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Times Leader 04-08-2012

Times Leader 04-08-2012

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INSIDE

A NEWS
Obituaries 2A, 9A
Local 3A
Click 8A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 6B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 8C
D BUSINESS
Motley Fool 4D
E VIEWS
Editorial 2E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
G CLASSIFIED
Golf
Hanson leads
in Masters
Sports, 1C
The Times Leader
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 $1.50
6 09815 10077
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE – For more
than 50 years, Anthony J. Lupas
Jr. was among the most respect-
ed attorneys in Luzerne County,
garneringpraise as a caring, dedi-
cated professional, friends and
colleagues said.
The son of a
well-known in-
surance agent,
Lupas and his
wife, Lillian,
raised four chil-
dren in their
close-knit
Plains Town-
ship neighborhood as he built a
highly successful law practice.
They watched with pride as their
children grew into successful
adults, including a son, David,
who is now a Luzerne County
judge.
Today the family’s reputation
is in tatters, shattered by allega-
tions that the 77-year-old family
patriarch stole millions of dollars
in a Ponzi scheme that targeted
friends and clients.
Federal prosecutors charged
Lupas on March 29 with one
count of mail fraud in connection
with the alleged scheme. An in-
dictment is expected to be filed
soon.
As Lupas awaits developments
in the case, family, colleagues
and friends are left to wonder
what led to his downfall. Inter-
views withpeople who knowhim
paint a conflicting portrait of the
veteran attorney.
Some recall a dedicated public
servant who, driven by the men-
tal disabilities of his daughter,
Joanne, worked tirelessly in the
early 1970s to help form the Lu-
zerne Intermediate Unit 18,
which provides educational ser-
vices to disabled children.
After federal charges, reputation of Lupas in turmoil
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
The East Mountain Apartments in Plains Township, where Antho-
ny J. Lupas Jr., accused of stealing millions of dollars, now lives.
Lupas, 1965
Friends describe him as really
good guy, but he has allegedly
stolen millions of dollars.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See LUPAS, Page 10A
WASHINGTON—Mitt Romney is starting to
honehisappeal tofemalevoters, acutelyawareas
he turns to the general election that he has little
choice but to narrow President Barack Obama’s
commanding advantage among this critical con-
stituency.
None toosoon, say many Republicanactivists.
They expect Romney, as well as his popular wife,
Ann, tomakeanexplicit pitchtofemalevoters on
the economy andjobs, their top issues.
The eventual nominee “needs to start recog-
nizing the power that women voters have,” said
Rae Lynne Chornenky, president of the National
Federationof RepublicanWomen.
Romney, on pace
to clinch the nomi-
nation in June, if
not earlier, ac-
knowledges that
theGOPfacesahis-
torical challenge in
closing the advan-
tage Democrats
have with women.
Like Obama, he
sees pocketbook is-
sues as the key to
winning them.
“Wehaveworkto
do to make sure we
takeourmessageto
the women of
America, so they
understand how
we’re going to get
good jobs and we’re going to have a bright eco-
nomic future for them and for their kids,” Rom-
ney saidthis past week inMiddleton, Wis.
By Friday, Obama was making the same argu-
ment at the White House, where he hosteda con-
ference onwomenandthe economy. He present-
ed a full review of the administration’s achieve-
ments on equal pay and workplace flexibility as
new unemployment numbers showed an uptick
injob creation.
“When we talk about these issues that primar-
ily impact women, we’ve got to realize they are
not just women’s issues. They are family issues,
theyareeconomicissues, theyaregrowthissues,
they are issues about American competitive-
ness,”saidObama, usinghisofficetocast himself
asadefenderof women. HisDemocraticalliesare
putting it more bluntly, accusing Republicans of
waging a “war against women.”
CAMPAI GN 201 2
Romney in
fight to get
female vote
Obama has huge lead over likely GOP
presidential nominee in this constituency
and Romney expected to make overt pitch.
By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press
See WOMEN, Page 10A
AP PHOTO
Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney
speaks on a roof in Har-
risburg Thursday.
WILKES-BARRE – The shooting
death of 14-year-old Tyler Winstead
brought together hundreds of peo-
ple Saturday night for a vigil to re-
member the teenager and secured a
promise from them to watch out for
each other in their schools, neigh-
borhoods and communities.
At dusk a stream of people ended
a short procession from the boy’s
house on Hill Street and poured into
the field in front of GAR Junior/
Senior High School where he at-
tended the eighth grade.
En route, a young boy told anoth-
er as they joined the line on the
sidewalk, “We all got the same pur-
pose.”
Many were students and gradu-
ates of the school. Many of them
held lit candles. Some pushed chil-
dren in strollers. Others provided a
“DON’T LET HIS LIFE go in
vain. We have to do something
about it. It’s important that we do
something about it.”
Kennard Johnston
A friend of the family
Tyler remembered
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A well-wisher signs a mural hanging on Tyler Winstead’s front porch on Hill Street in Wilkes-Barre before the start of a vigil for the 14-year-old on Sat-
urday night. Below, hundreds pour out to Wilkes-Barre’s Hill Street for the vigil for shooting victim Tyler Winstead on Saturday night.
Vigil held for shooting
victim Tyler Winstead
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See VIGIL, Page 10A
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Boston, Sarah
Christian, Claire
Duda, John
Harry, Betty
Jackson, Marqueen
Johnston, Carol
Karazia, Jacqueline
Macarek, Charlotte
MacCartney, Betty
Peranto, Dorothy
Piontkowski, Edward
Shellhammer-Smith,
Blanche
Stine, Ann
Tarnecki, Mark
Williams, Carolyn
Zambito, Frances
Zettles, Mary Ann
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 9A
BUILDING
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Issue No. 2012-099
More Obituaries, Page 9A
B
etty L. MacCartney, 64, of Plains
Township, passed away Friday,
April 6, 2012 at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital due to complica-
tions froma chronic illness. She was
surrounded by her loving family.
She was born September 29,
1947, the daughter of the late Ge-
orge andSophie (Haczewski) Baltu-
savich of Plains Township.
She was a graduate of Plains Me-
morial High School, class of 1965,
where she was a majorette. Betty
was employed at several area banks
as a Data Processor and last worked
at TRL trucking prior to her retire-
ment in 2007.
Betty enjoyed the simplest of
pleasures in life – coffee with
friends, visits to Atlantic City, more
recently Mohegan Sun, and family.
She was always ready to take a trip
anywhere. She took an interest in
the history of RussianTzar Nicholas
II, so in 2002 she and her husband,
Jack, along with her Aunt Joz trav-
eled to St. Petersburg, Russia. They
also visited the city of Moscow dur-
ing the journey. She enjoyed trips to
watch Penn State play or made sure
her Saturdays were free to watch
themontelevision. Beinga wife and
mother were her priorities in her
lifeandshegavesomuch, never ask-
ingfor anythinginreturn, but by far,
her greatest joy was her grandchil-
dren. Her wit and laugh will be re-
membered by those who knew her,
andthevoidcreatedinour hearts by
her loss will never be filled.
Surviving are her husband, John,
Plains Township; daughters, Joanne
Wychock and her husband, James,
Pittston; Dianne Kasisky and her
husband, Andrew, Plains Township;
grandsons, James Thomas and Rob-
bie John Wychock, Andrew John
Kasisky and step-granddaughter
KylaSundayKasisky. Alsosurviving
are her sister, Joan Stroup, Harris-
burg, andher brother, George Baltu-
savich, Plains Township; several
nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and
many cousins.
The family would like to thank
Dr. Kevin Carey, Dr. Delehanty, and
Dr. Elis for the excellent care they
provided Betty over the years. She
truly gave thema run for their mon-
ey. Theywouldalsoliketothankthe
staff at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital, especially Ken and Mar-
lene in the CCUfor the outstanding
and compassionate care they pro-
vided.
Funeral services will be held
Wednesday at 10 a.m. from the Cor-
coran Funeral Home Inc., 20 South
Main Street, Plains Township. In-
terment will be held at the conve-
nience of the family. Friends may
call Tuesday from 5 to 8 p.m.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions in Betty’s memory may be
made tothe AmericanHeart Associ-
ation, P.O. Box 15120, Chicago IL
60693 or the American Lung Asso-
ciation, 3000 Kelly Lane, Spring-
field IL 62711.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Betty L. MacCartney
April 6, 2012
Edward A.
“Boone” Piont-
kowski, 80, of
the Honey Pot
section of Nan-
ticoke, passed
awayonThurs-
day at home.
He was born
in Nanticoke, on Sep. 22, 1931. He
was the son of the late Stanley and
Theresa Ekker Piontkowski.
Boone was a U.S. Army veteran
of the Korean War, serving from
November 1952 to October 1954,
attaining the rank of Corporal.
He was employed by Penn Foot-
wear for over 36 years, serving as a
foreman, until his retirement in
1993.
Boone was a PIAA umpire for
softball. He was a member of the
Honey Pot Volunteer Fire Co. and
the Fraternal Order of Eagles No.
834, Nanticoke.
Hewas amember of St. Faustina
Parish, formerly of St. Stanislaus
Church, Nanticoke.
Boone was preceded in death by a
sister, Theresa Victoria, and a broth-
er, Stanley Piontkowski.
Boone was a good man who loved
spending his time with his wife,
daughters and granddaughter. He
will be sadly missed by his loving
family.
Surviving are his wife of 52 years,
the former Theresa Wineski Piont-
kowski, at home; daughters, Diane
Weiss and her husband, Ralph, with
whomhe resided; Karen Hughes and
her husband, David, White Haven;
granddaughter, Michelle Bukofski,
Nanticoke; several brothers and sis-
ters; nieces and nephews.
Private funeral services were
held at the convenience of the
family from the George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ash-
ley. Interment with military honors
was heldinSt. Mary’s Nativity Ceme-
tery, Plymouth Township.
Edward A. Piontkowski
April 5, 2012
John J. Du-
da, 90, Ply-
mouth Manor,
Plymouth, for-
merly of Larks-
ville, died
Wednesday,
April 4, 2012 in
the Wilkes-
Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Edwardsville, he was
the son of the late Joseph and Mar-
tha Pinchock Duda. He was a grad-
uate of Edwardsville High School,
Class of 1940. He was a carpenter
by trade and worked at Sordoni
Construction Company until his
retirement in 1984.
He was a Bronze Star Army vet-
eran of World War II.
He was a lifelong member of
Swoyersville American Legion,
Post 644.
He was a member of St John the
Baptist Church, Larksville.
He was preceded in death by his
brothers, Stephen, Mickey and Jo-
seph, andsisters, Julia Stefanko, Mar-
tha Lease, Katie Duda, Betty Quarte-
roni and Josephine Erwine.
Surviving are his wife of 60 years,
the former Florence Janoski; son and
daughter-in-law, John and Ellen Du-
da, Wilkes-Barre; granddaughters,
Melissa and Alison Duda; brother,
Matthew Duda, Edwardsville, and
sisters, Mary Michaels, Luzerne,
Agnes Rossick, Edwardsville; numer-
ous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
Monday at 10:30 a.m. in the
Chapel at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township, with the Rev. James
Quinn officiating.
Arrangements are by the Kielty-
Moran Funeral Home Inc., 87 Wash-
ington Ave., Plymouth.
John J. Duda
April 4, 2012
C
arol M. Johnston, of Kingston
Township, daughter of John J.
and Carol Space Kearns, passed
away on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 6
p.m.
Carol was preceded in death by
her husband, Attorney Ralph J.
Johnston Sr., and her sisters, Mrs.
Edward Ruane and Mrs. Leo Brady.
Surviving are her children, Attor-
ney Ralph J. Johnston Jr. and his
wife, Beverly Jean Johnston; Dr. Ju-
dith Johnston, AUD; James John-
ston and Thomas Johnston.
Acelebration of Carol’s Life will
be held in a private Funeral Mass in
the Church of Saint Mary of the Im-
maculate Conception. Interment
will be in Saint Mary’s Cemetery in
Hanover Township.
Memorial donations in lieu of
flowers inher honor maybemadeto
the charity of your choice, or, if de-
sired, to St Joseph’s Center, 2010
Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA
18509.
Carol’s family expresses their
heartfelt appreciation to Dr. David
W. Greenwald, Dr. Bruce H. Said-
man, their colleagues and staff for
their caring professional service.
Carol’s family also wishes to ex-
press their gratitude to the nurses,
caregivers and supporting staff as-
signed to the Fifth Floor East at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital for
their compassion and kindness.
There will be no visitation hours.
Privatefuneral arrangements will
be at the convenience of the family.
Arrangements are by McLaugh-
lin’s – The Family Funeral Service.
Permanent messages and memo-
ries can be shared with Carol’s fam-
ily at www.celebrateherlife.com.
Carol M. Johnston
April 3, 2012
J
acqueline Karazia, 80, formerly
of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Thursday in Geisinger Wyoming
Valley. She most recently resided
with her daughter and family in
Exeter.
Born in Laurel Run, she was the
daughter of the late Wilbur and Be-
ssy Belles Griffith. She graduated
from Laurel Run School and previ-
ously worked at Atwater Throwing
Company. She retired as a floor su-
pervisor at Kmart.
Jacqueline was a loving wife,
mother and grandmother, who en-
joyed scratching lottery tickets and
bingo. As mentioned by her grand-
son, Cody, she also loved cheating
at solitaire.
Preceding her in death were her
husband, Charles; son, Charles;
brothers and sisters.
Surviving are daughter, Susan
Karazia andhusband, GregVogelge-
sang; grandson, Cody; sisters, La-
verne Lenkaitis, West Pittston; Be-
tty Heffron, Olyphant; Leslie Holt,
Laurel Run; numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. from the
Straub Kane Funeral Home, 55 Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, with the Rev-
erend Krup, Laurel Run Primitive
Methodist Church, officiating. In-
terment will be in Mt. Greenwood
Cemetery, Trucksville. Friends may
call Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.
Memorial donations may be
made to the charity of the donor’s
choice.
Jacqueline Karazia
April 5, 2012
An elderly couple was
bound and robbed during a
home invasion early Saturday
morning in Bear Creek Town-
ship, state police reported.
Police said two black males
and one white male kicked in
the back door to 270 Pittston
Blvd. at approximately 12:30
a.m.
Once inside, the intruders
bound the hands and feet of
the home’s residents, 74-year-
old Bernard Gryskevicz and
his 73-year-old wife, Patricia,
and covered their heads with
blankets.
Reached by phone Satur-
day, Patricia Gryskevicz said
her husband was in the bath-
room when the break-in oc-
curred. She heard a thump
and, worrying that he fell,
went to investigate, leading
her to the intruders.
She was too distraught to
continue the story.
“I hope the police would
just catch them,” she said.
State police said the intrud-
ers ransacked the home, re-
moving $390 in cash, several
guns and two diamond rings.
The intruders were inside the
home for about and hour and
a half, police said.
They fled in Bernard Grys-
kevicz’s vehicle, a gray 2008
Nissan Frontier pickup bear-
ing Pennsylvania license
number YWH-9686.
The intruders were last
seen wearing dark-colored
hooded sweatshirts and
gloves. Their faces were cov-
ered throughout the home in-
vasion, police said.
Police are asking anyone
with information to contact
state police at Wyoming at
697-2000.
Senior duo tied up, robbed in Bear Creek Twp. home
Bernard Gryskevicz, 74, and
his 73-year-old wife, Patricia,
victims of home invasion.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
LOOKING TO EASTER
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
E
aster traditions
lived on in area
events Saturday.
Above, parishion-
ers at St. Leo’s/
Holy Rosary
Church in Ashley
take part in an
Easter Vigil Mass in
the evening. At
right, Father James
Hayer blesses
Easter baskets
filled with eggs,
butter, ham, salt
and other treats
for Easter dinner at
St. Mary’s Byzan-
tine Catholic
Church in Wilkes-
Barre.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
LOTTERY
SUMMARY
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 1-7-0 (7-8-1, double draw)
Monday: 0-0-7
Tuesday: 4-1-8
Wednesday: 8-0-6
Thursday: 4-7-3
Friday: 7-2-3
Saturday: 5-2-5
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 7-1-1-8
Monday: 1-3-0-6
Tuesday: 1-6-7-0
Wednesday: 8-2-0-1
Thursday: 2-8-4-2
Friday: 0-5-6-7
Saturday: 5-5-7-6
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 6-5-4-4-2
Monday: 5-4-4-8-6
Tuesday: 1-3-4-9-6
Wednesday: 8-6-4-8-0
Thursday: 2-6-4-6-3
Friday: 2-8-9-5-0
Saturday: 2-0-2-5-9
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 01-10-19-21-28
Monday: 17-21-22-23-30
Tuesday: 09-10-15-23-28
Wednesday: 01-12-16-17-29
Thursday: 04-16-17-22-23
Friday: 01-07-13-19-29
Saturday: 04-05-12-23-29
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-9-0
Monday: 5-8-5
Tuesday: 7-4-5
Wednesday: 0-3-7
Thursday: 8-6-6
Friday: 1-7-5
Saturday: 0-1-5
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 8-1-4-4
Monday: 4-6-5-0
Tuesday: 8-9-6-4
Wednesday: 0-2-4-3
Thursday: 6-1-3-4
Friday: 4-3-6-1
Saturday: 1-9-3-7 (8-1-8-0, double
draw)
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-9-3-0-5
Monday: 2-9-5-5-4
Tuesday: 0-6-6-2-6
Wednesday: 3-8-1-4-2
Thursday: 3-4-1-8-7
Friday: 1-5-9-0-4
Saturday: 0-7-5-4-5
Cash 5
Sunday: 02-08-24-30-39
Monday: 03-07-18-20-26
Tuesday: 08-10-26-29-33
Wednesday: 26-27-34-40-43
Thursday: 06-14-34-35-37
Friday: 03-10-12-14-42
Saturday: 03-06-09-15-16
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 11-14-19-26-37-40
Thursday: 11-25-31-32-44-49
Powerball
Wednesday: 01-24-33-45-49
powerball: 06
Saturday: 05-13-17-20-30
powerball: 18
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 11-35-38-41-52
Megaball: 40
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 02-19-20-24-33
Megaball: 39
Megaplier: 04
PLAINSTWP. – Police arrest-
edMatthewVital of Wilkes-Barre
onSaturday onanarrest warrant
for a probationviolationstem-
ming froma charge of theft by
unlawful taking. Police saidthey
encounteredVital while he and
another manwere loading scrap
metal into a pickup truck on
Pethick Drive at 12:40 p.m. Sat-
urday.
WILKES-BARRE– City po-
lice reportedthe following:
•Police saidthey charged
Jose Morales of Wilkes-Barre
withdriving under the influence
following anautomobile acci-
dent at 12:52 a.m. Saturday on
the 200 block of NorthMain
Street.
•A12-year-oldboy sustained
minor injuries after he was
struck by a vehicle while riding a
bicycle at the intersectionof
HortonandSouthFranklin
Street at 5:40 p.m. Friday
Police saidthe boy pulledin
front of the vehicle drivenby
JohnKoury, 72, of Parney Street,
andKoury was unable to stop.
No charges were filed, police
said.
•Three vehicles collidedat
the intersectionof SouthMain
Street andWoodStreet at 3:40
p.m. Friday.
Police saidDonaldDecolum-
na, 24, of Kingston, drove his
vehicle into the rear of a Ford
Taurus drivenby AnnMacFar-
land, 81, of Hanover Township.
The impact pushedMacFar-
land’s car into a thirdvehicle
drivenby Barry Perrin, 58, of
Wilkes-Barre, police said.
MacFarlandwas takento
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
for treatment of back pain, police
said. No other injuries were
reportedby police.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
MADISON TWP.
Infant dies in trailer fire
A 4-month-old infant died in a trailer
home fire early Saturday.
Lackawanna County Coroner Tim
Rowland said an autopsy Saturday
afternoon concluded Cindy Williams of
Hillside Park, Madison Township, died
as a result of carbon monoxide poison-
ing from smoke inhalation. The man-
ner of death is pending the results of
the ongoing state police fire marshal
investigation, Rowland said.
The fast-moving fire was reported at
9:10 a.m. Saturday. Township Fire Chief
Kevin Emerson said the trailer was
engulfed in flames when he arrived.
Several other children and adults were
rescued by neighbors or got out on
their own, fire officials said.
Emerson said they were taken by
ambulance to a Scranton hospital.
The cause of the fire has not been
determined, but it isn’t believed to be
suspicious.
WILKES-BARRE
Conference at Wilkes
“Women Across The World” is the
theme of Wilkes University’s annual
Women’s and Gender Studies Confer-
ence on April 16 and 17 in the Henry
Student Center. Hours for the confer-
ence, which is free and open to the
public, are from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. on
Monday and to 8 p.m. on Tuesday.
The event includes over 30 sessions
with a focus on the
diversity of women
around the globe. The
conference is co-
sponsored by King’s
College, with students
and faculty from
King’s and Wilkes
making presentations.
The keynote address
is at King’s, with all other events held
at Wilkes.
Ashley Mears, assistant professor of
sociology at Boston University, will
present the lecture “Pricing Looks,
Pricing Gender” Monday at 7 p.m., at
Burke Auditorium, McGowan Hall,
King’s College. As an ex-fashion model,
Mears researched the global context of
culture and beauty, recently publishing
her book “Pricing Beauty: The Making
of a Fashion Model.” Mears’ presenta-
tion will focus on the use of thin, al-
most exclusively white, models in
fashion.
Wilkes alumnus and stand-up comic
Teri Granahan of the class of 1994
presents “A Conversation with a Come-
dian – Who Just Happens to Be a Fe-
male” in the Miller Room on Tuesday
from 4 to 5:15 p.m.
HAZLE TWP.
Fourth juvenile is charged
A fourth juvenile was charged in the
ongoing investigation into the discov-
ery of .22-caliber ammunition in the
Hazleton Area 9th Grade Center on
Tuesday.
State police Saturday said a 14-year-
old boy from Kelayres, Schuylkill Coun-
ty stole a .22-caliber revolver in a bur-
glary in Kline Township and sold it to a
16-year-old boy near the Hazleton Area
High School. The gun was not taken
into any of the three schools on cam-
pus.
The 14-year-old boy was charged
with possession of a firearm by a mi-
nor, receiving stolen property, firearms
not to be carried without a license, sale
and transfer of firearms and possession
of a weapon on school property.
He was lodged in the Northampton
County Juvenile Detention Center to
await adjudication in Luzerne County
Juvenile Court.
WEST WYOMING
Trail project is session topic
There will be a public meeting on
Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the West
Wyoming Borough Hall, 464 W. Eighth
St., to discuss the West Side Trail pro-
ject.
Residents living on West Eighth
Street from the Wyoming border to
Charney Park and from West Eighth
Street to Dailey Park in West Wyom-
ing, residents along West Eighth Street
from the West Wyoming border to
Wyoming Avenue, residents who live
on Tenth Street from Wyoming Avenue
to Tenth Street Elementary School,
Exeter, residents that live along Erie
Street from Wyoming Avenue to Me-
morial Street and residents who live on
Memorial Street from Erie Street to
JFK School are urged to attend.
For information, call Karen Szwast at
654-0933.
I N B R I E F
Mears
HARRISBURG – The state
Senate will soonconsider a bill,
which received overwhelming
support in the House last week,
that could lead to a constitu-
tional amendment reducing
the size of the legislature.
On Wednesday, the House
voted 140-49 to approve House
Bill 153. The measure seeks to
cut the number of House dis-
tricts from 203 to 153 and re-
duce the number of senators
from50to38. Everystaterepre-
sentative from Northeastern
Pennsylvania, except for Rep.
KarenBoback, R-Harveys Lake,
voted in favor of the measure.
At least three local senators
also support the proposal,
though they aren’t set on the
optimum size of the chambers.
“There are several compet-
ing numbers that have been
proposed, and I will vote for a
reasonable reduction,” said
Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman
Township. “Larger districts
will make legislative service
more challenging, but it is a
necessary adjustment.”
Sen. John Yudichak, D-Ply-
mouth Township, agreed the
“size and cost of the General
Assembly needs to be evaluat-
ed, particularly in these tough
budgetary times.” He also stop-
ped short of supporting a set
number for reductions at this
point.
“There is no magic formula
for the right size for a state leg-
islature, but clearly the time
has come for Pennsylvania to
seriously examine this issue
and address the efficiency of
state government operations,”
he said.
Pennsylvania has the largest
full-time legislature in the na-
tion and the second-largest
overall, trailing only New
Hampshire, which operates
with part-time lawmakers.
Sen. John Blake, D-Archbald,
said that while he personally
believes the Senate is “right-
sized” at 50 members, he be-
lieves the overall size of the leg-
islature is toobig, andhe would
support House Bill 153 as writ-
ten.
PA. L EGI SL ATURE House-approved bill and some kind of cut favored by several local senators
Senate eyes assembly downsize
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Yudichak Baker
See DOWNSIZE, Page 7A
A state transportation head hopes to
convince Hazletonofficials that merging
the city’s public transit system with Lu-
zerne County’s will be in the best inter-
est of bus riders and taxpayers.
Hazleton officials are eager to find out
if the state can back up its cost-saving
claims, address questions they say have
so far gone unanswered and provide as-
surances that Hazleton area bus riders
won’t get the short end of the stick if a
merger materializes.
The Times Leader on Wednesday re-
ported that city coun-
cil was set to rescind a
resolution it passed
last year tomergeoper-
ations with the Lu-
zerne County Trans-
portation Authority.
Pennsylvania De-
partment of Transpor-
tation Deputy Secreta-
ry Toby L. Fauver refer-
enced a newspaper sto-
ry on council’s planned
vote in a letter he sent
electronically that
same day to Mayor Jo-
seph Yannuzzi and
council members be-
fore the council meet-
ing.
“I was disappointed
to read in the paper to-
day that the Mayor was
calling for a vote … to
rescind the previous
decision to move for-
ward with a merger
without discussing
with PennDOT or the
county the facts related
to consolidation,” Fauver wrote.
He said it would be “a travesty” for
state and county taxpayers and city resi-
dents if Hazleton opted to continue ma-
naging its own service with administra-
tion that duplicated LCTA’s. Fauver of-
fered to meet with Yannuzzi and council
to discuss the consolidation and address
local concerns. He urged council to de-
lay a vote until after a meeting.
Council on Wednesday followed Yan-
nuzzi’s recommendation to table the
vote.
Hazleton has concerns
After the meeting, Yannuzzi and Ha-
zleton Public Transit Director Steve
Hahn shared their concerns.
Hahn said he can’t imagine howPenn-
DOT is projecting a half-million dollars
in savings when Hazleton employs only
him and a secretary to run the program.
“Where is that (savings) coming from?
There are only two employees down
here. We’re not the cause of those costs,”
he said.
He suspects a majority of any savings
must come from merging the county’s
sharedride programs, but he hasn’t been
provided details froma transit study up-
State head
looking to
merge transit
operations
PennDOT secretary says merging
Hazleton system with LCTA is in best
interest of riders, taxpayers.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
“If they
don’t con-
tact us, if
they don’t
talk to us,
how are we
supposed
to know
what the
issues
are?”
Stanley Strelish
LCTA Executive
Director
See TRANSIT, Page 7A
PLAINS TWP. – Resi-
dents of Plains Township
saw significant improve-
ment to the public parks
in the last few years, ac-
cording to local govern-
ment officials. On Satur-
day, the largest one,
Plains Municipal Park on
Clark Lane was officially
rededicated by township
officials with a new stone
plaque bearing the names
of the commissioners and
the township’s recreation
board.
The dedication was tied
in with the township’s
Easter egg hunt which
about 150 children attend-
ed.
Township Commission-
er Robert Sax said the to-
tal cost incurred to up-
grade the township’s five
parks topped $250,000. A
percentage was covered
by casino-generated
funds, the rest through
the taxpayer revenues.
Plains Township rededicates Municipal Park
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Plains Township officials around the rededication plaque
Clockwise, from left: Robert Sax, Ciro Cinti, Lou Cardoni,
John Kozerski Jr., Clarence Ozgo, Jerry Yozwiak, John
Million, Ron Filippini, Emilio Aritz, Maureen Riley and
Joe Spagnuolo, former commissioner.
Casino-generated funds
paid portion of costs to
upgrade township’s parks.
See PARK, Page 5A
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
PLAINS TWP. – Harold Golomb Sr.
has endured 22 floods at his farm and
greenhouse complex along the flats
of the Susquehanna River.
But those disasters haven’t prevent-
ed him from stay-
ing in business.
Despite the
devastation of last
September’s
flooding, Go-
lomb’s Green-
house has reco-
vered and is open
for business for
the 55th Easter
season.
Golomb, 74, as-
sumed the busi-
ness from his father in the mid-1950s.
It sells fresh plants and flowers to a
loyal following of local customers.
“There are no dikes in Plains,” said
Golomb. “So every time the river ris-
es, our fields get flooded.”
Golomb, his wife, Audrey, and son
Harold Jr., decided to stay in their
low-lying home during the most re-
cent flood. He said the family took a
row boat to their relatives’ house on
higher ground each day to shower
and gather necessary staples and sup-
plies.
A photo album he has of the 2011
flood graphically shows the rising
flood waters and ensuing damage
from the Susquehanna, which crested
above 40 feet.
According to Harold Jr., the family
homestead also suffered significant
damage in the floods of 1996, 2004
and summer 2006.
“This flood was worse than ’72,”
stated the older Golomb. “We had
over 12 feet of water in our green-
houses and 8 feet of water on the first
floor of the house.”
Golomb’s Greenhouse will be open
daily through July. The Golombs also
sells fresh produce at local farmers
markets until November.
Golomb’s Greenhouse in Plains Twp. again open for Easter
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
HaroldGolombJr. replants petunias inhis Plains TownshipGreenhouse. The greenhouse was completelyunder water
inthe September floods, but the Golombfamilyis backandhas aselectionof Easter flowers fromwhichtochoose.
Still blooming after 22 floods
Audrey Golomb and daughter Laura Kosco replant begonias at the Plains
Township greenhouse off River Road at the end of McCullough Road.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
“There are
no dikes in
Plains. So
every time
the river ris-
es, our fields
get flooded.”
Harold Golomb Sr.
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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hosts Easter Egg Hunt
Birchwood Rehabilitation and Nursing Center hosted an annual Easter Egg Hunt on March
31. More than 100 children attended the event. The children were greeted by the Easter
Bunny, received a basket full of candy filled eggs, refreshments, and a picture with the
Easter Bunny. It was a great time for all.
Birchwood Rehabilitation and Nursing Center would like to
wish everyone a HAPPY EASTER!
WILKES-BARRE – The Ju-
nior Leadership Wilkes-Barre
members got together on Satur-
day at Kirby Park to help a cause
one member called “near and
dear to their hearts.” They orga-
nized an “Awareness Pet Picnic”
to benefit the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals.
Eleventh-grade students from
nine local schools set up food,
provided face-painting, ran raf-
fles, offered treats and toys for
the dogs and essentially got the
word out about helping local
pets. Dogs of all sizes, shapes
and colors showed up to play in
the sun along with about 70 pet
owners, SPCA volunteers and
prospective pet adopters.
“We’re all pet owners, too,”
said Tara Giarrantano, repre-
senting Crestwood School Dis-
trict. “This is our service project
for the leadership program and
we decided to have a day to help
the SPCA.” .
Blake Donovan from Dallas
School District manned the ta-
bles waiting on guests as they
purchased baked goods or other
items. He said members of
Leadership passed out promo-
tional fliers to local businesses
to get people to visit as well as
worked actively to catch those
passing by at Kirby Park.
“We want visitors to buy ev-
erything so we can donate to the
SPCA,” he said. “Dogs drink for
free,” he stressed.
Cary Moran, education direc-
tor from the SPCA, said when
the Junior Leadership group
members approached her about
their plans, she thought it was a
great idea. She added the mem-
bers essentially took care of the
whole project on their own.
“They did the bulk of the
work,” she said. “We just
brought the animals.”
During the picnic, several ani-
mals housed at the SPCA were
introduced to some potential
new owners.
Kristin Fino, one of about 200
SPCA volunteers, was taken
aback by a Bijon but was a little
reticent about adopting another
pet from SPCA after already tak-
ing three.
“The SPCA is a wonderful
place. They have so many great
dogs to adopt,” Fino said.
Tom Boyle, from Lake-Leh-
man School District, said the
group volunteered at the SPCA
as part of the project. They
cleaned up cages, walked the
dogs and provided whatever
help they could.
A dog day morning, afternoon
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Matt and Kristen
Boyle of Shaver-
town arrive with
their dogs Teddy,
front left, and
Taffy at the
SPCA pet picnic
at Kirby Park in
Wilkes-Barre on
Saturday morn-
ing.
Junior Leadership members
host ‘Awareness Pet Picnic’ to
benefit local SPCA chapter.
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
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HARRISBURG — The Corbett
administration said in announcing
that it wants to hire a private lot-
tery manager that Pennsylvania
needs a more profitable lottery.
As it happens, significant inno-
vation is afoot in state lotteries,
industry analysts say. And Gov.
Tom Corbett said he believes that
handing the reins of the Pennsyl-
vania Lottery to a private compa-
ny will not only boost innovation,
but encourage higher cash flow by
linking it to the company’s com-
pensation.
For now, Pennsylvania has the
nation’s sixth-largest lottery, with
more than $3 billion in annual
sales. But things could change
fast.
For instance, buying tickets for
Mega Millions or Lotto drawings
in real time from a home com-
puter is possible now in Illinois,
but nowhere else in the country.
Many in the industry are also
talking about online lottery
games — think social network
games like Angry Birds or ones
in Zynga Inc.’s lineup — that can
be played on a home computer,
tablet or smartphone. There’s
even technology to allow a
home-computer user to buy a
scratch ticket online and then
use a mouse to scratch it off.
“The growth potential is sig-
nificant,” said Angela Wiczek, a
spokeswoman for Providence,
R.I.-based GTECH Corp., one of
the nation’s leading lottery sys-
tems providers.
These steps do not necessarily
require hiring a private manager;
theoretically, they could be
made with the existing staff in
the Department of Revenue.
And it is likely that efforts to ex-
tend the Pennsylvania Lottery’s
reach to the Internet would re-
quire the state Legislature’s ap-
proval.
Regardless, online is now con-
sidered the new frontier for a
more lucrative lottery.
The grease in the gears came
from a U.S. Justice Department
opinion, issued in December in
response to a query by Illinois
and New York about whether
federal law prevented them from
selling lottery tickets online to
adults within their states. The
department answered that the
Wire Act only prevents players
from wagering on sports out-
comes — other bets are OK.
It was a gift for cash-strapped
states looking at long-termliabil-
ities they don’t know how to pay
for as well as for a lottery and
gambling industry that realizes
that 20- and 30-somethings don’t
care much for picking numbers
or standing in line to buy lottery
tickets, said I. Nelson Rose, a
Whittier Law School professor
who runs the website,
www.gamblingandthelaw.com.
“It opens doors to states doing
a very dramatic expansion of on-
line games,” Rose said.
Most states, including Penn-
sylvania, would probably have to
change their laws to allowonline
lottery gambling, and that could
get tricky: Lawmakers may not
want to be seen expanding gam-
bling, and many states now have
entrenched commercial casino
gambling industries that would
oppose such a move, unless they
get licenses to operate, say, In-
ternet poker, some say.
But lotteries may have more
to offer.
“The next stage is going to be
new (online) games, and new
games that lotteries are in just as
good a position as, and perhaps
they’re in a better position than,
casino operators to invent,” said
Paul Jason, who produces the
online trade journal, Public
Gaming Magazine.
There are other, more conven-
tional ways to improve cash flow
that the Pennsylvania Lottery
could pursue: introducing keno,
which would require legislation,
and greatly expanding the num-
ber and kinds of lottery retailers.
Last fall, for example, Florida be-
came the first state to sell lottery
tickets in Wal-Mart stores.
Corbett, a Republican who
campaigned on a pledge not to
raise taxes, right now isn’t say-
ing what kind of expansion, if
any, he would support.
Asked about it Wednesday, the
governor said his administration
first wants to hear ideas from
private companies on how they
can save money and raise more
revenue to support programs for
the elderly.
“I’m not going to say any-
thing’s on the table, off the ta-
ble,” Corbett said. “This is in a
very embryonic stage. ... There
is no table yet.”
More lucrative Pa. lottery may mean going to Internet
State wants to hire private
manager to bring in more
money from lottery.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
A cashier counts out Pennsylvania Lottery winnings. Cash-
strapped states are looking to get more revenue from lottery.
Municipal Park was the
largest upgrade, costing
about $100,000, he said.
Last year the township
hired a firm to install the lat-
est in “playground equip-
ment,” Sax said. It is de-
signed to be safe, provide ex-
ercise and entertainment for
children up to 12 years old
and is compatible for children
with disabilities, he added.
The large brightly colored
structure is replete with vari-
ous devices to encourage
physical activity and is bor-
dered with mulch to safely
cushion children from falls,
Sax said. On Saturday he
noted how it was covered
with children who were obvi-
ously enjoying it.
“It’s a blend for all kids,”
Sax said. “It’s also durable
and can take the wear and
tear,” he added.
The commissioners are
thankful for the residents of
the township for their sup-
port and the diligent work of
the township’s recreation
board, he said.
John Kozerski, recreation
board member, said the board
members approached the
commissioners because they
felt the township’s parks were
outdated and unsafe. Now he
takes pride in how well the
projects turned out.
“We think the parks are a
big asset to the community,”
Sax said. “People from all
over the Valley come to visit
them,” he said.
Kim Krushnowski and her
two sons Cael, 5, and Camren,
4, and Mara Vitale, with her
daughter Julia, 2, and son
Joey, 3, were there to enjoy
the park. The children were
having a good time running
on the ramps and through the
tunnels, sliding on the slides,
climbing into the structure.
Krushnowski noted how
her sons loved the “zip line.”
Vitale emphasized the park is
“beautiful and great for chil-
dren of all ages.”
Kozerski thanked the com-
missioners for their “bless-
ing,” with particular thanks
to Commissioner Brigid
O’Connor. She was a stalwart
supporter from the begin-
ning, he said.
He also thanked Wallace
McCarrol for donating his
time to help with the project.
Sax pointed out the res-
trooms were also upgraded to
be accessible to people with
disabilities.
PARK
Continued from Page 3A
Students froma strict Mormon
college that prohibits “homosex-
ual behavior” have launched a
Web video aimed at reassuring
other gay and lesbian youth
struggling with their faith and
sexual orientation.
The video recently posted to
YouTube by 22 Brigham Young
University students is the first of
its kind with ties to the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,
which forbids gay sex and mar-
riage. By posting the video, the
students could face excommuni-
cationfromthechurchandexpul-
sion at BYU.
The campaign is part of colum-
nist DanSavage’s “It Gets Better”
project, which seeks to give voic-
es andhopetobulliedgayandles-
bian teenagers.
Gay Mormon students at BYU come out in video
By CRISTINA SILVA
Associated Press
K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
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NEW YORK
Cardinal comes under fire
A
day before Easter, the head of New
York’s Roman Catholic archdiocese
faced a challenge to his stance on gay
rights: the resignation of a church
charity board member who says he’s
“had enough” of the cardinal’s attitude.
Joseph Amodeo said Saturday that
he quit the junior board of the city’s
Catholic Charities after Cardinal Tim-
othy Dolan failed to respond to a “call
for help” for homeless youths who are
not heterosexual.
“As someone who believes in the
message of love enshrined in the teach-
ings of Christ, I find it disheartening
that a man of God would refuse to
extend a pastoral arm” to such youths,
Amodeo said in his letter to the char-
itable organization last Tuesday.
Phone and email requests for com-
ment from the archdiocese were not
immediately answered on Saturday.
GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP
Israel: Strike nixed rocket
An Israeli airstrike wounded two
Palestinians in the Gaza Strip near the
Egyptian border on Saturday, officials
said. Israel’s military said its air force
targeted Palestinians in the town of
Rafah attempting to launch a rocket
from Gaza into Israel.
Gaza health official Adham Abu
Salmia said two people were wounded
in the strike.
The leader of the Islamic militant
group Hamas, which controls Gaza,
vowed on Friday to abduct more Israeli
soldiers to pressure the Jewish state to
release Palestinian prisoners.
Last year, Hamas struck a deal with
Israel to swap an Israeli soldier for
more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners,
including many jailed for helping carry
out bombings.
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA
N. Korea preps for launch
North Korea has assembled the first-
stage booster on a launch pad in the
northwest part of the country in prep-
aration for its planned rocket launch
this month, South Korean government
sources said Saturday.
The sources said the South Korean
government confirmed the booster for
the missile — which Pyongyang claims
will carry a satellite — was erected.
Despite strong opposition by Japan,
the United States, South Korea and
other countries to the plan, the latest
development shows North Korea has
entered the final stage of preparations
for the launch.
The first-stage booster assembly was
confirmed by analysis of data from a
U.S. reconnaissance satellite.
U.S. and South Korean authorities
believe the second- and third-stage
units will be set up by early this week,
followed by the injection of liquid fuel
from an underground facility.
BLANTYRE, MALAWI
Country has new president
Malawi has known rule by Britain
and by a mercurial dictator. Over the
last few days, however, it wasn’t clear
who was leading this impoverished
southern African country, as doctors
disclosed Malawi President Bingu wa
Mutharika had died, but the govern-
ment insisted he was only ill.
Joyce Banda, who had held onto her
post of vice president despite falling
out with Mutharika, was sworn in
Saturday in a ceremony in Lilongwe,
the capital. Earlier Saturday, she presi-
ded over a Cabinet meeting and held a
news conference, flanked by Cabinet
ministers, the army commander and
national police chief.
The Malawi government only con-
firmed the president’s death on Sat-
urday, two days after the leader died
and a day after it was announced by
doctors.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Isn’t this cat beautiful?
Don Sphynx cat is held by its owner
waiting for the evaluation by a judge
at an international cat beauty show in
Vilnius, Lithuania, Saturday.
VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict
XVI, carrying a tall, lit candle, ushered
in Christianity’s most joyous celebra-
tion with an Easter vigil service Satur-
day night, but voiced fears that man-
kind is groping in darkness, unable to
distinguish good from evil.
Easter for Christians commemorates
Christ’s triumphover deathwithhis res-
urrection following his crucifixion.
“Life is stronger than death. Good is
stronger thanevil. Love is stronger than
hate. Truth is stronger than lies,” Bene-
dict, wearing white robes in a symbol of
newlife, told the faithful in a packed St.
Peter’s Basilica.
Still, Benedict worried in his homily:
“Thedarkness that poses areal threat to
mankind, after all, is the fact that he can
see and investigate tangible material
things, but cannot see where the world
is going or whence it comes, where our
own life is going, what is good and what
is evil.”
“The darkness enshrouding God and
obscuringvalues is the real threat toour
existence and to the world in general,”
the pope said.
“If God and moral values, the differ-
ence between good and evil, remain in
darkness, thenall other ‘lights,’ that put
such incredible technical feats within
our reach, are not only progress but also
dangers that put us and the world at
risk,” Benedict added.
As the service began, the basilica was
almost pitch-black. After aides lit the
candle, Benedict climbed aboard a
raisedplatformthat was wheeledupthe
long main aisle to the central altar. The
wheeleddevice is usedto save wear and
tear on the pontiff, who turns 85 on
April 16.
On Sunday morning, Benedict will
lead Easter Mass in St. Peter’s Square,
then deliver a speech from the central
balcony of the basilica.
Benedict XVI, on eve of Easter, worries mankind unable to distinguish good from evil
AP PHOTO
Pope Benedict XVI, holding a tall, lit,
white candle, enters a darkened St.
Peter’s Basilica, Saturday.
Pope leads vigil
By FRANCES D’EMILIO
Associated Press
“The darkness enshrouding
God and obscuring values is
the real threat to our exist-
ence and to the world in gen-
eral.”
Pope Benedict XVI
TULSA, Okla. — Residents of
Tulsa’s predominantly black
north side said Saturday they’re
afraid a shooter is still roaming
their neighborhoods looking for
victims after five people were
shot — and three killed — a day
earlier.
“We’re all nervous,” said Re-
naldo Works, 52, who was get-
ting his hair cut at the crowded
Charlie’s Angels Forever Hair
Style Shop on
Saturday morn-
ing. “I’ve got a
15-year-old, and
I’mnot going to
let himout late.
People are
scared. We
need facts.”
Police are
still waiting for
the results of
forensic tests,
but investigators think the shoot-
ings are linked because they hap-
pened about the same time with-
in a three-mile span, and all five
victims were out walking when
they were shot. All the victims
are black, and community lead-
ers met Friday evening in an ef-
fort to calm unrest.
“We have to handle this be-
cause there are a number of Afri-
can-American males who are not
going to allow this to happen in
their neighborhood,” said the
Rev. Warren Blakney Sr., presi-
dent of the Tulsa NAACP. “We’re
trying to quell the feeling of ‘let’s
get someone’ and we will make
as certain as we can that this isn’t
pushed under the rug.”
Neighbors
fearful of
shooter
Tulsa police wait for the
results of forensic tests, but
think shootings are linked.
By JUSTIN JUOZAPAVICIUS
Associated Press
All the vic-
tims are
black, and
community
leaders met
Friday evening
in an effort to
calm unrest.
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. —
Zoomingalongat170mphina
fighter jet carrying thousands
of pounds of volatile fuel, two
Navy pilots faced nothing but
bad choices when their air-
craft malfunctioned over Vir-
ginia’s most populated city.
“Catastrophic engine sys-
tem failure right after takeoff,
which is always the most crit-
ical phase of flying, leaves ve-
ry, very few options,” said
aviationsafety expert anddec-
orated pilot J.F. Joseph. “You
literally run out of altitude, air
speedandideas all at the same
time,” he said.
Somehow, however, the stu-
dent pilot and his instructor
and everyone on the ground
survivedFriday whenthe men
ejected fromtheir F/A-18Djet
moments beforeit crashedina
fireball in an apartment com-
plex courtyard. The pilots and
five on the ground were hurt,
but all had been released from
the hospital.
Crews had carefully
checked the apartments, and
all residents had been ac-
counted for early Saturday,
fire department Capt. Tim Ri-
ley said Saturday. No deaths
were reported.
Tough choices for Navy pilots
AP PHOTO
Investigators approach the damaged Mayfair Mews apart-
ment complex in Virginia Beach, Va., on Saturday.
By ZINIE CHEN SAMPSON
Associated Press
BEIRUT — The U.S. warned Syria it
won’t be able todeceive the worldabout
compliance with a cease-fire that is just
days away, as regime forces pounded
more opposition strongholds Saturday
in an apparent rush to crush resistance
before troops must withdraw. Activists
said more than 100 people were killed,
including at least 87 civilians.
Almost half diedina Syrianarmy raid
on the central village of al-Latamneh,
activists said. Amateur video from the
village showed the body of a baby with
bloodied clothes and an apparent bullet
wound in the chest. On another video, a
barrageof shells is heardhittinganeigh-
borhood of Homs as the restive city’s
skyline is engulfed in white smoke.
Syrian President Bashar Assad last
week accepted a cease-fire agreement
brokered by international envoy Kofi
Annan calling for government forces to
withdraw from towns and villages by
Tuesday, and for the regime and rebels
to lay down their arms by 6 a.m. Thurs-
day. The truce is meant to pave the way
for negotiations between the govern-
ment andthe oppositionover Syria’s po-
litical future.
However, Western leaders are skepti-
cal about Assad’s intentions because of
broken promises of the past and the re-
cent escalation in attacks on opposition
strongholds, including arrest sweeps
and shelling of civilian areas. The U.S.
ambassador to Syria posted online sat-
ellite images late Friday that he said
cast doubt on the regime’s readiness to
pull out.
U.S. issues warning to Syria about cease-fire compliance
AP PHOTO
Pro-Syrian government demonstra-
tors hold Baath party flags and a
picture of President Bashar Assad at
a rally.
By KARIN LAUB
Associated Press
BABY, BRUCE WAS BORN TO RUN, AND ROCK
AP PHOTO
B
ruce Springsteen performs with the E Street Band during a concert at Madison Square Garden, Friday, in
New York. After 10 more dates in the U.S., Springsteen’s tour heads to Europe for much of the summer.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 7A
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150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Enjoy the tourna-
ment and have a
great Easter at
home Gary.
Happy Holiday.
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506 Administrative/
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FRONT DESK
Full time position in
Dallas medical clinic
Monday thru Friday.
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hours. Some travel
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Front desk experi-
ence in a medical
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and working knowl-
edge of MS Office
required. Must be
motivated, depend-
able and customer
oriented. Send
resume to:
Riverside
Rehab Center
220 S. River Street
Plains, PA 18702
Fax: 570-824-3517
skremski@
extendicare.com
EOE
522 Education/
Training
HEAD VOLLEYBALL
COACH, PART TIME
The primary respon-
sibilities include:
recruiting, schedul-
ing and related
administrative
duties involved with
the volleyball pro-
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degree and 2-3
years experience as
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required. Knowl-
edge of NCAA rules
preferred. For more
information see
www.marywood.edu
A complete Mary-
wood application is
required.
Marywood University
2300 Adams Avenue
Scranton, PA 18509
jobs@marywood.edu
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533 Installation/
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• Great pay and
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538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
Part time
Hanover Area Cleaner
Immediate Opening
Industrial-office
facility cleaner for
10pm- 2am and
with Friday at 8pm-
2am. Approx. 30
hours a week with
rotating every 3rd
weekend. Lifting
up to 30 lbs. Mop-
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Great environment.
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Drivers CDL-A:
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every night! Great
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548 Medical/Health
Employment Opportunities
www.evan
hospital.com/jobs
EOE
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
CMS East, Inc. is
one of the largest
family owned and
operated cemetery
corporations in the
country. We are
looking for experi-
enced sales people
to service new &
existing accounts.
Call Monday-Friday,
675-3283 for an
appointment.
Fax resume to
675-5749.
www.CMSEast.com
573 Warehouse
WAREHOUSE
Thursday (4/12)
1 pm until 3 pm.
We are a National
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Distribution
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2nd AND/OR
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WORKERS.
Full time & part time
Positions available.
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and various bonus
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
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All applicants sub-
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background check.
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“I believe the General Assemb-
ly, and perhaps more specifically,
the House chamber, is not ideally
configured for good governance.
Republican and Democratic
House members have expressed
as muchtome as they believe it is
sometimes difficult to operate or
to achieve consensus with so
many members offering literally
dozens and dozens of amend-
ments to various legislative ini-
tiatives,” Blake said.
But 50 senators serving 12.5
million people is reasonable,
Blake said, noting that the effi-
ciency so many argue shrinking
the legislature would bring may
be an issue if the Senate is down-
sized.
“Senate districts, on average,
comprise 255,000 (constituents)
and these districts offer reasona-
ble proximity to and public ac-
cess for citizens to their senators.
I currently represent 40 munici-
palities traversingthree counties.
My very distinguished colleague
in the Senate, Lisa Baker, has a
district that traverses well over a
hundred municipalities over a
six-county region,” Blake noted.
Using current population fig-
ures and the proposed reduction
in Senate districts would mean,
at 38 districts, each district
would include approximately
330,000 people.
“In rural Pennsylvania, this
would involve large, sprawling
multi-county districts that would
impose considerable distance be-
tween the elected official and his
or her electorate,” Blake said.
Erik Arneson, a spokesman for
Senate Majority Leader Dominic
Pileggi, said his boss “supports
reducing the size of the General
Assembly. Our goal is to advance
the legislation this spring, recog-
nizing that there needs to be
some additional discussion re-
garding what the best size is for
each chamber.”
He noted that while Pileggi, R-
Chester, is supportive of reduc-
ingthesizeof bothchambers, “he
is not locked into specific num-
bers.”
Even though the House ap-
proved the measure and sent it to
the Senate for consideration, the
process is a long way from over.
The bill, since it calls for a state
constitutional amendment, is re-
quired to be:
• Debated and passed by both
the House and Senate in two con-
secutive sessions.
• Approved by referendum
vote of the people of Pennsylva-
nia.
If it passes both chambers in
two consecutive sessions and is
approved by voters, it would be
effective in the first session of the
General Assembly that begins af-
ter the 2020 reapportionment.
DOWNSIZE
Continued from Page 3A
on which PennDOTis basing those savings claim-
s.Yannuzzi said he was steamed that LCTA was
withholdingstategrant moneyallocatedforHazle-
ton’s operations. He was also outraged that some-
one fromthe LCTAhad directed a company build-
ing two newbuses for the city to change the paint
scheme andseating to matchLCTA’s.
Another gripe, Yannuzzi said, if that heaskedfor
three Hazleton representatives to sit on the nine-
member LCTAboard, but the former county com-
missioners limited it to two, and only one would
havevotingprivileges. And, Yannuzzi said, thecon-
solidation agreement LCTA sent him in February
didnotaddressmanyof theconcernshebroughtup
during earlier talks.
Askedif he contactedLCTAtoprovide feedback
and share his concerns since then, Yannuzzi said
that by that time, he was “too hot” and threw the
proposedagreement inthe trash.
LCTAopentotalk
In a phone interview, LCTA Executive Director
StanleyStrelishsaidhe’s“wideopen”todiscussing
concernswithHazletonofficials. “If theydon’t con-
tact us, if theydon’t talktous, howarewesupposed
to knowwhat the issues are?” he said.
Strelish said he was following verbal directions
from PennDOT when he stopped sending Hazle-
tonits state operating subsidies inJanuary.
After Hazletonobjected, PennDOTsent Strelish
a letter, which he provided, authorizing him to
withhold the payments and stating that Hazleton
was to use a $2 million reserve in state operating
funds HPThadonhandto cover operating losses.
Yannuzzi said HPTruns an efficient systemand
he fears Hazleton’s service could suffer if LCTA
