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2

CONTENTS
Octave and Thumb Technique..................................................................... 3
Mi7 Over Dom7, Substitution ...................................................................... 6
Dom7 Over Mi7, Substitution ................................................................... 13
5 and 5, II-V, Substitution........................................................................ 17
Alternating Inversions .................................................................................. 27
Imi7-V79 Sequences .................................................................................. 28
Interchangeable Key Centres..................................................................... 30
Four Characteristic Sounds......................................................................... 32
3
OCTAVE & THUMB TECHNIQUE
Wes Montgomerys Octave Shapes
Shape One - S1 (1st & 3rd, and 2nd & 4th strings)
Shape Two - S2 (3rd & 5th, and 4th & 6th strings)
)`
`
1
4
)`
`
1
4
)
`
`
1
3
)
`
`
1
3
G major Scale in Octaves
Gmaj7 Arpeggio in Octaves
&
#
4
4

S2
S1

3
1

4
1

7 8
5 7 9
5 7 9 4 5
3 5 7
3 5 7

8 10 12 14 15 14
10 12
5 7 9 11 12 11
7 9
etc.

12 10 8
12
9 7 5
9
&
#
4
4

S2
S1

1
3

1
4

7 10
7 8
4 7 4 7
4 5 4 5
2 5
2 3
and descending
w
w 1
4
15
12
4
ROAD SONG (O.G.D.)
&
b
b
4
4
.
.
.
.

Gmi7 Ami7 D7
Vamp till ready
&
b
b
.
.
.
.

S2

3
1
7
5
%
S1

4
1

Gmi7
8 11 11 8 11 8
5 8 8 5 8 5

Gmi7

C9
S2

3
1

Am7
7 10 10 7 10
5 8 8 5 8
&
b
b


S2
j

D7
7
5
S1

1
4

Gmi7 B7
8 10
8 11 11 11
5 7
5 8 8 8
J

Emaj7
8 6 5
8
5 3 2
5
&
b
b
.
.
.
.

.
.

S2
j

3
1
Emi7 Cmi
6
8
3 7
5
5
1.
S1

4
1


S2
j

3
1
D7 Gmi
6 8
7
3 5
5
2.
S1

4
1
.
.

D7 Gmi7
6 8
3 5
5
&
b
b


S2
j

3
1
j

S1

4
1
J

Cmi7
8 11
8
5 8
6
.
.

S2

3
1
F9
10 8
10 8
7 5 10
7 5
8
w
w
Bmaj7
&
b
b

Bmi7 E9
Bmi7 E9

S2
j

b
b
j

S1

4
1
J

b
b
Bmi7
6 9
6
3 6
4
&
b
b

.
.

S2

3
1
E9
8 6
8 6
5 3 8
5 3
6
w
w
Amaj7
)
` `
``
^

D.S. take 2nd ending


(no repeat)

#
1
3
1
2


S2

D7
4 4 4
5 5 5 7
4 4 4
5 5 5 5
6
THREE SUBSTITUTIONS
Wes Montgomery made frequent use of 3 substitutional devices, both for single-line (octaves) and
chordal work. These can be summarized as follows:
1. The mi7 over a dom7th - (II over I7).
2. The Dom7th over a mi7 - (I7 over II).
3. 5 substitution
SUBSTITUTE NO.1:
Mi7 over Dom7
There are at least three ways of arriving at this substitution. Choose the method which suits you
best.
All substitutions are based on the common note principle - e.g. a substitute chord has one or more
notes in common with the original chord. Substitutes always have different names to the original
e.g. Gmi9 over C7 is a SUBSTITUTE. Whereas C13 over C7 is an EXTENSION.
This common note idea can be easily understood from the following example:
& 4
4
b
b

