS rlF

., ..

r d rr F i ~ ~ ii

Pupil

fl ,., ,., ,.,
'-.J. u . u ,u u U u !u u u u u u ,u U r.J U
Count: 1 2 3 4 it 2 34
~ U ,
L I [ I : I
@., .... ' ... .. .-6 ....... __ 7J -6 •••• •••• • • -41._' -rJ -d v

Marching**

v

Teacher

Ij_ Merrily *** HALF
REST
Pupil _L
~. u u
,u u iU U U U 'U U U
Count: 1 2 3 4 it 2 34 1234
fj~ j :---- I I I
Teacher
~
!) I I I I I I I I I I I I I [ I [ I I I I * Piano Ace. Teacher's Manual, Page 4

**,., " " "" 5

***" " " " "9

B.M.Co, S8f10

[xm)

LESSON 5 (OPT IORAD

Whole Notes - Four Counts Each

Draw the bow with an equality of motion in a straight line parallel with the bridge. Learn to save the bow, L e., a fault that is very prevalent is the starting of the bow at a too rapid pace, whereby the greater part of the bow is used up before half the time value of the note has expired. Whole notes four counts, half notes two counts.

(Always count aloud and give each note its full value.) USE A WHOLE BO"',.\! C\V. B.)

CD

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v

v

v

o

o

o 1234

o

: II

n

v

@ ~OT IN UNIS:jN :11:

o

1234 -n

v

II

I,

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Whole Notes and Half Notes

THE BOW MUST BE DRAWN T\VICE "\5 FAST FOR THE HALF NOTES.

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I 1 =t :11: ill J I u

7J 7J 1234

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I J J

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count:1.2 3 4,

n V ®

I J J :11:

~OT IN UNISON

n V

J

n

J

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n V

1 ~ ~ :11

o

1. 2 3 4

o

Piano ~

I'l n n n n n n n
@_ ........ 12~~ 1234 1234 ........ u ~~ u ~234
Count: 1. 2 3 4,
11" 3 4
I
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V .. u .... ~ ~ # .. u .... ~ ~ :# Whole, Half, and Quarter Notes Folk Song V

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V

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Pupil

~ n n n n r'1
'- l' 2 .... ........ .. ...... ""-:;J~ 12 3 4 ~
34 34
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V .. .. ~ .. .. -D .. .. q. .. . ~ ~ # y

v

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B.M. Co. 8860

[XIV]

1.

A TUNE A DAY

LESSON 1

The Open Strings

~ G D A E
l' On the staff
I,
0
u
6 6 6 6 On the Violin
G D A E Hold the bow firmly upon the stririgs while counting the rests.

Draw the bow with an equality of motion in a straight line parallel with the bridge. Learn to save the bow, i.e., a fault that is very prevalent is the starting of the bow at a too rapid pace, whereby the greater part of the bow is used up before half the time value of the note has expired.

The Open A-String

Whole notes four counts, half notes two counts. Use whole bow for each note, drawing the bow a little faster for the half notes than for the whole notes.

y

REPEAT

:11

-

-

II

WBn

I "

@ i1 V

:11: J J

:11

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I j J

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u:::

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:I. 234:

:I. 2 3 4:

fu:w the bow a little fast(~r for the half not~'<; J ® WB n HALF REST Y

~ d - I~

Teacher

B. M. Co. 88aO

Pupil

-

-

V,

Id

i1 V " V
- I j - 1 J - I j - I tJ - :11 Au clair de la lune

@

French Folk Song

V i1 V

V i1

n V

Y i1

fl i1 V , i1
~Count::I. 2 3 4 :1.234
~ I I ~ I I - -
@) I <::> I 1 ! 2

LESSON 2

The Open D-String

Whole notes four counts, half notes two counts. Oount a Zo u d .

CD -;. WE r"1

~ I I

v

v

-

-

-

-

:11

o

o

o 0

1234

I:J-Ij-IJ

v

i1 V r"1 V

I J J I J J

:11

o

o

123 4

Count: 1 2 3 4 t 2 3 4

y r"1 Y r"1 Y
- I J - I J - I J - I J - I j - :11 Pupil

i1

Marching

Y i1 V i1V i1

V i1 V

r1 Y

The Open A- and D-Strings

In crossing strings do not lift the bow off the string. ing or lowering the hand.

®

~CEt':'23Fi<-3 4 :

Hold the bow firmly upon the string while rai s-

-

-

1

-

:11

()

v

®i1 Y r"1

:11: J j I iJ

1 2 3 4

V i1

j I j

V i1 V

J 1 J J :11

"

o

r1 V n

I J I J

v V r I i1 1

o J J

v @WB V

J :11: J ;J

i1 V r"1 Y i1 g
1 J I I J I 1 j :11
Q
0 o 1 2 3 4

@

Merrily

V r"1

r1 Y

Pupjl

~ r1 Y r"1 V i1 Y i1 V r1
t. Count: f 2 3 4 1234 v; v; '-' v; ~ '-"
fl +t ,., M _ ......... -
t. I I I Teacher

B. x.ce. 8880

3

LESSON 3

Quarter Notes and Quarter Rests

t count, use middle half of bow. Use whole bow for whole and half notes. Give quarter notes full value.