took control.
“We’re running so efficient, we’re allocated $2
million and we spend $1.8 million, we’re left with
$200,000. That’showwegot $2millioninthebank.
Themguysupthere, they’rejustblowingthroughit
like water,” he said.
StrelishsaidLCTAis runefficientlyandits audi-
tsandbudgetsbackthat up. Savingsrealizedarein-
vestedbackintothesystemtoimproveservices for
riders.
Inresponsetoquestionsabout LCTAinterfering
with Hazleton’s bus purchases, Strelish produced
emails fromNovember suggesting that HPT’s pre-
vious director, PatrickKoch, was onboardwiththe
change.
As for giving three voting seats on the authority
boardto Hazletonresidents, Strelishsaidthat’s up
to county council. However, he questioned wheth-
er doing so wouldbe appropriate.
“How many should Kingston Have? How many
should Wilkes-Barre have? What’s important is
that therearerational peopleontheboardwhoput
theirtrust inthepeoplewhoruntheauthoritytodo
their jobs. It doesn’t matter if they come from Ha-
zletonor Nanticoke or Pittston,” Strelishsaid.
TRANSIT
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ C L I C K
7
4
8
8
1
0
VIOLA’S 103RD
BIRTHDAY PARTY
LIVING STATIONS AT
ST. ROBERT BELLARMINE
HABITAT FOR
HUMANITY HOUSE
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Louis Borino and Donald Cavanaugh
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Betty Missal and Meighan Hannon
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Ken, Noah and Bev Daily of Troop 281 Cub Scouts Webe-
los 4-2 of Dallas
John Bergen and Ann Haas Nicholas Casey, 3, and Mary Ellen Mudzik
Karen Evans Kaufer, Wyoming Valley Habitat for Human-
ity executive director; Dawn Hapeman, volunteer coor-
dinator; and Bob Sherlinski, building site supervisor
Connie Andrews and Nicoline Briggs Nicole and Ava Woodruff with Brianna Izen
Joe Dussinger, left, Wyoming Valley Habitat board mem-
ber; Malcolm Williams, board president; Bob Borwick,
board vice president; and Molly Wright, board member
Mike Vantell and Betty Hilla Shirley, Angelo, 7, and William Zarola Patty Sherlinski and daughter Jessica, 3
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 9A
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
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LAST OPPORTUNITY
NOTICE
TOALL VETERANS
and ex-service personnel who have loyally
served their country in peace and in war.
If you were honorably discharged and
live anywhere in the State of
Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a
burial space at no cost in the veteran’s
memorial section at
Chapel Lawn Memorial Park
RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612
This offer is available for a limited time
only. Special protection features are
available for your spouse and minor
children with National Transfer
Protection. This limited time offer is
also extended to members of the
National Guard and Reserve.
Space is limited.
Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for
investment purposes. You must register
for your free burial space.
1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
Happy Birthday In Heaven
Edmund Frank Gilroy
(Gilzy)
4/8/1952
to
6/9/2011
A Wonderful Husband
Awesome Other Father
And the World’s Best Be-Bop
It’s not easy picking up the pieces of our
lives since you left; you were the rock
of our family. It wasn’t supposed to end
this way, so soon, we had so much left
to do, so many plans left undone. The
years of the past still so vivid in our
minds, we think of you often and talk
about you every day. Nothing is the
same without you, our lives empty. We
love and miss you every day. May you
be forever at peace until the day we can
all be together again in Heaven...
All Of Our Love Now and Forever
Your Wife Carol Marie,
Eric, Autumn, Khaia and Drew
You Are Forever With Us...
BALOGA – Dr. Joseph, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shavertown.
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. Therese’s Church, Shaver-
town. Friends may call 5 to 7 p.m.
Monday at the funeral home.
BAUER – Anna, funeral services 9
a.m. Tuesday in the S.J. Gront-
kowski Funeral Home, Plymouth.
Mass at 9:30 a.m. in All Saints
Parish, Plymouth. Friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday.
BEST – James, funeral 9 a.m. Mon-
day in the Howell-Lussi Funeral
Home, 509 Wyoming Ave., West
Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Anthony of
Padua Church, Exeter, St. Barbara
Parish. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today.
DIGIACOMO – Arnold, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. Tuesday from
the A J Kopicki Funeral Home,
with Mass held at 10 a.m. in the
Church of St. Ignatius, Kingston.
Friends may call 4 to 8 p.m.
Monday at the A J Kopicki Funer-
al Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., King-
ston
DUDA – John, funeral services 10:30
a.m. Monday in the Chapel at Oak
Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Town-
ship.
HAHULA – Victoria, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in the E. Blake Collins
Funeral Home, 159 George Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. John
the Baptist Church. Friends may
call 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral
home.
LAYAOU – Alan, memorial service 4
p.m. April 14 in the Centermore-
land United Methodist Church.
LEWICKI – Frank, funeral 9 a.m.
Tuesday in the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 South Main Street,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Ss.
Peter & Paul Church, Plains
Township. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. Monday.
MARIANI – Anna, funeral service 10
a.m. Tuesday in Forty Fort United
Methodist Church, Wyoming and
Yeager avenues, Forty Fort.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Monday at the Hugh B. Hughes &
Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave. Forty Fort.
MCHENRY – Frederick Jr., funeral
services 2 p.m. Monday in the
Dean W. Kriner Inc. Funeral Home
& Cremation Service, Benton.
SCHIFANO – Charles, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Mon-
day in St. Joseph Marello Parish
at St. Rocco’s Church, Pittston.
The family will receive friends
and relatives in the church from
9 a.m. until the time of Mass.
SCHOONOVER – Frank, funeral
services 1 p.m. Monday in the
Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home
Inc., 73 West Tioga St., Tunk-
hannock. Friends may call 11 a.m.
until time of the service.
STEPANSKI – Dorothy, funeral
services 9 a.m. Thursday in the
Jendrzejewski Funeral Home, 21
N. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre. Mass
of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Our Lady of Hope Parish, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Wednesday.
TERRITO – Jane, funeral services 2
p.m. Tuesday in the Gubbiotti
Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming
Ave., Exeter. Friends may call 2 to
4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at the
funeral home.
WALTON – Raymond, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday in St. Leo’s Church,
Ashley. There are no calling
hours.
WITTY – Emanuel, graveside funer-
al service 12:30 p.m. today in
Temple Israel Cemetery, 212
Denison Street, Swoyersville.
ZAMBITO – Frances, Memorial Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday
in the Church of St. Ignatius
Loyola, North Maple Avenue,
Kingston. There are no public
calling hours. Family and friends
are asked to go directly to the
church on Monday.
FUNERALS
MARQUEEN JACKSON, 76, a
resident of Sorbertown Hill, Hun-
lock Creek, passed away April 6,
2012, inHospiceCommunityCare,
Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Clarke Piatt Fu-
neral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek.
CHARLOTTEV. MACAREK, of
Wilkes-Barre, died Friday in the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
She was preceded in death by hus-
band, Michael; sister, Ann Abra-
mek, and brothers, Frank, John
and Dominic Cwanek. Surviving
are daughter, Michele Casey, Ash-
ley; grandson, Kieran Casey, Ash-
ley; granddaughter, Maura Casey
and fiance John Pambianco, both
of Wilkes-Barre; granddaughter,
Megan Casey, Ashley; sister, Mar-
garet Titton and husband, Tho-
mas, Dupont; nephews, David Tit-
ton and his wife, Cheryl, Dupont;
Keith Titton, Dupont.
Funeral service will be Tues-
day at 10:30 a.m. fromthe Lehman
Family Funeral Service Inc., 689
Hazle Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with
Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m.
in St. Leo’s Church, Ashley. Inter-
ment will be in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Hanover Township. Friends
may call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday,
April 9, 2012 at the funeral home.
DOROTHY PERANTO, 65, of
Kingston, passed away Thursday
at her home following an illness.
Born Sept. 4, 1946, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the
late John and Dorothy Honey Geb-
hardt. She was a resident of King-
stonfor thepast 22years, previous-
ly residing in Trucksville. She was
a graduate of Dallas High School.
Surviving are her husband of 44
years, Lawrence; sons, Lawrence
with the U.S. Coast Guard in Alas-
ka; Thomas, Kingston; three
grandchildren; brothers, John
Gebhardt, Robert Gebhardt, Dal-
las; Mark Gebhardt, Nanticoke;
nieces and nephews.
Friends may call Monday from
2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at the Karl E.
Blight Funeral Home, 392 Wyom-
ing Ave., Kingston. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated
at St. Ignatius of Loyola Church,
NorthMapleAvenue, Kingston, on
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.
BLANCHEDOROTHYSHELL-
HAMMER-SMITH funeral servic-
es will be held at the First Welsh
Presbyterian Church, Wilkes-
Barre, April 14, at 11 a.m. Blanche
was 92, born in Nanticoke, and
raisedinWilkes-BarrebyEthel and
Joseph D’Amico. She was a gradu-
ate of Meyers High School and
Wilkes Business College. Married
to Edwin William Smith of Plains
Township for 38 years, she is sur-
vived by two daughters, two
grandsons, and five great-grand-
children. Blanche taught Sunday
school for 50 years and served as a
church deacon.
MARK TARNECKI, 57, of
Mountain Top and formerly of
Nanticoke, passed away Thursday
evening. Born in Bristol, he was
the son of the late Bernard and
Mae Tarnecki. He graduated from
Nanticoke High School. Mark was
employed with United Rehabilita-
tion Services and belonged to the
400 Club and the Eagles Club. He
was preceded in death by a broth-
er, Bernard. Surviving are sisters,
Shirley Krupa, Mountain Top; Be-
tty Glushefski, Nanticoke; Eliza-
beth Tarnecki, Nanticoke; Bonnie,
Nanticoke; nieces, nephews and
cousins.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. from the
Bednarski & Thomas Funeral
Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call Tuesday from 9
a.m. until time of services.
CAROLYNWILLIAMS, of West
Pittston, passed away unexpected-
ly on Friday, April 6, 2012 at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by E. Blake Collins Fu-
neral Home, Wilkes-Barre.
MARY ANN ZETTLES, of
Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday, April
7, 2012, in the Wilkes-Barre Gener-
al Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
F
rances A. (Jeconis) Zambito, 81,
formerly of North Street, Court-
dale, died Monday at Manor Care,
Kingston.
Frances was born in Berwick on
May 26, 1930. She was the daughter
of the late Edward and Helen (Ru-
pinski) Jeconis.
Frances was a graduate of Larks-
ville HighSchool. She enjoyedtend-
ing to her garden and traveling to
flea markets throughout the area.
She also enjoyed shopping on the
QVC Network and loved spending
time with her dog, Coco.
Frances was preceded in death by
her husband Lawrence A. Zambito;
sisters, Florence Sparwelis and Es-
telle Andrews, and brother, Edward
Jeconis.
Surviving are sons, Joseph P.
Zambito and his wife, Donna,
Wilkes-Barre; Lawrence J. Zambito
and his wife, Cora, Swoyersville;
loving granddaughter, Joann Zam-
bito; sister, Gloria Hill, Overland
Park, Kansas; brother, Walter Jeco-
nis, Larksville; numerous nieces
and nephews.
Family and friends are invited to
attend Frances’ Memorial Mass of
Christian Burial on Monday at 10 a.m.
in The Church of St. Ignatius Loyola,
North Maple Avenue, Kingston. Inter-
ment will be held in Denison Cemete-
ry, Swoyersville. There are no public
calling hours. Friends are asked to go
directly to the church on Monday.
The family would also like to say
thank you to Home Health Care for
their loving care and compassion.
Arrangements are by the Andrew
StrishFuneral Home, 11WilsonStreet,
Larksville.
Frances A. (Jeconis) Zambito
April 2, 2012
C
laire J. (Greek) Christian, a resi-
dent of Dupont, died Friday,
April 6, 2012, in Wilkes-Barre Gen-
eral Hospital.
She was born March 3, 1931, in
Dupont. She was the daughter of
the late Steven Greek and Sophie
(Sedor) Greek.
She is the wife of Carl Christian.
She was a graduate of Dupont
High School.
Surviving, in addition to her hus-
band, are sons, Steven and wife,
Theresa Christian; William and
wife, Donna Christian; grandson,
William Christian; granddaughters,
Katelynn Christian and Alyssa
Christian.
She was preceded in death by in-
fant sonCarl Christian; infant broth-
er Steven Greek and sister Dorothy
Greek.
Funeral services are entrusted
toGrazianoFuneral Home Inc., Pitt-
ston Township.
Viewing hours will be held at the
funeral home on Monday, April 9,
2012 from 5 to 7 p.m.
Funeral services will begin at the fu-
neral home on Tuesday, April 10, 2012
at 9 a.m.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
held from St. John the Evangelist R.C.
Church, Pittston, at 9:30 a.m. on Tues-
day, April 10, 2012.
Interment services will followat St.
John the Baptist Cemetery, Exeter.
Claire J. (Greek) Christian
April 6, 2012
Sarah “Mar-
gie” Boston,
86, of Rock-
view Avenue,
Shickshinny,
died Saturday
morning, April
7, 2012 at Ber-
wick Hospital
Center, where she had been a pa-
tient.
Born April 5, 1926, in Shickshin-
ny, she was a daughter of the late
Steward and Edith (Belles) Riss-
miller.
She was a graduate of the for-
mer Shickshinny High School and
the Empire Beauty School, Wilkes-
Barre. She worked in a silk mill in
Berwick during World War II and
then owned and operated her own
beauty shop. She was last employ-
ed at the Wise Potato Chip plant in
Berwick.
She was a member of the Bible
Baptist Church, Shickshinny and
was known for her generosity and
for helping people.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Robert L. Boston, who died
January 24, 2005. She was the last sur-
viving member of her immediate fam-
ily.
Surviving are a son, Randy Boston
and two daughters, Brenda and Beth
Boston, all of Shickshinny; grandchil-
dren Joanna Boston, McAllen, Texas;
Bethany Boston, Shickshinny; Timothy
Boston, McAllen, Texas, and Caleb
Boston, Dunbar, Wis.
Funeral services will be held Tues-
day, April 10, 2012 at 10 a.m. from the
Bible Baptist Church, Shickshinny,
with the Rev. Daniel Potter officiating.
Burial will be in Sorber Cemetery, Rey-
burn. Visitation will be held at the
church Monday from 6 to 8 p.m.
Donations can be made to the Bible
Baptist Church, 43 Furnace St., Shick-
shinny, PA18655.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of the Mayo Funeral Home Inc.,
Shickshinny. For additional informa-
tion, or to send condolences, please vis-
it www.mayofh.com.
Sarah ‘Margie’ Boston
April 7, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
A
nn Battenhausen Stine, loving
wife, mother, sister, grandmoth-
er, great-grandmother and friend to
many, passedaway Monday, April 2,
2012 as the result of a fall she sus-
tained nine days prior while vaca-
tioning in Cape Coral, Florida. She
was 88.
Born in NewYork City, she was a
daughter of the late Kurt and Made-
line Battenhausen. She grew up in
Larchmont, New York, and gradu-
ated from Mamaroneck High
School at the age of 16. She loved
classical music and was an accom-
plished pianist, inheriting this gift
from her concert pianist grand-
mother. She also enjoyed the “Big
Band” sound and particularly loved
to go dancing at the Glen Island Ca-
sino, where Tommy and Jimmy
Dorsey often played.
Her artistic talents led to a job of-
fer as a Vogue designer, which she
regretfully declined, in favor of tak-
ing what was considered a more
practical path, and she enrolled in
the Wood Secretarial School. She
worked in Manhattan at the Wal-
worth Company and later in Mama-
roneck for Peter K. Doern Real Es-
tate.
She was married to James E.
Stine Jr. and together they raised
three children in Harrison, New
York. Ann enjoyed cooking, garden-
ing, knitting and sewing. She de-
signed and made most of her chil-
dren’s clothes. She loved to ice
skate, swim and was quite proud of
her ability to do a swan dive, well in-
to her eighties! She bowled for the
Winged Foot Golf Club Bowling
Team and was a member of the
“150” Club. She volunteered for the
PTA and the Girl Scouts. A high-
light of every summer was a family
vacation on Cape Cod. She loved to
be near the water…any water.
Ann moved to Westtown, Pa., in
1975, where she enjoyed visiting art
galleries, museums and “antiqu-
ing.” Despite being newto the area,
her innate qualities of grace and ele-
gance enabledher to cultivate many
lastingfriendships before movingto
Shavertown in1985. Her love of gar-
dening steered her to the Back
Mountain Bloomers, where she was
revered as the club’s most senior
member. She won several awards
for her arrangements and table de-
sign. Ann played an enthusiastic
gameof golf andscoredaholeinone
on Newberry Estate’s second hole.
She was an avid fan of the North-
eastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic
and was a season subscriber.
Annlovedtotravel, andParis was
her favorite city. She made it a habit
to learn simple niceties in multiple
languages, which usually elicited a
surprised smile from those she was
able to greet in their native tongue.
Ever thestudent, Annhadaninquis-
itive mind. She had a plaque in her
kitchen inscribed, “I am still learn-
ing.” She took delight in the turn of
a well-chiseled phrase. She was a
collector of famous quotations,
whether from Shakespeare or of
Presidents, and could recite many
from memory. “Let not your heart
be troubled,” (John, Chapter 14)
was a frequent and comforting ex-
pression of her compassion for oth-
ers. In this, her final journey, her
family wishes her the same. God-
speed, Omah.
In addition to her parents, Ann
was pre-deceased by her husband
James, brother Fritz Battenhausen,
and infant granddaughter Ashley
Flack.
She is survived by her sister, June
B. Page, Nellysford, Va.; her chil-
dren, KristenArmstrong, Sweet Val-
ley; William Stine (Nancy) St. Pe-
ter’s Village; Kathi Flack, Dallas; her
grandchildren, Erica Fallstich, St.
Peter’s Village; Kurt Stine, Philadel-
phia;, Trevor Stine (Laura) Pott-
stown; Chad Flack, Harveys Lake;
Jamie Flack, Philadelphia; Alex
Flack, Harveys Lake; great-grand-
children, Madelynn, Kyla and Sa-
mantha Stine-Fallstich, all of St. Pe-
ter’s Village.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held on May 12 at Grace Church,
Kingston. Interment will be in Phi-
ladelphia at the convenience of the
family.
In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts
may be made to the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Philharmonic, Miser-
icordia University’s Shakespeare
Garden Endowment Fund, or the
charity of the donor’s choice.
Ann Battenhausen Stine
April 2, 2012
B
etty Ann Harry, of Plymouth,
passed away Friday, April 6,
2012.
Born in Plymouth, on January 6,
1924, she was the daughter of Wil-
liam and Hazel (Miller) Aston. She
was a graduate of Plymouth High
School, class of 1941. She received a
diploma from the Wyoming Semi-
nary Dean School of Business in
1942. She worked as a Secretary for
the Robert D. Kuschke and Son In-
surance Company for 34 years be-
fore retiring. She was a faithful
member of Pilgrim Congregational
Church, Plymouth, for several
years. She held the office of church
clerk for 18 years and then held the
office of financial secretary until she
retired from that in 2001. She was a
member of the church choir and the
“Ladies Improvement Society.”
Her beloved husband, Stewart
Harry, precededher death, inMarch
1992. She was also preceded in
death by brother Gilbert Miller As-
ton, and grandson Ryan Harry, Oc-
tober 2009.
Surviving are her children, Stew-
art J. Harry (Sharon) Forty Fort;
Keith Harry (Karen) Harveys Lake;
Nadine Calkins (Peter Kizis) Bear
Creek; grandchildren, Heather Con-
rad, Forkston; Bethany Harry, Win-
ston-Salem, N.C.; Shawn Calkins,
Plymouth; Erin Calkins, Plymouth;
Lindsay Harry, Atlanta, Ga.; Adam
Harry, Austin Harry, Alexis Harry,
Harveys Lake.
Funeral services will be Thurs-
day, April 12 at 11 a.m. at Pilgrim
Congregational Church, Shawnee
Avenue, Plymouth, with her neph-
ew, the Rev. James H. Harry, Golds-
boro, N.C., officiating. The inter-
ment will be Edge Hill Cemetery,
West Nanticoke. Friends may call
from10to11a.m. at the churchprior
to the service.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Wyoming Valley Chil-
dren’s Association, 1133 Wyoming
Avenue, Forty Fort, PA18704.
Betty Ann Harry
April 6, 2012
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
Others describe Lupas as a
“consummate insider” who was
well connected to the politically
powerful and elite.
To one of his alleged victims,
he’s a criminal who stole not on-
ly her money, but her sense of
trust in others.
Easygoing demeanor
There’s one thing everyone
agreed: Lupas had a way of at-
tracting people with his even-
tempered personality.
“Tony was
just a likeable
guy,” said
Steve Barrouk,
who served on
the Luzerne
County Con-
vention Cen-
ter Authority
with Lupas.
“He was just
an easygoing,
fatherly type
of person.”
Lupas opted not to follow the
profession of his father, also
named Anthony, who founded
the A.J. Lupas Insurance Agency
in Plains Township and also
worked as a guidance counselor
at the Plains High School.
The junior Lupas graduated
from law school and was admit-
ted to the Luzerne County Bar
in June 1959. He served as an
assistant district attorney in the
early 1960s before leaving to
take a position as an examiner
with the Public Utility Commis-
sion.
Attorney Robert Panowicz, a
longtime friend of Lupas, de-
scribed him as a “workaholic”
who was extremely dedicated to
his practice, which grew rapidly.
Panowicz’s cousin, attorney
Anthony Panaway, was Lupas’
longtime law partner. The men
built a successful firm that fo-
cused on a general practice of
law, including real estate, crimi-
nal defense, wills and personal
injury cases.
School district posts
Lupas also sought work in ar-
ea school districts early in his
career. He was
appointed solic-
itor for the
Wilkes-Barre Ar-
ea School Dis-
trict and Lu-
zerne Interme-
diate Unit 18 –
positions he
would hold for
decades – and
also served as
solicitor for the
Wilkes-Barre Ar-
ea Career and Technical Center.
In the early 1990s, Lupas was
among the first to be appointed
to the 11-member Luzerne
County Convention Center Au-
thority, which was formed to op-
erate the arena now known as
the Mohegan Sun Arena at
Casey Plaza.
Barrouk, former head of the
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
of Commerce, said Lupas devel-
oped many connections within
the legal and political communi-
ty over his career. He was in-
strumental in efforts to build the
arena, but it did not come easy.
The early years of the author-
ity were often marked by contro-
versy as two factions of the
board battled over important de-
cisions regarding construction
and operation of the arena.
Barrouk said he and Lupas
were on opposite sides and of-
ten butted heads, but they never
made it personal.
“We disagreed over a lot of
stuff, but were respectful to each
other,” he said.
As Lupas continued to build
his law practice, his wife stayed
home to raise the children, A.J.,
Diane, David and Joanne.
Panowicz said the couple
made great efforts to care for
the children and to provide a
normal life for Joanne, who suf-
fered from severe brain damage.
She died in 2008 at age 48. Doc-
tors initially believed she would
die in childhood.
Attorney Mike Butera, who
has known Lupas for decades,
said he believes Joanne’s disabil-
ities helped motivate Lupas to
push for educational rights of
special needs children. He was
among the founding members of
the LIU.
“He was a very strong advo-
cate for special needs children,”
Butera said. “He did a lot of
good for the LIU over the
years.”
Handling of clients
Panowicz said he saw that
same sense of caring in Lupas
with his clients.
“He treated them like they
were family,” Panowicz said.
“He was the kind of guy who felt
sorry for people and who was
concerned about people. That’s
why this is so utterly shocking.
Some of those people are the
same people who have lost mon-
ey.”
Barb Garey was one of those.
Garey lived adjacent to the
West Carey Street home where
Lupas and his wife raised their
children. When Lupas ap-
proached her about investing in
a trust fund that would pay 7
percent interest, she didn’t hes-
itate. She’s been told that money
is gone.
Garey, who invested $125,000,
is upset by the financial loss, but
equally troubled by the breach
of trust.
“He was just a very nice man.
He was very considerate and
low key. I don’t think he ever
had a mean word for anybody,”
she said.
Like others who know Lupas,
Panowicz said he’s at a loss to
explain what might have hap-
pened, if the allegations against
Lupas are proven to be true.
Panowicz said he does not
know Lupas to have any expen-
sive vices, such as gambling or
drinking. And he’s never known
Lupas, who now lives in the
East Mountain Apartments in
Plains Township, to be a big
spender.
“He never lived a rich life-
style. He never went on vaca-
tion. He never drove a brand
new car. He always bought a
used car,” he said.
Panowicz said he’s disheart-
ened by the allegations against
Lupas as he still considers him a
friend. As the case against Lu-
pas proceeds, he hopes some ex-
planation is forthcoming.
“I’m keeping my fingers cross-
ed that there will be some kind
of answer,” he said.
LUPAS
Continued from Page 1A
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Anthony Lupas leaving the William J. Nealon Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Scranton.
Federal prosecutors charged Lupas with mail fraud in connection with an alleged Ponzi scheme.
“He was the kind of guy
who felt sorry for peo-
ple and who was con-
cerned about people.
That’s why this is so
utterly shocking.”
Attorney Robert Panowicz
About Anthony J. Lupas Jr.
Almost daily, the nation’s political dis-
course features some echo of this battle
for women’s votes.
Earlier this spring, the president
called Georgetown University law stu-
dent Sandra Fluke to reassure her after
radio host Rush Limbaugh called her a
“slut.” She hadtestifiedto congressional
Democrats in support of their national
healthcare policythat wouldcompel her
school to offer health plans that cover
her birth control. Republicans widely
called Limbaugh’s comments inappro-
priate.
On Thursday, Obama called for wom-
en to be accepted as members to the all-
male Augusta National, home of the
Masters golf tournament. Romney
quickly followed his lead.
But the Republican’s challenge is
stark.
Romney must overcome history, polit-
ical mathandthemissteps of apartythat
picked a fight over one provision of Oba-
ma’s healthcare lawandendeduponthe
defensive over access to birth control.
Romney also has work to do with female
voters after inconsistencies or misstate-
ments onissues suchas abortionandthe
future of Planned Parenthood.
Republicans have faceda “gender gap”
since 1980, with women generally favor-
ing Democratic candidates. A recent
USA Today/Gallup poll found that gap
lifts Obama to a lead across a dozen cru-
cial states. The poll showed women fa-
vor Obama by 18 percentage points
while men split about evenly between
the two candidates. Taken together, that
means women boost Obama to a 51-42
lead over Romney in those states.
There’s evidence that Romney may
havea steeper climbamongwomenthan
that facedby Arizona Sen. JohnMcCain,
the GOP president nominee in 2008.
Washington Post/ABC News polls at
roughly the same point in the political
calendar show McCain was viewed fa-
vorably by 47 percent of women at this
time in 2008, while Romney currently
stands at 30 percent favorable among
women.
Romney is convinced women, like
men, will vote chiefly on Obama’s stew-
ardship of the nation’s finances, so he
tried to stay focused on the economy
during this year’s battle over contracep-
tion. But some of his surrogates led the
effort to cast the law’s mandate for birth
control coverage as a violation of reli-
gious freedom, widely considered a lost
argument that left questions about the
GOP’s commitment to preserving wom-
en’s rights.
Romney may have dealt himself trou-
ble with his inconsistent position over
theyearsonabortionandacomment ear-
lier thisyear that soundedasif hewanted
to “get rid of” Planned Parenthood. His
campaign later clarified that he was re-
ferringtodeletingfederal fundingfor the
organization, not eliminatingit outright.
Then there’s the way Romney handles
questions about his message to women.
Virtually every time, Romney answers
by invoking his wife of 43 years, and re-
ports what’s she’s told him about what
women want.
“She reports to me regularly that the
issuewomencareabout most istheecon-
omy, and getting good jobs for their kids
and for themselves,” Romney told the
Newspaper Association of America on
Wednesday. “They are concerned about
gasoline prices, the cost of gettingtoand
fromwork, taking their kids to school or
topracticeandsoforthafter school. That
is what women care about in this coun-
try, andmyvisionistoget Americawork-
ing again.”
Some Republican activists say they
are eager to see Romney showa genuine
interest in and understanding of how
women have experienced the recession,
while also using his wife to rally female
voters.
She did just that last month on Super
Tuesday, saying: “Do you know what
women care about? Women care about
jobs. They’re angry, and they’re furious
about the entitlement debt that we’re
leaving for our children.”
The Republican National Committee
is providing a model for any direct pitch
Romney eventually makes to women.
It has an extensive operation of surro-
gates and specific talking points that
connect the party’s commitment to low-
er taxes and smaller government to the
“kitchen table decisions” women make
every day.
WOMEN
Continued from Page 1A
Romney must overcome history, political math and the missteps of a party
that picked a fight over one provision of Obama’s health care law and ended up
on the defensive over access to birth control. Romney also has had inconsis-
tencies or misstatements on issues such as abortion and Planned Parenthood.
steady arm to hold onto during
the climb up Lehigh Street. On
the field’s green artificial turf
they formed a half circle before
a podium to listen to sing, pray
and listen.
“There’s a reason why we’re
here tonight because this young
man had some form of contact
with us. And if you didn’t know
him you must have felt a love
for him somewhere,” said Ken-
nard Johnston, a friend of the
family.
The teenager was shot Thurs-
day night near his home as he
returned from the Catholic
Youth Center with another boy.
As police continue to search for
the shooter, Johnston and oth-
ers struggled to find answers for
why the quiet, athletic honor
student was gunned down.
“I’m in pain because this was
senseless,” said Johnston.
He beseeched the crowd to be
strong and face the wrongs they
see in the community.
“Don’t let his life go in vain.
We have to do something about
it,” he said. “It’s important that
we do something about it.”
The Rev. Gloria Watson of
Shiloh Baptist Church in Scran-
ton expressed thanks from Tyl-
er’s family for the turnout and
recalled her last contact with
him.
“I saw Tyler in school on
Wednesday on the second floor.
I went over. I gave him a hug
and a kiss. Thursday his life was
snubbed out,” she said.
Watson offered assurance to
the crowd, saying that she’s
been reassured since being with
the family.
“Everything is going to be all
right; I want you to know that,”
she said. “I’ve been at the home
since Thursday night. I have
seen Muslim, Arab, Jew, black
man, white man … people came
to express their love.”
Shauntae Thomas came to
the vigil to remember the boy
he called “TW.”
“I coached him for the last
three years on football at the
Heights Packers,” said Thomas.
There were several Tyler’s on
the team and he settled on
“TW,” said Thomas.
He described Tyler as a “quiet
kid, always had a smile for you
and was kind, kind as could be.”
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Hundreds gather on the G.A.R. High School athletic field in front of the school to listen to speakers comment of Tyler Winstead’s life
Saturday night in Wilkes-Barre.
G.A.R. seventh-
grader Jay Dein-
inger, 12, left, and
Heights Ele-
mentary sixth-
grader Bryce
Baker, 11, listen to
Tyler Winstead’s
vigil.
Carol Goden, left, Tyler Winstead’s grandmother,
thanks the hundreds who poured out for the vigil.
Family, friends, students, and alumni walk from Hill Street to the
G.A.R. athletic field for Tyler Winstead’s vigil Saturday night.
VIGIL
Continued from Page 1A
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012
W
ell, the U.S. Census of 1940 is
out, and genealogists are hav-
ing a field day with this snap-
shot of America at the end of the Great
Depression and the eve of World War
II. Of course it was the first U.S. Cen-
sus to be available online.
Within 24 hours of the April 2 online
release by the National Archives, news
media were reporting that people were
having difficulty getting into the site
and that it was operating slowly — the
usual problems caused by too many
visitors to a website.
How about you? Did you plunge into
the census right away? Did you find
what you were looking for? Did you
experience trouble accessing it? Did
you, perhaps, give up in frustration and
go away, planning to return later when
things calmed down?
Whatever experience you had, I’d
like to know about it. Please drop me
an email at the address listed on the
bottom of this column.
Remember that indexing the census
is a worthy project for genealogists,
and you can help. Go to www.1940cen-
sus.com and click on “home” to sign up
for the indexing effort. When you do,
register to participate in connection
with the Northeast Pennsylvania Ge-
nealogical Society, sponsor of the local
effort.
Indexing, of course, will make it far
easier for a genealogist to search the
census and find his or her ancestors.
Civil War: We are in the 150th anni-
versary period of our devastating Civil
War (1861-1865), and genealogists are
searching hard for information about
their ancestors of that time. An esti-
mated one-third of present-day Amer-
icans had ancestors caught up in that
war.
Historian J. David Hacker of Bing-
hamton University recently published a
paper supporting his belief that the
death total for that war is far higher
than generally believed. His article in
“Civil War History” last December says
the dead for Union and Confederate
sides were about 750,000 rather than
the commonly accepted 620,000.
What does this mean for the geneal-
ogist? It suggests that the society-wide
dislocation caused by the gigantic war
(broken homes, poverty, lost busi-
nesses and farms, orphaned children,
marriages that never took place, forced
relocations) affected a lot more fam-
ilies than previously believed.
Put Hacker’s full name into your
search engine to find articles about his
research.
Genealogy Class: I’ll offer my “Get-
ting Started in Genealogy” program at
the Osterhout Free Library from 2 to 4
p.m. Thursday. Contact the library at
823-0156 to register. The library is at 71
S. Franklin St. in Wilkes-Barre. The
presentation is free.
News Notes: Don’t forget the second
and final Open House at the Northeast
Pennsylvania Genealogical Society
Research Library 4-8 p.m. April 24. The
library is on the grounds of the historic
Hanover Green Cemetery, Main Road,
Hanover Township.
The Luzerne County Historical So-
ciety’s annual dinner meeting (open to
all) is set for 6 p.m. on April 19 at the
Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. Dr.
William V. Lewis, Jr., commissioner of
the Pennsylvania Historical and Mu-
seum Commission, will speak on “Sto-
ries of the Wilkes-Barre Titanic Pas-
sengers.” Guests will include local
descendants of Titanic passengers.
This year is the 100th anniversary of
the sinking of the famed ocean liner,
with a loss of more than 1,500 people.
A number of those people were im-
migrants on their way to Wilkes-Barre.
Much information about the Titanic,
including a complete passenger list —
with biographies, origins and destina-
tions — is available online at www.en-
cyclopedia-titanica.org. For cost and
reservations, call the Historical Society
at 823-6244, Ext. 3.
TOM MOONEY
O U T O N A L I M B
1940 Census
is all aflutter
on the Web
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy
columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net
business or did you do other jobs
growing up? “Growing up I worked at
Sabatini’s and can remember making
pizza boxes with my brother and trying
to see who could finish folding a stack
first. As I got older I worked at maybe
seven different banquet or fine dining
restaurants. I wanted to become well-
rounded in the industry as I began to
realize it was going to be a big part of
my life. There was a time from1991 to
1995 that I also worked with a construc-
tion company. I also helped run a small
landscaping business with my brother
Nick at one point, too.”
The construction and landscaping jobs
may lead one to believe you have an
interest in real estate. Do you dabble
in that industry at all? “I actually own
and manage two real estate companies
currently. They deal with commercial
and residential properties and I oversee
all of their daily operations.”
What do you do on any down time you
may get? “I work over 90 hours a
week. When I get some free time I like
to spend it with my wife and kids. I like
to take the family anywhere we can be
together.”
Where have you visited when traveling?
“We have family in Italy and have trav-
eled there several times on various
trips. Once we went there for a wed-
ding. Last September we visited Belgi-
um and I got to see how breweries
worked there. I learned a lot about
brewing processes and proper serving
etiquette. I have been implementing
some of that etiquette into the daily
operation of Sabatini’s. We have over
400 beers and 80 of them originate
from Belgium.”
What about when you are away from the
family. Do you like to participate in
any activities? “I really enjoy playing
soccer at the Riverfront Sports Facility
in Scranton. I play in a men’s open
league where we compete against
college-aged players. It’s great fun.”
Do you have a favorite drink or food?
“It’s what we serve of course. Pizza and
beer are my favorite. I am partial to
Belgian I.P.A. beer.”
Do you have any favorite films or televi-
sion shows? “The film I like is more a
See MEET, Page 2B
MEET LINDO SABATINI
L
indo Sabatini is the owner of Sabatini’s Pizza in Exeter. Sabatini, 38,
graduated from Wyoming Seminary High School and attended Cabri-
ni College in Radnor, Pa. He and his wife, Maria, have a son, Savino, 4,
and daughter, Sofia, 6. They are expecting their third child, Santo,
at the end of the month. They live in Exeter.
The restaurant has been in your family
for a long time. What is some of the
background of the establishment
and your history with it? “It dates
back to 1958. That is when my grand-
father, John, started the restaurant. It
has been in the family for three gen-
erations. My father, Joe, took it over
in the 1970s. I worked at Sabatini’s all
through high school. I never saw a Friday
night football game as I worked weekends
and some during the week. In 1995, after
college, I worked full time in the kitchen
and dining room and I never left. I also
worked next door for our entertainment
arcade, the Play Plaza, for many years. In
2005 I bought the restaurant from my
father and have loved running the business
ever since. My manager, John Rallo, has
been with me from the beginning and is my
left and right hand man as he handles a
great deal of the daily concerns at the
restaurant.”
So is Sabatini’s your lifelong employer and
PETE G.
WILCOX/
THE
TIMES
LEADER
W
hen Carol Ann Vivrette was planning
her wedding four years ago, her fiance
encouraged her to bring her crafty nature to
the day. Hundreds of hours and yards of yarn
later, she had knit and felted flowers for her
wedding party, from her own calla lily bou-
quet to the corsages of her two grandmothers.
Why toss the bouquet when you can keep it forever?
Insteadof fresh-cut flowers, many brides like Vivrette
are making or buying alternatives out of fabric, paper
and even old brooches. The results can be stunning —
colorful paper hydrangeas, sparkling brooches, even
quirky buttons, hundreds of them, forming a bouquet.
It’s a way topersonalize a wedding, andturnwhat can
be a costly, one-time expenditure into a family keep-
sake.
It also can mean a lot of work. Vivrette, of Oakland,
Calif., began working seriously on her project six weeks
out and finished the day before her wedding.
Part of the fun was that the process became a family
affair: One friend helped knit; two helped assemble the
pieces into boutonnieres and corsages; and Vivrette’s
mother inserted and sewed wire into the flower stems
so the bouquet could hold its shape.
In all, they made 26 full flowers and 11 boutonnieres
or corsages.
“I definitely feel more lovedandconnectedtothemin
my wedding memories than I might have if I had just
ordered flowers from a florist,” Vivrette said.
Some brides choose an alternative bouquet to save
I’mpractical. Never dreamedof having a lav-
ishgown. Didn’t want toendurealonghunt for
bargains.
So four little words from the saleswoman
spoke tome: “Bridesmaiddress. Inwhite.”
Yes, I’m wearing a bridesmaid dress to my
own wedding. It’s simple, elegant, relatively
cheap and easy. Talk about putting the “bride”
inbridesmaid.
When I showed up at my local Macy’s bridal
salon on my first day of dress shopping, I ex-
plained that I wanted something elegant, good
for anoutdoor summer wedding, at apricethat
wouldn’t rival the liquor bill.
What the saleswoman suggested is a little-
knowntrickthatcansavehundredsof dollarsor
more on a wedding dress. Perhaps even better,
youcancustomizeyourweddingdresshowever
youlikeit; bridesmaiddresses areusuallybasic
—satinor silk, without thebeads, laceandoth-
er frills onmanytraditional gowns.
Andat anywherefrom$100to$300, there’s no
traditionalpricetageither.Getabridesmaiddress
inwhite, ivoryor whatever color youwant. Wear
it as is. Or glamit upwithaccessories andhavea
unique—andcost-effective—look.
It’scalledaweddingdresshack, I’dlaterfindout.
Happy with my plan, I couldn’t help looking
at the women sorting through the expensive
gowns at the store. Why would they want to
spend thousands on a dress for one day? They
couldspendfar less, still lookamazingandsave
CUSTOMIZED BRIDESMAID DRESS
MAKES A PRACTICAL GOWN
See GOWN, Page 2B
Dresses are among the
biggest costs of a wedding,
averaging nearly $1,200,
according to The Wedding Re-
port, Inc., which tracks indus-
try spending. And don’t forget
accessories, headpieces and
veils. An extra $250, please.
AP PHOTOS
A homemade calla lily bouquet was made by
knitting and felting flowers and shown in the
wedding of Carol Ann and Jason Vivrette in
Oakland, Calif.
Stories by EMILY FREDRIX Associated Press
See BOUQUETS, Page 2B
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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PUBLIC MEETING
LUZERNE COUNTY
MOON LAKE PARK MASTER
SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN
UPDATE/POOL FEASIBILITY
TIME - 6:00 P.M.
DATE - ApriI 18, 2012
PLACE - LUZERNE COUNTY
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
AGENCY
185 WATER STREET,
WILKES-BARRE
The purpose of the meeting is to present
the final draft of the master plan, seek
public comment/input on the master plan
and to answer questions on an informal
basis.
part of tradition, in a humorous
way. I would get together with
my brothers Nick and Carlo and
watch ’Boondock Saints’ before
all of our weddings. That movie
relieved some of the nervous-
ness for us before our big days.”
Do you have any favorite singers
or music that you enjoy? “I like
all types of music. I really like
most everything and I am an
avid WVIA listener.”
What do people have to look
forward to from Sabatini’s in
the future? “Customers and the
people that frequent our loca-
tion are a huge part of what I
love about my job and business. I
enjoy the interaction and that
becomes very evident at our Tap
Takeovers that we hold on spe-
cific Wednesdays throughout a
year. We will serve beers from a
particular brewery and the
events are very successful. We
once had close to 250 people at
one of the occasions.”
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
John Gordon writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7229.
Holy Redeemer High School will hold its annual spring art and music festival 7 p.m. April 28 and 29
in the school’s McCarthy Auditorium. The concert features the combined chorus, Royal Singers, in-
strumental ensemble and the traditional senior waltz. The art exhibit showcases artworks from the
current school year and will be displayed throughout the school’s first floor beginning at 6 p.m. Tick-
ets are $5 for adults and $3 for seniors and students and are available at the door. Students in AP
studio art and Honors studio art who will be among the featured exhibitors, from left, first row: Sarah
Warnagiris, Hunlock Creek; Andrea Siejna, Wilkes-Barre; Pat McHale, Kingston; and Jerry Maloney,
Hanover Township. Second row: Kim Waters, Swoyersville; Sydney Smith, Kingston; Devon Nowicky,
Drums; Sarah Williams, Mountain Top; Connor Linden, Wilkes-Barre; Alexandra Heck, Plains Township;
Olivia Vitali, Laflin; Abby Staskiel, Plains Township; Abby Keefe, Mountain Top; Mary Claire Materna,
Mountain Top; Marissa Walker, Hanover Township; and Maggie Sullivan, Wilkes-Barre.
Holy Redeemer to hold annual spring art/music festival April 28 and 29
the rest for their honeymoon or a
house. Why didn’t I feel their urge
to splurge? Was something wrong
withme?
Not at all, says Meg Keene, au-
thor of “A Practical Wedding: Cre-
ativeIdeasforPlanningaBeautiful,
Affordable, and Meaningful Cele-
bration.” I simplyhadn’t bought in-
tothe weddingmyth, she says.
The myth is why so many wed-
dings keep getting bigger (hello
Kardashians) and prices keep go-
ing up. Women see the glamour
and feel they are supposed to have
it, regardless of cost, says Keene,
who started the blog “A Practical
Wedding” when planning her own
nuptials in2008.
Dresses are among the biggest
costs of awedding, averagingnear-
ly $1,200, according to The Wed-
ding Report, Inc., which tracks in-
dustry spending. And don’t forget
accessories, headpieces and veils.
Anextra $250, please.
The average U.S. wedding now
costs more than$26,000.
“There’s now this industry
around weddings,” Keene says. “If
the word ‘wedding’ is attached,
people will pay.”
It doesn’t havetobethat way, es-
pecially for dresses. There are so
many other options: bridesmaid
dresses, prom dresses, vintage,
renting, borrowingandmaking.
Womenlike me who seek out al-
ternatives sometimes wonder if
they’ll look like a bride. But, says
Keene, there’s noone way tolook.
“You remember how your wed-
ding felt, not how it looked,” says
Keene, who wore a $250 vintage
dress toher wedding.
After deciding that I would cus-
tomize a bridesmaid dress, I al-
lowedmyself oneindulgent experi-
ence at a designer wedding-gown
studiosoIcouldgetideas. Aftertry-
ing on half a dozen pouffy, fancy
gowns, I knewthat ivory looks just
fine on me, a sweetheart neckline
works well, and an A-line cut and
strapless are bothflattering.
I tookall that knowledgebackto
myoriginal salon, tomysaleswom-
an friend. In minutes, I found the
dress. Thesamplewaswhitewitha
blackfloral print, butinthemirrorI
envisioned myself in ivory. With a
deeppurple sash, maybe some silk
flowers stitched onto it. And may-
be some tulle underneath to give
me some pouf. It’s all uptome.
Final price? The tag said $205,
but after a bridal salon-wide sale of
15 percent off, it was $174.25, be-
fore tax.
Bam.
Now I’m planning my accesso-
ries. And talking glowingly about
my weddingdress rebellion.
The question I get is always the
same: “What about your brides-
maids? What are they wearing?”
Bridesmaids? I’mnot havingany.
We’ve decidedtoelope.
GOWN
Continued from Page 1B
AP PHOTO
Emily Fredrix poses for a por-
trait in her wedding dress and
homemade sash.
money. Flowers for the average
wedding can cost more than
$2,000, according to The Wed-
ding Report, which tracks indus-
try spending. Of that, the bridal
bouquet runs on average $132; it
and the other bouquets, bouton-
nieres and corsages often add up
to more than $400.
Beyond cost, however, brides
might choose an alternative to
the traditional bouquet to ex-
press their individuality, go light-
er on the environment, or contin-
ue or establish a family tradition.
All of those factors influenced
Karyn Thurston’s decision to cro-
chet flowers for her wedding in
Portland, Ore., in February 2011.
Thurston grewup seeing the fab-
ric flowers her mother had made
for her own wedding and dis-
played at home. An avid knitter,
Thurston also wanted to avoid
having flowers shipped to her
winter wedding.
Over four months, she crochet-
ed flowers for her wedding party
of 12 people, including her own
bouquet — a mix of golden yel-
low, rusty orange and a deep gray
blue. The time she devotedto the
project gave her a chance to re-
flect.
“As I was going through the
process of making flowers, think-
ing about my hopes for the wed-
ding and our marriage, I was cro-
cheting all that intention into
these flowers,” she said.
The Internet is awash in pat-
terns, tutorials and how-to vid-
eos for making bouquets out of
things besides fresh flowers. And
if crafting’s not for you, you can
find handmade wares on sites
such as Etsy.com, where prices
range from $50 for simple silk
bouquets to well over $600 for
custom brooch bouquets.
Some popular bouquet op-
tions:
•Knit/Crochet —Tiny stitch-
es, an assortment of colors and
easy-to-follow patterns can turn
yarn into gorgeous keepsakes.
Novices to experienced knitters
can find patterns to suit their
skills. Because the flowers are
small, you can make a lot out of
just a few skeins of yarn. Thur-
stonspent under $100for yarnfor
the flowers for her entire wed-
ding party, including wrist cor-
sages andflower headbands, bou-
quets and boutonnieres. Yarn
stores also have patterns, and
knitters to help guide you. Many
patterns online are free. On Rav-
elry.com — a networking site for
knitters and crocheters — there
are more than 2,600 free flower
patterns.
• Fabric/Felt —Like wedding
dresses, fabric flowers can keep
for years. And they can be made
in many ways. Make flowers out
of silkandburnthe edges slightly
to curl them for a natural look.
Have a favorite fabric designer?
Take the vibrant floral patterns
found on, say, Liberty of London
fabrics and incorporate that into
your wedding. A bonus: Many of
the patterns for fabric flowers on-
line don’t even require sewing.
Felt —a thicker formof fabric —
works well too for flowers be-
cause it holds its shape. You can
buy felt in dozens of shades and
thicknesses. Or, like Vivrette, you
can essentially make your own
felt by knitting flowers and then
washing them in hot water. That
process, called“felting,” creates a
thicker, tighter fabric, akin to
what happens when you shrink a
sweater.
• Paper — Often, all that’s re-
quired is the paper, a pair of good
scissors and glue. Use recycled
books, crumple up tissue paper
or fold paper with origami tech-
niques. Online, ready-made pa-
per bouquets are among the less
expensive options — sometimes
as little as $30 — because paper
is relatively cheap. Want to make
your own? Martha Stewart has a
gallery of 20 different types of pa-
per flowers, withdirections, from
peonies and dahlias to roses
made out of coffee filters and ac-
cented with water color paint.
• Brooches/Buttons — To get
“something old” into your cere-
mony and add some sparkle too,
try incorporating family heir-
loom brooches or old buttons.
Scour thrift stores or ask rela-
tives for contributions. Some
brides even assemble a brooch
bouquet as they walk down the
aisle, having family members re-
ach out and contribute pieces. Or
buy online: The Blue Petyl web-
site, for example, has dozens of
combinations of brooches, but-
tons, pearls andmore, fromabout
$100 to $500.
• Buy a kit — Bridal designer
Princess Lasertron sells a felted
flower kit for bridal bouquets for
$140. To outfit bridesmaids too, a
larger kit is available for $420. Pa-
per Source has kits for roses, daf-
fodils, magnolias and more; you
can make nine red roses for less
than $20.
BOUQUETS
Continued from Page 1B
AP PHOTO
A bridesmaid
holds a
homemade
bouquet,
made by
knitting and
felting flow-
ers, for the
wedding of
Carol Ann
and Jason
Vivrette in
Oakland,
Calif.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3B
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WYOMI NG SEMI NARY’ S PERFORMI NG ARTS I NSTI TUTE
2012 Musical Theater Gala Event
Special performances by PAI alumni including: Evan Frace, Sarah
Galante, Meghan Hourigan, Jillian Puhalla, and Kyle Segarra.
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Broadway actress and Wilkes-Barre native
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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
DALLAS: Misericordia Uni-
versity is holding an open
house from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. April
21 for high school students and
their parents. Registration
begins at 9 a.m. in the Ander-
son Sports and Health Center
located at the North Gate of the
upper campus.
The open house schedule
includes refreshments, campus
tours, a faculty session over
lunch and meetings with repre-
sentatives of student services,
athletics and financial aid.
For more information about
the open house, or to register,
contact the Admissions Office
at 570-675-4449 or 1-866-262-
6363 or email admiss@miser-
icordia.edu. Students can also
visit Misericordia University
online at www.admissions.mi-
sericorida.edu.
HAZLETON: The Hazleton
Area School District is holding
kindergarten registration for
the 2012-2013 school year 3-7
p.m. at the Hazleton Area Ca-
reer Center on the following
days:
April 16, Valley Elementary/
Middle School and McAdoo-
Kelayres Elementary School.
April 17, West Hazleton Ele-
mentary/Middle School.
April 18, Freeland Elemen-
tary/Middle School and Drums
Elementary/Middle School.
April 19, Arthur Street Ele-
mentary School and Arthur
Street Annex.
April 23, Heights-Terrace
Elementary/Middle School.
Foster parents and legal
guardians must register
through the Child Accounting
Office. Original documentation
will be required. To make an
appointment, call Vanessa Rey-
noso at 459-3111 ext. 3281 or
Mervelise Medina at 459-3111
ext. 3153.
Active registration is now
available online at
www.hasdk12.org. Go to regis-
tration tab, scroll down to regis-
tration, click on HASD regis-
tration and follow instructions.
Also available at http.//regis-
tration.hasdk12.org. Regis-
tration should be completed
prior to arriving at the Career
Center.
Children must be five years of
age on or before Sept. 1. The
following documents are re-
quired at registration, docu-
mentation of the child’s age,
proof of immunization and
three proofs of residency. A
home language survey will also
be given.
New first-grade students
should register on the days
designated for kindergarten
registration. Children must be 6
years old on or before Sept. 1.
The same requirements apply.
HUNLOCK CREEK: The
Benscoter Cemetery Associ-
ation, Muhlenberg, reminds
families that all winter deco-
rations are to be removed from
the gravesites by April 21. Any
remaining decorations will be
removed and discarded by the
caretaker.
LEHMAN: Several Penn
State Alumni Societies from
Northeast Pennsylvania are
offering a day at Knoebel’s
Amusement Park for 2012 Penn
State Day on May 12.
The day will include enter-
tainment by Alumni Blue Band
and the Nittany lion, picnic
lunch, prize raffles and more.
Registration is at 11 a.m. in
Pavilion M with lunch and
entertainment from noon to 1
p.m. Penn State party is at 3
p.m. in Pavilion L.
General admission is $20 and
child admission is $10. Both
include a $10 food/ride book-
let. Penn State lunch only is
$10. Penn State Day T-shirts
will also be available for $10.
Reservation deadline is April
27. For more information call
570-385-6262, or visit http://
wb.psu.edu/Alumni/alume-
vents.htm.
IN BRIEF
Zebra Communications, the student-run public relations agency at
Wilkes University, is hosting a ‘Wing and Sing’ fundraiser 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday in the ballroom of the Henry Student Center on the
Wilkes University campus, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre. Cost for the
event is $5 and free parking will be provided. Funds raised will bene-
fit the Embrace a Child in Tanzania campaign to support orphans in
Karagwe, Tanzania, who have been affected by HIV/AIDS. The wing
tasting and karaoke fundraiser is open to the public. Wings have
been donated by Bart and Urby’s, Wilkes-Barre, and The Ice Pub,
Mountain Top. Alyssa Fursarro Lewandowski, lead singer from the
band Soul, will be the Master of Ceremonies. At 8:30 p.m. a slide
show of Karagwe, Tanazania, and traditional Tanzania dances will be
presented. At 10 p.m. awards will be presented for the best-tasting
wings, voted on by the people attending the event. For more informa-
tion call 408-4158. Committee members, from left: Carl Achhammer,
Bart and Urby’s; Sara Cosgrove; Breanne Ralston; Alexandra Zero;
Aubree Armezzani; Quyen Nguyen; and Lewandowski.
Zebra Communications hosting fundraiser
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
A
lyssa Bierbach and Dale Ambosie,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Raymond and Ruth Bierbach, Hun-
lock Creek. She is the granddaughter
of Robert and Carol Kiska, Ashley;
William Bierbach, Wilkes-Barre; and
the late Naomi Bierbach.
The prospective groom is the son
of Dale Ambosie, Mountain Top, and
Margaret Solovey, Plains Township.
He is the grandson of Dale and Ruth
Ambosie, Mountain Top, and William
and Dorothy Davis, Wilkes-Barre.
Alyssa is a 2004 graduate of North-
west Area High School and earned a
bachelor’s degree in elementary and
special education from Misericordia