_
`
````
w
w
w
w
w
b
3
1
2
}
C9
3
3
3
2
3
_
`
` ```
w
w
w
w
w
n
3
1
2
}
Gmi6
3
3
3
2
3
Notice that the Gmi6 had 4 notes in common with the C9. The more notes in common, the more
readily the substitute can be used, the downside being that it will sound very similar to the original.
The fewer notes the substitute has in common with the original chord, the more careful we need to
be. Ideally those chords with two or three notes in common prove the most practical.
The above example is, in fact typical of Montgomerys use of the minor over a dominant 7th. But,
how did he arrive at this? Any of the following methods may be used; pick the one which suits you
best:
7
Location
1. Substitute the minor chord a 5th above or 4th below the given Dom7 (Gmi7 over C7 - Fmi7
over B7 Cmi7 over F7 etc.)
2. Treat the dom7 as the V of a II-V progression, then substitute the II chord. (IIs and Vs are
interchangeable).
3. Extend your dom7th chord shape to a 9th, then visualize the extension as part of a minor
chord:
& 4
4

_
`
``
`
w
w
w
w
b
1
4
2
3
C7
1
3
2
3
_
`
````
w
w
w
w
w
b
3
1
2
}
C9
3
3
3
2
3
_
```
w
w
w b
1
Gmi
3
3
3
These methods may be summarized as:
1. Locate the Minor a 5th above, or 4th below..
2. Treat the dom7 as V and substitute chord II of same key.
3. Visualize an extended dom7 as a minor chord.
Having arrived at the minorised dominant, we can than apply any of the devices (scales,
inversions, etc.) we would normally use for a minor situation.
Chordally, Montgomery was fond of the following inversions:
& 4
4

)
` `
`
`
^
I
)
`` ``
&

b
1

b 2
1
3
1
3 6
3 5
3 7
3 5
)
`
` `
`
11
)
` `
``
^
I

b
4
1
3
1

b
4
1
3
2
10 13
8 11
10 12
8 12
)
``
`
`
I
)
``
`
`
% I

b
4
3
1
2

b
2
3
1
10 6
10 6
9 7
8 5
w
w
w
w
b
3
1
3
3
3
2
8
Mi7 over Dom7 Substitute for Cariba
)
` ` ``
+~
^
'
2
3
)
`
``
+
^
``
I
1
2
3
II and V chords, of the same key, are interchangeable.
Fmi7 Inversions for Cariba
Bbm7 Inversions for Cariba
B9 Fmi7
)
` ` ` ` `
+
&
'
1
3
)
` ` ` ` `
+
&
I
1
3
E9 Bmi7
)
`` ``
&
'
)
` `
``
^
I
)
``
`
`
%

)
`` ``
&
I
)
``
`
`
%
I
)
` `
`
^
`
11
9
Practice Regime (inversions for Cariba)
& 4
4
.
.
.
.

)
`` ``
&
'
w
w
w
w
b
b
1
1
1
1
1
)
``
`
`
%
w
w
w
w
b
b 2
3
1
4
4
5
3
)
` `
``
^
I
w
w
w
w
b
b
4
1
3
1
8
6
8
6
)
``
`
`
%
w
w
w
w
b
b 2
3
1
4
4
5
3
&
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

)
`` ``
&
'
)
``
`
`
%

b
b

b
b
1 4
1 4
