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UNIVERSITY OF KERALA

REGULATIONS, SCHEME and SYLLABUS


For

M.Tech. DEGREE PROGRAMME (2008 Scheme) ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING


Streams 1. 2. 3. 4. CONTROL SYSTEMS GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL POWER SYSTEMS ELECTRICAL MACHINES

UNIVERSITY OF KERALA (Abstract) Revised Regulation, Scheme and Syllabus - M. Tech/M. Planning (Housing) Degree Course 2008 Scheme - Approved - Orders issued. ACADEMIC A III SECTION No. Ac. A.III/3/1084/2008 Read: 1. 2. 3. Dated, Thiruvanarithapuram, 22.08.2008.

Minutes of the Special meeting of the Board of Studies in Engineering (P.G.) held on 10.07. 2008. Minutes of the Special Meeting of the Faculty of Engineering and Technology held on 25th July 2008 Minutes of the meeting of the Academic Council held on 08th August 2008 ORDER

The Academic Council vide paper read as (3) above, approved the revised Regulation, Scheme and Syllabus of the M.Tech/M.Planning (Housing) Degree Course (Regular and Part time) of the following streams to be implemented with effect from 2008 admissions. 1. Civil Engineering Stream (i). (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) 2. Structural Engineering Environmental Engineering Hydraulics Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Traffic and Transportation Engineering Structural Engineering and Construction Management

Mechanical Engineering Stream (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) Industrial Engineering Machine Design Propulsion Engineering Thermal Science Industrial Refrigeration and Cryogenic Engineering

3.

Electrical and Electronics Engineering Stream (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) Control Systems Guidance and Navigational Control Power Systems Electrical Machines

4.

Electronics and Communication Stream (i) Applied Electronics and Instrumentation (ii) Microwave and T V Engineering (Hi) Signal Processing

5.

Architecture Stream (i) M Planning (Housing)

The revised Regulations, Scheme an and Syllabi of M.Tech/TvLPlanning (Housing) Degree Course (2008 Scheme) is appended. Orders are issued accordingly. Sd/ZEENATH R.
DEPUTY REGISTRAR (Acad. II)

FOR REGISTRAR To 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. The Director of Technical Education The Principal, College of Engineering, Thiruvananthapuram. The Principal, T K M College of Engineering, Kollam. The Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Technology The Chairman, Boards of Studies in Engineering (PG) The Controller of Examinations The EB Section EE II A Section Ac.L. Section for further action Stock File/File Copy. Forwarded/By Order

SECTION OFFICER.
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M. Tech. DEGREE COURSE REGULATIONS w.e.f. 2008 ADMISSIONS


1. General:
The M Tech degree course is for 2 years comprising of 4 semesters. Duration is counted from the first registration date of the student( in the first semester). Credit system is adopted for the course. Grade point average is calculated on the basis of all courses taken by the student. The total credits for the course is 69. The distribution of these credits among the various course work is as follows:

2. Distribution of credits among the various Course Work:


Table 1: Distribution of credits for various coursework Course work Theory subject Seminar Laboratory Project - (Part 1 & Part 2) Industrial training/interaction Research Methodology Thesis -Preliminary Thesis Weekly hours 3 2 or 3 2 or 3 Credits allotted 3 2 1 3 1 1 4 12

3. Distribution of credits among the four Semesters:


Table 2: Distribution of credits among the semesters Semester Course work content Total credits Total credits allotted 6 x 3 = 18 1 x 2 =2 1x1 =1 1 x 1 =1 2x3+2x3 + 1x3+1x3 = 18 1x1 =1 1x2 =2 1 x2 = 2 2x3 =6 1x1 =1 1x1 =1 1x4 =4 12 23 22 Allotted credits semesterwise

6 Theory Subjects Seminar Laboratory Project - Part l(to be continued in the second semester) 6 Theory Subjects 2 core subjects,-2 Stream Electives 1 Departmental elective and 1 Non departmental Interdisciplinary Elective Laboratory Seminar Project - Part 2 2 Theory subjects(Stream Electives) Research methodology Industrial Training Thesis - Preliminary Thesis Total credits for four semesters

II

III

12 12 69

IV

4. Details of course work contents:


4.1 Academic Committee: This refers to the Academic Committee of the concerned institution comprising of (i) Principal, (ii) Dean (PG. studies) (iii) Heads of all departments offering PG, Courses and (iv) Course coordinators of P G. Courses in the departments offering PG. Courses. 4.2 Course coordinator: The Professor in charge of PG. Courses in each Department will be the course coordinator for M Tech/ M. Planning (Housing) course in that Department.

4.3 Department Committee: Each Department will have a Department Committee to look after the PG. Courses. This Committee will consist of (i) Head of the Department (ii) The Course coordinator (iii) Faculty in charge of each Stream and (iv) One student representative. 4.4 Evaluation Committee: Each Department has to constitute an evaluation committee to evaluate seminars, projects, pre- submission seminar for the Thesis etc., consisting of atleast three members. The internal guide and another expert in the area of specialisation shall be the two essential members of this committee. 4.5 Course work content: Semester I The student has to credit 6 theory subjects. All the subjects will be core subjects out of which one will be from the area of Mathematics. In addition, the student has to take up 1 Seminar, 1 laboratory and a project which is to be continued in the second semester and to be completed by the end of second semester. Semester II The student has to credit 6 theory subjects, one Seminar, one laboratory and one project (continuation of Project-part 1) in this semester: Among the six subjects, one would be a Non-departmental inter disciplinary elective as advised by the course coordinator in consultation with the academic Committee: two would be core subjects offered in the stream concerned, two would be stream electives and remaining one would be a departmental elective. Stream and departmental electives are to be selected from the list of electives for each department. The student has to continue the project work commenced in the first semester and submit a project report at the end of this semester. The seminar which the student has to credit would be on a topic different from his /her project work. Semester III The student has to credit 2 subjects from the Stream Electives listed and a course on research methodology. He/She has to undergo an Industrial Training during the semester break after semester II and complete it within 15 calendar days from the start of the III semester For crediting the industrial Training/Interaction, the student has to undertake the training in an Industrial organization /R&D organization for a period of not less than two weeks. The student is required to submit an industrial training report and present it before the evaluation committee. Thesis Preliminary comprises of a preliminary thesis work, two seminars and submission of thesis preliminary report. The first seminar would highlight the topic,

objectives, methodology and expected results. The first seminar shall he conducted in the first half of this semester. The second seminar is the presentation of the work they have completed for the thesis-preliminary and scope of the work, which-is to be accomplished in the fourth semester. Weightages for the 4 credits allotted for the Thesis Preliminary (i) Internal evaluation of the thesis-preliminary work by the guide 50% (ii) Internal evaluation of the thesis-preliminary by the Evaluation Committee 50% Semester IV: In the fourth semester there will be only thesis work. The fourth semester thesis must be the extension of thesis preliminary work. Towards the end of the semester there would be a pre-submission seminar to assess the quality and quantum of the work by the Evaluation Committee. This would be the pre-qualifying exercise for the students for getting approval from the Department Committee for the submission of Thesis. At least one technical paper is to be prepared for possible publication in Journals/ Conferences. The final evaluation of the Thesis would be external evaluation. The 12 credits allotted may be proportionally distributed between external and internal evaluation as follows. As far as possible, the student shall be encouraged to do their work in the parent institute itself. Weightage of marks for the Thesis Internal Evaluation of the Thesis work by the guide - 200 Marks Internal Evaluation of the Thesis by the Evaluation Committee - 200 Marks JFinal Evaluation of the Thesis work by the Internal and External Examiners- (Evaluation of Thesis: 100 marks + Viva Voce: 100 marks) - 200 Marks Facility for Students to do thesis outside the parent Institute: As far as possible the students shall be encouraged to do their thesis work in the parent institute itself. However if found essential, they may be permitted for continuing their Thesis in the IV th semester outside the parent Institute with the approval of the Department Committee, For students who are availing this facility, the following conditions are to be observed. 1. The student has to get prior approval from the Department Committee for availing this facility as well as choice of the Institution/industry/ R&D organization with which the student is associated for continuing his/her thesis work. 2. If they are doing their thesis work in an Educational Institute, then the Institute is to be preferably an institution of national repute like HTs, HSc, etc. 3. Students availing this facility should continue as regular students of the parent institute itself. -

4. They should have a guide each in the parent institution and the external Institution/industry/ R&D organization in which the student is associated for doing the thesis work. 5. The student also has to furnish a certificate from the guide of the organization concerned stating the willingness to supervise the thesis work through the Institution/industry/ R&D organization with which the student is associated for his/her thesis work and has to submit the same to the Department Committee. 6. The student has to furnish his /her monthly progress as well as attendance report signed by the external guide and submit the same to the concerned Internal guide. 7. The external guide and the internal guide are to be preferably present during all the stages of evaluation of the thesis work. In case the external guide is not present, the internal guide can alone take the responsibility of conducting the evaluation.

5. Evaluation Process:
In the first semester, second semester and the third semester, all the subjects to be credited are evaluated through internal assessment and examinations. The Written examination for the first semester will be conducted by the University. The Written examination for the second and third semesters would be through internal examination. The answer scripts of the internal examination in the second and third semester shall also to be valued by two examiners; the first examiner being the staff member handling the subject and a second examiner specialised in the area of the subject. The seminars, project, Industrial Training/Interaction programme etc. will be evaluated by the Evaluation Committee. The laboratory work will be evaluated by the staff member/(s) concerned. In the third semester, Thesis- Preliminary will be evaluated by the Evaluation Committee. The internal evaluation of the Thesis in the IV Semester, would be done by the Evaluation committee. Final evaluation of Thesis would be conducted by the guide and an expert from outside the Institute appointed by the University.

The University evaluation of thesis work and viva-voce examination will be taken up only after the student completes all core, elective as well as other course requirements satisfactorily.

5.1 Weightage of marks The following will be the weightage of marks for the different subjects a. Theory subjects Continuous assessment - 50 marks University/internal examination - 100 marks (For continuous evaluation, minimum 4 assignments and 2 tests shall be considered. The marks shall be distributed as follows; Attendance 20%. Assignment-30% and Tests- 50%) b. Laboratory based subjects Continuous assessment

- 50 marks

5.2 Grade and Grade Points A student is awarded a letter grade in each course he/she has registered for, indicating his/her overall performance in that course. There are eight letter grades S. A, B. C, D, E. F and I. The correspondence between grades and points (on a 10-point scale) rating is given in Table 3. If a student does not satisfy all the requirements for a course during the second and/or third semester for a genuine reason, the teacher concerned may award grade I(incomplete). The student will be given a chance to satisfy the requirements within a stipulated date as decided by the Department Committee. Once the student satisfies this within the time, the I grade will be converted by the Department committee to a regular letter grade. If the student fails to satisfy the requirements within this extra time allotted then, I grade is automatically converted to an F Grade. 5.3. Substitution of courses: A student getting an F or E grade in a course must either reappear for the subsequent chance of the examination or substitute the course with another course as suggested byjhe Department Committee. The student is allowed for substitution only if the course concerned is not a core course. A student is not allowed to register for more than one semester at a time. Hence substitution is allowed only after completing the regular course work. 5.4 Classification of Grades based on Marks scored: The grades are allotted based on the percentage of total marks (Continuous evaluation arid Written examination put together) scored by the student in each subject. Appropriate grades in that subject is then allotted based on the classification given in

Table3. In case a student has taken more than two chances in passing a subject only minimum pass grade D will be allotted in that subject irrespective of the actual marks scored. Table 3: Classification of grades based on percentage of marks Sl.No 1 2 Percentage of marks 90% and above 80 % or above but less than 90% 70 % or above but less than 80% 60 % or above but less than 70% 50 % or above but less than 60% 40 % or above but less than 50% Less than 40% Grades allotted S A B C D E F 1 Grade points 10 9 8 7 6 4 0 Incomplete

4 5 6 7 8

5.5 Computation of SGPA (Semester Grade Point Average) and CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average): The SGPA is an overall academic performance of a student in all the courses he/she has registered during a given semester. It is computed as follows: If a student is awarded Gl, G2 etc. grades in courses with corresponding credit units U.I, U2 etc., the SGPA is given by SGPA = (Ul*Gl+U2*G2+...)/(Ul+U2+....) Similarly the CGPA indicates the cumulative academic performance in all the courses taken including the current semester. CGPA for ith semester = (SGPA)i x Si)/ Si Where (SGPA)i = SGPA in the ith semester and Si = total credits in the ilh semester

5.6 Academic performance requirement: The minimum CGPA requirement for the M. Tech Programme is 6.0 in every semester with the following provisions. If a student scores CGPA below 6 in any semester he/she may be allowed to continue in the programme only on the recommendation of the Academic Committee. A student is given only three chances to reappear for the examination in the subject in which he has failed ( scoring E or F Grade ) within a period of 5 years from the time of his/her registration to the M Tech course, provided the student has obtained minimum attendance requirement.

5.7 Class Distinction: Minimum pass requirement for each written paper is 50 %. A student is eligible for the degree on completion of 69 credits obtaining at least D in each subject and a CGPA of at least 6.0. A student is placed in first class with Distinction if he/she has CGPA > 9. He/ she is placed in First Class if his/ her CGPA is 7> and < 9.

5.8 Attendance requirements: A student should have a minimum of 75% attendance in all the semesters, Medical leave is granted only twice during the entire duration of the M Tech (two years) and the student becomes eligible to avail the medical leave only if he/she has a minimum of 60% attendance. The percentage of attendance for a subject will be indicated by a code number/letter as given in Table 4 and will be included in the grade card: Table 4: Attendance code Attendance Rounded to 95% and above 85% and above but less than 95% 75% and above but less than 85% Below 75% Code H 9 8 W

6. Structure of Syllabus and Question Paper:


The syllabus would be of non-modular structure. The question paper shall cover entire syllabus and contain 20% choice.

7. Time limit for completion of Coursework: The student who has registered for the M. Tech. course has to complete all the requirements for awarding the degree within 5 years from the date of admission to the course.

PROJECT PART I The student is expected to select and complete the design of the project work. The project has two parts(Part I in semester I and Part-2 in semester -2). In part 1 the student has to select a project and submit the design phase report for evaluation. The report shall be in soft bonded form. This is the first volume of the Project report. The Second volume is the final project report to be submitted in the second semester. A presentation of the work under taken shall be done before the evaluation committee at the end of the semester. The Project shall preferably be hardware / hardware platform based in the area of specialization. Marks: Project Report Evaluation: 25 Presentation & Viva-Voce : 25 SEMINAR The student has to present a seminar in one of the current topics in the stream of specialization. The student will under take a detailed study based on current published papers, journals, books on the chosen subject, present the seminar and submit seminar report at the end of the semester. Marks: Seminar Report Evaluation: 25 . Seminar Presentation: 25 PROJECT PART II Each student has to complete the project selected in project part-1, prepare and submit a report and present a seminar highlighting the work done by him/her. The report shall be of a hard bound type and consist of design phase report as volume one and other part as volume two. Marks: Project work and Report Evaluation: 50 Presentation & Viva-Voce : 50

SEMINAR The student is expected to present a seminar in one of the current topics in the stream of specialization. The student will under take a detailed study based on current published papers, journals, books on the chosen subject and submit seminar report at the end of the semester. Marks: Seminar Report Evaluation: 25 Seminar Presentation: 25 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING There shall be 15 days training in Industrial / Research organization by each student during the Second Semester vacation and present a Seminar and report during the Third Semester. The report shall be approved by the organization / industry where the students have undergone the training.

10(a)

Marks: Evaluation of reports : 25 Seminar Presentation: 25 THESIS - PRELIMINARY The main objectives of the thesis is to provide an opportunity to each student to do original and independent study and research on the area of specialization. The student is required to explore in depth and develop a subject of his/her own choice, which adds significantly to the body of knowledge existing in the relevant field. The student has to undertake a thesis preliminary work on the stream of specialization during this semester. The fourth semester Thesis shall be an extension of this work in the same area. The student has to present two seminars and submit an interim thesis report. The seminar and report shall be evaluated by the evaluation committee. The first seminar would highlight the topic, objectives, methodology and expected results. The first seminar shall be conducted in the first half of this semester. The second seminar is presentation of the interim thesis report of the work completed and scope of the work which is to be accomplished in the fourth semester. Distribution of marks for the Thesis-Preliminaiy Evaluation of the ThesisPreliminary work by the guide - 100 Marks Evaluation of the Thesis-Preliminary by the Evaluation Committee-100 Marks

THESIS - FINAL The student has to continue the thesis work identified in the third semester. There shall be two seminars(a mid term evaluation on the progress of the work and pre submission seminar to assess the quality and quantum of the work). At least one technical paper is to be prepared for possible publication in journals / conferences. The final evaluation of the thesis shall be an external evaluation. The marks for the Thesis-Final may be proportionally distributed between external and internal evaluation as follows. Distribution of marks allotted for the Thesis Internal Evaluation of the Thesis work by the guide - 200 Marks Internal Evaluation of the Thesis by the Evaluation Committee - 200 Marks Final Evaluation of the Thesis work by the Internal and External Examiners: (Evaluation of Thesis: 100 marks + Viva Voce: 100 marks) - 200 Marks

10 (b)

Scheme of Studies

Electrical Engineering

M.Tech. Programme Electrical Engineering - Control Systems Curriculum arid scheme of Examinations

SEMESTER I
Credits Exam duration

Code No.

Name of Subject

Marks
Continuous Assessment University Exam

Hrs/ week

Total 150 150 150 150 150 150 50 50 50

EMA1001 EPC 1001 EMC 1001 EGC 1002 ECC 1001 ECC 1002 ECC 1101 ECC 1102 ECC 1103

Applied Mathematics Optimization Techniques Solid State Power Converters Introduction to Flight Digital Control Systems Dynamics of Linear Systems Advanced Control Lab 1 Project (Part 1) Seminar TOT AL

3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 22

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 -----

50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 450

100 100 100 100 100 100 ---

---

600

1050

SEMESTER II
Hrs/week Marks Exam duration Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 100 50 500 End Semester I Exam 100 100 100 100 100 100 ------600 Total 150 150 150 150 150 150 50 100 50 1100 Code No. Name of Subject Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 23 2

ECC 2001 EMC2001 ** ** ** * ECC 2101 ECC 2102 ECC 2103

Optimal Control Theory Control of Industrial drives Stream Elective Stream Elective Departmental Elective Interdisciplinary Elective Advanced Control Lab II Project (Part II) Seminar i TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 ---------

* Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under Interdisciplinary electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator. . ** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream/department electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator.

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR


M.Tech. Programme Electrical Engineering GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL Curriculum arid scheme of Examinations

SEMESTER I
Credits Exam duration

Code No.

Name of Subject

Marks
Continuous Assessment University Exam

Hrs/ week

Total 150 150 150 150 150 150 50 50 50

EMA1001 EPC 1001 EGC 1001 EGC 1002 ECC 1001 ECC 1002 EGC 1101 EGC 1102 EGC 1103

Applied Mathematics Optimization Techniques Principles of Aerospace Navigation Introduction to Flight Digital Control Systems Dynamics of Linear Systems Advanced Control Lab 1 Project (Part 1) Seminar TOT AL

3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 22

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 -----

50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 450

100 100 100 100 100 100 ---

---

600

1050

SEMESTER II
Hrs/week Marks Exam duration Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 100 50 500 End Semester I Exam 100 100 100 100 100 100 ------600 Total 150 150 150 150 150 150 50 100 50 1100 Code No. Name of Subject Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 23 2

ECC 2001 EMC2001 ** ** ** * ECC 2101 ECC 2102 ECC 2103

Optimal Control Theory Control of Industrial drives Stream Elective Stream Elective Departmental Elective Interdisciplinary Elective Advanced Control Lab II Project (Part II) Seminar i TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 ---------

* Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under Interdisciplinary electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator. . ** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream/department electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator.

CONTROL SYSTEM STREAM FOR THE II SEMESTER


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SEMESTER III
Hrs/week Code No. Name of Subject Exam duration Credits Marks Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 200 400 University Exam 100 100 ----200 Total 150 150 50 50 200 600

ECE 2001 ECE 2002 ECE 2003 ECE 2004 ECE 2005 ECE 2006 EGE-2001 EGE 2003

Robust Control Adaptive Control Variable Structure Control Systems Process Control Soft Computing Techniques Robotics and Industrial Automation Flight Dynamics and Control Introduction to Radar Systems

** ** ECC 3101 ECC 3102 ECC 3103

Stream Elective Stream Elective Research Method Industrial Training Thesis Preliminary TTOTAL

3 3 1 1 4 12

3 3 -

3 3 ---

14

---

** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream by the course coordinator.

electives for the third semester as advised

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR CONTROL SYSTEM STREAM FOR THE III SEMESTER
1. 2. 3. 4. ECE 2001 ECE 2002 ECE 2003 ECE 2004 Robust Control Adaptive Control Variable Structure Control Systems Process Control

SEMESTER IV
Marks Hrs/week Credits Code No. Name of Subject Continuous Assessment Guide ECC4101 Thesis Total Note : 12 12 29 29 200 200 Evaluation committee 200 200 University Exam Thesis Eva. 100 100 Viva Voce 100 100 600 600 Total

6 to 10 hours per week is fo r department assistance

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL STREAM FOR THE II SEMESTER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ECE 2001 ECE 2002 ECE 2003 ECE 2004 ECE 2005 EGE 2001 EGE 2002 EGE 2003 EGE 2004 EGE 2005 Robust Control Adaptive Control Variable Structure Control Systems Process Control Soft Computing Techniques Flight Dynamics and Control Navigation Guidance and Control of Robots Introduction to Radar Systems Digital Control of Aerospace Systems Helicopter Dynamics & Control

8 9 10
SEMESTER III

Hrs/week

Code No.

Name of Subject

Exam duration

Credits

Marks Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 200 400 University Exam 100 100 ----200 Total 150 150 50 50 200 600

** ** ECC 3101 ECC 3102 ECC 3103

Stream Elective Stream Elective Research Method Industrial Training Thesis Preliminary TTOTAL

3 3 1 1 4 12

3 3 -

3 3 ---

14

---

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED TO GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL STREAM FOR THE III SEMESTER 1 2 3 4 5
6

ECE300I ECE 3002 ECE 3003 ECE3004 EGE 3001 EGE 3002

Nonlinear Control Systems System Identification and Parameter Estimation Estimation Theory Advanced Instrumentation Guidance and Control of Space Vehicles and Satellites Guidance and Control of Launch Vehicles

SEMESTER IV
Marks Hrs/week Credits Code No. Name of Subject Continuous Assessment Guide ECC4101 Thesis Total 12 12 29 29 200 200 Evaluation committee 200 200 University Exam Thesis Eva. 100 100 Viva Voce 100 100 600 600 Total

Note :

6 to 10 hours per week is for department assistance

MTech- Programme Electrical Engineering Power Systems Curriculum and scheme of Examinations

SEMESTER I
Credits Exam duration Code No. Name of Subject Hrs / week Marks Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 450 University Exam 100 100 100 100 100 100

Total
150 150 150 150 150 150

EMA1001 EPC 1001 EMC 1001 EMC 1002 EPC 1002 EPC 1003 EPC 1101 EPC 1102 EPC 1103

Applied Mathematics Optimization Techniques Solid State Power Converters Modeling of Electrical Machines Computer Aided Power System Analysis Power Quality Power System Lab 1 Project (Part I) Seminar TOTAL

3 3

3 3
3

3 3
3

3
3

3 3 3 -------

3
3 1 1 2 22

3
3 2

1 50 ----600 50 50

1050

SEMESTER II
Marks Credits Code No. Name of Subject Exam duration 3 Hrs / week Continuous Assessment 50 50 3 3
3.