University in 2008. She earned her
master’s degree in educational devel-
opment and strategies from Wilkes
University in 2010. She is employed
by Northwest Area School District,
Shickshinny.
Dale is a 2004 graduate of Crest-
wood High School. He earned a bach-
elor’s degree in health sciences and a
master’s degree in physical therapy
from Misericordia University in 2009.
He is employed by Caregivers Amer-
ica, Stroudsburg.
The couple will exchange vows
July 6, 2012, at the Inne of the Abing-
tons, Dalton.
Ambosie, Bierbach
J
onelle Amber Dickson and Jo-
nathan Thomas Chipego, together
with their families, are pleased to
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Judith Dickson and Mr. and Mrs.
Jeffrey S. Dickson, all of Dallas. Jo-
nelle is the granddaughter of Melba
Dickson and the late William Dickson
Jr., Trucksville, and the late Mollie
Sullivan, Wilkes-Barre.
Jonelle is a 2003 graduate of Dallas
High School. She is a 2007 graduate
of Pennsylvania State University,
where she earned a bachelor’s degree
in communication sciences and dis-
orders and a 2009 graduate of Miser-
icordia University, where she earned
a master’s degree in speech-language
pathology. She is employed by the
Lake-Lehman School District.
The prospective groom is the son
of Carol Chipego and the late Ber-
nard Chipego, Lehman. Jonathan is
the grandson of Violet Chipego and
the late Bernard Chipego, Swoyers-
ville, and the late Katherine and
Thomas Guilford, Dallas.
Jonathan is a 2000 graduate of
Lake-Lehman High School and at-
tended Lackawanna College. He is
employed by the Kingston Township
Police Department.
The couple will exchange vows in
July 2012.
Dickson, Chipego
C
hina Chantel Dickson and Sam-
mie Lee Craven III, together with
their families, announce their engage-
ment and upcoming wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
LuAnn Dickson and the late Marvin
Dickson, Courtdale.
China is a 2005 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School and a
2009 graduate of Indiana University
of Pennsylvania, Indiana, where she
earned her Bachelor of Science de-
gree in nutrition. She is pursuing her
Master of Science degree in teaching,
learning and curriculum from Drexel
University. She is employed by the
Commission on Economic Opportu-
nity, Wilkes-Barre, as a nutrition
educator.
The prospective groom is the son
of Marie and Sammie Lee Craven Jr.,
Larksville.
Sam is a 2004 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School and a
2010 graduate of Wilkes University
School of Pharmacy, where he earned
his Pharm. D. Sam is employed by
Wal-Mart, Honesdale, as a pharmacy
manager.
The couple will exchange vows on
Sept. 1, 2012, at the East Mountain
Inn, Wilkes-Barre.
Dickson, Craven
S
tacey Fox and Robert Urban,
together with their families, an-
nounce their engagement and ap-
proaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Allen and Rita Fox, Jackson Town-
ship. She is the granddaughter of the
late John and Helen Malak, Jackson
Township, and Allen Fox Sr. and the
late Katherine Fox, Lehman.
The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate
of Lake-Lehman High School and a
2008 graduate of Penn State Uni-
versity, University Park, with a Bach-
elor of Arts degree in communica-
tions arts and sciences. Stacey earned
her master’s degree in organizational
management from Misericordia Uni-
versity in December 2011. She is
employed by Verizon Wireless as a
wireless sales consultant in Lexing-
ton Park, Md.
The prospective groom is the son
of Susan Urban and the late Robert
Urban, Wilkes-Barre. He is the grand-
son of Joseph and Mary Godlewski,
Wilkes-Barre.
The prospective groom is a 2005
graduate of Wyoming Seminary and a
2009 graduate of Penn State Uni-
versity, University Park, with a Bach-
elor of Science degree in aerospace
engineering. He is employed by Na-
vair as an aerospace engineer in Lex-
ington Park, Md. He recently earned
his private pilot license.
The couple will exchange vows in
the fall of 2012.
Fox, Urban
A
nnouncement is made of the
engagement and upcoming wed-
ding of Alexandra Celia Kokura and
Nicholas Frank Kravitz, both of Du-
pont.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Madelyn Kokura, Dupont, and the
late Thomas P. Kokura. She is the
granddaughter of the late Joseph and
Ceil Shandra; Martha Kokura, Nes-
quehoning; and the late John Kokura.
The prospective groom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Kravitz, Pitt-
ston. He is the grandson of Regina
Marriggi, Pittston; the late Frank
Marriggi; and the late Joseph and
Mary Kravitz.
Alexandra is a 2000 graduate of
Scranton Preparatory School and a
2004 graduate of Lehigh University.
She is also a 2009 graduate of Widen-
er University School of Law. Alex-
andra is a former law clerk to Lacka-
wanna County President Judge Tho-
mas J. Munley and serves as an at-
torney with Lackawanna County
Family Court.
Nicholas is a 2004 graduate of the
University of Scranton and a 2007
cum laude graduate of the Thomas
M. Cooley School of Law. Nicholas is
an attorney with Myers, Brier and
Kelly, LLP, Scranton.
An engagement party honoring the
couple was graciously hosted by
Jerry and Linda Mancinelli, Dallas, at
the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-
Barre, last August.
The couple is set to marry 2 p.m.
July 7, 2012, at St. John the Evange-
list Church, Pittston.
Kokura, Kravitz
K
imberly Krutski and Joshua Ma-
chlus, together with their fam-
ilies, announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Carl and Karen Krutski, Wilkes-Barre
Township. She is the granddaughter
of Laura Shubilla and Margaret Krut-
ski, both of Wilkes-Barre Township;
Carl Krutski Sr., Palm Beach Gar-
dens, Fla.; and the late Henry Shubil-
la.
The prospective groom is the son
of Linda Machlus, St. Petersburg,
Fla., and the late Barry Machlus. He
is the grandson of Abe Neidoff, New
York, N.Y., and the late Ruth Neidoff.
Kimberly is a 1997 graduate of
G.A.R. Memorial High School and
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in environmental engineering from
the Pennsylvania State University.
Joshua is a 1995 graduate of Flagler
Palm Coast High School. He earned
Bachelor of Science degrees in math-
ematics and statistics from the Uni-
versity of Florida in 1999. He earned
his Master of Arts degree in crimi-
nology and criminal justice from the
University of Maryland in 2001 and
his law degree from The Florida
State University College of Law in
2004.
The couple will exchange vows
Nov. 3, 2012, in Siesta Key, Fla.
Machlus, Krutski
M
atthew Edward Pietrzak and
Molly Anne Martin, together
with their families, are pleased to
announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Jack and Maureen Martin, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa. She is the granddaughter
of Peter and Marie Ciliberto, Pitt-
ston, Pa., and the late Norman and
Ruth Robinson.
The prospective groom is the son
of Sherri Jones Pietrzak, Dallas, Pa.,
and Edward Pietrzak Jr., Scranton,
Pa. He is the grandson of Carol Jones,
Dallas, Pa.; the late John Jones; Be-
verly Pietrzak, Scranton, Pa.; and the
late Edward Pietrzak Sr.
Molly is a 2004 graduate of James
M. Coughlin High School. She gradu-
ated in 2008 from Misericordia Uni-
versity, Dallas, Pa., with a Bachelor of
Science degree in medical imaging.
She also earned a certificate in radi-
ation therapy in 2009 from Bergen
Community College, Paramus, N.J.
Molly is employed as a registered
radiologic technologist at MedEx-
press Urgent Care, Edwardsville, Pa.,
and Geisinger Community Medical
Center, Scranton, Pa.
Matthew is a 2003 graduate of
Dallas Senior High School. He
earned an associate’s degree in auto-
motive technologies from Luzerne
County Community College in 2005.
He is employed at Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs.
The couple will exchange vows
October 2012 at St. Benedict’s
Church, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
Pietrzak, Martin
L
auren E. Nemeth and Thomas W
Sharkey, together with their fam-
ilies, are pleased to announce their
engagement and upcoming marriage.
Lauren is the daughter of Thomas
and Janice Nemeth, West Hazleton.
She is the granddaughter of the late
John and Adeline Yesenofski, West
Hazleton, and the late George and
Elizabeth Nemeth, West Hazleton.
Thomas is the son of Attorney
Thomas and Jean Sharkey, Hazle
Township. He is the grandson of
William and Catherine Lorah, Shepp-
ton, and the late Dr. Thomas and
Elizabeth Sharkey, West Hazleton.
The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate
of Bishop Hafey High School and a
2005 graduate of Bloomsburg Uni-
versity, where she earned a Bachelor
of Science degree in business admin-
istration with a major in marketing.
She is employed by Luzerne County.
The prospective groom is a 1997
graduate of Bishop Hafey High
School and a 2002 graduate of
Bloomsburg University, where he
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in elementary education. Thomas
earned his Juris Doctor degree from
Nova Southeastern University, She-
pard Broad Law Center, in 2009 and
is associated in the practice of law
with his father.
A wedding is planned for July 28.
Nemeth, Sharkey
R
uth Johanssen, Kingston, Pa., is
pleased to announce the engage-
ment of her son, Mark Johanssen, to
Michelle Poulin, daughter of Donald
Poulin and Pauline Couture, Canaan,
Vt.
Mark is a 2003 graduate of King’s
College with a Bachelor of Science
degree in information systems.
Michelle is a 2005 and 2010 gradu-
ate of Saint Michael’s College with a
master’s degree in the science of
administration.
The couple resides in Denver,
Colo., and works at the University of
Colorado Hospital.
A fall 2012 wedding is planned.
Poulin, Johanssen
F
our generations gathered to
celebrate the 90th birthday of
Ruth Christman Jones, Ashley.
Ruth is the daughter of Stanley
and Clara Shannon Christman. She
is also celebrating her 61st wedding
anniversary to John P. Jones.
A family dinner marked the occa-
sions.
Four generations, from left, first
row: Jones, Emily McDermott,
great-granddaughter; and Suzanne
Jones McDermott, daughter. Sec-
ond row: Kristin McDermott,
granddaughter.
Generations gather to
celebrate 90th
birthday
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sunday’s People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then “weddings”
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a color proof in advance
of other album photographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
J
ack and Sandra Pritchard, long-
time residents of Wyoming, Pa.,
will celebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary on April 14, 2012.
They were married in the Wyom-
ing United Methodist Church on
April 14, 1962.
The Pritchards have three children,
nine grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren.
They reside in Nokomis, Fla.
The Pritchards
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ O C C A S I O N S
O
n July 1, 2011, Carlene Kratz
married her best friend Mark
Crager. The wedding took place at St.
Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. Mon-
signor Joseph Rauscher served as
officiate.
Carlene is the daughter of Carl and
Arlene Kratz, Exeter. She is the
granddaughter of the late Mercur and
Helen Drew, Pittston, and the late
Carl and Marie Kratz, Wilkes-Barre.
Carlene is a 1997 graduate of Bish-
op Hoban High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree from
Lock Haven University and a Master
of Science degree from Florida State
University. She is employed by En-
terprise in Hattisburg, Miss., as a
branch manager.
Mark is the son of Gary and Sherry
Crager, Stateline, Miss. He is the
grandson of Ethel Dees and the late
Clifford Dees and the late Elmer and
Elizabeth Crager.
Mark is a 1994 graduate of Fruit-
dale High School and earned a Bach-
elor of Science degree from the Uni-
versity of Southern Mississippi and a
Master of Science degree from Mis-
sissippi University. He is employed at
Southern Mississippi University as
associate director of recreational
sports.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose friend Katie P. Desi-
derio as matron of honor. Brides-
maids were Ashley Andrews, Kerry
Smiley, Rachel Hannock and Cenecia
Leflore, all friends of the bride, and
Kayla Crager, niece of the groom.
Isabella Desiderio served as flower
girl. Tara Desiderio served as greeter.
The groom chose his friend, Grady
Sheffield, as best man. Groomsmen
were Drew Kratz, brother of the
bride, and Adam Germek, Ryan
Green, Darrel Hargraves and Matt
Sebring, all friends of the groom.
Chase Crager, nephew of the groom
served as ring bearer.
Scriptural readings were given by
Greg Crager, brother of the groom,
Drew Kratz, brother of the bride, and
Joseph and Frances Lisewski, godpar-
ents of the bride.
A cocktail hour and reception were
held at Oyster’s at the Genetti Hotel
and Conference Center following the
ceremony. The couple honeymooned
in Jamaica.
The bride was honored at a bridal
shower given by her mother at her
home. A couple’s shower was given
by the mother of the groom in State-
line, Miss. A rehearsal dinner was
hosted by the groom’s parents at
Rodano’s.
The couple resides in Hattisburg,
Miss., with their two dogs, Duce and
Hercules.
Kratz, Crager
T
he Church of Christ Uniting,
Kingston, Pa., was the setting for
the marriage of Amanda Gail Oriel
and David Walter Huebner on Oct.
29, 2011. The Rev. Dr. Carol A. Flem-
ing officiated the double-ring ceremo-
ny. Special music was provided by
Becky Olsen, sister of the groom, and
Tim Oriel, brother of the bride.
Amanda, the daughter of Janice
(Ritz) and David Oriel, Edwardsville,
Pa., is a 2002 graduate of Wyoming
Valley West High School. She earned
her Bachelor of Science degree in
education from Indiana University of
Pennsylvania and has a master’s
degree in classroom technology from
Wilkes University. She is an elemen-
tary teacher in the East Penn School
District in Emmaus, Pa.
David, the son of Billie Gail and
William Huebner, Coatesville, Pa., is
a 1997 graduate of Laurel Highlands
High School, Uniontown, Pa. He
earned his Bachelor of Science de-
gree in religion from Liberty Uni-
versity and has a master’s degree in
education from Philadelphia Biblical
University. He is a history teacher for
the Pennsylvania Leadership Charter
School, West Chester, Pa.
The bride, escorted by her father,
chose Jessica Bradley as her maid of
honor. Bridesmaids were Lauren
DePalma, Cathy Roberts, Tara Mark,
Tiffany Altman and Sarah Beltram,
friends of the bride; Becky Olson,
sister of the groom; and Abbegail
Fisher, godchild of the bride.
The groom chose Jeremy VanEtten
as best man. The groomsmen were
Brian Gaudiano, Robert Shopf, Ni-
cholas Gray and Scott Hall, friends of
the groom; Joshua Olson, brother-in-
law of the groom; Tim Oriel, brother
of the bride; and Zachary Fisher,
cousin of the bride.
Megan Kelly, cousin of the bride,
was flower girl and Liam Olson, ne-
phew of the groom, was ring bearer.
Scripture readings were given by
Robert Griffin, uncle of the groom,
and Cynthia Gordon, cousin of the
bride. Music was provided by William
Johnson.
An evening reception was held at
Appletree Terrace, Dallas, Pa.
The couple is residing in the Allen-
town area.
Huebner, Oriel
D
r. Joel Jacobson and Lauren
Cardoni were united in mar-
riage on April 30, 2011, at the
Bonnet Island Estate in Long
Beach Island, N.J. An evening
cocktail hour and reception fol-
lowed the ceremony at the estate.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cardoni, Har-
veys Lake. She is the grand-
daughter of Della Cardoni and the
late Harry J. Cardoni, Wilkes-
Barre, and the late Joseph and
Ann Mitros, Glen Lyon.
The groom is the son of Dr. and
Mrs. Norman Jacobson, Salinas,
Calif. He is the grandson of the
late Dr. Donald and Gertrude
Bleiberg, Palo Alto, Calif., and
the late Isaac and Edith Jacobson,
Los Angeles, Calif.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose Lauren Stahl as
her matron of honor. Bridesmaids
were Danielle Mullery, Leslie
Calzaretta, Rita Schmid, Jessica
Weintraub, Britt Wenzler, Katie
Sacripanti, Sarah Jacobson, Annie
Kantor, Cristina Carpintero and
Lauren Simhon. Junior brides-
maids were Emma and Sophie
Kantor, nieces of the groom. The
flower girls were Abby and Han-
nah Wolf, nieces of the groom,
and Jasmine Rebore-Nardone,
goddaughter of the bride.
The groom selected Darren
McDaniel as his best man.
Groomsmen were Sal Cardoni,
Kevin Wang, Mike Cohn, Kevin
Horowitz, Barry Wolf, Jason Kan-
tor, John Lorton, Jonathan Sarhad
and Orian Shirihai. Ring bearer
was Isaac Kantor, nephew of the
groom.
Lauren is a graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and a gradu-
ate of Georgetown University
with a Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration degree.
She earned a Master of Science
degree in occupational therapy
from New York University. She is
employed as a pediatric occupa-
tional therapist at UC Davis Med-
ical Center in California.
Joel is a graduate of Robert
Louis Stevenson High School,
Pebble Beach, Calif., and a gradu-
ate of the University of California
Berkeley with a Bachelor of Arts
degree in molecular biology. He
earned his Doctor of Medicine
degree from the University of
Michigan. He is a fellow in head
and neck and skulled based surgi-
cal oncology at UC Davis Medical
Center in California.
The couple honeymooned in the
Amalfi Coast, Italy. They will be
moving to Monterey, Calif., in
July.
Cardoni, Jacobson
A
mber Marie Manganello and
Christopher Luke Malonis were
united in holy matrimony at St. Ma-
ry’s Church of the Immaculate Con-
ception, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., on Sept.
30, 2011, at three o’clock in the after-
noon.
The bride is the daughter of Linda
Manganello, Kingston, Pa., and David
Manganello, Apopka, Fla.
The groom is the son of Luke and
Diane Malonis, Dallas, Pa.
Before leaving on a honeymoon
cruise to the Caribbean, the couple
received congratulations at a recep-
tion in their honor at the Appletree
Terrace at Newberry Estates in Dal-
las, Pa.
Melissa Cheramie, sister of the
bride, served as matron of honor and
Barbara Manganello, sister-in-law of
the bride, served as bridesmaid.
William Jesse, brother-in-law of the
groom, served as best man and John
Burke, also brother-in-law to the
groom, served as groomsman. Ushers
were Tyler Burke, Brenden Jesse,
Hunter Burke and Matthew and Za-
chary Jesse, all nephews of the
groom. Noah Manganello, the bride’s
nephew, served as ring bearer.
Mrs. Malonis holds a bachelor’s
degree in psychology from Mary-
wood University. She is employed by
Childcare Information Services of
Luzerne County, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., as
an eligibility representative.
Mr. Malonis is a graduate of Penn-
sylvania State University with a bach-
elor’s degree in business finance. He
is employed by Kraft Foods, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., as a financial control man-
ager.
The newlyweds will reside in Prin-
gle, Pa.
Malonis, Manganello
C
atrina Alicia Lispi and Colby
Christopher Ozgo were united in
marriage in a double-ring ceremony
performed by Magisterial District
Judge Diana Malast on Feb. 24, 2012.
The bride is the daughter of Albert
and Kathleen Lispi, Plains Township.
She is the granddaughter of Kathleen
Wysocki and the late Charles Wy-
socki and Gela Lispi and the late
Albert Lispi.
The groom is the son of Clarence
Ozgo and the late Catherine Ozgo,
Plains Township. He is the grandson
of Clarence and Julia Ozgo and Ruth
W. and Lester Williams.
Catrina chose her sister, Gina El-
izabeth, as her maid of honor. Colby
chose Daniel Pfeffer as his best man.
Colby is employed by Plains Town-
ship as a firefighter.
Catrina is a student at Luzerne
County Community College.
A dinner celebration was held at
Café Italia.
Colby and Catrina reside in Plains
Township.
Ozgo, Lispi
C
atherine Marie Zera and Robert
Joseph Stesney III were united in
marriage on March 31, 2012, at the
parish of St. Monica in Wyoming.
The bride is the daughter of Ed-
ward and Barbara Zera, Exeter. She is
the granddaughter of the late Edward
and Blanche Deschak, Edwardsville,
and the late Shirley Stanish, Exeter.
The groom is the son of Bob and
Sandra Stesney, Luzerne. He is the
grandson of Margaret and Richard
Slusser, Exeter, and Shirley Stesney,
Swoyersville.
The bride was given away in mar-
riage by her father. She chose her
close friend, Jessica Vernouski, as her
maid of honor. Bridesmaid was Erica
Madara, friend of the bride.
The groom chose his best friend,
Kenny Jones, as his best man.
Groomsman was Steven Stesney,
brother of the groom.
Flower girl was Tesa Stesney,
daughter of the bride and groom.
Ring bearer (or best boy as the bride
and groom called him) was Channing
Stesney, son of the bride and groom.
Readings were given by Jessica
Vernouski and Kenny Jones.
The bride is a psychology major at
Liberty University. She is also a stay-
at-home mother to the couple’s two
children, Tesa, 4, and Channing, 18
months.
The groom is a student at The
American School of Technology and
is majoring in computer program-
ming and design. He works night
shift at Price Chopper.
The couple resides in Swoyersville.
Zera, Stesney
M
r. and Mrs. Nicholas Magda,
Mountain Top, recently cele-
brated their 50th wedding anniver-
sary with a family dinner at the Top
of the 80’s in Drums.
They were married on Dec. 2, 1961,
in St. Patrick’s Church by the Rev.
Maurice A. Hughes.
Maid of honor was Janet Kennedy
Kaminski and best man was John
Magda.
They are the parents of three chil-
dren, Mark and his wife, JoAnn,
North Carolina; Sharon and her hus-
band, Merritt, Connecticut; and Neil
and his wife, Catherine, South Car-
olina.
Mr. and Mrs. Magda also have four
grandchildren, Rhett, Stephen, Ken-
dra and Matthew.
Mr. Magda retired from Intersil,
where he was employed for 35 years.
The Magdas
T
he Rev. Dr. and Mrs. James L.
Harring will celebrate their 60th
wedding anniversary on April 10.
Dr. and Mrs. Harring, both natives
of Mount Carmel, were united in
marriage by the Rev. E.B. Harris in
St. Paul’s Evangelical United Breth-
ren Church, Mount Carmel.
Mrs. Harring, the former Doris M.
Schucker, was employed by Bell
Telephone for more than 10 years.
Dr. Harring served as pastor of
Albright United Methodist Church,
Wilkes-Barre for 30 years and also
served as the senior Protestant chap-
lain of the Department of Veterans
Affairs Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre.
He is serving as minister of pastoral
care at the Church of Christ Uniting
in Kingston.
Attendants at the Harring’s wed-
ding ceremony were Emma Schucker
Good, Dorothy J. Kinsinger, the Rev.
Galen Klinger, Robert M. Harring,
the Rev. Norman Snook and Charles
Booser.
The couple has two children, Carol
and Mrs. Richard (Cathy) Hannis and
two grandchildren, Steven and Eric
Hannis, all of Mountain Top.
The couple will celebrate with a
dinner in their honor.
The Harrings
PNC Bank recently presented a
$10,000 check to Junior Achievement
of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The
money came from funds made avail-
able in 2011 by the Pennsylvania Edu-
cational Improvement Tax Credit
program. At the check presentation,
from left, are Melissa Turlip, Junior
Achievement, and Annmarie Andrej-
ko, PNC Bank.
PNC makes donation to
Junior Achievement
The students of the Wyoming Valley Montessori School in Kingston recently
collected food items for the West Side Food Pantry located in the Christ the King
Church on West Market Street, Kingston. The drive was spearheaded by the lower
elementary students of the school and all classes participated. Montessori stu-
dents conduct numerous drives to help the community throughout the school
year. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Jacob Kristeller, Shavertown;
Annabel Dobash, Mountain Top; Ainsley Dean, Mountain Top; Corbin Morrison,
Kingston; Alexis Kostoff , Moosic; and Aarez Khan, Mountain Top. Second row:
Remedy Allport, Nanticoke; Abel Waksor, Dallas; Nathan Kile, Shavertown; Ivana
Kumar, Wilkes-Barre; Trisha Kumar, Wilkes-Barre; and Rylee Critchosin, Shaver-
town. Third row: Kara Taylor, instructor; Zaiden Kaminsky, Mountain Top; William
Filali, Wilkes-Barre; Sophia Filali, Wilkes-Barre; Yousef Ramadan, Kingston; Kevin
McNulty, Kingston; Marie Parra , parent coordinator; Zachary Kile, Shavertown.
Montessori students collect items for West Side Food Pantry
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We are a complete design and installation landscaping company performing applications in the commercial and
residential market. We specialize in hardscape design, which includes various forms of retaining wall systems,
concrete pavers, stamped concrete, stucco, dryvit and all types of masonry restoration. We also feature ponds,
water falls and waterscapes. We also perform excavating, landscape design and the creation of new lawns. We
take pride in all of our work and we’re especially proud of landscaping the Capital Building in Harrisburg, PA.
We provide landscaping, snow removal and maintenance. In addition to the local work that we perform
we also work out of state in the commercial and industrial market. We provide all estimates within
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C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full
weeks before your child’s birth-
day.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must
be typed or computer-generat-
ed. Include your child’s name,
age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grand-
parents’ names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages.
Don’t forget to include a
daytime contact phone num-
ber.
We cannot return photos
submitted for publication in
community news, including
birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit pre-
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because such photos can be-
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lost, in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birth-
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Barre, PA 18711-0250.
GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16)
will be published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Sarah Elizabeth Kuderka, daugh-
ter of John and Colleen Kuderka,
Vernon, is celebrating her 1 1th
birthday today, April 8. Sarah is
a granddaughter of Carlos and
Marian Smith, Bear Creek, and
Jack and Linda Kuderka, Falls.
She is a great-granddaughter of
Mary Smith, Wilkes-Barre. Sarah
has a brother, John, 7.
Sarah E. Kuderka
Alexandra Kathryn Rutkoski,
daughter of Kelly and Joe Rut-
koski, is celebrating her second
birthday today, April 8. Alex-
andra is a granddaughter of
Maryellen Kashubski and the
late Alex Kashubski and Dorothy
Rutkoski and the late George
Rutkoski. She has five siblings,
Joey, 17, Jessica, 15, Matthew, 5,
Jakob, 3, and Braden, 7 weeks.
Alexandra K. Rutkoski
Aiden Scott Weidl, son of Scott
and Allison Smalley Weidl, Cler-
mont, Fla., is celebrating his first
birthday today, April 8. Aiden is
a grandson of Joe and Nina
Smalley, Pittston, and Sharon
Damron and Tom Weidl, Orlando,
Fla. He has a brother, Ethan, 6.
Aiden S. Weidl
Devon Michael Williams, son of
Will and Keri Williams, Hanover
Township, is celebrating his
fourth birthday today, April 8.
Devon is a grandson of Susan
Basham, Wilkes-Barre, and Cath-
erine Williams and Mike and
Diane Basham, all of Wilkes-
Barre Township. He is a great-
grandson of Elizabeth Gillman,
Wilkes-Barre.
Devon M. Williams
Binghamton University,
Binghamton, N.Y.
Katherine H. Schwiker, Sugarloaf;
Hoang Minh M. Ngo, Kingston.
Salve Regina University,
Newport, R.I.
Olivia Marquart, Dallas.
OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS’ LIST
Luzerne County Council recently proclaimed March 31 Bowl For
Kids’ Sake Day in Luzerne County. The proclamation was made in
conjunction with the 30th anniversary of Bowl For Kids’ Sake, which
is the largest annual fundraiser of Big Brothers Big Sisters of The
Bridge. Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge is a program of Cathol-
ic Social Services and is a United Way partner agency. All proceeds
from Bowl For Kids’ Sake help provide mentors to the young people
of Northeastern Pennsylvania. This year’s event took place at Stan-
ton Lanes in Wilkes-Barre and raised approximately $92,000. From
left: Jim Bobeck, Luzerne County Council; Tanya Olaviany, program
director, Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge; and Noreen Clark,
WNEP-TV and co-chair of Bowl For Kids’ Sake 2012. Second row: Tim
McGinley, Luzerne County Council; Nick Michalisin Jr., co-chair of
Bowl For Kids’ Sake 2012; Alan K. Stout, community and resource
development coordinator, Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge.
Luzerne County Council proclaims Bowl For Kids’ Sake Day
The dance line Sugar recently
attended the Performing Arts
Alliance Contest of Champions
competition in King of Prussia.
The group was named Grand
Champion Group/Line in the 8-9
age division and was awarded a
$1,000 check. Sugar also won
‘Tops’ in the tap and specialty
categories. Members of Sugar
are dance students under the
direction of Robert and Kristine
Oberst, owners and directors of
the Back Mountain Dance Studio
of Dallas. Members of Sugar,
from left, are Faith Bradley, Bai-
ley Zelinski, Samantha Matushek,
Megan Krakosky, Carly Kappler,
Makayla Krakosky, Erin McLaugh-
lin, Tegan Ostroski, Samantha
Blamire, Ashley Elick and Maken-
zi Walsh.
Sugar dance line named Grand
Champion at arts competition
The Mary Kintz Bevevino Library at Misericordia University has
scheduled a slate of events to celebrate National Library Week, Tues-
day through Saturday. The theme of the 2012 national celebration is
‘You belong at your library.’ Librarian Sameera Redkar will present
‘iPads Belong at the library!’ an iPad tips and tricks tutorial, at noon
on Tuesday. A Food for Fines can goods collection will also take place,
with donations going to the Back Mountain Food Pantry. Anyone
signing up during the week as a Friend of the Library will be eligible
for great prizes, including a $100 gift certificate to Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs and a basket from the Nimble Winery. Community
library supporters and local businesses have donated prizes and
basket raffle items. Additional information on the library and the
week’s events is available at www.misericordia.edu/mu_library, or by
contacting Colleen Newhart at 674-3036 or cnewhart@misercor-
dia.edu. Members of the library staff, from left, first row: Colleen
Newhart, National Library Week coordinator; Joan Yamrick; Jennifer
Luksa; Beth Spaciano; Martha Stevenson; Susan Lazur; Jean Dobin-
ick; and student Kelly Rogan, Pittsburgh.
Misericordia University celebrates National Library week
The Wyoming Valley West School District recently participated
in the Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science held at King’s
College. Over 600 students in grades 7 through 12 in seven North-
eastern Pennsylvania counties participated in the daylong event.
First-award winners proceed to the state competition in May at
Penn State University. Students who participated in the mathe-
matics category, from left, first row: James Dal Santo, grade 8,
first award; and Bethany Lindsey, grade 9, second award. Second
row: Drea Buczeskie, grade 7, first award; and Lauren Hannagan,
grade 9, first award. Third row: Ethan Rosentel, grade 8, first
award; and Hollis Langley, grade 9, first award. Fourth row: Alexa
Vargo, grade 9, first award; and Hunnter Maxwell, grade 8, first
award. Fifth row: Maria Konopke, sponsor. Joseph Dal Santo, grade
10, also received a first award.
WVW students to compete at Junior Academy of Science
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 7B
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OUT-OF-TOWN
HONOR ROLL
Mark Macosky, a senior at West
Side Career and Technology
Center, was named the Student
of the Month for March. Macosky
was selected
based on his
outstanding
attributes both
in and out of
the classroom.
He is in the
computer
maintenance
program and
plans on at-
tending college and pursuing a
career in computer technology
and history education. Macosky
is the son of Mark and Michele
Macosky, Edwardsville.
Mia Cipriani, daughter of Michele
and Thomas Michael Cipriani,
Sugar Notch, celebrated her
sixth birthday by having a fun-
draising birthday party at Chuck
E. Cheese’s on March 25. Her
guests, which
included her
classmates
from Hanover
Green Ele-
mentary
School and her
close friends
and family,
were request-
ed to bring an
item to be donated to the Lu-
zerne County SPCA in lieu of
birthday gifts. She was proud to
have donated about 20 bags of
pet food and numerous cleaning
supplies and miscellaneous pet
items.
Robert Yanik, a resident of Dallas
and a student at King’s College,
has been awarded a full-tuition
scholarship to study at Queen’s
University in Belfast, Northern
Ireland, during the 2012-2013
academic year. The Irish-Amer-
ican Scholars Program is spon-
sored by the Government of
Northern Ireland, Ulster and
Queen’s Universities, The Belfast
Institute of Further and Higher
Education and the Catholic,
United
Methodist
and Presby-
terian
Churches.
Yanik, the
son of
Glenn and
Marianne
Yanik, is a political science
and theology double major
with a minor in political econ-
omy. He is an Academic Skills
tutor and participated in the
King’s service trip to Austin,
Texas. Yanik is also an English
as a Second Language and
Big Brothers/Big Sisters
volunteer and a Dean’s List
student.
Jeffrey Feist, Larksville, a
student at Luzerne County
Community College, has been
selected to participate as a
National Community College
Aerospace Scholar (NCAS)
with NASA. The NCAS is an
educational
program
that allows
students to
participate
in onsite
team pro-
jects, web-
based
activities
and behind the scenes tours
of NASA. As part of the pro-
gram, Feist and his team
members submitted a project
for a competition for the
opportunity to travel to NA-
SA. The team’s winning entry,
a theoretical mission to Mars,
enables the students to travel
to the Johnson Space Center
in May and work with NASA
engineers, astronauts, and
educators and community
college students from across
the nation. Feist is president
of the Science Club and will
graduate in May. He is one of
two students from Pennsylva-
nia to be selected to partici-
pate in the NCAS program
and was chosen from more
than 230 initial applicants.
Peter Shaver, sophomore at
Dallas High School, recently
received first
place in the
regional
history day
competition
held at Penn
State Wilkes-
Barre. Shav-
er competed
in the individual paper category
with his essay, “Rebellion on the
Frontier: The Whiskey Insurrec-
tion of 1791-1794.” Shaver has
competed since sixth grade and
has won the last five consec-
utive years with his historical
paper entries. He will advance to
the Pennsylvania State Competi-
tion to be held in May at Cum-
berland Valley High School in
Mechanicsburg.
Carly Kappler, daughter of Chas
and Leah Kappler, Dallas, recent-
ly competed in the Performing
Art Alliance Competition at King
of Prussia. She was awarded
first place in solo pantomime,
duo pantomime, duo TV, second
place in solo
tap, solo
specialty,
solo ethnic,
photogenic
and third
place for
duo jammin’
in the 8-9
age groups.
Kappler is also a member of
dance group Sugar which placed
first place in group specialty and
line tap categories. Kappler
qualified to perform at the
Performing Arts Alliance’s Con-
test of Champions at King of
Prussia. She placed “Tops In”
duo jammin’ and duo panto-
mime categories. She and dance
members of the group Sugar
also placed “Tops In” group
specialty and line tap and also
won $1,000 for being the Grand
Champion in the 8-9 age group.
Kappler is a student of Robert
and Kristine Oberst, owners and
directors of Back Mountain
Dance Studio.
Leanna Woehrle Blazosek, recent-
ly earned a Juris Doctor degree
from the New York Law School
in New York City. Blazosek is the
daughter of Randy and Carole
Woehrle, Lake Ariel. Her mother
and father in-law are attorney
Joseph and Elaine Blazosek,
Avoca. Blazosek graduated from
New York Law School, with
honors, in 1981. She received her
diploma from her father-in-law,
an alumnus of the school. Prior
to entering law school, Blazosek
was a child victim advocate at
the Children’s Advocacy Center
of Northeast Pennsylvania,
Scranton. She graduated from
Western Wayne High School in
2002 and Fordham University,
magna cum laude, in 2006.
Blazosek studied abroad during
her junior year of undergraduate
studies at St. Andrews Uni-
versity, Scotland. She will be
taking the Pennsylvania Bar in
July. Blazosek and her husband
reside in Avoca.
NAMES AND FACES
Macosky
Cipriani
Yanik
Feist
Shaver
Kappler
Joshua Mast and Paul Blackledge, proprietors of POSH at the
Scranton Club, recently hosted a fundraising dinner that benefited
the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic 2012 Conductor’s Chal-
lenge. The Conductor’s Challenge features an individual each year
who takes up the conductor’s baton in an effort to raise funds for the
Philharmonic orchestra. Mast will be a guest conductor this year in
the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic’s annual Conductor’s
Challenge at ‘The Gershwin Symphonic Experience: Here to Stay’ 8
p.m. Friday at the Scranton Cultural Center. The event raised more
than $3,000 with all proceeds going to the Philharmonic’s education
and community engagement projects. Contributions are still being
accepted and can be made by logging onto www.nepaphil.org. From
left: Steve Parulski, director of marketing and community relations,
Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic; Patricia Arvonio, chief
financial officer and director of administration, Northeastern Penn-
sylvania Philharmonic; Mary Marrara, board member, Northeastern
Pennsylvania Philharmonic; Mast; Sandy Davis, patron services man-
ager, Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic.
POSH proprietors host fundraising dinner for Philharmonic
Wyoming Valley West Middle
School
Miss Troy, principal, Wyoming
Valley West Middle School, re-
cently announced the Honor Roll
for the second marking period.
Grade 8: Honors with Distinction:
Jacob Chalawich, James Dal
Santo, Edward Doreskewicz,
Matthew Finnegan, Alexandria
Hargrave, Joshua Hospodar,
Leeann Mahalick, Hunnter Max-
well, Megan Menzel, Brianna
Moran, Samantha Packer, Young
Eun Park, Ethan Rosentel, Wil-
liam Stone III, Kaitlyn Stoodley,
Nicholas Stuart, Emily Welgoss,
Kiersten Wiedwald, Jackson
Williams, Elizabeth Wood, Kyra
Yaglowski. High Honors: Emma
Bakewell, Anthony Barbose,
Andrew Barney, Cynthia Bed-
narski, Nicole Birosak, Alexa
Biscotto, Matthew Bobkowski,
Timothy Brown, Katelyn By-
theway, Auston Chopick, Andria-
na Christoforatos, Erene Chris-
toforatos, Nelson Colon, Taylor
Crisano, Sara D’Andrea, Gina
Davis, Nicolas Delazzari, Mark
Desilva, Kyle Deutschman, Philip
Diaz, Maria Dibuo, Kyle Dow,
Tyler Edwards, Lorenzo Enri-
quez, Matthew Evans, Alyssa
Ford, Connor Gaffney, Emelyn
Galvez, Garrett Giza, Gabrielle
Griffin, Michaela Haas, Gabrielle
Hartzel, Christopher Heylek,
Terrence Hinton, Ryan Hogan,
Asdone Hooper, Helia Hossein-
pour, Brian Hritzak, Mackenzie
Janneh, Gianna Jannuzzi, Mi-
chael Johns, Benjamin Kaplan,
Amethyst Keeler, Allison Klach,
Joseph Koval, Morgan Kultys,
HONOR ROLL
See HONOR ROLL, Page 8B
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Sorber, Ronny Sosa, Seth St Clair,
Michael Tandoh Jr., Laura
Thompson, Jamal Totimeh, Caleb
Trojan, Emily Urbanovitch, Marc
Volack, Jason Wall, Emily Walton,
Colin Warnke, Bailey Welki, Law-
rence Wesneski, Caitlin West-
erholm, Brentley Wilbur, Clare
Winton, Kristopher Wolfe, Tyler
Wozniak, Peter Yakoub, Alex-
andra Yanchick, Tyler Yankosky,
Dillon Yuhas, Joshua Zavada,
Aeryona Zim. Honors: Melody
Aguilar, Mikayla Akulonis, Sage
Auer, John Baker Jr, Sarah Ann
Bannon, Bethany Barker, Michael
Bazadona, Jonathan Biller, Mack-
enzie Bittle, Louis Brennan,
Dorian Budziak-Featherstone,
Amore’ Cameron, Olivia Colleran,
Anthony Dutter, Adam Edwards,
Ryan Ellsworth, Thomas Evans,
Heaven-Lee Ewing, Isaiah Faux,
Dennis Gentry, Matthew Gilroy,
Bryan Gourley, Alexandria Gra-
blick, Christofer Granahan, David
Hall, Jalysha Hartzell, Katelyn
Henninger, Joseph Hodges,
Ashley Hungarter, Nicole Hunter,
Jason Jacobosky, Kayla Kavetski,
Nicholas Klimchok, Paul Kubicki,
Ryan Kwastavich, Jonathan
Lagoski, Zoe Lambert, Jonathan
Letteer, Madeline Luff, Samuel
Lukas, Matthew Mackiewicz,
Brian Magoski, Priya Majamun-
dar, Caitlyn Maloney, Sarah Mas-
saker, Jennifer Mcdermott, Kait-
lin Melodick, Mariah Monseur,
Jonathan Mylott, Thomas Pash-
inski, Reiley Paulewicz, Britany
Pavone, Sherly Perez-Mejia,
Desiree Pollick, Jocelyn Polney,
Grant Powell, Rafe Rickard,
Amanda Rosengrant, Kelsey
Shaffer, Dominic Shandra, Kath-
leen Shovlin, Michelle Sikora,
Alyssa Simmers, Alaiyah Smith,
Victoria Stasukinas, Nathan
Studenroth, Laurel Trzesniowski,
Crystal Valyo, Jamie Webb Jr,
Devon Weidman, Drew Wilkinson,
Jason Williams, Sequoia Winters,
Cory Yashinski, Ryan Zaruta,
Jason Zavala.
Grade 7: Honors with Distinction:
Eric Baron, Ryan Bird, Drea Buc-
zeskie, Danielle Cook, Casey
Cryan, Lauren Greenwald, Natalie
Gruver, Megan Guarilia, Brittany
Hebda, Melinda Holena, Jacob
Lesoine, Grant Loose, Thomas
Lyall, Chelsea Mackiewicz, Mor-
gan McIntyre, Joseph Motovidlak,
Brandi Sholtis, Gabriela Smicher-
ko, Lauren Thoryk, Paige Wil-
liams, Olivia Winters, Madison
Yoh. High Honors: Elizabeth
Abraham, Michael Allunis, Mi-
chael Ascolillo, Aaron Austin,
Ariel Banks, Anessa Bartusek, Ian
Bayley, Dominick Bayo, Eric
Bealla, Stephen Berger,
Cheyenne Blackhawk, Payton
Boler, Courtney Borland, Alexan-
der Brandreth, Shane Brandt,
Matthew Brennan, Morgan Bren-
nan, Carol Brewster, Carylanne
Burrier, Matthew Butchko, Austin
Canavan, Madelyn Casier, Ryan
Casterline, Austin Christo, Ashley
Collura, Morgan Collura, Joshua
Cook, Taylor Cook, Courtney
Costello, Colleen Cwalina, Made-
line Delarche, Erica Deleo, Nina
Dellarte, Jonathon Derhammer,
Lauren Devens, Bianca Difebo,
Cheyenne Dixon, Brooke Dom-
broski, Ashley Duda, Gianna
Dutter, Logan Fluegel, Bernadine
Fox, Sarah Gacek, Amber Gesek,
Erin Gibbons, Kayley Gibbons,
Mykala Gillespie, Joyssen Gon-
zalez, Dorothy Goss, Kasen Heim,
Luke Hoskins, Dale Ide, Dani
Iorio, Daisy Jaimes-Mattox, Kate-
lyn Johnson, Dylan Jolley, Sean
Judge Jr, William Kaufmann,
Ethan Kemmerer, Meghan Kling-
es, Maya Kornfeld, Stephen
Kotch, William Kotchik, Eric
Krushinski, Russell Kutish, Shawn
Lamoreaux, Rachel Langdon,
Sarah Lawson, David Lazinsky,
Jonathan Libby, Jacklyn Lindsey,
Kyra Tani Little, Nina Magnotta,
Megan Marinos, Morgan Marinos,
Madison Matello, Celeste Mccar-
ley, Madison Michak, Luke Mount-
joy, Joseph Novitski, Riley O’Neil,
Roshan Patel, Sweta Patel, Alicia
Pedana, Alexis Peele, Kendra
Percodani, Jared Perdikis, Amber
Perez, Bryden Peters, Samantha
Pritchard, Matthew Proski, Kyle
Puterbaugh, Melodi Raskiewicz,
Jordan Reilly, Matthew Repko,
Ariana Rinaldi, Brittany Ritsick,
Mackenzie Rood, Brydon Ruksta-
lis, Kaylin Sarris, Sabrina Seitz,
Kiara Serrano, Christine Shandra,
Jake Shemo, Rebecca Shields,
Lauryn Simmons, David Sites,
Giana Skaff, Kylie Slatky, Taylor
Smith, Richard Sott, Kristina
Specht, Morgan Sullivan, Aman-
da Sura, Jacob Taffera, Abigail
Thomas, Darius Thomas, Kristi
Tomcho, Natalia Vivanco, Justin
Vought, Michael Walsh IV, Ian
Warunek, Davis Weaver, Trevor
Weiss, Audrea Welles, Ryleigh
White, Stanley Zaneski. Honors:
Mohamed Abuelhawa, Jasmine
Acevedo, Khalil Adams, Courtney
Allabaugh, Kiera Allabaugh,
Dakotah Belles, Francesco Bellia,
Zachary Benczkowski, Nathan
Berkey, Jenna Besermin, Emily
Boney, Gabriella Bottaro, Joseph
Butcher, Gabrielle Care, Mariah
Carey, Jacob Carver, Elizabeth
Crossin, Damian Davies, Dennis
De La Cruz, Joseph Dobbs, Desti-
nee Dominick, Courtney Dorshef-
ski, Sierra Dudek, Evelyn Egenski,
Christopher Ercolani, Alyssa
Fasciano, Nicole Favia, Haylee
Fedor, Amanda Finney, Kathleen
Ford, Noah Frace, Haley George,
Morgan Gronkowski, Jarrett
Guziejka, Adam Harbaugh, Nicole
Harper, Emilee Heil, Bryana
Henninger, Faith Hockenberry,
Juliette Jacobosky, Julia Jonelu-
nas, Morgan Josefowicz, Domin-
ick Kay, Jill Ktytor, Eric Latoski,
Robert Lipski, Katie Mackiewicz,
Brandon Maute, Brittany Mays,
Adam Mccue, Payton Mendygral,
Joshua Montalvo, Nicholas Moo-
ney, Mawa Moore, Mason Mora-
vinski, Michael Moser, Courtney
Mountjoy, Kerri Mulligan, Calvin
Naugle, James O’Rourke, Michael
Orlando, Courtney Pearson,
Jasmine Pearson, Courtney
Pellam, Marco Pernisco, Ryley
Phillips, Olivia Pieczynski, Bran-
don Pieszala, David Pilcavage,
Julianne Polachek, Christopher
Polk, Robert Poluske, Ryan Reino,
Annamarie Rodriguez, Sarah
Roman, Chad Romanowski,
Ashley Rood, Tacarra Roper,
Velvet Salgado, Nadirah Saun-
ders, Angela Schneider, Nicholas
Sedeski, Kaycee Seiwell, Sheylah
Silva, Amber Springer, Erin
Steibel, Ross Thompson Jr.,
Carlos Torres-Teran, Courtney
Uren, John Usavage, Irwin
Wainwright, Keisha Watkins,
Andrew Wiedwald, Shay Wilkin-
son, Amanda Williams, Tylar
Williams, Cassandra Wright,
Chase Wychock, Jaegeon Yoo.
Grade 6: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Carolyn Antall, Caitlyn
Berrini, Matthew Bolan, Ashley
Brown, Joseph Burridge, Abigail
Capin, Callie Edwards, Nicole
Fenner, Mitchell Forgash, Megan
Handley, Madisen Jastremski,
Joseph Konopke, Kyra Kopacz,
Gracelyn Marsh, Mark Obrzut Jr,
Sophia Polgar, Daniel Rogers,
Lawrence Territo Jr, Elizabeth
Trojan, Fotini Tsioles, Madison
Woods. High Honors: Mahdee
Abuelhawa, Taeya Adams,
Dominic Alunni, Mia Amendola,
Corey Barber, Ashley Blannard,
Morgan Boedecker, Corey Bohn,
James Bonoski, Derek Boos,
Paul Booth Jr, Kiana Bower,
Rayn Bozek, Ashlin Broody-
Walega, Alfred Bugayong, El-
izabeth Burkhardt, Dylan Caru-
so, Samera Chamberlain, Evan
Covert, Noah Cussatt, Jaymes
Davenport, Alexandria Davis,
James Decosmo, Allura Dixon,
Haley Dow, Rosemarie Egbert,
Brian Everhart, Andrew Faul,
Emily Frace, Donovan Gaffney,
Matthew Gallagher, Matthew
Gist, Samantha Good, Jake
Gurtis, Alexis Haines, Areej
Hamad, Nicole Hartzel, Alex-
andra Hoffman, Joseph Hogan,
Shakuan Hudgins, Beverly Isbel,
Alex Jaskulski, Mercedes Jas-
terzenski, Patrick Johnson,
Derek Kamus, Caroline Keeler,
Natalie Kerrigan, Noah King,
Morgan Klosko, Jacob Kobusky,
Julia Kobusky, Zachary Ko-
busky, Alison Kraynak, Colin
Kultys, Edward Kupstas, Ga-
brielle Labar, Olivia Langley,
Rey Laureano, Ivelise Leachey,
Sara Lecce, Benjamin Lewis,
Tessa Liskosky, Kailee Lyons,
Jacob Malia, Tia Margiewicz,
Anna Markoch, Bernice May,
Brandon Mcdaniels, Sadiq
Mcduffie, Nicole Mcnelis, Tiffany
Michalek, Sean Mikovitch, Britt-
ny Mikulka, Joshua Miller, Ale-
nys Morales, Whitney Morris,
Kayleigh Moser, Joshua Moses,
Jacinda Muckey, Aydia Najib,
Joscelyn Noss, Gage Nudo,
Jacob Packer, Joshua Payne,
Raissa Pivarnik, Kiersten Po-
lachek, Alexa Povilitus, Vedant
Prasad, Ryan Price, Derek
Ptashinski, Grace Ramsey,
Desiree Reiss, Raven Rickard,
Katlyn Rincavage, Leah Roma-
nowski, Zac Rosencrans, Ellie
Rosentel, Jacob Saporito,
Samantha Savage, Brandon
Shaw, Allie Shulskie, Beth Sims,
Jason Singer, Lauren Sivak,
Connor Smith, Natalie Smith,
Alek Sokoloski, Morgan Soko-
loski, Brandon Steidinger, Dako-
tah Stoshick, Michael Stuart,
Irelynd Sullivan, Miranda Sur-
del, Cassidy Taylor, Cavan
Temple, Katrina Thomas, Za-
chary Thomas, Kasandra Travis,
Tea Tyszko, Elizabeth Varner,
Tyler Vitale, Madysen Wallace,
Dylan Weaver, Zachery Whibley,
Gerald Wiernusz, Layla Wil-
liams, Colton Winters, Alexis
Wychock, Haily Yakimowicz,
Eric Yanalis, John Zardecki,
Joshua Zawatski. Honors:
Cortes Adams, Patrick Adam-
ski, Alyanna Arroyo, Tiblets
Berhe, Jared Bittle, Jake Blaski,
Shawna Bower, Brandon Bow-
man, Angela Boyd, Francis
Brandt, Emily Brunn, Jasmine
Cardona, Michelle Carpio,
Corwyn Chaban, Dale Chap-
man, Trenton Coleman, Abriele
Dileo, Brandon Donnelly, Derek
Doreskewicz, Hunter Dragon,
Robert Dwyer, William Elko,
Matthew Emel, Bayley Forgues,
Jacob Gillman, Grace Giza, Jus-
tine Harvey, Jonathan Heather-
man, Essence Hickson, Mildred
Horace, Quamere Howard, Dylan
Jockel, Bo Johnson, Casey
Joyce, Zoe Kanellis, Gillian Kas-
ko, Patrick Kasson Jr, Michael
Kindler, Matthew Kochinski,
Brandon Koval, Maxim Kowalski,
Jolene Krzywicki, Joshua Lewis,
Kyle Littman, Mark Mahalick,
Jacob Mcdonnell, Ryan Mcgee,
Tiffany Monahan, Clayton Moore,
Bailey Morris, Ethan Natishan,
Isis Nelson, Fawn Nulton, Qianyi
Ou, Julie Patton, Jeannie Pham,
Lauren Piercy, Joseph Pisack,
Emily Pocono, Justin Radginski,
Haylee Rodrigues, Imani Rojas,
Molly Roper, Dezarae Sabecky,
Kayla Sawicki, Nicholas Schap-
pert, Alyssa Schweiss, Zachary
Sharpe, Austin Sienkiewicz,
Brianna Sims, Michael Sims,
Megan Smith, Alexandra So-
bieski, Madison Sokoloski, Lan-
don Stanislow, Christian Swart-
wood, Erica Thomas, Prodius
Townes, Kameron Trimmer,
Brittney Washko, Dillon Wilbur,
Michael Williams, Zachary Wil-
liams, Sierra Wren, Emily Yuhas,
Mark Zimmerman, Matthew
Zimmerman.
HONOR ROLL
Continued from Page 7B
The Dallas Lions Club recently
presented Lion Pat Burke with a
Certificate of Appreciation for
his 30 years of service as a
member of the club. During that
time he served as secretary in
1998, treasurer in 1999 and presi-
dent in 2000. Burke is the owner
of Chuck Robbins Sporting
Goods in Wilkes-Barre. He and
his wife, Molly, reside in Dallas.
At the presentation of the certif-
icate, from left, are Lions Presi-
dent Dan Corbett and Burke.
Dallas Lions honor club
member for service
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 9B
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C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Center at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital
Ripka, Dennelle L. and John E.
Ripka Jr., Glen Lyon, a son,
March 27.
Sickler, Cyndee and David, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, March 27.
Pantaline, Christina, Nanticoke, a
daughter, March 27.
Campbell, Danielle and Samuel
Avila, Wilkes-Barre, a son, March
27.
Devlin, Kelly and Daniel, Mountain
Top, a son, March 27.
Grochal, Tammy and Matthew
Mattioli, Exeter, a daughter,
March 27.
Jablonowski, Sara and Lionel
Valentin, Wilkes-Barre, a daugh-
ter, March 28.
Bowers, Kimberly and Joseph,
Hunlock Creek, a daughter,
March 29.
Schuckers, Jennifer and Jeff,
Jenkins Township, a daughter,
March 29.
Becker, Carissa and John, Moun-
tain Top, a son, March 30.
Nagessar, Priscilla and Aaron
Bangaroo, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, March 31.
Lee, Zena and Chris Lockavich,
Luzerne, a daughter, March 31.
BIRTHS
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
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The road to Russia can be pretty expen-
sive.
And to get there in time for the 2014
Paralympics, Stephanie Jallen can’t just
depend on her astounding athletic
ability.
She’s counting on the community.
So when Jallen lost count of the long
line of people who stopped by to sup-
port her during a Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton Penguins game Friday night, it
made her feel fortunate to find such
warmth in an icy place.
“I didn’t think there were going to be
that many people,” Jallen said after
signing autographs on the concourse of
Mohegan Sun Arena. “I was absolutely
shocked when I saw this many.”
Apparently, Penguins fans want to
see Jallen reach her dreams.
They came out on Stephanie Jallen
Appreciation Night to wish her well
between periods of Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton’s stirring hockey victory over
Hershey, but Jallen’s performances in
another winter sport seem to thrill area
sports fans just as much.
The Harding native was born with
CHILD’s Syndrome, which forced the
amputation of her left leg and bur-
dened her with an underdeveloped left
arm that tapers down to a stump.
But her prowess on the ski slopes
even stumps able-bodied competitors.
Jallen not only became a national
championship skier before she turned
16 in February, the daughter of Deb
and Mike Jallen was named to the
United States ski team that’s heading
for the 2014 Paralympics in Sochi,
Russia.
“She’s quite a kid,” said Mike Rosto,
a long-time supporter of Jallen’s who
helped organize Friday’s fundraiser
with the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pen-
guins.
But Jallen has quite a task in front of
her.
Right now, she’s on the U.S. “B”
team, trying to move up to the “A”
team. To get there, Jallen expects to
compete in anywhere from16 to 25
races worldwide over the next two
years in an attempt to accumulate
points and move up in national stature.
But those travel costs add up quickly.
Jallen’s trip to represent our nation in
two years could become a bank-breaker,
costing in the neighborhood of $40,000
each year, Deb Jallen said.
“The Paralympics doesn’t have the
(financial) backing like the able-bodied
team,” Rosto said. “It’s very minimal
funding that we get. Everybody thinks
because she’s on the (U.S.) team, every-
thing’s cared for. But it’s not.”
That’s why night’s like Friday at
Mohegan Sun Arena can make Jallen’s
quest much brighter.
The Penguins donated a portion of
the proceeds from each ticket sale to
the Stephanie Jallen Paralympic Fund
(SJPF), Inc., which was set up not only
to help Jallen reach Russia but to help
other physically-challenged children
and adults live more productive lives.
Other scheduled fundraisers for
Jallen this year include the “Friends of
Stephanie” 5K run/walk in Hazleton
on April 21, and the Big Bike Run at St.
Barbara Parrish (formerly St. Antho-
ny’s), right outside where Jallen at-
tends classes at Wyoming Area High
School.
“Every little bit helps,” Stephanie
Jallen said. “Everything we do (with
fundraisers) goes to the SJPF, Inc. for
travel costs, equipment costs, lodging,
food. It’s absolutely necessary.
“Ski racing and traveling is very
expensive.”
Thanks to nights such as the one she
shared with the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins, her planned run to Paralym-
pic glory is getting a little less steep.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
To Russia with
love and help
from others
WILKES-BARRE TWP. – There are
several possible reasons why Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins goaltender
Scott Munroe has dominated the Con-
necticut Whale this season.
Could it be that Connecticut’s style of
putting a lot of pucks on net suits Mun-
roe?
“It’s nice to have that work some-
times. I really get in a groove,” he said.
Is it because Munroe knows Connec-
ticut inside and out?
“You do kind of learn some tenden-
cies and have a little bit of an idea what
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins’ Brandon DeFazio, No. 24, takes the puck
past Connecticut Whale defensiveman Wade Redden during an AHL game
Saturday night at Mohegan Sun Arena. The Penguins won the game 3-0.
A H L
Another whale of a game
for WBS goalie Munroe
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
3
PENGUINS
0
WHALE
See PENS, Page 9C
of the tournament, to
take a one-shot lead
into the final round.
“I’m standing in the
middle of the fairway
and I feel him breath-
ing down my neck a
little bit,” Hanson
said.
He followed with an approach into 2
feet for birdie, a 15-foot putt from the
fringe on the 15th, a 30-foot birdie putt
over the ridge on the 17th and one last
birdie at the 18th with a shot that stop-
ped inside 3 feet from the cup.
What a finish —and it’s all just begin-
AUGUSTA, Ga. — Phil Mickelson
raised the putter in his right hand and
slammeddownhis left fist tocelebrate a
20-foot eagle putt that shook Augusta
National with the loudest roar on a day
filled with them.
Peter Hanson knew what was going
on behind him without looking Satur-
day. He also knew exactly what he had
to do.
The 34-year-oldSwede, playing inon-
ly his second Masters, answered by
making four birdies over the last five
holes for a 7-under 65, the lowest score
ning.
The advantage going into Sunday be-
longs to Mickelson, a three-time Mas-
ters champion who thrilled the sun-
baked crowd with some magical shots.
Mickelson shot 30 on the back nine, in-
cluding a birdie on the par-5 15th when
he played a full flop shot with a 64-de-
gree wedge —no one eventhinks about
hitting a shot like that — to 4 feet.
He woundupwitha 66 andwas inthe
final group at the Masters for the fourth
time in the last nine years. Mickelson
won the last three times he was in that
T H E M A S T E R S
Hanson parked in lead
Swede up 1 stroke after 7-under 65
AP PHOTO
Peter Hanson, of Sweden, waves after his birdie on the eighth green during the third round of the Masters Saturday in
Augusta, Ga.
Rally has Mickelson looming in second
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
See MASTERS, Page 9C
Mickelson
SYRACUSE – It hasn’t been a good
start of the season for the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre Yankees as they were
shut out for the second time in three
games on Saturday afternoon.
Starter Yunesky Maya and reliever
Austin Bibens-Dirkx combined to
scatter six hits as Syracuse defeated
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 4-0.
Syracuse improved to 1-2, while the
Yankees dropped to
0-3. They were also
shut out in their
opener of the season
in Allentown on
Thursday.
Maya, who has
made spot starts with
the parent Washing-
ton Nationals, struck
out four and allowed
for hits in six innings
of work. Bibens-
Dirkx pitched three
scoreless innings to
pick up the save.
The Yankees’ best
threats to score came
in the third and
eighth innings.
Doug Bernier and Chris Dickerson
opened the third with infield singles.
Francisco Cervelli , though, grounded
into a double play and Steve Pearce
flew out to end the inning.
In the eighth, Bernier singled to left
with one out and Dickerson followed
with a walk. But Cervelli and Pearce
failedagain. Cervelli struckout swing-
ing and Pearce grounded into a fiel-
der’s choice.
SWB had just one baserunner be-
tween the two threats when Colin
Curtis singled with two outs in the
seventh.
Syracuse got a runinthe first inning
on Tyler Moore’s RBI single to left.
The Chiefs increased their lead to
3-0 in the third on run-scoring singles
by Carlos Maldonado and Mark Tea-
hen. They tacked on their final run in
the fourth when Seth Bynum led off
the inning with a homer to left.
SWB starter Manny Banuelos last-
ed just 31/3 innings. He gave up all 11
hits and four runs.
Righty D.J. Mitchell will be on the
mound today for the Yankees. He’ll be
matched against lefty John Lannan, a
S W B YA N K E E S
Yankees’
offensive
struggles
continue
SWB Yanks are shut out for the
second time in three games,
falling to Syracuse.
The Times Leader staff
4
CHIEFS
0
YANKEES
See YANKEES, Page 9C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com

BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories and
update them promptly. Sports
corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the sports department at
829-7143.
➛ S P O R T S
MEETINGS
County Line Girls Softball League
will have a scheduling meeting 6
p.m. Wednesday at the Dupont
Boro Building. Softball team
coaches from ponyball to 17U are
asked to attend. For more in-
formation, call Bob Cappelloni at
881-8744.
Hollenback Thursday Night Wom-
en’s Golf League will hold an
organizational meeting 5:30 p.m.
Thursday at the clubhouse. First
day of play is April 19. New mem-
bers are being accepted. If there
are any questions contact Donna
Zapotek at 570-696-0424.
Luzerne County Federation of
Sportsmen will meet 7:30 p.m.
Monday at American Legion Post
609, on the corner of Lee Park
Ave. and St. Mary’s Rd. Club dele-
gates are urged to attend and
interested sportsmen are cordially
invited.
Monday Night Golf League of the
North End Slovak Citizens Club
will hold a team selection meeting
at 7 p.m. Monday in the club’s
meeting hall. All league members
are asked to attend. League play
will begin on Monday, April 16, at 4
p.m. at the Hollenback Country
Club. Contact Rick at 817-3999 for
more information.
Wyoming Area Diamond Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
Room129 at the Secondary Center.
All parents of players grades 7-12
are encouraged to attend.
Wyoming Valley West Baseball
Booster Club will meet 7 p.m.
Monday at Murphy’s Pub in
Swoyersville.
REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS
Beginner to Intermediate Field
Hockey Players may sign up for
the upcoming season beginning
April 15 to May 20. There will be a
total of six training/game play
sessions every Sunday from 3:30-
5:30 p.m. Gear and sticks will be
available for sale for those who
have never played. To register,
visit www.kapowfh.com and print/
complete/mail the Youth Spring
Training Flier on the homepage.
Plains Yankees Football & Cheer-
leading Organization will hold
registration 6-8 p.m. Wednesday
at the Plains American Legion, 101
E. Carey Street, Plains. Cost is $60
for one child or $75 per family.
Please bring a recent picture of
your child along with a copy of
their birth certificate.
West Side United Soccer Club is
having sign-ups at Dick’s Sporting
Goods at the Arena Hub Plaza on
Saturday, April 14 from 2-4 p.m.
Fee is $20 per player for all ages
3-17. Plus $50 to cover cost of 10
raffle tickets per family. Selling the
raffle tickets earns you your $50
back. Uniforms are $20 for those
who need them. New players
required to provide proof of age.
For more info visit our website
www.wsusc.org or phone Matthew
Detwiler at 779-7785.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Dallas High School Softball Clinic
will be held on 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday,
April 15, for girls ages 7-13 at the
Back Mountain Little League Field.
In case of rain, the clinic will be
held at the Dallas Middle School.
For more information please call
Bill Kern, 498-5991 or email dal-
lashighsoftball@gmail.com.
Soccer Referee Course (entry level
grade 8), will be taking place April
20-22 in the Plymouth Borough
building. The course involves 18
hours of classroom and field work.
It will be held Friday from 6:30-
9:30 p.m.; Saturday from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m.; Sunday from10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Cost is $100. Students must
be at least 14 years old by the last
day of class. The course is limited
to the first 30 students. For more
information, go to http://www.ep-
sarc.org, or contact Matthew
Detwiler at 779-7785 or Presi-
dent@WSUSC.org.
Central Pennsylvania Conservancy
and the Susquehanna Appa-
lachian Trail Club will be hosting
the Ironmaster’s Challenge, a 5K,
15K, 30K and 50K trail hike and
run on Saturday, May 5. There will
be four checkpoints providing
snacks, water, energy beverages
and first aid. Participants in the
50K and marathon may begin
check-in at 5:30 a.m. by picking up
packets at the Furnace Stack
Pavilion at Pine Grove Furnace
State Park. For more information,
call 717-241-4368.
SPCA of Luzerne County Annual
Golf Tournament Fundraiser will
be held on Friday May 25, at the
Sand Springs Country Club in
Drums. Registration is $100 per
golfer and includes, lunch, golf,
cocktails, dinner and prizes. For
more information, visit http://
www.spcaluzernecounty.org/
golf.html.
Modrovsky Park Charity Wiffle Ball
Tournament will be held May 6 at
noon at Modrovsky Park. The
tournament follows a pool play
format with all teams playing at
least three games (12 teams and
four fields). Cost is $5 per player.
The tournament is benefiting the
MS Society. To sign up, visit
www.leaguelineup.com/modrov-
skypark and click “Team Sign-Up”.
Ice Rink at Coal Street special
holiday public skating session
1-2:30 p.m. Monday, Admission for
the holiday skate will be free, while
skate rentals will be available for
patrons for $3..
Jenkins Twp Little League annual
golf tournament Saturday, May 12.
Registration is $75 per person and
$300 per team. Registration fee
includes green fee, cart fee, unlim-
ited driving range, hog dog and
refreshments at the turn, Italian
buffet dinner menu and a hole-in-
one prize on all par 3s. For more
information, go to www.jenkinstw-
plittleleague.com.
Misericordia University Athletics
Department 22nd Annual Arnie
Garinger Memorial Golf Tourna-
ment on Monday, May 21, at Blue
Ridge Golf Club in Mountain Top.
Entry fee is $100 for the captain-
and-crew event, and includes golf,
dinner and prizes. Registration
begins at 10 a.m. with an 11 a.m.
shotgun start. The field is limited
to 120 players. Call 674-6374 for
more information.
Toby FCU Ninth Annual Golf Tour-
nament taking place on Monday,
June 11, at Blue Ridge Trail Golf
Club located in Mountain Top. . The
four-flight captain-and-crew for-
mat. All golfers will receive free
gifts and a buffet dinner at the
end of the tournament. All pro-
ceeds will benefit the Make-A-Wish
Foundation and The Fisher House.
The tournament cost is $90 per
person which includes green fees,
cart, gifts, and dinner. Make your
reservations by May 21 for the
early registration discount. For
more information, contact Nina
Waskevich, Chairperson, at 1-866-
TobyFCU ext.109, or visit www.to-
byhannafcu.org.
JCC Milton Brown Memorial Golf
Tournament will be held on Mon-
day, June 11, at 1 p.m. Shotgun start.
The cost is $125 per golfer and this
includes greens fees, cart, and
dinner. Proceeds for this tourna-
ment go towards scholarships for
children to attend the JCC Day
and Autistic Summer Camps. If
you would like to play in this year’s
tournament, please contact Bill
Buzza at 824-4646, ext. 232.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
Girls basketball
Geena Palermo of Berwick was
not included in the list provided
for the Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence Division II All-Stars publish-
ed recently.
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive
Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
We’re Open
27 Holes One Breathtaking Course
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L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
This Week's Events
MONDAY, APR. 9
H.S. BASEBALL
Hazleton Area at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Berwick, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
North Pocono at Hanover Area, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at GAR, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. SOFTBALL
Crestwood at Nanticoke, 4:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Coughlin, 4:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Berwick, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
COLLEGE BASEBALL
King’s at DeSales, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at Dickinson, 4 p.m.
TUESDAY, APR. 10
H.S. BASEBALL
GAR at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m.
Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Northwest, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Coughlin at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. SOFTBALL
GAR at Hanover Area, 4:15 p.m.
Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Northwest, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. BOYS TENNIS
Berwick at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Coughlin at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m.
Crestwood at Wyoming Seminary, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Area, 4:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at MMI Prep, 4 p.m.
Meyers at Tunkhannock, 4 p.m.
H.S TRACK AND FIELD
Berwick at Tunkhannock, 4:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Pittston Area, 4:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Hazleton Area, 4:15 p.m.
H.S. BOYS VOLLEYBALL
Coughlin at Delaware Valley
North Pocono at Wyoming Valley West
H.S. BOYS LACROSSE
Delaware Valley at Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS LACROSSE
Dallas at Tunkhannock, 5 p.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
PSU-Berks at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
Susquehanna at King’s, 4 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF
King’s vs. Scranton, Huntsville CC, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
King’s at Drew, 3 p.m.
COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at Scranton, 5 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Noon
BTN — Minnesota at Ohio State
3 p.m.
BTN — Michigan State at Michigan
CYCLING
9 a.m.
NBCSN — Paris-Roubaix, Saint-Quentin to Rou-
baix, France
GOLF
2 p.m.
CBS—Masters Tournament, final round, at Augus-
ta, Ga.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
SNY — Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
1:30 p.m.
ROOT, WQMY — Philadelphia at Pittsburgh
YES — N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay
2:10 p.m.
WGN — Washington at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN — Chicago White Sox at Texas
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, at Doha, Qatar (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
SPEED —MotoGP World Championship, at Doha,
Qatar
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ABC — Chicago at New York
6 p.m.
CSN — Philadelphia at Boston
YES — Cleveland at New Jersey
SOCCER
3:25 p.m.
ESPN2 — Spanish Primera Division, Valencia at
Real Madrid
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — WTA, Family Circle Cup, championship
match, at Charleston, S.C.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGOWHITESOX—Signed RHPKip Wells to
a minor league contract.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS—Selected the contract of Rodri-
go Lopez Iowa (PCL). Sent INF Luis Valbuena out-
right to Iowa.
NEWYORKMETS—Agreed to terms with RHPJo-
nathon Niese on a five-year contract. Recalled OF
Kirk Nieuwenhuis from Buffalo (IL).
American League
HAMILTONBULLDOGS—Signed GBrandon Max-
well.
Eastern League
ALTOONACURVE—Announced RHPKris Harvey
was added to the roster fromextended spring train-
ing.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
OAKLANDRAIDERS—SignedDEDaveTollefson.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Agreed to terms with
G Ray Emery on a one-year contract extension.
WASHINGTONCAPITALS—Recalled GDany Sa-
bourin from Hershey (AHL).
ECHL
ECHL—Suspended Idaho’s Matt Case three
games and fined him an undisclosed amount for an
illegal check to the head of an opponent during an
April 6 game at Ontario. Suspended Ontario’s Benn
Olson one game and fined him an undisclosed
amount for beings assessedafightingmajor. Fined
Ontario’s Geoff IrwinandJ.D. Watt andIdaho’s Kory
Scoran undisclosed amounts as a result of their ac-
tions at the conclusion of the April 6 game. Fined
Elmira’s Dustin Gazley and Corey Cowick undis-
closed amounts as a result of their actions an April 6
game against Reading.
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS—Signed G Rob
Madore.
COLLEGE
FRESNO STATE—Named Raegan Pebley wom-
en’s basketball coach.
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
TIGERS -$105 Red Sox
INDIANS -$118 Blue Jays
ORIOLES -$120 Twins
RAYS -$118 Yankees
ANGELS -$170 Royals
RANGERS -$185 White Sox
National League
METS -$108 Braves
REDS -$130 Marlins
Phillies -$125 PIRATES
Rockies -$128 ASTROS
BREWERS -$110 Cards
Nationals -$130 CUBS
PADRES -$120 Dodgers
Giants -$115 D’BACKS
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Bulls 2.5 KNICKS
NETS 7.5 Cavaliers
CELTICS 4 76ers
HEAT 12.5 Pistons
THUNDER 13 Raptors
SPURS 10 Jazz
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By Roxy Roxborough
BOXING REPORT: In the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las
Vegas, Nevada, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is -$700 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$500.
G O L F
The Masters
At Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, Ga.
Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72
Third Round
(a-amateur)
Peter Hanson........................... 68-74-65—207 -7
Phil Mickelson.......................... 74-68-66—208 -6
Louis Oosthuizen .................... 68-72-69—209 -5
Bubba Watson.......................... 69-71-70—210 -4
Matt Kuchar .............................. 71-70-70—211 -3
Padraig Harrington.................. 71-73-68—212 -2
Hunter Mahan .......................... 72-72-68—212 -2
Henrik Stenson........................ 71-71-70—212 -2
Lee Westwood......................... 67-73-72—212 -2
Paul Lawrie............................... 69-72-72—213 -1
Fred Couples ........................... 72-67-75—214 E
Ben Crane ................................ 69-73-72—214 E
Jason Dufner............................ 69-70-75—214 E
Sean O’Hair.............................. 73-70-71—214 E
Fredrik Jacobson..................... 76-68-70—214 E
Francesco Molinari .................. 69-75-70—214 E
Ian Poulter ................................ 72-72-70—214 E
Nick Watney ............................. 71-71-72—214 E
Sang-Moon Bae....................... 75-71-69—215 +1
Jonthan Byrd............................ 72-71-72—215 +1
Jim Furyk.................................. 70-73-72—215 +1
Sergio Garcia........................... 72-68-75—215 +1
Brandt Snedeker...................... 72-75-68—215 +1
Charles Howell III .................... 72-70-74—216 +2
Justin Rose .............................. 72-72-72—216 +2
Webb Simpson ........................ 72-74-70—216 +2
Miguel Angel Jimenez ............ 69-72-76—217 +3
a-Hideki Matsuyama................ 71-74-72—217 +3
Rory McIlroy............................. 71-69-77—217 +3
Geoff Oglilvy ............................ 74-72-71—217 +3
Scott Stallings.......................... 70-77-70—217 +3
Kevin Chappell ........................ 71-76-71—218 +4
Graeme McDowell .................. 75-72-71—218 +4
Kevin Na................................... 71-75-72—218 +4
Adam Scott ............................... 75-70-73—218 +4
Vijay Singh................................ 70-72-76—218 +4
Y.E. Yang.................................. 73-70-75—218 +4
Aaron Baddeley ....................... 71-71-77—219 +5
Zach Johnson .......................... 70-74-75—219 +5
Tiger Woods............................. 72-75-72—219 +5
Angel Cabrera.......................... 71-78-71—220 +6
Rickie Fowler ........................... 74-74-72—220 +6
Steve Stricker .......................... 71-77-72—220 +6
Anders Hansen........................ 76-72-73—221 +7
David Toms.............................. 73-73-75—221 +7
Keegan Bradley ....................... 71-77-73—221 +7
Ross Fisher .............................. 71-77-73—221 +7
Bill Haas.................................... 72-74-76—222 +8
Martin Kaymer.......................... 72-75-75—222 +8
Martin Laird .............................. 76-72-74—222 +8
Charl Schwartzel ..................... 72-75-75—222 +8
Thomas Bjorn .......................... 73-76-74—223 +9
a-Patrick Cantlay...................... 71-78-74—223 +9
Luke Donald............................. 75-73-75—223 +9
Bo Van Pelt............................... 73-75-75—223 +9
Scott Verplank.......................... 73-75-75—223 +9
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano 74-75—76—225+11
Trevor Immelman .................... 78-71-76—225+11
Robert Karlsson....................... 74-74-77—225+11
Edoardo Molinari ..................... 75-74-76—225+11
a-Kelly Kraft.............................. 74-75-77—226+12
Stewart Cink............................. 71-75-81—227+13
Gary Woodland........................ 73-70-85—WD
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-N.Y. Rangers........... 82 51 24 7 109 226 187
x-Pittsburgh ................ 82 51 25 6 108 282 221
x-Philadelphia............. 82 47 26 9 103 264 232
x-New Jersey.............. 82 48 28 6 102 228 209
N.Y. Islanders............. 82 34 37 11 79 203 255
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Boston...................... 82 49 29 4 102 269 202
x-Ottawa ...................... 82 41 31 10 92 249 240
Buffalo ......................... 82 39 32 11 89 218 230
Toronto........................ 82 35 37 10 80 231 264
Montreal ...................... 82 31 35 16 78 212 226
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Florida....................... 82 38 26 18 94 203 227
x-Washington.............. 82 42 32 8 92 222 230
Tampa Bay................... 82 38 36 8 84 235 281
Winnipeg...................... 82 37 35 10 84 225 246
Carolina ....................... 82 33 33 16 82 213 243
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-St. Louis................... 81 48 22 11 107 207 163
x-Detroit....................... 82 48 28 6 102 248 203
x-Nashville .................. 81 47 26 8 102 231 209
x-Chicago.................... 82 45 26 11 101 248 238
Columbus.................... 82 29 46 7 65 202 262
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver................ 81 50 22 9 109 246 198
Calgary........................ 82 37 29 16 90 202 226
Colorado...................... 81 41 34 6 88 207 214
Minnesota ................... 81 35 35 11 81 176 222
Edmonton.................... 81 32 39 10 74 212 236
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Phoenix .................... 81 41 27 13 95 212 203
x-Los Angeles............. 81 40 27 14 94 192 176
x-San Jose................... 81 42 29 10 94 225 208
Dallas ........................... 81 42 34 5 89 209 219
Anaheim ...................... 82 34 36 12 80 204 231
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Phoenix 4, St. Louis 1
Saturday's Games
Chicago 3, Detroit 2, SO
Boston 4, Buffalo 3, SO
New Jersey 4, Ottawa 2
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 2
Calgary 5, Anaheim 2
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 1
Montreal 4, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 4, Winnipeg 3, OT
Columbus 7, N.Y. Islanders 3
Florida 4, Carolina 1
Phoenix at Minnesota, late
St. Louis at Dallas, late
Nashville at Colorado, late
Edmonton at Vancouver, late
Los Angeles at San Jose, late
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
y-St. John’s........... 72 41 23 5 3 90 230 205
Manchester ........... 72 36 31 2 3 77 192 197
Portland ................. 73 34 30 4 5 77 213 246
Providence............ 73 34 32 3 4 75 187 204
Worcester.............. 72 29 31 4 8 70 189 209
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
y-Norfolk ............... 73 52 18 1 2 107 261 175
x-Penguins.......... 73 43 23 2 5 93 229 207
x-Hershey ............. 72 38 22 4 8 88 237 210
Syracuse............... 73 35 28 5 5 80 233 227
Binghamton .......... 74 28 40 4 2 62 196 239
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Bridgeport .......... 73 39 25 3 6 87 224 213
Connecticut........... 72 35 25 7 5 82 203 199
Adirondack............ 72 36 32 2 2 76 195 203
Springfield............. 73 34 33 3 3 74 207 224
Albany.................... 73 30 32 6 5 71 184 217
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Chicago................. 71 39 26 3 3 84 196 179
Peoria .................... 73 39 30 2 2 82 212 193
Charlotte................ 71 35 27 3 6 79 193 196
Milwaukee ............. 70 36 28 2 4 78 195 180
Rockford................ 73 34 31 2 6 76 202 220
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
y-Toronto............... 73 43 23 4 3 93 210 166
Lake Erie............... 74 36 28 3 7 82 183 205
Rochester.............. 72 33 26 9 4 79 209 212
Grand Rapids........ 72 32 29 7 4 75 231 230
Hamilton ................ 72 32 33 2 5 71 173 214
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
y-Oklahoma City .. 72 43 20 4 5 95 206 169
Abbotsford ............ 73 39 26 3 5 86 184 195
San Antonio .......... 71 38 28 3 2 81 184 192
Houston................. 71 32 24 5 10 79 189 196
Texas..................... 72 30 38 2 2 64 213 238
x-Clinched Playoff Berth
y-Clinched Divisional Title
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Saturday's Games
Abbotsford 2, Charlotte 1
Toronto 3, Grand Rapids 2, OT
Springfield 6, St. John’s 3
Portland 5, Worcester 4, SO
Syracuse 3, Hershey 2, SO
Rochester 3, Hamilton 1
Providence 4, Bridgeport 2
Adirondack 5, Albany 3
Penguins 3, Connecticut 0
Norfolk 4, Binghamton 1
Lake Erie 4, Rockford 3
Milwaukee at San Antonio, late
Chicago at Oklahoma City, late
Peoria at Houston, late
Today's Games
Springfield at St. John’s, 2:30 p.m.
Hamilton at Toronto, 3 p.m.
Abbotsford at Charlotte, 3 p.m.
Connecticut at Hershey, 5 p.m.
Rochester at Adirondack, 5 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Manchester at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Rockford, 8:05 p.m.
B A S E B A L L
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies).............. 3 1 .750 —
Buffalo (Mets) ............................. 2 1 .667
1
⁄2
Rochester (Twins)...................... 2 1 .667
1
⁄2
Pawtucket (Red Sox) ................. 2 2 .500 1
Syracuse (Nationals) ................. 1 2 .333 1
1
⁄2
Yankees...................................... 0 3 .000 2
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Charlotte (White Sox).............. 2 0 1.000 —
Durham (Rays) ......................... 2 1 .667
1
⁄2
Gwinnett (Braves) .................... 1 2 .333 1
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles)....................... 0 2 .000 2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians).................... 1 1 .500 —
Indianapolis (Pirates) ................. 1 1 .500 —
Louisville (Reds)......................... 1 1 .500 —
Toledo (Tigers) ........................... 1 1 .500 —
Saturday's Games
Syracuse 4, Yankees 0
Buffalo 4, Rochester 2
Pawtucket 4, Lehigh Valley 1, 1st game
Durham 6, Gwinnett 5
Charlotte 6, Norfolk 3, 1st game
Indianapolis 8, Toledo 6
Lehigh Valley 3, Pawtucket 2, 2nd game
Louisville at Columbus, late
Norfolk at Charlotte, late
Today's Games
Buffalo at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.
Louisville at Columbus, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Toledo, 5 p.m.
Yankees at Syracuse, 5 p.m.
Gwinnett at Durham, 5:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Yankees at Syracuse, 6 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Pawtucket, 6:15 p.m.
Louisville at Toledo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Columbus, 6:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Reading (Phillies)..................... 4 0 1.000 —
New Britain (Twins) ................. 3 1 .750 1
New Hampshire (Blue Jays) ... 2 1 .667 1
1
⁄2
Binghamton (Mets) .................. 1 2 .333 2
1
⁄2
Trenton (Yankees) ................... 1 2 .333 2
1
⁄2
Portland (Red Sox) .................. 0 4 .000 4
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Akron (Indians) ........................... 2 1 .667 —
Altoona (Pirates)......................... 2 1 .667 —
Harrisburg (Nationals) ............... 2 1 .667 —
Bowie (Orioles)........................... 1 2 .333 1
Erie (Tigers) ................................ 1 2 .333 1
Richmond (Giants) ..................... 1 3 .250 1
1
⁄2
Saturday's Games
Binghamton 2, Akron 1
Trenton 11, New Hampshire 2
Richmond 3, New Britain 1, 12 innings
Harrisburg 13, Bowie 3
Erie 12, Altoona 1
Reading 4, Portland 1
Today's Games
Harrisburg at Bowie, 2:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Akron at Altoona, 6:30 p.m.
New Hampshire at Reading, 6:35 p.m.
Portland at Trenton, 7:05 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston........................... 31 24 .564 —
Philadelphia ................. 29 25 .537 1
1
⁄2
New York...................... 28 27 .509 3
Toronto ......................... 20 36 .357 11
1
⁄2
New Jersey .................. 20 37 .351 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami ......................... 39 15 .722 —
Atlanta........................... 33 23 .589 7
Orlando ......................... 32 23 .582 7
1
⁄2
Washington.................. 12 44 .214 28
Charlotte....................... 7 46 .132 31
1
⁄2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago ..................... 43 13 .768 —
Indiana .......................... 34 22 .607 9
Milwaukee..................... 27 28 .491 15
1
⁄2
Detroit ........................... 21 34 .382 21
1
⁄2
Cleveland...................... 18 35 .340 23
1
⁄2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio ................... 39 14 .736 —
Memphis ........................ 31 23 .574 8
1
⁄2
Dallas.............................. 31 25 .554 9
1
⁄2
Houston.......................... 30 25 .545 10
New Orleans.................. 14 41 .255 26
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City.......... 40 15 .727 —
Denver .......................... 30 25 .545 10
Utah............................... 29 27 .518 11
1
⁄2
Portland......................... 27 29 .482 13
1
⁄2
Minnesota..................... 25 31 .446 15
1
⁄2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers ................... 35 21 .625 —
L.A. Clippers................. 33 22 .600 1
1
⁄2
Phoenix......................... 28 27 .509 6
1
⁄2
Golden State ................ 21 33 .389 13
Sacramento.................. 19 36 .345 15
1
⁄2
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Indiana 103, Oklahoma City 98
Atlanta 101, Detroit 96
Memphis 97, Miami 82
New Jersey 110, Washington 98
Cleveland 84, Toronto 80
Portland 99, Dallas 97, OT
San Antonio 128, New Orleans 103
Milwaukee 95, Charlotte 90
Denver 105, Phoenix 99
Utah 104, Golden State 98
Houston 112, L.A. Lakers 107
Saturday's Games
Boston 86, Indiana 72
Minnesota at New Orleans, late
Dallas at Memphis, late
Atlanta at Charlotte, late
Orlando at Philadelphia, late
Portland at Milwaukee, late
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, late
Denver at Golden State, late
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Chicago at New York, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Utah at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Houston at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10 p.m.
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting Kansas City............. 5 0 0 15 8 1
New York................................. 3 2 0 9 14 8
Houston................................... 2 1 0 6 2 2
Columbus................................ 2 2 0 6 4 6
New England .......................... 2 3 0 6 4 6
D.C........................................... 1 2 2 5 5 5
Chicago................................... 1 1 1 4 2 3
Montreal .................................. 1 4 1 4 5 12
Philadelphia............................ 0 3 1 1 2 6
Toronto FC.............................. 0 4 0 0 2 9
WESTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose.................................. 4 1 0 12 8 2
Real Salt Lake........................ 4 1 0 12 9 4
Colorado.................................. 3 1 0 9 7 5
Vancouver ............................... 2 1 2 8 4 3
Seattle...................................... 2 1 1 7 5 2
FC Dallas ................................ 2 2 1 7 6 8
Portland ................................... 1 2 1 4 6 6
Chivas USA ............................ 1 3 0 3 1 3
Los Angeles............................ 1 3 0 3 5 8
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday's Games
Real Salt Lake 1, Montreal 0
Thursday's Games
FC Dallas 1, New England 0
Saturday's Games
Montreal 2, Toronto FC1
New York 4, Columbus 1
Sporting Kansas City 1, Los Angeles 0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 1
D.C. United 0, Seattle FC 0, tie
Colorado at Real Salt Lake, late
Chivas USA at Portland, late
Saturday, April 14
Columbus at Philadelphia, 3:30 p.m.
D.C. United at New England, 4 p.m.
Colorado at Seattle FC, 4 p.m.
Chivas USA at Toronto FC, 4:30 p.m.
San Jose at New York, 7 p.m.
Montreal at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 15
Houston at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Premier League
England
GP W D L GF GA Pts
Manchester United........ 31 24 4 3 76 27 76
Manchester City............. 31 22 5 4 75 25 71
Tottenham...................... 32 17 8 7 56 36 59
Arsenal............................ 31 18 4 9 62 41 58
Chelsea........................... 32 16 8 8 55 37 56
Newcastle....................... 32 16 8 8 48 42 56
Everton ........................... 32 12 8 12 34 34 44
Liverpool ......................... 32 11 10 11 37 34 43
Sunderland..................... 32 11 9 12 42 37 42
Fulham............................ 32 11 9 12 42 42 42
Stoke............................... 32 11 8 13 31 44 41
Norwich........................... 32 10 10 12 44 51 40
West Bromwich Albion . 32 11 6 15 39 43 39
Swansea......................... 32 10 9 13 35 41 39
Aston Villa ...................... 31 7 13 11 34 43 34
Bolton.............................. 31 9 2 20 36 63 29
Queens Park Rangers.. 31 7 7 17 35 54 28
Blackburn ....................... 32 7 7 18 43 67 28
Wigan.............................. 32 6 10 16 30 57 28
Wolverhampton ............. 32 5 7 20 34 70 22
Saturday's Scores
Sunderland 0, Tottenham 0
Bolton 0, Fulham 3
Chelsea 2, Wigan 1
Liverpool 1, Aston Villa 1
Norwich 2, Everton 2
West Bromwich Albion 3, Blackburn 0
Stoke 2, Wolverhampton Wanderers 1
N C A A H O C K E Y
FROZEN FOUR
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Thursday, April 5
Semifinals
Ferris State 3, Union (NY) 1
Boston College 6, Minnesota 1
Saturday, April 7
Boston College 4, Ferris State 1
NCAA Hockey Champions
2012 — Boston College
2011 — Minnesota-Duluth
2010 — Boston College
2009 — Boston University
2008 — Boston College
2007 — Michigan State
2006 — Wisconsin
2005 — Denver
2004 — Denver
2003 — Minnesota
2002 — Minnesota
2001 — Boston College
2000 — North Dakota
1999 — Maine
1998 — Michigan
1997 — North Dakota
1996 — Michigan
1995 — Boston University
1994 — Lake Superior State
1993 — Maine
1992 — Lake Superior State
1991 — Northern Michigan
1990 — Wisconsin
1989 — Harvard
1988 — Lake Superior State
1987 — North Dakota
1986 — Michigan State
1985 — RPI
1984 — Bowling Green
1983 — Wisconsin
1982 — North Dakota
1981 — Wisconsin
1980 — North Dakota
1979 — Minnesota
1978 — Boston University
1977 — Wisconsin
1976 — Minnesota
1975 — Michigan Tech
1974 — Minnesota
1973 — Wisconsin
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
April 13
At Oberhausen, Germany, Felix Sturm vs. Sebas-
tian Zbik, 12, for Sturm’s WBA Super World middle-
weight title.
At Las Vegas (ESPN2), Michael Katsidis vs. Albert
Mensah, 10, junior welterweights.
April 14
At Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, Las Vegas
(HBO), Brandon Rios vs. Richard Abril, 12, for the
vacant WBA World lightweight title.
At Lima, Peru, Jose Alfredo Rodriguez vs. Alberto
Rossel, 12, for the interim WBA light flyweight title.
April 20
At Bell Centre, Montreal (ESPN2), Adonis Steven-
son vs. Noe Gonzalez, 12, super middleweights.
At Biloxi, Miss. (SHO), Jermain Taylor vs. Caleb
Truax, 10, middleweights;Erislandy Laravs. Ronald
Hearns, 10, junior middleweights.
April 21
At Schwerin, Germany, Karoly Balzsay vs. Dimitri
Sartison, 12, for Balzsay’s WBA World super mid-
dleweight title.
At the Don Haskins Center, El Paso, Texas (SHO),
Abner Mares vs. Eric Morel, 12, for the vacant WBC
super bantamweight title;Anselmo Moreno vs. Da-
vid De La Mora, 12, for Moreno’s WBA Super ban-
tamweight title.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3C
PENGUINS SUNDAY
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
March 30
at Conn.
W, 3-0
March 31
at Albany
W, 5-2
April 3
at Norfolk
L, 2-1
April 7
Connecticut
(n)
April 6
Hershey
W, 4-2
L AST F I VE GAMES
April 13
Binghamton
7:05 p.m.
April 14
Bridgeport
7:05 p.m.
April 15
at Bridgeport
3 p.m.
TBA
Playoffs
TBA
Playoffs
NEXT F I VE GAMES
Cal O’Reilly spent the first six years
of his pro career with the Nashville
Predators organization.
That stability came to an abrupt
halt this season, when O’Reilly was
traded by Nashville to Phoenix after
five games. Since then, O’Reilly has
played for three more teams – two
AHL and one more NHL (Pittsburgh),
and has worn a total of five different
jerseys this season.
While O’Reilly may not have enjoyed
the stability he had for much of his
career, this season certainly has given
him an opportunity to play with a ton
of great players.
And that has given O’Reilly an ad-
vantage when it came time to pick his
fantasy team.
FORWARD
Steven Stamkos (Tampa Bay), “He’s
an easy choice, just look at his goal
total.”
DEFENSEMAN
Shea Weber (Nashville), “He can do
it all – put up points, hit and fight.”
GOALTENDER
Pekka Rinne (Nashville), “He’s so
quick and agile. He’s big, skilled and
he can do it all as a goalie.”
POWER PLAY SPECIALIST
Erik Karlsson (Ottawa), “He’s having
a great year and putting up points
while quarterbacking that power
play.”
PENALTY KILL SPECIALIST
Pavel Datsyuk (Detroit), “He’s very
smart and really good with his stick.”
SHOOTOUT SPECIALIST
Pavel Datsyuk (Detroit), “He has
unbelievable moves.”
ENFORCER
Brian McGrattan (Nashville), “He’s a
very tough guy.”
AGITATOR/PEST
Matt Cooke (Pittsburgh), “Been
doing it effectively for a long time.”
HEAD COACH
Claude Noel (Manitoba-AHL), “I
played for him in Milwaukee during my
first pro season and I really liked him.”
ALL-TIME GREAT
Wayne Gretzky (Edmonton, Los
Angeles, N.Y. Rangers, St. Louis), “He’s
the best player that ever played. I
loved the way he played and he did
some unbelievable things.”
Fantasy GM
Last May, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins forwards Bryan Lerg and
Ben Street were both missing time
in the playoffs as they battled in-
juries.
It was a frustrating few weeks for
a pair that the Penguins were count-
ing on to provide an offensive punch
in the postseason.
“It was a very frustrating time,”
Lerg said. “There was nothing we
could do.”
Now, fully healthy and well on
their way toward playing a full sea-
son, Lerg and Street have been pro-
viding the offensive punch they
hoped to contribute in the 2011 play-
offs. Heading into this weekend,
Street leads the Penguins with 26
goals and 54 points, while Lerg is
second in both categories – 25 goals
and 49 points.
After injuries limited their postsea-
son, both players have come away
with an appreciation for what it’s like
to be healthy and contribute.
“There are guys in the room now,
like Carl Sneep who has had a tough
year and Keven Veilleux, who didn’t
even get a chance this season be-
cause of an injury,” Street said. “You
feel fortunate. It’s always a blessing
when you’re able to stay healthy.”
The Penguins are counting their
blessings that Lerg and Street have
been healthy and productive. Head
coach John Hynes said both players
were considered to be key compo-
nents of the team coming into the
season, and they’ve responded not
only with points, but by playing a
ton of minutes in all situations.
“They’re competitors. The tougher
the hockey gets, those guys have the
ability to thrive in pressure situa-
tions,” Hynes said. “That’s what
you’re seeing when they’ve pulled
away (in points). They can raise
their games.”
Both players are in their second
season with the Penguins and both
have already posted career highs in
goals and points.
But the consistency between the
two wasn’t present for the entire
season.
In October, Lerg got off to a hot
start and ended up with six goals
and 12 points for the month. Street
struggled, managing just two assists
during the span.
But in November, it was Street’s
turn to light the lamp when he regis-
tered six goals and 15 points. Mean-
while, Lerg managed only three goals
and six points.
“At the beginning of the year we
were taking turns,” Lerg said. “One
guy would get hot, the other would
slow down. It went back and forth a
bit.”
But since the start of 2012, both
players have been constant. Street
has 15 goals and 32 points after Jan.
1, while Lerg posted 12 goals and 25
points.
“Right now the team is playing
well and we’re both scoring at the
same time,” Lerg said. “We know we
have to be all-around players and
lead the way production-wise.”
And that goes back to the compet-
itive nature that Hynes mentioned.
When Lerg or Street struggle they
don’t quit, he said, and they look for
a way to get back on track.
“They’re mentally tough and they
want answers if things aren’t work-
ing,” Hynes said.
Street found himself looking for an
answer during a six-game stretch
from Dec. 27 to Jan. 7, when he
managed to post a single assist. He
admits to getting frustrated, but
rather than change things Street
stuck to playing a simple game and
doing the little things to help his
team win.
“Then, the points started to come
again,” Street said.
For players who are expected to
contribute points, Lerg said it’s im-
portant to remain intact mentally
during those times when the points
are hard to come by.
And those times will occur, he
said, pointing to his own 11-game
stretch without a goal that struck
earlier this season. .
“There’s 76 games and you’re not
going to score in all of them. You
have to stay in it mentally, stick to
the system and it eventually works
out,” Lerg said.
Despite the mental fortitude, Lerg
and Street both admit they put pres-
sure on themselves to produce offen-
sively. Street said the pressure isn’t
overbearing, but it does exist.
“If I come out of a game without
any points and we lost, I take re-
sponsibility for that,” he said. “It
may not be the end-all if we don’t
get a point and it’s more important
to play the right way. But I need to
be a guy that’s a difference maker,
and that’s where the pressure comes
from.”
Lerg equals out the pressure with
confidence, and that comes from
having a coach in Hynes who be-
lieves in him.
Lerg spent his first three pro sea-
sons with Edmonton, playing in
Springfield. He said the coach didn’t
have much faith in him, and as a
result he lost confidence.
With Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, Lerg
knows Hynes believes in him.
“That builds confidence and scor-
ing comes from that,” Lerg said.
“Coach Hynes has helped both of us
to play a physical game and not just
be perimeter players. He believes in
us and we are confident because of
it.”
Lerg, Street healthy this time around for postseason
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Bryan Lerg, left, and Ben Street, right, both missed time during last season’s playoffs. Both are healthy and ready for this year’s postseason.
JENNIFER WYCHOCK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Providing playoff punch
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
“Right now the team is playing well and we’re both scoring
at the same time. We know we have to be all-around players
and lead the way production-wise.”
Bryan Lerg
WBS Penguins forward
Player Team G A Pts
Chris Bourque Hershey 26 65 91
Cory Conacher Norfolk 34 39 73
Patrick Maroon Syra. 32 41 73
Keith Aucoin Hershey 11 59 70
T.J. Hensick Peoria 21 48 69
Tyler Johnson Norfolk 30 36 66
Travis Morin Texas 12 52 64
Trevor Smith Norfolk 23 40 63
Martin St. Pierre Spring. 11 52 63
Ryan Potulny Hershey 31 31 62
Kris Newbury Conn. 24 37 61
Mike Zigomanis Toronto 19 42 61
Peter Holland Syra. 23 37 60
Ady-Mrchsslt Conn. 23 37 60
Mark Barberio Norfolk 13 47 60
Gustav Nyquist GR 22 36 58
Brett Sterling Portland 28 29 57
Jon DiSalvatore Houston 26 31 57
Jon Matsumoto SA 21 36 57
Jamie Johnson GR 20 37 57
Leading Scorers
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SC/N lc |ecrn mcre
cLcul Meric|e’:
CenterFo|ntI
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c: c cclc cenler
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Wycming Vc||ey
- 108,000 SF {expcnccL|e)
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ES ESFF FF ff ll lli FF FF
400-450 CenterFo|nt 8ou|evord
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Jenk|ns Iownsh|p
/L c l
1110 Honover Street
Honover Industr|o| Estotes, Sugor Notch 8orough
320-330 Stewort kood
Honover Industr|o| Estotes, Honover Iownsh|p
ó 844 S S f i
240-258 Armstrong kood
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Jenk|ns Iownsh|p
ó1 Green Mounto|n kood
Humbo|dt Industr|o| Fork, Eost bn|on Iownsh|p
- 10,04ó SF lc 104,870 SF
- 30´ lc 33´ó" cei|ing:
- 17 |cccing cccr:, 1 crive-in
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- ºº,200 SF lc 1º8,400 SF
- 33´ lc 3ó´7" cei|ing:
- 2ó |cccing cccr:, 1 crive-in
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47ó
- Fermillec & cpprcvec
- /|| uli|ilie:
- Grecl |ccclicnl
óó0 8o|t|more Dr|ve
Corporote Center ot Eost Mounto|n, F|o|ns Iownsh|p
177-1º3 keseorch Dr|ve
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Eost Jenk|ns Iwp.
BUI LDI NG READY S I TES OF F I CE
- Fermillec & cpprcvec
- /|| uli|ilie:
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47ó
- Grecl view:l
- 408,200 SF cvci|cL|e
- ExpcnccL|e lc ó48,200 SF
- 30´º" lc 3ó´ó" cei|ing:
- 32 |cccing cccr: {crc::-ccckec)
- ESFF fre prcleclicn
- 8" ccncrele cprcn & cc||y pcc
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-80
- /cunccnl pcrking
570.823.1100
BROKERAGE DIVISION www.mericle.com/brokerage
For more information on the above properties, call Bob Besecker, Jim Hilsher, Bill Jones, or Dan Walsh.
Developing Pennsylvania’s I-81 Corridor for 26 Years.
Visit our Web site to see hundreds
of buildings and sites from
1,000 SF to 1,000,000 SF
- 4ó,13ó SF flne::/enlerlcinmenl clr
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00000 SF SF ff i| i|iil 22 óó
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ó SSF fl fl // ll ll ii
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35 0040 40 SSFF cper l cliing rc rcc¢ c¢ue uell | c|u
700 kutter Avenue, K|ngston
33 ó0 ó000 SF SF ff ll ll
33 Iunkhonnock Hwy., Do||os
- 10.51 /cre: zcnec 8-2
- Leve|, :uL:lcnlic||y c|ecrec :ile
- Grcwing Lu:ine:: |ccclicn
- $25,000Jocre ... Steve 8orrouk
10 51 / c 88 22
131 8eor Creek 8|vd., F|o|ns Iwp.
F LEX I NDUS TRI AL
C| C| ll ll 8811 cc ll 47 47óó
250 Enterpr|se Woy [Force| 13}
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork West, F|ttston Iownsh|p
345 Enterpr|se Woy [Force| 7A}
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork West, F|ttston Iownsh|p
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- Lcrge pcrking crec:
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400 Stewort kood
Honover Industr|o| Estotes, Honover Iownsh|p
- 53,040 SF cffce/fex Lui|cing
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- 8cck up cie:e| generclcr
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We are pleased to welcome Pella Products, Inc. and its team of employees to our brand new
flex building at 345 Enterprise Way in CenterPoint Commerce &Trade Park West.
Pella Products is the locally owned branch of Pella Corporation, the nation’s second largest
manufacturer of windows, patio doors and entry doors. Te company will serve 20 Pennsylva-
nia counties from its new CenterPoint office headquarters, showroom, and distribution center.
Pella’s local owner Bert Kriegh said, “We believe the new location will give us more visibility,
exposure and convenience for our customers. Te quality of the new building and the services
Mericle provides helped us choose this property.”
We thank Pella for choosing Mericle and we hope our CenterPoint building will help open
many doors for Bert and his team.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 5C
➛ S P O R T S
Travis Buckner
Hazleton Area, Sr.
As a junior, Buckner showed signs of
being a special player. As a senior, he
was one. Buckner led the Cougars
during the WVC season by averaging
15.5 points and shot 68 percent from
the foul line. He led the team in all
games with 173 rebounds and 84 steals.
He shot 49 percent from the field.
Shane Dunn
Dallas, Sr.
Dunn was selected the Division II MVP
by the coaches after helping Dallas to
the divisional title. He led the team
with 65 field goals and 177 points. His
13.6 scoring average was second best
in Division II. His all-around ability
made him a threat anywhere on the
court and on defense.
John Fazzini
Crestwood, Sr.
Fazzini was one of the best all-around
players in the WVC who helped Crest-
wood win 10 of its last 13 games. He
averaged 14 points, connected on 44
three-pointers, shot 84 percent from
the foul line and averaged four assists
and five rebounds per game.
Ryan Krawczeniuk
Meyers, Jr.
The Division III MVP led the Mohawks in
three-point shooting, steals and as-
sists. He averaged 14.3 points and shot
78 percent from the foul line in Wyom-
ing Valley Conference play. He scored
in double figures in 12 of 14 WVC games.
Eugene Lewis
Meyers, Sr.
The Wyoming Valley West transfer and
future Penn State football player was
pivotal in Meyers winning the WVC
Division III and District 2 Class 2A
titles. He grabbed a team-leading 159
rebounds and blocked 25 shots. He
averaged 18.1 points and electrified
crowds with his powerful dunks.
Rasheed Moore
Meyers, Jr.
One of the top inside players in the
WVC, the 6-foot-5 Moore led the Mo-
hawks with 65 blocked shots and
grabbed 131 rebounds, second most on
the team. He was also a scorer, tossing
in 13.2 points per game and shot 64
percent from the foul line in WVC play.
Matt Sharpe
GAR, Sr.
A three-year starter at point guard,
Sharpe dished out 149 assists, more
than double any of his teammates. He
also recorded 82 steals and 68 re-
bounds. He averaged 9.2 points in WVC
games in helping GAR to a 20-3 overall
record.
Steve Stravinski
Pittston Area, Sr.
The most prolific scorer in the WVC,
Stravinski led the entire conference
with a 22.0 average and tied for the
three-point field goal lead with 34. He
scored in double figures in all 13 WVC
contests and shot 81 percent (38-of-47)
from the foul line.
Travis Buckner was at a
crossroads after his junior year.
The Hazleton Area wing
player could either be content
with the status quo – an un-
even season where he lost his
starting spot for a time – or
prove he could be the player
coach Mike
Joseph envi-
sioned.
Buckner
chose the
latter and it
showed
this season as he was named
The Times Leader Player of
the Year in boys basketball.
Buckner’s statistics were
impressive, especially for a
player in the traditionally
strong Hazleton Area program.
He set a school single-season
record with 84 steals. He
tossed in 16.5 points per game,
the fourth-most for a single
season. His 412 points ranked
ninth in the school’s record
books. And his 30 points ver-
sus Tunkhannock was the most
by a Cougars in a game since
Mike Demarco scored 39 in
2007.
Those stats added up to
Hazleton Area winning the
Wyoming Valley Conference
Division I title and finishing
20-5 overall, a jump of seven
victories from the previous
season.
“With the numbers he put
up, arguably he had one of the
top 10 seasons of any individu-
al player in the 20 years of our
school district,” Joseph said.
One aspect of Buckner’s play,
though, couldn’t be measured
by numbers. It was how he
handled a rough junior season
where he showed enough to
earn a starting position at the
beginning, only to lose it at
midseason and regain it by the
end.
Even though Buckner played
“starter’s minutes” coming off
the bench according to Joseph,
the demotion was difficult.
“It was rough,” Buckner said.
“I was young and really didn’t
know how to respond to it.
Instead of taking it as some-
thing to build off to get better,
I was just a little shocked about
it. But then I finally used it as
something I could build off.”
The construction began in
the Harrisburg summer league
where Buckner made the all-
star team.
“I started to see him doing
things offensively and defen-
sively against great competi-
tion,” Joseph said. “We played
Harrisburg, Cedar Crest, Cen-
tral Dauphin, Central Dauphin
East. We made the semifinals
and he definitely distinguished
himself as one of the best play-
ers in the summer league. And
that’s arguably one of the best
summer leagues in the state.”
The jump in Buckner’s play –
both physically and mentally –
wasn’t and aberration. He
knew what the competition
would be like and prepared
accordingly.
“When we went down there,
I knew there would be a lot of
good competition every night
and I would have to step up my
game,” Buckner said. “During
the summer I worked really
hard on my body and my game
to get better. When we went
there, it kind of showed the
hard work I put in during the
summer.”
More hard work is in store.
Buckner will be heading to
Misericordia University in the
fall and will be vying for play-
ing time on a Cougars team
that won the Freedom Confer-
ence championship and qual-
ified for the NCAA Division III
tournament.
And he’ll take with him the
memories of playing for one of
the WVC’s top programs.
“I was blessed to play for
them, really,” said Buckner,
who moved to the area from
New York City in sixth grade.
“It’s a good school, a good
program. There are great play-
ers who played there. I’m just
fortunate to play there and put
that jersey on.”
Hazleton Area star shines in senior season
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Hazleton Area’s Travis Buckner scored 16.5 points per game, the fourth-most for a single season in school history. It’s one of the
reasons he was named Times Leader Player of the Year..
Year to remember
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
TI MES L EADER BOYS BASKETBAL L AL L- STARS
Sal Biasi, Hazleton Area, So.
Marcus Cobb, Coughlin, Sr.
James Hawk, Tunkhannock, Sr.
ShaQuille Rolle, Hanover Area, Sr.
Darrell Crawford, GAR, Sr.
Ryan DeReemer, Holy Redeemer, Sr.
James McCann, Wyoming Valley West, Sr.
Isaiah Francis, GAR, So.
SECOND TEAM
Travis Buckner led Hazleton
Area to a 20-5 record this
season.
ARCADIA, Calif. — I’ll Have
Another edged 9-10 favorite
Creative Cause by a nose in the
$750,000 Santa Anita Derby on
Saturday, returning from a two-
month layoff to make himself
one of the early favorites for the
Kentucky Derby.
Sent off at 4-1 odds, I’ll Have
Another ran 11-8 miles in
1:47.88 under Mario Gutierrez
in the West’s leading prep for
the Kentucky Derby.
I’ll Have Another paid $10.20,
$4.20 and $3.60. Creative Cause
returned $2.60 and $2.40, while
Blueskiesnrainbows paid $9.60
to show. The top three horses
came charging down the stretch
together in the most exciting of
the day’s three Derby preps
around the country.
Todd Pletcher-trained Gemol-
ogist won the $1 million Wood
Memorial at Aqueduct, and
Done Talking took the $500,000
Illinois Derby at Hawthorne.
At Santa Anita, Blueskiesn-
rainbows was a half-length back
in third for Hall of Fame trainer
Bob Baffert, who was trying to
win his record seventh Santa
Anita Derby. His other entries,
Paynter and Liaison, were
fourth and sixth, respectively in
the nine-horse field.
Trained by Doug O’Neill, I’ll
Have Another won the Robert
Lewis Stakes on Feb. 4 after
returning from a five-month
layoff. He was then given two
months off to prepare for Sat-
urday’s race. He’ll have just
under a month to get ready for
the May 5 Kentucky Derby.
Brother Francis was fifth,
followed by Liaison, Midnight
Transfer, Senor Rain and Long-
view Drive.
Wood Memorial
NEW YORK — Gemologist
won the $1 million Wood Memo-
rial for 3-year-olds at Aqueduct
on Saturday, holding off Alpha
by a neck to improve to 5 for 5.
The latest victory makes the
colt trained by Todd Pletcher
one of the favorites for the Ken-
tucky Derby on May 5. Gemol-
ogist will enjoy an important
advantage over many rivals in
the Derby, having already won
twice at Churchill Downs.
Ridden by Javier Castellano,
Gemologist ran 11-8 miles in
1:50.96 and paid $4.40 to win.
The $600,000 first prize in the
Wood assures Gemologist a
starting spot in the Derby where
the 20 entrants are determined
by graded stakes earnings.
Teeth of the Dog finished
third.
Ashland Stakes
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Karlovy
Vary took an early lead and
easily beat favorite Stephanie’s
Kitten on Saturday in the Grade
1 Ashland Stakes for fillies at
Keeneland.
The 3-year-old brown filly’s
next stop is likely the Kentucky
Oaks on May 4 after a change in
strategy has netted her two
straight victories, even though
questions remain about her
abilities on dirt after the win in
1:44.82 over 11-16 miles on the
poly surface.
Karlovy Vary paid $32.80,
$11.60 and $5.60, Hard Not to
Like returned $9.80 and $4.60,
and Stephanie’s Kitten, who
went off at even money, paid
$2.40 to show.
H O R S E R A C I N G
I’ll Have Another edges favorite Creative Cause to win Santa Anita Derby
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
PITTSBURGH — Alex Pres-
ley singled home Mike McKen-
ry with two outs in the bottom
of the 10th to lift the Pitts-
burgh Pirates to a 2-1 win over
the Philadelphia Phillies on
Saturday night.
Rod Barajas, brought in by
the Pirates in the offseason to
provide some power, doubled
off Philadelphia reliever Joe
Blanton (0-1) leading off the
inning and pinch-runner
McKenry came home three
batters later when Presley beat
out an infield single.
Juan Cruz (1-0), a non-roster
invitee to spring training, won
in relief. Presley had two of
Pittsburgh’s six hits.
Nationals 7, Cubs 4
CHICAGO — Adam La-
Roche homered and matched a
career high with four hits, and
the Washington Nationals
again rallied late against Kerry
Wood and Carlos Marmol,
scoring five runs in the eighth
to beat the Chicago Cubs.
LaRoche drove a two-run
shot off Matt Garza in the
fourth. The Cubs chased Gio
Gonzalez with three in the
bottom half to go up 4-2. But
Washington sent up 11 batters
in the eighth and hammered
Wood (0-1) and Marmol again
after they faltered in a 2-1 loss
on Thursday.
Mets 4, Braves 2
NEW YORK — Lucas Duda
homered twice and became the
first player to take advantage of
the pulled-in fences at Citi
Field, leading R.A. Dickey and
the Mets over Atlanta.
David Wright kept hitting
with a homer and two singles
as the Mets improved to 2-0 for
the first time since 2009.
Josh Thole lined a go-ahead
single with two outs in the fifth
inning off well-traveled Livan
Hernandez, making his first
regular-season relief appear-
ance since his major league
debut in 1996.
Diamondbacks 5, Giants 4
PHOENIX — Aaron Hill hit
two homers, Chris Young had a
pair of run-scoring doubles and
the quick-striking Diamond-
backs beat San Francisco.
The kings of the comeback
last season, the Diamondbacks
have been fast starters in 2012,
scoring seven runs the first two
innings their first two games.
Brewers 6, Cardinals 0
MILWAUKEE — Corey Hart
homered twice, Zack Greinke
pitched four-hit ball for seven
innings and the Brewers beat
the Cardinals.
Rickie Weeks homered while
Aramis Ramirez and Carlos
Gomez added RBI doubles for
the Brewers. Ryan Braun had a
pair of doubles and drew a
walk after going 0 for 5 on
Friday.
Astros 7, Rockies 3
HOUSTON — J.D. Martinez
homered and drove in three
runs and the National League’s
youngest team, the Houston
Astros, beat baseball’s oldest
player, 49-year-old Jamie
Moyer, and the Colorado Rock-
ies.
Jordan Schafer took it deep
leading off for the Astros and
Martinez’s two-run shot in the
fourth made it 3-0.
Marlins 8, Reds 3
CINCINNATI — Giancarlo
Stanton led Miami out of its
early slump, getting three hits
and driving in three runs, and
the Marlins beat the Cincinnati
Reds for their first victory of
the season.
Omar Infante, Hanley Rami-
rez and John Buck homered for
the Marlins, who managed a
total of one run and seven hits
while losing their first two
games. Infante also had a dou-
ble and a triple.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Pirates rally by
Phillies for win
The Associated Press
DETROIT — Prince Fielder
hit his first two home runs
with the Detroit Tigers and
Miguel Cabrera added a pair of
his own in a 10-0 rout of the
Boston Red Sox on Saturday.
Fielder signed a $214 mil-
lion, nine-year deal with De-
troit in the offseason, forming a
powerful middle of the order
with Cabrera that was on full
display against Red Sox starter
Josh Beckett (0-1). Cabrera
opened the scoring in the first
inning with a two-run shot to
left-center, and Fielder added a
solo homer in the fourth to the
same part of the ballpark.
Royals 6, Angels 3
ANAHEIM, Calif. — Luke
Hochevar took a shutout into
the seventh inning and Kansas
City got solo homers from Eric
Hosmer and Mike Moustakas
against Dan Haren in a victory
over the Angels.
Blue Jays 7, Indians 4, 12 inn.
CLEVELAND — Rajai Davis
hit a two-run double in the
12th inning, Toronto rallied for
the second straight game
against Cleveland’s bullpen and
the Blue Jays beat the Indians
in extra innings again.
Davis’ hit off Tony Sipp (0-1)
gave the Blue Jays a 5-3 lead
and they held on to win anoth-
er extra-inning game between
the teams, who set a major
league record by playing the
longest opening-day game in
history — a 16-inning mara-
thon Thursday.
Orioles 8, Twins 2
BALTIMORE — Tommy
Hunter took a four-hitter into
the eighth inning, Nick Marka-
kis went 3 for 4 with a homer
and the Baltimore Orioles
cruised past the Minnesota
Twins.
Rays 8, Yankees 6
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
Luke Scott had three hits and
drove in three runs in his debut
as Tampa Bay’s designated
hitter, helping the Rays beat
the New York Yankees.
The Yankees trimmed a
six-run deficit to two in the
ninth, even getting Alex Rodri-
guez to plate as the potential
tying run. But Fernando Rod-
ney came out of the bullpen to
retire A-Rod on a first-pitch
grounder to a perfectly posi-
tioned second baseman to the
left of second base.
Left-hander David Price (1-0)
allowed two runs and five hits
over 6 1-3 innings to win for
the first time since Aug. 28.
Matt Joyce hit a solo homer
off Hiroki Kuroda (0-1) for the
Rays, and added a two-run
single against Clay Rapada in
the seventh after umpires used
instant replay to overturn what
initially was ruled a two-run
homer for Evan Longoria.
White Sox 4, Rangers 3
ARLINGTON, Texas — Alex
Rios led off the ninth inning
with a home run and the Chica-
go White Sox got their first
win for new manager Robin
Ventura, beating the two-time
defending American League
champion Texas Rangers.
Rios homered off new Rang-
ers closer Joe Nathan (0-1)
who got a save with a perfect
inning in the season opener a
day earlier but entered a tie
game this time.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Tigers use long ball
in rout of Red Sox
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E
B O X S C O R E S
Angels 5, Royals 0
Kansas City Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 1 1 3
L.Cain cf 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 0
Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0
Butler dh 4 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1
Francr rf 3 0 1 0 V.Wells lf 4 0 1 0
YBtncr 2b 3 0 1 0 KMorls dh 3 0 1 0
Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0
Amarst
pr-dh 0 1 0 0
B.Pena c 3 0 1 0 Trumo 3b 3 1 1 0
AEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Callasp 3b 0 0 0 0
Iannett c 3 1 1 0
Bourjos cf 3 1 2 1
Totals 31 0 4 0 Totals 31 5 9 5
Kansas City ....................... 000 000 000 — 0
Los Angeles....................... 000 000 05x — 5
E—Trumbo 2 (2). DP—Kansas City 2. LOB—Kan-
sas City 4, Los Angeles 3. 2B—Francoeur (1),
H.Kendrick (1). 3B—Aybar (1). CS—Bourjos (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
B.Chen ..................... 6 3 0 0 0 4