1 5
1 3
)
` `
``
^
I
)
``
`
`
%

b
b

b
b
8 4
6 4
8 5
6 3
&
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

)
`` ``
&
'
)
``
`
`
%
)
` `
``
^
I
)
``
`
`
%

b
b

b
b

b
b

b
b
1 4 8 4
1 4 6 4
1 5 8 5
1 3 6 3
)
`` ``
&
'
w
w
w
w
b
b
1
1
1
1
1. 1 shape per measure
2. 2 shapes per measure
3. 4 chords per measure Last time
Practice the same pattern with the Bmi7 shapes
Alternative fingering
)
`
`
`
`
%

2
3
1
)
`
`
`
`

2
3
4
1
10
CARIBA
(F minor Blues over a Bb Blues)
&
b
b
4
4

)
`` ``
&
'
)
``
`
`
%
)
` `
``
^
I

b
1

b
2
3
1
J

4
1
3
1
Fmi7 Fmi7 Fmi7
1 1 4 8
1 1 4 6
1 1 5 8
1 1 3 6
simile

J

4 8 4
4 6 4
5 8 5
3 6 3

b
J

1 1 4 8
1 1 4 6
1 1 5 8
1 1 3 6
&
b
b

4 8 4
4 6 4
5 8 5
3 6 3
)
`` ``
&
I
)
``
`
`
% I
)
` `
`
^
`
11

b
b

b
b
J

Bmi7 Bmi7 Bmi7


6 6 9 13
6 6 9 11
6 6 10 13
6 6 8 11

J

b
b

9 13 9
9 11 9
10 13 10
8 11 8
&
b
b

b
J

1 1 4 8
1 1 4 6
1 1 5 8
1 1 3 6
)
`` `
`^ I
)
``
`
`
% I

J

b
J

b
n
3
1
J

n
b
n
4
3
1
G9 F13
4 8 9 10
4 6 9 8
5 8 9 8
3 6 8 7
)
``
`
`
% I

S1
J

S2

b
4
3
1
E13
10 1310 8
6
7 10 7 10 8 6
5
8 6
&
b
b
.
.
.
.

S1
J

S2

b
b

8 11 8
5 8 5 8 6
6 4

b
J

1 1 4 8
1 1 4 6
1 1 5 8
1 1 3 6

J

b
4 8 4
4 6 4
5 8 5
3 6 3
11
& 4
4

III
j
#

1
1
3
b
2

3
b
4
j

3
n
1

2 3
4
5
6 5 3
etc.
&


III
j

3
3
b
4

3
b
2
4
5
5 6
j
#

1 1
3
b
2

3
b
4
3

3
b
4
n
1

2 3
4
5
6 5 3
6
etc.
&

III

J
b
4
>


1

4
6 3 6

1
>
b
2

2
>

3

2
3 3
4 4 4
5
etc.

3
>

3
b
1
j
#

3
2
>
5 3
5 4 5
&

j
#
VI

2
3
b
1
j
#


3
b
4

3
n
1

3
6 6
7 8 7 8 9 8 6 8
j
#

2
3
b
1
3
b
4

2
n
1
J

3
V
.
1
6
7 8 9 8 6 8
5
etc.
Mi7 over Dom7 Licks for Cariba
1. Fmi7 over B7
2. Fmi7 over B7
3. Fmi7 over B7
4. Fmi7 over B7
12
5. Fmi7 over B7
6. Bmi7 over E7
(Fmi7 over B7) etc.,
&

I
3

b

III
3

b

IV
3


b
VI
3



1 3 4 6
1 3 5 7
3 5 6 8
j
#

4 4
3
b
1

2
b
3

2
III
n
1
.

7 8 4
5
6 5 3
etc.
&

V
move shapes as chords
3
b
3
b
1

1
VIII
3

1
b
1

3
IX
3

2
b
1
6 8 9
6 8 10
8 1011
XI
3
b
1

2
b
3
IX
3
b
3

2
b
1
VIII
3

3
VI
3
b
3

1
11 9 8 6
12 10 8 6
13 11 10 8
&

V
.
1
J
b
4

1
5 5
8
etc.
13
)
` ` ` ` `
1
SUBSTITUTE NO. 2:
Dom7 over Mi7
Location
This is essentially a reversal of the idea explained in No. 1: Mi7 over Dom7th; similarly, there are
three different ways to locate it:
1. Substitute the dom7th chord a 4th above, or 5th below the given or mi7 (G7 over Dmi7 D7
over Ami7 C7 over Gmi7 etc.)