EPC2001

Power System Dynamics and Control Operation and Control of EPC2002 Power System
Stream Elective Stream Elective

->
D

100 100 100 100

150 150 150 150 150 150 50

- J

3 3 3

*>

50 50 50 50 50 100

3 3

**

Departmental Elective Interdisciplinary Elective

100
100

3 1 2 2 23 2 2

EPC2101 Power System Lab 11 EPC2102 Project (Part 11)

600

\ | j

100 50 1100

EPC2103 Seminar TOTAL

50 500

* Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under Interdisciplinary electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator. ** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream/department electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator.

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR


POWER SYSTEM STREAM FOR THE II SEMESTER
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. ECE2001 ECE2002 ECE2003 ECE2004 ECE2005 ECE2006 ECE2005 Digital Protection of Power System Transient Analysis in Power System FACTS and Custom Power Modern Trends in Power System Operation Power Distribution Systems SCADA Systems and Applications Soft Computing Techniques

7.

SEMESTER III
Hrs / week Exam duration

Marks Continuous Assessment


50 50 50 50 200 400

Credits

Code No.

Name of Subject
Stream Elective Stream Elective Research Methodology Industrial Training Thesis-Preliminary TOTAL

End Semester Exam


100 100 -

Total
150 150 50 50 200 600

**
**

3 3 1 1 4 12

3 3 44

3 3 -----

ECC3101 ECC3102 EPC3103

----200

** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream electives for the third semester as advised bv the course coordinator.

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR POWER SYSTEM STREAM FOR THE III SEMESTER 1 2 3 4 SEMESTER IV
Hrs/week Credits Code No Subject Name Marks Continuous Assessment University Exam Guide 200 200 Evaluation Committee 200 200 Thesis Eva. 100 100 Viva Voce 100 100 Total 600 600

EPE3001 EPE3002 ECE3004 EPE3003

Power System Stability and reliability EHV AC & DC Transmission Advanced Instrumentation ^^ Renewable Energy Technology

EPC4101

Thesis Total

12

29 29

Note : 6 to 10 hours per week is for department assistance

M.Tech. Programme Electrical Engineering Electrical Machines Curriculum and scheme of Examinations
SEMESTER I
Hrs/ week Exam duratior Code No. Name of Subject Credits

Marks
Continuous Assessment University Exam Total

EMA1001 EPC 1001 EMC 1001 EMC 1002 EMC 1003 EPC 1003 EMC1101 EMC 1102 EMC 1103

Applied Mathematics Optimization Techniques Solid State Power Converters Modeling of Electrical Machines Special Electrical Machines i j Power Quality Laboratory Practice I Project (Part I) Seminar TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 22

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 -----

30 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 450

100 100 100 100 100 100 ------600

150 150 150 150 150 150 50 50 50 1050

---

SEMESTER II Hrs/week Marks Exam duration Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 50 50 ----2 ----50 100 50 500 End Semester Exam 100 100 100 100 100 100 ------6,00 Total Code No. EPC2001 EMC2001 ** ** ** * EMC2101 EMC2102 EMC2103* Name of Subject Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 23

Power System Dynamics and Control Control of Industrial Drives Stream Elective Stream Elective Departmental Elective Interdisciplinary Elective Laboratory Practice 11 Project (Part II) Seminar T OT AL

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3

150 150 150 150 150 150 50 100 50 1100

* Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under Interdisciplinary electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator. ** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream/department electives for the second semester as advised by the course coordinator.

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR ELECTRICAL MACHINES STREAM FOR THE II SEMESTER
1 2 3 4 5 6 EME2001 EME2002 ECE2004 ECE2005 EPE2002 EPE2003 Field Theory Finite Element Methods of Electrical machines Process Control Soft Computing Techniques Transient Analysis in Power Systems FACTS and Custom Power

SEMESTER III
Hrs / week Credits Code No. Name of Subject Exam duration Marks Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50 200 400 End Semester Exam 100 100 ------200 Total 150 150 50 50 200 600

** **

Stream Elective Stream Elective

3 3 1 1 4 12

3 3 14

3 3 -----

ECC3101 Research Methodology ECC3102 Industrial Training EMC3101 TOTAL Thesis- Preliminary

** Students can select a subject from the subjects listed under stream electives for the third semester as advised by the course coordinator.

STREAM ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR ELECTRICAL MACHINES STREAM FOR THE III SEMESTER 1 2 3 ECE3004 Advanced Instrumentation ^ EME3001 Computer Aided Design and Analysis of Electrical Machines EME 3002 Digital Simulation Of Power Electronic System ^^^

SEMESTER IV
Hrs/week Marks Continuous Assessment
Guide 200 200 Evaluation Committee 200 200

Credits

Code No

Subject Name
Thesis

University Exam
Thesis Eva. 100 100 Viva Voce 100 100 \ Total

EMC4101

12 12

29

600 600

Total

29

Note : 6 to 10 hours per week is for department assistance

DEPARTMENT ELECTIVES FOR II SEMESTER ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


1 2 3 4 ECD2001 ECD2002 EPD2001 EMD2001 Embedded Systems & Real time Applications Advanced Digital Signal Processing New and Renewable Sources of Energy Special Purpose Electrical Machines ,

INTERDISCIPLINARY ELECTIVES FOR II SEMESTER


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. API 2001 API 2002 API 2003 API 2004 CSI 2001 CSI 2002 CSI 2003 CSI 2004 CSI 2005 CEI 2001 CEI 2002 CEI 2003 CGI 2001 CHI 2001 CTI 2001 CMI2001 EMI 2001 EGI 2001 EPI 2001 ECI 2001 Mil 2001 Mil 2002 Mil 2003 Mil 2004 Mil 2005 MDI 2001 MDI 2002 MPI2001 MTI2001 MRI 2001 MRI 2002 MRI 2003 MRI 2004 TAI2001 TMI2001 TSI2001 Urban Environment Management Energy Environment & Buildings Energy Efficiency and Micoclimate Rural Planning and Development Finite Element Analysis Theory of Plates and Shells Advanced Mechanics of Materials Mechanics of Composites Random Vibration Philosophy of Technology Environmental Management Environment and Pollution Geotechnical Engineering for Infrastructure Projects Fuzzy Sets and Systems in Engineering Optimisation Techniques s. Personnel Management Biomedical Instrumentation Navigation, Guidance And Control Energy Conservation and Management Engineering Optimization Heuristics for Optimization Financial Management Organizational behavior Operations Research Management Information Systems Applied Finite Element Methods Acoustics and Noise Control for Engineers Computational Fluid Dynamics Numerical Methods Finite Element Methods Advanced Numerical Techniques for Engineers Total Quality Management Optimisation Techniques Mechatronics Fuzzy Systems & Applications Artificial Neural Networks

EM A1001

Applied Mathematics

3-0-0-3

Vector Space Vector space, subspace, linear independence of vectors* Dimension and basis (Definitions, theorems without proof and problems), linear transformations, Rank and nullity, Inner product, Norm of a vector, Orthogonal vectors, Gram Schmidst Orthogonalization process. [Text: Linear Algebra and its Applications, 3rd edition. David C. Lay, Pearson Edn., Chapter 4 (4.1 to 4.6), Chapter 6 (6.1, 6.2, 6.4, 6.7, 6.8)] Calculus of Variations Basic problems of calculus of variations, other forms of Euler's equation, problems, problems of the minimum surface of revolution, minimum energy problem, Brachistochrone problem, isoperimetric problem. [Text: Mathematical Methods for Engineers and Physicists, A. K. Muhopadhyay, Chapter 13 (13.2 to 13.6)] Special Functions Bessel function, Recurrence relation, properties, generating function, orthogonality property, Legendre function, Rodrigues formulae, Legendre polynomials, Recurrence relations (without proof), orthogonality, generating function. [Text: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 4th edition, Peter' V. O. Niel, Brooks Cole Publications] Integral Equations Formation of Volterra - Fredholm integral equations, solution of integral of 2nd kind by transform methods, convolution type, method of successive approximation and iterative method. [Text: Higher Engineering Mathematics. Dr. B. S. Grewal] Probability Distribution Estimation (point and interval) of parameters, unbiased-consistency-efficiency and sufficiency, definition, problems of joint probability distribution of discrete and continuous random variables, normal distribution, Cauchy distribution. [Text: Miller and Freunds, Probability and Statistics for Engineers by Johnson] Boundary Value Problem Solution of partial differential equations using Laplace Transform Method. [Text: Introduction to partial differential equations. K. Shankara Rao, Chapters 6.13, 6.14] References 1. Serge Lang, 'Linear AIgebra' 2. Peter V. O. Niel, 'Advanced Engineering Mathematics', 4th edition, Brooks Cole Publications. 3. Greenberg, 'Advanced Engineering Mathematics \ Pearson Edn. 4. G. F. Simmons, 'Differential Equation with historical notes'. 5. S. S. Rao,'Optimization Theory and Practice ', Wiley Eastern Limited. 6. N. P. Bali and Iyengar, *Engineering Mathematics \ Laxmi Publications, 7. Vasista and Gupta, 'Integral Transforms'. 8. Shanti Swaroop, 'Integral Equations \ 9. Gupta and Kappor, 'Foundations of Mathematical Statistics \ 10. Murray R. Spiegal, 'Linear Algebra \ Schaum Outline Series. NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

20

ECC 1001

DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This course covers the basic concepts in digital control systems, different design techniques of digital controller, estimators and their design aspects, analysis of system performance with controller and estimator in the closed-loop. Syllabus Analysis in Z-domain Review of Z Transforms, Pulse Transfer Function and sample and hold - effect of damping stability-Jury*s test-Schur Cohn test-Bilinear Transformation-Routh-Hurwitz method in w-plane -Bode plot in w-plane.' Discrete equivalents Discrete equivalents via numerical integration-pole-zero matching-hold equivalents Digital Controller Design for SISO systems Transform techniques-by emulation-by root locus in the z-plane-by frequency response methods-Direct Design-method of Ragazzini-Design using State-Space approach-Controllability-Observability-Control Law Design-decoupling by state variable feedback - effect of sampling period. Estimator/Observer Design Full order observers-reduced order observers-Regulator Design-Separation Principle-case with reference input - Introduction to MIMO systems. Design Concept-Case Studies References 1. Gene F Franklin. J David Powell, Michael Workman, 'Digital Control of Dynamic * Systems\ Pearson Education, Asia 2. J R Liegh, "Applied Digital Control", Rinchart & Winston lncs New Delhi 3. Frank L Lewis, "Applied Optimal Control & Estimation", Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1992 4. Benjamin C Kuo, 'Digital Control Systems', 2nd Edition, Saunders College Publishing, Philadelphia, 1992 5. K Ogata, 'Discrete-Time Control Systems', Pearson Education, Asia 6. C L Philips, H T Nagle, 'Digital Control Systems", Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1995 7. R G Jacquot, 'Modern Digital Control Systems', Marcel Decker, New York, 1995 8. M.Gopal, 'Digital control and state variable methods \ Tata Me Graw Hill 1997.

Prerequisite: First level course in control systems

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper*

21

ECC 1002

DYNAMICS OF LINEAR SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: The course provides an exposure to (he design of compensators and linear state variable feedback Syllabus Design of feedback control systems Approaches to system design-compensators-performance measures - cascade compensation networks-phase lead and lag compensator design using both Root locus and Bode plots-systems using integration networks-PI-PID controllers-systems with pre-filter - PID tuning integral windup and solutions. State space descriptions and basic concepts Analysis of stabilization by pole cancellation - Canonical realizations - Parallel and cascade realizations - reachability and constructability - stabilizability - controllability - observability grammians. Linear state variable feedback for SISO systems Analysis of stabilization by output feedback-modal controllability-formulae for feedback gain significance of controllable canonic form-Ackermann's formula- feedback gains in terms of Eigen values - Mayne-Murdoch formula - Transfer function approach - state feedback and zeros of the transfer function - non controllable realizations and stabilizability -controllable and uncontrollable modes - regulator problems - non zero set points - constant input disturbances and integral feed back - Examples Asymptotic obsenters and compensators Asymptotic observers for state measurement-open loop observer-closed loop observer -formulae for observer gain - calculation of transfer function - implementation of the observer - full order and reduced order observers - separation principle - combined observer -controller - optimality criterion for choosing observer poles - direct transfer function design procedures - Design using polynomial equations - Direct analysis of the Diophantine equation - control of MIMO systems. References 1. Thomas Kailath. "Linear System1, Prentice Hall, Inc. Eaglewood Cliffs. NJ. 1998 2. Benjamin C Kuo, 'Control Systems', Tata McGraw Hill, 2002 3. M Gopal, 'Control Systems-Principles and Design', Tata McGraw Hill 4. Richard C Dorf & Robert H Bishop, "Modern Control Systems', Addison -Wesley, 8th Edition, 1998 5. Gene K Franklin & J David Powell, 'Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems', Addison Wesley, 3rd edition 6. Friedland B, 'Control System Design: An Introduction to State Space Methods', McGraw Hill, NY 1986 7. M R Chidambaram and S. Ganapathy, 'An Introduction to the Control of Dynamic Systems', Sehgal Educational Publishers, 1979 8. C.T. Chen, 'Linear system theory and Design\ Oxford University Press, New York, 1999 Prerequisite: First level course in Control Systems and basic concepts of state-space representation of dynamic systems

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

22

ECC 1101

ADVANCED CONTROL LAB I

0-0-2-1

(CONTROL SYSTEMS / GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL) 1. MATLAB - S1MUL1NK Familiarization. Closed Loop Transfer Function Satellite Control System Electric Traction Motor Control Root Locus Problem Torsional Mechanical System State Feedback Gain Matrix

2. Data Acquisition System 3. DSP based System Familiarization. Familiarization of the digital signal processor trainer kit TMS320 and generate different types of waveforms.

4. Experiments with models of Process Control (flow, level, temperature) 5. Compensator Design Design and realization of Lead Compensator Design and realization of Lag Compensator.

In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Control Systems/ Drives/Guidance Laboratories.

Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted

23

ECC2001

OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: The purpose of this course is to give students a background in the historical trends in dynamic optimization Syllabus Optimality problems in control theory -mathematical models-selection of performance measures-constraints-classification of problem constraints-problem formulation-examples Dynamic Programming -Optimar Control Law-Principle of Optimality-Application to decision making-routing problem-Hamilton Jacobi Bellman equation-Discrete and Continuous Linear Regulator Problems Calculus of Variations -basic concepts-variation of a functional-extremals-fundamental theorem in calculus of variation-Euler equation-Piecewise Smooth extremals-constrained extrema-Hamiltoniannecessary condition for optimal control Pontjyagin *s Minimum Principle -Minimum Time problem-Minimum Fuel problem-Minimum Energy problem-singular intervals References
1. Donald E Kirk, "Optimal Control Theory - An Introduction', Prentice-Hall Inc, Englevvood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1970 2. Athans M and P L Falb, 'Optimal Control - An Introduction to the Theory and its Applications', McGraw Hill Inc, New York, 1966 3. Sage A P, 'Optimum Systems Control\ Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1968 4. Brian D O Anderson, John B Moore, 'Optimal Control - Linear Quadratic Methods' 9 Prentice-Hall Inc, New Delhi, 1991

Prerequisite: First level course in control systems

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

24

ECE 2001

ROBUST CONTROL

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This course aims to provide the students the basic concepts of Robust Control and the different approaches for Robust Control of Linear Dynamical Systems Syllabus Introduction -definition of robust control-classification of robust control-elements of robust control theorymodeling-design objectives and specifications-additive and multiplicative perturbations-plantcontroller configuration-shaping the loop gain Modeling of Parametric Uncertain Systems -modeling systems with parameter uncertainty-general concepts-generalization of several control concepts to parametric uncertain systems-stability-controllability and observability Robust Stability Analysis -Pole spread and gridding-principle of argument and Rouche's theorem-Boundary crossing theoremstability-Gamma stability boundaries-Gamma stability radius-Schur stability test-Hurwitz stability test Parametrization of Stabilizing Controllers -Well-posedness-internal stability-parametrization approach-coprime factorization of plantcoprime factorization of controller-state space realization-strong stabilization Sensitivity minimization and Robust Stabilization -Sensitivity minimization-problem formulation-model matching problem-trade-offs for multivariable plants-design limitations due to right half plane zeros-plant uncertainty and robustnessrobust stability-robustness under perturbations-small gain theorem- stability margins-1-2 stability, 1infinity. and 1-1 stability margins-robust stabilizing-controllers-stabilizing P controllers-stabilizing PI controllers- stabilizing PID controllers H? and H Optimization -LQG methodology-separation principle-Algebraic Riccati Equation-solution of LQG problemrobustness properties of the LQG solution- H optimization techniques-state space formulation H control-H filter-generalized H regulator Basic concepts ofHs.. and ji - synthesis controllers Text Books 1. S P Bhattacharya, L H Keel, H Chapellat, 'Robust Control: The Parametric Approach', Prentice-Hall, 1995 2. PC Ghandrasekharan, 'Robust Control of Linear Dynamical Systems' , Academic Press, 1996 References 1. Michael Green, David J N Limebeer, 'Linear Robust Control*, Prentice-Hall, 1995 2. Kemin Zhou, 'Essentials of Robust Control9, Prentice-Hall, 1998 Prerequisite: First level course in control systems

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

25

ECE2002

ADAPTIVE CONTROL

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To provide the fundamental concepts of adaptive control theory Syllabus Introduction -Adaptive ComroI-elYects of process variation-Adaptive schemes-Adaptive Control problemApplications Real-Time Parameter Estimation -Introduction-Least Squares and Regression Models-Estimating-Parameters in Dynamical Systems-Experimental Conditions-Simulation of Recursive Estimation Model-Reference Adaptive Systems -Introduction-The MIT Rule-Determination of the Adaptation Gain-Lyapunov Theory-Design of MRAS Using Lyapunov Theory-Bounded-Input-Bounded-Output Stability-Applications to Adaptive control-Output Feedback Self Tuning Regulators -Introduction-Pole Placement Design-Indirect Self-tuning Regulators-Continuous Time Self-tunersDirect Self-tuning Regulators-Disturbances with Known Characteristics-Relations between MRAS and STR Adaptive Predictive Control -Stochastic and Predictive Self-Tuning Regulators-Introduction-Design of Minimum-Variance and Moving-Average controllers-Stochastic Self-Tuning Regulators-Unification of Direct Self-tuning Regulators-Linear Quadratic STR Robust Adaptive Laws -Introduction-Plant Uncertainties and Robust Control. Instability-Phenomena in Adaptive Systems-Modifications for Robustness-Simple Examples-Robust Adaptive Laws-Summary of Robust Adaptive Laws Gain Scheduling -Introduction-The Principle-Design of Gain-Scheduling controllers-Nonlinear Transformationsapplications of Gain Scheduling References 1. Karl Jhon Astrom & Bjom Wittenmark, 'Adaptive Control* ,Addison Wesley, 2003 2. Shankar Sastry, 'Adaptive Control', PHI( Eastern Economy Edition), 1989 3. Karl Jhon Astrom, 'Adaptive Control', Pearson Education, 2001 4. Petros A Ioannou, Jing, 'Robust Adaptive Control', Prentice-Hall, 1995 5. Eykhoff P, 'System Identification: Parameter and'State Estimation9, 1974 6. Ljung, 'System Identification Theory for the User*, Prentice-Hall, 1987 Prerequisite: Basic knowledge in sampled data systems, feedback control systems and automatic control

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

26

ECE 2003
Syllabus

VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROL SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Variable Structure Systems (VSS) Introduction- Synthesis of stable systems from unstable structures- VSS for improving speed of response,-VSS for stability- simulation using MATLAB-Simulation using SIMULINK. Variable structure systems with sliding mode Sliding mode motion - existence condition - equivalent control for sliding mode motion - sliding mode motion on switching line - Invariance conditions - Design of sliding mode controllers using feedback linearisation for non-linear systems - simulation of sliding mode controller using Matlab and Simulink. Sliding mode motion on switching surface Design of stable switching surfaces - design of sliding mode controller for higher order systems -Sliding mode controller design for a robotic manipulator - Chattering - Chattering reduction techniques. Variable Structure Model Following Control (VSMFC) Systems Conditions for perfect model following - sliding mode equivalent control - Sliding mode discontinuous control - Design of VSMFC for second order system - Design of VSMFC for higher order systems - Simulation using Matlab and Simulink. Textbook/References 1. U Itkis, 'Control Systems of Variable Structure \ New York, Wiley, 1976. 2. A S I Zinober (Edited by) , "Deterministic Control of Uncertain Systems', British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data, Peter Peregrinus Ltd. 1990. 3. B. Drazenovic, 'The invariance conditions in variable structure systems', Automatica, Vol. 5. pp 287-295, 1969. 4. K.K.D.Young, 'Design of Variable Structure Model Following Control Systems', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Vol. 23, pp 1079-1085, 1978. 5. A.S.I. Zinobar, O.M.E. EI-Ghezawi and S.A. Billings, Multivariable variable structure adaptive model following control systems, Proc. 1EE. Vol. 129, Pt.D, No.l,pp 6-12, 1982. 6. J J. Slotine and S.S. Sastry, Tracking control of non-linear systems using sliding surfaces with application to robot manipulators, International Journal of Control, 1983, Vol. 38,No.2, pp 465-492. 7. Vadim I. Utkin,' Variable Structure Systems with Sliding Modes', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, April 1977, pp 212-222. 8. K.K.D.Young, 'A Variable Structure Model Following Control Design for Robotic Applications', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Vol. 23, pp. 1079-1085, . 1978. NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

27

ECE 2004 0-0-3

PROCESS CONTROL

3-

Course Objective: To impart ideas of distributed control and computer controlled industrial processes. Syllabus Introduction to process dynamics Physical examples of first order process-first order systems in series-dynamic behavior of first and second order systems - Control valves and transmission lines, the dynamics and control of heat exchangers. level control, flow control, dynamics, Stability and control of chemical reactors, Control modes: on-off? P, PL PD, PID, Controller tuning-Zegler Nichols, Self tuning methods. Advanced control techniques Feed forward control, Cascade control. Ratio control. Adaptive control, Override control, Control of nonlinear process . Control of process with delay. Hierarchical control, Internal mode control, Model predictive control. Statistical process control. Digital controllers Effects of sampling-implementation of PID controller-stability and tuning-digital feed forward control Computerized process control Programmable logic controllers, combinational and sequential logic controllers - System integration with PLCs and computers - PLC application in Industry - control and instrumentation networks and protocols - distributed control system - PC based control - Basic PLC Programming- Programming On /Off Inputs to produce On/Off outputs, Relation of Digital Gate Logic to contact /Coil Logic, Creating Ladder Diagrams from Process control Descriptions. References 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. George Stephanopoulos, "Chemicalprocess control", Prentice-Hall of India Donald R Coughnour, 'Process System analysis and Control", McGraw-Hill, 1991 DE Seborg, T F Edger, 'Process dynamics and control', John Wiley, 1998 Enrique Mandado, Jorge Marcos, Serafin A Perrez, 'Programmable Logic Devices and Logic Controllers', Prentice-Hall, 1996 Dobrivoje Popovic, Vijay P Bhatkar, Marcel Dekker, 'Distributed Computer Control for Industrial Automation", INC, 1990 B.G.Liptak, 'Handbook of Process Control9', 1996 of India 7- Ronald A.Reis, 'Programmable logic Controllers Principles and Applications', Prentice-Hall