Crow L,0-1............... 1
1
⁄3 3 3 3 0 3
G.Holland.................
2
⁄3 3 2 2 1 1
Los Angeles
Weaver W,1-0......... 8 4 0 0 0 10
S.Downs................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP—B.Chen.
Umpires—Home, Jerry Layne;First, BobDavidson-
;Second, Hunter Wendelstedt;Third, Dan Bellino.
T—2:22. A—44,106 (45,957).
Mariners 7, Athletics 3
Seattle Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Figgins lf 4 1 3 2 JWeeks 2b 5 1 2 0
Ackley 2b 5 1 3 0 Crisp lf 4 0 2 0
ISuzuki rf 3 1 0 1 Reddck rf 4 0 1 0
Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 Gomes dh 2 1 0 0
JMontr dh 4 0 1 1
S.Smith
ph-dh 1 0 1 1
Seager 3b 4 0 2 2 Cespds cf 4 1 1 2
Olivo c 5 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0
MSndrs cf 4 2 2 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 0 0
Ryan ss 3 2 2 0 Kaaihu 1b 4 0 2 0
Pnngtn ss 4 0 0 0
Totals 36 713 6 Totals 36 3 9 3
Seattle ................................ 004 102 000 — 7
Oakland.............................. 000 200 010 — 3
E—Vargas (1), Donaldson (1). DP—Seattle 1, Oak-
land 2. LOB—Seattle 9, Oakland 7.
2B—M.Saunders (1), Ryan(2). HR—Cespedes (2).
SB—Figgins (1), I.Suzuki (1). S—Figgins. SF—
I.Suzuki, J.Montero.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Vargas W,1-0 .......... 5
1
⁄3 5 2 2 1 3
Delabar..................... 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
Wilhelmsen.............. 1 3 1 1 0 2
League ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Oakland
McCarthy L,0-1 ....... 5 7 5 2 2 3
Norberto................... 1 4 2 2 0 0
Carignan................... 2 1 0 0 2 2
De Los Santos......... 1 1 0 0 0 1
PB—Olivo, K.Suzuki.
Umpires—Home, Tom Hallion;First, Brian O’No-
ra;Second, AlfonsoMarquez;Third, ChadFairchild.
T—3:06. A—35,067 (35,067).
Dodgers 6, Padres 0
Los Angeles San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DGordn ss 5 0 1 0 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0
M.Ellis 2b 5 2 2 0 Venale rf 4 0 1 0
Kemp cf 4 2 2 1 Headly 3b 4 0 0 0
JRiver 1b 3 2 2 1 Guzmn lf 3 0 1 0
Ethier rf 4 0 2 4 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0
HrstnJr lf 3 0 1 0 Hundly c 2 0 0 0
Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 OHudsn 2b 3 0 0 0
A.Ellis c 3 0 0 0 Bartlett ss 3 0 0 0
Blngsly p 3 0 0 0 Luebke p 1 0 0 0
JWrght p 0 0 0 0 Owings p 1 0 0 0
Cashnr p 0 0 0 0
Hermid ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 610 6 Totals 29 0 3 0
Los Angeles....................... 202 020 000 — 6
San Diego.......................... 000 000 000 — 0
E—Luebke(1), Alonso(1). DP—Los Angeles1, San
Diego 1. LOB—Los Angeles 5, San Diego 3.
2B—M.Ellis (2), Ethier (1), Venable (1), Guzman
(2). 3B—Ethier (1). SB—Kemp (1). CS—D.Gordon
(1). S—Billingsley.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Billingsley W,1-0..... 8
1
⁄3 3 0 0 1 11
J.Wright ....................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
San Diego
Luebke L,0-1 ........... 4
2
⁄3 9 6 5 1 6
Owings ..................... 3
1
⁄3 1 0 0 1 2
Cashner ................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals;First, Paul Emmel-
;Second, Scott Barry;Third, Gary Darling.
T—2:31. A—32,490 (42,691).
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Baltimore ........................................ 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 2-0 0-0
Tampa Bay ..................................... 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 2-0 0-0
Toronto........................................... 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 0-0 2-0
Boston ............................................ 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-0 0-2
New York........................................ 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-0 0-2
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit ............................................. 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 2-0 0-0
Chicago.......................................... 1 1 .500 1 1 1-1 W-1 0-0 1-1
Kansas City.................................... 1 1 .500 1 1 1-1 W-1 0-0 1-1
Cleveland ....................................... 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-2 0-0
Minnesota ...................................... 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-0 0-2
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Seattle............................................... 2 1 .667 — — 2-1 W-1 0-0 2-1
Los Angeles ..................................... 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 L-1 1-1 0-0
Texas ................................................ 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 L-1 1-1 0-0
Oakland ............................................ 1 2 .333 1 1
1
⁄2 1-2 L-1 1-2 0-0
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York........................................ 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 2-0 0-0
Washington.................................... 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 0-0 2-0
Philadelphia................................... 1 1 .500 1 1 1-1 L-1 0-0 1-1
Miami .............................................. 1 2 .333 1
1
⁄2 1
1
⁄2 1-2 W-1 0-1 1-1
Atlanta............................................. 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-0 0-2
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis............................................ 2 1 .667 — — 2-1 L-1 0-0 2-1
Cincinnati .......................................... 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 L-1 1-1 0-0
Houston............................................ 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 W-1 1-1 0-0
Milwaukee ........................................ 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 W-1 1-1 0-0
Pittsburgh......................................... 1 1 .500
1
⁄2 1 1-1 W-1 1-1 0-0
Chicago ............................................ 0 2 .000 1
1
⁄2 2 0-2 L-2 0-2 0-0
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona ........................................... 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 2-0 0-0
Los Angeles................................... 2 0 1.000 — — 2-0 W-2 0-0 2-0
Colorado......................................... 1 1 .500 1 1 1-1 L-1 0-0 1-1
San Diego ...................................... 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-2 0-0
San Francisco................................ 0 2 .000 2 2 0-2 L-2 0-0 0-2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Texas 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2
Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 6
L.A. Angels 5, Kansas City 0
Seattle 7, Oakland 3
Saturday's Games
Toronto 7, Cleveland 4, 12 innings
Detroit 10, Boston 0
Kansas City 6, L.A. Angels 3
Baltimore 8, Minnesota 2
Tampa Bay 8, N.Y. Yankees 6
Chicago White Sox 4, Texas 3
Seattle at Oakland, (n)
Sunday's Games
Boston (Buchholz 0-0) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-0),
1:05 p.m.
Toronto(Carreno0-0) at Cleveland(Lowe0-0), 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota (Swarzak 0-0) at Baltimore (Hammel
0-0), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Hughes 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Hellick-
son 0-0), 1:40 p.m.
Kansas City (Sanchez 0-0) at L.A. Angels (E.Santa-
na 0-0), 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 0-0) at Texas (Harrison
0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Seattle at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
St. Louis 11, Milwaukee 5
Colorado 5, Houston 3
Arizona 5, San Francisco 4
L.A. Dodgers 6, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games
Washington 7, Chicago Cubs 4
N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 2
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 0
Arizona 5, San Francisco 4
Houston 7, Colorado 3
Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 1, 10 innings
Miami 8, Cincinnati 3
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, (n)
Sunday's Games
Atlanta (Minor 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-0), 1:10
p.m.
Miami (Zambrano 0-0) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 0-0),
1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Worley 0-0) at Pittsburgh (McDonald
0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado(Nicasio0-0) at Houston(Norris 0-0), 2:05
p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 0-0) at Milwaukee (Wolf 0-0), 2:10
p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 0-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 0-0), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Harang 0-0) at San Diego (Richard
0-0), 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 0-0) at Arizona (Collmenter
0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
Mets 4,
Braves 2
Atlanta New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 3 1 2 0 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0
Prado lf 4 1 1 2 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0
McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Frncsc p 0 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 5 1 3 1
Fremn 1b 4 0 2 0 I.Davis 1b 4 1 0 0
Heywrd rf 2 0 1 0 Bay lf 4 0 1 0
JFrncs 3b 4 0 0 0 Duda rf 4 2 2 2
Pstrnck ss 3 0 0 0 Thole c 4 0 2 1
Hinske ph 1 0 1 0 Niwnhs cf 4 0 2 0
JWilson pr 0 0 0 0 Dickey p 2 0 1 0
Jurrjns p 2 0 0 0 Baxter ph 1 0 0 0
LHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0
Constnz ph 1 0 0 0 Turner ph 1 0 1 0
Durbin p 0 0 0 0 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Cedeno 2b 0 0 0 0
Diaz ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals 37 413 4
Atlanta ................................ 000 020 000 — 2
New York ........................... 100 110 10x — 4
DP—New York 1. LOB—Atlanta 7, New York 12.
2B—Bourn (1), Thole (1). 3B—Heyward (1). HR—
Prado (1), D.Wright (1), Duda 2 (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Jurrjens L,0-1 .......... 4
1
⁄3 7 3 3 3 3
L.Hernandez............ 1
2
⁄3 3 0 0 0 1
Durbin....................... 1 3 1 1 0 1
C.Martinez ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0
New York
Dickey W,1-0........... 6 5 2 2 4 3
Parnell H,1............... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rauch H,2................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
F.Francisco S,2-2 ... 1 2 0 0 0 2
PB—McCann, Thole.
Umpires—Home, Eric Cooper;First, Phil Cuzzi;Se-
cond, Vic Carapazza;Third, Gerry Davis.
T—2:53. A—39,526 (41,922).
Brewers 6,
Cardinals 0
St. Louis Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Furcal ss 4 0 1 0 RWeks 2b 4 2 2 1
Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 Morgan cf-rf 3 0 0 0
Hollidy lf 4 0 0 0 Braun lf 3 1 2 0
Brkmn 1b 4 0 1 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1
Freese 3b 4 0 2 0 Hart rf 3 2 2 3
YMolin c 3 0 0 0 CGomz cf 1 0 1 1
Jay cf 3 0 2 0 Gamel 1b 4 0 0 0
Descals 2b 3 0 0 0 AlGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0
Wnwrg p 2 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0
VMarte p 0 0 0 0 Greink p 2 0 0 0
MCrpnt ph 1 0 0 0 Ishikaw ph 1 0 0 0
Salas p 0 0 0 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0
JRomr p 0 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 0 6 0 Totals 31 6 8 6
St. Louis............................. 000 000 000 — 0
Milwaukee.......................... 010 003 02x — 6
E—Wainwright (1). DP—St. Louis 1, Milwaukee 1.
LOB—St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 3. 2B—Braun 2 (2),
Ar.Ramirez (1), C.Gomez (1). HR—R.Weeks (1),
Hart 2 (2). S—Morgan.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Wainwright L,0-1..... 5
2
⁄3 4 3 3 1 6
V.Marte..................... 1
1
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
Salas.........................
2
⁄3 3 2 2 0 2
J.Romero .................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
Greinke W,1-0......... 7 4 0 0 0 7
Fr.Rodriguez ........... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Veras ........................ 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP—Greinke.
Umpires—Home, Laz Diaz;First, Ed Hickox;Sec-
ond, Ed Rapuano;Third, Cory Blaser.
T—2:51. A—42,084 (41,900).
Nationals 7,
Cubs 4
Washington Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dsmnd ss 4 1 0 0 RJhnsn rf-lf 4 1 1 2
Espinos 2b 5 1 2 1 Mather 3b 3 1 1 1
Zmrmn 3b 5 1 1 0 IStewrt 3b 0 0 0 0
LaRoch 1b 5 2 4 2 SCastro ss 5 0 2 0
Werth rf 4 1 0 0 ASorin lf 4 0 1 0
DeRosa lf 3 0 0 0 K.Wood p 0 0 0 0
Matths p 0 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0
Tracy ph 1 0 1 2 Camp p 0 0 0 0
BCarrll pr-cf 0 1 0 0 DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0
Berndn cf-lf 4 0 2 1 JeBakr 1b 4 0 0 0
Ramos c 3 0 1 0 Soto c 4 1 1 0
GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Byrd cf 3 1 0 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0
Lmrdzz lf 2 0 1 1 Garza p 2 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 LaHair ph 1 0 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Dolis p 0 0 0 0
DeJess rf 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 712 7 Totals 35 4 8 3
Washington ....................... 000 200 050 — 7
Chicago.............................. 100 300 000 — 4
DP—Chicago 1. LOB—Washington 7, Chicago 10.
2B—Bernadina (1). 3B—R.Johnson (1). HR—Espi-
nosa (1), LaRoche (1). SB—S.Castro 2 (2). S—
Stammen.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
G.Gonzalez ............. 3
2
⁄3 7 4 4 3 6
Stammen.................. 2
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Mattheus W,1-0....... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Clippard H,1 ............ 1 0 0 0 1 1
H.Rodriguez S,1-1.. 1 0 0 0 1 3
Chicago
Garza........................ 6 5 2 2 1 5
Dolis H,1 .................. 1 0 0 0 0 0
K.Wood L,0-1 H,1...
2
⁄3 3 3 3 0 1
Marmol BS,1-1........ 0 2 2 2 2 0
Camp........................ 1
1
⁄3 2 0 0 0 1
Marmol pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
HBP—by Stammen (R.Johnson). WP—G.Gonza-
lez, Stammen.
Umpires—Home, Kerwin Danley;First, Doug Ed-
dings;Second, Paul Nauert;Third, Dana DeMuth.
T—3:22. A—40,102 (41,009).
Diamondbacks 5,
Giants 4
San Francisco Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 RRorts 3b 5 0 1 0
MeCarr rf 4 1 1 0 A.Hill 2b 4 2 2 3
Sandovl 3b 3 1 2 2 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 0
Posey c 4 0 0 0 MMntr c 3 1 2 0
A.Huff lf 4 0 1 0 CYoung cf 3 0 2 2
Belt 1b 3 1 0 0 Gldsch 1b 3 0 0 0
Theriot 2b 3 0 0 0 Kubel lf 3 0 0 0
GBlanc ph 1 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 4 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0
Bmgrn p 1 0 1 0 JMcDnl ss 4 0 0 0
Schrhlt ph 1 0 0 0 DHdsn p 3 1 2 0
Otero p 0 0 0 0 Shaw p 0 0 0 0
Pill ph 1 1 1 2 GParra lf 1 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0
JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 6 4 Totals 32 510 5
San Francisco.................... 000 200 200 — 4
Arizona............................... 220 010 00x — 5
DP—San Francisco 2. LOB—San Francisco 4, Ari-
zona 8. 2B—A.Huff (1), C.Young 2 (2). HR—Sand-
oval (1), Pill (1), A.Hill 2 (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,0-1..... 4 7 4 4 2 3
Otero......................... 2 3 1 1 1 2
S.Casilla................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Ja.Lopez .................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Arizona
D.Hudson W,1-0..... 6
2
⁄3 5 4 4 2 4
Shaw H,1..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
D.Hernandez H,2.... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Putz S,2-2................ 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP—by S.Casilla (C.Young). WP—Otero.
Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds;First, Mike DiMu-
ro;Second, James Hoye;Third, Jim Joyce.
T—2:36. A—34,789 (48,633).
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
Blue Jays 7, Indians 4
Toronto Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
YEscor ss 6 0 0 0 Brantly cf 5 0 0 0
KJhnsn 2b 5 2 2 2 ACarer ss 4 2 2 1
Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 Choo rf 5 0 0 0
Lind 1b 5 1 0 0 CSantn c 4 0 1 0
Encrnc dh 5 1 1 0 Hafner dh 5 0 1 1
Lawrie 3b 5 1 3 2 Duncan lf 4 0 0 0
Thams lf 3 0 0 0 Ktchm 1b 5 1 0 0
RDavis ph-lf 2 1 1 2 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 2
Arencii c 5 0 0 0 Hannhn 3b 4 0 0 0
Rasms cf 4 1 1 1
Totals 44 7 8 7 Totals 40 4 5 4
Toronto..................... 000 000 201 004 — 7
Cleveland................. 000 020 001 001 — 4
E—Arencibia (1). DP—Toronto1. LOB—Toronto 6,
Cleveland 3. 2B—Encarnacion (2), R.Davis (1).
HR—K.Johnson (1), A.Cabrera (1), Kipnis (1). SB—
R.Davis (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
Morrow..................... 7 1 2 0 3 3
Oliver ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Santos BS,1-1......... 1 1 1 1 0 0
Janssen W,1-0 ........ 2 0 0 0 0 2
Cordero.................... 1 3 1 1 0 0
Cleveland
Jimenez.................... 7 1 2 2 3 3
J.Smith ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Pestano....................
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
R.Perez .................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Perez .................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Sipp L,0-1 ................
1
⁄3 4 4 4 0 1
Wheeler....................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 1 0
HBP—by Pestano (Bautista). WP—Jimenez.
Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson;First, Mike Everitt-
;Second, Paul Schrieber;Third, Tim Welke.
T—3:38. A—18,842 (43,429).
Royals 6, Angels 3
Kansas City Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 0 0 0
L.Cain cf 4 1 1 1 HKndrc 2b 3 0 1 0
Hosmer 1b 5 2 2 1 Iannett c 0 0 0 0
Butler dh 4 0 1 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 1 0
Francr rf 4 0 2 2 KMorls dh 4 2 4 0
YBtncr 2b 3 0 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 1 2 0
Getz 2b 1 1 1 0 Abreu lf 3 0 1 2
Mostks 3b 4 1 1 1 V.Wells cf 4 0 0 1
Quinter c 3 1 2 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0
AEscor ss 3 0 1 0 BoWlsn c 1 0 0 0
MIzturs
ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 612 5 Totals 31 3 9 3
Kansas City ....................... 210 011 010 — 6
Los Angeles....................... 000 000 201 — 3
E—Quintero(1), Bo.Wilson(1). DP—Kansas City 2,
Los Angeles 1. LOB—Kansas City 6, Los Angeles
4. 2B—Getz (1), Quintero 2 (2), Pujols (1), K.Mo-
rales (1), Abreu (1). HR—Hosmer (1), Moustakas
(1). SB—Getz (1). S—A.Escobar. SF—L.Cain,
Abreu.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
Hochevar W,1-0...... 6
1
⁄3 5 2 2 2 4
Collins.......................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
G.Holland................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Broxton..................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Los Angeles
Haren L,0-1.............. 5
1
⁄3 11 5 5 1 5
Takahashi ................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Isringhausen............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Hawkins.................... 1 1 1 0 1 1
Thompson................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires—Home, Bob Davidson;First, Hunter
Wendelstedt;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Jerry Lay-
ne.
T—2:46. A—40,022 (45,957).
Tigers 10, Red Sox 0
Boston Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsury cf 3 0 0 0 AJcksn cf 3 1 1 1
DMcDn ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Boesch rf 5 0 0 0
Pedroia 2b 3 0 0 0 MiCarr 3b 5 2 2 3
AdGnzl 1b 4 0 2 0 Fielder 1b 3 2 2 2
Ortiz dh 3 0 1 0 Kelly 1b 0 0 0 0
Shppch ph 1 0 1 0 DYong lf 4 2 2 0
Youkils 3b 4 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 0 0 0 0
Sweeny rf 3 0 2 0 Avila c 4 2 2 2
C.Ross lf 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0
Sltlmch c 3 0 1 0 Dirks dh 4 0 2 1
Aviles ss 3 0 0 0
Raburn
2b-lf 4 0 0 0
Totals 32 0 7 0 Totals 361012 9
Boston.............................. 000 000 000 — 0
Detroit .............................. 200 321 20x — 10
E—Aviles (1), Saltalamacchia (1). DP—Boston 1,
Detroit 2. LOB—Boston 7, Detroit 5.
2B—Saltalamacchia (1), A.Jackson (1). HR—
Mi.Cabrera 2 (2), Fielder 2 (2), Avila (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Beckett L,0-1........... 4
2
⁄3 7 7 7 1 3
Atchison ................... 1
1
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Albers.......................
2
⁄3 2 2 1 0 0
J.Thomas.................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Bowden.................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Detroit
Fister......................... 3
2
⁄3 3 0 0 1 3
Below W,1-0............ 2
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
Dotel ......................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 3
Coke .........................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
Benoit ....................... 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBP—by Albers (Fielder).
Umpires—Home, Bill Miller;First, Dan Iassogna-
;Second, CB Bucknor;Third, Dale Scott.
T—2:53. A—44,710 (41,255).
Astros 7,
Rockies 3
Colorado Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Scutaro 2b 4 0 1 0 Schafer cf 3 1 1 2
Fowler cf 4 1 1 0 Bixler 2b 3 1 1 0
CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 JMrtnz lf 4 1 2 3
Tlwtzk ss 4 1 1 1 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0
Helton 1b 4 0 0 1 CJhnsn 3b 4 2 2 0
Cuddyr rf 4 1 2 1 Bogsvc rf 3 0 0 0
RHrndz c 3 0 0 0 CSnydr c 4 0 1 1
Nelson 3b 3 0 0 0 MGnzlz ss 4 1 1 0
Moyer p 1 0 0 0 Harrell p 2 0 1 0
JHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 T.Buck ph 1 1 1 0
Chatwd p 0 0 0 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0
Colvin ph 1 0 1 0 MDwns ph 1 0 0 0
Roenck p 0 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0
R.Cruz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 33 710 6
Colorado ............................ 000 000 012 — 3
Houston.............................. 100 211 11x — 7
E—Scutaro 2 (2), Nelson (1). DP—Colorado 2.
LOB—Colorado 3, Houston 5. 2B—C.Gonzalez
(2), Cuddyer (1), C.Johnson 2 (2), M.Gonzalez (1).
3B—Tulowitzki (1), T.Buck (1). HR—Cuddyer (1),
Schafer (1), J.Martinez (1). SB—C.Johnson (1).
CS—Tulowitzki (1). S—Schafer.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Moyer L,0-1 ............. 5 5 4 3 1 2
Chatwood................. 2 4 2 2 0 3
Roenicke.................. 1 1 1 0 1 1
Houston
Harrell W,1-0........... 7 3 0 0 0 4
Lyon.......................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
W.Wright ..................
2
⁄3 2 2 2 0 1
R.Cruz ......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
WP—Roenicke, Harrell. PB—R.Hernandez.
Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale;First, Fieldin
Culbreth;Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Gary Ce-
derstrom.
T—2:31. A—23,962 (40,981).
Orioles 8, Twins 2
Minnesota Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 4 0 1 0 Reimld lf 5 0 2 1
JCarrll ss 4 0 0 1 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0
Mauer c 4 0 1 1 Markks rf 4 1 3 1
Mornea dh 4 0 2 0 AdJons cf 4 1 1 1
Wlngh lf 3 0 1 0 Wieters c 2 1 1 1
Parmel 1b 3 0 0 0 MrRynl 3b 3 1 0 0
Valenci 3b 4 0 0 0 Flahrty 3b 0 0 0 0
Revere rf 4 1 1 0 NJhnsn 1b 4 0 0 0
ACasill 2b 3 1 1 0 RPauln dh 4 2 4 0
Andino 2b 4 2 2 2
Totals 33 2 7 2 Totals 34 813 6
Minnesota.......................... 000 000 020 — 2
Baltimore............................ 012 300 20x — 8
E—Willingham 2 (2), Mar.Reynolds (1). DP—Min-
nesota 3, Baltimore 2. LOB—Minnesota 6, Balti-
more 5. 2B—Morneau (1), R.Paulino (1). HR—Mar-
kakis (2), Ad.Jones (1), Wieters (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Liriano L,0-1............. 4 8 6 5 2 4
Al.Burnett ................. 2 2 0 0 1 0
Burton....................... 1 2 2 2 0 1
Perkins ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Baltimore
Tom.Hunter W,1-0.. 7 6 2 0 1 3
Strop......................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Ayala......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tom.Hunter pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP—by Tom.Hunter (Willingham).
Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson;First, Bill Welke;Se-
cond, Chris Guccione;Third, Tim Tschida.
T—2:37. A—31,532 (45,971).
Pirates 2,
Phillies 1
Philadelphia Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Victorn cf 5 1 2 0 Tabata rf 5 0 1 0
Polanc 3b 5 0 2 0 Presley lf 5 0 2 1
Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 McCtch cf 4 0 1 0
Pence rf 4 0 1 1
McGeh
3b-1b 4 0 0 0
Nix 1b-lf 3 0 0 0 Hague 1b 3 0 0 0
Mayrry lf 3 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
Thome ph 1 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
Stutes p 0 0 0 0 McLoth ph 0 0 0 0
Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0
Blanton p 0 0 0 0 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0
Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 Barajs c 4 0 1 0
Galvis 2b 4 0 0 0 McKnr pr 0 1 0 0
Cl.Lee p 2 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0
Kndrck p 0 0 0 0 Karstns p 1 0 0 0
Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 Navarr ph 0 1 0 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0
Wggntn 1b 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn 3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 36 1 7 1 Totals 33 2 6 1
Philadelphia................. 100 000 000 0 — 1
Pittsburgh..................... 000 001 000 1 — 2
Two outs when winning run scored.
E—McGehee(1). DP—Philadelphia1, Pittsburgh1.
LOB—Philadelphia 9, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Barajas
(1), J.Harrison (1). SB—Pence (1), McCutchen (1).
S—Rollins, Barmes.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
Cl.Lee....................... 6 2 1 1 2 4
K.Kendrick ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Qualls ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Stutes .......................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Bastardo...................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Blanton L,0-1...........
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Pittsburgh
Karstens................... 6 5 1 1 1 2
Watson ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Grilli........................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hanrahan.................. 1 0 0 0 2 2
J.Cruz W,1-0 ........... 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBP—by Blanton (J.Harrison). WP—Cl.Lee.
Umpires—Home, Larry Vanover;First, Tony Ran-
dazzo;Second, Todd Tichenor;Third, Brian Gor-
man.
T—3:13. A—38,885 (38,362).
Marlins 8,
Reds 3
Miami Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Reyes ss 5 1 1 0 Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0
Bonifac cf 4 3 2 0 Cozart ss 4 2 3 1
HRmrz 3b 3 1 1 2 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0
Stanton rf 5 0 3 3 Votto 1b 4 1 1 2
Morrsn lf 3 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 4 0 0 0
Bell p 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0
GSnchz 1b 5 0 0 0 Heisey lf 4 0 1 0
Infante 2b 5 2 3 1 Stubbs cf 3 0 0 0
J.Buck c 4 1 1 2 Mesorc c 3 0 1 0
Nolasco p 4 0 1 0 Latos p 0 0 0 0
Coghln lf 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Harris ph 1 0 0 0
LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Simon p 0 0 0 0
Valdez
ph-ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 812 8 Totals 32 3 6 3
Miami .................................. 000 130 220 — 8
Cincinnati ........................... 000 200 010 — 3
E—Reyes (1). DP—Miami 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB—
Miami 8, Cincinnati 3. 2B—Reyes (1), Stanton (1),
Infante (1). 3B—Infante (1), Cozart (1). HR—H.Ra-
mirez (1), Infante (1), J.Buck (1), Cozart (1), Votto
(1). SB—Reyes (1), Bonifacio 2 (2). S—Latos.
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Nolasco W,1-0 ........ 8 6 3 3 0 5
Bell ............................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Latos L,0-1............... 4
2
⁄3 7 4 4 2 4
Ondrusek .................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
LeCure ..................... 2 3 2 2 0 0
Simon ....................... 1 2 2 2 0 3
Arredondo................ 1 0 0 0 2 2
Umpires—Home, Ted Barrett;First, Brian Runge-
;Second, Marvin Hudson;Third, Tim McClelland.
T—2:58. A—41,662 (42,319).
Rays 8, Yankees 6
New York Tampa Bay
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter dh 5 0 2 0 Jnnngs cf 5 1 1 1
Swisher rf 3 1 1 3 C.Pena 1b 3 1 1 1
Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 0
ARdrgz 3b 4 0 0 0 Joyce lf 3 2 2 3
Teixeir 1b 4 0 0 0 Zobrist rf 2 1 1 0
Grndrs cf 4 2 2 0 Scott dh 4 1 3 3
AnJons lf 3 1 1 1 Kppngr 2b 3 0 0 0
Ibanez ph 0 0 0 1 SRdrgz 2b 1 0 0 0
Martin c 1 1 0 0 Loaton c 4 1 1 0
ENunez ss 3 0 1 1 Brignc ss 3 0 0 0
ErChvz ph 1 1 1 0
Totals 32 6 9 6 Totals 32 810 8
New York ........................... 000 200 004 — 6
Tampa Bay......................... 211 002 20x — 8
E—E.Nunez (1), Lobaton (1). DP—New York 2,
Tampa Bay 3. LOB—New York 7, Tampa Bay 6.
2B—Cano (1), Longoria (1), Zobrist (1), Scott (1),
Lobaton (1). 3B—Granderson (1). HR—Swisher (1),
Joyce (1). SB—Jennings (1). SF—Ibanez.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Kuroda L,0-1............ 5
2
⁄3 8 6 4 4 2
Rapada.....................
2
⁄3 2 2 2 2 0
Wade........................ 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 3
Tampa Bay
Price W,1-0.............. 6
1
⁄3 5 2 2 4 5
Badenhop.................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Lueke........................ 1
1
⁄3 3 3 3 2 0
Jo.Peralta.................
1
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
McGee...................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Rodney S,1-1 ..........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
McGee pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP—Price.
Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook;First, Andy
Fletcher;Second, Rob Drake;Third, Joe West.
T—3:20. A—34,078 (34,078).
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
Compiled By PAUL MONTELLA
April 8
1934 — The Philadelphia Athletics and the Phila-
delphia Phillies played the first legal Sunday base-
ball game in Philadelphia. The exhibition game was
made possible when the state made Sunday base-
ball a local option and the city approved it in a refer-
endum ballot.
1969 —The Montreal Expos played their first regu-
lar-season game —the first international contest in
major league history — and defeated the eventual
world champion NewYork Mets, 11-10, at Shea Sta-
dium. Expos pitcher Dan McGinn hit the expansion
team’s first home run.
1974 —In the opener in Atlanta, Hank Aaron broke
BabeRuth’s career recordby hittinghis 715thhome
run off Los Angeles left-hander Al Downing in the
fourth inning. The Braves beat the Dodgers 7-4 be-
fore a crowd of nearly 54,000.
1975 — Frank Robinson became the first black
manager in major league history by making his de-
but as player-manager of the Cleveland Indians. He
hit a home run in his first at-bat — as a designated
hitter — to help beat the New York Yankees, 5-3.
1986 — Jim Presley of the Seattle Mariners hit
home runs in the ninth and10th innings for a come-
from-behind 8-4 opening day victory over the Cali-
fornia Angels.
1987 — Pitchers Phil Niekro and Steve Carlton of
the Cleveland Indians teamed up to beat the Toron-
to Blue Jays14-3. Niekro recorded his 312th victory
and Carlton pitched four shutout innings in relief. It
was the first time in modern history that two
300-game winners pitched for the same teamin the
same game.
1993 —Carlos Baerga of the Cleveland Indians be-
came the first player in major league history to hit
home runs from both sides of the plate in the same
inning. The homers came in the seventh inning of a
15-5 rout of the New York Yankees.
1994 — Kurt Mercker of the Atlanta Braves pitched
the season’s first no-hitter, beating the Dodgers
6-0. It was the first complete game of Mercker’s ca-
reer.
2002 — Craig Biggio hit for the cycle and had four
RBIs in Houston’s 8-4 win over Colorado.
2009 —Four Phillies walked with the bases loaded
duringaneight-runseventhinningandPhiladelphia
rallied for a 12-11 victory over the Atlanta Braves.
2011 — Manny Ramirez retired from baseball after
testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug.
The slumping Tampa Bay slugger informed Major
League Baseball that he would retire rather than
face a 100-game suspension. Ramirez served a
50-game ban for violating the drug policy in 2009.
Today’s birthdays: Felix Hernandez 26; Bobby Wil-
son 29; Chris Iannetta 29; Jeremy Guthrie 33.
White Sox 4, Rangers 3
Chicago Texas
ab r h bi ab r h bi
De Aza cf 4 1 1 0 Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 0
Lillirdg lf 3 1 0 0 Andrus ss 5 1 1 1
A.Dunn dh 2 1 1 0 Hamltn cf 4 0 1 0
Konerk 1b 4 0 2 3 Beltre 3b 3 0 0 1
Rios rf 4 1 1 1 MYong dh 4 1 2 0
AlRmrz ss 4 0 0 0 N.Cruz rf 3 0 1 0
Flowrs c 4 0 0 0 DvMrp lf 3 0 2 0
Morel 3b 4 0 0 0 Napoli c 4 0 1 1
Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 4 0 0 0
Totals 32 4 5 4 Totals 35 310 3
Chicago.............................. 102 000 001 — 4
Texas.................................. 012 000 000 — 3
E—Dav.Murphy (1), D.Holland (1). LOB—Chicago
4, Texas 8. 2B—Konerko (1), Dav.Murphy 2 (2).
3B—Kinsler (1). HR—Rios (1). SB—De Aza (1).
CS—Kinsler (1). SF—Beltre.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Peavy ....................... 6 8 3 3 1 5
Ohman......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Reed.........................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornton W,1-0....... 1 2 0 0 0 0
H.Santiago S,1-1 .... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Texas
D.Holland ................. 6 3 3 3 3 5
Ogando..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Adams ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Nathan L,0-1 ............ 1 1 1 1 0 1
HBP—by Thornton (Dav.Murphy). Balk—Peavy.
Umpires—Home, Wally Bell;First, Mark Wegner-
;Second, Brian Knight;Third, Mike Winters.
T—2:36. A—47,867 (48,194).
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 7C
➛ S P O R T S
Habitat for
Humanity of
Wyoming Val-
ley would like
to carve out its
own little cy-
cling tradition
in the first
week of May.
The group will hold its fourth
annual Spencer Martin Memo-
rial Bike Ride on Sunday, May
6, in the Back Mountain.
It’s the first charity ride of
the season in the area. Some-
thing that Habitat executive
director Karen Evans Kaufer
hopes will help draw cyclists to
the event.
“People are very happy with
the way we run the ride,” Evan
Kaufer said, adding that many
cyclists are already making it
yearly event on their calendar.
Martin was a longtime volun-
teer with the group and al-
though he wasn’t a cyclist,
Habitat decided a 30-mile bike
ride through the scenic Back
Mountain might just be the way
to do that.
“We just decided to have an
event to honor his voluntee-
rism,” said Evans Kaufer.
As usual, Evans Kaufer says
the ride will feature a host of
volunteers, refreshments and a
SAG wagon.
“We are very supportive of
the cyclists,” she said.
However, the course will be a
bit different this time around
due to some road construction.
Tom Jones, of Around Town
Bicycles in Wilkes-Barre,
mapped out a new route for the
ride, which takes in more of the
road around Harveys Lake.
The route is both “beautiful
and challenging” and runs just
a little over 30 miles, according
to Evans Kaufer.
The ride is the primary fun-
draising event for Habitat.
According to Evans Kaufer,
the previous three rides have
raised somewhere in the neigh-
borhood of $100,000.
The group uses the money to
carry out its mission of the
helping Luzerne County fam-
ilies. In the last 20 years, Hab-
itat has built 28 homes in part-
nership with local craftsmen
and thousands of local volun-
teers.
So on the first Sunday in
May, Evans Kaufer hopes to see
200 or more cyclists pedaling
through the Back Mountain.
If you are interested in riding
more information can be found
at www.bikeforhabitat.org.
If you can’t ride and still want
to contribute, sponsorships are
available. More information
about sponsorships is also avail-
able at the website.
New cycling rule
Good news for cyclists – well
at least those of us who prefer
to road biking to mountain
biking.
A law went into effect on
Monday, setting new rules that
in theory will make it safer to
ride on Pennsylvania’s roads.
The law requires motorists to
leave a four-foot “cushion of
safety” when passing a bike
rider. Drivers may cross a road-
way’s center line if needed.
But wait … there is more.
Drivers attempting to turn
left must also yield the right of
way to bicycle riders traveling
the opposite direction. I would
like to think that would be
common sense, but I narrowly
missed becoming someone’s
hood ornament enough times
to know that just isn’t the case.
“The differential in speed is
the biggest safety challenge
with motor vehicles and bicy-
cles sharing our state’s road-
ways,” PennDOT Secretary
Barry J. Schoch said in a news
release announcing the new
regulations. “I urge all drivers
and cyclists to learn the rules of
the road to better share our
highways and make travel safer
for all.”
Schoch hits the nail on the
head there.
The new rules will only have
an effect if drivers learn them
and follow them.
So far the results I have seen
on the roads have been mixed.
I noticed no difference at all
while riding through Wilkes-
Barre early in the week and
actually came pretty close to
becoming a hood ornament
once or twice while merely
attempting to go straight
through an intersection.
Later in the week in Hanover
Township, I noticed several cars
giving me wide berth. However,
whether this was due to the
new law or simply those driv-
ers’ normal habits is debatable.
Still any law aimed at making
it safer to ride is a good one.
He said what?
Working late in the office
Sunday night, I happened to
catch the audio of one of local
newscasts announcing the new
bike regulations going into
effect.
Unfortunately, I was in the
middle of something and didn’t
see which station or anchor it
was, but the anchor did drop a
real gem. In describing the new
regulations, the anchor said
they were aimed at “making
bicycling safer both on the road
and on the sidewalk.”
Seems to me, that if the sta-
tion was going to take the time
to do a story on the new law,
they would have at least in-
formed the anchor that it is
illegal to ride a bicycle on a
sidewalk in Pennsylvania. (As
far as I’m concerned, not know-
ing that little fact should be
grounds for having your license
revoked).
And I would hope that cars
are already giving anyone on a
sidewalk a four-foot “safety-
cushion.”
Calendar, results
If you have a ride coming up,
we would like to know about it.
Whether it’s a club ride, char-
ity ride or just a weekly ride
from a local bike shop we
would be more than glad to list
it when Cycling Scene runs and
on our website at www.times-
leader.com.
The same goes for your race
results. Whether you have com-
peted locally or out of town, let
us know and we will publicize
your results.
Send your calendar of events
and race results to me at jsopra-
no@timesleader.com. Please
include Cycling Scene in the
subject.
Charity ride is set for Habitat for Humanity
JOE SOPRANO
C Y C L I N G S C E N E
Joe Soprano is a page designer for
The Times Leader and an avid cyclist.
His Cycling Scene column appears
every other week. Reach him at
jsoprano@timesleader.com or 829-
7164. Follow him on twitter at @tlcy-
cling.
PITTSBURGH — Evgeni
Malkin scored his 50th goal of
the season and added an assist
to lock up his second NHL
scoring title and the Pitts-
burgh Penguins beat the Phila-
delphia Flyers 4-2 on Saturday.
Malkin finished the regular
season with 109 points and
became the ninth player in
Penguins history to reach the
50-goal mark when his wrist
shot with 12 seconds left in the
second period beat Philadel-
phia’s Sergei Bobrovsky to give
Pittsburgh a two-goal lead.
Sidney Crosby, Chris Kunitz
and Pascal Dupuis also scored
for the Penguins, who knocked
off the Flyers for the first time
at Consol Energy Center.
Brent Johnson stopped five
shots in relief of Marc-Andre
Fleury to get the win.
Brayden Schenn and Jaromir
Jagr scored for the Flyers, who
rested leading scorer Claude
Giroux in the regular season
finale in preparation for their
first-round matchup with Pitts-
burgh starting next week.
Bruins 4, Sabres 3
BOSTON — Patrice Berge-
ron had three assists before
scoring the winner in the shoo-
tout to lead defending Stanley
Cup champion Boston into the
playoffs with a win over Buffa-
lo.
The Sabres had already been
eliminated from the playoff
race.
Tyler Seguin scored twice,
and Brad Marchand also had a
goal for the Bruins, who will
be the No. 2 seed in the East.
They open the playoffs next
week against either Ottawa or
Washington.
Blackhawks 3, Red Wings 2
DETROIT — Patrick Kane
scored the only goal of the
shootout to give Chicago the
win over Detroit in the final
game of the regular season for
both teams.
Despite the loss, the Red
Wings clinched the fifth seed
in the Western Conference,
while the Blackhawks finish as
the sixth seed.
Viktor Stalberg and Andrew
Shaw scored in regulation for
Chicago, Patrick Sharp had
two assists and Corey Craw-
ford made 30 saves.
Johan Franzen and Pavel
Datsyuk scored for Detroit.
Jimmy Howard stopped 30
shots.
Datsyuk tied the game with
46 seconds left while Howard
was off for the extra attacker.
Devils 4, Senators 2
NEWARK, N.J. — Ilya Ko-
valchuk scored twice, Stephen
Gionta broke a third-period tie
with his first NHL goal and
New Jersey beat Ottawa for its
sixth straight win.
Petr Sykora also scored, and
Martin Brodeur made 31 saves
for the Devils, who clinched
the No. 6 seed in Eastern Con-
ference. They will face Florida
or Washington in the opening
round.
Matt Gilroy and Jim O’Brien
scored for Ottawa, which will
be the seventh or eighth seed
in the East, facing either the
Rangers or Boston. Craig An-
derson made 30 saves for Otta-
wa.
Flames 5, Ducks 2
CALGARY, Alberta — Ni-
gerian-born Akim Aliu scored
his first two NHL goals to lead
Calgary to a season-ending
win over Anaheim.
By winning their final two
games, the Flames reached the
90-point mark for the eighth
season in a row. However,
since going to the Stanley Cup
finals in 2004, they have been
ousted from the playoffs in the
first round four times followed
by three years of not making
the postseason.
Rangers 4, Capitals 1
NEW YORK — Washington
scored three first-period goals
and third-string goaltender
Braden Holtby made 35 saves
Saturday night to help the
Capitals beat the Rangers 4-1,
spoiling New York’s chance to
clinch the Presidents’ Trophy.
The Rangers (51-24-7) fin-
ished with 109 points for the
third time in franchise history
and remain tied with Vancouv-
er for the league’s top spot.
The Canucks host Edmonton
later Saturday.
Washington (42-32-8) has 92
points and will be the No. 7
seed in the Eastern Confer-
ence if Florida earns at least a
point against Carolina. Wash-
ington would open the playoffs
in Boston, while the Rangers
host Ottawa in the first round.
NHL
AP PHOTO
The Philadelphia Flyers’ Harry Zolnierczyk (29) fights with the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Joe Vitale
during the first period of an NHL game against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Pittsburgh Saturday.
Malkin wins scoring crown
The Associated Press
CHARLESTON, S.C. — Sere-
na Williams even impressed her-
self with her powerful showing
at the Family Circle Cup on Sat-
urday.
Williams needed less than an
hour to dispatch second-seeded
Samantha Sto-
sur 6-1, 6-1 and
advance to the
clay-court final.
“You know, I
think it was
just one of
those days that
I could have
done anything
against anybody,” Williams said.
There aren’t many people in
the world who could’ve with-
stood Williams’ performance at
the Family Circle Tennis Center.
The 10th-ranked player was on
her game from the start, win-
ning the match’s first eight
points and rarely letting Stosur
catch a breath.
On Sunday, Williams will face
Lucie Safarova, a 6-0, 6-0 winner
over Polona Hercog.
Stosur held serve to cut Wil-
liams’ lead to 2-1, then lost the
next nine games. Stosur, who
defeated Williams to win the
U.S. Open title last September,
got a loud cheer from the crowd
when she prevented Williams
from shutting her out in the sec-
ond set.
Williams hit a forehand win-
ner to end the match moments
later, and eliminated Stosur
from a tournament for the sec-
ond straight week. Williams
beat Stosur 7-5, 6-3 last week at
the Sony Ericsson Open, serv-
ing 20 aces — tying per person-
al best — in the hard-court win.
Williams only had seven aces
in this one, but was in com-
mand of nearly every shot she
hit.
“I have to say this is probably
the best match I’ve played in my
career, either in a long time or
it’s up there in the top five,”
Williams said.
Safarova has lost all four
times she’s played Williams.
The 25-year-old from the Czech
Republic watched the opening
semifinal and said she’ll have a
plan to slow down Williams’ at-
tack. After all, Safarova didn’t
lose a game in her semi, some-
thing she joked about with Sere-
na.
“’Yeah, I got you,”’ Safarova
told Williams when they saw
each other after the match.
If Williams matches her Sat-
urday effort in the finals, Safaro-
va will have her hands full. “It’s
a great challenge. She’s a great
player,” Safarova said, “and you
see what she’s done today.”
P R O T E N N I S
Serena routs
Stosur to
make final
By PETE IACOBELLI
AP Sports Writer
Williams
INDIANAPOLIS — Paul
Pierce scored 24 points to help
the Boston Celtics beat the Indi-
ana Pacers 86-72 on Saturday
night.
Ray Allen added 19 points, Ke-
vin Garnett scored 15 and Rajon
Rondo had 12 assists for the Cel-
tics. Boston snapped a two-game
skid and remained ahead of the
Philadelphia 76ers at the top of
the Atlantic Division.
Danny Granger scored 20
points, David West had 16 and
Roy Hibbert added nine points
and 17 rebounds for Indiana.
The Pacers had won four in a
row and had scored more than
100 points in five consecutive
games, but they matched their
lowest point total of the season
against Boston. Indiana shot 35
percent from the field, made just
5 of 22 3-pointers and committed
19 turnovers.
Thepossiblefirst-roundplayoff
opponents split their season se-
ries, winning two games apiece.
The Pacers were coming off a
home winagainst Oklahoma City
on Friday night, but looked tired
against the Celtics.
Boston took a 22-19 lead, then
held the Pacers scoreless for the
next 7:23 to take a 36-19 lead.
Boston led 43-33 at halftime.
The Pacers shot just 3 for 19 in
the second quarter, but hung
tough because they only allowed
Boston to shoot 30 percent. The
Pacers just missed their low half
of the season, which was 29
points in the second half against
Chicago on March 5. Boston roo-
kie Greg Stiemsma had10 points,
five rebounds and five blocks in
the first half.
Pierce hit a 3-pointer, then a
pull-up jumper to extend Bos-
ton’s lead to 15 points.
Granger made a 3-pointer and
Leandro Barbosa made a layup to
cut Boston’s leadto55-48, but the
Celtics held on and led 59-51 at
the end of the quarter. Pierce
scored13 points in the third peri-
od.
Boston led by double digits for
most of the fourth quarter. Indi-
ana tried to make a late surge,
and a 3-pointer by Granger cut
Boston’s lead to 74-65. Allen hit a
3-pointer at the other end a few
seconds later to stop Indiana’s
momentum.
N B A R O U N D U P
Pierce leads Celtics
to win over Pacers
The Associated Press
MIAMI — The collective
mood of the Miami Heat after a
loss onFriday was relatively gloo-
my.
Perspectives changed consid-
erably on Saturday.
The Heat are spending the
weekend hosting Thiago D’Elia,
a 17-year-old high school player
from Atlanta. The kid can shoot
—he was hitting 3-pointers from
NBArange during practice Satur-
day — but his presence was for a
more important reason. D’Elia
has fought cancer, and the Make-
A-Wish Foundation reached out
to the Heat to see if his dream of
hanging out with LeBron James
could become reality.
On Wednesday, D’Elia found
out that it was going to happen.
“It’s unreal,” D’Elia said, wear-
ing a black Heat uniform with
No. 32 —his highschool number
—on it, along with his first name
on the back. “No words for it, re-
ally. It’s kind of overwhelming
but once you get used to it, it’s
pretty fun.”
Even after seeing their 17-
game homecourt winning streak
snapped Friday night by Mem-
phis, Saturday’s workout was a
light one for the Heat, evidenced
by the fact that it ended with a
halfcourt shooting contest, with
D’Elia taking part in that.
He missed. No one was disap-
pointed.
“He’s agreat kid, fromthestory
we’ve gotten to know about him,
and it was a joy to have him with
us today,” Heat coach Erik Spoel-
stra said. “Not only for him, but
also coming off a night like last
night it certainly keeps every-
thing in perspective for all of us.
We are in the toy department of
human affairs.”
D’Elia said he’s followed James
for most of his life, and for rea-
sons that go beyond basketball.
Like James was, D’Elia said he’s
being raised by a single mother,
Laura Roig, who was there for
practice as well on Saturday.
They’ll have courtside seats on
Sunday when the Heat play host
to the Detroit Pistons.
“As a mom, how can I thank
you?” Roig asked James after
practice.
With that, James gave her a
hug.
“It brings it all in perspective,”
James said. “The game is bigger
than just five-on-five or the two
teams meeting last night. We’ve
got fans all over the place and for
him to be here, for this organiza-
tion to put this together, man, it
means a lot.”
D’Elia alsogot a signedauthen-
tic game jersey and a pair of
sneakers from James, as well as
an autograph from Dwyane
Wade. The autograph wasn’t for
himself — D’Elia wanted it for a
friend at home who recently had
surgery.
Heat give Make-A-Wish kid
a weekend to remember
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
The Red Rock Chapter of
the National Wild Turkey
Federation will hold its
annual JAKES event on
Sunday, April 22 at the
Wilkes Barre Twp. Settle-
ment Camp in Thorn-
hurst. The event runs
from 8 a.m. until approx-
imately 4 p.m.
If you are looking for a fun
day for your kids to
attend and learn about
the many things there
are to enjoy in the
outdoors, this event is
for them. For $15 your
child will get a one-year
membership and maga-
zine delivered to your
house, lunch, a t-shirt
and day filled with fun.
For more information on
this event contact Chas-
tity King, event coor-
dinator at 472-1190. This
event is limited to 150
children ages 5-17. Some
of the classses offered
may include: archery,
shotguns (12-17 yr. olds)
.22s (5-11) turkey calling,
trapping and fishing to
name a few.
The North Mountain
Branch of the Qual-
ityDeer Management
Association will hold is
ninth annual QDMA
REACH Banquet on
Saturday, April 14 at the
Triton Hose Company in
Tunkhannock. Doors
open at 4:30 p.m. and
buffet-style dinner
begins at 6 p.m. A live
art auction, silent auc-
tion, gun raffles and
ladies and sportsmen’s
raffles will be held.
Twelve guns will be
auctioned off as well.
Ticket prices are: single -
$50; couple - $75; and
sponsor - $250. For
more information,
contact Chris Denmon
at 477-2238 or Linda
Coolbaugh at 836-2765.
The Pennsylvania Fish
and Boat Commission
will hold its quarterly
business meeting on
April 11-12 at The Confer-
ence Center at Ship-
pensburg University,
500 Newburg Road,
Shippensburg, Pa.
Commission committees
will meet beginning at
10:10 a.m. on Wednesday,
April 11, and again at 8:15
a.m. on Thursday, April
12. Formal consideration
of the agenda by the full
Commission will begin at
approximately 11:05 a.m.
on Thursday, April 12. All
committee meetings
and the formal meeting
are open to the public.
A complete copy of the
meeting schedule and
the full agenda for the
meeting can be found
on the PFBC’s web site
at www.fishand-
boat.com/minutes.htm.
The Factoryville Sports-
man’s Club will host the
annual Fred Loch Memo-
rial Scholarship Shoot
on May 6 on the club
grounds, located on
Lithia Road off Route 6.
This event is to help
fund the club’s scholar-
ship program for grad-
uating seniors at both
Tunkhannock and Lacka-
wanna Trail high
schools. Any Tunk-
hannock or Lackawanna
student may apply, and
club members’ children
attending other schools
may also apply.
Scholarship winners in 2011
were: Hailey Weisenfluh
and Jarrica Garey from
Tunkhannock and Jen-
nifer Brown from Lacka-
wanna Trail.
The format has changed
beginning this year. We
will now be offering a 50
bird and 100 bird course
for our shooters. The 50
bird course is $25 in-
cluding your meal, and
the 100 bird course is
$45 including your meal.
In both cases, each
shooter is to provide
their own ammo.
All shooting begins at 9
a.m. and a meal will be
ready after 11:30 a.m.
Shotguns are also avail-
able if needed; please
indicate on the applica-
tion form. All proceeds
go towards the scholar-
ship fund. This year’s
sporting clays course
will again feature auto-
matic traps.
If you aren’t available to
shoot, you can sponsor
a shooter for $25 or
$45. You may also
sponsor a shooting
station for $25. Dona-
tions of any size are also
appreciated.
Scholarship applications
will be available in the
guidance offices at both
high schools and at the
Factoryville Sportsman
Club. For additional
information or to re-
quest an entry form,
contact either Carl
Tylutki at 945-3137or
Phil McCarthy at 836-
5395 by April 30th. You
can also check the Club
website atwww.fsc-
web.org.
BUL L E T I N
BOARD
N
o matter how one interprets the
numbers, it’s big news.
In a press release this week,
the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Com-
mission reported that, as of April 4,
sales of fishing licenses, vouchers and
permits – mainly Trout/Salmon
Stamps, were up 21 percent when com-
pared to the same time last year.
According to Brenda Verner, the
PFBC’s manager of licensing and regis-
tration, that’s a total of 581,739 licenses
and permits.
Resident licenses sold totaled almost
280,000 as of April 4, more than 51,000
than the same time last year. More
than 6,800 senior licenses have also
been sold already, which is 1,800 ahead
of last year’s pace.
It’s true that license sales could stabi-
lize as the year progresses and when
it’s all said and done the increase may
evaporate, and it’s also accurate to
assume that the mild winter kept most
waterways ice-free and accessible to all
anglers, sparking a surge in sales.
But it doesn’t change the fact that
large numbers of anglers still get excit-
ed about fishing, whether it’s because
of the approaching trout season opener
or the nice weather that we enjoyed for
weeks.
The weather is an indirect reason for
the spike in license sales.
The main factor is the sport of fish-
ing itself.
People love it, and for good reason.
My love for fishing actually began
indoors when I could count my age on
one hand. That’s when my parents took
me to an outdoors show, where I fished
in a makeshift trout pond that was
nothing more than a shallow swim-
ming pool. I remember eagerly await-
ing my turn to walk up and grab a pole
that was nothing more than a rod with
line tied to the end and a chunk of bait
on the hook. The trout slowly swam
around the edge of the pool, and I
anxiously lobbed the chunk of bait in
front of the passing fish.
They rarely hit, but when one did my
excitement level shot through the roof.
If I was lucky I’d pull two or three out
before the session ended and the next
group of eager kids took their turn.
And I remember the pride I felt as I
walked around the rest of the evening
carrying a plastic bag with my trout.
I was hooked.
It wasn’t long after my indoor trout
pond days that my dad took me to ply
my new-found skill in an outdoor set-
ting.
And that’s when the anxiety and
sleepless nights kicked in. Visions of
clear water and schools of trout kept
me awake all night. When I finally
made it to the edge of the stream early
the next morning, those visions turned
into a reality.
And then came the torturous wait.
We’d usually arrive at the stream well
before 7 a.m. to claim a spot. That
meant waiting an hour or more for the
8 a.m. start time.
I was five years old when I experi-
enced my first opening day, and I re-
member every detail vividly. The frigid
morning air, the sound of the stream as
it emptied into the deep hole, and the
sight of greenish/blue trout calmly
holding in the current below.
As the last hour drug on, I repeatedly
asked my dad how much longer as I
stared at my rod and reel and felt the
urge to pick it up and make that first
cast.
After an eternity, someone along the
stream would blow a whistle to signal
that 8 a.m. had arrived, and all at once
everyone lobbed their baited hooks
into the water.
The season had begun.
That excitement is rekindled every
year in April, and it’s ultimately what
draws anglers to the water.
It’s a time when anticipation makes
for a sleepless night, and 8 a.m. can’t
come soon enough.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
Love of fishing
keeps growing
for good reason
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com
It’s understandable if Kathy Sterling has
visions of nightcrawlers, mealworms and
waxworms when she sleeps.
It’s not that Sterling is having night-
mares, but when you spend all day count-
ingandpackagingthousands of worms and
grubs for the upcoming trout season, such
images become ingrained.
Sterling and her husband, Jody, own B-C
Bait in Lehighton. The business sells bulk
orders of minnows, worms and grubs to
more than 100 bait shops in Pennsylvania
and New Jersey. With the April 14 opener
of trout season less than a week away, Ster-
ling’s business has picked up.
During the 10 days before the season
opens, Sterling said her business will pack-
age and sell approximately 2,000 pounds of
fathead minnows and up to 300,000 each of
worms, mealworms and waxworms.
That means a lot of counting.
“If I’m on nightcrawlers one day, I can
package around1,200 cups or 15,000 night-
crawlers,” Sterling said. “It’s a lot of count-
ing and a lot of time.”
Ohio-based Grubco, Inc. also sees it’s
sales for mealworms and waxworms spike
before trout season. Owner Dan Cochran
said his business sells approximately four
million extra mealworms , 300,000 wax-
worms and 100,000 maggots per week be-
fore the season opens.
“It’s about two-and-a-half times more,”
Cochran said. “It’s like a Christmas tree
farmer before Christmas – you have that
one big shot, and for us it’s trout season.”
Grubco sells to bait shops and individual
anglers looking to buy in bulk. The busi-
ness has eight employees and all of the
grubs andcrickets it sells are raisedon-site.
Cochran said the entire process takes
five months, and they begin planning for
trout season around Thanksgiving.
Deciding howmuch of the insect larva to
raise can be a gamble, he said, depending
on the demand for that year.
“We’ve had years when we had to throw
away millions of them, and years when
TROUT SEASON: OPENING DAY IS SATURDAY
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Volunteer Mike Sypniewski, of Wilkes-Barre, left, and Joe Burkardt, of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, load brook
and brown trout into a bucket for stocking at Nescopeck State Park on Friday afternoon. Trout season opens Saturday.
Bait is their business
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See TROUT, Page 9C
Grubco sells minimum orders of 300
mighty mealworms (packaged in cups of
25) and 600 waxworms (packaged in cups
of 50). Cochran said buying live bait in
bulk is affordable in the long run, and
there are steps that need to be taken to
keep the bait alive for longer periods.
Mealworms, he said, should be
refrigerated. Only remove what you
intend to use that day and leave the rest
in the refrigerator. Exposing the
mealworms to drastic temperature
fluctuations can reduce their lifespan, he
said.
Waxworms shouldn’t be refrigerated
but stored in a large container in a room