2. Treat the mi7 as the II of a II-V progression, then substitute the V chord (IIs and Vs are
interchangeable):
3. Visualise your mi7 shape as an extended Dom7 chord:
Dmi7 G9
)
`
` ` ``
^
The same concept applies to all mi7 shapes. Remember II and V chords of the same key are
interchangeable.
As before, when we have arrived at the substitute dom7 we can apply any of the common dom7
devices. Simple dom7th and dom9th arpeggios are very effective, in tunes like Yesterdays,
Impressions and Full House.
14
&

etc.
II

2
3
2 4 5
2 3 5
5
&

etc.














3
3 5 6
2 4 5
2 3 5
2 3 5
3 5
D Dorian Mode
2 Octave G7 scale showing notes of Dorian Mode
&

1
}
II

1

2

4
2 3 5
2 3 5
1 3 5
&

1
1
3
4
3 5
2 5
3

1
3 1
3
4
5 3
5 2
w
2
3
G7 Scale
G7 Arpeggio
G7 Scales and Arpeggios over Dmi7
15
&

etc.
II

2
3
2 4 5
2 3 5
5
&

etc.














3
3 5 6
2 4 5
2 3 5
2 3 5
3 5
& 4
4

III

2
3
3 6 6 3
4 4
5
use over Dmi 7, Dmi9, etc.

5
& 4
4

VII

2
8
7 10 10 7
9 9
10
use over Dmi 7, Dmi9, etc.

10
Dom7 Arpeggio No.1
Dom7 Arpeggio No.2
Dom7 Arpeggio No.3
Dom 9th Arpeggio No.1
16
& 4
4

VII

3
10
7 10 10 7
9 9
10
use over Dmi 7, Dmi9, etc.

10
& 4
4

IX

4
flatten 2nd finger

1
10
10 10
9 12 12 9
10
use over Dmi 7, Dmi9, etc.

10
Dom 9th Arpeggio No.2
Dom 9th Arpeggio No.3
17
SUBSTITUTE NO. 3:
b5 and b5, II-V
Flat-five (tritone) substitution is a standard Be-bop device. Wes Montgomery incorporated this
substitution into every aspect of his playing, single-line soloing, comping, octaves and even his
compositions.
The basic principle is that a dominant chord, a 5th away from a given dom chord can be used in
its place:
G7 D7
&

original chord
w
w
w
w
3
4
1
2
3
4
3
3




b
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5
2 3 5 4
3 5
5 substitute
w
w
w
w
b
b
b 1
4
2
3
2
4
3
4
This substitution works because both shapes have two notes in common. The 7th and the 3rd
(F and B) of G7 invert to become the 3rd and 7th of the D7:
Because II and Vs, from the same key, are interchangeable, Wes liked to add the appropriate II chord
to his 5 substitute. In the previous example the II would be Ami7.
)
`
`` `

)
`
`` `

7, 3
G7 D7
)
`
` `
`
^
)
`
` `
`
^
3, 7
18
Study the following equation:
Given chord 5 sub., with appropriate II
G7 = D7 = Ami7 D7
Consequently, the b5 substitution of G7 is D7 and the 5, II-V of the G7 is Ami7 D7. Montgomery
made extensive use of 5, II-Vs. He also liked to use 5 substitutions over the popular I, VI, II, V