CD MH r1 V n y n @ f4H Y r1 Y r1 V n V

~ e J J J J I J J J J I J J J J I J J J J :II:J iJ ~ I J d ~ I J d i I J d H

® Count: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

ill ~ IJ3J31 U 13JJ/fJ jJIJ JjlJ Big JJ=.

12341234 12341234

ri v ri vnY n V® r1 Vny, r1 I

J J j , I J J J I J J j I J J J :11: II I J J J I j j I J J J J :11

1 234:

1234 1 2 34

2 {TWO counts to a measure.

-TIME MEANS

4: Quarter-notes get one count.

Pupil

Teacher

Baa! Baa! Black Sheep

I D. & A. Strings I

Nursery Rhyme

f1 n Y M V V r1
~ Count: 1. 2 .. .. .. .. f-' .. .. (J
f1 ~
~ .. .. r..; y

11 r1 V I n
..L
~
t- .. .. .. .. .. .. v .. .. 0
fl .. ,,_ l
.
t- .
.. .. .. I "-' - - - - r..; Pupil

Teacher

I D. & A. Stringsl

Hop, Hop, Hop!

German Folk Song

fJ r1 V n V, i7 y n ~
~ Sount: 1 2 v (J .. ..
-
~l/
@) .. - f-' .~ .. V

1l_ n V j r1
~ .. • • .. .. ..
fl ~ - r1
f) - - ... ~ • .. - .. B.M.CO.8860

II

LESSON 4

The Open E-String

(Violin and Bass only)

@IiVrlY rI V

I r r :11: r r r r 1 r r 1 r r F Fir r :11

®

,

1234 1234

@rlY rI Vn V

f r r r 1 r r Fir F r I F r r :11: r r r I r r r I r r r I r r r :1

1234 1.234 1.234

Pupil

Teacher

Pupil

Teacher

Pupil

Teacher

Ten Little Indians

I A. & E. Stringsl n V rI V

American Folk Tune

~ 'I
@. Count: 1 .2
~ u H I I J I
@. I I -
- Oats and Beans

In A.& E. Strings I rlV

Old English

Y

n

rl I 1 I I 1 1
@) Count: 1 .2 3 4 •
rl ~ +I I I I I
@) • - - - - - --- I - - I I • • - *A Riddle

I D. A. & E. Strings I rI

German Folk Song

nv

I'} V _I I
@. Count: 1 .2 3 4 •• --
~ u ~
@. .... - I c.. ~ ... . I c.. ~ V

11 Ii ,I I
'4v ••
':::1
~ »Ji i . - 1
~ - . .... ..... ?; - . ~ - ..... -z; .. . - I 1 V -& *By permission of Silver, Burdett &: Co. owners of the copyright. From Book one, "The progressive Music Series." B. M. Co. 8860

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

IG. D.&A. Strings I

Nursery Rhyme

Pupil

f1 i1 V i1 V Y i1 I
~ ~ ~ =J ~ ~ ~ ~ .. .. .. .. .. ~
flC~unt: 1. 2 .1 _l ISnd
~ I I I Teacher

-~ i1 V _'j_ 11 _l
I~ ~ .. .. =it .. c..t ~ .. .. s :". r;.;
1l~ I ITo the llJeginning
@) I I I I I I I ~

The Four Open Strings (Violin and Bass only)

i1 V i1

II II

y

y

:1

I,

o

"'0 ®Count:1. 2 a "

, II L L 13 J 1 ill ill 14 4 14 4 1 ill ill I J d I r r :1

(J) MH

, e JJJJIJ J JJ I J J J J I cr EEl E FEEl J j J J I JJ JJ IJJJrl

® 1234 @MH

, e L~)J g 14 J Id j: :1:Ej]gIJJJ ElcWJJIJJd E:I

t 2 3 -4

Home work: Write 4 lines of open string notes, marking the name of each. Divide into measures, using whole, half and quarter notes. Mark time signature.

B. M.Co. 8860

6

LESSON 6 The Eighth Note

To be played with a loose wrist and most generally with the middle part of the bow. Play slowly at first, gradually increasing the speed until you can play quite fast. Oount aloud. Be careful not to cut the up bow stroke too short. Use the same amount of bow for notes of equal value.