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

28

ECE 2005

SOFT COMPUTING TECHNIQUES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: The course provides exposure to soft computing techniques and its applications in control systems Syllabus: Neural network Biological foundations - ANN models - Types of activation function - Introduction to Network architectures -Multi Layer Feed Forward Network (MLFFN) - Radial Basis Function Network (RBFN) - Recurring Neural Network (RNN). Learning process Supervised and unsupervised learning - Error-correction learning - Hebbian learning - Boltzmen learning - Single layer and multilayer perceptrons - Least mean square algorithm - Back propagation algorithm - Applications in pattern recognition and other engineering problems Case studies - Identification and control of linear and nonlinear systems using Matlab-Neural network toolbox. Fuzzy sets Fuzzy set operations - Properties - Membership functions - Fuzzy to crisp conversion fuzzification and defuzzification methods - applications in engineering problems. Fuzzy control systems Introduction - simple fuzzy logic controllers with examples - Special forms of fuzzy logic models - classical fuzzy control problems - inverter pendulum - image processing - home heating system - Adaptive fuzzy systems - hybrid systems - Adaptive Neuro fuzzy Inference System (ANF1S) controllers Genetic Algorithm Introduction - basic concepts - application References 1. J.M. Zurada. Introduction to artificial neural systems, Jaico Publishers, 1992. 2. Simon Haykins. Neural Networks - A comprehensive foundation,, Macmillan College, Proc, Con, Inc, New York. 1994. 3. D. Driankov. H. Hellendorn, M. Reinfrank, Fuzzy Control - An Introduction, Narora Publishing House, New Delhi, 1993. 4. HJ. Zimmermann, Fuzzy set theory and its applications, 111 Edition, Kluwer Academic Publishers, London. 5. G.J. Klir, Boyuan, Fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic, Prentice Hall of India (P) Ltd, 1997. 6. Stamatios V Kartalopoulos, Understanding neural networks and fuzzy logic basic concepts and applications, Prentice Hall of India (P) Ltd, New Delhi, 2000. 7. Timothy J. Ross, Fuzzy logic with engineering applications, McGraw Hill, New York. 8. Suran Goonatilake, Sukhdev Khebbal (Eds,), Intelligent hybrid systems, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1995. 9. Vose Michael D., Simple Genetic Algorithm - Foundations And Theory, Prentice Hall of India. 10. Rajasekaran & Pai, Neural Networks, Fuzzy Logic, and Genetic Algorithms: Synthesis and Applications, Prentice-Hall of India, 2007. 11. J.S.Roger Jang, C.T.Sun and E.Mizutani, NEURO FUZZY AND SOFT COMPUTING, prentice hall inc., New Jersey, 1997.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

29

ECE 2006

ROBOTICS AND INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Basic understanding of Robotics.-Familiarity with the control aspects of Robots, Design and control of a Robot, Concepts of Automation Syllabus: Introduction -Robots and automation-classification-specifications-notation-Direct Kinematics-Co-ordinate framesrotations-Homogeneous coordinates-The Arm equation-Kinematic analysis of a typical Robotexamples-Inverse Kinematics problem-Tool configuration-Inverse kinematics of a typical Robotexamples-Workspace analysis and trajectory planning-Work envelope of different robots-The pick and place operation -Continuous path motion-interpolated motion-Straight line motion-Tool configuration Jacobian matrix and manipulator Jacobian-Manipulator Dynamics-Dynamic model of a robot using Lagrange's Equation Robot control -The control problem-state equations-Single axis PID control-PD gravity control-Computed torque control-Variable Structure control-Impedance control Robot Vision -Robot applications-Characteristics-Robot cell design-Types of applications-material handling applications-Machine loading and unloading-spot welding-arc welding-spray painting Mobile Robots and Control issues -Industrial automation-General layout-general configuration of an automated flowline-conveyor systems-major features-types-Roller, State wheel, Belt, Chain and overhead trolley-Inspection station with feedback loops to up steam workstations-shop floor control-3 phases-order scheduling References: 1. Robert J Schilling, 'Fundamentals of Robotics-Analysis and Control' Education. Asia 2. Janakiraman P A. "Robotics and Image processing", Tata McGraw Hill. New Delhi, 1995 3. Mikell P Grover, 'Automation, Production System, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing', Prentice-Hall India, 1992 4. S R Deb, "Robotics Technology and Flexible Automation", Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi 5. Lorenzo Sciavicco & Bruno Siciliano, 'Modeling and Control of Robot manipulator', The McGraw Hill Companies 6. C Roy Asfahl, 'Robots and Manufacturing Automation', John Wiley & Sons 7. Yoran Kaen, 'Robots for Engineering', McGraw Hill
y

Pearson

Prerequisite: Thorough understanding of Matrix and Vector algebra NOTE: 20%

Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

30

ECC 2101

ADVANCED CONTROL LAB II

0-0-2-1

1. Simulation of PMBLDC Motor Drive System. 2. Study of Position Control -Servo Plant using Quanser Module Speed Control - Servo Plant Position Control of rolling Ball and Beam Balancing of Inverted Pendulum through Rotary Motion arm Rotary Pendulum Angular Position Control - Flexible Link Position Control- Rotary Flexible Joint

3. Lab practice on LAB VIEW software 4. Study of servo control systems 5. Wind Tunnel Experiments. In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Control Systems/Drives/Guidance Laboratories, Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted

31

ECE3001

NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: The course ensures a thorough knowledge-on various classical methods of design and analysis of nonlinear systems Syllabus: Describing function analysis -Fundamentals-Describing Function of saturation, dead-zone, on-off non-linearity, backlash, Hysteresis-Describing function analysis of non-linear systems, Dual Input Describing Function (DIDF)-existance of limit cycles Phase plane analysis -Concept of phase portraits-Singular points characterization-Analysis of non-linear systems using phase plane technique-Equilibrium points-stable & unstable Concept of stability -stability in the sense of Lyapunov-absolute stability-Zero-input and BIBO stability-Second method of Lyapunov-stability theory for continuous and discrete time systems-Aizerman rs and Kalman's conjecture-Construction of Lyapunov function for non linear systems-Methods of Aizerman-Zubov-variable gradient method-Lure problem-Popov's stability criterion-KalmanYakubovich Lemma-Popov's hyper stability theorem. Non-linear control system design -concept of variable structure controller and sliding control-implementation of switching control laws-cascade designs-partial-state feedback design-feedback linearization. References 1. Jean-Jacques E. Slotine & Weiping Li, 'AppliedNonlinear Control9, Prentice-Halh, NJ, 1991 2. Hassan K Khalil. 'Nonlinear Systems', Macmillan Publishing Company, NJ 3. M Vidyasagar. teNonlinear Systems Analysis', Prentice-Hall, India, 1991 4. Shankar Sastry, *Nonlinear System Analysis, Stability and Control9, Springer, 1999 5. Ashok D Belegundu, Timpathi R Chandrupatla, * Optimization concepts and Applications in Engineering', Pearson Education, Delhi, 2002 6. John E Gibson, 'Nonlinear Automatic Control', Me Graw Hill, NevvYork

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

32

ECE3002 SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION 3-0-0-3


Syllabus Principles of Modelling and Transfer function identification System Identification and Stochastic Modeling- Structure and parameter estimation . properties of estimates - validation of models-impulse Response. Step Response - Frequency response- transfer function from these - disturbances and transfer function State Space Models Distributed parameter models- model structures, identifiability of model structures - signal spectra - single realization and ergodicity - multivariable systems - Transfer function from frequency response. Fourier Analysis and Spectral analysis - Estimating Disturbance Spectrum -Correlation Identification - Practical Implementation - Pseudo random binary signals - maximum length sequences generation using hardware - random number generation on digital computer Parameter Estimation Methods Guiding principles behind parameter estimation methods . minimizing prediction errors . linear regression- and least squares methods . statistical framework for parameter estimation . maximum likelihood estimation . correlating prediction errors with past data . Instrumental variable method . consistency and identifiability- Recursive methods . RLS Algorithm, Recursive IV MethodRecursive Prediction Error Method ~ pecursive pseudo-linear regressions . choice of updating step. Experiment Design and Choice of Identification Criterion Optimal Input design . Persistently exciting condition . optimal input design for higher order black box models . choice of sampling interval and presampling filters . Choices of Identification criterion . choice of norm . variance: optimal instruments References 1 o Lennart Ljung, 'System Identification Theory for the User \Prentice Hall Information Systems Science Series, 1987. 2. SinhaN K, Kuztsas * System Identification and Modeling of Systems' y 1983. 3. Harold W Sorensen, 'Parameter Estimation \ Marcel Dekker Inc, New York, 1980. 4. Daniel Graupe, 'Identification of Systems \ Van Nostrand. 5. Current literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper*

33

ECE3003

ESTIMATION THEORY

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: The purpose of this course is to give students a background in stochastic system approach and the analysis. Stochastic optimal linear filter, prediction, and smoothing algorithms for discrete-time systems are the main focus. Syllabus: Elements of probability theory -random variables-Gaussian distribution-stochastic processes-characterizations and properties-GaussMarkov processes-Brownian motion process-Gauss-Markov models Optimal estimation for discretetime systems -fundamental theorem of estimation-optimal prediction Optimal filtering -Weiner approach-continuous time Kalman Filter-properties and implementation-steady-state Kalman Filter-discrete-time Kalman Filter-implementation-sub-optima! steady-state Kalman FilterExtended Kalman Filter-practical applications Optimal smoothing -optimal fixed-interval smoothing optimal fixed-point smoothing-optimal fixed-lag smoothingstability-performance evaluation References 1.James S Meditch, "Stochastic Optimal Linear Estimation and Control', McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969 2. Jerry M Mendel, 'Lessons in Estimation Theory? for Signal processing, Communication, and Control', Prentice-Hall Inc, New Delhi. 1995 3. Mohinder S Grewal. Angus P Andrews. "Kalman Filtering: Theory and Practice', PrenticeHall Inc, Englewood Cliffs. 1993 4. Grimble M J, M A Johnson. 'Optimal Control and Stochastic Estimation; Theory and Applications', Wiley, New York, 1988 5. Peter S Meybeck, 'Stochastic Models, Estimation, and Control', Volume 1 & 2, Academic Press, New York, 1982 6. Papoulis Athanasios, 'Probability, Random Variables, and Stochastic Process', 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1984 7. Frank L Lewis, ''Optimal Estimation', Wiley, New York, 1986 8. Mcgarty J P, 'Stochastic Systems and State Estimation', John Wiley, New York, 1974 Prerequisite: Second level course in control systems

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

34

FXE 3004

ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To impart principles and methods of modern instrumentation


Syllabiis Generalized performance characteristics of Instruments - Static characteristics, static calibration, memory, precision and bias, dynamic characteristics, development of mathematical model of various measurement systems. Response of a general form of instrument to a periodic input. Response of a general form of instrument to a transient input. General concept of transfer function(with special reference to measuring systems)- classification of instruments based on their order and their dynamic response and frequency response studies. Requirement of instrument transfer function to ensure accurate measurement. Plant level automation- process and instrumentation diagrams- Performance modeling role of performance modeling- performance measures. Petrinet models- introduction to petrinets- basic definitions and analytical techniques. Laser instrumentation-Principles of lasers-Types of lasers, Solid state, Gas and molecular gas, Metal vapour, excimer, semiconductor, liquid and chemical lasers. Laser applications. Ultrasonic measurement - basic ultra sonic transmission link-ultra sonic transmitter ands receiver-principle of ultrasonic transmission-examples of ultrasonic measurement systems. Gas chromatography, liquid chromatography. Typical data acquisition and processing system. References 1. B D Doeblin, 'Measurement systems Application and Design, McGraw Hill New York. 2. John P. Bentley5 'Principles of Measurement Systemsf , Pearson Education . 3. J W Dally, W F Reley and K G McConnel, 'Instrumentation for Engineering measurements (second edition)99 John Wiley & sons Inc5 New York, 1993 4. K. B. Klaasen, 'Electronic Measurement. and Instrumentation', Cambridge University Press. 5. B B Laud, 'Laser and Non-linear Optics(Second edition)', Wiley Eastern Ltd 6. Thyagarajan A K & Ghatak K, 'Lasers theory and Applications', Plenum Publishing Corporation, N Y. 7. N. Viswanathan & Y. Narahari, 'Performance and modeling of Automated -Manufacturing Process", Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper*

35

EGClOOl

PRINCIPLES OF AEROSPACE NAVIGATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give basic concepts of navigation of aerospace vehicles Syllabus Definition-navigation-guidanee-control-General principles of early conventional navigation systemsGeometric Concepts of navigation-Reference frames-Direction cosine matrix-Euler anglesTransformation of angular velocities-Quaternion representation in co-ordinate transformationsComparison of transformation methods. Inertial navigation-block diagram representation of essential components-Inertial sensors, Gyros: Principle of operation-TDF and SDF gyros-precession-Nutation-gimbal lock-gimbal flip-gyro transfer function-rate gyro-integrating gyro-Constructional details and operation of floated rate integrating gyro-Dynamically tuned gyro-Ring laser gyro-Fiber optic gyro-gyro performance parametersAccelerometers-transfer function-Pendulous gyro integrating accelerometer-Vibrating String accelerometer-Accelerometer performance parameters- Navigation equations-Schuler principle and mechanization, MEMS. inertial platforms-Stabilised platforms-Gimballed and Strap down FNS and their mechanizationGyrocompassing for initial alignment Externally aided navigation systems-TACAN, TERCOM, LORAR OMEGA. DECCA. VOR, DME? JTIDS, FLIR-Basics of satellite navigation systems: Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Global Navigation of Satellite Systems (GNSS) Principles of advanced navigation systems- GPS aided navigation. References 1. Anthony Lawrence , 'Modern Inertial Technology-' . second Edition. Springer-

Verlag New York, Inc, 1998. 2. George M Siouris ^Aerospace Avionics Systems- A Modern Synthesis', Academic Press, Inc. 3. Ching-Fang, 'Modern Navigation, Guidance, and Control Processing', Lin-Prentice-Hall Inc, Engle Wood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1991 4. Manuel Fernadez and George R Macomber , 'Inertial Guidance Engineering\ Prentic-Hall, Inc., Engle Wood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1962 5. Myron Kayton and Walter R Fried , 'Avionics Navigation Systems', John Wiley & Sons Inc, 1969 6. Current Literature NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

36

EGC1002

INTRODUCTION TO FLIGHT

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give basic ideas of aerodynamics and principles of flight of aerospace vehicles. Syllabus Fundamentals of Aerodynamics Aerodynamics- aerodynamic variables- definition of standard atmosphere-definition of altitudes-layers of atmosphere-isothermal and gradient layers-calculation of pressure, density, temperature in stratosphere and troposphere- stability of atmosphere-lapse rate-pressure, density and lemperature altitudes- aerodynamic flow- types of flow -inviscid and viscous flowincompressible and compressible flow- subsonic, transonic-super sonic and hypersonic flow regimsboundary layer- laminar and turbulent flow-vorticity-circulation- pressure and shear stress distribution downwash and induced drag- wash-in wash-out, Reynolds number-dimensional analysisBuckingham PI theorem-aerodynamic forces and moments- aerodynamic heating - -dynamic pressure-pressure coefficient-isentropic flow -speed of sound- Mach number, critical Mach number, drag-divergence-Mach number-Mach angle-Mach number independence, compressibility- flow similarity-wind tunnels-open ,closed and variable density tunnel-critical shock stall- drag polar-shock polar, .Numerical problems. Airfoils and Generation of Lift Airfoils- symmetric and cambered airfoil- pressure distribution over airfoil -elliptical lift distribution- Generation of lift-lifting surfaces-wings-wing geometry- wing planform- aspect ratio aerofoil nomenclature- NACA aerofoils- modern low speed airfoils- chord line-angle of attackaerodynamic forces- lift-drag - force and moment co-efficients- Cl,Cd,Cm-variation of Cm with an gle-of-attack-types of drag- aerodynamic center- Center of pressure-stalling of aerofoilscharacteristics of ideal aerofoil - lift curve -drag curve-lift/drag ratio curve- swept wings-super critical aerofoils-control surfaces-elevator-aileron-rudder-canard- -tail plane-loads on tail plane dihedral angle, dihedral effect- flaps and slots -spoilers- numerical problems. Aircrafts-helicoptersiaunch vehicles-missiles-Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and spacecrafts. References 1. John.D.Anderson Jr, 'Fundamentals of Aerodynamics', Me Graw Hill Ineternational, Fourth Edition, 2007. 2. E.L.Houghton and N.B.Carruthers 'Aerodynamics for Engineering Students', Arnold Publishers/Third Edition, 1986. 3. A.C.Kermode, ''Mechanics of Flight', Pearson Education, Tenth Edition, 2005. 4. John D Anderson Jr, 'Introduction to Flight \ McGraw Hill International, Fifth Edition,2005. 5. Thomas.R.Yechout, 'Introduction to Aircraft Flight Mechanics', A1AA Education Series,2003> 6. Richard s shevell, 'Fundamentals of Flight \ Pearson Education Inc., Second Edition , 2004. 7. Louis V. Schmit 'Introduction to Aircraft Flight Dynamics', AIAA Education Series, 1997

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

37

EGC1101

ADVANCED CONTROL LAB

0-0-2-1

(CONTROL SYSTEMS / GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATIONAL CONTROL) 1. MATLAB - SIMUL1NK Familiarization. Closed Loop Transfer Function Satellite Control System Electric Traction Motor Control Root Locus Problem Torsional Mechanical System State Feedback Gain Matrix

2. Data Acquisition System 3. DSP based System Familiarization. Familiarization of the digital signal processor trainer kit TMS320 and generate different types of waveforms.

4. Experiments with models of Process Control (flow5 level, temperature) 5. Compensator Design Design and realization of Lead Compensator Design and realization of Lag Compensator.

In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Control Systems/Drives/Guidance Laboratories. Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted

38

EGC2001

OPTIMAL CONTROL OF AEROSPACE SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: to give an insight into the application of optimal control theory to aerospace systems Syllabus Optimal control problems in aerospace systems -mathematical models-selection of performance measures-constraints-classification of problem constraints-problem formulation-examples Dynamic Programming -Optimal Control Law-Principle of Optimality-Application to decision making-routing problem-Hamilton Jacobi Bellman equation-Discrete and Continuous Linear Regulator and Tracking Problems Calculus of Variations and its application in optimal control problems -basic conceptsvariation of a functional-extremals-fundamental theorem in calculus of variation-Euler equation-Lagrangian formulation-Piecewise Smooth extremals-constrained extremaHamiltonian-necessary condition for optimal control Ponttyagin rs Minimum Principle -Minimum Time problem-Minimum Fuel problem-Minimum Energy problem-singular intervals -optimal control based guidance laws-application of optimal control to aerospace vehicles References 1. A E Bryson Jr. and Y.-C. Ho, 'Applied Optimal Control9. Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, newyork. 1975 2. Donald E Kirk, "Optimal Control Theory - An Introduction" ?Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1970 3. Athans M and P L Falb, 'Optimal Control - An Introduction to the Tlieory and its Applications', McGraw Hill Inc5 New York, 1966 4. Sage A P, 'Optimum Systems Control', Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1968 5. Brian D O Anderson, John B Moore, 'Optimal Control - Linear Quadratic Methods' , Prentice-Hall Inc, New Delhi, 199K Current literature Prerequisite: EGC1001 and EGC 1002

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

39

EGC2002

GUIDANCE AND CONTROL OF MISSILES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give basic ideas of guidance laws for missiles. Syllabus History of Guided Missile for Air Defence Applications - Classification of Missiles-Tactical Missile Description-Fundamentals of Guidance - Basic Results in Interception and Avoidance - Taxonomy of Guidance Laws, Command and Homing Guidance, Classical Guidance Laws - Pursuit, LOS, CLOS, BR, Proportional Navigation and Its Variants Like PPN? BPN, APN, TPN, GPN and IPN. Modern Guidance Laws-Guidance Laws Derived from Optimal Control Theory - PPN with Non-Maneuvering and Maneuvering Targets. Comparative Study of Guidance Laws from the Point of View of Time, Miss-Distance, Launch Boundaries, Control Effort and Implementation Difficulties - Numerical Problems. Missile Autopilots - Flight Control System-Pitch, Yaw and Roll Autopilot - Control Surfaces and Autopilot Commands - Dither Adaptive Control-lnertial Reference Adaptive Control -

Guidance Section Functional Block Diagram-Angle Tracking and Seeker Head Stabilization-Radom Refraction-Aerodynamics for Autopilot Design-Missile Control Methods. Optimal Control - Optimal Filtering- Numerical Problems and Simulations.
References 1. George M.Siouris , 'Missile Guidance and Control Systems \ Springer Verlag , New York Inc- 2004. 2. Paul Zarchan , "Tactical and strategic Missile guidance', (2nd Edition) - AIAA, Inc. 1994 3. Eichblatt E J , 'Test and Evaluation of the Tactical Missiles \ AIAA Inc, 1989 4. Ching-Fang-Lin , 'Modern Navigation, Guidance, and Control Processing', PrenticeHall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N J, 1991 5. P Garnell , 'Guided Weapon Control Systems', Second Edition, Brassey's defence Publishers,London,l 987. 6. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

40

EGE2001

FLIGHT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give insight into the dynamics and control of aerospace vehicles. Syllabus Airplane Performance Brief history of aviation-Equation of motion of aircraft-level flight-stalling speed-level flight at different air speeds -relation between speed and angle-of-attack-power required-thrust required-power available and maximum velocity-altitude effects on power required and power available-rate *of climb-time to climb-range and endurance -take-off performance-Gliding and landing performanceturning flight and V-n diagram-wing loading -load factor-absolute and service ceilings- numerical problems. Stability and Control Longitudinal and lateral dynamics- stability and control-modes of motion: short period-phugoid-spiral divergence-dutch roll-stability derivatives-roll coupling-. Aircraft transfer functions, control surface actuator - longitudinal autopilots- displacement autopilot, pitch autopilot - block diagrams-root locus-flight path stabilization- acceleration control systems -lateral autopilots-yaw and roll autopilots attitude control systems - stability augmentation-state observers - optimal control - instrument landing systems - numerical problems and simulations. References L John D Anderson Jr,, 'Introduction to Flight', McGraw Hill International, Fifth Edition, 2005. 2. Thomas.R.Yechout, 'Introduction to Aircraft Flight Mechanics \ A1AA Education Series, 2003. 3. A.C.Kermode, 'Mechanics of Flight \ Pearson Education, Tenth Edition , 2005. 4. E.LHoughton and N.B.Carruthers*c Aerodynamics for Engineering Students \ Arnold Publishers/Third Edition, 1986. 5. Bernard Etkin, 'Dynamics of flight Stability and Control', John Wiley and Sons Inc. Third edition, 1996. 6. Nguyen.X.Vinh,, 'Flight Mechanics of High Performance Aircraft' Cambridge University Press, 1993. 7. John D Anderson Jr?'Aircraft performance an d Design', McGraw Hill Ineternational, 1999. 8. Robert.C.Nelson, 'Flight Stability and Automatic Control', WCB/Mc-Graw Hill, Second Edition, 1998. 9. Louis V. Schmit, 'Introduction to Aircraft Flight Dynamics \ AIAA Education Series, 1997

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

41

EGE2002 NAVIGATION GUIDANCE AND CONTROL OF ROBOTS 3-0-0-3


Course Objective: To understand the basic ideas of Robotics and to give insight into the Navigation, Guidance and Control aspects of Robots. Syllabus: Introduction-Manipulators and Mobile Robots- Classification-Specifications-Notation-Direct Kinematics-Co-Ordinate Frames-Rotations-Homogeneous Coordinates-The Arm Equation-Kinematic Analysis of A Typical Robot-Examples-fnverse Kinematics Problem-Tool Configuration-Inverse Kinematics of a Typical Robot-Examples-Workspace Analysis and Trajectory Planning-Work Envelope of Different Robots-Applications-Continuous Path Motion-Interpolated Motion-Straight Line Motion-Tool Configuration Jacobian Matrix -Manipulator Dynamics-Dynamic Model of a Robot Using Lagrange's Equation Navigation and Guidance of Mobile Robots- Path Planning-The Control Problem-State EquationsSingle Axis PID Control-PD Gravity Control-Computed Torque Control-Variable Structure ControlImpedance Control. References: 1. John J. Craig , 'Introduction to Robotics Mechanics and Control', Pearson Education Asia. 2. Ashitava Ghosal , 'Robotics Fundamental Concepts 'and Analysis' Oxford University Press. 3. Robin R. Murphy , 'Introduction to AIRobotics \ Prentice-Hall India, 2005. 4. Mark W. Spong . 'Robot Modeling and Control', Wiley India Pvt. Ltd. 5. Janakiraman P A , 'Robotics and Image processing', Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1995 6. Mikell P Grover, 'Automation, Production System, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing \ Prentice-Hall India, 1992 7. S R Deb , 'Robotics Technology and Flexible Automation', Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi 8. Yoran Kaen , 'Robots for Engineering', McGraw Hill 9. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

42

EGE 2003

INTRODUCTION TO RADAR SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To understand the principle of operation of radars and its application in navigation, guidance and control of aerospace vehicles. Syllabus Radar -Block Diagram and Operation - Radar Equation - Radar Frequencies - Receiver Noise Probability Density Functions Signal To "Noise Ratio Magnetron Oscillator - Transmitter Power Pulse Repetition Frequency and Range Ambiguities - Pulse Duration- Propagation EffectsScanning Radar- Tracking Radar- Lobe Switching- Conical Scan- Monopulse Tracking-Millimeter Wave Tracking Radars - Radar Cross Section of Targets- Back Scatter Cross Section-Cross Section Fluctuations- Radar Cross Section Measurements- CW And FM Radar-Air Born Doppler NavigationMultiple Frequency CW Radar- Target Reflection- Reflection Characteristics and Angular Accuracy, Tracking Range. Modern Radars - Laser Radar- MT1 and Pulse Doppler Radar - Synthetic Aperture Radar - AirSurveillance Radar - MMW Radar - Sensor Radar - Missile Guidance and Seeker Systems Acquisitions - Tracking With Surveillance Radar Radomes Stabilization of Antennas Classification of Targets With Radar- Radar Clutter - Navigation and Remote Sensing Radar -Multi Function Array Radars - Radars for Navigation and Guidance of Robots - Radars for Aerospace Applications.