progression, a technique which played a major role in Montgomerys most popular composition:
West Coast Blues.
I VI II V turnaround with b5 substitutions
I 5, VI 5, II 5, V
| Bmaj7 | D7 | *Gmaj7 | B75 | to bar 1
Originals:
| Bmaj7 | Gmi7 | Cmi7 | F7 |
* Wes used the maj7 instead of a Dom7 to obtain the pedal note F.
Introduction and Ending: West Coast Blues
&
b
b
4
3
.
.
.
.
.

b
b
Bmaj7
Imaj7
I
Ami7
VI

j

b
b

5,IIV
D7
b

b
j

n
Gmaj7
5
II
Fmi7
V
j

#
j

n

#
5,IIV
B7
)
`
` `
`
I
3 4
1 2
)
`` `
`
^
4
1 3 2
)
`
``
`
^
2
3 4
1
)
`
`
`
`
I
2 3
4
1
19
WEST COAST BLUES
&
b
b
4
3

Intro.
VI
.
.
.

2
4
3
1

IV
j

b
b
1
Bmaj7

Ami7

6 6 6 6
7 4
7 4
6
j


3
j

b
b
III

2
1
D7
4 4
4 3
6
&
b
b
.
.
.
.

II
b
1

b
2
4
3

n
1
Gmaj7

Fmi7

2
3 2
3 2
2
j

#
3
j

n
I

#
B7
2 2
2 1
4
&
b
b

Tune
j
#

j
#



B7
6 7 6 7
8
8
b

3



6 8 3 6
6
j
n

j
n

b

A7
4 5 4 5
6
6
&
b
b

b
b
3

n

4 6 7 8
8
j
#

j
#



B7
6 7 6 7
8
8
b
.

J
#
6
6 8
20
&
b
b

n
#



j
#
Bmi7
5 7 5
7
4
j

#
j

n

E7
6 4
7 7
j

b
j




E7
5 6 5 6
8
8
&
b
b

b

3



6 8 5 8
6
j

b
j




5 6 5 6
8
8
b

3



6 8 5 8
8
&
b
b

j
#

j
#



B7
6 7 6 7
8
8
b

3



6 8 5 8
8
j
#

j
#



6 7 6 7
8
8
&
b
b

b
.

7
6 8





j
#
F7
6 8 6
8
4





n
7 5
5 8 7
8
21
&
b
b



b

j
n
E7
4 6 4
6
2

b



b
5 3
3 6 5
6
j
#

j
#



B7
6 7 6 7
8
8
&
b
b

b

3



6 8 8
8 10
j
#

j
#


J

#
#
B13
9
9
6 7 6 7 8
7
J

#
#
j

9 9
9 9
8 8
7 7
8
&
b
b
4
3
B7 B7 A7 A7
&
b
b
B7 B7 Bmi7 E7
&
b
b
Bmi7 E7 Emi7 A7
&
b
b
Dmi7 G7 Dmi7 G7
&
b
b
Cmi7 F7 Fmi7 B7
&
b
b
Bmaj7 D7 Gmaj7 B7
West Coast Blues
(Changes for solos)
22
b5, II-V Substitute at bars 7 and 8
b5 Substitute on the V chord (bar 24)
ROAD SONG
(extract)
&
b
b

IV
n
2
#
4

j
#
1
Bmi7
5 7 5
7
4
j

#
3
j

4
n
1

4
E7
6 4
7 7
etc.
&
b
b

j
#

j
#


* 5 substitute for F7
J

#
#
4
3
2
1
B7 B13
9
9
6 7 6 7 8
7
hold shape
J

#
#
(5)
j
1

9 9
9 9
8 8
7 7
8
&
b
b
4
4

.
.

F
10 8
10 8
7 5 10
7 5
8
.
.

Bmaj7
7
7
J

5
J


#
.

.
Bmi E9
7 7 7 7
7 7 6 6
23
4 ON 6
&
b
b
4
4

)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&
I
basic:

4
1

n
b
*
1
2
1


Cmi7
Cmi9
F7
B7
5
10 7
8 7
8 8
8 7
)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&
I

b
b

J

n
b
*


Bmi7
Bmi9
E7
A7
5
8 5
6 5
6 6
6 5
&
b
b

)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&

n
n

J

b
b
b
*


Ami7
Ami9
D7
A7
5
7 4
5 4
5 5
5 4
)
`
```