CD i1 V @INote time signature. I

t t J J J J 1 J JJ 3 JJ JJ IJ J J J I JJ 3J J oj J 3=11: i J JJ 1 n J :11

Count: 1 2 3 4 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 2 & 1 & 2

i f ~ [[~UIJ J ffl"j1J j JJJJlgggggglj j jJJJIJ J 9:11

Gaily The Troubadour

!D.&A.Stringsj·

Pupil

'l i1 V i1 V r-o\ ~
\ ~ount: f .... ...... .. .. .... ...... ..
2 & 1 & 2
~ .. .. .. .. ...... - - .. Teacher

"J i1 ~ _[_ ~
e- .. .. .. ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. VI
~ ~ - ~
e- o....! .. 1 .. 1 1 VI Lightly Row

I G. & D. Strings!

Pupil

i1Vi1Y
e- ~ .. ~ • ..... i .~. ••• i·i .. ..... ~~ .... iJ
"l ~ount: 1 & 2 & I -
I"'"'
e- ...... I o....J --I ~ I ._. 1
- Teacher

Home work: Write 4 lines of open string notes dividing into measures, using half, quarter and eighth notes in 44 and ~~ time. Mark time signature.

B. M. Co. 8860

7

Note: All manuscript pages are to be used for home-work according to instructions.

~

aM.CO.8860

8

TEST-QUESTIONS THROUGH LESSON 6

Questions from this, and following test-sheets, will be given as a check on your home-study of preceding lessons.

Remember: The more you know and understand about the signs and symbols used in music-writing, the easier it will be for you to learn how to play welt.

(1) This ~I ~~I

is called?

(2) Thi, symbol ~

is called?

(3) The staff is divided by bar-lines into?

(4) Fractions at the beginning of music art' called

........ signatures?

(5)

Thi'~

The.. 141;j J I

Thesel41JJJJI These I" JljliJ I

are.

........ notes and have count each?

IS a.

....... note, and has counts?

(6)

are notes and have counts each?

(7)

are notes and have count each?

(8)

(9)

Lines and spaces are named after the first letters of the alphabet?

(10)

Thi. ~ is •........ rest,

These 1*4 - - I

: ~ ~ : are rests?

These 1'1 J J t J I are rests?

(11)

(12)

(13) This (#) is a?

(H) This(~)isa?

(15) (16)

How does a sharp affect a notc?

How does a flat affect a note?

(17) Name the open strings?

(18) Write (notate) the open strings? ~I i'~~~~~~~~1

(19) (qO)

This sign n This sign V

means?

means?

9

B

Finger 1

Pupil

Teacher

Pupil

G

LESSON 7

On the staff

D A E Open strings

First, second and third fingers must be perpendicular from the first joint to the tip when pressing on the strings. Keep the fingers over the strings. Do not allow the little finger to curl under the neck. Listen caref'ul ly that you play exactly in tune and give each note the proper time value.

First Finger B on the A-String

E B

On the Violin

Whole tone from A to B

Y
:1 0 :1 0 :1 Q :1
0 " 0 " 0 ~~ 0 :1
Y i1 i1 Y
~ 0
;J :1 IJ j j :1 j J j
I F I F F I F I F I r I r :11 @

Little A and B March

i1Yi1Y

o

o

:1

:1

First Finger E on the D-String

Whole tone

from Dto E
Q :1 2 :1
0 0 0 =11
i1 V
0 1 0 :1
I J j IJ j IJ j IJ J :11 V

1

o

:1

o

o

o

V i1 ¥

Little D and E March i1Vi1

:1 0 :1

:1

Home work: Write 4 lines of the notes thus far studied, marking name of each, and finger used.

Divide into measures using whole, half, and quarter Dotes; mark time signature.

B. M.en. 8860

10

Optional Material for Lessons 7 & 8

Now The Day is Over

ILesson 71

V M

Pupil

11 ~ t1 ilV I 1'1 I
~ I I - - - ~ ~
~ u t1 /'"' _l
.
~ .... y tr -9 -9 .. 4fT" r -9-f t+"r- - - -~r ~r y ....... .- ~ Teacher

The Boat Song

ILesson 71 C. P. H.

'tiD! 3 r J r I J J I J r J r I J J I J r J r I J J I J r J J I J (~, I

'~D Jj J J I jJ J I h J J I J J J 13 r J r I J J I J rJ J I;J - I

Au clair de la lune

I Lesson 81 French Folk Song

'~Hti I g J J r I r F I J r rr I J (~) 13 J J r IFF I J r rr I;J (r, I

,tiftti r r n IJ g I rr rr IJ (~J I g J J r IFF I J rr r I t) J I

Harvest Time

1 Lesson 81 C. P. H.

'~D I J :JJ J I;J J I J r J r I J (~) I J J JJ r J J I J r J J I j (~, I

~tiD r r r r I J J I J J J J IJ J IJ JJ J I J J I J r J J Ij Jill

.. "---"'

B.M.Co. 8860

11

~ On the st aff G D A E Open strings

LESSON 8

Finger 1

On the Violin

2

First finger E, second finger F# on the D-String

Whole tone D to E. Whole tone E to Ft

® Key of D Major F~-C~

Ii V ® Ii V

~~ 0 1 2 1 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 1

, # I 0 I 0 I ., I 0 :11: ill J I J j I j j I j j :11

® Ii Ii @Ii 1'1

~~ 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 2 1 2 0 2 1 0 1 0

~ ft I J J j J I J J J J I J J j J I J J J J :11: ill J I J J I J J J J I J J :11

@ Melody

41ftIJ j IOJ] iJ J IJUJ IJ j IJWJJlJolUJ IJ~H

Home work: Write" Iines of notes as before, adding the two new notes in this lesson.