with a temperature between 55 and 70
degrees. Keep the lid off for plenty of air.
“They should keep for a couple of
months,” Cochran said. “If you refrigerate
them they’ll last three weeks tops.”
It’s no secret that anglers like to fish in nice
weather.
After all, it’s tough to cast in the wind and
it’s even harder to stand in a cold downpour.
But not only doanglers like tohit the water
whentheweather is nice, theyalsoliketobuy
licenses.
Since 2012 licenses became available on
Dec. 31, 2011, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat
Commission reported license and permit
sales are up by 21 percent as of April 4. That
means 53,000 more anglers bought licenses
compared to the same time last year. Resi-
dent license sales are also up, 279,069 com-
pated to 227,405 at the same time last year.
And it’s all due to the weather.
“This year we’ve had significantly warmer
weather and anglers everywhere are excited
to get out and start the season,” said PFBC
executive director John Arway.
The hike in license sales has been seen lo-
cally. Paul Scavone, owner of JS Sporting
Goods in Wilkes-Barre Township, said even
without ice during the winter anglers started
buying licenses in February to fish the Sus-
quehanna River and area lakes.
It’s a trend that continued into March,
Scavone said.
“My fishing license sales for March were
double what they normally are for that
month,” he said. “I really think it’s because of
the warmer weather.”
Joe Lasecki, owner of Nimrod Haven
Sporting Goods in Hanover Township, said
he lost license sales over the winter because
of the lack of ice, but regained those sales in
the weeks leading up to trout season.
“This past month it’s really picked up,” La-
secki said.
Walt Dietz, outreach and education coor-
dinator for the PFBC’s Northeast Region,
said the mild winter had many anglers either
fishing for panfish in lakes or walleye in the
river at times when such places would be in-
accessible. Headdedanglers startedthinking
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Volunteers Ken Whitman, right, and his son
Chase, 8, both of Sugar Notch, stock trout
into Nescopeck Creek on Friday afternoon.
Warm weather
causes a surge
in license sales
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat
Commission says that license and permit
sales are up by 21 percent as of April 4.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See LICENSES, Page 9C
No angler is immune to the antici-
pation that builds before the April 14
opening day of trout season.
Not eventheheadof theagencyrun-
ning the show.
“I remember lying awake the night
before and then getting up early and
fishing with my family on opening
day,” said John Arway, executive di-
rector of the Pennsylvania Fish and
Boat Commission. “Opening day is a
time-honored tradition for so many
families, including grandparents, par-
ents and their children. It’s a lot of fun
that I now share with my grandkids.”
A fun time, and a busy one to.
Area bait shops have reported a
spike in business as the opening day
approaches. JoLasecki, owner of Nim-
rodHavenSportingGoods inHanover
Township, said anglers have been
coming in to stock up on small items,
but the big rush will take place this
week.
“They’ll be buying the Power Baits,
live bait, salmon eggs, lures. All the
usual items,” Lasecki said, adding
sales for trout seasonarefairlypredict-
See OPENING, Page 9C
Opening day is
exciting even for
Fish & Boat boss
Area bait shops owners say they
see anglers are stocking up for
the upcoming season.
TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 9C
➛ S P O R T S
we’ve run out,” Cochran said.
Rather than count each grub,
Cochran’s employees use a
gram scale and a measuring de-
vice.
It’s an accurate method that
speeds up the process, he said,
and timing is crucial when ship-
ping a perishable item.
“Our shipping department is
working an extra 24 hours ev-
ery three days for trout season
orders,” Cochran said. “It’s got
to get shipped right away.”
The method works, as Co-
chran said his replacement rate
on orders is less than a quarter
of one percent.
But while the numbers of
minnows, worms and grubs
that are shipped and used by
anglers may be staggering, it’s
not what it used to be.
Cochran and Sterling both
said the live bait business has
slowed over the years, and
much of it is due to the increas-
ing popularity of lures and Pow-
er Bait.
“People don’t use live bait
like they used to, and things
like Power Bait had an influen-
ce on that,” said Cochran, who
has owned Grubco for 25 years.
“Some anglers like to use artifi-
cials that mimic the live baits,
but what’s more natural than a
real mealworm or waxworm?
“Live bait represents the tra-
dition and simplicity that made
angling popular in the first
place.”
To compensate for the de-
cline, Cochran has shifted
much of his business toward
the pet industry and zoos that
purchase grubs to feed reptiles
and birds. He holds out hope
that anglers will one day switch
back to live bait, and said they
won’t be sorry if they do.
“There isn’t too much that
doesn’t crawl or fly that hasn’t
been used as bait,” Cochran
said. “It’s hard to beat a meal-
worm or waxworm when it
comes to catching trout.”
TROUT
Continued fromPage 8C
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Brook and brown trout wait to
be stocked into Nescopeck
Creek on Friday afternoon.
about trout earlier thenusual due
to the nice weather.
“They’re prepping early and
getting their licenses,” Dietz
said. “Plus you have ice anglers
that didn’t get to fish this winter
and they’re anxious to get out for
trout.”
Dietz cautioned that license
sales may stabilize as the year
goes on because many people
bought them earlier.
“When we look at the stats at
the end of the year, it may not
necessarily mean more anglers
bought licenses this year,” he
said. “Of course we hope they do,
but we won’t know for sure if
there is a trend of more anglers
picking up the sport or returning
to fishing.”
LICENSES
Continued fromPage 8C
able.
“It’s not a mystery. The
stocked trout aren’t too particu-
lar, especially during the first
week. What drives a particular
bait or lure is someone will see
another angler catching trout
on something, they’ll come in
and buy it and tell their friends.
Then you have a trend for that
particular item for the year.”
One trend that Paul Scavone
has seen in his Wilkes-Barre
Township shop, JS Sporting
Goods, is a revival of the salmon
egg.
“The popularity of salmon
eggs fell off a bit because of Pow-
er Bait, but now they’re making
a comeback because guys are re-
alizing it’s a proven, effective
bait,” Scavone said.
Bait shops aren’t the only bu-
sy places in the weeks leading
up to trout season.
The PFBC’s Northeast Re-
gion Office has also been bus-
tling, but it doesn’t happen only
for trout season.
Walt Dietz, outreach and edu-
cation coordinator for the
Northeast Region, said his of-
fice has been busy year round.
“A lot of people think we’re
seasonal innature, but that’s not
really the case,” Dietz said. “It’s
just that right now the anglers
are seeing the white stocking
trucks out in full force.”
Dietz said the tradition of the
trout season opener also adds to
the excitement of the season.
He likened the trout opener to
the first day of deer season, but
with one difference.
“A lot of anglers fish closer to
home, as opposedto going away
to hunting camp for a fewdays,”
Dietz said. “With the access to
stocked streams and lakes that
are close to so many urban ar-
eas, people can trout fish almost
anywhere.
“We want it to be convenient
because we want people to have
the opportunity to get out there
and catch fish.”
OPENING
Continued fromPage 8C
TROUT SEASON FACTS
• Trout season opens on
Saturday, April 14 at 8 a.m.
• Minimum size is seven
inches and the creel limit
(from opening day through
Labor Day) is five. Other rules
apply for Special Regulations
Areas (consult the Summary
of PA Fishing Laws and
Regulations).
• Anglers 16 and older must
possess a valid fishing license
and Trout/Salmon Stamp.
Licenses and permits must be
displayed.
• A resident license costs
$22.70 and a Trout/Salmon
Stamp is $9.70.
spot, and on Sunday he faces a
Swede whomhe trounced in the
Ryder Cup two years ago in
Wales.
“I love it here, and I love noth-
ing more than being in the last
group on Sunday at the Mas-
ters,” Mickelson said. “It’s the
great thing in professional golf.”
Hanson, who has never been
closer thansevenshots goingin-
to the lead at any major, was at
9-under 207.
Mickelson gave the leader-
board some star power when so
manyothers fadedor, inthecase
of Tiger Woods, never came
close to getting there. Woods
now has gone 26 consecutive
holes on the back nine at Augus-
ta without a birdie. He had to
settle for a 72 and was 12 shots
behind, his largest 54-hole defi-
cit ever at the Masters.
But he wasn’t alone.
U.S. Open champion Rory
McIlroy, who started the day
one shot out of the lead, made
double bogey from the trees on
the first hole and it only got
worse from there. He had three
6s on his card and went out in
42, finishing with a 77 that left
him 10 shots behind. He played
withSergioGarcia, whoshot 75.
Neither made a birdie until No.
12, and they hugged each other
on the green to celebrate.
Fred Couples, at 52 the oldest
player atop the leaderboard go-
ing into the weekend at Augus-
ta, bogeyed his first two holes
andtriedto stay inthe game. He
woundupwitha 75 andwas sev-
en shots behind.
A win would give Mickelson
his fourth green jacket, same as
Woods and Arnold Palmer.
But this is far froma two-man
race.
Former British Open cham-
pion Louis Oosthuizen rode his
sweet swing to a 69 and was on-
ly two shots behind. Bubba Wat-
son birdied the last hole for a 70
and was three shots back, fol-
lowed by Matt Kuchar, who
joined Mickelson as the first
players in 13 years to birdie the
18th hole each of the first three
rounds.
The group at 4-under 212 in-
cluded Lee Westwood (72) and
Padraig Harrington, who shot
68 and summed up what awaits
on Sunday.
“It’s not the player that plays
the most consistent that wins at
the Masters. The player who
plays probably some of the most
exciting golf wins at the Mas-
ters,” Harrington said. “You on-
ly have to look at the way Phil
has won some of his majors.
You’ve got to take on golf shots.
Fortune favors the brave at
times here.”
MASTERS
Continued fromPage 1C
AUGUSTA, Ga. — Tiger
Woods’ latest temper tantrum
did not go over well with some
fans at the Masters.
Woods caused a scene with
his boorish behavior at but-
toned-down Augusta National
on Friday, scowling, cursing,
tossing clubs. He even went so
far as to give one a swift kick
after his shot on the 16th tee
landed in the bunker.
“It’s not what you want to
see,” said Charles Hatcher III,
who was at the course on Sat-
urday with his 11-year-old son,
Charles IV, and his father, Char-
les Sr. “Golf is a gentleman’s
game, and you should treat it
as such.”
Especially at Augusta.
The home of the Masters
oozes decorum. Members wear
their green jackets no matter
how high the temperatures
climb; there are no garish video
boards or corporate logos to
take away from the simple
beauty of the shrubs and the
Georgia pines. “Patrons” know
their golf and their history, and
show a proper appreciation for
both.
“I’m not making excuses,
trust me. What he’s been
through —
largely
brought on by
himself —
and not play-
ing up to ex-
pectations,
and the expec-
tations he
puts on himself, it’s hard some-
times to keep your emotions in
check,” said two-time U.S.
Open champion Curtis Strange,
working as a broadcaster at the
Masters. “With that said, you
have to be somewhat aware of
the stage you’re on.
Expectations that Woods
would win a fifth green jacket
skyrocketed two weeks ago
when he won at Bay Hill — his
first PGA Tour victory in 30
months. But his chances began
imploding with a flurry of way-
ward tee shots, blocked ap-
proaches and missed putts
from close range.
As his game melted down, so
did he. He cursed the bad shots
or took mock swings in anger
— sometimes doing both. He
hung his head or looked sky-
ward with exasperation after
the missed putts. He flipped
clubs and, after that poor tee
shot on 16, booted his 9-iron
about 15 yards.
P R O G O L F
Tiger’s antics disrupt
Masters atmosphere
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
Woods
SWIFTWATER – Becky
Demko pitched a one-hitter to
lead Hazleton Area to a 12-2
victory over Pocono Mountain
East in five innings Saturday.
Demko allowed only a
ground single in the fourth
inning to Shanay Kleeman. She
struck out eight batters.
Maria Trivelpiece led the
Cougars three hits, an RBI and
two runs. Shannon Salvaterra
went 2-for-4 with two RBIs and
a double. Lexi Wolk produced
three runs and two hits. Carly
Rossi hit a two-run double.
Hazleton Area 12, Pocono
Mountain East 2
Hazleton Area............................. 800 04 — 12
Pocono Mountain East.............. 000 02 — 2
WP – Becky Demko, 5 IP, 1H, 2R, 0ER, 4BB, 8K;
LP – Theresa Smith, 5 IP, 11H, 12R, 7ER, 2BB,
2K;
2B— HAZ, Shannon Salvaterra, Carly Rossi.
Top hitters – HAZ: Maria Trivelpiece 3-4, RBI,
2R; Salvaterra 2-4, 2 RBI; Lexi Wolk 2-4, RBI, 3R;
Abby Sachse 2-2, RBI; Rossi 2RBI
COLLEGE TRACK
Cougars relay breaks school
record
The men’s 4x800m relay
finished eighth in a school-
record time of 8:07.92 and
qualified for ECACs. Joe Ardo
finished fourth in the discus
with a distance of 13.66 meters.
Angel Guzman finished fifth,
throwing a school-record dis-
tance of 40.93 meters.
For the women, Stacey Per-
rins won the 200 meter with a
time of 23.28. Jill Dunn fin-
ished fourth in the 100 meter
hurdles with a time of 16.07,
and Ashlee Ward had a height
of 1.62 meters in the high jump,
all qualifying for ECACs.
L O C A L R O U N D U P
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Coughlin’s Devon Davis tries for a kill as Abington Heights’ Jake Roba, No. 21, defends during a
volleyball match Saturday at the Lake-Lehman boys volleyball tournament. Crestwood defeated
Coughlin in the championship game. Crestwood’s Nick Banos was named tournament MVP. No
further details were available at press time.
Demko hurls 1-hitter for Hazleton
The Associated Press
former opening-day starter for
the Nationals who failed to land
the fifthspot inthe rotationof the
parent club. Game time is 5 p.m.
Syracuse 4, SWB Yankees 0
SWB YANKEES SYRACUSE
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dickerson cf 3 0 1 0 Brown cf 5 1 1 0
Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 Bynum ss 4 1 1 1
Pearce 1b 4 0 1 0 Paul lf 4 1 1 0
Cust dh 4 0 0 0 Moore 1b 4 1 3 1
Laird 3b 4 0 0 0 Harper rf 3 0 1 0
Curtis rf 4 0 1 0 Maldndo c 4 0 1 1
Garner lf 3 0 1 0 Teahen dh 3 0 1 1
Pena ss 3 0 0 0 Rivero 3b 4 0 1 0
Bernier 2b 3 0 2 0 Hoffpauir 2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 32 0 4 0 Totals 35 4 11 4
SWB Yankees .................... 000 000 000 — 0
Syracuse ............................. 102 100 00x — 4
DP– Syracuse 1. LOB– SWBYankees 6, Syracuse
11. HR – Bynum (1). SB –Brown (1), Teahen (1),
Paul (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
SWB Yankees
Banuelos (L, 0-1) ..... 3.1 11 4 4 1 2
O’Connor .................. 2.2 0 0 0 2 3
Eppley ....................... 1.1 0 0 0 0 2
Cedeno ...................... 0.2 0 0 0 1 0
Syracuse
Maya (W, 1-0)........... 6.0 4 0 0 0 4
Bibens-Dirkx (S, 1).. 3.0 2 0 0 1 4
Umpires – HP: Jeff Gosney. 1B: A.J. Johnson. 2B:
Chris Ward. 3B: Chris Conroy.
T: 2:46. Att: 4,243.
YANKEES
Continued fromPage 1C
TAMPA, Fla. — Steven Whit-
ney scored twice and Boston Col-
lege beat Ferris State 4-1 on Sat-
urday night for its fifth NCAA
hockey title and third in five sea-
sons.
The Eagles (33-10-1) finished
with a 19-game winning streak,
outscoring their opponents 77-21
duringthat span. Ferris State(26-
12-5) was making its first Frozen
Four appearance.
Paul Carey broke a tie with a
power-play goal midway through
the first period, redirecting Brian
Dumoulin’s blast from left point
to make it 2-1.
Johnny Gaudreau also scored
for Boston College.
Garrett Thompson scored for
Ferris State.
Whitney opened the scoring at
3:18 of the first period, stealing a
pass and beating lunging goalie
Taylor Nelson. Thompson tied it
at 5:19, and Carey put the Eagles
in front at 10:33.
Gaudreau weaved through the
Ferris State defense tomake it 3-1
with 3:02 left in the game, and
Whitney added an empty-net
goal with 1:03 to go.
H O C K E Y
BC wins
NCAA title
The Associated Press
they’re trying to do out there,” he
said.
Or could it be because Munroe
owns a house 25 minutes outside
of Hartford, where the Whale call
home?
“I don’t know. Maybe I’m play-
ing for a contract,” he joked.
Whatever the reason, Munroe
was the main factor behind the
Penguins 3-0 win over the Whale
on Saturday night. It was the
third time he faced Connecticut
this season, and he shut themout
every time.
Saturday’s win wraps up a
weekend sweep for the Penguins,
which began with a 4-2 victory
over Hershey on Friday.
Head coach John Hynes liked
what he saw from his team over
the weekend, but stopped short
of declaringthat thePenguins are
ready for the playoffs.
“I still think we can get to an-
other level. We’ve taken a nice
step this weekend, but there are
still some things we can improve
to get completely ready for the
first-round series,” Hynes said.
Saturday’s win coupled with a
Hershey shootout loss to Syra-
cuse moves the Penguins five
points ahead of the Bears for the
fourth spot in the conference and
home ice advantage.
On Saturday, the Penguins
cruisedthroughthefirst twoperi-
ods with sound defense backed
by Munroe, who stopped all 15
shots he faced including a string
of eight to close out the first.
The offense was also clicking,
with a first period goal from Si-
monDespres followedbya break-
away tally from Bryan Lerg 49
seconds into the second period,
and a Geoff Walker power-play
score five minutes later to make
it 3-0.
Munroe was stellar in the third
period also, making a diving save
on Jonathan Audy-Marchessault
duringa power play andstopping
all 12 Connecticut shots he faced
to earn his fifth shutout of the
season.
Munroe said killing off the
third-period power play was cru-
cial.
“It’s still only 3-0. They get a
goal early and the tide can turn
real quick,” he said. “It was a big
kill.”
The goal from Despres turned
out to the game winner and it
came after Cal O’Reilly made a
long pass from the boards out to
the top of the slot. Despres
rushed across the blue line and
buzzeda wrister past Whale goal-
tender Chad Johnson.
“It was a good momentum
swing for us and we built on it
from there,” he said.
The game took a nasty turn
midway through the third period
when Connecticut’s Jared Night-
ingale cross-checked Despres re-
peatedly after he fell to the ice
along the boards in the offensive
zone. Colin McDonald rushed in
and cross-checked Nightingale
before getting jumped by Con-
necticut’s Andre Deveaux.
“I was trying to protect the
puck, I fell and he cross-checked
me as I tried to get back up,”
Despres said. “I wanted to turn
around and fight, but I couldn’t
get back up.”
Penguins 3, Connecticut 0
Connecticut ................................................. 0 0 0 — 0
Penguins...................................................... 1 2 0 — 3
First period: 1, W-B/Scranton, Despres 5 (O’Reilly,
Thompson), 12:16. Penalties-Bortuzzo Wbs (knee-
ing), 13:28; Tanski Ct (fighting), 16:06; Grant Wbs
(fighting), 16:06.
Second period: 2, W-B/Scranton, Lerg 26 0:49.
3, W-B/Scranton, Walker 18 (Williams, Despres),
5:18 (PP). Penalties-Deveaux Ct (hooking), 5:10;
Samuelsson Wbs (hooking), 6:08; Nightingale Ct
(high-sticking), 9:05; Petersen Wbs (hooking),
11:55; Deveaux Ct (tripping), 13:34.
Third period: No Scoring.Penalties-O’Reilly
Wbs (tripping), 0:30; Deveaux Ct (roughing, miscon-
duct), 8:26; Nightingale Ct (fighting), 8:26; Bortuzzo
Wbs (fighting), 8:26; McDonald Wbs (cross-check-
ing, misconduct), 8:26; Bell Ct (hooking), 18:24.
Shots on Goal: Connecticut 11-4-12-27. W-B/
Scranton 10-11-6-27. Power Play Opportunities:
Connecticut 0/ 4; W-B/Scranton1/ 4. Goalies: Con-
necticut, Johnson 22-18-5 (27 shots-24 saves). W-
B/Scranton, Munroe 19-9-3 (27 shots-27 saves). A:
7,901. Referees: Graham Skilliter (48). Linesmen:
Francis Trempe (56), Alex Stagnone (7).
PENS
Continued fromPage 1C
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
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information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 56/29
Average 56/35
Record High 86 in 2010
Record Low 14 in 1982
Yesterday 22
Month to date 141
Year to date 4482
Last year to date 5741
Normal year to date 5640
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00”
Month to date 0.30”
Normal month to date 0.74”
Year to date 5.68”
Normal year to date 7.69”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 2.80 -0.27 22.0
Towanda 1.78 -0.12 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 2.85 -0.05 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 58-65. Lows: 35-37. Partly to most-
ly sunny skies and breezy.
The Poconos
Highs: 65-67. Lows: 43-46. Partly to most-
ly sunny skies and breezy.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 52-61. Lows: 32-39. Partly to mostly
cloudy skies with a slight chance of
showers.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 67-68. Lows: 43-46. Partly to most-
ly sunny skies and breezy.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 62-68. Lows: 40-46. Partly to
mostly sunny skies.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 34/30/.16 41/24/s 45/27/pc
Atlanta 65/48/.00 78/49/pc 74/47/s
Baltimore 64/38/.00 69/50/pc 66/42/sh
Boston 52/38/.00 53/43/pc 60/44/c
Buffalo 52/31/.00 52/38/sh 52/35/c
Charlotte 68/37/.00 77/49/pc 74/45/pc
Chicago 66/34/.00 64/45/pc 57/37/pc
Cleveland 57/27/.00 54/44/pc 51/36/sh
Dallas 81/59/.00 77/62/t 84/60/t
Denver 59/24/.00 72/42/s 73/45/s
Detroit 64/32/.00 61/42/pc 54/36/sh
Honolulu 81/72/.00 83/69/s 81/68/s
Houston 83/60/.00 81/63/pc 83/62/pc
Indianapolis 65/38/.00 65/44/pc 60/38/t
Las Vegas 73/46/.00 83/59/s 86/61/s
Los Angeles 80/54/.00 71/52/s 69/52/s
Miami 82/68/.00 79/66/s 80/69/pc
Milwaukee 60/32/.00 62/42/pc 54/34/pc
Minneapolis 55/45/.17 58/36/pc 47/29/pc
Myrtle Beach 66/37/.00 73/55/pc 71/53/s
Nashville 73/41/.00 72/43/pc 72/44/s
New Orleans 79/65/.00 80/60/pc 83/61/pc
Norfolk 66/51/.00 71/48/pc 70/50/pc
Oklahoma City 71/58/.00 72/55/pc 76/54/pc
Omaha 63/49/.37 70/38/s 60/36/s
Orlando 79/61/.00 80/60/s 83/60/pc
Phoenix 88/56/.00 93/67/s 94/67/s
Pittsburgh 59/33/.00 62/37/sh 56/35/sh
Portland, Ore. 62/31/.00 61/45/c 61/48/c
St. Louis 69/42/.00 68/45/s 69/41/s
Salt Lake City 59/28/.00 72/50/s 76/54/s
San Antonio 84/66/.00 81/61/c 83/62/pc
San Diego 76/53/.00 72/55/s 70/53/s
San Francisco 64/41/.00 63/50/pc 65/51/pc
Seattle 60/35/.00 56/48/c 57/48/c
Tampa 82/61/.00 82/56/s 81/57/pc
Tucson 88/48/.00 90/58/s 91/60/s
Washington, DC 65/42/.00 71/44/pc 67/42/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 45/37/.00 50/45/sh 56/46/c
Baghdad 93/59/.00 96/72/s 99/69/s
Beijing 68/34/.00 70/45/s 74/46/pc
Berlin 41/30/.21 44/31/c 51/39/c
Buenos Aires 82/52/.00 72/54/c 74/59/c
Dublin 55/46/.00 53/43/c 50/37/sh
Frankfurt 46/37/.08 50/39/pc 56/42/c
Hong Kong 73/68/.00 77/70/sh 78/72/t
Jerusalem 90/63/.00 82/58/pc 69/48/s
London 52/45/.00 59/41/sh 56/45/c
Mexico City 79/52/.00 74/52/sh 75/50/sh
Montreal 46/32/.00 49/37/c 48/35/sh
Moscow 37/28/.00 43/37/sh 39/30/rs
Paris 55/41/.00 57/48/sh 56/42/c
Rio de Janeiro 84/77/.00 85/72/t 85/71/pc
Riyadh 81/66/.00 88/70/pc 91/69/pc
Rome 63/54/.00 64/47/sh 60/43/pc
San Juan 85/75/.15 84/74/t 82/72/t
Tokyo 54/43/.00 56/44/s 64/48/s
Warsaw 45/36/.04 42/27/pc 45/31/s
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
68/45
Reading
66/40
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
61/36
63/35
Harrisburg
67/41
Atlantic City
65/45
New York City
62/48
Syracuse
58/36
Pottsville
64/39
Albany
56/35
Binghamton
Towanda
59/32
61/34
State College
63/37
Poughkeepsie
59/37
77/62
64/45
72/42
81/61
58/36
71/52
63/50
71/43
52/33
56/48
62/48
61/42
78/49
79/66
81/63
83/69
53/28
41/24
71/44
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 6:35a 7:37p
Tomorrow 6:33a 7:38p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 10:23p 7:28a
Tomorrow 11:33p 8:17a
Last New First Full
April 13 April 21 April 29 May 5
Today looks like
it is going to be
very nice. If you
have any out-
door egg hunts
or activities
planned, you're
in luck! This
morning will
start out cold,
but warm up to
60 with mostly
sunny skies.
More clouds will
come in the
afternoon and
we could see a
late night show-
er. Monday will
be mild with
scattered show-
ers. Then rain
will carry on and
off through
Wednesday.
Sunshine will
return Thursday
with highs in the
mid-50s. The 60s
will return just in
time for the
weekend. Friday
will be mostly
sunny and
Saturday will be
partly cloudy
with the chance
for some show-
ers late in the
day.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: An area of low pressure will produce a mix of rain and snow showers across
far northern portions of New England today. A few showers will also be possible over portions of the
Great Lakes. Scattered thunderstorms will develop over portions of Texas, as well as across parts of
New Mexico and southern Colorado.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Mostly sunny
MONDAY
Partly
sunny, a
shower
58°
38°
WEDNESDAY
Råin
52°
32°
THURSDAY
Partly
sunny
55°
31°
FRIDAY
Mostly
sunny
60°
35°
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny,
showers
65°
35°
TUESDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
showers
54°
32°
60
°
30
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012
timesleader.com
T
he suspended animation at the
former Sterling hotel and much
of the University Corners retail
development is evidence that “build it
and they will come,” while an attrac-
tive notion in the movie fantasy “Field
of Dreams,” may not be the most effec-
tive way to attract new residents and
businesses to downtown Wilkes-Barre.
The two projects in purgatory also
illustrate how things can go off track
when good intentions and easy money
overwhelm realistic expectations in the
cutthroat world of commercial real
estate.
Both the Greater Wilkes-Barre
Chamber, backer of University Corners,
and CityVest, the nonprofit behind the
Sterling, convinced themselves and
others that latent demand would reveal
itself once a suitable property was
available. Both also had the benefit of
millions of dollars in public funding
that most private developers lack.
The absence of fiscal discipline al-
lowed costly projects to go forward
despite an absence of commitments
from potential occupants or purchas-
ers. A more pragmatic evaluation of
University Corners might have
spawned a smaller complex with full
storefronts rather than the shiny but
empty shell most of the ground-floor
retail space now is. And it surely would
have meant that before spending
$600,000 — in state gambling taxes —
to prepare a vacant 7,418-square-foot
section as an Irish pub there would
have been an actual tenant ready to
move in.
At the Sterling, there apparently was
so much certainty an eager buyer
would surface that $6 million provided
by Luzerne County was spent largely to
take down an unwanted tower and to
acquire more property rather than to
preserve the integrity of the structure
that is now damaged beyond repair.
I know what advocates of these pro-
jects will say — that if it wasn’t for
their efforts these parts of the city
would now be crumbling, unsightly fire
hazards that would discourage busi-
nesses and residents from moving
downtown. In fact, if it wasn’t for the
theaters at University Corners, fewer
new restaurants and shops would have
opened on South Main Street, they’ll
claim.
There may be some truth in that, but
there are reasons for doubt. First, few
of those businesses are located in the
theater block and other than the ones
there, none are in new buildings. Also,
it’s likely that new sidewalks and street-
lights had a lot to do with filling spaces
that had been empty for years. Given
that many of the new businesses are
bars and restaurants, it may simply be
that some smart entrepreneurs decided
to take advantage of the long-neglected
college market.
Certainly the Great Recession had
some effect on the viability of both
projects. But an honest appraisal of the
risks and potential rewards would have
taken into account that the real estate
boom of the early 2000s could not be
sustained. Combined with an honest
look at the demographics of the city
and region, that would have signaled a
more cautious approach, one that
might have resulted in less grand but
also more successful developments.
Thankfully, the theaters seem to be
doing fine and undoubtedly attract
some shoppers and diners to down-
town. But the forlorn-looking empty
spaces there and the unsightly Sterling
block project a poor image, one fueled
in part by plans that leaned too heavily
on misplaced optimism and not
enough on clear-eyed realism.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
‘Supply side’
developments
fall far short
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
IT’S TAX WEEK, SO
for all you procrasti-
nators, either request
your extension or get
a local CPA ASAP.
One local eatery is
helping you to save
some money this
week, though it’s not a write-off.
Cork Bar & Restaurant in Wilkes-
Barre is offering a 1040 Tax Week
Discount this Tuesday through Sat-
urday. Get $10 off a dinner check of
$40 or more.
Today also marks Easter, so start-
ing tomorrow Easter candy will go on
clearance at area grocery and drug
stores. Hey peeps, load up on Peeps.
Grab a Mini Iced Cappy Blast every
Wednesday this month at Baskin
Robbins for 99 cents. And for every
one you purchase, Baskin Robbins
will donate a meal to Feeding Amer-
ica.
I am a big Old Navy fan and while I
love heading to the stores, sometimes
I like to shop online. I like it even
more now that any purchase over $50
will ship for free.
Here’s a sweet smelling deal for
you today at Bath and Body Works.
Buy three Signature Collection body
care items priced up to $34.50 each
and get three equal or lesser value
Signature Collection body care items
for free. Clearance items, gift sets,
home fragrance, travel and trial sizes,
and Anti-Bacterial Collection items
are among the exclusions.
For all the folks out there with
smart phones with a touch screen,
fingerprints and smudges are a con-
stant issue. One company has a prod-
uct that will help. KIMTECH is giv-
ing away samples of touch screen
wipes, but hurry, supplies are limited.
Head here to try to snag one before
they’re gone: www.kcdiy.com/touch-
screen.
Since today is a holiday, it might be
a bit easier to try to win some free-
bies from Victoria’s Secret.
The lingerie retailer has been giv-
ing away reward cards to the first
1,333 people on their Facebook page
starting at noon each day through
April 15.
Prizes include $10 off $50 purchase
coupons and gift cards with values of
$50, $100 or $500 that are redeem-
able in-store or online through April
30. They have been going fast but
with people out and about today for
Easter you might have better odds.
For details and to try to win, head
here: www.facebook.com/victorias-
secret/app_346827745352858.
If you aren’t a Shop Your Way Re-
wards member at Kmart, now’s a
good time to become one.
The retailer is offering all members
the chance this week to double manu-
facturer’s coupons up to $1. You must
have at least $25 of health, grocery or
beauty merchandise in your order to
qualify and you can use only up to
five coupons per customer per day.
Check out the Kmart circular in-
serted into today’s Times Leader
that’s chock full of other rewards club
member offers.
Best wishes for a good Easter and
Passover.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Prepare those tax forms; great promotions are all over the place
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader Staff
Writer, may be reached at 829-7269. Follow
him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder
FORT WORTH, Texas —
With pointy red gnome hats, a
cruise giveaway and plenty of
balloons, Travelocity turned
sweet 16 last month.
But it hasn’t been all cup-
cakes and champagne for the
Southlake, Texas-based travel
websitethat operates acustom-
er contact center in Hanover
Industrial Estates.
Once considered a trailblaz-
er, Travelocity has struggled
for thepast fewyears tokeepup
with competitors like Expedia
or Priceline.
“We weren’t moving as fast
as we needed to,” CEO Carl
Sparks said about newer, nim-
bler competitors. “We’re16 and
so sometimes we think of our-
selves as one of the elderly
companies in the space be-
cause we were around since its
inception. ... Yet 16 is quite
young for a multibillion-dollar
company.”
Since Sparks took the topjob
a year ago, he andhis executive
team have refocused the com-
pany on hotel products, build-
your-own-vacation packages
and mobile devices. In Febru-
ary, the company launched its
first iPad app, which allows us-
ers to book airline tickets, ho-
tels and rental cars from their
tablets and offers hotel deals
exclusive to its mobile users.
Created in 1996 by the Sabre
Group, then part of American
Airlines’ parent, AMR Corp.,
Travelocity first offered travel
content to consumers brows-
ingtheWebwith28.8Kbps mo-
dems. Withina year, they could
buy airline tickets, book hotels
and reserve rental cars on the
site.
As dot-coms hit Wall Street
withsoaringinitial publicoffer-
ings, Travelocity became publi-
cly traded in 2000 through its
acquisition of Preview Travel.
But it faced increasing compe-
titionfromExpedia, whichwas
Travelocity works to get back its magic
By ANDREA AHLES
McClatchy Newspapers
See TRAVELOCITY, Page 2D
SEATTLE — The bad news
came to McFarland & Co. in an
email from Amazon.com. The
world’s largest Internet retailer
wanted better wholesale terms
for the small publisher’s books.
Starting Jan. 1, 2012 —then only
19 days away — Amazon would
buy the publisher’s books at 45
percent off the cover price,
roughly double its current dis-
count.
For McFarland, an independ-
ent publisher of scholarly books
situated in the mountains of
North Carolina, Amazon’s email
presented a money-losing propo-
sition.
“It was the apocalypse,” said
Karl-Heinz Roseman, director of
sales and marketing at McFar-
land, which has a long track re-
cord of giving all its retail part-
ners the same discount.
McFarland and Amazon have
shared a mutually beneficial rela-
tionship for more than a decade.
A well-regarded source of books
onbaseball andchess, McFarland
helped Amazon fulfill its mission
of offering “Earth’s biggest selec-
tion.” And Amazon —in contrast
to traditional bookstores — list-
ed all of McFarland’s titles, no
matter how arcane.
Last year, Amazon generated
nearly 70 percent of McFarland’s
retail sales and 15 percent of its
entire business.
“If we made a change for Ama-
zon, we’d have to do it for every-
one, and that would jeopardize
our business,” Roseman said.
“We couldn’t exist like that.”
Now, McFarland and others in
the book world worry that Ama-
zon will use its pricing pressure
to crush publishers. They say
MCT PHOTO
Amazon co-sponsored last
year’s South Lake Union Block
Party and has given local writ-
ers groups grants of about
$25,000 each.
Amazon
squeezing
publishers
By AMY MARTINEZ
The Seattle Times
See AMAZON, Page 2D
States make sure the equip-
ment from Canada, Germany
and the United States is ready
to go on line. On Tuesday, if all
the equipment passes muster,
the brewing process will begin.
The Maiers said that beer
should be on tap at local bars
and taverns by Memorial Day
and in bottles at area beer dis-
tributors and six-pack stores a
few weeks later.
J
ENKINS TWP. – What started as a father-son trip
to Boston three years ago to a craft brewers’ con-
ference will culminate this week when the brew-
ing units are fired up and the Susquehanna Brew-
ing Co. begins making beer.
The smell of hops was in the
air last week as the final tou-
ches were being put into place
inside the sprawling brewery
that was once home to United
Beverage of NEPA, a beer dis-
tributorship owned by the
brewery’s current owners Ed
Maier, his son Fred and Mark
Nobile.
On Monday the brewery will
look more like a laboratory as
engineers from England, Aus-
tria, Germany and the United
EdMaier remembers a timenot longago
whenonly42beer breweries remainedinthe
UnitedStates.
Theyear was1974andSchaefer was the
world’s best-sellingbeer withSchlitz, Gene-
seeandStroh’s still popular at thecorner
tavern. Miller Litewas just a year oldandwas
officiallycalled“LiteBeer fromMiller.”
“Theindustrywas caving,” saidMaier,
great-great-grandsonof local brewingicon
Charles Stegmaier. Things weresobadthat
Maier soldhis family’s brewinglabel and
names that year totheLionBreweryin
Wilkes-Barre.
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Fred Maier, co-founder/vice president of Susquehanna Brewing Co., holds a glass of grains that will be used in
making the company’s beer.
A NEW BREW
By ANDREWM. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com
See BREWERY, Page 2D
Owners foresee
a crafty boom
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See CRAFT, Page 2D
FRIEDMAN ELECTRIC
Courtney (Sav-
age) Sha-
trowskas has
joined the
company as a
marketing
specialist.
Shatrowskas
holds a bache-
lor’s degree in
marketing from Penn State
University.
LUZERNE COUNTY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
The Foundation Board of Directors
has elected new officers for
2012. The new officers are:
James Burke, vice president/
regional executive, Luzerne
Bank, foundation board presi-
dent; Robert Tamburro, vice
president, TFP LTD real estate
development, foundation board
first vice president; Robert
Stanley, financial advisor, Merrill
Lynch, foundation board second
vice president; Judith Aita,
owner, Company’s Coming,
foundation board treasurer; and
David Sawicki, director, business
solutions and customized train-
ing, LCCC, foundation board
executive secretary.
BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF
NORTHEASTERN
PENNSYLVANIA
Alexia Kita Blake, Esq., Blake Law
Offices, L.L.C. owner/member,
has joined the board of directors.
She resides in
Moosic Lakes
with her
husband, Geff,
and three
children.
GEISINGER
WYOMING
VALLEY
MEDICAL CENTER
Liza Behrens, MSN, RN, CCRC,
associate director of nursing
research, was recently named
president-elect of the Interna-
tional Association of Clinical
Research Nurses. She earned
her first nursing degree and a
bachelor’s degree in biology
from Norwich University, North-
field, Vt.; her baccalaureate
nursing degree from Cedar Crest
College, Allentown; and her
master’s degree in clinical re-
search administration from
George Washington University,
Washington D.C.
GEISINGER COMMUNITY
MEDICAL CENTER
Dr. Gerald Maloney was named
associate chief medical officer
for Geisinger Northeast. Malo-
ney obtained a Bachelor of
Science degree in pharmacy
from Duquesne University in
Pittsburgh and a Master of
Science degree in Human Ser-
vices Administration from Miser-
icordia University in Dallas. He
earned his Doctor of Osteopath-
ic Medicine degree from Phila-
delphia College of Osteopathic
Medicine.
CORPORATE LADDER
Shatrowskas
Burke Tamburro
Stanley Aita
Sawicki
Blake
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
HAZLETON CHAMBER NET-
WORKING MIXER: Tuesday, 5-7
p.m., Damon’s, 120 Route 93,
Hazleton. Complimentary hors
d’oeuvres, cash bar, prizes. Free
for members, employees, co-
workers and guests. Reservation
required; call 455-1509 or email
jferry@hazletonchamber.org.
WYOMING COUNTY CHAMBER
LUNCHEON: Wednesday, 1 1:45
a.m.-1 p.m., Purkey’s Pink Apple,
Route 6, Tunkhannock. Officials
from Cabot Oil & Gas will de-
scribe their investments in the
region. Free for chamber mem-
bers; non-members, $10 per
person. To reserve, call 836-7755
or email Deborah@Wyccc.com.
PSU EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT
SERIES: Thursday, 7:45
a.m.-9:30 a.m., Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center, 77 E. Market
St., Wilkes-Barre. Topic is new
Luzerne County governance and
management. Keynote speakers
will be James Bobeck, chairman
of Luzerne County Council and
Robert C. Lawton, Luzerne
County manager. Call 823-2101,
ext. 133 for more information.
NEPA CUSTOMER SERVICE
CONSORTIUM: Thursday, 8:30-
10 a.m., Luzerne County Commu-
nity College Corporate Center,
Public Square, Wilkes-Barre.
Presenters Noreen Zadarosni
and Sharon Furbur, of Telerx
Marketing Inc., will tell how the
company of 2,000 associates,
spread across five locations in
three states, developed a road-
map to enrich their culture and
created leadership teams. Free;
light refreshments will be
served. Reservations can be
made at nepacsc.com or 592-
8378.
MAINTENANCE ROUNDTABLE:
Thursday, 1 1 a.m.-1 p.m., Top of
the 80s, Sugarloaf Township.
Topics will include energy costs,
replacement costs, service con-
tracts, parts and supplies, re-
pairs, administration and lost
productivity in HVAC systems.
$36 for Northeast Pennsylvania
Manufacturers and Employers
Association members and $72
for non-members, includes
lunch. To register, email crob-
bins@maea.biz, or call 622-
0992.
BACK MOUNTAIN BUSINESS &
COMMUNITY EXPO: April 18,
4-7 p.m., Insalaco Hall, Miser-
icordia University, Dallas. Local
businesses and organizations
will have tables and booths; door
prizes, refreshments provided by
Gerrity’s Supermarkets and Fire
and Ice restaurant. Free to the
business community and general
public. For more information, call
675-9380 or log on to
www.BackMountainChamber.org.
HAZLETON CHAMBER NET-
WORKING MIXER: April 18,
5-7:30 p.m., Mountain Valley Golf
Course, 1021 Brockton Road.,
Barnesville. Complimentary hors
d’oeuvres, beer and wine. Door
prizes including a corporate golf
membership at Mountain Valley
and custom designed websites.
Reservation required; call 455-
1509 or email jferry@hazle-
tonchamber.org.
BUSINESS AGENDA
KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI RECEIVES RECOGNITION
Ken Pollock Suzuki has been recognized with the Suzuki President’s Award for the second consecutive year. The award
is given for outstanding sales, service and customer satisfaction. Shown surrounded by the dealership staff are Kevin
Burns, regional sales manager of American Suzuki Motor Corp.; A.J. Detrick, Ken Pollock Suzuki sales manager (hold-
ing the award plaque); Gary Peters, general manager; and Murad Elbaitah, business manager.
Amazon’s demands for deeper
discounts threaten already-thin
profit margins, and some warn of
a coming Amazon monopoly.
Amazon, which declined to an-
swer questions or discuss its rela-
tions with publishers for this re-
port, dominates the U.S. market
for print books sold online and al-
so leads the market for electronic
books. At the same time, it’s
working to become a big-name
publisher in its own right.
Although publishers rarely
criticize companies they do busi-
ness with, some say they’re
speaking out against Amazon
partly because they’re offended
byits tactics. TheydescribeAma-
zon’s demands —made in email,
with no personal-contact infor-
mation provided — as overly ag-
gressive and leaving almost no
room for discussion.
To some, Amazon’s hardball
tactics are reminiscent of its
much-publicized pricing rowtwo
years ago with Macmillan, one of
the nation’s largest publishers.
In early 2010, Amazon re-
moved the “buy” buttons from
Macmillan’s titles after the pub-
lisher sought to take pricing con-
trol of e-books away from the re-
tailer. Amazon soon relented,
saying it had no other choice but
to cede control because Macmil-
lan “has a monopoly over their
own titles.”
This February, Amazon again
asserted its influence when it
pulled nearly 5,000 titles by dis-
tributor Independent Publishers
Group from its Kindle e-book
store. Amazon wanted better
terms, and IPG refused.
Other online retailers, includ-
ing Barnes & Noble and Apple,
continuetosell digital versions of
IPG’s titles, enabling the distrib-
utor to resist Amazon’s demands.
“They want more margin than
what is reasonable to give,” IPG
President Mark Suchomel said.
“At some point, enough is
enough. What we and our pub-
lishers do to bring a book to mar-
ket is so much riskier than what
Amazon does to bring it to the
reader.”
While Amazon’s discounting
long has made it the go-to place
for many book buyers, critics ar-
gue that the strategy prevents
competition and devalues books.
In November 2007, at a news
conference to introduce Ama-
zon’s Kindle e-reading device,
Chief Executive Jeff Bezos re-
vealed that Amazon would sell
newly released e-books for $9.99,
below the wholesale price.
“When you sell books at a loss,
by the millions, to corner the
market, you’re not interested in
competing,” said novelist Ri-
chard Russo, a Pulitzer Prize-
winning novelist. “You’re inter-
ested in burying your competi-
tors and then burying the shov-
el.”
AMAZON
Continued from Page 1D
addingtoits hotel offerings, and
Orbitz, a new site founded by a
group of U.S. airlines.
As Travelocity slipped out of
first place, Sabre Holdings
brought the company back into
the fold and combined it with
Lastminute.com, a European
travel site. In 2007, Sabre was
taken private by Texas Pacific
Group and Silver Lake Partners
in a $5 billion deal.
In a survey Harteveldt con-
ducted late last year, 13 percent
of consumers said they used
Travelocity to book their lei-
sure/personal travel within the
previous 12 months, as many as
Priceline, Orbitz and Hotel-
s.com. Expedia ranked first,
with 21 percent.
When Sparks came in as CEO
last April, he recognized that
having staff spread among three
offices hurt the company by
slowing down business deci-
sions. Sparks, who previously
was president of Gilt Groupe, an
online fashion retailer, and had
worked at Expedia and Hotel-
s.com, closedTravelocity’s offic-
es in NewYork and San Francis-
co, consolidating employees at
its Texas headquarters.
He also added more execu-
tives with experience in e-com-
merce and continues to hire de-
velopers to create products and
apps. And instead of trying to
make Travelocity all things to
consumers, Sparks decided to
focus on three areas: hotels, va-
cation packages and mobile
platforms.
“We could do a lot more with
this brand than we have,”
Sparks said, adding that he is
pleased with the past year’s pro-
gress. “It’s done well. We’re very
proudof the fact that we’re large
and we’re profitable and we’re
growing again.
“Our biggest markets — the
U.S., the U.K. and France — we
are now growing in all three of
those markets. We are taking
share, we think, in a number of
those markets across multiple
product categories.”
TRAVELOCITY
Continued from Page 1D
MCT PHOTO
In his first year at the helm,
Carl Sparks has refocused
Travelocity on hotel products,
vacation packages and mobile
devices.
Three beers will be rolled
out for the initial core lineup:
Golden Cold Lager, Sixth
Generation Stock Ale and
Pils-Noir. The lager will be
along the lines of a traditional
pilsner, said Fred Maier. The
ale will be brewed in the tradi-
tional pre-Prohibition tradi-
tion and will resemble a pale
ale. The Pils-Noir is an experi-
mental beer that will markthe
first jet black pilsner on the
market in the world, accord-
ing to Jaime Jurado, the com-
pany’s master brewer.
A 1990 Wilkes University
graduate, Jurado walked
through the brewery last
week excitedly using terms
like “endosperm mashing”
and pointing to the odd- look-
ing devices and see-through
tubes that will carry the beer
and husks through the proc-
ess and give the brewery an
aura of a fictional chocolate
factory.
“We’ve got a little bit of Wil-
ly Wonka stuff going on here,”
Juradosaidas he passedstain-
less steel fermenting bins that
are part of nearly $9 million in
investments the brewery’s
owners have made to date.
Which gets us back to the
Maiers’ road trip to Boston in
the spring of 2009.
“We initially thought a cou-
ple of million was doable,”
laughed Ed Maier. “It’s well
beyond that scope now.”
Both the Maiers and Nobile
said it’s an investment they
believe in and was impressive
enough to lure Jurado back to
Northeast Pennsylvania from
his position as director of
brewing operations at The
Gambrinus Company in San
Antonio, Texas. That brew-
ery, the country’s sixth large-
st, produces beer under the la-
bels of the Spoetzl Brewery, in
San Antonio, Bridgeport
Brewing Company of Por-
tland, Ore. andTrumer Braue-
rei of Berkeley, Calif.
“Every decision we made
was about the quality of beer,”
Ed Maier, of Lehman Town-
ship, said.
Jurado said the unique top-
of-the-line equipment and
brewing methods that Sus-
quehanna Brewing will em-
ploy attracted himto the star-
tup. In addition to being able
to brew the Pils-Noir, Jurado
noted the facility will be one
of only seven in the world us-
ing the endosperm mashing
method to brew beer. That
means the grain is completely
dehusked before mashing and
then the husk is reintroduced
later on in the brewing proc-
ess.
Fred Maier said local bars
and distributors already have
signed on and the community
has been keeping tabs on the
brewery’s progress waitingfor
their first products to begin
flowing.
“The support without even
making a drop of beer has
been great,” Fred Maier said.
Maier shook his head as he
retraced the journey from ca-
sual thoughts of brewing craft
beer to being just a day or two
from reality.
“It’s unbelievable,” he said.
Jurado said the Maiers and
Nobile are doing things right
by focusing on quality in
equipment, the brewing proc-
ess and the final product.
And he’s already thinking
about the future, pointing
out areas on the brewing
floor where additional fer-
menting machines could be
installed and how the slope
of the roof was designed to
accommodate taller and
wider silos.
With the local river in its
name andthe townof Pittston
on all its kegs and bottles, the
brewery owners believe they
have what the region is look-
ing for and will support.
“We sure hope Northeast
Pennsylvania sees us as their
local brewery,” Ed Maier said.
BREWERY
Continued from Page 1D
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
The fermentation vats are in place at the Susquehanna
Brewing Co. in Jenkins Township.
Jamie Jurado, master brew-
er, holds some of the first
hops that will go into mak-
ing the company’s beer.
Theindustrybegantobrightenin
the1990s as beer becamemorepopular
andhomebrewers andsmall craft
brewingcompanies beganspringingup
withuniqueflavors. Theupstarts in-
cludedSamuel Adams, whichwouldgo
ontobecomethelargest American-
basedbreweryuntil it was passedby
YuenglingBreweryinPottsville.
Yuengling, about 60miles southof
Wilkes-BarreinSchuylkill County, is
America’s oldest brewerybut it’s not
theonlyoneintheregion. Inaddition
totheLionBreweryinWilkes-Barre
andSusquehanna BrewingCo. inJen-
kins Township, there’s alsoBreaker
BrewingCompanyinPlains Township,
3Guys &a Beer’dBrewingCo. inCar-
bondale, BarleyCreekBrewingCo. in
Tannersville, BennyBrewingCo. in
Newport Township, ShawneeCraft
BrewingCo. inShawnee-On-Delaware
andTurkeyHill BrewingCo. andOld
ForgeBrewingCo., bothinBlooms-
burg. All arewithin60miles of Wilkes-
Barre.
“Toseetheindustrytakea180de-
greeturnwheresmall is cool again, and
local is cool againandvarietyis cool
againis beyondbelief,” Maier said.
Hesaidthat startingupa nano- or
micro-brewingoperationintoday’s
environment “is a veryfeasiblethingto
do.”
MarkNobile, oneof theco-owners of
theSusquehanna BrewingCo., saidhe
recentlyreadthat therearecloseto
2,000breweries intheUnitedStates
nowandhalf of themaresmall startups
or brewpubs.
Accordingtoa recent Los Angeles
Times story, craft brewers intheU.S.
sawa15percent boominretail sales
last year anda13percent boost invol-
ume, comparedtoa1.3percent slidein
volumefor theoverall beer market.
Craft brewers nowmakeupnearly6
percent of theU.S. beer economy, the
Brewers Associationreported.
CRAFT
Continued from Page 1D
Q: After three phone inter-
views with an out-of-state com-
pany, I was invited to corporate
headquarters to meet with the
hiring manager. The human re-
sources employee who made my
flight arrangements asked for
my date of birth, saying the air-
line needed it for security rea-
sons.
Shortly thereafter, I received
an email saying the manager
needed to cancel our interview.
When I called to reschedule, I
was told they were considering
another candidate and would let
me know if they still needed to
talk with me.
Now I’m concerned that my
age was the real reason for this
rejection. Although I am in ex-
cellent health and have a very
youthful appearance, that
doesn’t help unless I get aninter-
view. Should I just forget about
jobs that require a plane flight?
A: Before restricting yourself
to ground transportation, take a
moment to reconsider your as-
sumptions. Although age could
have been a factor in your inter-
view cancellation, it is equally
possible that management dis-
covered a more qualified appli-
cant or found a local candidate
who would not incur relocation
costs.
Nevertheless, if revealingyour
age troubles you, try asking if
you can make future flight reser-
vations yourself. Some compa-
nies will allowyou to do so with-
in their travel guidelines. In that
case, youhave little choice but to
share your birth date if the air-
line must have it for security re-
porting.
You might also consider using
a webcam to turn phone screen-
ings into video interviews. That
wouldenable youtomake a posi-
tive visual impression at the be-
ginning of the process. Again,
some companies may not allow
this, but there’s no harm in ask-
ing.
OFFICE COACH
Age may not be reason for canceled interview
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of "Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics." Send in
questions and get free coaching
tips at http://www.youroffice-
coach.com.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3D
➛ B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
FLYING HIGHER
To get a sense of how Estee
Lauder’s sales are doing, don’t
just look at adepartment store’s
cosmetics counter. Check the air-
port. Well-off customers jetting
between countries are a prime
target for cosmetics companies,
and Estee Lauder gets about 20
percent of its operating profits
from duty-free stores, according
to Citi analyst Wendy Nicholson.
Good news for Estee Lauder in-
vestors: More people are flying
abroad. International air traffic
jumped 8.9 percent in February
from a year earlier, according to
the most recent data available.
That’s faster than January’s 5.5
percent growth.
IT CAN WAIT
When CEOs hit the beach house or
ski lodge, their share prices take a
vacation too. After comparing the
travels of corporate CEOs against
the performance of their stocks, a
researcher from New York
University’s business school found
that stocks become less volatile
when their CEOs are on vacation.
That’s because companies tend to
release little, if any, news during the
period. But the day that CEOs re-
turn tends to be a busy one, with a
flurry of good announcements. This
could be because CEOs plan their
vacations for when they expect little
to happen or because CEOs are
cutting vacations short when news
breaks.
CHIPPING AWAY
Retirement portfolios made it
through 2011 relatively unscathed.
Savers held $3.07 billion in their
401(k) plans at the end of 2011,
up 1 percent from the $3.03 billion
that had held at the end of 2010.
IRAbalances also rose ever so
slightly, to $4.87 billion from $4.84
billion.
But that small change belies a
wild ride for investors through the
year. Retirement portfolios
bounced up and down during
2011. The S&P 500, for example,
ended up nearly flat for the year.
But in August, it swung by at least
4 percent for four straight days,
the first time that has happened
since the financial crisis.
AP
Source: International Air Transport Source: Investment Company Institute
2.0
2.5
$3.0
Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q4 3
6
9%
F J D N O S A J J
International air traffic growth 401(k) plan assets
Retirement portfolios rose in 2011, but only
after volatile markets caused big swings
throughout the year. In billions
5.9
7.3
6.2
6.6
4.6
4.0
6.4
5.5
8.9
3.0
3.1
3.2
2.9
3.1
’11 ’12
’11 ’12
Short-term high-yield bonds
are drawing greater interest as
investors seek higher yields with-
out tying up money for long peri-
ods. Sherman’s fund was
launched in September 2010,
and companies such as PIMCO
and State Street have recently in-
troduced exchange-traded funds
specializing in short-term junk
bonds. The short maturities of the
bonds offer protection. When in-
terest rates rise, there’s less risk
of a loss with short-term bonds
than with bonds maturing in five
years or longer. Most bonds that
Sherman invests in mature in
less than a year, and the fund
has returned about 4 percent the
past 12 months. However, high-
yield investors should expect
more volatility than those invest-
ing in lower-risk segments of the
bond market.
How do you explain the recent
interest in short-term high-
yield bonds?
Whenever interest rates are de-
clining, people will stretch for re-
turns. Low rates are painful for
savers, but one should be ultra-
careful in how they invest. Maybe
you should just bite the bullet and
say, “I’m going to earn zero on
my money for the next few
years.” That’s better than getting
caught in the next financial ca-
lamity. But obviously, one can’t
live on a portfolio earning zero.
There are lots of choices to gen-
erate yield, and short-term high-
yield is one of them.
Aren’t the risks of investing in
junk bonds too great for many
investors?
Obviously, we’re going to have
some volatility in any day, week
or month. But over an extended
time, we’re trying to preserve
your principal. We’re not looking
to buy bonds with short-term ma-
turities where we think there is
limited upside potential, and a
whole bunch of downside. I refer
to that as a widow-making invest-
ment. But because we don’t do
that, we won’t perform on a par
with the high-yield market when
it’s up sharply. That’s because
we’re focusing on short-term
bonds, rather than bonds with
longer maturities. We may miss
out on some short-term returns,
but protect against losses. For
many investors, that’s better than
reaching for a strong short-term
return. That’s merry-go-round in-
vesting — you’re betting you’re
going to get off before there’s a
problem.
Aren’t dividend-paying stocks
a reasonable alternative be-
cause they generate income
with comparable volatility?
It’s a fair comparison. With divi-
dend stocks, share prices will
grow if the global economy
grows. But in the short-term,
they’ll be more volatile than in-
vesting in a bond maturing in one
year. However, you have daily li-
quidity with a stock, so you can
sell it when you want.
Loading up on
short-termjunk
InsiderQ&A
AP
What he does: Runs RiverPark Short
Term High Yield Bond (RPHYX)
What he suggests: Invest in
short-term junk bonds to generate
yield, while also limiting the risk of
losses due to rising interest rates.
What he owns: High-yield corporate
bonds
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
David Sherman
’12 ’11 ’10 ’09 ’12 ’11 ’10 ’09
Dividend increases
First quarter
12 months
Dividend decreases
First quarter
12 months
193
1,028
790
1,216
284
413
552
222
479
335
73
30
15 20
Dave Carpenter; J. Paschke • AP Sources: Standard & Poor; The companies
The big payback
The dividend comeback got a big boost recently
when Apple said it would resume quarterly payouts for
the first time in 17 years. Nearly $10 billion will go to
shareholders in the first year alone.
All told, dividend payments
increased by a net $24.2 billion
in the first quarter. Some 677
companies initiated, resumed or
increased thier dividends. Only 31
suspended or decreased them,
according to Standard & Poor’s.
That nearly 22-to-1 ratio made it
the best first quarter for dividends
since 2007.
Other noteworthy develop-
ments in the quarter:
Tech comes around
Technology companies are gradually shedding their
reputation for being stingy with quarterly dividends.
Among the tech newsmakers:

