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Conclusions A general test program comprising partial strength bolted extended end plate joints with fillet welds

and component parts which represent an alternative to fully welded connections for use in seismic force resisting moment frames was presented in this paper. The main results as well others presented elsewhere [5] indicate that partial strength bolted extended end plate connections are suitable for use in seismic force resisting moment frames. They represent an alternative to fully welded connections because together with the column web panel yielding, they can they can exhibit favourable ductility and absorbed energy. As far as the understanding of the low-cycle fracture behaviour of isolated Tee stub connections is concerned, experiments and analyses under monotonic and cyclic loading have provided insights in order to develop rules able to reduce fracture in the aforementioned connection components. The main conclusions of this study follow. Test results on isolated bolted Tee stubs as well complete extended end plate bolted joints have shown that the overall behaviour of the specimens under investigation is governed by the material endowed with the lowest strength, viz. the base metal, in which yielding occurs, effectively. In fact, the weld metal persists in the elastic regime whilst the contiguous zones are weakened owing to the sharp thermal treatments and to structural as well as shape discontinuities. Two material models have been exploited to capture the material behaviour: (i) the isotropic hardening model for the monotonic stress strain response; (ii) the non-linear kinematic hardening model designed to reproduce the stabilized cyclic stress strain response. Whilst the classic isotropic model with geometrical non-linearities provides a good approximation of the monotonic response, simulations calibrated on cyclically stable stress strain curves through the non-linear kinematic hardening model overestimate the transient onset of yielding because they are intended to reproduce a cyclically stable material. The simulations relevant to isolated Tee stub connections reflect the above-mentioned trend and indicate that the isotropic hardening model is able to capture both the monotonic and the cyclic responses but is not able to reproduce properly stiffness and strength degradation. As far as the non-linear kinematic hardening model is concerned, it cannot capture the cyclic response being calibrated on cyclically stable stress