Wr ite and study the key signatures of D and A Major.

• When two notes on the same degree of the staff are tied by a slur , they are to be played as one note.

B. M.Co. 8880

12

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL HARMONIZATION FOR LESSON VIII

®

M~ I I I I I
..__..
tJ I I I I I T I -.
fl .u ~ i1 I
-----
t- o • 0 .. u u • ••
fl ~ ~ i1 I ------..
f.}
-.
tJ. ~ t1 Tealicher
\tJ 4 u ·4 o ~ ... 0 4 u --.-~ --. -, -- ~~ ... ®

/ I'l ~ +t i1 I i1 I
1 -'
tJ I I I I I I I I
~~~ Ii V i1
---1 I I I
.L
• •• 0 • ., -, -.. ~
t- ", •
~~+1 i1 V i1
I ------
U
~ +t Teacher V
I ~ Ii n
,,- - • .#. •• 0 - .. - .. -. .. -- --- -- •• .. 44- v

o» .j.f
'- I I I I I I I T r I I I ~
fl.ui1 i1 I
~
f.} . ", • • • 0 •• ••
fl~ft i1 I -..
u
fl ~ +t Te~cher
_..
,tJ .... . - •• -4 .. • .# "' -"0 ... .# .--.- .# • .. -9- 4- B. II.Co. 88110

LESSON 9

13

On the A-String ~

First finger B, second finger C#, third finger D 'Ii.-- _

tl D Whole Tone A to B. Whole Ton. e B to C!. Half Tooe C# to D. ~ \ tt

___53 On the staff Key of A Major F#-C#-G#

G D A E Open strings

On the Violin

Learn to keep the fingers on the strings whenever possible. Rule:

Never lift a finger unless obliged to. Press the fingers firmly upon the strings, but do not allow the hand to become cramped. Listen carefully to play in tune and always count. It is not music where there is no time or rhythm. l_gave YOUr a good position?1

This sign __......__ indicates half step, fingers close together.

Finger 1

2

3

oj)

®

&* WB " #e

On the D String

First finger E, second finger F~, third finger G Whole Tone D to E. Whole Tone E to F#. Half Tone F# to G Key of D Major F#-C#

v

o

« . () <.)

2 3 2 3 2

r if -=o~ if -= ~ if '50- ?Fs

o

:1

Home work: Write 4 lines of notes thus far studied, as before.

_ Hold fingers down .

B.M.Co.8880

14

Note: All manuscript pages are to be used for home-work according to instructions.

~

RM.Co.8860

LESSON 10 Slurred Notes (*legato)

This sign (~ slur) when placed above or below two or more notes indicates that they are to be played with onc bow. Gre at care must be given to the equal di1Jision of the bow.

(!) lOne half of bow for each note.\

t1# t J J JJ ! J B J IJ JJ :oJ I:l JJ:oJ I U JJ 18 J J :11

®~~ 1000 quar t er of bow for ea ch not,_1

===# it J J J J I J J J J 1 J J J j I J J J J

I J J 3 J :11

------------- --------- --.........___. -------------

" Smoothly - connected.

The Scale

A scale is a succession of tones from a given note to its octave, 8 notes higher. The form on which all major scales are modeled is as follows:

The Natural, or C Major Scale

o

« )

o ..

3~

u

-e- W.T. 1

W.T.

W.T.

W.T.

W.T.

2

5

6

The ascending progression is: two whole tones, one half tone, three whole tones, one half tone.

The half tones come between the numbers 3 -4, 7-8.

The D Major Scale - four tones on the D s tr i n g , four tones on the A string.

II

I,

o

#«(=--<0

3 4

~

o 2

u 1

6

7 8 ---------

5

Play the following scale and arpeggio with different bowing's as indicated; also play, slurring four one bow. Use plenty of bow. Play slowly at first using whole bow for each note.

CD

'~a e j j

notes to

" V

1 dis)

,., V

16IF

I J J

u

u

Home work: \Vrite the D Major scale 4 times, marking half steps. Use key signature, and place a sharp before the notes affected.

B. M. Co. 8860

15

II

II

u

II

II

II

16

LESSON 11

Up and Down the Ladder of D

CD

-J_# n

~#iill :JJI:JJ rrlE J I .. IE rrIJ:JJWIJ j loll

*Fido and His Master

@ E.B. Birge

~ ~ft I J j I j j I r J J J I j J I J J I j j I r J J J I j ill II

Reuben and Rachel

@

~# r1 ~ . V r1

Hi JJJJIFiQlJJJJlpJ IjCEpIJJJ]IJJJ]IUF II

German Folk Song

® n .

~"g I J J rr I J j J I J J U ! J j j I J jJ J IJ J I J :J J J U j II

*Katydid

@ i1 Bohemian Folk Song