References: 1. Merril 1. Skolnik , Introduction to Radar Systems', 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company 1981. 2. Current Literature.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

43

EGE2004

DIGITAL CONTROL OF AEROSPACE SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective; To impart ideas of various techniques of digital autopilot design for aerospace vehicles. Syllabus Introduction-Review of Z-Transforms, Modified Z-Transform, Controllability and Observability, Digital Autopilots for Aircrafts, Missiles, Launch Vehicles and Other Aerospace VehiclesClassical Controller Design. Digital Autopilot Design Via Pole Placement and Eigen Structure Assignment, Observers, P1D Control, Optimal Control, Regulator and Tracking Systems, Kalman Filters, LQG / LQR. H2 / H And Robust Controller Design, Adaptive Control, Design of Digital Controller for Aircraft. Missiles, Launch Vehicles and Spacecrafts. Fault Detection and Isolation, Digital Fly-By-Wire Systems.

References 1. Franklin G F- Powell. J D and Worknann M L , 'Digital Control of Dynamic Systems', Addison WerIey-1990 2. Stoorvogel A . The Hoc Control Problems \ Prentice Hall, 1992 3. Green M, Liniebeer D , 'Linear Robust Control', Prentice-Hall, 1995 4. Frank L Lewis 'Applied Optimal Control and Estimation', Prentice- Hall, Inc. NJ, 1992. 5. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

44

EGE2005

HELICOPTER DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give insight into the principle of operation and control of Helicopters. Syllabus Introduction- History of Helicopter Flight-Rotor Aerodynamics-Configuration-Operation-Vertical Flight-Disk Loading and Power Loading- Induced Flow Ratio-Thrust and Power CoefficientsFigure of Merit- Induced Tip Loss-Climb and Descent-Vortex- Forward Flight- Blade Element Analysis- Momentum Theory- Radial Inflow Equation- Ideal Twist-Effects of Swirl VelocityCirculation Theory of Lift- Prandtl's Tip Loss Function-Blade Design and Figure Of MeritCompressibility Correction To Rotor Performance- Types of Rotors-Flapping Hinge- Lead Lag Hinge-Flapping Angle-Helicopter Performance- Hovering and Axial Climb-Forward Flight Performance- Reverse Flow-Performance Analysis. Stability and Control- Longitudinal and Lateral Dynamics- Flying Qualities. References 1. Wayne Johnson, 'Helicopter Theory \ Dover Publications lnc- New York, 1980. 2. J, Gordon Leishman, 'Principles of Helicopter Aerodynamics', Cambridge University Press -Second Edition. 2006. 3. Current Literature.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

- 45

EGC 2101

GUIDANCE AND CONTROL LAB

0-0-2-1

1. Wind Tunnel Experiments. 2. Flight Stability under Longitudinal and Lateral Dynamics 3 PN Guidance Law based Missile -Target Interception 4. Study of Position Control -Servo Plant using Quanser Module Speed Control - Servo Plant Position Control of rolling Ball and Beam Balancing of Inverted Pendulum through Rotary Motion arm Rotary Pendulum Angular Position Control - Flexible Link Position Control- Rotary Flexible Joint

5. Lab practice on LAB VIEW software 6. Study of servo control systems 7. Simulation of PMBLDC Motor Drive System.

//; addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Guidance/ Control Systems/Drives Laboratories,

Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted

46

EGE 3001 GUIDANCE AND CONTROL OF SPACE VEHICLES AND SATELLITES 3-0-0-3 Course Objective: To give the principles and various methods of guidance and control of space vehicles and satellites. Syllabus
Introduction to Astrodynamics-Fundamentals of Orbital Mechanics-Orbital Parameters- N-body Problem- Two-body Problem-Different Types of Orbits-Circular, Elliptical, Parabolic, Hyperbolic and Rectilinear Orbits, Energy of the Orbit, Orbital Transfer and RendezvousLEO,SSPO;GSO,GTO Orbits- Orbital Transfers-Impulse Transfer between Circular Orbits, Hofmann Transfer, Other Co-planar and Non-coplanar Transfers-Orbital Plane Changes. Space Flight, Space Vehicle Trajectories, Re-Entry of Space Vehicle, Re-Entry Dynamics, Ballistic Re-Entry, Skip Re-Entry, Double-Dip Re-Entry, Aerobraking, Lifting Body Re-Entry, Entry Corridor, Equilibrium Glide, Thermal and Structural Constraints, Commanded Drag Guidance. Attitude Control of Satellites, Reaction Wheel, Momentum Wheel, Thrusters, Stabilization of Satellites, Spin Stabilization, Gravity Gradient Stabilisation, Yo-Yo Mechanism, Control Moment Gyros, Orbit Determination of Satellites, Sensors in Satellite AOCs, Dual Spinners, Navigation of Satellites. Ascent Guidance, Satellite Rendezvous-Tethered Satellite Systems, Satellite Services, Space Stations, Docking of Spacecrafts. Interplanetary Missions- Lunar and Mars Mission References 1. Roger R Bate , 'Fundamentals of Astrodynamics ',Dover Publications Inc, New York, 1971 2. Francis Joseph Hale . 'Introduction to space Flight", Prentice Hall Inc.1994 3. Marshall H Kaplan , "Modern Spacecrafts Dynamics and Control \ John Wiley & Sons 4. Edward V B Stearns , ^Navigation and Guidance in Space \ Prentice-Hall IncEnglewood Cliffs, NJ 5. William E Wiesel, 'Space Flight Dynamics \ McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1989 6. Current Literature NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

47

EGE 3002

GUIDANCE AND CONTROLOF LAUNCH VEHICLE

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give insight into the navigation, guidance and control aspects of launch vehicles.
Syllabus Launch Vehicles, ASLV, PSLV, GSLV - Subsystem and Components- Inertial Sensors and Systems-Control Actuators and Thrusters-Basic Concepts of Launch Vehicle Navigation, Guidance and Control- Rigid Body Equations-Sloshing-Block Diagram of Autopilots- Attitude Control-Autopilot Design-Vehicle Flexibility- Explicit and Implicit Guidance, Inertial Guidance, Flat Earth Guidance, Perturbation Guidance, Velocity To Be Gained Guidance , Delta Guidance, Q Guidance, Near Optimal Guidance, Cross Product Steering, Linear Perturbation Guidance, Open Loop and Closed Loop Guidance- Functional Configuration of Guidance Systems Guidance System Configuration for ASLV and PSLV- Strap Down Gyro-Servo AccelerometerFunctional Blocks in Strap Down Systems -Actuator Systems -endo atmospheric guidance. Reaction Control Systems-Thrust Vector Control-Control Loop with Flexible Dynamics. Classification and Selection of Guidance Algorithms. References

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Arthur.L.Greensite , 'Analysis and Design of Space Vehicle Flight Control Systems'. Spartan Books. 1970. C.T.. Leondes Ed.. 'Guidance and Control of Aerospace Vehicles', McGrawHill, N.Y.? 1963. Fehse , Automated'RendezvousandDockingoj~ Spacecraft'-2001 G W Gage, ''Flat Earth Guidance \ Current Literature.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

48

EPC1001

OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Course offers different optimization procedures to solve a wide variety of problems which can be applied to different fields Syllabus Classification of optimization problems and applications-Basic concepts of design vectors-design constraints-constraint surface and objective function surfaces-Formulation and solution of linear programming problem-Karmarkar's method-Simplex Method-Two phase simplex methodDuality theory, Duel Simplex method-Sensitivity analysis to linear programming problemchanges in constants of constraints-changes in cost coefficients-changes in the coefficients of constraints-addition of new variables and addition of new constraints Introduction to Integer Programming methods -Branch and bound method-Gomory's cutting plane method for integer and mixed integer programming-lnteger polynomial programming-sequential linear discrete programming and nonlinear programming-Nonlinear programming-Properties of single and multivariable functionsOptimality criteria-Direct Search Methods-Gradient based methods-Newton's method- Conjugate Gradient Methods-Quasi - Newton Methods-DFP method-Broyden-Fletcher-Golfarb-Shanno method Constrained optimality criteria-Lagrange Multipliers-KKT Conditions-interpretation of KKT Conditions, Second order optimality Conditions-Linearization methods for constrained problemsmethod of feasible directions-GRG methods-Quadratic approximation methods for constrained problems-Variable metric methods for constrained optimization-Quadratic ProgrammingDynamic programming-Stochastic linear programming-stochastic nonlinear programmingstochastic separable programming-Multi objective optimization methods Basic concepts of Genetic algorithm based optimization. Text books: 1. G V Reklaitiss A Ravindran & K M Rajsdell, "Engineering optimization, Methods and Applications'John Wiley & Sons 2. Singiresu S Rao9 John, "Engineering Optimization Theory and Practices', 3rd Edition, Wiley and Sons, 1998 References: 1. A Ravindran, Don T Philips and Jamer J Solberg, 'Operations Research - Principles and Practice\iohn Wiley & Sons 2. P G Gill, W Murray and M H Wright, 'Practical Optimization', Academic Press, 1981 3. Fredrick S Hiller and G J Liberman, 'Introduction to Operations Research', McGraw-Hill Incl995 4. Ashok D Belegundu, Tirupathi R Chandrapatla, 'Optimization Concepts and Applications in Engineering', Pearson Education, Delhi, 2002 Prerequisite: Knowledge in matrix algebra and differential calculus. NOTE:

20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

49

EPC 1002

COMPUTER AIDED POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective of the course is to introduce computer applications in analysis of power systems Syllabus
Elementary linear graph theory - Incidence and network matrices. Development of network matrices from Graph theoretic approach, Building algorithm for Bus impedance matrix, Modification of ZB,,s matrix due to changes in primitive network. Load Flow Studies: Overview of Gauss, Gauss- Seidel and Newton Raphson Methods. Decoupled Newton Load Flow, Fast Decoupled Load Flow, AC/DC load flow, Three phase Load Flow Sparsity techniques - Triangular factorization - Optimal ordering - Optimal load flow in power Systems. Harmonic Load flow Analysis Incorporation of FACTS devices in Load Flow: Static Tap Changing, Phase Shifting (PS)? Static Var Compensator (SVC), Thyristor Controlled Series Compensator (TCSC) and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) Short Circuit studies - Types of Faults - Short circuit study of a large power system - Algorithm for calculating system conditions after fault - three short circuit, three phase to ground . double line to ground, line to line and single line to ground fault - Short circuit studies using bus admittance matrix. Wavelet based applications in power systems References: 1. Stagg and El Abiad, "Computer methods in Power system Analysis\ McGraw Hill, 1968 2. G L Kusic, 'Computer Aided Power System Analysis', Prentice Hall, 1986 3. J Arriliga and N R Watson. 'Computer modeling of Electrical Power Systems'* Wiley, 2001 4. L P Singh, 'Advanced Power Systems analysis and dynamics'. New Age Inth Publishers, 1983 5. IJ Nagrath and D P Kothari, 'Modern Power system Analysis', Tata McGraw Hill, 1980 6. Jos Arrillaga, Bruce C Smith, Neville R Watson, Alan wood 'Power System Harmonic Analysis" John Wiley and Son, 1997 7. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

50

EPC 1003

POWER QUALITY

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective of the course is to discuss various power quality issues and different methods to control them Syllabus
Power quality issues in distribution systems - Different categories - Transients, short duration voltage variation, long duration voltage variation, voltage imbalance, waveform distortion, and voltage flicker- methods of characterization-typical causes and solutions. Harmonics -mechanism of harmonic generation-harmonic indices (THD5 TIF, DIN, C - message weights). standards and recommended practices . Harmonic Analysis - Fourier series and coefficients, the fourier transforms, discrete fourier transform, fast fourier transform. Window function. Harmonic sources - SMPS, Three phase power converters, arcing devices, saturable devices, fluorescent lamps Effects of Power System harmonics on Power System equipment and loads Harmonic elimination -passive filter, active filter - shunt , series, hybrid filters^ Computation of harmonic flows. Voltage regulation- devices for voltage regulation-capacitors for voltage regulation. Dynamic Voltage Restorers for sag. swell and flicker problems Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Introduction -Frequency Classification - Electrical fields - Magnetic Fields - EMI Terminology - Power frequency fields - High frequency Interference - EMI susceptibility - EMI mitigation Cable shielding- Health concerns of EMI References:
4

1. R.C.Durgan, MF Me Gran^ghen, H W Beaty, "Electrical Power System Quality", Mcgraw hill 2. Jose Arillaga, Neville R Watson, "Power System Harmonics', Wiley, 1997 3. C.Sankaran, 'Power Quality', CRC Press2002 4. G T Heydt, "Power Quality', stars in circle publication Indiana 1991 5. Math H Bollen, "Understanding Power Quality Problems' 6. Recent literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

51

EPC 1101

POWER SYSTEMS LAB I

0-0-2-1

1. Load flow analysis (Programming) 2. Short circuit and Transient stability studies 3. Voltage Instability analysis MA. Dt>-*>^ 4. Dynamic stability studiesliff M^ ^ 5. Harmonic analysis f^U.|>#/^ M'V

6. High voltage testing of Insulators

7. Determination of Transmission line parameters , SIL, Regulation, Efficiency and Voltage control of transmission line training system ^C 8. Stability study on Power Line Series Compensator < 9. Monitoring and analysis of Power system parameters 10. Characteristics of linear induction motor 11. Experiments on Static and Electro magnetic Relays In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few experiments in the Electrical Machines Laboratory. In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Power Systems Laboratories. Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

52

EPC 2001

POWER SYSTEM DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To introduce various types of small signal stability problems that will encounter in power systems and also to introduce means to overcome them
Syllabus Concept of Power system stability-Types of stability-Classical model of single machine connected to infinite bus and a multi machine system-mathematical modeling of power system elements for stability studies-Synchronous machines. Excitation systems and Prime mover controllers-Transmission lines-Loads-HVDC and FACTS devices Small Signal Analysis-Fundamental concepts of Stability of Dynamic Systems: State Space representation-Linearization-Eigen properties of state matrix-Small Signal Stability of Single Machine Infinite Bus(SMlB) System-Heffron-Phillips constants-Effects on Excitation system Block diagram representation with exciter and AVR-Power System Stabiliser(PSS): State matrix including PSS-Small Signal Stability of Multi Machine Systems-Special Techniques for analysis of very large systems: Analysis of Essentially Spontaneous Oscillations in Power Systems(AESOPS) algorithms-Modified Arnold! Method(MAM), Characteristics of Small Signal Stability Problems: local problems and global problems-Small Signal Stability Enhancement: Using Power System Stabilisers-Supplementary control of Static Var CompensatorsSupplementary Control of HVDC transmission links-Inter area oscillations Sub synchronous Resonance-Turbine-Generator torsional Characteristics-Torsional interaction with Power System Controls-Sub synchronous resonance-Impact of network switching disturbances-Torsional interaction between closely coupled units-Hydro generator torsional characteristics References: 1. Anderson and Fourd , 'Power System Control and Stability" , Galgotia Publications, 1981 2 . K R Padiyar, 'Power System Dynamics', 2nd Edition, B.S. Publishers, 2003 3. P Kundur, 'Power system Stability and Control', McGraw-Hill Inc., 1994 4. P W Sauer & M A Pai, 'Power System Dynamics and Stability, Pearson, 2003 5. Olle I Elgerd, 'Electric Energy Systems Theory an Introduction', 2nd Edition, McGrawHill, 1983 6. E W Kimbark, 'Power System Stability', Wiley & IEEE Press, 1995 7. Yao-nan-Yu, 'Electric Power Systems Dynamics', Academic Press, 1983

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

53

EFC 2002 OPERATION AND CONTROL OF POWER SYSTEM

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective of the course is to make the students aware the importance of Economic operation as well as control of power system. Syllabus
Introduction-Review of Thermal units.-The Lambda iteration method-First order gradient method base point and participation factors. Generation with limited supply-Take or pay fuel contract-composite generation production cost function- solution of gradient search techniques. Hard limits and slack variables-Fuel scheduling by -linear programming. Hydro-thermal coordination-Long range and short range scheduling- Hydro-electric plant models- scheduling problems types of scheduling problems. Scheduling energy-short-term hydrothermal scheduling problem-Pumped storage hydro plants-pumped storage hydro scheduling X-y iteration. Inter change evaluation and power pools-Economy interchange evaluation with unit commitments. Types of interchange. Energy banking-power pools. Power system security-system monitoringcontingency analysis- security constrained optimal power flow- Factors affecting power system security. Detection of network problems. Control of generation-Automatic Generation control Review-AGG implementation -AGC features -Modeling exercise in single area system using SIMUL1NK.AGC with optimal dispatch of Generation-Reactive power and voltage control-AGC including excitation system. State estimation in power system-Introduction- state estimator functions- network real time modelingconventional "state estimation-generalized state estimatif n-Network Topology processor(NTP)Weighted Least square(WLS) estimator Network Observ.ibilty analysis-Bad data detection and Identification-Network parameter estimation-Topology Error Processing. References: 1. A J. Wood and B F Wolien Berg, Towrer generation .Operation and control \ John Wiley ,1984 2. S S Vadhera. 'Power system Analysis and stability', Khanna Publishers 3. Kirchmayer, 'Economic operation and control of power system', Wiley 1958 4. Mahalanabis & D P Kothari, 'Computer Aided analysis and control of power systems', TMH,1999 5 A Montieelli.,'State Estimation in Electric power system-A Generalised Approach' 6. Ali Abur & Antonio Gomez Exposito, 'Power system state estimation-Theoiy and Implementation1, Marcel Dekkerjnc. 7. Hadi Sadat, 'Power system Analysis'- Tata MaGraw Hill 8. Recent literature.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

54

EPE2001

DIGITAL PROTECTION OF POWER SYSTEM

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To gel an overall idea of different types of static relays and its applications, and about the modern techniques used in power system protection Syllabus Static relays Merits and demerits-Comparators-Amplitude and Phase Comparators-Duality between Amplitude and phase Comparators Over current protection * * Time current characteristic-Special characteristic-different types of static over current relays-Static over voltage and under voltage relays-Static directional relays Distance protection scheme Standard 3 zone protection-Types of static distance relays-impedance, reactance. Mho, quadrilateral, elliptical .numerical relays -Effect of arc resistance and power surges in the performance of distance relays-Pilot Relaying Scheme-wire pilot protection-carrier current protection Microprocessor based protective relays Over current relay-Impedance relay-Directional relay-reactance relay-Basic protection scheme using microcomputers Computer application to protected relays Digital computer-Digital simulation of power system disturbance-Digital simulation of distance relay during tfansierits-On line and Offline application of digital computers to protection Digital signal proc ssing techniques: sampling, aliasing, Fourier. Discrete Fourier Transforms and Fast Fourier Transforms. Numerical algorithms, CT/PT modelling and standards, simulation of transients, electromagnetic transient program (EMTP). References:
UTS Madhava Rao, * Power system protection Static relays' , T M H, 1991 2. Badri Ram DM & Viswakarma,'Power system protection and switchgear , TMH, 1999 3. C R Mason. 'The art and science of protective relays', Wiley Eastern 4. M V Deshpande, 'Switchgear Protection', TMH, 1993 5.''Power system protection. Volume-1,11 & 111 edited by the Electricity Council" 6 . J.L. Blackburn,, Marcel Dekker, "Protective Relaying : Principles and Applications' New York, 1987. 7, A.G. Phadke and J.S. Thorp, 'Computer Relaying for Power Systems', John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1988.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

55

EPE2002

TRANSIENT ANALYSIS IN POWER SYSTEM

3-0-0-3

Course Objective :To introduce various types of transient overvoltages in power system and the methods to overcome them Syllabus Lightning ami travelling waves : Transients in electric power systems - internal and external causes of over voltages - lightning strokes - mathematical model to represent lightning - stroke to tower and midspan - travelling waves in transmission lines selection of typical wave to represent over voltages. Switching Transients : Switching transients - the circuit closing transient - the recovery transient initiated by the removal of the short circuit double frequency transients abnormal switching transients - current suppression - capacitance switching - arcing ground - transformer inrush current - ferro resonance - neutral connections - transients in switching a three phase reactor- three phase capacitor. Surges in transformers, motors and Generators : Step voltage - voltage distribution in transformer winding -winding oscillations - Travelling wave solutions - Transformer core under surge conditions - voltage surges -Transformers - Generators and motors Transient parameter values for transformers - Reactors - Generators - Transmission lines Protective Devices and Systems : Basic idea about protection - surge diverters - surge absorbers - ground fault neutralizers - protection of lines and stations by shielding ground wires - counter poises - driven rods - modern lightning arrestors - insulation coordination - protection of alternators- industrial drive systems. Text Books: 1. Allen Greenwood, 'Electrical transients in power systems', Wiley Interscience, 1971 2. Bewely LW, "Travelling Waves and transmission systems', Dover Publications, New York, 1963 References: 1 .Gallaghar P J and Pearmain A J, 'High Voltage Measurement, Testing and Design \ John Wiley and sons, New York, 1982. 2. Klaus Ragallea "Surges and High voltage networks" Press, 1980. 3. Diesendrof W"Over Voltages on High Voltage Systems", Rensselaer Book Store, roy, New York, 1971.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