SAIC, will start paying 12 cents per share starting
this month

Applied Materials, increased dividend to 9 cents,
up 12.5 percent

Qualcomm, increased dividend to 25 cents, up
16 percent

Xilinx, increased dividend to 22 cents, up 16
percent
Banks on board
Major lenders increased their quarterly dividends after
getting a green light from the Federal Reserve
for passing its stress test. They’ll now pay
investors the following amounts per share each
quarter:

American Express, 20 cents, up 11 percent

BB&T, 20 cents, up 25 percent

JPMorgan Chase, 30 cents, up 20 percent

State Street, 24 cents, up 33 percent

U.S Bancorp, 19.5 cents, up 56 percent

Wells Fargo, 22 cents, up 83 percent
Yields still solid
The dividend yield measures annual
payouts to shareholders against a
company’s stock price. The average
yield decreased to 2.6 percent at
the end of the first quarter from 2.8
percent at the end of December.
s

Ame

BB&

JPM

Stat

U.S

Wel
Air Products APD 72.26 8 98.01 90.81 -0.99 -1.1 s s 6.6 +1.05 2 6.2 16 2.8
Amer Water Works AWK 25.39 0 34.67 33.81 -0.22 -0.6 t s 6.1+22.17 125.7a 18 2.7
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 3 48.46 40.17 -0.35 -0.9 t t -12.5 —9.74 3 10.2 22 7.6
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 8 23.28 22.23 -0.06 -0.3 s s 0.8 —.31 2 2.0 22 3.0
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 6 37.28 31.32 -0.34 -1.1 s s 9.5—13.59 3 -1.7 14 2.2
AutoZone Inc AZO 266.25 0386.00 383.80 12.00 3.2 s s 18.1+38.74 1 24.3 19 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 5 13.88 9.23 -0.34 -3.6 s s 66.0—31.18 4-23.4 ... 0.4
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 5 30.77 23.82 -0.31 -1.3 s s 19.6—19.93 4 -8.0 12 2.2
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 5 15.60 8.01 -1.24 -13.4 t s 137.7—45.84 5-31.0 ... 2.5
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 31.30 0 45.88 44.62 -0.18 -0.4 t s 9.4+29.02 1 6.0 17 1.5
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 8 52.95 48.99 -0.26 -0.5 s s 16.6+12.04 2 0.0 10 0.1
CocaCola KO 63.34 0 74.39 73.47 -0.54 -0.7 s s 5.0 +11.74 2 10.6 20 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 0 30.41 29.56 -0.29 -1.0 t s 24.7+19.48 1 3.2 19 2.2
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 9 29.47 28.54 -0.24 -0.8 s t 2.7+21.20 1 10.3 14 3.6
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 3 41.09 22.50 0.26 1.2 t s 28.9—44.42 5 -8.7 9 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 3 11.97 6.36 -0.13 -2.0 t t 3.4—44.74 5-22.1 7 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 4 21.02 13.99 -0.71 -4.8 s s 16.2—25.51 4 -4.1 12 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.81 1 8.97 4.31 0.14 3.4 t t -16.3—38.31 4-10.3 25 9.3
Genpact Ltd G 13.37 6 18.16 16.13 -0.17 -1.0 s s 7.9 +9.28 222.2a 21 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 4 12.22 8.74 -0.31 -3.4 s t -3.9—24.02 4-17.6 13 3.9
Heinz HNZ 48.17 8 55.00 53.26 -0.29 -0.5 s r -1.4+12.38 2 5.4 17 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 53.77 9 62.38 60.66 -0.67 -1.1 s t -1.8+12.21 2 3.6 22 2.5
Kraft Foods KFT 31.35 9 39.06 38.04 0.03 0.1 s s 1.8+24.48 1 6.7 19 3.0
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 0 31.57 31.35 -0.03 -0.1 s s 23.5+19.04 1 1.2 22 1.8
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 9 90.76 86.88 0.00 0.0 s s 13.8 -+1.12 2 -1.0 14 3.2
McDonalds Corp MCD 75.66 9102.22 98.62 0.52 0.5 s t -1.7+32.17 1 19.0 19 2.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 7 24.10 21.64 -0.44 -2.0 s t -2.2 —2.22 3 2.4 13 3.7
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 5.53 5 10.28 7.63 -0.68 -8.2 t t -2.7—11.79 3 -4.2 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 0 64.85 63.53 -0.96 -1.5 s s 10.2 +3.05 2 -0.5 11 2.2
PPL Corp PPL 25.00 5 30.27 27.63 -0.63 -2.2 t t -6.1+13.62 1 -4.3 11 5.2
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 8 17.34 14.86 -0.41 -2.7 s s 42.3 +9.34 2-15.1 ... 4.0
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 6 71.89 66.15 -0.20 -0.3 s t -0.3 +4.01 2 3.4 16 3.1
Philip Morris Intl PM 60.45 0 90.10 88.64 0.03 0.0 s s 12.9+39.73 138.6a 18 3.5
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 0 67.95 67.31 0.10 0.1 s s 0.9+12.55 2 3.9 17 3.1
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 9 65.30 62.52 -0.87 -1.4 s s 24.7 +1.30 2 -5.9 8 2.3
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 8 17.11 15.26 -0.50 -3.2 t s 13.9 +1.39 2-17.7 13 3.3
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 5 60.00 48.25 -1.25 -2.5 t s 23.7 ... 0.0 ... 9.6
TJX Cos TJX 24.60 0 39.99 40.29 0.58 1.5 s s 24.8+59.96 1 24.5 21 1.1
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 4 33.53 27.61 0.36 1.3 t t -6.1—13.63 3 3.3 15 3.8
Verizon Comm VZ 32.28 7 40.48 37.66 -0.07 -0.2 t t -6.1 +4.57 2 5.7 44 5.3
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 9 62.63 60.67 -0.53 -0.9 s s 1.5+17.87 1 6.6 13 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 8 44.85 42.97 -0.63 -1.4 t s 7.6 +11.56 2 2.2 15 2.8
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
* 1 = buy; 2 = hold; 3 = sell Data through April 4; Source: S&P Indices, FactSet
StockScreener
Not only are more companies paying dividends, they’re paying
bigger amounts.
S&P Indices counted 677 companies that either started paying
a dividend or increased their payouts during the first quarter. Only
31 companies cut or suspended their dividends.
This screen shows the stocks in the S&P 500 that have an-
nounced the biggest percentage increase in dividends so far in
2012. Six companies have already doubled their payouts.
Fidelity National Information Services (FIS) leads the group. Its
dividend quadrupled. The company, which helps banks with pay-
ment processing and other services, announced the dividend hike
the same day it said its net income rose 16 percent to $469.6 mil-
lion in 2011.
Several financial companies are on the list. Both Wells Fargo
and U.S. Bancorp hiked their dividends after they passed the Fed-
eral Reserve’s stress test, which checked to see if they could sur-
vive another severe recession.
Fidelity Nat. Inf. Serv. FIS $0.80 $0.20 300% $32.54 -1.7% 1.6
Gannett GCI 0.80 0.32 150 14.98 -3.5 1.7
Mosaic MOS 0.50 0.20 150 53.84 -34.7 1.4
Cliffs Nat. Res. CLF 2.50 1.12 123 68.28 -31.7 1.4
Macy’s M 0.80 0.40 100 40.91 70.9 1.4
MasterCard MA 1.20 0.60 100 430.94 65.0 1.4
Wells Fargo WFC 0.88 0.48 83 33.88 6.5 1.4
U.S. Bancorp USB 0.78 0.50 56 31.31 17.7 1.6
Wyndham Worldwide WYN 0.92 0.60 53 46.38 44.6 1.2
Apartment Inv. & Mngmt. AIV 0.72 0.48 50 26.71 4.9 2.0
Comcast CMCSA 0.65 0.45 44 29.32 16.1 1.4
Ball BLL 0.40 0.28 43 43.62 21.2 1.3
Mattel MAT 1.24 0.92 35 33.88 33.7 1.4
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AVG.
BROKER
RATING* COMPANY TICKER
NEW
ANNUAL
DIVIDEND
PREVIOUS
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
INCREASE
The biggest dividend increases this year
American Funds BalA m ABALX 19.56 -.14 +1.3 +6.7/A +3.6/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.64 -.2 +7.3/B +3.5/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 50.92 -.42 -.1 +3.4/A +.9/D
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 35.00 -.57 -.5 -3.3/C /B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 38.87 -.60 -1.1 -8.6/B -.4/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 38.97 -.39 +1.4 +.9/D +1.6/B
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 32.66 -.26 +2.2 +2.1/D +1.3/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 17.36 -.13 +.3 +4.5/B +1.9/D
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 29.70 -.26 +1.4 +3.3/C +.5/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 29.46 -.29 +1.4 -.9/B +2.2/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 30.24 -.18 +1.4 +7.2/A +1.0/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 19.40 -.23 -.7 -1.2/C +4.3/B
BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX 18.04 -.22 -.8 -2.0/C +3.5/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 19.49 -.24 -.7 -1.0/C +4.6/B
DFA EmMktValI DFEVX 29.70 -.31 -4.7 -17.4/E +3.9/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.56 -.1 +6.3/D +6.7/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 32.01 -.95 -2.1 -11.3/C -3.0/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 112.50 -2.13 +1.2 -.1/D -2.7/E
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 77.77 +.23 +4.3 +9.3/B +4.9/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 97.94 -.07 +4.5 +11.8/A +7.5/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 40.19 -.53 +1.0 +4.9/A +3.6/A
Fidelity Puritan FPURX 19.38 -.14 +1.7 +5.1/B +3.3/B
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX 49.57 -.52 +2.7 +7.2/A +1.5/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.15 -.03 +.1 +1.6/E +2.9/D
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.17 -.03 +1.1/E +2.4/D
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 58.44 -1.57 -2.5 -6.4/A +.3/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 28.92 -.27 +.4 +2.0/D +4.9/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.09 -.05 -.7 +4.2/A +6.2/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.41 +.01 +.2 +2.4/C +5.3/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.10 +.01 +5.6/E +7.9/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 11.10 +.01 +5.7/D +8.1/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.10 +.01 +6.0/D +8.4/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.10 +.01 +5.7/D +8.0/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 48.12 -.62 -1.6 +2.1/D +8.5/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 25.21 -.31 +1.6 +2.4/C +.4/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 38.10 +.18 +5.5 +12.3/A +4.3/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.73 -.01 -.1 +4.6/C +7.0/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 59.36 -.34 +1.9 +1.2/C +6.9/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.70 -.4 +6.7/C +6.6/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 128.91 -.87 +2.7 +7.2/A +1.6/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 128.91 -.87 +2.7 +7.1/A +1.5/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.02 +.01 +.2 +7.9/A +6.8/A
Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX 14.19 +.02 -.2 +11.4/A +7.3/B
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 128.07 -.87 +2.7 +7.2/A +1.6/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 128.08 -.86 +2.7 +7.2/A +1.6/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 31.62 -.23 +2.5 +5.9/B +2.1/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.10 +.01 -.6 +10.7/B +5.2/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.74 +3.0/B +4.4/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 13.27 -.12 +.6 +2.9/A +2.2/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.95 +.01 -.4 +7.9/A +6.3/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.95 +.01 -.4 +7.9/A +6.3/B
Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX 14.25 -.37 -2.7 -10.5/D -3.0/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 34.93 -.26 +2.5 +5.8/B +2.0/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 34.94 -.26 +2.5 +5.9/B +2.0/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 34.93 -.26 +2.5 +5.7/B +1.9/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 56.97 -.15 +.2 +10.0/A +6.3/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 33.18 -.30 +.6 +5.6/A +4.3/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 57.31 -.52 +.6 +5.7/A +4.4/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 50.78 -.64 +2.1 +6.3/A +.2/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 28.61 -.36 +2.1 +6.2/A +.1/B
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
-1.2%
+1.2%
Nasdaq
-0.4%
+3.7%
S&P 500
-0.7%
+2.4%
Russell 2000
-1.5%
+1.5%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
p
p
q
p
p
q
p
p
q
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+6.9%
+18.3%
+11.2%
+10.4%
Mortgage rates tick down
The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage
dipped to 3.98 percent from 3.99 percent a week
earlier. Mortgage rates tend to follow the yield on
the 10-year Treasury, which swung sharply last
week. The yield spiked on Tuesday on lowered ex-
pectations that the Federal Reserve will buy more
Treasurys to help the economy. The yield later fell
on renewed worries about Europe’s debt problems.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Selected Daily Govt Fund/Cl D 0.20 $ 10,000 min (800) 243-1575
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
Vanguard OH Tax-Exempt MMF 0.08 $ 3,000 min (800) 662-7447
Broad market Lehman 2.27 0.08 s t -0.88 3.18 2.05
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 4.07 0.11 s s -1.08 5.23 3.72
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.45 0.09 s t -0.63 4.11 3.27
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.60 -0.04 t t -1.09 5.72 4.54
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.25 -0.02 t t 0.30 10.15 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.21 0.02 s s -1.22 2.43 0.93
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.07 0.01 r s 0.02 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.23 0.00 s s -0.05 0.30 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.13 0.00 r s 0.01 0.16 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.34 0.01 s s -0.48 0.82 0.16
5-year T-Note 1.01 -0.03 s s -1.30 2.31 0.71
10-year T-Note 2.18 -0.03 s s -1.36 3.57 1.72
30-year T-Bond 3.33 0.00 s s -1.25 4.63 2.72
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012
timesleader.com
MITT ROMNEY
“unzipped” is the
stuff of cartoonists’
dreams.
The image suggest-
ed came from none
other than his wife,
Ann, when a Balti-
more radio interviewer asked wheth-
er it’s true that her husband is stiff.
Yes, do go ahead and cover the chil-
dren’s eyes.
“Well, you know, I guess we better
unzip him and let the real Mitt Rom-
ney out because he is not!” laughed
the Mrs.
But, really, should we be talking
like this? About unzipping the stiff
and letting the “real Mitt” out? Good-
ness gracious, as Romney would say.
What’s next, hot cocoa before noon?
Ann Romney’s comments coincided
with the punditocracy’s swoon over
her husband’s lack of popularity
among the once-fairer sex. (Women
have cojones now, you might have
heard, while men are ransacking
Viagra warehouses. Dots, anyone?)
Recent polls show single women
younger than 50 scrambling back into
the warm embrace of Barack Obama
after a brief flirtation with the Repub-
lican boy band — Mitt, Rick, Ron
and Newt.
Was it something they said about
birth control?
This seems to be the conventional
wisdom. Once con-
traception became a
topic of debate,
women amscrayed
in the other direc-
tion. It isn’t as
though women
haven’t always
found the Demo-
cratic Party more
hospitable, but the
brouhaha over
whether “Obama-
care” should force
religious groups to
fund or endorse
insurance coverage
for contraception
seems to have re-
minded women of
just how fragile
reproductive autonomy is.
It didn’t help that at the same time,
some states moved to force ultra-
sounds on women seeking abortion;
Rush Limbaugh called a young wom-
an a “slut” when she appeared on
Capitol Hill to make a case for con-
traceptive coverage; the GOP looks
and acts like a fraternity of cranky
old white men.
But what really gives with the old
gender gap? Why are women running
away from Republicans if, as Ann
Romney insists, they’re really in-
terested in the economy and jobs, not
abortions and “free” birth control?
In 12 battleground states where
pollsters recently took to clipboards,
more than 60 percent of women
younger than 50 prefer Obama over
Mitt Romney. Just a few weeks ago,
fewer than half of this group said
they’d re-elect the president. Which
means, of course, that things could
shift in another few weeks.
Meanwhile, some analysts say that
Romney’s decline in popularity
among women has to do with his
promise to defund Planned Parent-
hood, which to female ears apparent-
ly is tantamount to saying, “Women?
They’re so cute when they’re preg-
nant.”
Defunding Planned Parenthood is
of course a staple of the Republican
diet because some portion of public
funds is in the same airspace as wom-
en seeking abortions. A guy can’t get
nominated by the GOP unless he
confesses his disapproval of Planned
Parenthood, a thorough exploration
of which will have to await a better
mood. I’m swinging at the moment.
It nevertheless bears mentioning at
this point that Romney has no ob-
jection to contraception, as he said
during one of the Republican de-
bates. Moreover, the shift in women’s
attitudes did not, in fact, coincide
with the birth-control debate.
Counterintuitively, women indicat-
ed in yet other polls that they weren’t
COMMENTARY
K A T H L E E N P A R K E R
Mitt may have
just lost ‘it’
with women
See PARKER, Page 2E
Recent polls
show single
women younger
than 50 scram-
bling back into
the warm em-
brace of Barack
Obama after a
brief flirtation
with the Re-
publican boy
band – Mitt,
Rick, Ron and
Newt.
ONCE UPON a time
in the late ’90s, a cer-
tain black newswoman
was awarded her own
column. She wrote 12
pieces, three of them
about race. That was
too many for her boss,
who told her to tone it down. Confused,
she went to a white colleague for advice.
He explained that, being black, she
lacked the judgment to decide if a given
racial matter merited a column. In the
future, he suggested, if she saw some
racial issue she thought worth writing
about, she should bring it to him and let
him decide.
That paternalistic offer is brought to
mind by a recent on-air statement from
Tamara Holder, a contributor to Fox
“News,” about the killing of Trayvon
Martin. “The blacks,” she told Sean
Hannity, “are making this more of a
racial issue than it should be.”
One is reminded that the more things
change, the more they don’t. One won-
ders how much of a racial issue Tray-
von’s death should be, in Ms. Holder’s
esteemed opinion.
There is a storyline coalescing here
among conservative pundits. From Hold-
er to Hannity to William Bennett to my
colleague, Glenn Garvin, it says there’s
been a “rush to judgment” against Ge-
orge Zimmerman, the man who stalked
and killed an unarmed 17-year-old black
kid he found suspicious.
Candidly, there is good reason to fear
such a rush. Anyone who remembers
the Tawana Brawley hoax and the Duke
lacrosse case, among others, knows
many African-Americans have proven
prone to jumping to conclusions of
racism even when the evidence thereof
is dubious. Some black folks see racial
mistreatment everywhere, always.
But some white folks see it nowhere
— ever. That’s a corollary truth that
seems apropos to this moment. Indeed,
when a black man named Abner Louima
was maimed in an act of broomstick
sodomy by New York police, Holder’s
friend Hannity accused Louima of lying.
Don’t rush to judgment, he warned.
For some people, that is less sage
advice than default response. The Rod-
ney King beating, said former Los An-
geles Police Chief Daryl Gates, “did look
like racism,” but wasn’t. “This is not a
racial issue,” said a school official in
Louisiana after six black kids were
charged with attempted murder for a
schoolyard fight with a white classmate.
And so on.
There is a line — subjective, but there
just the same — between avoiding a
rush to judgment and avoiding judg-
ment itself. If rushing to judgment sug-
gests a reflexiveness that ill serves the
cause of justice, refusing to judge sug-
gests a moral cowardice that does the
same.
Where this case is concerned, it is
telling that judgments made weeks after
the fact are being called rushed. The
rapid response nature of media being
what it is, we make judgments every day
based on much less than five weeks of
reflection. We do this on matters of
economics, war, politics, scandal.
But, of course, race is different. It
scares some of us, particularly when it
requires them to concede the continued
existence of injustices they would rather
deny. They are aided in this denial by a
naïve belief that a thing can’t truly be
racist unless it is wearing a pointed
hood or spouting epithets.
But racial bias is seldom so conve-
niently obvious. More often, it lurks
behind smiles and handshakes, un-
known sometimes even to its host. More
often it is deduced, not declared, seen in
excuses that don’t add up, justifications
that make no sense, logic that is not.
As in Zimmerman’s decision to stalk
Trayvon. Five weeks later, for all the
back and forth, push and pull, no one
has yet explained what the boy did that
made him suspicious. Five weeks later,
the initial conclusion still feels like the
right one: Trayvon did not seem suspi-
cious because of what he did but be-
cause of what he was.
So fine, let us not rush to judgment.
But let’s not rush from it, either.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
Seeking truth
and justice?
Why rush it?
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitz-
er Prize for commentary, is a columnist for
the Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL
33132. Readers may write to him via email at
lpitts@miamiherald.com.
W
ASHINGTON—Darren Spencer, a 39-year-old Army veteran fromTacoma,
Wash., found himself homeless after losing his $15.45-an-hour job as a furni-
ture mover a year ago. He takes pills for his depression and has trouble hear-
ing. He has no car, and his unemployment benefits ran out in December. But Spencer
considers himself lucky on one count: Last August, he got a voucher from the federal
government to help pay the $725 monthly rent for his apartment in Tacoma’s Hilltop
neighborhood, where he lives with his 18-year-old son, Lamont.
“I still have a lot of stress, but
that’s one thing I don’t have to
stress about,” Spencer said. “It’s
still hard, but at least now I have a
place to stay.”
Spencer is among thousands of
beneficiaries of a federal effort to
end all homelessness among veter-
ans by 2015. It’s a lofty goal as the
nation gears up to accommodate
another 1million service members
who are set to return home from
war in the next five years
To get the job done, President
Barack Obama and the Veterans
Affairs Department are thinking
big, asking Congress to increase
spending for veterans homeless
programs by 33 percent next year,
to $1.35 billion.
On Capitol Hill, Democratic
Sen. Patty Murray of Washington
state is the champion of the cause,
making the issue a centerpiece of
her tenure as the chair of the Sen-
ate Veterans’ Affairs Committee.
Last year, when some Republi-
cans in the House of Representa-
tives proposed eliminating 10,000
vouchers as a way to save $75 mil-
lion from the 2011 federal budget,
Murray led the fight to get the
money reinstated. At the time, Re-
publicans defended the plan by
saying that many of the vouchers
weren’t being used, but the pro-
gram has won plenty of bipartisan
backing and critics have been
largely silent this year.
“I can’t tell you how many peo-
ple have come up to me on the
street who tell me stories of having
lived on the streets, out of Dump-
sters, in horrible conditions, and
because of a voucher have got a
place to live and are now back. ...
My passion comes from that,”
Murray said in an interview.
Murray, who also heads the Sen-
ate Housing Appropriations Sub-
committee, called the president’s
latest budget request “absolutely
essential” and said the administra-
tion’s timetable was laudable.
“We’d all like to end it tomor-
row,” Murraysaid. “But it’s the first
time they’ve set a goal of doing
this, which really focuses everybo-
dy on what we are doing.”
Last month, when the Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban Devel-
opment sent out $73 million in
voucher aid to public housing
agencies in all 50 states, HUDSec-
retary Shaun Donovan called the
level of homelessness among vet-
erans a “national disgrace.”
According to the government’s
latest count, 67,495 of the nation’s
22 million veterans were homeless
last year. That was a nearly 12 per-
cent drop froma year earlier, when
the government found 76,329 vet-
erans in emergency shelters or liv-
ing in their cars, abandoned build-
ings or on the streets. If Congress
approves the newfunding request,
VA Secretary Eric Shinseki told
Congress last month, the number
of homeless veterans will fall to
35,000 next year.
But Murray, the first woman to
lead the Senate Veterans’ Affairs
Committee, is none too pleased
with the VA’s performance in one
key area: She says far too many fe-
male veterans are falling through
the cracks and getting inferior ser-
COMBATING
homelessness
Spending hike sought to help veterans
By ROB HOTAKAINEN McClatchy Newspapers
See HOMELESS, Page 2E
MCT PHOTO
Darren Spencer, a former homeless veteran, and his 18-year-old son, Lamont, pose in their Tacoma, Wash.
apartment. Darren said he has lived in the apartment for two years with his son.
C M Y K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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vice when they do find their way
to government shelters.
While the overall numbers
have declined, the number of
homeless female veterans more
than doubled from 2006 to 2010,
rising from1,380 to 3,328.
Areport last month by the VA’s
inspector general found that
womenfaceserious safetyandse-
curity shortcomings in shelters,
especially those who experi-
enced sexual trauma in the mili-
tary. Investigators found women
assigned to live in mixed-gender
facilities with bedrooms and
bathrooms that lacked sufficient
locks, and halls and stairways
that didn’t have proper lighting.
In one case, a woman and her 18-
month-oldsonwere assignedto a
building that housed a homeless
male veteran who was a regis-
tered sex offender.
“Sometimes they stay on the
street because it’s more safe than
going into a facility that doesn’t
have locked doors or separate
bathrooms,” Murray said. “Or in
some cases where these women
have children, there’s no place for
their children. ... That is really an
outrage to me.”
Spencer, who served six years
in the military after he joined at
age 18, said he’d been frustrated
with the VA because he wanted
more help with his mental health
issues. He said he thought he suf-
fered from post-traumatic stress
disorder but that he’d received
medication only for depression.
“It’s just beenpill after pill after
pill,” he said.
For the last 15 years, he said,
he’s worked a variety of jobs,
“from a steamboat to a billy goat
— I’ve done it all.” His jobs in-
cluded grinding metal at a foun-
dry, working in warehouses as a
shipping clerk and forklift oper-
ator, evenhelpingtoproducea ra-
dio show. He said he had to file
for bankruptcy in2005 andthat it
had been difficult for him to
maintain either a job or a place to
live.
“No matter how much I tried,
every two steps I would go for-
ward there would be five steps
taking me back,” he said. “It just
seemed like somebody had their
foot on my neck and I could not
get up.”
Each voucher, which is provid-
ed by the HUD-VA Supportive
Housing Program, is worth
roughly $7,500, with veterans
paying no more than 30 percent
of their incomes for rent. Local
housing programs help HUDand
the VA administer the program.
Since he lost his unemploy-
ment benefits, Spencer said, he’s
been relying on “the grace of
God” to survive, along with time-
ly temporary jobs such as helping
friends or acquaintances move.
Without a federal housing
voucher, he said, he has no
doubts that he’d be homeless
again.
“It’s been a big load off of my
shoulders,” Spencer said. “And it
just feels good to be able to say I
have a place to stay, and my kid
has a place to lay his head.”
HOMELESS
Continued from Page 1E
MCT PHOTO
Darren Spencer plays video games with his 18-year-old son, Lamont, in their apartment in Tacoma,
Wash. Last August, Darren got a voucher from the federal government to help pay the $725 month-
ly rent for his apartment.
According to the government’s latest count,
67,495 of the nation’s 22 million veterans were
homeless last year. That was a nearly 12 percent
drop from a year earlier, when the government
found 76,329 veterans in emergency shelters or
living in their cars, abandoned buildings or on the
streets. If Congress approves the new funding
request, VA Secretary Eric Shinseki told Congress
last month, the number of homeless veterans will
fall to 35,000 next year.
really that concerned about
the birth-control issue and
that they did, by a majority,
disapprove of what the govern-
ment was doing in principle.
The public opinion research
firm QEV Analytics conducted
a private poll for the Catholic
Association and found that 59
percent of unmarried women
think birth control should be
handled like any other drug,
rather than offered for free.
Among married women, the
number was 67 percent.
The poll also found that 55
percent of unmarried women
would question the wisdom of
the Obama administration’s
contraceptive mandate if it
meant that religious agencies
serving the poor would have
to shut down because of pro-
hibitive fines.
Women do not monolithical-
ly think with their uteri, in
other words, the assumption
of which might well be a male
projection, so to speak. And
though the cumulative effect
of these discussions might
have swayed some women to
stick with the president, to
focus only on so-called “wom-
en’s issues” is perhaps to miss
the more compelling point
and, therefore, in Romney’s
case, to miss what needs fix-
ing.
It is entirely possible that
women simply aren’t that into
Mitt. He’s just not their kind
of guy. Health care, taxes,
budgets, debt ceilings, capac-
ity utilization, Chinese cur-
rency: so important. But at the
end of the day — does he have
“it”?
His wife says he does, but
then she knows the unzipped
Mitt. The question for Amer-
ican women is, do they really
want to go there?
PARKER
Continued from Page 1E
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
kathleenparker@washpost.com.
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3E
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“Matt is the franchise, and our
franchise player has decided to
keep leading our team.”
Steve Capus
The NBC News president released a statement
regarding Matt Lauer’s new long-term deal to
remain with the network’s “Today” show. The morning program is in a
ratings dogfight with ABC’s “Good Morning America.”
GO AHEAD, Supreme
Court. Rip off the Band-
Aid.
The court recently
heard arguments on
whether the federal re-
quirement that Americans
buy health insurance is unconstitutional.
The truth, of course, is that nobody
knows.
That’s because it’s a theological ques-
tion, like “what is literature?” The Consti-
tution doesn’t say anything about health
insurance. But it’s like the Bible: People
can find almost anything in there, and
then lay claim to the credibility of Scrip-
ture. For a while the Constitution said
black people weren’t citizens, at least
according to the Supreme Court in 1857.
The current justices presumably don’t see
it that way.
Since the Constitution offers little use-
ful guidance on health insurance, today’s
justices will no doubt decide based on
their own preferences and prejudices, just
like their forebears would have done.
And you know what? I hope they throw
out every bit of it.
That’s not because I think the Patient
Protection and Affordable Health Care
Act – “Obamacare” to its enemies – is
such a bad thing. On the contrary, I al-
ways liked the idea of mandatory health
insurance (and subsidies for those who
can’t afford it), as did the Republicans
who came up with the notion. But like
Mitt Romney, who backed just such a plan
in Massachusetts when he was governor,
I’ve come to see the error of my ways.
Americans dislike a law requiring all to
have health insurance. But they also dis-
like the soaring cost of health care, the
way medical spending fuels government
deficits or the fact that we let people die
for want of care – or go bankrupt trying to
pay for it. Did you know that ours is the
only affluent country in the world where
this kind of thing is routine?
In retrospect, the Obama reforms were
both too complex and too modest. “Oba-
macare” was a way of making our crazy
system fairer while slowing the growth in
costs – but the system would still be cra-
zy. It’s already the world’s costliest by far,
even while leaving 50 million uncovered.
It’s also fragmented, over-reliant on med-
ical technology and adept at turning the
natural process of dying into an expensive
mess.
Here’s how crazy our system is: Be-
cause my wife has had cancer, we’re not
sure we could move to another state.
What if we couldn’t get coverage? Amer-
ican health care has made us prisoners of
New York.
The Supreme Court now has a chance
to toss out the Obama reforms en masse –
and as a result, I hope, our whole ugly,
irrational and unsustainable health care
system finally will get the truly massive
overhaul it has needed for years – if it
doesn’t collapse first.
Think of it: Without “Obamacare,”
insurance companies can continue ex-
cluding pre-existing conditions like my
wife’s cancer. Young adults won’t auto-
matically be eligible for their parents’
policies. And hordes of Americans will
remain uninsured, except for the promise
of limited care at an emergency room.
Sweeping away the Obama reforms will
mean a lot of pain. But that might be
what it takes to get us to see how badly
our system is broken – and to save the
45,000 lives lost annually (according to a
Harvard study) for want of universal cov-
erage.
The funny thing is, Uncle Sam already
has a highly efficient health system. It’s
called Medicare. And until we get every
last American on it, we’ll never stop shov-
eling cash into administrative expenses
and insurance-company profits.
Medicare for all isn’t a new idea. Theo-
dore and Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Tru-
man, John Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jim-
my Carter and Bill Clinton all saw the
need for universal coverage long before
Barack Obama came along. How ironic if
it’s the Supreme Court that ultimately
gets us there.
Declare ‘Obamacare’ dead and begin from scratch
Daniel Akst is a columnist for Newsday and a
member of the newspaper’s editorial board. His
email address is daniel.akst@newsday.com.
COMMENTARY
D A N I E L A K S T
In retrospect, the Obama reforms were
both too complex and too modest.
“Obamacare” was a way of making our
crazy system fairer while slowing the
growth in costs – but the system would
still be crazy.
WORDS MATTER. Take
the term “red tide,” which
is the popularized way of
talking about blooms of
harmful marine algae.
This common terminology
is a misnomer because the
blooms are not always red and their move-
ment is largely unrelated to tides. Also,
many species of algae that cause red dis-
coloration are not harmful.
I am a biological oceanographer, so
naturally I focus on my own discipline. But
I worry that throughout the sciences we
are using inaccurate terminology to de-
scribe serious environmental issues.
Though catchy names do grab public at-
tention, they are often misleading and
likely to feed troublesome misconceptions
in a public unfamiliar with the complexity
of the issues.
To take another example from my field,
let’s consider the “great Pacific garbage
patch.” The term “garbage patch” leads
many people to believe that a visible blan-
ket of trash and other debris covers the
ocean surface somewhere in the middle of
the North Pacific. This is not true. The
majority of the debris is small plastic piec-
es (often microscopic) that are suspended
in the water column. This type of garbage
– or more accurately, pollution – is not
visible from plane or satellite images or
even always from boats.
The popularized term “garbage patch”
misrepresents the complexity of the prob-
lem. Garbage sounds like something that
can be simply collected and disposed of.
But the widespread and dispersed nature
of the problem makes any cleanup effort
extremely difficult. Experts are still unsure
how to tackle it. The only credible solu-
tion in the long run is to stop plastic waste
from entering the ocean, which would take
both public policy shifts and widespread
education efforts. I do not believe the term
“garbage patch” conveys this crucial mess-
age.
“Global warming” is another example of
a not entirely accurate term, and it’s one
that has fed skepticism about whether the
phenomenon exists. Skeptics often cite
extreme weather events or short-term
cooling periods as evidence against global
warming. But weather (which is short-
term, localized and highly variable) is not
the same as climate (the long-term average
of such things as rainfall and temperature).
Still, doubters are quick to cite cool Mid-
western weather in August or a winter
deep-freeze in Florida to bolster their
claims that global warming is “history’s
biggest scam.”
In response to this public doubting,
there has been a push by climate experts
to replace the term “global warming” with
the more accurate term “climate change.”
A relatively new issue catching public
attention is “ocean acidification.” “Ocean
acidification” is a term used to describe
changes in seawater chemistry due to
increasing amounts of CO2 being taken up
by the ocean. When CO2 from the atmo-
sphere dissolves into seawater, a series of
chemical reactions occurs that effectively
lower seawater pH. But while ocean pH is
definitely decreasing, the ocean is not
actually becoming acidic – just less basic.
The world’s oceans are not predicted to
drop below a pH of 7.0 (neutral on the pH
scale).
That doesn’t mean we should downplay
the severity of changing ocean chemistry.
Extensive research has shown that even a
slight reduction in pH, down to 7.8 from
the current average of about 8.1, could
have devastating impacts on marine eco-
systems. Many types of organisms, espe-
cially those with calcium-carbonate shells
like corals and shellfish, will have trouble
surviving in lower pH waters. Although it
is important that the crucial nature of the
issue be translated to the public, we must
be careful with terminology.
People don’t like to hear bad news.
They’d prefer that the oceans were healthy
and that rapid shifts in climate were not
occurring. That’s why scientists and the
media must avoid hyperbolic language
when describing crucial environmental
issues. The use of more colorful terms
might make for catchier headlines, but the
terms also can invite disbelief.
There is a need, of course, to make com-
plex scientific issues understandable to
nonscientists. But in trying to do so, we
must also be careful to be absolutely accu-
rate in our descriptions.
Words matter when addressing environmental issues
Elizabeth Tobin is a doctoral candidate in the
School of Oceanography at the University of Wash-
ington. Her research focuses on improving the
prediction of harmful algal blooms. She wrote this
for the Los Angeles Times.
COMMENTARY
E L I Z A B E T H T O B I N
D
URING MITT Rom-
ney’s campaign stop
in Tunkhannock last
week, the Republi-
can presidential hopeful won
the backing of a 7-year-old girl
whonoted, “He has a very nice
smile.”
All too often, grownups
evaluate the candidates – even
for thehighest electedofficein
the land – on equally superfi-
cial observations and hunch-
es. It shouldn’t be that way.
As GOP contenders Rom-
ney, Ron Paul, Rick Santorum
and Newt Gingrich blitz the
Keystone State between now
and the April 24 primary,
would-be voters should disre-
gard the men’s certain on-
slaught of folksy charm and
sudden devotion to Philly
cheesesteaks and shoofly pie.
Ditto for when President Oba-
ma and Vice President Joe Bi-
den invariably descend on the
state later inthis electionyear.
If you cross off a viable can-
didate from your list simply
because he or she doesn’t visit
your city or burg, you’re being
petty. If you require a hand-
shake to solidify your support,
you’re pathetic.
Evaluate the choices in this
and every race on the candi-
dates’ qualifications andviews
on the issues that most matter
to you.
To help you identify your
ideal pick, try online resources
such as the nonpartisan On
the Issues.org, at www.on-
theissues.org, and the New
YorkTimes’ Election2012syn-
opsis, at http://elections.ny-
times.com/2012/primaries/
issues#issue/abortion.
Also, gauge the candidates’
claims byreadingreports from
trusted news sources and vis-
iting websites such as Politi-
Fact.com, a project of the Tam-
pa Bay Times.
Don’t be swayed by baby-
smooching or back-slapping.
Vote wisely inthis presidential
race.
Or you’ll be compelled for
the next four years to grin and
bear it.
OUR OPINION: CAMPAIGN FEVER
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney and others
will woo Pennsylvania voters this month. Choose wisely.
Use your head
in the vote ahead
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
B
ORROWING A LINE
from conservative
critics of the judici-
ary, President Obama
declared that the Supreme
Court would be engaging in
“judicial activism” if it threw
out the2010healthcarereform
law. Responding to a question
at a news conference Monday,
Obama saidit wouldbe “anun-
precedented, extraordinary
step” if the court overturned“a
lawthat was passedbyastrong
majority of a democratically
elected Congress.” He added
that such a move would be a
good example of the lack of ju-
dicial restraint that conserva-
tive commentators have be-
moaned for years.
There are several things
wrong with the president’s re-
mark. For one thing, it’s simply
not true that it would be “un-
precedented” for the court to
overturn such a law. Since
Marbury v. Madison in 1803,
the court has seen “judicial re-
view” of laws as part of its re-
sponsibility, and over the years
it has ruled many unconstitu-
tional. That’s entirelyappropri-
ate.
Furthermore, the implica-
tion of the remark was that the
number of votes in favor of a
bill was somehow relevant to
its constitutionality. It’s not.
Otherwise, whichever party or
point of viewis in the majority
would be free to tyrannize the
minority.
That doesn’t mean that the
court can do as it pleases. For
muchof the past century, it has
deferred to Congress’ judg-
ment about how to regulate
commerce. On Tuesday, Oba-
ma noted those precedents
and said that “the burden is on
those who would overturn a
law like this.” And that’s cor-
rect: Thejustices start everyre-
view from the presumption
that the lawin question is con-
stitutional.
There’s a natural tension be-
tween the Supreme Court’s
role as the ultimate arbiter of a
law’s constitutionality and
Congress’ power to set policy
through statute. It’s appropri-
ate for the court to tread care-
fully and with restraint as it re-
views this landmark change in
health care policy.
Los Angeles Times
OTHER OPINION: HEALTH CARE
Obama off-target
on court comment
An company
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
7
4
8
4
7
5
Defense crucial
election issue
I
agree that the economy is
of the utmost importance
for the upcoming election.
We should not forget that our
national defense also is impor-
tant.
Our first socialist president
and his administration are
engaging in defense cuts far
too deep and putting our
national security on a precip-
ice.
We are going to cut 50 A-10
aircraft, our most lethal
ground support and tank-killer
aircraft, not to mention a
significant cut in U.S. Marine
Corps manpower along with
Army personnel. We stopped
the F-22 Raptor program, the
best fighter out there, bar
none. Oh, don’t forget our
space program.
I agree there is room for
cuts in the Department of
Defense, but not to the point
at which we are taking money
from defense and putting it
into social programs.
Everyone touted the over-
throw of Hosni Mubarak in
Egypt. The now-governing
Muslim Brotherhood doesn’t
govern on Jeffersonian princi-
ples nor is it democratic. Its
members raise money for
Hamas and apparently have
ties to Hezbollah. They talk a
good game, but it’s a facade.
Our defense budget is being
slashed, yet we are going to
give Egypt $1.5 billion in aid –
remarkable since we are only
facilitating a radical Islamic
military. The day after we
announced that, they declared
Israel their No. 1 enemy. And
Iran then stated, we have
Israel surrounded.
We are giving this money
via the State Department.
What happened to Congress?
Now the president is cutting
deals on missile defense with
Vladimir Putin. This adminis-
tration is going to give Russia
the football if he gets re-elect-
ed. Our missile defenses are
better than their offense. We
have tested and shot down 24
out of 24 missiles with our
defense system, and Russia
wants these defense plans.
To the Jewish community:
Stop sitting on the fence and
hedging your bets. Vote to not
re-elect Obama.
To veterans: I don’t care
what your party affiliation is;
this election is too important.
If Russia gets the football, it
almost surely will send that
missile defense technology to
Iran and North Korea. The
bottom line is this: Are voters
willing to gamble on the secu-
rity of the United States? It’s
your call.
Chuck Marhelski
Trucksville
Barletta distorts
health reform
C
ongressman Lou Barletta
apparently is so confused
about health care reform
that he once more is misin-
forming his constituents.
The Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act is not
government-run health care,
despite Barletta calling it so at
least four times in a recent
commentary (“Health care
reform law won’t fix insurance
problems,” March 27).
The Obama administration’s
health care reform is all about
providing better health care to
as many Americans as pos-
sible through our current
mixed system of for-profit,
nonprofit and public insurance
plans and medical providers.
Reform seeks fairness by
including as many citizens as
possible under insurance
plans, using ideas pushed by
Republicans until a Democrat-
ic president adopted them.
Reform improves health by
covering pre-existing condi-
tions, covering basic tests and
physician’s visits and encou-
raging preventive care.
Reform improves our eco-
nomic competitiveness by
laying out a fair playing field
for more businesses and indi-
viduals on how to pay for
health care.
Reform starts to address
rising costs of Medicare (in-
cluding spending the $500
billion the congressman is
worried about in more cost-
effective ways).
Using the recent nonparti-
san Congressional Budget
Office estimates of costs of
health care in a partisan way,
Rep. Barletta implies the costs
have almost doubled from
previous estimates and claims
rising costs of the program
will hurt Americans. The
actual numbers, according to
objective analysis, actually
save money in the overall
economy and for the federal
deficit compared to what they
should be without reform. The
newly factored increases also
reflect the ongoing damage to
our economy of the Bush tax
cuts, which slow our recovery.
What does Congressman
Barletta offer as an alterna-
tive? Tort reform and in-
creased competition through
inter-state competition? That’s
all? (And reform already calls
for “exchanges” to increase
competition). Oh, and don’t
forget he wanted to take away
Medicare from those of us
who are 55 and younger.
The Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act is not
perfect, but it is not the dan-
ger that its partisan enemies
portray.
Republicans such as Rep.
Lou Barletta want to foster
fear about such a vital and
important issue as our health.
Do not surrender to such
scare tactics.
Pennsylvanians need better
representation in Washington.
Brian A. Pavlac
Kingston
Keep animals
out of circuses
I
t’s that time of year again
and the circus is coming to
town.
After the tragedy two years
ago – a man stomped to death
by an elephant in Wilkes-Barre
– I was hoping they would
have a non-animal circus this
year. The problem with circus-
es that use animals is twofold.
First, as in the case we saw
the year before last, animals
that come from the wild are
dangerous and unpredictable.
People are killed every year by
circus elephants, lions and
tigers. The unsuspecting pub-
lic does not know this. Chil-
dren are even allowed to ride
on the backs of the elephants.
Second, there can be ter-
rible cruelty to animals in
circuses.
The training process of
elephants is very inhumane,
with the use of bullhooks (a
long bat with a metal hook on
the end) and shockprods.
They also are beaten with
bats, boards and other objects.
They are chained almost 24
hours a day. This is how they
travel in trucks and boxcars.
Tigers and lions live in small
cages that barely let them
move.
With so much cruelty and
so much danger, let’s hope
that we can look forward to a
circus with only human per-
formers who are willing and
talented.
For more information, visit
www.bornfreeusa.org and
www.circuses.com.
Lisa Walker
Clarks Summit
Will you answer
call from Jesus?
A
t Easter, as Christians, we
remember the resurrec-
tion of our savior, Jesus
Christ.
As I contemplate the suf-
fering and death of Christ that
preceded his glorious resur-
rection, I am overwhelmed
with love and gratitude for the
sacrifice he made for all man-
kind. I am reminded of how
much my heart and life has
changed since Jesus became
my lord and savior. Please
don’t misunderstand; I still
experience hardships, trials
and heartaches. The differ-
ence for me now is that no
matter what circumstance I
encounter, God’s love is ever
before me to sustain me, to
give me hope, comfort, joy
and peace.
Although God desires our
love, he is just and fair and
will not force anyone to love
him. We can freely make our
own choice for or against him.
Because of his love for all of
us, God set forth his wonder-
ful plan of salvation and re-
demption through the birth,
life, death and resurrection of
his son, Jesus. It puzzles me
that even though we have this
wonderful opportunity to
respond to the prompting of
God through his holy spirit,
many individuals have not yet
made their decisions.
Allow me to share a few
Scripture verses:
“For God so loved the
world, that He gave His only
begotten Son, that whosoever
believeth in Him should not
perish, but have everlasting
life.” (John 3:16).
“For God sent not His Son
into the world to condemn the
world; but that the world
through Him might be saved.”
(John 3:17).
The Bible teaches that Jesus
is the only mediator between
mankind and God; there is no
other way to reach God.
So, what will your decision
be? Jesus is calling. Will you
say yes?
I welcome your questions
and concerns. Please contact
me at Bibletruths@ptd.net.
Catherine Merrifield
Danville
Remember true
meaning of Easter
O
ften, the observance of
Easter Sunday is overtak-
en by a more “traditional”
celebration than one truly
reflecting the Feast of the
Resurrection.
Lest we forget: Before there
were bonnets or bows, there
was a cap of thorns, common
and coarse; but more precious
by far than all the crowns of
all the kings who ever reigned.
Before there were gather-
ings or greetings of the day,
there was a crowd and the cry:
“Crucify him! Crucify him!”
Before there were fashion
pageants or parades, there was
a path whose sacred steps
were sorrow-worn and whose
only design was death. Before
there was elegance or style of
dress, there was a simple robe,
woven of a mother’s love and
trimmed with tears untold.
Before there were baskets
brimming with every sort of
sweet delight, there was a
crude casket of spikes spilled
out upon a hill and driven
deep into sinless hands. Be-
fore there were customs of
candy and cake, there was the
bitter taste of gall. Before
there were gifts of fond ex-
change, there was redemption,
rising with the dawn; and
hope, like prayer, lifting the
least of us to the heights of
heaven.
Easter, then, is not about
bunnies or bouquets or cloth-
ing or cuisine – although they
are pleasant and familiar asso-
ciations. No. it is about the
greatest love humankind has
ever known. It is a day given
to the glory of God. It is a holy
day and one like no other.
Mary Lynch
Wilkes-Barre
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 5E
➛ V I E W S
I’M confident
that the Su-
preme Court
will not take
what would be
an unprece-
dented, ex-
traordinary
step of overturning a law that
was passed by a strong majority
of a democratically elected
Congress.
– Barack Obama, on the
constitutional challenge to his
health care law, April 2
“Unprecedented”? Judicial
review has been the centerpiece
of the American constitutional
system since Marbury v. Madi-
son in 1803. “Strong majority”?
The House has 435 members.
In March 2010, Democrats held
a 75-seat majority. “Obamacare”
passed by seven votes.
In his next-day walk back, the
president implied that he was
merely talking about the normal
“restraint and deference” the
courts owe the legislative
branch. This concern would be
touching if it weren’t coming
from the leader of a party so
deeply devoted to the ultimate
judicial usurpation – Roe v.
Wade, which struck down the
abortion laws of 46 states – that
fealty to it is the party’s litmus
test for service on the Supreme
Court.
With “Obamacare” remaking
one-sixth of the economy, it
would be unusual for the Su-
preme Court to overturn legisla-
tion so broad and sweeping. On
the other hand, it is far more
unusual to pass such a funda-
mentally transformative law on
such a narrow, partisan basis.
“Obamacare” passed the
Congress without a single vote
from the opposition party – in
contradistinction to Social Secu-
rity, the Civil Rights Act, the
Voting Rights Act, Medicare
and Medicaid, similarly grand
legislation, all of which enjoyed
substantial bipartisan support.
The fundamental deviation
from custom and practice is not
the legal challenge to “Obama-
care” but the very manner of its
enactment.
The president’s pre-emptive
attack on the court was in direct
reaction to “Obamacare’s” three
days of oral argument. It was a
shock. After years of contemptu-
ously dismissing the very idea
of a legal challenge, Democrats
suddenly realized there actually
is a serious constitutional argu-
ment to be made against “Oba-
macare” – and they are losing it.
Here were highly sophisti-
cated conservative thinkers –
lawyers and justices – making
the case for limited govern-
ment, and liberals weren’t even
prepared for the obvious consti-
tutional question: If Congress
can force the individual into a
private contract by authority of
the Commerce Clause, what can
it not force the individual to do?
Without a limiting principle, the
central premise of our constitu-
tional system – a government of
enumerated powers – evap-
orates. What then is the limiting
principle?
Liberals were quick to blame
the administration’s bumbling
solicitor general, Donald Verril-
li, for blowing the answer. But
Clarence Darrow couldn’t have
given it. There is none.
Justice Stephen Breyer tried
to rescue the hapless Verrilli by
suggesting that by virtue of
being born, one enters into the
“market for health care.” To
which plaintiffs’ lawyer Michael
Carvin devastatingly replied: If
birth means entering the mar-
ket, the Congress is omnipo-
tent, authorized by the Com-
merce Clause to regulate “every
human activity from cradle to
grave.”
QED.
Having lost the argument,
what to do? Bully. The New
York Times loftily warned the
Supreme Court that it would
forfeit its legitimacy if it ruled
against “Obamacare” because
with the “five Republican-ap-
pointed justices supporting the
challenge led by 26 Republican
governors, the court will mark
itself as driven by politics.”
Really? The administration’s
case for the constitutionality of
“Obamacare” was so thoroughly
demolished in oral argument
that one liberal observer called
it “a train wreck.” It is perfectly
natural, therefore, that a major-
ity of the court should side with
the argument that had so clearly
prevailed on its merits. That’s
not partisanship. That’s logic.
Democrats are reeling. Oba-
ma was so taken aback, he
hasn’t even drawn up contingen-
cy plans should his cherished
reform be struck down. Liberals
still cannot grasp what’s hap-
pened – the mild revival of
constitutionalism in a country
they’ve grown so used to order-
ing about regardless. When
asked about “Obamacare’s”
constitutionality, Nancy Pelosi
famously replied: “Are you
serious?” She was genuinely
puzzled.
As was U.S. Rep. Phil Hare,
D-Ill. As Michael Barone notes,
when Hare was similarly chal-
lenged at a 2010 town hall, he
replied: “I don’t worry about the
Constitution.” Hare is now
retired, having been shortly
thereafter defeated for re-elec-
tion by the more constitutional-
ly attuned owner of an East
Moline pizza shop.
A beaten-back Obama
resorts to being a bully
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
T
roubled waters can in some cases bubble unnoticed by all but the keenest
observers. Other times the signs are perfectly clear.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Pete G. Wilcox
and words by Mark E. Jones
NO, THE U.S.
Constitution
does not guar-
antee a “right”
to carry a gun.
There. Now
you know I will
never run for
office. That’s because the Nation-
al Rifle Association, America’s
pioneer mega-lobby, would
shoot down any human being
who would dare say something
so sacrilegious.
But the Second Amendment,
the cornerstone of the NRA’s BS,
is not relevant today. It was
ratified in relation to state mili-
tias in 1791 and has no meaning
in today’s world.
The “right to keep and bear
arms” does not mean you can
own a heat-seeking missile or a
nuclear bomb, does it?
By the way, have you ever read
the Third Amendment? It’s
similarly archaic. “No soldier
shall, in time of peace be quar-
tered in any house ...”
The Second and Third amend-
ments addressed conditions in
Colonial times, when the British
army was America’s biggest
problem and nobody knew
where the Mississippi River was.
Guess what? The redcoats are
not coming. But the rednecks
are.
And when they say that the
Second Amendment protects
them from a “tyrannical” federal
government, they are more than
delusional. The U.S. military is
so big, Mitt Romney’s annual
“income” couldn’t buy lunch at
the Pentagon, especially if Paul
Ryan’s budget passes.
Now please don’t misunder-
stand. I don’t want to trigger any
anger.
Progressives like me don’t
care if you own a gun. The NRA
wants you to think we care, but
we don’t care. I don’t want to rip
anything from any actor’s “cold,
dead hands.”
I believe that most gun own-
ers, unlike texting drivers, are
responsible caretakers of their
deadly weapons.
But we do have problems
these days. The numbers are
startling – nearly 100,000 shoot-
ings per year. And mass shoot-
ings seemingly are becoming a
weekly occurrence.
To ignore the problem be-
cause of some outdated verbiage
in the Constitution aimed at
warding off redcoats is the ulti-
mate cop-out.
I agree that gun ownership
does not correlate with killing.
Something more pernicious is at
play here. The NRA has evolved
from an organization dedicated
to sportsmen into a Washington-
based political bully and propa-
gandist that encourages the sale
and use of guns. And, of course,
a vehicle for right-wing political
dogma.
“Lock and load,” as Sarah
Palin, an NRA mouthpiece,
would say.
Fear is the NRA’s primary
mode of marketing itself. Be
afraid. Buy a gun. Join the NRA.
Gun sales soared after the
election of President Obama
because the NRA had its
minions convinced that Obama
was coming after their guns,
which he wasn’t.
More insidious than the NRA’s
dominance over politicians in
both parties is its new gig as the
writer of laws.
The gun lobby drafts laws and
sponsors them through lapdog
legislators who would allow
people to carry a gun anywhere:
in a bar, at a football game, at a
college campus. Oh, guns in
bars, that’s a good idea.
The “Stand Your Ground”
nonsense passed in Florida and
22 other states is one of the
NRA’s marquee accomplish-
ments, and it was responsible for
the killing of young Trayvon
Martin.
George Zimmerman, a “neigh-
borhood watch captain,” acting
more like a hunter, armed with a
Kel-Tek 9mm semi-automatic
pistol, stalked Martin, who was
armed with a bag of Skittles, and
shot him dead. And the cops let
Zimmerman go as if he were a
pretty woman who went through
a stop sign.
Luckily, such right-to-kill laws
were not around when I was a
teen. Most of our Pittston gang,
especially my brother Cowboy,
would not have made it to pu-
berty. Then again, the adults in
our day, the people who fought
World War II, weren’t easily
scared by teenagers and they
recognized fear-mongerers and
vigilantes when they saw them.
The gun lobby insists that “an
armed society is a polite socie-
ty,” because criminals live in fear
of law-abiding gun owners. But
the opposite is true. Residents in
“red states” with the highest
rates of gun ownership (such as
Louisiana and Alabama) are
more than twice as likely to
become homicide victims than
those in the states with the
lowest rates of gun ownership
(such as Massachusetts and New
Jersey).
In Seattle, a liberal bastion
where everybody wears a hoo-
die, including old white guys,
there were only 19 murders last
year.
Own all the guns you want,
just get the NRA back to repre-
senting responsible sportsmen
and gun owners instead of cor-
porate overlords. Its present
mission to make guns of all
kinds ubiquitous serves only one
purpose, its own, to the danger
and detriment of the rest of us,
including gun owners.
Only thing to fear is NRA’s fear tactic itself
JOHN WATSON
C O M M E N T A R Y
John Watson is the former editor of
the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He
lives in Seattle.
The gun lobby drafts laws and
sponsors them through lapdog
legislators who would allow
people to carry a gun
anywhere: in a bar, at a football
game, at a college campus. Oh,
guns in bars, that’s a good
idea.
LAST WEEK, she got
her house back.
She never should
have lost it.
After 101 years on
this Earth, Texana
Hollis deserved better
than to watch from
the street, in a wheelchair, as her pos-
sessions were stacked on the sidewalk
like garbage.
But that is where she found herself
last September, evicted from her home
of nearly 60 years, after her son Warren
failed to make tax payments.
Since then, this sweet, slight woman
– who was born four years before the
start of World War I – has been living
with a caregiver, Polly Cheeks – a wom-
an Texana once taught in Sunday
school – hoping and praying her fates
would change.
They have.
“You don’t know how happy you
have made me,” Texana told us, a soft
robe over her shoulders, a blanket on
her lap. “I get my house back?”
“Yes.”
“Lord, have mercy!”
That should have applied six months
ago.
Like many of you, I watched Texana’s
story with dismay. How could a 101-
year-old woman be evicted from any-
where?
After weeks of back-and-forth with
the federal agency that took over the
property – the Department of Housing
and Urban Development – I offered to
buy the house to return it to Texana.
It’s something many Detroiters would
have done. Only it wasn’t enough,
HUD said. The house was unlivable
and needed major work. OK, I said,
we’ll get the work done.
More bureaucracy. More paperwork.
Assurances that mold and lead paint
would be removed. More waiting.
Finally, last month, the deal went
through. Working with our charity to
help homeless people, S.A.Y. Detroit,
the good people from the Detroit Res-
cue Mission Ministries, some studs
from Tamer Builders of Dearborn and
plenty of big-hearted volunteers from
all around town, we ensured the west-
side house on Carbondale was com-
pletely refurbished: new floors, walls,
appliances, repaired roof, heating,
electrical, a security system donated by
Guardian Alarm.
We even painted it the colors Texana
said were her favorites: canary yellow
and light green.
“I gotta get someone to clean it,” she
said.
“We’ll clean it,” she was told.