~ #ft I ; J J I j ] J I r r I j I J :J I ;J I n J J I ill II

*Polly's Bonnet

@ French Folk Song

t # I J r I ill :J~ I r r r j I IT IT I j r I J J~ I r r J J I .. II

* By permission of Silver) Burdett & Co. owners of the copyright. From Book one) "The Progressive Music Series?'

B. !t.Co. 8860

LESSON 12

The Dotted Half Note and the Dotted Quarter Note

17

A dot is equal to one half the value of the note it follows. A dotted half note equals 3 beats; a

dotted quar ter note equals IJ..2 beats. Use the same amount of bow for the quarter note as for the half note.

, Written

J.

Played

IJ=J

Written

" J.

Played

I JsJ1 II

Rhythm Drills

Play the model as written. Repeat, using each variation below until the rhythm is memorized.

Drill: Count aloud each variation while clapping the hands once for each note. Repeat several

times, then play an the open strings.

Model

J. I

t 2 3 1 2 3

®
'iJ J J
1 2 3 Variations for the above
® J J © J J
~ r r II I r r II J J
I
t 2 3 i 2 3 ci , ® J J ® J J
r F cr II J J I cr r r II J J I r cr r II
t & 2 3 1 2 & 3 @ J J ® J
I r' ~ r II t I t r F 11 t t I t t r I
t 2 3 t 2 3 12 & 3

®

'D~iJ J IF

Combinations of Different Rhythms

Fir F r I rJ . I r r I E r I F r r I ,J.

I

,.,

J I J. J) J I J J J I n J J I ~ J J I J n Wi J j J I J. II

v

r1ttr1r r IrrU1urr1rur1j JI

Home work: Write 4 lines of notes thus far studied, using different groupings of notes in % time.

B. M. Co. 11860

18

LESSON 13

My First Solo Pieces

Little Waltz in G

C.P.H.

,~ i J. I j. I J. 14 I OJ J OJ I 51 J I~, I

,~ j. 10 I J__j I W I j~ I 8 I tJ) Ii) I

'ti J. j. J J I OJ J OJ I U I J I ~,

,~ J 18 I;J J 10 I J I J I tID i i II

~

In A Garden

C.P.H.

,# I r j r I j j I J J OJ OJ I F' i I F j F I j J F I

~4::J J j I J. OJ I F J r I j j I J OJ J J I F' Vl

'~IT F J I j F J I j J I J. Ii) II j F j I j J J I

I End I

Fine

., # OJ OJ F J I 0 I J ¢ J I r J J J I J . j .1 J ~ I

I To the beginningl ./).0.

B.Il.Co.8880

LESSON 14

Using the D Major Scale

19

French Folk Song

prrr1rrr1rrrid tIDOl:lIJJJ] -r-#:lOlJ IJ t laOlE IEJE IUOlU 12 t IWE J I ,~ Ol J Ol I J J Ol l;j t I r r r I oj :l J l:l J :l I J ]

Joy to the World

Handel

'~i r 0 I oJ. )\ I J :l I J. ;1 I r f4

'~r' V 11 62 cr r lEt Ell J- J ~ J

4## r r r J I J J J J I J J J J I J. ;l l:l J J J

1 +2

v J
r I J J J
+ IJ J I J II

Beneath Thy Guiding Hand

IFollow bowings carefullyl J. Hatton

~. n~ n V n V V n V

~ # (l J 9 I cJ n I r A I J. t I rJ oj oj

V n V n V n V
J I j. t I J J J I J J J~r
~ ~
n V n V n V n V n
I J ,. r I ro J I J J I j ., I
0 I n

I J

B.M.Co.8860

20 TEST-QUESTIONS THROUGH LESSON 14

(1) This sign :JI: means? .

(~) This sign .....--........ means? .

(3) Name the following lines and spaces of the staff?

1st space .

4th line .

3rd space .

Srd line .

4th space .

(4) The key of ~ sharps is? .

(5) The key of 3 sharps is? .

~nd space '" ..

lst line .

~nd line .

Ist space below the staff .

3rd space below the staff .

(6) This not. _

~

(i) This note ~

has counts?

has counts?

(R) Which finger should h(' used for the following notes?

C# on the A string. . . . . . B on the A string .

E on the D string . . . . . . . . . . G on the D string .

D on the A string . . . . . . . . . F# on the D string .

(9) What note is played with the following fingers?

1st finger on the D string .

3rd finger on the A string .

~nd finger on the D string .

~nd finger on the A string .

3rd finger on the D string .

1st finger on the A string .

(11)

Divide the following into measures?' 1 J n J n 1J"'J') J J J n

i J. .h n J ~ J)l 1 n J J J. J1J J n J

Write (notate) the key-signatures of D and A Major? I' I ~ I

(Ill) This sign ~ connecting two or more notes means?

(10)

( 13)

What is a scale? .

(14) Write and spell the D major scale? $ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~I

