Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 12

Unit 251 Lamb.

Quality Points of Lamb.


• Bones porous, with slight bluish tinge.

• Fat evenly distributed, hard brittle, flaky and


clear white in colour.

• Lean flesh firm dull red, with fine texture or


grain.

• Before preparation, carcasses should be hung


in a cool, dry area (cold room) for up to five or
six days. This will improve taste, texture and
tenderise the meat.
Storage.
• Carcasses of lamb should be hung by the leg.
• Joints should be stored in well drained trays,
which should be changed daily, under
refrigeration 3°C to 5°C for a maximum of 5
days. Smaller joints and cuts deteriorate
quicker than a whole lamb carcass.
• Frozen joints should be stored in a deep
freeze at -18°C with an appropriate wrapping
and defrosted in a refrigerator at
3°C to 5°C for 24 hours.
Joints And Usage From A Side
Of Lamb.
C UT WEIGHT METHOD OF C OOKING
1 Leg 3 1 2 kg (7 lb) Roasting
2 Saddle 3 1 2 kg (7 lb) Roasting, Grilling, Shallow Frying
3 Best end 2 kg (4 lb) Roasting, Grilling, Shallow Frying
4 Breast 11 2 kg (3 lb) Roasting, Stewing
5 Shoulder 3 kg (6 lb) Roasting
6 Middle neck 2 kg (4 lb) Stewing
1
7 Scrag end 2 kg (1 lb) Stewing
• When a carcass of lamb has been dissected
into its basic joints it will require some
preparation before it can be cooked. If it is to
be used for smaller cuts then the basic
preparation would be taken further.
C UT WEIGHT METHOD OF COOKING
1 Leg 3 1 2 kg (7 lb) Roasting
2 Saddle 3 1 2 kg (7 lb) Roasting, Grilling, Shallow Frying
3 Best end 2 kg (4 lb) Roasting, Grilling, Shallow Frying
4 Breast 11 2 kg (3 lb) Roasting, Stewing
5 Shoulder 3 kg (6 lb) Roasting
6 Middle neck 2 kg (4 lb) Stewing
7 Scrag end 1
2 kg (1 lb) Stewing
C UT METHOD OF PREPARATION
C OOKING
1 Leg Roasting Remove knuckle,
aitch bone and tie
2 Saddle Roasting Skin, bone, roll and tie
3 Best End Roasting Chine, skin, trim to six
bones
Shallow Frying Chine, skin and cut into
Grilling six cutlets
4 Breast Roasting Bone, roll and tie
Stewing Trim and dice
5 Shoulder Roasting Trim, remove two bones,
reform and tie
6 Middle Neck Stewing Cut into Basse Cotes
7 Scrag End Stewing Bone and dice
Cuts From the Loin and Saddle.
• Single loin chops:
• cut across the un-boned loin; each chop
100-150 g.
• (4-6 oz) in weight.
• Noisettes (French style):
• cut from a boned loin at an angle of 45º;
cuts are 2 cm.
• (1 in) thick; flattened out and trimmed of
excess fat.
• Rosettes:
• cut from a boned saddle (i.e. across two
loins); 2 cm.
• (1 in) thick; ends rolled in and secured
with string to achieve a flat heart shape.
• Barnsley chops:
– cut from the un-boned saddle; 2 cm (1 in)
thick.
• Cutlets (cotelette):
– Prepare as for roasting, excluding the
scoring.
• Cotellettes double:
– divide evenly between the bones; or the
cutlets can be cut from the best-end and
prepared separately. A double cutlet
consists of two bones; therefore a six.
– bone best-end yields six single or three
double cut-lets.
• Saddle:
– A full saddle includes the chumps and
the tail. For large banquets it is
sometimes found better to remove the
chumps and use short saddles.
Leg of Lamb.
• This is generally boned or partly
boned for roasting. Leg of mutton is
usually boiled.
• Preparing a leg of lamb.
– Cut along a line following the line of the
aitchbone and through the ball and
socket. Remove the aitchbone.
– Saw off the bottom knuckle and bone.
– Remove any excess fat, and tie with
string before cooking.
Cuts from a Leg of Lamb.

• Chump chops:
– Cut from the chump end of the leg.
• Gigot chops:
– Cut from the centre of the leg.