56

EPE 2003

FACTS AND CUSTOM POWER

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Advances in Power electronics Industry led to rapid development of Power Electronics controllers for fast real and reactive power control The aim of the course is to introduce these advancements Syllabus
Introduction to FACTS - Flow of power in AC systems , Power flow and dynamic stability considerations of a transmission interconnections, Basic Types of FACTS controllers, Description and definition of FACTS controllers - Benefits from FACTS technology. Converters for Static Compensation - Three Phase Converters and Standard Modulation Strategies (Programmed Harmonic Elimination and SPWM) . GTO Inverters, Multi-Pulse Converters and Interface Magnetics , Transformer Connections for 12 , 24 and 48 pulse operation Multi-Level Inverters of Diode Clamped Type and Flying Capacitor Type and suitable modulation strategies (includes SVM), Multi-level inverters of Cascade Type and their modulation , Current Control of Inverters. Static shunt Compensator - Objectives of shunt compensations, Methods of controllable VAR generation - Variable impedance type VAR Generators -TCR , TSR, TSC, FC-TCR Principle of operation, configuration and control , Switching converter type VAR generators, Principle of operation, configuration and control , SVC and STATCOM - Regulation slope - Transfer functions and Dynamic performance Var Reserve Control , Comparison between SVC and STATCOM Static Series compensator - Objectives of series compensations , Variable impedance type series compensators - (GCSC. TCSC, TSSC - Principle of operation, configuration and control. Application of TCSC for mitigation of SSR, Switching converter type Series Compensators (SSSC), Principle of operation, configuration and control. Static Voltage and Phase Angle Regulators (TCVR &TCPAR): Objectives of Voltage and Phase angle regulators, Thyristor controlled Voltage And Phase angle Regulators - Principle of operation, configuration and control. Switching converter type Voltage and Phase Angle Regulators , Unified Power Flow Controller(UPFC)- Principle of operation, configuration and control, Simulation of UPFC, Steady state model of UPFC. Interline Power Flow Controller(lPFC) - Principle of operation, configuration and control. References: 1. T J E Miller, "Reactive Power Control in Power Systems' , John Wiley, 1982 2. J Arriliga and N R Watson, "Computer modeling of Electrical Power Systems', Wiley, 2001 3 . N G Hingorani and L Gyugyi, 'Understanding FACTS', IEEE Press, 2000 4.Y.H. Song and A.T. Johns, 'Flexible ac Transmission Systems (FACTS)\ IEE Press, 1999 5. Ned Mohan et.al ''Power Electronics' John Wiley and Sons. 6. Dr Ashok S & KS Suresh kumax, 'FACTS Controllers and applications " course book for STTP, 2003 7. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

57

EPE2004

MODERN TRENDS IN POWER SYSTEM OPERATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective oj the course is to introduce modern power system operation practices in the deregulated environment Syllabus
Deregulation Introduction - Deregulation of Electric Utilities - Energy Generation under new environment Competitive whole sale electricity market - Transmission expansion in new environment Transmission Open Access - Pricing Electricity in Deregulated environment- Availability based Tariff Advances in online control of Power System Application of Internet and GPS in power system control Application of Artificial Neural Networks, Fuzzy. Neuro-fuzzy, Genetic Algorithms and Experts systems in Power System Control Electrical Safety Hazards of electricity - Electrical Safety Equipment - Safety Procedures and methods Grounding of Electrical Systems and Equipment - Regulatory and Legal Safety Requirements and Standards - Safety Audits - Rescue and first aid procedures. Energy Management: Energy Conservation Through Demand Side Management-Load Management- Reactive Power Control. References: 1. Loi Lei Lai. 'Power System Restructuring and Deregulation: Trading Performance and Information Technology'' John Wiley, 2001 2. 'Proceedings oflEEE\ February 2000 3. Steven Stoft, 'Power System Economies', IEEE Press, 2002 4. John Cadick, Mary Capelli - Schellpfeffer, Dennis. K, 'Electrical Safety Handbook", Me Graw Hill, 2005. 5. David. J. Mame, cMc-Graw Hills' National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) Handbook', Me Graw Hill, 2002 6. Craig B Smith, 'Energy management principles*, Pergamon Press 7. Current Literature

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

58

EPE2005

POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective of the course is to introduce various advancements in the distribution systems Syllabus Power System: General Concepts - Distribution of power - Management - systems study - Loads and Energy Forecasting: Power loads - Area Preliminary survey load forecasting - Regression analysis - Correlation analysis - Analysis of time series - Factors in power system loading Technological forecasting Sources of error Planning, Design and Operation methodology: System calculations, Network elements Distribution load flow: Radial systems, distribution systems with loops - fault studies - effect of abnormal loads, Voltage control - line circuits - harmonics- urban distribution - load variations Ferro resonance - system losses - Energy management Distribution automation: Distribution automation - Definitions - Project Planning Communication, Sensors, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), Consumer Information systems (CIS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Optimization of distribution systems: Introduction, Costing of Schemes, Typical network configurations - Long and Short term planning, network cost modelling, voltage levels Synthesis of optimum line networks -Application of linear programming to network synthesis Optimum Phase sequence - Economic loading of distribution transformers- Worst case loading of distribution transformers - System Reliability: Introduction Definition Failure Probability Concepts -, limitation of distribution systems- Power quality variations -Reliability Measurement- Power supply quality survey - Reliability aids - Consumer Services: Supply industry - Natural monopoly - Regulations - Standards - Consumer load requirements Cost of Supply - load management - theft of power ~ Energy metering - Tariffs: Costing and Pricing, Classification of Tariffs - Grounding: Grounding system. Earth and Safety Earthing Schemes Earth Testing Power Capacitors: Reactive power - Series and shunt capacitors - system harmonics - HT shunt capacitor installation requirements - size of capacitors for power factor improvement - LT capacitors - Guide for operation of shunt capacitor Insulation measurements: Insulation supervision. Insulation measurements: Destructive and Nondestructive tests - Transformer oil testing - System Protection: Time-current Characteristics Fuses - Circuit Breakers - Additional Protection Equipment Protective Relaying - Instrument Transformers - Unit Protection - System Maintenance: Successful Maintenance -Failures and Maintenance - Porcelain Insulator -Transformer oil maintenance - Transformer drying Lighting systems - Electrical Services for Buildings: Standards, Electrical Installations Consumer Power Supply arrangements- Switch gears - load estimation - Lighting design Road lighting - Flood lighting - Automatic Fire alarm systems - Electrical Call bell services Lightning protection Text Book: 1. A.S.Pabla, 'Electrical Power Distribution Systems', 4th Edn, TMH, 1997 References: 1. Turan Gonen, 'Electrical Power Distribution Engineering', McGraw Hill, 1986 2. Colin Bayliss, 'Transmission and Distribution Electrical Engineering', Butterworth Heinemann, 1996

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

59

EPE2006

SCADA SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Objective of the course is to introduce SCADA systems, its components, architecture, communication and applications. Syllabus Introduction to SCADAi Data acquisition systems. Evolution of SCADA, Communication technologies. Monitoring and supervisory functions, SCADA applications in Utility Automation, Industries SCADA System Components: Schemes- Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), Intelligent Electronic Devices (IED),Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Communication Network, SCADA Server, SCADA/HMI Systems SCADA Architecture: Various SCADA architectures, advantages and disadvantages of each system - single unified standard architecture -IEC 61850 SCADA Communication: Various industrial communication technologies -wired and wireless methods and fiber optics. Open standard communication protocols SCADA Applications: Utility applications- Transmission and Distribution sector -operations, monitoring, analysis and improvement. Industries - oil, gas and water. Case studies, Implementation. Simulation Exercises References: I. Stuart A Boyer. SCADA-Supervisoiy Control and Data Acquisition', Instrument America Publications. USA. 1999. 2. Gordan Clarke, Deon RzynAzvs;Practical Modern SCADA Protocols: DNP3, 60870J Related Systems', Newnes Publications, Oxford, UK,2004 NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper and Society of

60

EPC2101

POWER SYSTEMS LAB II

0-0-2-1

1, Optimal Load flow 2. Economic Dispatch 3, Relay coordination M* r 0*^* * f ^ 4. Simulation of converters using PSCAD/MATLAB 5. Simulation of SVC , STATCOM etc. using PSCAD/MATLAB alysisK* f 0 6. Three Phase Load

flow analys %,1\ Behaviour of power system components for different harmonic overvoltages 8. Study of thermal imager 9. Lab practice on LABV1EW software 10. Calibration of Electro static voltmeter using Sphere gap 11. String efficiency of insulators h V 12e Partial discharge measurement of Dielectrics r! V Hv

In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few experiments in the Electrical Machines Laboratory. In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Power Systems Laboratories. Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

61

EPE3001

POWER SYSTEM STABILITY AND RELIABILITY

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To equip ike engineers for operating power systems more effectively and reliably utilizing the resources in an optimal manner Syllabus
Concept of Power system stability-Types of stability Transient stability analysis: An Elementary View of Transient Stability-Structure of a complete power system model for transient stability analysis-Transient Stability Enhancement Voltage Stability Analysis-Definition and Criteria-Mechanism of Voltage Collapse-Static Analysis: V-Q sensitivity analysis, Q-V modal analysis-Determination of Shortest distance to instability-The continuation load flow analysis-Important voltage stability indices-Prevention of Voltage Collapse Concept of reliability, non-repairable components, hazard models, components with preventive maintenance, ideal repair and preventive maintenance, repairable components, normal repair and preventive maintenance. System reliability, monotonic structures, reliability of series-parallel structures, the V out of 'rf configuration, the decomposition methods, minimal tie and cut method, state space method of system representation, system of two independent components, two components with dependent failures, combining states, non-exponential repair times failure effects analysis, State enumeration method, application to non-repairable systems. Other methods of system reliability, fault free analysis. Monte Carlo simulation, planning for reliability, outage definitions, construction of reliability models. Generating capacity reserve evaluation, the generation model, the probability of capacity deficiency, the frequency and duration method, comparison of the reliability indices, generation expansion planning, uncertainties in generating unit failure rates and in load forecasts. Operating reserve evaluation, state space representation of generating units, rapid start and hot-reserve units, the security function approach. Interconnected systems, two connected systems with independent loads, two connected system with correlated loads, more than two systems interconnected. References: 1. K R Padiyar, 'Power System Dynamics', 2nd Edition, B.S. Publishers, 2003 2. P Kundur, 'Power system Stability and Control\ McGraw-Hill Inc., 1994 Publishers, 1998 4. J JEndrenyi, 'Reliability modeling in electric power systems' , John Wiley & Sons 5. Singh C, and Billinton R. 'System reliability modeling and evaluation', Hutchinston, London, 1977 3. T Van Cutsem, C Vournas, ' Voltage Stability of Electric Power Systems', Kluwer Academic

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question pape

62

EPE3002

EHV AC/DC TRANSMISSION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This course presents EHV ac-dc transmission system components, protection and insulation level for over voltages Syllabus Generation and measurement Generation and Measurement of High Voltages and currents : Generation of high AC/DC impulse voltages - impulse currents - measurement using sphere gaps -peek voltmeters potential dividers - high space CRO

EHV DC Transmission Converter circuits-single phase and three phase circuits-analysis of bridge converter-with and without overlap-grid control-features of control-actual control characteristics-constant minimum ignition angle control-constant current control-extinction angle control-stability of controlharmonics-characteristics of harmonics-means of reducing harmonics-telephone interferencefilters-single frequency and double frequency-tuned filters-DC harmonic filters-DC line oscillations and line dampers-over voltage protection-DC lightning arresters-DC circuit breakers basic concepts types & characteristics-Ground return-current field in the earth near an electrode buried electrode-two layer earth-three layer earth EHV AC Transmission Components of transmission system-voltage gradients of conductor-single and bundled conductor-corona effects-electrostatic field of EHV lines-biological effects-live wire maintenance-insulation coordination-insulation for power frequency-voltage-switching over voltage-lightning performance-calculation of line & ground parameters References: 1. EW Kimbark, 'Direct Current Transmission Volume - F ,John Wiley -New York 2. Rakosh Das Begamudre, 'EHV AC Transmission Engineering', New Age International (p) Ltd., 2nd Edition, 1997 3. KR Padiyar, 'HVDC Power Transmission Systems', Wiley Eastern Ltd.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

63

EPE3003

RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This subject provides sufficient knowledge about the promising new and renewable sources of energy so as to equip students capable of working with projects related to it and to take up research work in connected areas Syllabus Photo-Voltaic: Basic characteristics of sunlight - solar energy resource - photovoltaic cell-characteristics - equivalent circuit - photovoltaic for battery charging charge regulators - equipments and systems. Wind Turbines: Wind source - wind statistics-energy in the wind aerodynamics-rotor types - forces developed by blades - aerodynamic models - braking systems - tower control and monitoring system - power performance. Embedded Generation: Wind driven induction generators-power circle diagram-steady state performance - model ling-integration issues - impact on central generation transmission and distribution systems- wind farm electrical design. Isolated Generation: Wind - diesel systems - fuel savings - permanent magnet alternators - modeling - steady state equivalent circuit - self-excited induction generators integrated wind-solar systems. Other Renewable Sources : Micro-hydel electric systems - power potential - scheme layout - generation efficiency and turbine part flow - isolated and parallel operation of generators - geothermal-tidal and OTEC systems.

References:
1. John F Walker & Jenkins N, 'WindEnergy Technology', John Wiley and sons, Chichester, UK, 1997. 2. Van Gverstreaton R J and Mertens R P,'Physics, Technology and user of Photovoltaics \ Adam Hilger, Bristol, 1996. 3. Freries L L, ' Wind Energy Conversion Systems \ Prentice Hall, U. K., 1990 4. Imamura M. S et. al, 'Photovoltaic System Technology, European Hand Book\ H. S. Stephen & Associates.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

64

EMC1001

SOLID STATE POWER CONVERTERS

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This course covers (he operation and characteristics of modern power semiconductor devices and analysis of converters and power supplies Syllabus Power Semiconductor Devices -Gate Turn Off thyristor-MOS Controlled Thyristor-Power MOSFBT-1GBT-VI characteristicsdevice operation-switching characteristics and drive circuits AC Voltage Controllers -analysis of single phase ac regulators with R and RL loads-two and multistage sequence control of ac regulators DC to DC Converters -Buck converter-Boost converter-Buck-Boost converter-Cuk converter-two quadrant convertersfour quadrant converter-isolated dc-dc converters-forward converter-fly back converter I 'oltage Source Inverter -power circuit-control strategy and output waveforms of single phase full bridge inverters-3 phase six step bridge inverters and 3 phase 12 step inverters-voltage control of inverters-analysis of various PWM techniques-methods of harmonic elimination and reduction in PWM inverter Current Source Inverter -circuit configuration and waveforms of ideal single phase CSl-analysis of single phase capacitor commutated current source inverter with purely resistive and purely inductive loads Power Supplies -Switched Mode DC Power Supplies-operating principles-control-protection and isolationdifferent configurations-fly back-push pull-half bridge and full bridge-Resonant DC Power Supplies-Bi-directional DC Power Supplies-AC Power Supplies-Uninterruptible power suppliesSwitched mode AC power supplies-Resonant AC power supplies-Bi-directional AC power supplies References 1. Muhammad H Rashid, "Power Electronic Circuits, Devices and Applications" Pearson Education Asia, 2003 2. Bimal K Bose, 'Modern Power Electronics and AC Drives', Pearson Education Asia, 2003 3. Jay P Agarwal, 'Power Electronic Systems Theory and Design' Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2001 4. G K Dubey, S R Dorodha, A Joshi, RMK Sinha, "Thyristerised Power Controllers' , Wiley Eastern Ltd, 1986 5. M D Singh, K B Khanchandani, 'Power Electronics" ,Tata Mcgraw Hill, New Delhi, 1998 6. Jayant Baliga, 'Modern Power Devices' , John Wiley and Sons, 1987 7. S B Dewan, A Straughen, 'Power Semiconductor circuits' 5 John Wiley and Sons, 1989 Prerequisite: First level course in power electronics NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

65

EMC 1002

MODELING OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To develop the basic elements of generalized theoiy and to derive the general equations for voltage and torque of all type of rotating machines and to deal with their steady state and transient analysis Syllabus: Unified approach to the analysis of electrical machine performance - per unit system - basic two pole model of rotating machines- Primitive machine -special properties assigned to rotor windings - transformer and rotational voltages in the armature voltage and torque equationsresistance, inductance and torque matrix. Transformations - passive linear transformation in machines- invariance of power - transformation from three phase to two phase and from rotating axes to stationary axes-Park's transformation DC Machines: Application of generalized theory to separately excited, shunt, series and compound machines. Steady state and transient analysis, transfer functions. Sudden short circuit of separately excited generator, sudden application of inertia load to separately excited dc motor. Synchronous Machines: synchronous machine reactance and time constants-Primitive machine model of synchronous machine with damper windings on both axes. Balanced steady state analysis-power angle curves. Transient analysis- sudden three phase short circuit at generator terminals - armature currents and torque. Determination of reactance and time constants from short circuit oscillogram - Transient power angle curve-Hunting performance-equation of motion of rotor-linearised analysis for small oscillations. Induction Machines: Primitive machine representation- Steady state operation-Equivalent circuit-Double cage rotor representation - Equivalent circuit -Induction machine dynamics during starting and braking. References 1. P.S.Bhimbra, 'Generalized theory of electrical machines \ , Khanna Publishers, 2002 2. Charles V. Johnes, 'Unified theory of electrical machine'. 3. Adkins and Harley, 'General theoiy ofac machines'. 4. C. Concordia, 'Synchronous machines* 5. M. G. Say, *Introduction to unified theory of electrical machines' 6. E. W.Kimbark, 'Power System Stability Vol. IIP

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

66

EMC1003

SPECIAL ELECTRICAL MACHINES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This paper gives an over view of some of the special machines for control and industrial applications. Syllabus Reluctance Motors: Principle of Operation-Conventional and special types of rotor constructionanalysis and equivalent circuit-phasor diagram-circular loci of current and voltage componentsmaximum pf-power expression-pull-in characteristics-factors affecting pulling in-applications Switched Reluctance Motors: Principle of Operation-structure-inductance profile-Torque production-static and dynamic-Energy conversion loops-partition of energy and effects of saturation-control-Torque/speed characteristics-Rotor position sensing methods-different typescomparison Servomotor: AC servomotors-construction-principle of operation-performance characteristicsdamped AC servomotors-Drag cup servomotor-applications-DC servomotors-field and armature controlled DC servomotors-permanent magnet armature controlled-series split field DC servomotor-printed circuit motors. Stepper Motors: different types-construction-theory of operation-monofilar and bifilar windingsmodes of excitation-static and dynamic characteristics-no of teeth-steps per revolution and no of poles-single phase stepping motors. Linear Motors: different types-end effect -goodness factor-equivalent circuit of LIM applications-linear reluctance motor-linear synchronous motors. Brushless Machines: Brushless DC motors-Brushless Servomotor-Torque generation principlesmotor characteristics. Reference 1. T.J.E. Miller, 'Brushless PM and Reluctance Motor Drives \ C. Larendon Press, Oxford. 2. Takashi Kenjo? 'Stepping Motor and Microprocessor Control \ Oxford Science Publications. 3. Vienott & Martin, 'Fractional & Sub fractional hp Electric Motors \ McGraw Hill International Edn. 4. Bimal K Bose, 'Modern Power Electronics & AC Drives '-,Prentice Hall India Ltd. 5. Sake Yamamura,' Theory of Linear Induction Motors '-,University of Tokyo Press. 6. Irving L Kossow, 'Electrical Machinery and Transformers \Oxford Science Publications 7. Theodore Wildi, 'Electric Machines, Drives and Power Systems'-, Prentice Hall India Ltd. 8. E.V.Armensky&G .B.Falk, 'Fractional Hp Electrical Machines \ ,Mir Publishers 9. Laithwaite, 'Induction Machines for special purposes'

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

67

EMC 1101

LABORATORY PRACTICE -I

0-0-2-1

(ELECTRICAL MACHINES)

1. Control of DC motor (Simulation using MATLAB/SIMULINK) 2. Control of Induction Motor (Vector control using MATLAB/SIMULINK) 3. Voltage and Current monitoring using LABVIEW 4. Control experiments using LABVIEW 5. Design experiments using MAXWELL. 6. Circuit design and PCB design using ORCAD. 7". Simulation and Analysis of simple networks using PSCAD In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few experiments in the Power Systems Laboratory. In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Electrical Machines Laboratories. Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

68

EMC2001

CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL DRIVES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This course covers the control of dc drives, scalar and vector control of induction motor drives, control of synchronous motor drives, and control of brush less dc and ac motor drives Syllabus Separately Excited DC Motors and DC series motors

-system model-braking-speed control-motor dynamics (review) DC Drives -fully controlled rectifier drives-inverter operation-half-controlled rectifier drives-single quadrant-two quadrant and four quadrant drives-power in load and source circuits-closed loop control of DC drives-transfer function-micro computer control of DC drives-block diagram and flowchart Three Phase Induction Motors -equivalent circuit-braking-speed control-variable voltage operation-variable frequency operation(review)-constant volts/Hz operation-Voltage source inverter drives-Pulse Width Modulated inverter drives-space vector PWM drives-CSI drives-slip power recovery drives-Vector control-DC drive analogy-direct vector control-indirect vector control-Direct Torque Control (DTC) Synchronous Motor Drives -Volt/hertz control of synchronous motor-closed loop operation-self-controlled synchronous motors Switched Reluctance Motor Drives. Permanent Magnet Brushless DC motor Drives, Sensor less Speed Control of DC and AC Drives.
References 1. Bimal K Bose, 'Modern Power Electronics and AC Drives" , Pearson Education Asia, 2003 2. Peter Vas, *Sensorless Vector and Direct Control' , Oxford London, 1998 3. Dubey G K. 'Power Semiconductor Controlled Drives' , Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1989 4. Peter Vas, '"Sensorless Vector and Direct Control' , Oxford London, 1998 5. Muhammad H Rashid, 'Power Electronic Circuits, Devices and Applications' , Pearson Education Asia, 2003 6. NKDe,PK Sen, 'Electrical Drives' , Prentice-Hall of India, 2002 7. Dewan S B, G R Slemons, A Straughan, 'Power Semiconductor Drives' , John Wiley and Sons, 1984 8 Jay P Agarwal, 'Power Electronic Systems Theory and Design' , Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2001 9 J M D Murphy,c Thyrister Control of AC Drives', Papermon Press, 1973 10 T J.E Miller,'Brushless PM and Reluctance Motor Drives' ,C.Larendon Press, Oxford

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

69

EME2001

FIELD THEORY

3-0-0-3

Course Objectives: This presents a unified macroscopic theory of electromagnetic waves in accordance with the principle of special relativity from the point of view of the form in invariance of Maxwell's equations and the constitutive relations. Tlie topic includes the fundamental equations and boundary conditions, time harmonic fields, waves through space and media, reflection, transmission, guidance and resonance of electromagnetic waves, antenna theory and the various methods of flux plotting. Syllabus Time varying fields and electromagnetic waves - Solution of Maxwell's equations for charge free unbounded region - Uniform waves - Uniform plane waves - Characteristics - Wave impedance and propagation constant - Wave propagation in good dielectrics, conductors - Depth of penetration - Surface impedance of good conductor to sinusoidal currents - Polarization Elliptic, Linear and Circular polarization. Waves at boundary between two media - Wave incident normally on boundary between perfect dielectrics - Wave incident obliquely on boundary between perfect dielectrics - Wave polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence - Parallel polarization - Wave incident normally on perfect conductor - Oblique incidence - Brewster angle. SnelPs law. Poynting Vector - Poynting Vector for a plane wave in a dielectric - Flow of direct current in cylindrical resistor - Co-axial cables - Instantaneous. Average and Complex poynting vector. Guided waves - Essential conditions -Transverse electric waves - Transverse magnetic waves Characteristics - TEM waves - Velocities of Propagation - TEM waves in co-axial cables and two wire transmission line - Attenuation factor for TE. TM and TEM waves. Propagation characteristics of Radio waves - Electro-magnetic wave spectrum - Transmission path from transmitter to receiver - Ionosphere - Ionospheric investigation - Virtual height and critical frequency - Maximum usable frequency. Eddy current problems - Calculation of Eddy current loss - Effect of saturation Flux plotting Two Dimensional field plotting methods - Method of images - Multiple images - Image of point charge in conducting sphere - Graphical method of field mapping - experimental methods. Text Books