(15) How many D's can you play?

E's .

G's .

(16) Mark the count under the following? J. ~J I J n J u J. J'tn J J J J J J J ,

(17) Play the D Major scale and arpeggio from memory.

(1M) What is this _

called?

21

LESSON 15 Detached Notes in One Bow

Semi-Staccato

A dot placed above or below two or more notes connected by a slur indicates that the notes are to be played in one bow with a short pause between each note. The bow is simply stopped and then started again. The bow, however, must not be lifted from the strings. A slight pinching of the stick at the beginning of each note will produce the desired effect.

Written Played

"Written Played

V i1

J J I j

V~ i1

r r I r

V i1

J J I J

V i1 V 11
J J I j j j I ,J
. -------- --------
~~ ® i1 V n
r r lEJ J J I j
.
~ V

J 4 j

v

J Jjj

V~ i1

r r I r

y_.__ 11 V --------. i1 V 11 V

r r I r r r I r F1' I IT L~ :1

Holy, Holy, Holy

i1 V i1 V

,J IF ~ I,J J

Dykes

i1 V i1

I J. ):J J ]

B. M.Co. 8880

V i1

# J I ill

i1

j I J

i1 V i1 V i1 V
J l J. J J
I j r· Jl I ~ I J J J J I J

V

J~ I r

J

i1 V i1

I J :J j. )I I J. t I

Ir

Haydn
(From Second Symphony) Adapted
V i1 V i1 V i1
J J I j j J J I r J J I IT F
. .
<:» ....___-- -------- --...__...
V i1 V i1 V i1 V
J J I J (j I J j j I J J J
. .
~ "-_...... ....___--
V i1 V-=- n
J J I IT r I r r0J I J? (j I J . t II
<c:»: 22

LESSON 16 1':11 ~====:;.

The Fourth Finger on the D and A Stri~s

This finger being short and weak requires a great deal of attention to make it as strong as the others.

Keep the elbow well under the violin, stretch the fourth finger and press firmly with the tip upon the string. The fingers must be pressed firmly upon the strings in order to produce a clear tone. Whole tone from D to E. "Whole tone from G toA.

'~ti# (l 3 r I f= IT I ~ IT I H F ft:3 r r r I ~ F= I r r r F I J ;J ~

L 1-----

I ---------

-------------

®

'ft (I j J J J I J J J J I J j J J I J J J J i JJ JJ I dg tJ I @ 8 I J J1

1 n' • ® n • • • •

~g I J J J I J J J I J J j I J J J :11: J J J I J J J I J J J I J J J AI

Old English Song

Adapted

, "ti# f 3 J F FIE a r F I J J F Fie L) r F I ~ #fi# err J r (;) I E: r rJ r (i) I C: r El E r I r F J ~ II

Lightly Row

H n n~~

-J:. ~ jj: 4 4 4 REST

~ ft i c:r r I EJ ric r r:r I EJ r I c:r r I EJ F I c: r CJ I r' 7 I

J=~~ n 4 4

~ ft r IT IT r I tr r I r r r r I a r I OJ F I EJ F I c: E [1 I r· , II

The Cuckoo
, #ti ':1 4
i J j I ~ J I j J j I J ~ I J J J I J J

=4-## J J J n W
J J J I J I J I J I 4iJ I J ~ I

B. M. 00. 8860 23

LESSON 17 The Up-Beat

Many pieces beg-in with an incomplete measure) usually starting with the last beat or fraction thereof.

This is called the up-beat and is generally played with an up bow. The ending always completes the

measure of the up-beat. Follow the bowings carefully.

Away in a Manger

® (Flow Gently, Sweet Afton) Sp~man

~# V 0 nV n 4 0 4 V V

i J I J J C! I J J J I J J J I] J I J J F I F r Fie F J I F=~ I

V ~**

~#n nV n 4 V~

#u JJ crlJJW IS rS I] W IJJ F IrCrIJJ~ l;j I

._____._..

rI\ The First Noel T d it i 1 Ch . t C 1

~ ra Ilona rIS mas ar o

~~ V n VnV 0 V n V n V n V n V n V n V

# a ~ II: J. m I j t? IF? r I j at! fF r I Wi' F I (J j I J tJ :11

~ti n V n V 0 V n V n V n V n V n V n

~ J. n7J I J [r 1 r r I,J J I r7r r I W=r r I rf~ J I J II

® Blue Bells of Scotland V

~~ V n V n V n V n V n V 4

# e J I r F r I J F SF I J J W J I J. j 'r F r I j r 6f' I J J J J ! ill. J I

*Note: Place the finger on two strings at once.

** Hold- A short curved line drawn over a dot, prolongs the time of the note. B.M.Co.8860

24

LESSON 18

H v rn rJS and Folk Songs embracing the different kinds of not e s and b owing s thus far studied. Review the

wr i t t cn wo r k at the top of each page. Play the bowing and fingering as marked.

Gone Are the Days

Stephen Fo s t er

n y- 4 0 Y n y_ 4. 0 '"