)
` `
` `

b
b
*
4
3
2
1

b
*
1
3
2


D7
Emi9
5IIV
A9

6 3
6 3
4 4
6
4
4 ON 6
&
b
b
4
4





5
5 3
3

24
&
b
b




10
10 8
8




8
8 6
6

n


7
7 5
5
b

b

8
8 6
6
&
b
b





5
5 3
3

&
b
b

`
)
`
`
`
'
)
` ` `
+%

)
`
+
` ` `
^
)
`
+
` ` `

4
2
3
1

3
2

b
b
b
b
1
4
3
2

n
n
n
n
Bmaj7 Gmi7 Am11 Ami11
3 2 3
2 3 4 5
3 3 4 5
1
3 4 5
)
`
+
`
``

#
#
4
3
1
2

D7
6
5
4
5
&
b
b

2nd Part, etc.




Tune

3


J

3 3
3 5 5 3
25
&
b
b



3 4 3 3
3 5 3
5
.
j

j
.
5 2 2
5
.

&
b
b

)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&
I

4
1

n
b 1
2
1


Cmi9 B7
10 7
8 7
8 8
8 7
)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&
I

b
b

J

n
b


Bmi9 A7
8 5
6 5
6 6
6 5
)
` ``
`
^
I
)
`` `
`
&

n
n

J

b
b
b


Ami9 A7
7 4
5 4
5 5
5 4
&
b
b

)
`
```

)
` `
` `

b
b
4
3
2
1

b
1
3
2


Emi9 A9
6 3
6 3
4 4
6
4


J

3 3
3 5 5 3
&
b
b



3 4 3 3
3 5 3
5
.
j

j
.
5 2 2
5
w
26
&
b
b

b
b
b
b

n
n
n
n
Bmaj7 Gmi7 Am11 Ami11
3 2 3
2 3 4 5
3 3 4 5
1
3 4 5

#
#

D7
6
5
4
5
&
b
b

Break (into solo)




5
5 3
3

4 on 6 - Chords for Solos


&
b
b
Gmi7 C7 Gmi7 C7 Gmi7 C7
&
b
b
Gmi7 C7 Cmi7 F7 Bmi7 E7
&
b
b
Ami7 D7 Emi7 A7 Gmi7 C7
&
b
b
Gmi7 C7 Gmi7 C7 Cmi7 F7
&
b
b
.
.
Bmaj7 Ami7 D7 Gmi7 D7
27
CHARACTERISTIC TECHNIQUES
TECHNIQUE No.1: Alternating Inversions
West Coast Blues
(extract)
& 4
4
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

)
`
`
``
^
I
)
` ` `
`^
j

1
4

#
1
3
j

Ami9 Ami6
7 5 7 5 7 5
5 5 5 5 5 5
5 5 5 5 5 5
5 4 5 4 5 4
)
`
`
``
^

)
` ` `
`^ ^
j

Gmi9 Gmi6
5 3 5 3 5 3
3 3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3 3 3
3 2 3 2 3 2
&
b
b
4
3
.
.
.
.

)
` `
``
^
I
)
` `
`
`
&
I

4
1
3
1

b
1
3
2
1

B13 B13
10 6 6 6 10 6 6 6
8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
10 7 7 7 10 7 7 7
8 6 6 6 8 6 6 6
)
` `
``
^
I
)
` `
`
`
&

b
b

A13 A13
8 4 4 4 8 4 4 4
6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
8 5 5 5 8 5 5 5
6 4 4 4 6 4 4 4
&
b
b
4
3

)
` `
`
`
&
I
)
`
`
``
I

b
4
3
1
2

b
1
3
2
1

B7 B13
10 6 6 6 10 6 6 6
9 8 8 8 9 8 8 8
10 7 7 7 10 7 7 7
8 6 6 6 8 6 6 6

10 6 6 6 10 6 6 6
9 8 8 8 9 8 8 8
10 7 7 7 10 7 7 7
8 6 6 6 8 6 6 6
28
TECHNIQUE No. 2: Imi7-V7b9 Sequences
Most Used mi7 and mi6 inversions
)
` ` ` `
&
1
)
`
`
^
``
1
3
)
`
`
`
`
%
2
3
1
)
`
`
`
^
`
1
3
2
Mi7 Mi6 Mi7 Mi6
&
b
b

)
` `
`
`
&

b
b

A13
4 4
6 6
5 5
4 4 4

b
b

4 4 4