1. V V Sarwate, 'Electromagnetic field and waves' , Wiley Eastern, Second Edition 2. William H Hayt Jr., 'Engineering Electromagnetics', Tata McGraw Hill, Fifth Edition
References

1. Kraus/ Fleisch, 'Electromagnetics with applications' , McGraw Hill Inter National, Fifth Edition 2. E C Jordan, 'Electromagnetic waves and Radiating systems' 3. P V Gupta, 'Electromagneticfields'

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

70

EME2002

FINITE ELEMENT METHODS OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES 3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To give a basic idea of the finite element methods as applicable to electrical engineering and to apply it for analyzing the performance of electrical machines. Syllabus Introduction: Conventional design Procedures - Limitations - Need for Field Analysis based design - History of development and Applications - Recent Trends Mathematical Formulation of Field Problems: Review- Development of Torque/Force Electromagnetic Field Equations - Magnetic Vector/Scalar Potential - Electrical Vector/Scalar Potential - Stored Energy in Field Problems - Inductances - Maxwell Equations - Laplace and Poissons Equations - Energy Functional - Principle of Energy Conversion Philosophy of FEM: Mathematical Models - Differential/Integral Equations - Finite Difference Method - Finite Element Method - Energy Minimization - Variational Method - 2d Field problems - Discretization - Shape Functions - Stiffness Matrix - Rayleigh Ritz and Galerkin Approach to finite Elements - Normal gradient boundary conditions- Forced and natural boundary conditions-a typical current flow problem - Galerkin Method for poison equation -A numerical example - Solution Techniques CAD Packages and Design Applications: Elements of CAD Systems - Preprocessing - Modeling - meshing - Material Properties - Boundary Conditions - Setting up Solutions - Electric and Magnetic Fields in a co-axial cable - The magnetic field - The electric field-finite element analysis - Case study of machines. References 1. Peter Silvester. Ronald L Ferrari. "Finite Elements for Electrical Engineers', Cambridge University Press. 2e S. Ratnajeevan H. Hoole , 'Computer Aided analysis and design of electromagnetics devices' ? Elsevier, Newyork. 3. D.A.Lowther and P.P.Silvester , 'Computer Aided design in Magnetics\ Verlag, Newyork 4. SJ.Salon, Kluwer , ^Finite Element ANAlysis of Electrical Machines', Academic Pub;ishers, London 5. Krishna Moorthy C. S., lAn Introduction to Computer Aided Electromagnetic Analysis, Vector Field Finite Element Analysis * Springer

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

71

EMC 2101

LABORATORY PRACTICE -II (ELECTRICAL MACHINES)

0-0-2-1

1. Measurement of current using Hall sensors. 2. Measurement of output voltage of cascade transformer using 1. Voltage Divider method 2. Sphere Gap method 3. Measurements of constants in a synchronous machine. 4. Generation of Impulse voltage and impulse current waveforms. 5. Speed control of Induction Motor using DSP Trainer. 6. Study of Linear Induction Motor. 7. Experiment on Vector Control Drive. 8. Control of Stepper motor. Reluctance motor DC motor, Induction Motor Synchronous Motor.

In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few experiments in the Power Systems Laboratory. In addition to the above, the Department can offer a few newly developed experiments in the Electrical Machines Laboratories. Minimum of 10 experiments are to be conducted.

72

EME3001 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES 3-0-0-3 Course Objective: To give an introduction to the analysis of time-varying and spatially dependant quantities of electric machines leading to better design. Study ofMATLAB software for the analysis. Syllabus Computer aided design- different approaches- analysis and synthesis methods- Hybrid methodFeasible design Design optimization- general procedure for optimization- mathematical formulation of the objective function- Different objective functions. Non-linear constrained optimization techniques for design of electrical, equipments- Exterior penalty function techniques, Geometric programming- comparison. Representation of B.H curves, wire tables etc. Torque produced in electric machines - torque as a function of air gap quantities. Steady state performance of induction machines, synchronous machines and commutator machines. Effect of flux harmonics, single phase induction machines Transient phenomena in electric machines. Transformer design- Design considerations, core section and yoke section design- multistep core design, computation of step dimension for optimum fill. Design of insulation and windings. Example case for computerized design. References 1. M Ramamoorthy, 'Computer aided Design of Electrical Equipments', Affiliated East West Press 2 . Machine Designf 3. S K Sen, 'Principles of Electrical Machine Design '-.Oxford and 1BH Publishing Co. 4. Matlab Reference Manual A. K Sawhney , lA Course in Electrical

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

73

EME 3002 DIGITAL SIMULATION OF POWER ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 3-0-0-3


Course Objective: To impart basic principles and modeling of different power semi conductor devices. Syllabus Principles of Modeling Power Semiconductor Devices - Macro models versus Micro models Thyristor model - Semiconductor Device modeled as Resistance, Resistance-Inductance and Inductance-Resistance-Capacitance combination - Modeling of Electrical Machines - Modeling of Control Circuits for Power Electronic Switches. Computer Formulation of Equations for Power Electronic Systems - Review of Graph Theory as applied to Electrical Networks - Systematic method of Formulating State Equations - Computer Solution of State Equations - Explicit Integration method - Implicit Integration method. Circuit Analysis Software MicroSim PSpice A/D - Simulation Overview - Creating and Preparing a Circuit for Simulation - Simulating a Circuit with PSpice A/D - Displaying Simulation Results PSpice A/D Analyses - Simple Multi-run Analyses - Statistical Analyses - Simulation Examples of Power Electronic systems. MicroSim PSpice A/D - Preparing a Schematic for Simulation - Creating Symbols - Creating Models - Analog Behavioral Modeling - Setting Up and Running analyses - Viewing Results Examples of Power Electronic Systems. Design Creation and Simulation with Saber Designer - Placing the Parts - Editing the Symbol Properties - Wiring the Schematic - Modifying Wire Attributes - Performing a Transient and DC Analysis - Placing Probes in the Design - Performing AC Analysis and Invoking SaberScope Analyzing waveforms \^ith SaberScope - Performing Measurements on a waveform - Varying a Parameter - Displaying the Parameter Sweep Results - Measuring a Multi-Member Waveform Simulation Examples of Power Electronic Systems. Texts/References 1. V.Rajagopalan: *Computer Aided Analysis of Power Electronic Systems', Marcel Dekker, Inc. 2. 'MicroSim PSpice A/D and Basics+: Circuit Analysis Software, User's Guide', MicroSim Corporation. 3. 'MicroSim Schematics: Schematic Capture Software, User's Guide', MicroSim Corporation. 4. 'Getting Started with Saber Designer (Release 5.7/ , An Analogy Inc. 5. 'Guide to Writing MAST Template (Release 5-1) \ Analogy Inc.

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper.

74

ECD 2002

Advanced Digital Signal Processing

3-0-0-3

Syllabus Review of Laplace Transforms. Z transforms, Fourier Transforms, Wavelet Transforms, Discrete Sequences and Systems-Introduction to Discrete Linear Time Invariant Systems, Digital processing of continuous-time signals- sampling, hold, ADC, DAC, Reconstruction Filter design Periodic Sampling-Aliasing, Spectral Inversion, Discrete Fourier Transforms- Properties of DFT, DFT Leakage, Windows, Interpreting DFT, Fast Fourier Transform- FFT Algorithm, D1T & DIF algorithms, Relationship of the FFT to the DFT, FFT Software programs, Radix -2 FFT Butterfly structures. MATLAB based exercises. Digital Filter Structures, Finite Impulse response filters- Introduction to FIR filters. Convolution in FIR filters, Low Pass FIR Filter design, Band pass Filter design, High pass filter design. Design of FIR filters using Windows Infinite impulse response filters- Design of 1IR Digital Filters from analog filters, Impulse invariance method, Bilinear transform design method, Butterworth filters, Chebyshev filters, Digital Filter design-, Digital Filter design using MATLAB. Basic FIR & IIR digital filter structures Comparison of IIR & FIR filters, Computer aided design of FIR & IIR digital filters. Realization of Basic structures using MATLAB. Other MATLAB based exercises. Digital signal processor: Fixed and floating point processors, Introduction to TMS320F240 processor, architectural features, addressing modes, instruction set, programming examples. References 1. Richard G Lyons - Understanding Digital Signal Processing. Pearson Education 2004 2. Sanjit K Mitra. Digital Signal Processing. Tata Me Graw hill 2004 3. Alan V. Oppenheim. & Ronald W Schafer. Digital Signal Processing, Prentice Hall India 2000. 4. Sen Kuo, Woon-Seng Gan? 'Digital Signal Processors- Architecture, Implementation and applications'

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

75

FXD 2001

EMBEDDED SYSTEMS AND REAL TIME APPLICATIONS 3-0-0-3

Syllabus Introduction to Embedded Systems- An Embedded system, features. Current trends and Challenges, Product life Cycle, Processor, Tool Chain, Hardware Design Issues, System memory Layouts, Real-time Systems. Hard and Soft, Predictable and Deterministic kernel, Scheduler. 8051-8 bit Microcontrollers and Interfacing Hardware: Microprocessor basics. Terminology and principles. 8051 Microcontroller Architecture: Function and basic description of 8051 components to include Special Function Registers (SFRs). Interfacing and address decoding techniques. Essential hardware for computer control. Interfacing, address decoding, analogue and digital input/output, input/output control A/D and D/A conversion, Interrupts, bus timing, serial and parallel communications, Bus timing, Interrupts Real-time systems. Software: Program creation, flow charting. Algorithms for embedded control. Structured programming, Data structures and types. Program classification. Computer control: Components of embedded control systems to include terminology and components. Discrete modelling for computer control. PID control in discrete form. Classification of programs, programs for sequential tasks, multitasking systems, real-time systems. Real World Interfacing - LCD, ADC, Sensors, Stepper motor, keyboard and DAC Project on 8051 - Application based on 8051 microcontroller. Programming Concepts - Review of C-Programming, Data Structures, C++, EC++ Real-Time Operating Systems - Introduction to OS and EOS Process Management & Inter Process Communication Memory management I/O subsystem File System Organization Introduction to Real-Time /Embedded Operating Systems. Real Time Scheduling Performance Metrics of RTOS Linux & RTLinux Internals Programming in Linux & RTLinux Configuring & Compiling RTLinux Overview of other RTOS/EOS. Embedded Systems Programming - Embedded System Design Issues Challenges & Trends in Embedded Systems Assemblers. Compilers, linkers, Loaders, Debuggers Profilers & Test Coverage Tools. Software Engineering- Software Life Cycle Models. Embedded Systems Design. Implementation and Testing, Project Management Core References 1. Raj Kamal, "EmbeddedSystems ", Tata Me Graw hill, 2003 2. Shultz, T. W, "C and the 8051: programming for multitasking". - Prentice-Hall, 1993 3. Mazidi," The 8051 Microcontrollers & Embedded Systems "> - Pearson Education Asia. References 1. Barnett, R. H, "The 8051 family of Microcontroller. Prentice Hall, 1995, 2. Ayala, K. J., 6 The 8051 Microcontroller: architecture, programming, and applications \ West Publishing, 1991, 3. Stewart, J. W.? 4 The 8051 Microcontroller: hardware, software and interfacing \ Regents/Prentice Hall, 1993 4. Yeralan, S, Ahluwalia, A. 'Programming and interfacing the 8051 Microcontroller', Addison-Wesley91995

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

76

EPD 2001 NEW AND RENEWABLE SOURCES OF ENERGY 3-0-0-3


Course Objective: This subject provides sufficient knowledge about the promising new and renewable sources of energy so as to equip students capable of working with projects related to it ami to take up research work in connected areas Syllabus: Direct solar energy The sun as a perennial source of energy; flow of energy in the universe and the cycle of matter in the human ecosystem; direct solar energy utilization; solar thermal applications - water heating systems, space heating and cooling of buildings, solar cooking, solar ponds, solar green houses, solar thermal electric systems; solar photovoltaic power generation; solar production of hydrogen. Energy from oceans Wave energy generation - potential and kinetic energy from waves; wave energy conversion devices; advantages and disadvantages of wave energy Tidal energy - basic principles; tidal power generation systems; estimation of energy and power; advantages and limitations of tidal power generation Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC); methods of ocean thermal electric power generation Other renewable forms of energy Wind energy - basic principles of wind energy conversion; design of windmills; wind data and energy estimation; site selection considerations. Classification of small hydro power (SHP) stations; description of basic civil works design considerations; turbines and generators for SHP; advantages and limitations. Biomass and bio-fuels; energy plantation; biogas generation; types of biogas plants; applications of biogas; energy from wastes Geothermal energy Origin and nature of geothermal energy; classification of geothermal resources; schematic of geothermal power plants; operational and environmental problems New energy sources (only brief treatment expected) Fuel cell: hydrogen energy; alcohol energy; nuclear fusion: cold fusion; power from satellite
stations

References 1. John W Twidell and Anthony D Weir, 'Renewable energy resources' , English Language Book Society (ELBS), 1996 2. Edited by Godfrey Boyle 'Renewable energy -power for sustainable future\ Oxford University Press in association with the Open University, 1996 3. S A Abbasi and Naseema Abbasi, 'Renewable energy sources and their environmental impact" Prentice-Hall of India, 2001 4. G D Rai, 'Non-conventional sources of energy', Khanna Publishers, 2000 5. G D Rai, 'Solar energy utilization', Khanna Publishers, 2000 6. S L Sah, 'Renewable and novel energy sources', M.I. Publications, 1995 7. S Rao and B B Parulekar, 'Energy Technology9, Khanna Publishers, 1999 Pre-requisite: General background of any Engineering Degree will be sufficient to learn this subject

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

77

EMD 2001

SPECIAL PURPOSE ELECTRICAL MACHINES

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This paper gives an over view of some of the special machines for control and industrial applications. Syllabus Servomotor- AC servomotors-construction-principle of operation-performance characteristicsdamped AC servomotors-Drag cup servomotor-applications-DC servomotors-field and armature controlled DC servomotors-permanent magnet armature controlled-series split field DC servomotor. Stepper Motors-different types-construction-theory of operation- Comparison -Applications. Reluctance Motors-Principle of Operation-Conventional and special types of rotor constructionequivalent circuit-phasor diagram-Characteristics-Applications. Switched Reluctance Motors-Principle of Operation- different types-comparison-Applications. Linear Motors-different types-end-equivalent circuit- applications-linear reluctance motor-linear synchronous motors. Brushless DC motors-Different Types-Applications Hysteresis Motor-Principle of operation-constructional details-selection of rotor materialsperformance characteristics-torque equation- applications. Magnetic Levitation Devices-Magnetostatic Repulsion, Magnetostatic Attraction-Electromagnetic repulsion-Magnetic Levitation Vehicles. Reference: 1. TJ.E. Miller, "Brushless PMand Reluctance Motor Drives', C. Larendon Press, Oxford. 2. Takashi Kenjo Publications. 3. Vienott & Martin , * Fractional & Sub fractional hp Electric Motors \ McGraw Hill International Edn. 4. Irving L Kossow, 'Electrical Machinery and Transformers \ Oxford Science Publications 5. Theodore Wildi, 'Electric Machines, Drives and Power Systems', Prentice Hall India Ltd.
%

'Stepping Motor and Microprocessor Control' , Oxford Science

NOTE: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

78

CS12001

Finite Element Analysis

3-0-0-3

Preliminaries - Strain displacement relations - constitutive relations - Energy principles Principle of virtual work - Total potential energy - Rayleigh-Ritz method - method of weighted residuals. Introduction to FEM - out line of the procedure -Element properties - polynomial form - shape function form - equilibrium and compatibility in the solution - convergence requirements. Developments of shape functions for truss, beam and frame elements- constant strain triangle Linear strain triangle -Bilinear plane rectangular elements -Consistent nodal loads - lumped loads-patch test - stress computation Isoparametric formulation - Line element- Plane bilinear element- Isoparametric formulation of Quadratic plane elements - Subparametric elements and superparametric elements - Gauss quadrature - Pate and shell elements. Solution techniques, Large systems of equations - Storage schemes- Solution techniques Discussion of Finite Element programs and packages Application of FEA in various fields of engineering References: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Cook R.D, Concepts and Application of Finite Element Analysis, Wiley & Sons Krishnamoorthy C.S, Finite Element Analysis, McGraw Hill. Zienkiewicz (XC, Tlie Finite Element Method. Bathe K J, Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis, Prentice HalL Rajasekharan S, Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design, Wheeler. Reddy J.N,v4w Introduction to FEM, McGraw Hill Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

79

CIC 3101

Research Methodology

Introduction - Meaning of research - Objectives of research - Motivation in research - Types of research - Research approaches - Significance of research - Research methods vs Methodology Criteria of good research. Defining Research Problem - What is a research problem - Selecting the problem - Necessity of defining the problem Literature review - Importance of literature review in defining a problem - Critical literature review - Identifying gap areas from literature review Research design - Meaning of research design - Need- Features of good design - Important concepts relating to research design - Different types - Developing a research plan Method of data collection Collection of data- observation method - Interview method Questionnaire method - Processing and analysis of data - Processing options - Types of analysis - Interpretation of results Report writing Types of report - Research Report, Research proposal /Technical paper Significance - Different steps in the preparation - Layout, structure and Language of typical reports - Simple exercises - Oral presentation - Planning - Preparation - Practice - Making presentation - Answering questions - Use of visual aids - Quality & Proper usage - Importance of effective communication - Illustration

References

Coley S M and Scheinberg C A. 1990, "Proposal Writing", Newbury Sage Publications* Leedy P D, "Practical Research : Planning and Design", 4th Edition, N W MacMillan Publishing Co. Day R A,. "How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper", Cambridge University Press, 1989.

102

M.Teche Degree Programme

INTER DISCIPLINARY ELECTIVES OFFERED FOR SEMESTER II

AFJ 2001:

URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Definition and General consideration of Urban Environment Management, Urban Systems, Management approaches Population, Technology, Management issues. Spatial behaviour, Structural and demographic meaning of urbanization, methods of decomposing urban growth components, level and rate of urbanization, economical demographics of urbanization and mega urbanization, urban poverty and informal sector, Rural and urban impacts f urbanization. Need for Environmental Management in Cities and Towns, Urbanization, Environment and Human Settlement Policies. Contemporary urban patterns, trends and problems - Major issues such as population change, the economy, land use, housing, neighbourhood development, fiscal and unemployment crises. International urbanization patterns and policies. Natural Environment, Built environment and Socioeconomic Environments. Management of Natural Environment in urban areas, open spaces, vegetation, water bodies, air, water, land, noise, soil etc. Built environment - Land use planning - Density control, housing, slums, and squatter settlements - Infrastructure - water supply, solid and liquid waste, transportation and other services. Spatial analysis and Management tools. Life cycle analysis, Environment assessment and reporting. Management control and decision making. Development standards and controls. Environmental Laws, Constitutional Environmental Provisions, Sustainable urbanization policies, environmental policies for sustainable cities. Sources and effects of urban pollution - Air, Noise, Odour, Water, Wastewater, Land, Solid wastes and toxic wastes and treatment technologies and decision making on urban pollution.

References 1. 2. 3-. 4. Tony Kendle and Stephen Forbes, "Urban Conservation - Landscape Management in Urban country Side - E & FN SPON, London, 1997. The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution Report - Transport and Environment- Oxford University Press, 1995. Rob Gray - Accounting for the Environment - Chartered Association of Certified Accountants- 1993. Brain J.L. Berny Urban Environmental Management

API 2002: ENERGY ENVIRONMENT & BUILDINGS

3-0-0-3

Energy Scenario and energy systems in nature - Reasons for the present energy and environmental crisis - Need for the energy and environmental conservation - Study of conventional, non-conventional, renewable, non-renewable energy - passive, active and hybrid systems. Building climatology (Indian context) - Need of climatically responsive energy efficient buildings - Analysis of climatic data for the building designers both in macro and micro levels. Concept of human comfort - Study and assessment of the factors influencing human comfort- Use of solar passive energy and wind energy in buildings. Study of the energy conception of buildings - Concept of embodied energy for materials and building components - Requirement of energy for production and operation - energy for maintaining the comfortable internal environment in buildings - Assessment of total energy in buildings. Factors affecting energy use in buildings - Environmental factors, envelope factors, air conditioning and electrical systems Energy sources Energy conservation Methods and techniques of energy performance assessment of buildings - Aspects of energy management in buildings - Energy audit of buildings.
References

1. 2. 3.

Baker Nick and Steemers Koen, "Energy and Environment in Architecture", E& FN, Spon. London, 1999. Goulding, John, R, Lewis, Owen J and Steemers, Theo C, ctEnergy in Architecture", Bastford Ltd., London, 1986. Bansal Naveendra K., Hauser Gerd and Minke Gernot, "Passive Buildings Designs : Handbook of Natural Climatic Control", Elsevier Science, Amsterdam 1997. Givonji B., "Man, Climate and Architecture", Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1986. Smith R.J., Philips, G.M., Sweeney, "Environmental Science", Longman Scientific & Technical, Essex, England, 1982. Watson Donald, feCIimatic Design : Energy Efficient Building Principles & Practices", Me Graw Hill Book company, New York, 1983. 3

45. 6.

API 2003: ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND MICROCLIMATE 3-0-0-3


Climatic impact of landscape elements. Climate and man. The Climatic impact of natural elements - land, land forms, vegetation & water. Thermal properties of commonly used building materials for outdoor spaces* Site selection, siting & orientation for energy conservation. Human comfort levels. The climatic regions & human adaptation. Site analysis processes & technologies. Site selection for energy conservation. Siting & orientation for energy conservation* Site planning and design for energy conservation - Integration of building & site for energy conservation. Site planning for energy conservation. Site design for energy conservation. Modification of micro climates - Selection & use of landscape elements for microclimatic modification. Radiation modification using modification, temperature, humidity and precipitation modification. Conservation of water - water conserving landscape design. Conservation of embodied energy through landscape design. Quantitative determination of human thermal comfort in outdoor spaces. Eco-sensitive and sustainable landscape.
References

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Gray O. Robinette, "Landscape Planning for Energy Conservation'7, Van Nostrand Reinhold New York, 1984. Geiger R., "The Climate Near the Ground", Harward University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts - 1965. Me. Pherson EG. "Energy Conserving Site Design", American Society of Landscape Architecture, 1984. Mebsh W.M.' "Landscape Planning Environmental Applciation", John Wiley & Sons Inc. New York. 1999. Oke T.R., "Boundary Layer Climates" 2 nd Edition, Mellhuen & Co. Ltd. London. Robers D. Brown, Terry L Gillespie, "Microclimatic Landscape Design", John Wiley & Sons.