~ II J ljl J. J I F r r F I J. t I J dijYJ, J ITttltr::_-=gJ

J- n y- 4. 0 . n Y Ii 4.

~ #cl!~J:#t*tJ I r F t F I ~, r IF' vEr I r r J r I j j I J. J I

V V

""' 4 V "i I. n Y n V n Y 4. .

~$.f!§L_1JJ J t !91 r r r r I J, r I F' V E Fir r J r I J j I J t ~ .

While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks

Arr. from Handel

~ V- "i Y n V 4 V "i- V-

-# B J1LO I J r F F I J JJ J iiti J J J J J fel oj f:f I

~ ....._ '___.....

Stephen Foster Melody

Gaily the Troubadour

Y Bayly

~;~ .., I, n Ei&~iH 4

~ ;tl~~-mtr=f~lJ 1FJ __ ttt--i~~ff £J I J J rl j £II J. 8

ifiut]fi-iTrfP=UTruifnrtn r I A I ~ =til

B. M.Co. 881e

LESSON 19

Five tones on the E String

(Violin and Bass only)

Open E to F# whole tone; F# to G~ whole tone.

G~ to A half tone and A to B whole tone.

Key of E Major F#, C#,G#, DM·

Folk Song of the Civil War

Scale of A Major

F~, C#, G~. Half tones C# to D. G~ to A.

Auld Lang Syne

(Scotch Folk Song) V

0\

~. J I r PC r IE" Dr r I r p r r If" r If" pr r If' d r IE' ~r J 1[" r 1

4

~ -H t P C C I C' ~ tel t H r Ie r I tp r c Ih,t r I r ~ r J I;{ I

Home work: Write 4 lines of notes, using new notes on the E string. Mark name below and finger used above. Write A Major scale 5 times marking the same as the D Major. Study new key signatures.

B.M.Co.8860

26

LESSON 20

Five tones on the G-String

Open G to A whole tone, A to B whole tone, B to C half tone, C to D whole tone.

Keep the elbow well under the violin so as to let the fingers fall straight upon the strings.

Scale of G Major

One sharp, F#. Half tones B to C, and F# toG.

Play the following scales and arpeggio with different bowings as indicated.

1- e J J Ii J I JJ I ill I Q I tJ I; J I; ~ :.

u--.___./ II~ L.J II u A ~,,~

~~ r1~r1V r1 @~~nv r1

, 1\ JJnl Jj 4118 tJlJJJJ IjJJ IVJJlgJU I~JJ:II

:____/~:o£/ LJ A U II ~ ~ ~ II L.J ~ ~" LJ ,,\....].

L.J 1\ L.J" LJ "U

Old Folks z.t Home

Home work; Write 4 lines of notes on the G string as before, also scale of G Major 4 times. Mark half steps.

B.M.Co.8880

21

LESSON 21

Review of the different keys, rhythms, and bowings thus far studied.

Annie Laurie

Scotch Air

Largo from New World Symphony

Hymn

Henry Smart

n V

J r IdtiJPJ

~ n
i J J r
-rft n
J J r J
f# n
r· ~ F J
B. M.Co. 8860 n

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I r· F r FIE F r

II

28

LESSON 22

Ensemble Playing

Pieces arranged for trio (three parts) and quartet (four parts) are given for your training in ensemble (togetker) playing, and also to prepare you for your place in the school orchestra. Heretofore you have always played the melody, but in these arrangements you will play secondary or harmony parts as well. Tunes that you have played before in this book were selected so that you could hear the melody while playing a secondary part. Listen carefully to ALL the parts so that you keep in time and in tune (karmony) with them. Learn to .play each part equally well so that you can take turns with the other members of your class in playing the different parts.

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star (Trio for Three Violins)

Arr. C.P. H.

Pupil

~ ~ M I 4
·
·
@, T J 1 I
~ ~ M n I I I I
·
·
e. - - - -.- .... r r I J -
~ ~ ~ I I
·
It. .. - ........ 9- • 6- -- - - Pupil

Teacher

11ULf! 4 I I - - I
@,J I I I I I
_t ~ ~ I I I I I I I I I
t. I I I I - - . -
-~ ~ ~ I
'It. - - '--. .......... .. ~ • -6r B. x.ce. 8880

29

LESSON 23

Lightly Row (Trio for Three Violins)

German Folk-Song Arr. C. P. H.

Pupil

) fl ~ r1 4 4
. .
~ - - - •
fl ~ i1
,
~ •• I~~~~ i~ • •••• . - • • ~~ ~:J~~ ...
~ ~
~ I
,'- • . .~.~ ... ~ .~. .... .~~ ... ~ . .. .... ~ .. :: German Folk Song (Trio for Three Violins)

Au. C. P. H.

Pupil

~ lo+ n V 4 1 _l 4 I I r1 V
_L
~ .. .. - I l...I .. .. I
fl ~ i1 V
_L
~
'- ..
~ U i1 V
.~
,'- ... .... ~:it .... .. .. .. ...... ~ ~ c.J Pupil