6 6 6
5 5 5
4 4 4
)
` `
`
`
&
I
)
`
`
``
I

B7 B13
10 6 6 6 6
9 8 8 8 8
10 7 7 7 7
8 6 6 6 6
etc.

b
J

6 6 6
8 8 8
7 7 7
6 6 6
)
``
`
^
`
1
3
4
)
`
`
`
^
`
1
4
2
)
`
`
`
`
2 3
4
1
)
`
`
``
2 3 4
1
Mi7 Mi6 Mi7 Mi6
29
)
` `
``
)
` `
``
R 9
)
`
`
``
R
)
` `
``
9
)
` ``
`
R
)
`` `
`
R
)
` `
``
9
)
`
`
``
R
)
` `
``
9
)
`
^
`
``
2 3
1
)
` `
``
1
3 4
2
& 4
4

)
`` ``
&
I
)
` `
``
I

#
3
1
2
1
Ami7 E7
5 7
5 6
5 7
5 6
)
` `
`
`
^
I
)
` `
``
^

#
2
1
3
1

#
n
3
1
2
1
Ami6 E7
8 10
7 9
9 10
7 9
)
` `
``
^
1
)
` `
``
12

n
4
1
3
1

#
3
1
2
1
Ami7 E7
12 13
10 12
12 13
10 12
1.
V79
Master Shape:
Use either of the
following fingerings:
V7b9 and their parent V7 inversions
30
TECHNIQUE No. 3:
Interchangeable Key Centers
Bmaj7 Gmi9 C7sus
)
`
`
`
`
I
2
3
4
R, 5, 7 3,
1
)
`
`
`
`
I
2
3
4
9 5, 7, 3,
1
)
`
`
`
`
I
2
3
4
(11)
13 4, 7, 9,
1
& 4
4

)
` `
`
`
^
I
)
`` ``
&
I
)
` `
``
I
)
` `
``
^
)
` `
``
^
1
J

#
n
J

n
Ami7 E7 Ami6 E7 Ami7
5 7 8 10 12
5 6 7 9 10
5 7 9 10 12
5 6 7 9 10
)
` `
`
`
^
I
)
`` ``
&
I
)
` `
``
I
)
` `
``
^

n
#

n
E7 Ami6 E7 Ami7
10 8 7 5
9 7 6 5
10 9 7 5
9 7 6 5
2.
&

)
`
` `
`
13
)
` `
``
15

N
4
1
3
1

# 3
1
2
1
Ami7 E7
15 16
13 15
14 16
14 15
)
``
&
`` 17

w
w
w
w
1
Ami7
17
17
17
17
31
&
b
b

2

4

1

3

4
1

3
4

2 4
1

2
5 6
6 8
5 7 8
5 7 8
5 6 8
6 8
&
b
b

V
1
2

1

1

2
5 6
6
7
7 8
5 8
5 6
Bbmaj7 Scale and Arpeggio
(use for Bmaj7, Gmi7 and C7)
Example played over Gmi7, Bmaj7 and C7 on video:
& 4
4

1
b
2

3

1

3
b
4

4
5 8 5 8
6
5 5 7
7 7 8
5 8
5 6
.

1

2

1
.

2

3

2
5 5
6 6 6
7
&

1
j
#
.
3 2

4
n
1

4
b
2
7 5
7 6 7 5
8 8 6
.
1

4
b
2

1
5
8 6 5
32
TECHNIQUE No. 4:
Characteristic Sounds for Soloing
Sound No.1
Use the major scale and major7th arpeggio a tone below the Dom7 and mi7th chords,
e.g:
G major scale and Gmajor7th arpeggio, over A7 or Ami7
A major scale and Amaj7 arpeggio over B7 or Bmi7
E major scale and Emaj7 arpeggio over F7 or Fmi7, etc.
Sound No.2
Change all IIs to Vs and vice versa, e.g:
Dmi7 = G7 or G7 = Dmi7
Ami7 = D7 or D7 = Ami7
Emi7 = A7 or A7 = Emi7 etc.
Sound No.3
Play over the 5 substitute of.dominant chords, e.g:
D7 = A7
F7 = B7
Play over the II of the 5 substitute ,e.g.
D7 = A7(5 sub) = Emi7(5-II)
F7 = B7(5 sub) = F mi7 (5-II) etc.
Sound No.4
Emphasize the 9th (or 2nd) and 4th (or 11th) when soloing over Dom7 and Mi7th
chords.