API 2004: RURAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

3-0-0-3

Rural society in India, characteristics of rural people - structure of rural society physical planning - typology, forms and structure of rural settlement. Gandhian Approach to Rural Development Relevance of rural area for urban development, mutual dependence between urban and rural areas, between industry and agriculture - Characteristic of symbiotic development and the pattern of urban development in India* Causes of rural poverty - Causes of economic and social changes - The policies and measures taken by the government of India to combat poverty in rural areas - Rural housing in India. Levels of living standards of rural people in different regions of India - National planning and rural development concepts of planning for rural settlement. Regional development and urban rural partnership. Planning principles and village and community norms. Rural Infrastructure problem - Rural reconstruction - Basic needs and rural sanitation - water supply - hygiene and drainage - technology transfer and options. Area, district and block level development planning and implementation - public participation in rural development process - Role of voluntary organisations in rural development. Rural energy issues, renewable and alternative sources of energy - ecological and environmental considerations in rural development and village planning Sustainable village development -- Village institution & rural management problems.
References

1. 2. 3. 4.

T.K. Oommen, "Social Transformation in Rural India - Mobilization and State lnterbention", Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., 1984. Dr. Kumar, "Rural Sociuology", Lakshmi Nanain Agarwal, Educational Publichsers, Agra 2. JJB. Chitambar - Introductory Rural Sociology Wiley Eastern Ltd. India, 1993. Saita Anama Sharma - Rural Settlements - A Cultural Ecological .Perspective - Inter India Publications.

CSI2001

Finite Element Analysis

3-0-0-3

Preliminaries - Strain displacement relations - constitutive relations - Energy principles Principle of virtual work - Total potential energy - Rayleigh-Ritz method - method of weighted residuals. Introduction to FEM - out tine of the procedure -Element properties - polynomial form shape function form - equilibrium and compatibility in the solution - convergence requirements. Developments of shape functions for truss, beam and frame elements- constant strain triangle -Linear strain triangle -Bilinear plane rectangular elements -Consistent nodal loads - lumped loads-patch test - stress computation

Isoparametric formulation - Line element- Plane bilinear element- Isoparametric formulation of Quadratic plane elements - Subparametric elements and superparametric elements - Gauss quadrature - Pate and shell elements. Solution techniques, Large systems of equations - Storage schemes- Solution techniques Discussion of Finite Element programs and packages Application of FEA in various fields of engineering References: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Cook R.D, Concepts and Application of Finite Element Analysis, Wiley & Sons Krishnamoorthy CS, Finite Element Analysis, McGraw Hill. Zienkiewicz O.C, Vie Finite Element Method, Bathe K.J, Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis, Prentice Hall. Rajasekharan S, Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design, Wheeler. Reddy J.N, An Introduction to FEM, McGraw Hill

Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

CSI2002

Theory of Plates and Shells

3-0-0-3

Introduction-Assumptions in the theory of thin plates- Bending of ling rectangular plates to a cylindrical surface Pure bending of plates - Slope and curvature - Relations between bending moments and curvature - Particular cases of pure bending Symmetrical bending of circular plates Differential equation - Uniformly loaded circular plates with simply supported and fixed boundary conditions - Annular plate with uniform moments and shear forces along the boundaries Small deflections of laterally loaded plates - Differential equation - Boundary conditions Navier solution and Levy's solution for simply supported rectangular plates - Effect of transverse shear deformation - Anisotropic plates Deformation of shells without bending - Definitions and notation - Shells in the form of a surface of revolution, displacements - Membrane theory of cylindrical shells General theory of cylindrical shells - A circular cylindrical shell loaded symmetrically with respect to its axis symmetrical deformation General case of deformation of a cylindrical shell- cylindrical shells with supported edges - Shells having the form of surface of revolution and loaded symmetrically with respect to their axis

References: 1 2 3 4 5 Timoshenko S.P. and Krieger S.W., Theory of Plates and Shells, Tata Me Graw Hill. Chandrasekhara K., Theory of Shells Fluigge W., Stresses in Shells Bairagi N.K., Plate Analysis, Khanna Publishers. Kelkar V. S. and Sewell R. T., Fundamentals of the Analysis and Design of Shell Structures., Prentice Hall, Inc.

Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

CS1 2003

Advanced Mechanics of Materials

3-0-0-3

Introduction to mathematical theory of elasticity. Analysis of stress and strain in 3D Equilibrium equations : Strain displacement relations Compatibility conditions - Stress and strain transformations - Principle stresses and strains Octahedral planes and stresses* - Constitutive relations. Boundary value problems of elasticity - Displacement Traction ,and Mixed types Equilibrium equations in terms of displacements ( Lame Navier ) and Compatibility conditions in terms of stresses ( Beltrami - Michel!) - Saint Venant's principle. Two dimensional problems in Rectangular coordinates - Plane stress and plane strain problems - Stress function - Solution by polynomials - Bending of cantilever loaded at free end and bending of simply supported beam by uniform load. Two dimensional problems in polar coordinates -General equations- Equilibrium equations, Strain displacement relations and Stress strain relations. Biharmonic equations and Airy's stress functions. Problems of axisymmetric stress distributions -Thick cylinders - Rotating discs -solid disc and disc with central hole Shear centre in thin walled sections-Shear flow in open thin walled beams - Shear centre for open thin walled beams with one axis of symmetry - Shear centre for open unsymmetric thin walled beams-shear in closed thin walled sections. Stress Concentrations- Stress concentration factors - Circular hole in an infinite plate under uniaxial tension Elliptic hole in an infinite plate stressed in directions perpendicular to major and minor axis of hole. Stress concentration factors in combined loading - stress concentration at a groove in a circular shaft. - Experimental techniques for the evaluation of stress concentration factors. Torsion of prismatic bars- Saint Venant's semi inverse and Prandtl's stress function approach - Torsion of Straight bars - Circular, Elliptic and Equilateral triangular cross section Torsion of narrow rectangular section. References: 1 Timoshenko.S.P and GoodierJ.N., Theory oj'Elasticity\ McGraw Hill 2. SrinathJLS., Advanced Mechanics of Solids, Tata Me Graw Hill 3. Sokolnikoff.LS., Mathematical theory of Elasticity, Tata Me Graw Hill 4. Den Harteg, Advanced Strength ofMaterials. 5. Seely and Smith , Advanced Mechanics of Materials. 6. AmeenJVL, Computational Elasticity, Narosa Publishing House 7. Boresi.A.P., SchimidtJRJ., Advanced Mechanics of Materials ,John Wiley Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper
8

CSI2004

Mechanics of composites

3-0-0-3

Introduction - Classification and characteristics of composite materials - Mechanical behaviour - Laminated fibre reinforced composite materials - Advantages of fibre reinforced composite materials. Macromechanical behaviour of a lamina - Stress-strain relations for anisotropic materials, orthotropic materials and a lamina of arbitrary orientation - Strength concepts of an orthotropic lamina - Biaxial strength theories. Macromechanical behaviour of a laminate - Classical lamination theory - Laminate stiffness - Stress distribution through the thickness - Force and moment resultants. Bending and vibration of laminated composite beams and plates. References 1. Lee R. Calcotte, The analysis of laminated composite structures, Van IMastrand Reinhold Company " 2. Robert M. Jones, Mechanics of composite materials, Scripta Book Company. 3. J M. Reddy, Mechanics of laminated composite plates .Theory and analysis, CRC Press. 4. M.W.Hyer, Stress analysis of fibre reinforced composite materials y Tata McGraw Hill.

Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

CSI2005

Random Vibration

3-0-0-3

Probability Theory - Random variables, Probability distribution and density functions Expected value mean, variance, conditional probability, characteristic functions, Chebyshev inequality, functions of random variable Random process- concepts of stationary and ergodicity - nonstationary process - auto and cross correlation and covariance functions Mean square limit, differentiability and integrability - Spectra] decomposition, power spectral and cross spectral density functions Wiener Khintchine relation - Properties of Guassian, Poisson and Markov process. Broad band and narrow band random process- white noise. Random vibration : response of linear SDOF and MDOF systems to stationary and nonstationary random excitation. Response of continuous systems - normal mode method Nonlinear random vibration - Markov vector - equivalent linearisation and perturbation methods- Level crossing, peak and envelope statistics First excursion and fatigue failures Applications References: 1. Nigam N.C9 Introduction to random vibration, MIT press 2. Lin Y.K, Probabilistic theory in structural dynamicsy McGravv Hill 3. Bendat and Piesol, Random data analysis and measurement procedure, John Wiley 4. Clough and Penzien, Dynamics of structures, McGravv Hill 5. Nigam N.C and Narayanan S, Applications of random vibrationy Narosa.

Note: 20% Choice may be given while setting the question paper

10

CEI2001

Philosophy Of Technology

3-0-0-3

Scope of Technology-Scope and subdivisions of philosophy -scope and historical development of philosophy of science and technology -Ethics and interpersonal relationship in engineering -IQ-Vs EQ-Ergonomics. Brief study of the evolving world views based on Issac Newton, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg and Stephen.W.Hawking-Cybernetics and systems science-Analytic Vs Systemic approach -Theory of chaos and complexity.

Thoughts on technology: Martin Heidegger, Karl Marx and Mahatma Gandhi.

Philosophy of Architecture, Information Technology and Biotechnology-Gaia hypothesisPhilosophy of Ecology and Environment Concept of sustainable development -Cost benefit analysis.VsEnvironmental Impact Assessment. Technology revolutions and social changes. Social impact of NanoTechnology References; I. Abdul Kalam, A JPJ (2002), Ignited Minds. Viking. 2e Friedrich Paulson (1999), Introduction to philosophy, Anmol Publications. 3. Ilya Prigogire and Isabella tengers(l 984), Order out of chaos, Bantom books 4. John G MoGuine and Howard Barlow (1951), An introduction to Engineering Profession^ Addition Wesley. 5. John horgan (1996), The end of Science, Helix books. 6. Jonathen Powers (1982), Philosophy and New physics, Methuen. 7. Lebia Green (2007), Tecnoculture, Atten&Unwin 8. Nataraja, G (1995), Science and Human Values-in Wisdom, DK Print world. 9. Oroon K (1985), Science, Society and Philosophy, Ajantha Publishers. 10. Philip L Alger et.al(1965), Ethical Problems in Engineering ,John Wiley and Sons I1. Pradeep.T ,Nana, The Essentials, Tata McGraw-hill 12. Stephen Whawking(l 998), A Brief History of Time ,Bantam Books 13. Journal of the Society for Philosophy and Technology.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

11

CEI 2002

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Introduction-Man and environment- physical chemical and biological hazards and their adverse effects- environment and biotechnology- environmental ethics- politics and relevance Interdisciplinary nature of environment: - air environment, water environment, land environment, biological environment-Nature resources of environment - Renewable resources, Non Renewable resources, continuous resources extrinsic resourcesCharacteristics of environment: - hydrology-, meteorology, fluid mechanics, material balance, transport and transformation, sound and noise, water chemistry, air, soil, microbiology, energy and material flow. Sustainable development: definition economic dimensions- environmental dimension framework for achieving sustainability, assessment of sustainable performance. Global environmental issues: - greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion- global warming acid rain - deforestation Tools of environmental management: - EIA life cycle assessment, Environmental audit, Environmental reporting, and standardization of tools.

References:

1. Kurian Joseph & R. Nagendran' Essential Environmental studies'. Pearson 4 education(SINGAPORE) PteLtd Indian Branch,482. F.I E. Patparganj, New Delhi. 110092 2. R.F Fuggle and M. A. Rabie,7 Environmental Management in South Africa'> Juta & Co Ltd 1994. 3. SC Bhatia ''Environmental Pollution and Control in Chemical Process Industries', Khanna Publishers- Naisarak Delhi. Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

12

CEI2003

Environment And Pollution

3-0-0-3

Introduction to Environment- components of environment -man and environment. Natural resources- Water, Land, Forest, Mineral, Energy, Food* Introduction to environmental pollution -General pollutants; types of Pollutants Pollution-Air, Water, Land, Noise, Thermal, Marine, Pesticide, Radioactive, Plastic* Pollution Case studies, Population and the Environment. Environmental ethics, Disaster Management.

References:

l.P.Aarne Vesilind, "Introduction to Environmental Engineering VPWS Publishing Company. 2.Dr.N.Arumugam & Prof.V.Kumaresan/'Envfronmenm/ Studies", Saras Publication. 3.Surinder Deswal & Dr.Anupama Deswal, "A Basic Course in Environmental Studies'\ Dhanpat Rai and Co (P) Ltd.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

13

CGI 2001 Geotechnical Engineering for Infrastructure Projects 3-0-0-3

Foundations for infrastructure facilities - requirements, types, suitability, selection. Investigation for infrastructure projects: methods, data required, investigation planning, selection of investigation types, obtaining and analysis of field data with special reference to IS code provisions. Foundations for building infrastructure: Choice between shallow and deep foundations (Piles, wells, large diameter drilled shafts), Types of shallow and deep foundations, selection* Design of deep and shallow foundations for typical cases. Foundations on rocks. Shallow foundations on rock, rock socketed piles, IS code provisions. Equipment for deep foundation construction. Foundations for power infrastructure: Dams, water conductor system, transmission line towers. Foundations for transport infrastructure: embankments supporting transport structures, application of soil reinforcement in embankments and retaining walls. Applications of sheet piles, excavation. Foundations for marine structures: Forces acting on piles supporting berthing structures and jetties, pile installation for marine structures. Field tests on foundations: Vertical, lateral, cyclic, CRP, and pullout test for piles, plate load test, and analysis of field test data. Pile integrity testing-References: 1. 2. 3. Tomlinson, Pile Design and Construction Practic, Taylor and Francis, Swamy Saran, A nalysis and Design of Substructures Das, B.M. Geotechnical Engineering

Note: 20% choice may be given.at the time of setting the question paper

14

CH1 2001

Fuzzy Sets and Systems in Engineering

3-0-0-3

Fuzzy set-concepts, operation on fuzzy sets, fuzzy numbers, fuzzy relations and equations membership functions, construction methods - Fuzzy measures-belief, possibility, probability and possibility. Fuzzy logic-fuzzy rule based systems - fuzziflcation and defuzzification methodsapplications to water resources problems. Fuzzy decision making-fuzzy linear and dynamic Programniing-applications to water resources References 1. George J KHr, Tina A Folger, Fuzzy sets, uncertainty and Information* Prentice Hall 2. George J Klir. B.yuan? Fuzzy sets and Fuzzy' logic^ Prentice Hall lncJ995 3. Timothy J Ross. Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications, Me Graw Hill, 1995

Note; 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

15

CTI2003

Optimisation Techniques

3-0-0-3

1.Linear Program ming : Formulation; Basic Properties, Simplex Algorithm, Artificial Variables, Chames.M.Method,two phase Technique Transportation Problem, Assignment Problem, Solution of Primal through Dual, Dual Simplex method. Bounded variable technique. (Two questions to be set) 2.Non Linear Programming: Multivariable optimization with equality constraints-Lagrange multiplier method* 3JDynamic programming: Characteristics, -Bellmans Optimality principle- shortest path route, forward and backward solution. 4Jnteger Programming : Formulation of problems with binary variables. (From 2, 3 and 4, IXA questions to be set) 5.1nventory Management : Inventory Control; Selective control techniques, ABC analysis, Usage Rate, Criticality, Techniques of Inventory Control with known demand, EOQ with uniform demand; with finite rate of replenishment with shortage, limitations. ( 1 Vz questions to be set) 6.Theory of Games : Characteristics-Two Persons Zero sum Games- Maximin Minimax principle-Saddle points- Games without Saddle Points.(One question to be set) References : 1. Frederick, Hiller and Liebermann, Intro. To Operations Research, Holden Day, Calif USA 2: Paul J Ossenbruggen, Systems Analysis for Civil Engineersy John Viley. 3. Ravindran & Philips, Operations Research, John Viley.2 4. TahaJH A Operations research An introduction P.Hall India Delhi. 5. Hiller FS & Lieberman G J Introduction to Operations research

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

16

CMI2001

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Personnel management in organizations - definitions - functions - changing. role of personnel management analysis and design of jobs - human resources planning procurement - recruitment and selection - induction placement - training and development. Behavioural science aspects motivation of individuals theories of motivation - foundation of group behaviour leadership ~ leadership theories - communication - factors affecting communication channels of communication - group decision making- Foundations of organizational structure - organization design. References. 1 Organisational behaviour - Concepts, controversies and applications - Stephen P. Robbins, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi. 2 Organisational Behaviour -Fred Luthans, McGraw Hill Book Company.

1.7

Mil 2001 : HEURISTICS FOR OPTIMIZATION

3-0-0-3

Introduction to evolutionary computation: Biological and artificial evolution, Evolutionary computation and AI, different historical branches of EC Genetic Algorithms: Coding, Search operators, Selection schemes, Applications. Simulated Annealing: Theoretical Approaches, Parallelization, Applications., Tabu Search: Neighborhood, Candidate list, Short term and Long term memory, Applications Ant Colony Algorithms: Overview, Basic algorithm, Variants, Formalization and properties of ant colony optimization, Applications. Multi objective evolutionary optimization: Pareto optimality, Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms. References: 1. Baeck T, Fogel D B & Michalewicz Z -Handbook on Evolutionary Computation- IOP Press 2. Michalewicz Z-Genetic Algorithms + "Data - Structures = Evolution ProgrammsSpringer-VerlagJEterlin 3. Goldberg D E-Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization & Machine LearningAddisson Wesley 4. Banzhaf W,Nordin P,Keller et al.-Genetic Programming :An Introduction- Morgan Kaufmann 5. Yao X-Evolutionary Computation: Theory and Applications- World Scientific PubhCo,Singapore 6. JLDreo,A.Petrowski,Eric Taillard-Metaheuristics for Hard Optimization:Methods and case studies- Springer. 7. Tabu Search-Fred Glover 8. How to Solve It:Modern Heuristics- Zbigniew MichalewiczJDavid B. Fogel-ACM Press
9. AntColonyOptimization-Marco Dorigo Thomas Stutzle-MIT Press

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

18

Mil 2002: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Financial management objectives, Financial analysis and planning, balance sheet, income statement, funds flow analysis. Financial ratio analysis, Cost-volume- profit analysis, Operation and financial leverages* Working capital management, Capital Budgeting, Cost of capital, Capital structure theories, Dividend decisions. Demand theory and Economic forecasting: Price elasticity, Income elasticity, Cross elasticity. Demand estimation: Time-series analysis, Barometric forecasting, Input/Output analysis. References 1. 2. 3. 4. l.ML Pandey, Financial Management, Vikas. LC.T. Mao, Quantitative Analysis of Financial Decisions, MacMillan. H.C. Petersen and W.C. Lewis, Managerial Economics, Pearson Education H. Bierman, Financial Policy Decisions, Macmillan.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

19

Mil 2003 : ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR

3-0-0-3

Dimensions of human behaviour: self development, perception, motivation, personality and leadership- concepts, theories and applications. Modes of values, beliefs, attitudes and intelligents in determining human behaviour. Group dynamics: nature of groups and group decision making. Conflict management, Transactional Analysis . Organizational development: Concepts of QWL, Organizational change, Goals of organizational change. Concept of organizational climate, health and effectivenessOrganizational culture: nature and characteristics, Motivation of person across cultures, Managerial leadership across cultures. Case studies. References: 1. Jerry 1. Gray, Frederick A. Stark,Organisational Behaviour concepts and applications 2. Fred Luthans Organizational Behaviour ,McGraw Hill 3. Stephen P.Robbins Organizational Behaviour ,Pearson Education. 4. Uma Sekharan Organizational Behaviour-Text and Cases /FMH Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

20

Mil 2004 OPERATIONS RESEARCH

3-0-0-3

Introduction to operations research, applications. Linear programming, formulation, solution methods, duality, sensitivity and applications, Integer programming, transportation and assignment problems. Routing problems, traveling salesman problems, Queuing theory, Replacement problems, Sequencing, game theory, decision theory, network analysis, Introduction to simulation, Dynamic programming, goal programming and non linear programming. Case studies illustrating above models in Industries, Introduction to softwares for decisions. References 1. H.A. Taha, Operations Research: An Introduction, Pearson Education 2 S.S. Rao, Engineering Optimization: Theory and Practice, New Age International Publishers. 3 H. JvL Wagner, Principles of Operations Research, Prentice- Hall of India Pvt.Ltd. 4 Gross and Harris, Fundamentals of Queuing Theory, John Wiley & Sons

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

21

Mil 2005: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3-0-0-3

Introduction to Information Systems, Establishing the framework, Business models, Information System Architecture, Evolution of Information Systems. Information Systems: Functional Areas such as Finance, Marketing, Production, Personnel Levels. Types: DSS, E1S, ES, OAS, TPS - Comparison, Concepts and knowledge representation , Managing International Information System. Information technology infrastructure: hardware, software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks* System Development: System development Life Cycle, Structured Methodologiesprototyping, case methodology, Designing Computer based methods, procedures, control. Implementation and Control: Control, Testing Security, Coding Techniques, Detection of error, Validating, Cost Benefit Analysis, Assessing the value and risk of information systems. System Audit: Software engineering qualities - design, production, service, software Specification, software metrics, software quality assurance. Systems methodology: objectives, Time and Logic, Knowledge and Human Dimension, software life cycle models Verification and Validation.

References: 1. Kenneth C. Laudon and Jane P Laudon -Management Information Systems Managing the Digital firm, ,Pearson Education, Asia, 2002. 2. Gordon B.Davis - Management Information System: Conceptual Foundations, Structure and Development,, McGraw Hill 3. Joyce J Elam ,Simon and Schuster-Case series for Management Information Systems'- Custom Publishing, 1996. 4. Steven Alter - Information Systems - A Management Perspective - Addison Wesley, 1999. 5. James A O'Brein - Management Information Systems, Tata McGrawHill, New Delhi, 1999. 6. Turban, Me Lean and Wetherbe - Information Technology for Management-Making connections for strategic advantage, John Wiley, 1999. 1. Ralph M. Stair and George'W. Reynolds- Principles of Information Systems -A Managerial Approach, Thomson Learning, 2001.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

22

MD1 2001: APPLIED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS

3-0-0-3

Introduction: Historical background, Basic concept of FEM, General procedure of FEM. Engineering applications. Comparison with other methods of analysis, Advantages, Disadvantages, Finite Element software - FE packages. Finite element modeling, Discretisation of domain, Types of elements, Interpolation functions. Formulation of element characteristic matrices: Axial beam element, torsional beam element, bending beam element and generalized beam element. Properties of element characteristic matrix, load vector, transformation matrices, assembly of element matrices and vectors, boundary conditions, solution of finite element equations, computation of element resultants. Convergence and patch test, One dimensional problems. Natural coordinates systems, numerical integration, Iso-parametric elements. Two dimensional analysis, Plane stress, Plane strain and Axisymmetric analysis, finite element analysis of plates & shells, Two dimensional iso-parametric elements. Three dimensional problems in stress analysis, Hexahedral elements and higher order elements. Dynamic Analysis- Element mass matrices, Evaluation of Eigen values and Eigen vectors. Dynamic analysis of spring mass system -solid body with distributed mass, Determination of critical speed of shafts, Rigid body modes. ' ' References: 1. Introduction to finite elements in engineering, Thirupathi R.Chandrupatla and Ashok D. Belegundu 2. Fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis, David Hutton, TMH? 2005 3. A text book of Finite Element Analysis, P.Seshu, PHI, 2005 4. Finite Element Analysis : Procedures in Engineering, H.VJLaksminarayana, Universities press, 2004 5. A first course in the Finite Element Method, Daryl L Logan, Thomson Learning, 2007 6. The Finite element methods in engineering, S S Rao 7. The Finite Element Method, Zienkiewicz O. C. 8. Applied finite element analysis, Larry J.Segerlind 9. Finite Element Method, R.D. Cook 10. Basics of F E M- Solid Mechanics, Heat transfer and Fluid mechanics, Dubuque 1 A and W C Brown.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

23

MDI 2002 : ACOUSTICS AND NOISE CONTROL FOR ENGINEERS 3-0-0-3 Introduction -Basic acoustic principles-acoustic terminology and definitions -velocity of sound in fluids-relationship between wave length particle velocity, acceleration - Energy density - acoustic intensity - reference standards and measurement- Transmission loss reflection at plane surface-standing waves and standing wave apparatus, spherical waves radiation - simple source -hemispherical source-radiating piston-pressure intensity distribution-Beam width and directivity index-sound absorbing materials. Noise measurement: Decibel scale-relationship between pressure, intensity and power-sound level meter, noise analyzer and graphic level recorder-measurement in anechoic and reverberation chambers, machinery noise control.