Pupil

B.MCO.8860

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- - - , I
tJ Melody
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d. _:,. _ ..... ~"*~c; ~ ~ ..... ...... -~
\~ - 30

Pupil

Pupil

Pupil

Teache

LESSON 24

Old Folks at Home (Quartet for Four Violins)

Stephen Foster Arr. C. P. H.

Ii

Mid

,

,'-

_,

l

- - -

I

- - -

_l

Melody •

_._. ~...r:=

I

o

. _.

---

r

,

- -"*-

~.

Melody

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LJ · _. Iooooool' ,
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·
~ . .
II - - - I
4!J j .1 I
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·
L - - -
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'-l
./J.~ Ji Ii
·
..... ~ ..... ~ v ... - -6'
\~ - .. - - :&. B M.Co. 8860

31

LESSON 25

Gone Are the Days (QuartlOt for Four Violins)

St ephe n Foster ArrC.PH.

M I dy

v

Pupil

e a V r1
) fl lot i1 I I --L
-, ._._. . . • :fJ .
J.. .. ~
::s: tz <:> 1 I
!J ~
Melody y
V i1 I I I
fllot r1 I
. .
,. . .
. _ . (_,/ -.___/
~ '; ~ . ...:__._..
V
V i1
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••• ~. . . . . .. ~.
!J '-.._...-. V
V i1
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LJ U' • ~~ ~~ ~.
.1'1'\. ~. ~ £to • ~ -:J -:J ~ c/- (_,/ _. "'!'
1...'"
'- 0 '- Pupil

Pupil

Pupil

_______ .

..1
.!J.1ot r1 _
...
-4J :.L_'
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T~ r. . .. . . U' • \/
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'-
rl lot i1
+ t\ ~F ..
.L • .... -:J £t ~ U·
~ :J--J~:J- U' • ~. ~)~ ;_
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1L1ot Melody _L"l..
r1 ..1 I
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T
. I
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Melody 4
fl.Jt i1 I
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\!J ~ -~ 4

4

Melody V ~ nV 4 I
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· __.
I I ~ U·
. • • • . . .. . U·
'- ..____..
V i1J Melody I .
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f., .. ......_____, . .. I 1 I 4
tJJ.+ Y nV _.
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t ~~~~ v' .. -
tJ ~.~-! ~. _ ..
t.» Y nY I
· • ~. ~J~;_ ••• ~ ~ ~ U'
\~ .. .. -! .. . Melody

B Mea. 8860

32

TEST-QUESTIONS THROUGH LESSON 25

(1) This sign 1":'\ means? .

(2) This" is an rest?

(3) This sign ~. placed above or below two or more notes means?

I ~ 1ft I J J J I J J J If J r r r I r r I" F I (5) Bow the following? J I J J J J II n I J J J II n I J J J II

--._.; '--'

(4) Finger the following?

(6) Mark the count under the following? i l'J ~I J n IIi J. m I.hJ. J II

(7) N arne the five tones on the E string? (8)

What is the signature of E Major? .

(9) Write (notate) and spell the scale of A Major? ~I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~II

What is the signature of G Major?

Write and spell the G Major scale? ~I 'i.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~D Finger the following? ,~Ug~ I r r I" r I L j"- r I" I

Finger the following? I;. t } =t I::J I

~ JJ.~ ;.14

Write the following notes:

2nd finger on the D string :, :

3rd finger on the E string

l st finger on the G string I" ~

4th finger on the A string

2nd finger on the G string ~

How many of the following notes can you play?

Write (notate) your answers to No. 17. ~I 'I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~II

(10) Name the five tones on the G string?

(1 I)

(12)

(13)

(14)

(15)

(16)

Write the signatures of G-D-A and E major.

(17)

(18)

(19)

Music written for three instruments is called?

(20) Music written for four instruments is called?

1st finger on the E string ~ Srd finger on the G string ~ 2nd finger on the A string ~ 4th finger on the E string ~ Srd finger on the D string I ~ I

I~

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