Environmental noise control : Human reaction to sound-definitions of speech interference level, perceived noise level, phon and sone etc, hearing loss-principles of noise controlcontrol at source, during transmission and at receiver-protection of receiver-Acoustic insulation-acoustic materials-acoustic filter and mufflers -. Methods of control of noise using baffles, coverings, perforations etc. Transmission through structures - control vibration by damping and other methods. Principles of noise control in an auditoriumrequirements of a good auditorium

References: 1. Kinsler and frey - Fundamental sof Acoustics 2. Berenek, LJL - Noise and Vibration control 3. Harris, C.K. - Handbook of Noise control 4. Petrusowicz and Longmore - Noise and Vibration control for industrialists 5. Graf- Industrial noise and vibration 6. R.D.Ford-Introduction to Acoustics 7. DouglasJP-Reynolds-Engg Principles Of Acoustics

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

24 MPI 2001: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

3-0-0-3

System and control volume approaches - velocity, acceleration, Reynold's transport theorem - conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations - Gradient of velocity - deformation and rotation tensors - stress strain relations - Navier - Stoke's equations -

Cartesian and polar coordinates(derivation) - Energy equation - Boundary layer equation. Stream function potential flow - vorticity stream function formulation -potential flow - Turbulence and turbulence modeling. Finite difference schemes backward - central and forward schemes - stability analysis - Finite volume method for incompressible flows - Vertex centered and cell centered FVM - Treatment of convection term - Upwind, hybrid, upwind least square reconstruction and QUICK schemes - staggered and collocated grids - solution algorithms for both types - Evaluation of velocity field - SIMPLE, SIMPLER, and projection methods - Time dependent problems - Implicit, Crank-Nicolson and Explicit schemes-Finite volume method for compressible flows-Treatment of convection termsFlux vector splitting method - Artificial diffusion - Structured and unstructured grids Solution of system of equations - Tridiagonal matrix algorithm - Line by line solver. Development of a computer program for the. analysis of incompressible flows in two dimensions - solution of few typical problems using the computer program. Study of any two latest papers describing development in CFD. References: 1. J D Anderson : Computational Fluid Dynamics- Me Graw Hill International, 1995 2. C A J Fletcher: Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics - Vol 1 & 2, Springer Verlag, 1988 3. S V Patankar : Numerical Heat Transfer - Hemisphere, 1980 4. K Muralidhar and T Sundrarajan : Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Narosa Publishers, 1996. 5. KJMuralidhar and G.Biswas: Advanced Engineering Fluid Mechanics, Narosa Publishers, 1996. 6. Joel H Ferziger, Milovan Peric : Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics.

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

25

MTI 2001: NUMERICAL METHODS

3 - 0 - 0 - 3

Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations- Review and comparison of various iterative methods, convergence - Generalised Newton-Raphson method for multiple roots Higher order methods - Newton's method for non-linear systems. Solution of simultaneous equatiuons-Direct & indirectmethods-Gauss elimination and Gauss Jordan methods - ill conditioning- pivoting - Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and Relaxation methods-convergence-Eigen value problems-Vector iteration method. Interpolation-Newton's Divided difference, Lagrange, Aitken,' Hermite and Spline techniques - Inverse interpolation-Error estimates-Double interpolation-Trigonometric interpolation. Numerical differential- Numerical integration-Newton-Cote's Integration formula-Gauss quadrature-Error estimates-Double integration. Curve fitting - method of least squares - hn-linear relationships - Correlation and Regression - Linear Correlation - Measures of correlation - Standard error of estimate Coefficient of correlation - Multiple linear regression. Solution of ordinary differential equations-Single step & multi step methods-stability of solution - simultaneous first order differential equations- higher order different equations. Numerical solution of integral equations. Partial eifferential equations - classification ~- Laplace equation, ID wave equation, ID heat equation - Finite differencemethods - Relaxation methods. Stability and convergence of solution. Note- Computer program assignments are essential as part of sessional requirements. Reference: 1. Numerical methods for Scientific and Engineering Computation - Jain M.K., 2. Elementary Numerical Analysis - Conte and Carl DeBoor 3. Introduction to Numerical Analysis - Gupta A and Bose S C 4. Introduction to Numerical Analysis - Hilderbrand FB 5. Introduction toNumerical Analysis - Fjorberg C E 6. An Introduction toNumerical Analysis - Kendall E Atkinson 7. 8. 9. 10. Statistics - Murrey R Spiegel Numerical Mathematical Analysis ~ James B. Scarborough Applied Numerical Analysis - C F Gerald & P O Wheatley Numerical algorithms - E V Krishnamurthy & S K Sen

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

26

MRI 2001 FINITE ELEMENT METHODS 3-0-0-3 Introduction, historical background, general procedure, applications, advantages. Theory of elasticity, stress and equilibrium, strain displacement relationship, stress-strain relationship, plain stress, plain strain and axi-symmetric approximation. Temperature effect. Potential energy and equilibrium, principles of minimum potential energy. The Rayleigh Ritz method, Gelarkin method, SaintVenanfs principle. Solution of algebraic equations. Banded and skyline solutions. Numerical integration using Gauss Quadrature. Finite element modeling- types of elements, Discretization, Shape functions-Types (linear and quadratic) Boundary conditions, penalty and elimination approach for scientific displacements, multipoint constraints , local and global co-ordinates derivation of element equations on axial beam ? bending beam elements, transformation matrices, assembly procedure, Global equations, load vector, properties of stiffness matrices. 2D problems with CST, Axi-symmetric solid subjected to axi-symmetric loading. Two dimensional isoparametric elements. Mesh generation, Node numbering, Scalar field problems, Element mass matrices. Evaluation of Eigen value and Eigen vectors. Modeling and solution procedure for heat transfer problems. Determination of critical speed of shafts. Finite element packages. Post processing. Text book:- Introduction to finite element in engineering Thiruppathi R Chandrapath & Ashok D Beligundu. ^ References :1) Finite element methods O.C.Zienkievicz & R.LTsyor 2) Finite element methods R.D.Cook 3) Finite element methods S.S.Rao

Note: 20% choice may be given while setting the question paper.

27

MRI 2002 ADVANCED NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES FOR ENGINEERING 3-0-0-3


Solution of Simultaneous Linear Equations- Guassian elimination and Guass-Jordan Methods, Matrix inversion, Interactive Method and Relaxation Method. Solution of nonlinear equationLinear interpolation Methods, Newton's Method, Muller's Method. Numerical Differentiation and Integration-derivatives from Differences-Table, Higher-Order Derivatives, Newton-Cotes Integration Formula, Trapezoidal Rule and. Simpson's Rule. Solution of Ordinary differential Equation. Taylor- series, Modified Euler Method, Renge-Kutta Method. Boundary- value Problem, Finite element Method- Rayleigh- Ritz Method Galerke Method, Finite element for Ordinary Differential equation. Optimization techniques-Conventional and Non Conventional. Introduction to MATLAB.

References: 1) Applied Numerical Analysis- Gerald/Wheatly, Pearson Education. 2) Numerical Methods using MATLAB, third Edition- John H.Mathews, Pearson Education. 3) Numerical Methods Scientific and Engineering Computation- M.K. Jain, S.R.K.Iyengar, R.K. Jain, Wiley Eastern Ltd Note: 20% choice may be given while setting the question paper.

28

MRI2003

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Quality and Total Quality-small 'q9 and Big Q\ tatal Quality Model- internal customerImperatives of TQM- Cost of poor Quality-QC Tools- management Vs Leadership. Six E's of outstanding leadership- importance of QC due to globalization- Introduction of Quality control- control chart techniques- acceptance sampling- Reliabilty- Reliabilty improvementmaintainability and availability- Quality control in Industry-QC organization. Tools for effective product development* Requirement world class manufacturing. KAIZENContinuous improvement- improvement Vs crisis management JIT, Concurrent Engineering TPM, BPR, Quality circle- ISO 9000- Bench Marking- Computer Applications.

References: 1) TQM- Paul James (Prentice Hall International) 2) Quality Management - David L.Goetsch & Stanley. B. Davis (Prentice Hall International) 3) Total Quality Management - Dale JHL Basterfield 4) Fundamentals of Quality Control and Improvement- Amitava Mitra 5) Total Quality Handbook- David.L.Goetsch & Stanley.B.Davis 6) Total Quality- Bharat Wakhulu (A.H. Wheeles & Co.Ltd. 1998) 7) TQM & ISO 14000- Dr.K.C.^Arrora (S.K. Kataria& Sons) 8) Total Quality Handbook- Tata Steel Note: 20% choice may be given while setting the question paper.

29

MR12004

OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES

3-0-0-3

Introduction, Optimal Problem formulation- Design variable, constraints, Objective function and variable bounds, single variable optimization algorithms- Optimality criteria, Exhaustion search methods, Fibronacci search methods. Multi variable optimization algorithmOptimality criteria, unidirectional search method, Simplex method, Powell's conjugate direction method. Constrained Optimization algorithm- penalty function method, Sensitivity analysis, Frank-wolf method, cutting plain method, Integer programming. Non traditional optimization algorithm- Genetic algorithm- Working principle, Building Block Hypothesis, GA Operators- Selection, Crossover and mutation, GA for constrained optimization, Advanced GA operators, implementation of GA, Introduction to Simulated Annealing, Global Optimization using GA and simulated annealing.

References: 1) Optimization for Engineering Design, Algorithm& ExamplesKalyanmony Deb.(PHl) 2) Optimization Theory & Application- S.S. Rao 3) Genetic Algorithm in search, Optimization & Machine LearningGoldberg, D.E. 4) Simulated Annealing and Bolzman's Machine: A Stochastic Approach to Combinational Optimization and Neural Computing- Aarts, E and KorstJ. 5) Handbook of Genetic Algorithm- Davis. C. 6) Engineering Optimization- Methods and Applications- Reklaitis. G.V. 7) Operation Research- Taha, H.A.

Note: 20% choice may be given while setting the question paper.

30

TAI2001

MECHATRON1CS

3-0-0-3

Mechatronics System Design - Integrated Design Issues in Mechatronics, Mechatronics Key Elements, The Mechatronics Design Process, Advanced Approaches in Mechatronics- Sensors and transducers: Introduction-Performance TerminologyDisplacement, Position and Proximity-Velocity and Motion-Fluid Pressure-Temperature Sensors-Light Sensors-Selection of Sensors-Signal Processing. Artificial Intelligence in Mechatronics, Fuzzy Logic Applications in Mechatronics, Microsensors in Mechatronics. Introduction to Modern CNC Machines - Advantages of CNC Machines, CNC Machining Centre Developments, Turning Centre Developments, Part Program Terminology: G and M Codes, Types of interpolation, Methods of CNC part programming, Manual part programming, Computer Assisted part programming: APT language. Programmable Logic Controller: PLC Programming, Introduction-Basic structureInput/Output Processing-Programming-Mnemonics-Timers, Internal relays and counters-Data handling-Analog Input/Output-Selection of a PLC. Direct Numerical Control (DNC). Reference: 1. Devdas Shetty & Richard A Kolk - Mechatronics System Design - PWS Publishing Company 2. Mechatronics -HMT Ltd., TMH 3. Bradley D.A., Dawson D., Buru N.C and Loader A.JL, "Mechatronics". Chapman and Hall, 1993. 4. Histand Michael B. and Alciatore David G., "Introduction to Mechatronics and Measurement Systems", McGraw Hill International Editions, 2003. 5. Bolton W., "Mechatronics ", Longman,Second Edition, 2004. For the End semester exam (50 marks), the question paper shall have six questions of 10 marks each covering entire syllabus out of which any five shall be answered. It shall have 75% problems & 25% Theory. For the Internal marks of50, Two test of 20 marks each and 10 marks for assignments (Minimum two) /Term Project.

31

TMI2001

FUZZY SYSTEMS & APPLICATIONS

3-0-0-3

Introduction to Fuzzy sets and systems. Basics of fuzzy sets, membership function, support of a fuzzy set, height - Normalised fuzzy set, a - cuts (decomposition of a fuzzy set), set theoretic definitions on fuzzy sets, complement, intersection and union equality, subsethood - basic definition based on membership functions. The law of the excluded middle and law of contradiction on fuzzy sets. Properties of fuzzy sets operations (logical proof only). Extension of fuzzy sets concepts - type-2 and level 2 fuzzy sets - examples. Operations on fuzzy sets - intersection, algebraic sum - product, bounded sum product, drastic sum product, t-norms and t-conorms(s - norms) on fuzzy sets, typical parameterised t - norms and s-norms(with simplified proof). Extension principle and its applications. Fuzzy relation. Resolution form of a binary fuzzy relation. Operations on fuzzy relations - projection, max.-min. and min and max, compositions cylindric extension. Similarity relations - Reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity. Further operations on fuzzy sets, concentration, dilation, contrast intensification, linguistic hedges. Logical operations on fuzzy sets - Negation - Conjunction, disjunction, implication, fuzzy inference. Block diagram of a fuzzy logic system. Fuzzy rule base simplification of compound rule base - fuzzy inference - max. - min, man product, man drastic product, man bounded product. Defuzzification - Centre of gravity, center of sums, weighted average etc. Fuzzy pattern recognition-Feature analysis, Partitions, Identification, Multifeature recognition. Fuzzy control systems- Review of control theory for fuzzy controls, Simple controllers, General controllers, Stability, Models, Inverted pendulum, Aircraft landing control, Aircondioner control. References: 1. C.T Lin & C S George Lee: Neural Fuzzy Systems, Prentice Hall. (Module 1,2, 3) 2. Ahamad M. Ibrahim : Introduction to Applied Fuzzy Electronics, PHI. (Module 3) 3. S. Rajasekharan, G A Vijayalakshmi Pai; Neural Networks, Fuzzy logic and Genetic Algorithms, PHL 4. Timothy J. Ross, Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications, 2/e, McGraw Hill. Reading: 1. Earl Cox: Fuzzy Systems Handbook, Associated Press 2, Klir and Yuan: Fuzzy Sets and Fuzzy Logic- Theory and Applications, Prentice Hall of India. 3. Bart Kosko: Fuzzy Engineering, Prentice HalL . 4. Bart Kosko: Fuzzy Thinking, Hooper Collins Publications. 5. Yen: Fuzzy Logic: Intelligence, Control and Instrumentation , Pearson Education, 2002 For the End semester exam ( 50 marks), the question paper shall have six questions of 10 marks each covering entire syllabus out of which any five shall be answered. It shall have 50%problems & 50% Theoiy. For the Internal marks of 50, Two test of 20 marks each and 10 marks for assignments (Minimum two) /Term Project

32

TSI2001

ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

3-0-0-3

Introduction to Neural Networks Biological Neurons and Neural Networks, Networks of Artificial Neurons. Single Layer Perceptrons, Learning and Generalization in Single Layer Perceptrons, Hebbian Learning, Gradient Descent Learning, learning rates, Widrow-Hoff Learning , The Generalized Delta Rule, Practical Considerations

Basic neural network models ADALINE networks, LMS algorithm, Learning in Multi-Layer Perceptrons, Back-Propagation algorithms, Radial Basis Function Networks: Fundamentals, Algorithms and Applications, Learning with Momentum, Conjugate Gradient Learning, Bias and Variance. UnderFitting and Over-Fitting. Applications of Multi-layer Perceptrons.

Basic learning models Associative Learning, Competitive Networks, Winner-take-alt networks, Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART), Neural networks as associative memories, Hopfield network, BAM, Self Organizing Maps: Fundamentals, Algorithms and Applications. Learning Vector Quantization, Optimization problems solving using neural networks, Stochastic neural networks, v Boltzmann machine

Applications of artificial neural networks: Application areas like system identification and control, decision making, pattern recognition, and sequence recognition.

References 1. Simon Haykin, "Neural Nehvorks", second edition, Prentice Hal), 1999 2. Christopher M. Bishop, Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition by Oxford University Press, 1995 3. Martin T. Hagan, Howard B. Demuth, Mark Beale, Neural Nehvork Design, Vikas Thomson learning For the End semester exam (50 marks), the question paper shall have six questions of 10 marks each covering entire syllabus out of which any five shall be answered. It shall have 75%problems & 25% Theory. For the Internal marks of 50, Two test of 20 marks each and 10 marks for assignments (Minimum two) /Term Project.

33

EMI2001

BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: To make an introduction to the modern Biomedical instruments and systems, their features and applications
Syllabus: Introduction to the physiology of cardiac, nervous, muscular and respiratory systems. Transducers and Electrodes Different types of transducers and their selection for biomedical applications, Electrode theory, Different types of electrodes, reference electrodes, hydrogen, calomel, Ag-AgCl, pH electrode, selection criteria of electrodes* Measurement of electrical activities in muscles and brain Electromyography, Electroencephalograph and their interpretation. Cardiovascular measurement The cardio vascular system, Measurement of blood pressure, sphygmomanometer, blood flow, cardiac output and cardiac rate. Electrocardiography, echo-cardiography, ballistocardiography, plethysmography, magnetic and ultrasonic measurement of blood flow. Therapeutic Equipment Cardiac pace-makers, defibrillators, hemodialysis machine, diathermy. Respiratory System Measurement Respiratory mechanism, measurement of gas vojjume, flow rate, carbon dioxide and oxygen concentration in inhaled air, respiration controller. Instrumentation for clinical laboratory Measurement of pH value of blood, ESR measurements, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration in blood, GSR measurement X-ray and Radio isotopic instrumentation, diagnostic X-ray, CAT, medical use of isotopes. Ultrasonography, MRI

References:
1. ''Handbook of Biomedical Instrumentation* R S Khandpur TMH Publishing Company Ltd. New Delhi 'Introduction to Biomedical Equipment Technology9 Joseph J Carr, John M Brown Pearson Education (Singapore) Pte. Ltd ' Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurements' Leslie Cromwell Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd? "New Delhi

2.

3.

Prerequisite: Basic knowledge in electronic instrumentation

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

34

EGI 2001 INTRODUCTION TO NAVIGATION, GUIDANCE AND CONTROL 3-0-0-3


Course Objective: To impart basic ideas of Navigation and Guidance and control of Aero space vehicles

Syllabus:
Introduction to the concepts of navigation guidance and control. Gpneral principles of early conventional navigation systems. Geometric concepts of navigation. Reference frames. Direction cosine matrix, Euler angles, Quaternion representation in co-ordinate transformation. Comparison of transformation methods, GPS and GNSS. Inertial navigation- block diagram- inertial sensors-Gyros - Principle of operationAccelerometer- principle of operation-Inertial platforms-stabilised platforms-gimballed and strap down INS. Stabilization and Control of space crafts, Missile control systems and Autopilots, Launch vehicle flight control systems. Longitudinal and lateral autopilots for aircraft. Radar systemsCommand and Homing guidance systems

References:
1. Modern Inertial Technology second Edition - Anthony Lawrence Springer-Verlag - New York, Inc? 1998. 2. Aerospace Avionics Systems- A Modern Synthesis - George M Siouris- Academic Press, Inc. 3. Modern Navigation, Guidance, and Control Processing- Ching-Fang-Lin- Prentice-Hall Inc; Engle Wood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1991 4. Inertial Guidance Engineering- Manuel Fernadez and George R Macomber- Prentic-Hall, Inc., Engle Wood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1962 5 Automatic Control of Aircraft and Missiles Blaklock J H Wiley, 1990

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

35

EPI 2001

ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: This subject provides essential input to equip engineers of any discipline suitable to take up responsibility of an energy manager in any organization Syllabus: Energy conservation management The relevance of energy management profession; general principles of energy management and energy management planning; application of Pareto's model for energy management; obtaining management support; establishing energy data base; conducting energy audit; identifying, evaluating and implementing feasible energy conservation opportunities; energy audit report; monitoring, evaluating and following up energy saving measures/ projects. Energy efficiency Energy efficiency analysis; thermodynamics and energy; coefficient of performance; energy effectiveness; management of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) - principles, opportunities, case studies; management of process energy- principles, opportunities, case studies; management of electrical load and lighting - management opportunities with electric drives, lighting, heating and electrolytic systems; electrical load analysis; peak demand control; computer-aided energy management; cogeneration; forms of cogeneration; feasibility study for cogeneration. Energy efficiency of turbines, compressors and pumps; specific energy consumption; parameters affecting specific energy consumption; flexi targeting technique. Energy economics Financial evaluation of energy projects; cash flow model; time value of money; evaluation of proposals - payback method, average rate of return method, internal rate of return method, present value method, profitability index, life cycle costing approach, investment decision and uncertainty; consideration of income taxes, depreciation and inflation in investment analysis. Text-books: 1. " Industrial energy conservation7 - Charles M Gottschaik - John Wiley & Sons, 1996 2. * Energy management principles'' - Craig B Smith - Pergamon Press References: 1. IEEE recommended practice for energy management in industrial and commercial facilities, IEEE std 739-1995 (Bronze book) 2. ' Optimizing energy efficiencies in industry1 - GGRajan - Tata McGraw Hill, Pub. Co., 2001 3. ^Energy management* -. Paul O'Callaghan - McGraw Hill Book Co 4. ' Energy management Hand Book' - Wayne C Turner - The Fairmount Press, Inc., 1997 5. 4 Energy Technology* - S Rao arid B B Parulekar - Khanna Publishers, 1999 Pre-requisite: General background of any Engineering Degree will be sufficient to learn this subject

Note: 20% choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

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ECI 2003

ENGINEERING OPTIMIZATION

3-0-0-3

Course Objective: Course offers different optimization procedures to solve a wide variety of problems which can be applied to different fields Syllabus: Concepts of optimization: Statement of optimization problem - Classification -Engineering applications- Linear Programming- Graphical method- Simplex method -Duality- Sensitivity analysis -Transportation and assignment problems. Nonlinear programming- Unconstrained optimization techniques-Direct search methods-Descent methods -Constrained optimization - Direct and Indirect methods - Kuhn tucker conditions. Dynamic programming- Multistage decision process -Concept of sub optimization and Principle of optimality -Computational procedure Advanced optimization techniques- Genetic Algorithm -Simulated annealing methodsOptimization programming.
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Text books: 1. ~ Engineering optimization, Methods and Applications' G V Reklaitis, A Ravindran & K M Rajsdell John Wiley & Sons 2. "Engineering Optimization Theory and Practices* Singiresu S Rao, John 3rd Edition, Wi ley and Sons, 1998 References: 1. ' Operations Research - Principles and Practice* ~ A Ravindran, Don T Philips and Jamer J Solberg John Wiley & Sons 2. ''Practical Optimization' P G Gill, W Murray and M H Wright Academic Press, 1981 3. ^Introduction to Operations Research* Fredrick S Hiller and G J Liberman :: ". - McGraw-Hill Inc 1995 4. ''Optimization Concepts and Applications in Engineering' Ashok D Belegundu, Tirupathi R Chandrapatla Pearson Education, Delhi, 2002

Prerequisite: Knowledge in matrix algebra and differential calculus. Note: 20%

choice may be given at the time of setting the question paper

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