“You gonna do that, too? Lord, have
mercy! ... I’m the happiest person on
Earth.”
The mark of a society is how it treats
its neediest citizens, especially its
neediest senior citizens. Texana Hollis
should never have been thrown out –
no matter what mistakes her son made
– and it should not have taken this long
to get her back in.
But she is made of tough stuff. Mar-
ried for six decades before her husband
died, she once had cancer so wide-
spread that the doctors who “opened
me up” gave her up for dead. “They
couldn’t save me. But the Lord said,
‘Stand back! Man has gone as far as he
can go. Now watch my glory.’
“I was in my 30s. Here I am, 101
years old.”
And there she was on Wednesday
afternoon, when we gave her the keys
to the house she never should have
lost. She had owned it outright until
her son talked her into a reverse mort-
gage – essentially taking money out of
the house. It is not the first time such a
deal has gone badly for senior citizens.
Texana told us often how her hus-
band bought her that house after World
War II, and how dearly she missed
sitting in it, cooking in it. On Wednes-
day, she promised to make cookies for
the well-wishers. And despite the
wheelchair, she said, “I think I might
have to dance.”
Texana Hollis is a joyous piece of our
city’s living history, and we should
cherish her.
Once evicted, 101-year-old woman gets an overdue ‘welcome home’
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the Detroit
Free Press. Readers may write to him at:
Detroit Free Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI
48226, or via email at malbom@free-
press.com.
AP PHOTO
Texana Hollis, 101, re-enters the Detroit home from which she had been evicted.
Columnist Mitch Albom’s nonprofit group led the campaign for her return.
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Do Something Special
Tis Mother’s Day
Honor or memorialize the special woman in your life by
making a donation in support of the mothers and children in
Misericordia University’s Women with Children Program.
Mail gift payable to
Misericordia University
Women with Children
Program by May 7th to:
301 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
All special women will be recognized in
the Mother’s Day edition of The Times Leader.
Misericordia University was founded in
1924 by the Sisters of Mercy to provide
opportunity for women to achieve a college
degree. In support of the mission, the
Women with Children Program provides
single mothers with the opportunity to attend
classes while living at Misericordia University
with their children. The Women with Children
Program is funded through grants and
contributions.
Print name as you would like it published.
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Doo-wop music
getting its due
T
hanks for keeping our
music alive!
This is not me saying it.
This is what has been said by
the various musical groups
appearing over the last four
doo-wop shows I produced.
Thank you for The Times
Leader’s wonderful reviews of
our shows. Many of the
groups that have appeared
were recording their songs in
the ’50s, when many record
companies were not paying
the proper royalties, and as a
result never received pay-
ments for their works. Many
performers were not allowed
to stay in the hotels during the
1950s because of their skin
color. When they say, “Thanks
for keeping our music alive,” it
means this: Thanks for finally
giving us a chance to earn a
decent living by playing at
doo-wop shows here and
across the country.
Those people who attend
are paying a fine tribute to the
groups that experienced very
difficult times during their
recording careers.
My thanks to public televi-
sion (WVIA-TV, Channel 44)
for bringing back to our area
the sounds of doo-wop – an-
other reason why we all
should support public televi-
sion with our dollars to keep
this and other kinds of pro-
gramming that we do not see
on networks or cable.
Much of the music we are
hearing at the doo-wop shows
was not heard on radio in the
’50s due to playlists of radio
stations, which did not play
most black music. But that’s
another story for another
time.
If anyone wants to suggest
some groups he or she would
like to see in Wilkes-Barre,
email me at jrn@galleryof-
sound.com.
Thanks for keeping our
music alive!
Joe Nardone Sr.
Wilkes-Barre
Blue Ribbon aims
to help our health
T
he Blue Ribbon Founda-
tion of Blue Cross of
Northeastern Pennsylvania
is pleased to announce that its
2011 annual report is now
available on this website:
www.bcnepa.com/ceBRFoun-
dation.aspx.
Blue Cross of Northeastern
Pennsylvania established its
private, nonprofit Blue Ribbon
Foundation in 2002 to invest
in health and wellness initia-
tives throughout Northeastern
and North Central Pennsylva-
nia. In 2011, our foundation
awarded grants to 26 orga-
nizations for health and well-
ness projects that are serving
thousands of regional resi-
dents. These projects – driven
by grassroots organizations
and executed with the help of
foundation funding – are pro-
ducing real results.
Last year, for example, in
Greater Wilkes-Barre, our
partners included:
• Ruth’s Place, which will
provide onsite trauma services
for 110 shelter guests.
• Volunteers in Medicine,
which will provide diagnostic
testing and lab services for
475 uninsured patients.
• The Boys and Girls Clubs
of Northeastern Pennsylvania,
which is providing personal
safety education to 100 at-risk
children, ages 6 through 11,
across two counties.
• United Way of Wyoming
Valley, which provides much-
needed health and human
services to county residents,
including a new behavioral
health education program for
child care centers.
These partners and others
recognize the value of prevent-
ing, rather than treating, dis-
ease, and they are helping to
turn the tide on many of to-
day’s most pressing – and
most costly – health issues.
We remain committed to our
mission of helping people live
healthier lives, and we’re privi-
leged to support the work of
so many dedicated organiza-
tions.
Cynthia A. Yevich
Executive director
The Blue Ribbon Foundation
of Blue Cross of Northeastern
Pennsylvania
Scranton
Time to eliminate
property taxes
I
am the president of one of
71 property taxpayers’ asso-
ciations in Pennsylvania. We
represent tens of thousands of
taxpayers.
I am well aware of the prob-
lems municipalities are having
with special interests that do
not pay property taxes, name-
ly nonprofits, businesses and
residences that are covered by
state programs such as En-
terprise Zones, KOZs and
LERTA. Yet, they are receiv-
ing public services: i.e. fire,
police, street plowing, in-
frastructure. If they are not
paying for these services, then
the taxpayers are also paying
for their share of services.
Also, our system of school
funding is crumbling. This
decay has been occurring for
many years and continues to
worsen. Home foreclosures
and tax sales are occurring at
an expanding rate, and the
home market is at a standstill.
The opportunity to fund edu-
cation from the existing state-
wide source is rapidly vanish-
ing.
There is a better approach.
The Property Tax Independ-
ence Act offers the only hope
for all Pennsylvania homeown-
ers to truly own their homes,
improve school financing and
improve economic devel-
opment – without increasing
property taxes.
Instead of property taxes,
education would be funded
through an increase of the
sales tax from 6 percent to 7
percent, as well as an expan-
sion of the sales tax base to
include items such as land-
scaping, haircuts, sports and
theater tickets, dry cleaning,
candy, gum and magazines.
Exemptions from the sales tax
have been proposed for other
items, including food stamp
purchases, utilities, home-
heating fuels, health, hospital
and dental services, prescrip-
tion drugs and home health
care.
In addition to the benefits it
would provide to homeowners
and school systems, it would
be a tremendous advantage to
employers and workers. Every
dollar of school property taxes
that homeowners and employ-
ers do not have to pay can be
reinvested into Pennsylvania’s
economy. Homeowners would
have more money to spend in
our local businesses. Employ-
ers would have more money to
invest in their operations and
to hire more workers.
Our students perhaps stand
to benefit the most from the
replacement of the inherently
inequitable school property
tax system. Due to great varia-
tions in property values, a
student in one corner of the
commonwealth might have
access to a quality education,
while a student in another
area might be compelled to
attend a severely underfunded
school that fails to meet that
student’s needs. School dis-
tricts should be equalized
yearly.
It’s time to rise up and elim-
inate the property tax in Penn-
sylvania. It’s time to help
homeowners, to make a better
state school system to benefit
all students and concurrently
increase economic devel-
opment.
For more information,
please go to Pennsylvania
Taxpayers Cyber Coalition at
www.ptcc.us/pcta.htm.
Ozzie Quinn
President
Scranton & Lackawanna County
Taxpayers’ Association Inc.
Corruption drives
people from area
W
hen is corruption going
to end?
This area is known for
it; a lot of people leave this
Valley, and you cannot blame
them. Monkey see, monkey
do.
Alex S. Partika
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
Marianne Strong may have left
Northeastern Pennsylvania al-
most 50 years ago, but the region
and its rich history still linger in
her everyday life, serving as the
basis for nearly half of the 35
short stories she’s written for
mystery magazines.
“The area, to me, is an endless
sourceof stories andinspiration,”
she said.
The 70-year-old Wilkes-Barre
native, who nowresides in Mary-
land, focuses many of her mur-
der-mystery tales on coal mining.
“It’s a fascinating history,”
Strong said. “It fired the Industri-
al Revolution in this country, and
it’s a story that I thinkis beingfor-
gotten and lost. It needs to be
told, so, for me, it’s almost a kind
of mission to tell it through both
my fiction and the lectures I’ve
given in Pennsylvania and here in
Maryland.”
Her sharp ear in her father’s
presence helped provide many
plots.
“Growing up, my father would
tell me many stories, and I was
one of those kids wholistenedve-
ry carefully,” Strong said. “He
andhis brothers wouldtalkabout
the coal-mining days, although
none of them had actually
worked in the mines. My father
owned a garage and knew many
miners. All of these things I heard
as a kid made their way into my
published works.”
“TheHonoredGuest” is a story
that draws inspiration from such
anecdotes, this one about the kill-
ing of a mine foreman. It was cho-
sen by readers of “Ellery Queen
Mystery Magazine” as one of the
best mysteries of the year and
was published in the “Best Mys-
teries of 2001” anthology.
Another series of stories in-
volves the character Aunt Chesla.
“She’s based on some of the ve-
ry strong and impressive women
I knew in Wilkes-Barre who had
to deal with husbands who had
black lung and met early deaths
because of coal mining.”
Chesla stories such as “The
Shooters” and“Ice-ColdMurder”
were published in “Alfred Hitch-
cock’s Mystery Magazine.”
Strong also looks to what she
calls “the incredible ethnic rich-
ness of the area.”
“Wedding Blues” deals with
the marriage of a Polish girl and
an Irish man in the times of Irish-
Polish rivalry, which Strong said
was a result of working in the
mines.
“The Last Vigil” is a story
based on a night-before-Easter
ritual, when men would keep vig-
il in the churches.
“That story in particular is fil-
led with an ethnic richness that
comes from the Polish back-
ground of which I was part.”
Strong is now working on a
short story, “The Breaker,” which
centers on the Huber Breaker in
Ashley. She is also halfway
through writing a novel with the
working title “Treasure at the
French Azilum.”
“I used to go there with my fa-
ther when I was a kid, and he
would tell me stories about it,”
Strong said. “It’s extremely inter-
esting, a place right along the
Susquehanna where a group of
French aristocrats came to to es-
cape being guillotined.”
Strong has taught courses for
Misericordia University’s Road
Scholar program. She graduated
from Misericordia with a bache-
lor’s in English, then went on to
earn a master’s in English from
the University of Maryland.
She will discuss her upcoming
novel, as well as someof her short
stories, Tuesday at the Osterhout
Free Library in downtown
Wilkes-Barre.
W-B native mines area’s coal history for her mystery tales
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
What: Treasures
and Tragedies:
Using Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania
in Fiction
When: 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Where: Osterhout Free Library, 71
S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre
IF YOU GO
Strong
She once cut her roommate’s
hair and sold it for wigs. She told
the parents of yet another room-
mate that he was kidnapped,
then used the ransom money to
take a trip to Paris. She has been
described as opinionated, deceit-
ful and downright terrifying.
She
grew up in
Shickshin-
ny.
OK, so
only one
of those
things is
actually
true of
Hollywoodstarlet KrystenRitter.
Her birthplace was indeed Shick-
shinny.
All the other stuff is true only of
the latest character the 30-year-old
actress plays on television: a
(rhymes with witch) who runs
through roommates faster than a
Kardashian through husbands.
“Don’t Trust the B---- in Apart-
ment 23” will debut at 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday on ABC.
“It’s like the role of a lifetime,”
Ritter said during a phone inter-
view from Los Angeles. “I feel re-
ally lucky. I’ve never seen a char-
acter like this on TV, and I’mhap-
py I get to play” her.
“Apartment 23” centers on
New York party girl Chloe. Her
newest roommate is June, and
Chloe wastes no time in causing
trouble for her.
“I think that the reason Chloe
gets away with what she does is
because she has what she be-
lieves are the best intentions,
which is what makes the charac-
ter work,” Ritter explained.
“As an actress it’s really fun to
play a character that’s so well writ-
ten, has suchagreat point of view,”
she said. “You can get inside her
head, and you know exactly how
she’d approach every line, every
scene, everysituation. There’sreal-
ly nothing that is going too far.”
Ritter also has a project mak-
ing a limited debut on April 13, a
movie titled “Life Happens.” She
and close friend Kat Coiro wrote
and produced the film, in which
Ritter is also the main character.
“It’s about two fabulous,
young, modern women hell-bent
on having it all, and my character
gets pregnant, whichchanges the
dynamic and ruins their fabulous
plans.”
Trust us,
this actress
is different
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
AP
PHOTO
‘As an actress it’s really fun to
play a character that’s so well
written ... ’ says Shickshinny
native Krysten Ritter of her
role in ‘Don’t Trust The B---- in
Apartment 23’.
See RITTER, Page 4F
What: “Don’t Trust
The B---- in Apart-
ment 23”
Starring: Shickshinny
native Krysten Ritter
When: 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday on ABC
IF YOU WATCH
I
f you grew up in
Wilkes-Barre dur-
ing, oh, let’s say the
1960s or ’70s, you may
well have sipped your
milk from a plastic Mr.
Peanut cup, saved nick-
els and dimes in a color-
ful Mr. Peanut bank and
maybe even picked up a
new sport at the local
playground with help
froma Mr. Peanut how-to-play ten-
nis booklet.
But stop by the Luzerne County
Historical SocietyMuseumfor “The
Wonderful Story of Planters Pea-
nuts”exhibit andyou’ll seethemany
other ways the smiling legume with
the monocle and top hat
reminded people about
thecrunchy, tastyfunof a
handful of Planters.
Mr. Peanut showed up
in a series of statues atop
what was once the head-
quarters of the Planters
Nut and Chocolate Co.
on South Main Street in
Wilkes-Barre. He ap-
peared on bracelets
and pajamas and as a Hallo-
ween costume. He was
part of several holi-
day ornaments, a
whistle and a
golf put-
ter.
“There’s an alarm clock shaped like a peanut.
There are salt-and-pepper shakers that look like a
peanut. I love it all,” Katie Kearney, 25, of Scran-
ton marveled as she meandered through the ex-
hibit’s opening-night reception.
“They left nostone unturned,” museumcurator Ma-
ry Ruth Burke said. “He (Planters Peanuts founder Ame-
deo Obici) was a marketing genius.”
Visit the museum and you’ll soon learn Obici was a gen-
erous philanthropist as well. He willed 98 percent of his es-
tate to establish a hospital and foundation in Suffolk, Va.,
where by 1913, most of his peanuts were processed. He paid
for a hospital wing devoted to women’s care in the province of
Treviso, Italy, which was his birthplace.
He also founded a company, at one time a major employer in
Wilkes-Barre, where employees were proud and grateful to work.
“This is my 10-year pin,” 81-year-old Frank Elick of Luzerne
said during the recent reception, showing a tie tack, emblazoned
with Mr. Peanut, to Obici’s great-niece Jolyne R. Dalzell.
“I treasure this,” he told her.
When Elick was a senior at Coughlin High School, a Planters rep-
resentative came to the school and asked the principal to recommend
a likely student for office work. Elick got the job and remembers Plant-
ers had a policy of giving deserving employees a raise every six months.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
Obici
A Mr. Peanut Christmas
ornament is one of
many places the smil-
ing legume has ap-
peared over the years.
Several cast-iron statues of Mr.
Peanut once decorated the head-
quarters of the Planters Nut and
Chocolate Co. in the 600 block of
South Main Street, Wilkes-Barre.
You can see this one through
October at the Luzerne County
Historical Society Museum.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
What: ‘The Wonderful Story of Planters
Peanuts’
Where: Luzerne County Historical Society
Museum, rear 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre
When: Noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through
Saturdays, through Oct. 27
More info: 823-6244
IF YOU GO
See PEANUTS, Page 4F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
KENKEN
JUMBLE
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Talking only about oneself
is a bad habit that a friend
has been guilty of on many
occasions. It’s your turn to
talk today, and you should
gladly take it. You’ve
earned the right.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Your words reveal your
level of experience in the
world. Others will make
decisions about how to
interact with you based on
your vocabulary.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
The thing about getting
what you want is that it’s
always going to change
your world. It’s wise to
consider the many effects
that will happen, good and
bad, and weigh your desire
against them.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
It’s polite to make as little
noise as possible in many
public arenas. But where
you’re going, it’s only
appropriate to add noise
to the arena in the form of
cheers and applause.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Maybe
your ultimate ambition
is so lofty that few have
achieved it. You’ll be hap-
piest when your goals that
lead up to that place are
realistic. Set small achiev-
able goals so you can feel
good along the way.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). It’s
the perfect time to update
your contacts, addresses
and calendar. You’ll have
to be ultra-organized to
take advantage of the
interesting opportunities
in the week ahead.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Problems and troubles are
not the same thing. Today
you’ll realize that you have
problems, not troubles.
Everything will work out.
It’s just an equation that
needs to be solved.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
In order to get where you
want to go, you’ll have to
change your attitude. The
good news is that this will
make your life better on
many levels. You’ll love
what happens next.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Our caveman and
cavewoman ancestors
didn’t live as long as we do
now, and their courtships
were proportionately brief.
You, however, can take
your time instead of rush-
ing in like a Neanderthal.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). A desire to impress
someone can be healthy
for a relationship up to
a point. If this desire is
exaggerated, it becomes
destructive. You’ll find a
graceful balance.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You want to be well
thought of as much as the
next person, but you’re not
about to let that stop you
from contributing freely
to the social milieu. You
may make a mistake and
discover that others don’t
care so much.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Do what’s necessary to
get to a smiling, laughing
place. There will be a situ-
ation that has you unsure,
but you’ll interpret things
in a positive way, dem-
onstrating the difference
between a happy person
and an unhappy person.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (April
8). Lifestyle upgrades
happen over the next 10
weeks. Friends support
you in many ways this
year, especially by making
life fun and lighthearted.
May brings vows and
promises. Your experience
will pay off in June, and
you’ll use the money to
start a new venture. This
could be important to your
long-term financial growth,
so give it a high priority.
Your mentorship will be
needed in August. Taurus
and Gemini people adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 10, 3, 32, 18 and 50.
"FAILING FRENCH"
Steven J. St. John
4/8/12
1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies:
Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
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HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
4/8
DEAR ABBY
Vietnam vet wants to
acknowledge thanks
Dear Abby:
My husband
served in
Vietnam
and proudly
wears a
Vietnam vet-
eran insignia on his jacket
or cap everywhere he goes.
People approach him all the
time and thank him for his
service, which is wonder-
ful. The big question is,
how should he respond? He
isn’t quite sure what to say
back to them — “You’re wel-
come”? “It was my honor to
serve”?
I’m not sure of the right
response, either. So I told
my husband I’d ask you.
What’s the proper thing to
say when someone is kind
enough to take a minute and
say thanks?
— Vet’s Wife in Phoenix
Dear Vet’s Wife: I’m sure
being thanked for his ser-
vice in Vietnam is music to
your husband’s ears. When
members of the military re-
turned from Vietnam, many
of them were treated with
hostility. A proper response
when someone thanks him
for his service would be any
of those you offered, or a
simple, “Thanks for saying
that. I appreciate it.”
Dear Abby: My husband
and I have dear friends who
live in another country. They
also have a vacation home in
a very nice part of the U.S.
They have invited us to use
their vacation place while
they’re away, since it stands
empty 11 months of the year.
I have hesitated in the past
because I know we would
use utilities and it would be
of expense to them. They are
insistent that they will not
let us pay for the use.
We would love to spend
some time there. Is there
anything we could do to
show our appreciation with-
out paying them?
— Appreciative, But ...
Dear Appreciative: Yes.
After spending time in their
vacation home, write a letter
thanking them and describ-
ing the experience. Consider
sending them an album of
photographs you took during
your vacation there, or buy a
gift for their vacation home.
That way you will have re-
paid them without “paying”
them.
Dear Abby: My little sister
is almost 12. She has been
having a lot of behavior prob-
lems. I thought it was the
stupid videos she watches
that made her act like that,
but she’s getting worse.
One night, her mood was
terrible and I noticed she
was texting. So while she
slept I took her cellphone
and started reading the mes-
sages. Her texts were about
her being a skank, drunk,
sexually active, depressed,
cutting herself and moving
away soon. No one in the
family knows or would ever
allow this.
I feel the right thing to do
is to tell our parents, but I
don’t want to make the situa-
tion worse. Her behavior and
attitude stress us out, and
her “friends” are the wrong
crowd for her. I know it was
bad for me to invade her pri-
vacy, but something needs to
be done. What can I do?
— Sister Who Cares in Texas
Dear Caring Sister: Tell
your parents what you have
learned. Your sister’s behav-
ior problems and angry or
depressed mood must have
been noticed by them as
well as you. Ask them not
to reveal that you looked at
the messages, but to insist
on some answers from her
until they get to the bottom
of what’s happening. If even
half of what your sister is
writing and receiving is true,
she is headed for serious
trouble.
To My Christian Readers:
Happy Easter, one and all!
To order “How to Write
Letters for All Occasions,”
send your name and mail-
ing address, plus check or
money order for $7 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby — Let-
ter Booklet, P.O. Box 447,
Mount Morris, IL 61054-
0447. Shipping and handling
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To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most
frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-
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$3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
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A D V I C E
KenKen
4/8
New York Times
4/8
Bonus Puzzle
4/8
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ E T C .
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SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Manon LIVE
Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata
Saturday, April 14 at 12:55pm only
Grateful Dead Meet Up 2012
Thursday, April 19th at 7:00pm
*American Reunion - R - 120 min
(1:15), (2:10), (3:45), (4:40), 7:15, 7:45,
9:45, 10:15
**Titanic 3D - PG13 - 200 min
(2:00), 8:00
Mirror Mirror - PG - 115 min
(1:25), (2:05), (3:50), (4:30), 7:10, 7:35,
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*Wrath of the Titans 3D - PG13 -
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21 Jump Street - R - 120 min
(1:30), (2:15), (4:00), (4:45), 7:00, 7:45,
9:30, 10:15 (No 4:45, 7:45, or 10:15 on
Thurs 4/12/12)
The Lorax - PG - 105 min
(2:20), (4:40), 7:30, 9:45
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
TITANIC (2012)
TITANIC (2012) (XD) (PG-13)
11:45AM, 3:45PM, 7:55PM
21 JUMP STREET (DIGITAL) (R)
11:50AM, 2:25PM, 5:00PM, 6:25PM, 7:45PM,
9:00PM, 10:20PM
ACT OF VALOR (DIGITAL) (R)
9:05PM
AMERICAN REUNION (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM, 2:10PM, 3:30PM, 4:50PM, 6:10PM,
7:30PM, 8:50PM, 10:10PM
DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (3D) (PG)
1:00PM, 3:15PM, 5:30PM, 7:50PM, 10:15PM
DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:35PM, 4:00PM
HUNGER GAMES, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, 12:45PM, 1:20PM, 2:00PM,
2:45PM, 3:20PM, 4:05PM, 4:40PM, 5:20PM,
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9:20PM, 9:55PM, 10:25PM
JEFF WHO LIVES AT HOME (DIGITAL) (R)
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JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND
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11:50AM
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WRATH OF THE TITANS (3D) (PG-13)
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7:35PM, 8:25PM, 10:05PM
WRATH OF THE TITANS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
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Ritter will thenstepbehindthe
camera for “Cassandra French’s
Finishing School For Boys,” an
MTVpilot sheis producingabout
a young woman in search of the
perfect guy who eventually de-
cides to lock one up in her base-
ment to train him to become the
perfect gentlemen.
“I’ve been acting on the other
side of the camera for solongthat
I’ve learned a lot, and you can
bringthat totheother side. It was
a natural progression for me.
“Acting is what I do and what I
love, but I also love producing.
For me it’s all creative. ... It’s all
character work at the end of the
day.”
Ritter, daughter of Garry Ritter
of Benton and Kathi and Ron Tay-
lor of Shickshinny, grew up on a
farm in Shickshinny and gradu-
ated from Northwest High School
in 2000. Her ascent to stardombe-
gan with an Elite Model Manage-
ment search at the Wyoming Val-
ley Mall when she was 15. She
modeledoff andon, thenmovedto
New York City at the age of 18 to
continue her career.
She has been in several televi-
sion series, including “Breaking
Bad,” “Gilmore Girls,” “Veronica
Mars” and “ ’Til Death” as well as
the movies “She’s Out of My
League,” “Confessions of a Shop-
aholic” and “27 Dresses.”
She believes persistence got
her where she is today.
“It is hardfor young people, be-
cause they may feel like they
don’t have a lot of direction. I
know I did.”
“If you want something and
you work really hard at it, it’s go-
ing to happen. You’re going to get
rejectedandbe toldno, nomatter
what you do, over and over and
over again. I really believe every
no is one step closer to a yes.”
RITTER
Continued from Page 1F
“When I got drafted to go to
Korea,” Elick recalled, his boss
calledhimintotheofficeandtold
him, “We’ll give you your raises
just as if you were here all along.”
Obici worked hard himself and
expected Planters employees to
do the same, Dalzell said. She re-
calls her uncle as a fair person
who paid black employees a
wage equal to white employees,
something not always done be-
fore the Civil Rights era.
Dalzell is the granddaughter of
Obici’s sister Angelina and her
husband, Thomas Sangiuliano,
who worked at Planters Peanuts
for more than half a century. She
treasures her grandfather’s 50-
year pin as well as the story of the
famous Amedeo, who emigrated
from Italy in 1889 at age 11.
Amedeo’s father had died and
his mother’s brother, Victor Sar-
tor, who lived in Scranton, sug-
gested the boy be sent to him.
Obici, who had not yet learned
to speak English, disembarked
from a train in Wilkes-Barre in-
stead of Scranton, the story
goes, and ended up at the fruit
stand of Enrico Musante. Mu-
sante eventually would become
his father-in-law when Amedeo
married his daughter Louise.
Young Amedeo worked at var-
ious jobs until he was able to
open his own fruit stand and pea-
nut roaster in downtown Wilkes-
Barre. He delivered roasted pea-
nuts throughout the Wyoming
Valley via horse and wagon and
paid the passage for his brother
Frank, widowed mother and two
sisters to join him in America.
“He saved enough money to
bring everybody,” Dalzell said,
indicating Frank came first, fol-
lowed in 1985 by the women.
In 1906 Obici went into busi-
ness with his friend Mario Peruz-
zi (who married Obici’s sister El-
izabeth). The two men formed
the Planters Peanuts Co., which
later was incorporated as the
Planters Nut and Chocolate Co.
By 1913, according to Historical
Society records, a majority of the
peanut productionshiftedtoa new
plant in Suffolk, Va., which was
closer to the fields where the pea-
nuts were grown. And in 1916,
Planters sponsored a contest for
school children in Suffolk to come
upwithanadvertisingfiguretorep-
resent the company. The winner
was 12-year-old Antonio Gentile,
who designed the rough draft of
the peanut man. He received $5 in
gold and, later, Obici paid for his
college and medical-school tuition.
“When I was in Suffolk in 2001
for the 50th anniversary of the
hospital,” Dalzell said, “I can’t
tell you how many people came
up to me andsaid‘Your uncle put
me through college.’ ”
“He did a tremendous amount
of good,” she said. “That (foun-
dation) money that’s in Virginia
now is still his gift to the poor.”
Planters Peanuts became part
of Standard Brands in1961. That
company merged with Nabisco
in 1981 and later with R.J. Rey-
nolds, eventually becoming part
of Kraft Foods, which owns the
Planters brand today.
PEANUTS
Continued from Page 1F
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A Mr. Peanut golf putter is
among the many pieces of
memorabilia on display at ‘The
Wonderful Story of Planters
Peanuts’ exhibit.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 5F
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B E S T S E L L E R S
MELVILLE, N.Y. — At the nail
salon, the grocery store and the
gym, Jen Boudin of Melville has
been urging friends and even
strangers to read “Fifty Shades of
Grey” — a racy romance incorpo-
ratingbedroombondageandservi-
tude that has become a grassroots
phenomenonamongwomen.
“I’m at the gym, we’re washing
our hands at the sink. I say, ‘Have
youreadthebook?’ That’s what it’s
known as — ’the book,’” Boudin
says. The allure? “Shades of Grey”
is chick-lit gone wild.
The power of word-of-mouth
recommendation has catapulted
the novel by unknown London au-
thor E.L. James to worldwide at-
tention. This
week, 575,000
paperback co-
pies of “Fifty
Shades of
Grey” hit U.S.
bookstores.
Untilnow,most
readers have
downloadedthenovelontoe-readers;
hard copies have been difficult to
comeby. Butsincethebookhasbeen
picked up by mainstream publisher
VintageBooks, it will becomewidely
availableinbothformats.
On April 17, the remaining two
books inthe trilogy —“Fifty Shad-
es Darker” and “Fifty Shades
Freed” —will jointhefirst bookon
shelves, for a total of more than 1
millioncopies. Lastweek, thestory
was optioned for a movie by Uni-
versal PicturesandFocusFeatures.
“FiftyShades”tellsthetaleofcol-
lege student Anastasia Steele and
27-year-old billionaire entrepre-
neur Christian Grey, who asks
Steele to sign a contract to be his
submissive partner in a sadomaso-
chistic relationship.
“There’s alot of buzzbecauseit’s
supposedtobeaveryjuicystory, so
peoplewant toseewhat it’sabout,”
says Elizabeth Olesh, assistant di-
rector of the Nassau Library Sys-
tem; morethan3,000peopleareon
waitinglistsforthebookatLongIs-
land libraries. Says Charline Spek-
tor, co-owner of three BookHamp-
ton stores on Long Island’s East
End: “People are very eager to get
it. Women seem to be sharing it
withtheir girlfriends.”
Barbara Egenthal’s Merrick,
N.Y.-area book club read “Fifty
Shades of Grey” in March. The
bookclubdelvedintothepsycheof
Grey: Why was he the way he was
andwhydidSteelegothroughwith
someofhismoreunusualrequests?
“You want to know what makes
himtick,” Egenthal says.
Nobodywasembarrassedbythe
subject matter, she says. “We’re a
bunch of old ladies. I’m 57,” Egen-
thalsays. “Iwasmakingjokesabout
all the accessories. You know
what? It makes youhot. Youmight
needa water guntocool off.”
Lyss Stern, who lives in Manhat-
tan, says she expects to see lots of
people with the book at her beach
club this summer. Stern’s company,
Divalysscious Moms, whichlaunch-
es products and plans events for
mothers, hostedapartyfor“Shades”
author James when she came to
New York in January. As soon as
Stern sent out the invites, she had
900RSVPs. “Ithoughtmycomputer
was going to break,” Stern says.
“Moms drove in from Long Island,
Westchester, Connecticut, NewJer-
sey.”Jamesherself isamom—afor-
mer television executive who’s mar-
riedandhas twoboys.
Sternsaysthestorylinehasmade
a lot of women feel sexy. “The book
has helpedrekindle a lot of marriag-
es, addingthat littlesparkor flame,”
shesays.“Ithinkalotofhusbandsare
thrilledabout this book. Thrilled.”
Laurie Segal, a social worker in
private practice in Williston Park,
says the book has taken on a life of
its own. “The question is: Why?
What doesit touchuponinthepsy-
che of women?” she says.
Boudin is happy to answer. But
she has to do it quickly: “My kids
aregoingtobeinthecarinabout10
minutes,” says Boudin, 42, a “hap-
pilymarried” stay-at-home mom.
“I thinkthat it allowedwomento
become more verbal about what
theywant. I cantalklikethat tomy
husband. I can talk to him about
things that I like,” Boudin says.
“Are all these women going out to
buyhandcuffs?No. ButIthinkiten-
courages them to have a dialogue.
Women are communicating with
theirhusbands, talkingmoreabout
whathappenswhentheygethome,
what theywant tohappen.”
By BETH WHITEHOUSE
Newsday
‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ is an alluring hit with women
Much has been written about
FrankLangella’svoice—asonorous,
plummy seducer that suggests both
sophistication and unnerving ambi-
guity.
So we shouldn’t
be surprised, per-
haps, thattheactor
writes witha voice
just as distinctive
andsure of itself in
“Dropped Names:
Famous Men and
Women as I Knew Them.” What’s
likelytosurprise,however,isthecon-
tentofthismemoir—agossipy, can-
did and occasionally creepy succes-
sionofbrief, addictivelyentertaining
chapters about intimate encounters
(often sexual) with famous people
(both genders, he implies, and all
dead) through 50 years in theater
andfilm.
IfAmericahadanold-timeclassical
theater, Langella would be up there
with the master thespians, a grand
and gutsy performer of serious —if
sometimes self-serious — majesty
andanappetitefortastyslabsof scen-
ery. At 74, he has three Tony Awards
andmuchlesshairthanthebeautiful
escapee fromBayonne, N.J., who ro-
mancedlate’70sBroadwayasamati-
neeidol inaDraculacape.
It makes sense that the people
who attracted him have been the
glamorous, oversizedstars of a style
that few, alas, will soon remember.
ElsaLanchestershowedhimthecor-
nerof thepool wherehusbandChar-
lesLaughtonencouragedhandsome
youngmentoswimnude. At asmall
party in Cape Cod in1961, Langella
watched John F. Kennedy laugh so
hardatNoelCoward’sone-linersthat
thepresident poundedthetableand
beggedhim“towaitwhilehecaught
his breath.”
But thestories destinedtomake
news, or at least raise eyebrows,
come from less liberated times,
when “famous older men in the
closethadsecreteveningstowhich
all theyoungmeatinNewYorkwas
invited.” There also was the exclu-
sive “private time” in Antigua and
the Cape with Jackie Kennedy be-
fore she became anOnassis.
Shewas just nineyears his senior,
a rarity for the dashing fellow re-
countinghis lust, oftenconsummat-
ed, for much —really, for the time,
much — older women. There was
RitaHayworth, 56tohis 34, onloca-
tioninMexico. Yvonne de Carlo, 52
tohis36,“treatedmelikeaprettygirl
in the backseat of a convertible on a
hot summernight.”BrookeAstor, at
95, was “still vital, still available.”
In2001, therewerenightswithEl-
izabethTaylorafterherdivorcefrom
Larry Fortensky. Langella, in one of
hislessinvasivememoriesof that re-
lationship, describes her as “asmall,
sweet womanwhowantedamanto
bewithher,protecther,andfillavoid
as deepas thedeepest ocean.”
Around this time, late in the
book, one wishes Langella had
stopped a few chapters earlier. By
the end, his nasty charmturns cru-
el and his revelations about others
feel too private. Until then, howev-
er, sex scenes have the passionate
mysteryof thewind-on-the-curtain
shots inthe oldmovies he grewup
adoring. And when he drops
names, they bounce.
All in who
you know
By LINDA WINER
Newsday
“DroppedNames: FamousMenand
WomenasI KnewThem,”byFrank
Langella; Harper (356pages, $25.99)
In his excellent debut, Owen Laukkanen
mixes the economic downturn and a bleak
job market for a suspenseful and insightful
thriller about four out-of-work, newly gradu-
atedcollegefriendswhobecomekidnappers.
Laukkanen’s action-packed plot delivers
finely honed characters we care deeply
about, even when their behavior is despica-
ble. Theauthor carefullymakes theganglik-
able, but never totallysympathetic.
“The Professionals” works well as a vividil-
lustrationof contemporary economics while exploring
how a sense of entitlement and selfishness can shade
people’s logic. Laukkanenskillfully shows howthe kid-
nappers’ amoralityandlackof empathyforothersallow
themto become criminals while still thinking of them-
selvesasgoodpeople.Sotheycan’tgettheirdreamjobs?
Jointherest of Americanswhodon’t turntocrime.
Kidnapping begins as a lark for Arthur Pender, the
leader of this bandthat includes his loyal girlfriendMa-
rie, computer expert Mouse and muscleman Sawyer.
Fortwoyears,theycrisscrossAmerica,kidnappingbusi-
nessmenjusthighenoughintheircompanytobeworth
millions, but not sohigh-profileastodrawattention.
“A fat-cat day trader, grown rich short-selling the
American Dreamwhile the rest of the country strug-
gledtopaythemortgage.”
They demand a low ransom — from $60,000 to
$100,000—releasethevictimunharmedwithintwodays
anddisappear. Thevictimsarerelievedtobesafeandstill
too scaredto go to the cops. It’s over so quickly that the
police might not believe a kidnapping took place. Be-
sides,whodemandssuchlowransoms?That’s
“aninconvenience... notacrime,”theyreason.
But thenonevictim, angryat beingtarget-
ed, does gotothepolice, andthenext person
theyabductisconnectedtotheDetroitmafia.
Soon, the kidnappers are being chased by
thecopsandthemob.Andasmuchasthegang
hastriedtostayoff thegrid, nooneisuntrace-
able.Onemaybeabletotravelonasophisticat-
edlookingfakeI.D., onlytofindthat yourfam-
ilydoctorissittingnext toyouontheplane.
Laukkaneninvestsmuchinthekidnappers’
individual personalities, allowing us to care
aboutthembutnevertoapproveofwhattheyaredoing.
Theydon’tunderstandtheanguishof thevictimandhis
family or how, if they are caught —andthese schemes
never endwell —thiswill devastatetheir ownfamilies.
Thegroupbecomestoocaughtupin“somecrazyRobin
Hood thing, this gang of broke kids, outsmarting the
rich, redistributingthewealth”torealizethat what they
aredoingis“hard-core, nosafeword, wrong.”
But Laukkanen wisely makes the real heroes of
“TheProfessionals”KirkStevens, aMinnesotastatecop,
andCarlaWindermere,ayoungFBIagent.Theirpartner-
ship and insightful investigation balance the gang’s irra-
tional behavior. KirkandCarlaaresturdycharacterswho
couldeasilycarryaseries.
“The Professionals” smoothly moves from De-
troit, Minnesota, Seattle and Miami, capturing the
moodandspirit of eachlocation.
“TheProfessionals”isreceivingahugepushfrom
itspublisher, toutedasPutnam’stopbookof thesea-
son. Laukkanen’s fresh voice and original storytell-
ing deserve it.
“The Profession-
als” by Owen
Laukkanen; Put-
nam ($25.95)
BY OLINE H. COGDILL Sun Sentinel
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL
PARK, Calif. —It’s a dry heat —a
boulder-studded, wind-raked Mo-
javeheatinwhichrockstarslielow,
artists think big, Marines train,
weirdplantsjut towardthesunlike
beseeching biblical figures, and
climbers cling to granite walls like
insects stuck to flypaper, except
the climbers are way happier.
That’s a notable thing about
Joshua Tree National Park and the
towns around it. While legions of
Californians keep their faces to-
ward the beach no matter the sea-
son, a certain stripe of traveler is
powerlesstoresistthedesert, espe-
ciallyincoolermonths. Theycome
for the wide-open spaces and quir-
ky lodgings yousee inJoshua Tree
and Twentynine Palms. They
comeforthebandsatPappy&Har-
riet’s, for thesteamingpoolsof lith-
ium-rich water at Desert Hot
Springs or for a sound bath (to be
explained soon) at the Integratron
inLanders.
•Big rocks, bigger sky
Joshua TreeNational Parkcovers
nearly 800,000 acres. No matter the
time of year, you’ll enjoy it most in
the day’s first andlast hours of light,
when the shadows get interesting
and temperatures change quickly.
The Mojave and Colorado deserts
collide here, and a fewbillion rocks
demand climbing or observation.
There are almost as many cartoon-
ishJoshuatrees, whicharebetterad-
miredthanclimbed.
From the park’s west entrance
(near the town of Joshua Tree),
head to Hidden Valley, a haven for
tent-camping, hiking, climbing
and scrambling. There’s a 1.1-mile
loopingnature trail toBarker Dam
that’s great for photography (still
water, stacked boulders), and the
neighboring Gunsmoke area is be-
loved by boulderers. Not far from
there is Cap Rock. Back in 1973, a
few days after 26-year-old Gram
Parsons died of a drug overdose in
Room8 of the Joshua Tree Inn, his
friendPhil Kaufmanstolethebody
from authorities and brought it to
Cap Rock for a DIY cremation. It
didn’t go well, and rangers contin-
uetodiscouragethispractice. Fora
healthier interactionwiththeland-
scape, tryaclassofferedbytheDes-
ert Institute (www.joshua-
tree.org); its recent offerings have
included geology and plein air po-
etry. Whereveryougo, bringwater.
•DowntownJoshua Tree
Get your first meal at the Cross-
roads Cafe (61715 Twentynine
Palms Highway, Joshua Tree),
where postings on its bulletin
board are liable to mention rock
climbers’ chalk bags for sale, mer-
cenaries for hire and upcoming
drumcircles. (Atleast, itdidinFeb-
ruary.)Foradateshake, walkdown
to Ricochet (61705 Twentynine
Palms Highway). For gear or a
guide, stop at Joshua Tree Outfit-
ters (61707 Twentynine Palms
Highway). There’s also a pottery
shop, a couple of thrift stores and
the Joshua Tree Saloon (61835
Twentynine Palms Highway),
which plays a key role during the
Joshua Tree Music Festival inMay
and the Joshua Tree Roots Music
Festival in October. Across the
street, there’s the Instant Karma
YogaStudio, theMountFuji Gener-
al Store (a hipster boutique) and a
pizzeriacalledPiefor thePeople. If
youlike a lodgingwitha little style
and don’t need a pool, head for the
five-room Spin & Margie’s Desert
Hide-a-way (64491 Twentynine
Palms Highway). If youwant high-
er style (and have more money),
there’s the Mojave Sands Motel
(62121 Twentynine Palms High-
way), whereowner BlakeSimpson
has turned a roadside hole-in-the-
wall into a five-room compound
with vintage vinyl and a manual
typewriter in every room. Though
he opened in 2011 and his bottom
price is $200, Simpson hopes to
add a pool and bump up prices be-
fore the year is over. Bear in mind
that dozens of Joshua Tree proper-
ties are listed on vacation-rental
sitessuchasVrbo.com, withwidely
varying descriptions andprices.
•The egg inthe boulders
There’s a growing art scene in
Joshua Tree, andnot just withinthe
walls of the Red ArrowGallery and
JoshuaTreeArt Galleryonthemain
drag. Check out the artists of High
Desert Test Sites (6470 Veteran’s
Way), whomakeoutdoorworksthat
the desert will transform and re-
claim. Like the galleries, the head-
quarters opens on weekends (11
a.m.-3p.m. SaturdaysandSundays),
and one work is always accessible.
It’s along Twentynine Palms High-
way, one mile east of Park Drive, on
theboulder-strewnslopesat theend
of meandering, unpaved Neptune
Road. Up close, you may see that
“untitled,” by Sarah Vanderlip, is
madeofweldedaluminum, butfrom
a distance, it gleams like a silvery
egg, possibly dropped by a titanium
dinosaur.
•Pappy &Harriet’s
Pioneertown, onaplateauabout
five miles north of Yucca Valley,
was built in the 1940s as a TV and
movie set. Some decades later,
along came Pappy &Harriet’s Pio-
neertown Palace (53688 Pioneer-
town Road, Pioneertown), a road-
house with live music that has be-
come a desert institution. Pappy’s
gentlyblends desert-rat locals with
escaped city slickers and lures per-
formers youwouldnever expect in
the middle of nowhere. The Pio-
neertown Motel is next door. If
you’re OK to drive back to Joshua
Tree, there’s the 10-room Joshua
TreeInn(61259TwentyninePalms
Highway), where you can have
Room 8 (the Gram Parsons death
room) for $109. It has a pool and a
shrine to Parsons.
•Dampandshady at last
After you’ve zoomed down the
hill from Joshua Tree but before
youreachthewindmill forestatthe
entrance to the Coachella Valley,
you reach Big Morongo Canyon
Preserve (11055 East Drive, Mo-
rongo Valley), where boardwalk
trails trace paths past riparian
brush and desert willows. More
than250birdspecies have beenre-
corded in the area. When you’re
done, hop across the highway for
grub at Willie Boy’s Saloon &
Dance Hall (50048 Twentynine
Palms Highway, Morongo Valley).
•The pueblo andthe spas
First, you’ll see the head—a 40-
foot Indian head with a feather,
carvedfromaSequoiaredwoodlog
by artist Peter Toth in 1978. Then
you’ll notice the rest of Cabot’s Pu-
eblo Museum (67616 E. Desert
View Ave., Desert Hot Springs), a
four-level, 35-room mansion built
inersatzHopi stylebyCabotYerxa,
one of the pioneering eccentrics of
Desert Hot Springs. To get a good
look inside, sign up for the hour-
longtourandlearnhowYerxabuilt
the home from recycled materials
between1941andhisdeathin1965.
Thenit’stimefor cocooninginalit-
tlespahotel, of whichtherearesev-
eral. The seven-room Sagewater
Spa (built in1954, redone in 2001)
givesyouMidcenturyminimalism.
El Morocco Inn & Spa (66810 4th
St., Desert Hot Springs) is a 2005
revival project with 10 rooms,
many veils, three round beds and
sparkling TripAdvisor ratings for
its service. The six-roomHacienda
Hot Springs Inn (12885 Eliseo
Road, Desert Hot Springs)delivers
anOldCaliforniafeel, includingan
outdoor kitchen, enormous com-
mon table and plenty of books and
desert memorabilia. None of these
places is good for children or out-
door cellphone chats.
•Soakedfor a pittance
You’re done with the national
park, your muscles are sore and
your wallet is thin. And so, for just
$7ona Friday, Saturdayor Sunday
—or $5 on most weekdays —you
can buy a day pass at the Desert
Hot Springs Spa Hotel (10805
Palm Drive, Desert Hot Springs).
There, you meander among eight
spring-fed pools, each a different
temperature. (On Tuesdays, the
pricedropsto$3.)Thespamenuis
long, and families are welcome.
You can rent a poolside room for
the day (9 a.m.-4 p.m.) for $45 or
spend a night for a little more than
$100. To go with your cheap soak,
grab some hearty, affordable Mex-
icanfoodafewblocksawayat Casa
Blanca Restaurant (66370 Pierson
Blvd., Desert Hot Springs).
By CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT PHOTOS
A bright moon illuminates the sky above the desert in Joshua Tree National Park.
Pappy & Harriet’s, a bar, restau-
rant and live music venue in
Pioneertown, draws an enter-
tainment cross-section of des-
ert-swellers, city slickers on
holiday and musicians.
Triet Le, 36, of Torrance climbs on Intersection Rock inside Josh-
ua Tree National Park.
Joshua Tree offers a desert oasis
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 1G
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$
9,999
*
2006 SUBARU
TRIBECA AWD
If you’re searching for the best
deals, don’t hop all over town.
Visit our showroom and you’ll
know you’re getting warmer.
2009 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
Stk# P14586, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks, CD, 5 Speed
$
11,599
*
2008 HYUNDAI TIBURON GT COUPE
Stk# P14621, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, PW, PL
$
12,699
*
$
12,799
* 2005 MAZDA RX-8 COUPE
Stk# P14631, Sunroof, Leather, Power Windows & Locks, Only 48K Miles!
$
13,599
* 2004 DODGE RAM REG CAB 4X4
Stk# P14604, SLT Sport Package, 5.7L V8 Hemi, Automatic, A Must See!
2008 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN
Stk# S1958A, All Wheel Drive! Sunroof, Auto, PW, PL
$
13,799
*
2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
Stk# S1939A, Tech Package w/ Navigation, Auto, PW, PL
$
13,799
*
$
13,799
* 2007 MERCURY MARINER 4X4
Stk# P14592, Luxury Package w/ Sunroof, Alloys, Auto
$
13,799
* 2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT
Stk# S1954A, Only 19K Miles! Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks
2009 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ
Stk# P14573A, Leather, Power Seat, Automatic, 4 Cylinder
$
13,899
*
$
14,499
* 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
Stk# P14613, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Auto, Only 17K Miles
$
16,699
* 2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
Stk# S1993A, Only 442 Miles! Automatic, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL
2011 HONDA CIVIC EX-L SEDAN
Stk# P14615, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Alloy Wheels, Only 11K Miles!
$
17,999
*
2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI SE AWD
Stk# P14566A, Power Driver’s Seat, Auto, Power Windows & Locks, Alloys, 1-Owner!
$
18,399
*
2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI GTS AWD
Stk# S1808A, Sunroof, Power Memory Seat, Auto, PW, PL, Only 10K Miles, Save Big!
$
20,399
*
2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4
Stk# P14637, DVD, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, V6
$
20,999
*
2008 GMC ACADIA AWD
Stk# S1997B, 3rd Row, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Automatic, Alloys
$
21,599
*
2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4
Stk# S1854A, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 18” Alloys, Navigation w/ Blue Tooth!
$
21,799
*
2011 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SE 4WD
Stk# S1808A, Sunroof, Power Memory Seat, Auto, PW, PL, Only 10K Miles, Save Big!
$
21,999
*
2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS AWD
Stk# S1625B, Leather, Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, Power Seats, Blue Tooth, Auto, Only 9K Miles!
$
22,299
*
2011 TOYOTA VENZA
Stk# S1912B, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, Low Miles! Power Windows/Locks, 1-Owner
$
23,999
*
2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB RMZ-4 4X4
Stk# S1996A, Navigation, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Off Road Pkg
$
24,599
*
2009 NISSAN ARMADA LE 4X4
Stk# P14614A, Navigation w/ Rear Camera, DVD Player, 3rd Row, Leather, Sunroof
$
30,499
*
2001 SUBARU LEGACY WAGON AWD
Stk# S1895A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD
$
1,999
*
1999 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB 4X4
Stk# P14625A, Automatic, 4 Wheel Drive, XLT Pkg
$
2,799
*
1999 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 4X4
Stk# S2071A, Long Bed w/ Cap, Automatic
$
2,999
*
1997 FORD F350 REG CAB 4X4
Stk# P14453C, Plow! Dual Rear Wheels, Automatic
$
3,199
*
2000 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4X4
Stk# S2032A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
3,499
*
1991 FORD BRONCO 4X4
Stk# S2090A, Anniversary Edition! Nice Nice Truck!
$
3,999
*
2003 DODGE DURANGO SXT 4X4
Stk# S1977B, Auto, PW, PL
$
3,999
*
2001 FORD F150 SUPER CREW 4X4
Stk# S1936A, XLT Pkg, Power Windows & Locks
$
4,499
*
2000 CHEVROLET BLAZER 4DR 4X4
Stk# S1991A, LT Pkg w/ Leather, Auto, PW, PL
$
4,599
*
Gaughan Auto Store
We’re Making Lots Of Friends
g a u g h a n a u t o s t o r e . c o m
114 South Main Ave, Taylor, PA 18517
570-562-3088
Welcome Our New Sales Professionals from Wilkes-Barre!
Joe O’Neil Shannon Sosnak
*Tax & Tags extra. Based on 4.99% for 60 months w/ your good credit.
DON’T OVERPAY
20yrs SERVICING NEPA*
$
199
00
A MONTH
#1 in Select and Customer Satisfaction!
2008 MAZDA 3
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Sporty!
08 DODGE NITRO
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
4X4,
1-Owner
07 PONTIAC G6
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Power
Moonroof
05 GMC ENVOY
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
4X4,
1-Owner
05 JEEP LIBERTY
$
9,988
*
$
199
*
A MONTH
Power
Options,
5 To
Choose
From
07 SATURN VUE
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Power
Option,
1-Owner
06 SAAB 9-3
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Automatic,
1-Owner
08 VW JETTA
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Automatic,
Nicest
Around
06 HYUNDAI SONATA
4DOOR
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Automatic,
Moonroof,
2 To Choose
From
05 HYUNDAI TUCSON
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
$
9,988
* $
199
*
A MONTH
Go
Anywhere!
ALL PRICED @
WVON¡MO VALLEV
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Think
Cars
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Lost: Long hair,
black, older female
cat, with white
markings on the
face and paws. Last
seen Sunday, March
24. Very sweet.
Child’s pet. Indoor
cat. Answers to the
name of Chloe. Lost
in North Wilkes-
Barre, near the
General Hospital.
Please call
570-328-5511.
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
360 Instruction &
Training
360 Instruction &
Training
INVITATION FOR BIDS
SEALED BIDS will be received at the Newport Township Munici-
pal Building, 1002 Center Street, Wanamie, PA 18634, until10
A.M. Local Time, April 18, 2012, and then publicly OPENED and
READ ALOUD. A Contract may be awarded to the lowest
responsible bidder at a meeting of the Board of Commissioners.
TWO BIDS are invited for: Building Demolition/Site Clearance – 2
Properties
51 East Main Street and 44 Coal Street, Glen Lyon, PA
The Township will select the lowest bidder for each property.
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS are on file at Penneastern Engineers,
165 North Wilkes-Barre Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702.
COPIES of the Contract Documents may be obtained at a cost of
Fifty Dollars ($25.00) per set during normal business hours.
BID PROPOSALS are unique and must be upon the forms provid-
ed. Bids will be rejected from any bidder not registered with the
Engineer. BID SECURITY in an amount equal to ten percent
(10%) of the total bid shall be submitted with each bid, in accor-
dance with the Instructions to Bidders.
The Labor Standards, Wage Determination Decision, and Anti-
Kickback regulations (29 CFR, Part 3) issued by the Secretary of
Labor are included in the Contract Documents of this project and
govern all work under the contracts.
Non-discrimination in Employment – Bidders on this work will be
required to comply with the President’s Executive Order #11246
and will be required to insure that employees and applicants for
employment are not discriminated against on the basis of their
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or familial
status in employment or the provision of services. In addition to
EEO Executive Order 11246, Contractors must also establish a
6.9% goal for female participation and a 0.6% goal for minority
participation in the aggregate on-site construction workforce for
contracts in excess of $10,000 as per the notice of requirement
for affirmative action as contained in the contract documents.
Attention is called to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Devel-
opment Act of 1968, 12 USC 179 LU and the Section 3 clause and
regulations set forth in 24 CFR, Part 135.
The Township of Newport reserves the right to reject any or all
Bids or to waive informalities in the bidding and is an EQUAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
BIDS may be held by the Township for a period not to exceed
ninety (90) days from the date of the Opening of the Bids for the
purpose of reviewing the bids, prior to awarding the Contract. In
this period of time, no Bidder may withdraw his Bid.
BY: Richard Zika, Township Manager
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Happy
Easter!
Closed, Sunday, April 7
for the Easter Holiday.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
Day and evening
classes available!
CALL NOW!
1-888-788-2890
www.FortisInstitute.edu
FORTIS Institute –
Forty Fort
166 Slocum St
Forty Fort, PA 18704
(Greater Wilkes-
Barre Area)
Financial aid available
for those who qualify.
For consumer
information,
visit www.Fortis.edu
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
EMISSIONS
& SAFETY
INSPECTION
SPECIAL
$39.95 with
this coupon
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
Expires 6/30/12
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Atty. Mike Anthony
Vehicle Accidents
D.U.I., Bankruptcy
Reasonable Fees
825-1940 W-B
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS’ COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Exp.
Joseph M.
Blazosek
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
*Unemployment
Hearing?
*Sued by Credit
Card Company?
*Charged with
DUI? *Sued for
Custody or Child
Support? Call the
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
110 Lost
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Adoring couple
longs to adopt your
newborn. Promis-
ing to give a secure
life of unconditional
and endless love.
Linda & Sal
1 800-595-4919
Expenses Paid
HAPPY
EASTER!!
bridezella.net
150 Special Notices
SPECIAL NOTICE
Hayduk Enterprises,
Inc.,
257 Riverside Drive,
Factoryville, PA
will be conducting
blasting in Plains
Township between
April 16, 2012 and
May 18, 2012, Mon-
day through Friday
between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. If you
have questions
please call
570-945-3242
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Enjoy the tourna-
ment and have a
great Easter at
home Gary.
Happy Holiday.
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
Dolton Childrens
Fishing Derby
Next meeting April
10th 7pm at
McGraths pub,
Dolton.
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
380 Travel
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
LION KING
Wed., June 13
$175.
Orchestra
PHANTOM
OF THE
OPERA
Wed., July 18
$135.
Orchestra
SISTER ACT
Wed., July 18
$150.
Orchestra
Call
Roseann @
655-4247
Reduced
Rates from
$839.
per person
2012 GROUP
CRUISES
New
Jersey to
Bermuda
Explorer of
the Seas
09/09/12
New York to the
Caribbean
Carnival Miracle
10/13/2012
New York to the
Caribbean
NCL’s Gem
11/16/2012
Includes Trans-
portation to Piers
Book Early, limited
availability!
Call for details
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRIP
(288-8747)
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $700. OBO
570-674-2920
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
POLARIS`03
330 MAGNUM
Shaft ride system.
True 4x4. Mossy
oak camo. Cover
included. $3,000
negotiable. Call
570-477-3129
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVROLET `90
CELEBRITY
STATION WAGON
3.1 liter V6, auto,
A/C. excellent interi-
or, new tires. 66K
$3,250.
570-288-7249
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVROLET `99
MONTE CARLO
Z34, V6, white, all
power with power
sunroof. CD player,
cloth interior. High
mileage. $1,100.
570-332-8909
FORD `97 WINDSTAR
GL. 71K miles.
3.8V6 A1 condition.
Auto, cruise, tilt. All
power accessories.
Traction control. 3
remotes. Like new
tires & brakes.
Mechanic is wel-
come to inspect this
vehicle. Reduced
to $2,950. 570-
313-8099/457-5640
LEO’S AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
PONTIAC ‘99
GRAND AM
4 door 4 cylinder
automatic. Good
condition. $2,150
CHEVY ‘04
MALIBU CLASSIC
4 door, 4 cylinder,
auto, good condi-
tion. 120k. $2,850.
PLYMOUTH ‘92
ACCLAIM
4 door , 4 cylinder,
auto. Very good
condition. $1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
HONDA `96 ACCORD
Sunroof, two new
tires, good condi-
tion, 4 door, white.
$2,200
570-466-5079
PONTIAC `99 BON-
NEVILLE
112,000 miles.
Alloys, new
battery, newer
engine (76K)
$2,600.
570-825-9657
SUZUKI ‘06
SWIFT RENO
4 cylinder. Automat-
ic. 4 door. $4,800
(570) 709-5677
(570) 819-3140
412 Autos for Sale
ONE
YEAR
WARRANTY
On Most Models
lousgarage.com
570-825-3368
AUDI `01 A6
QUATTRO
123,000 miles, 4.2
liter V8, 300hp, sil-
ver with black
leather,heated
steering wheel, new
run flat tires, 17”
rims, 22 mpg, Ger-
man mechanic
owned.
$6,495. OBO.
570-822-6785
AUDI ‘03 TT
ROADSTER CONVERTIBLE
BEAUTIFUL AUTO
4 cylinder 1.8.
Loaded, silver black
leather. 66,000
miles. Bose premi-
um sound. 6 CD
changer. New tires,
inspection, timing
belt. Garaged, no
snow. $11,200.
570-592-2458
CHEVROLET `08
IMPALA
Excellent condition,
new tires, 4 door,
all power, 34,000
miles. $11,999.
570-836-1673
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
09 CADILLAC DTS
PERFORMANCE
PLATINUM silver,
black leather,
42,000 miles
09 CHEVY IMPALA LS
SILVER
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
07 CHRYSLER PT
Cruiser black,
auto, 4 cyl
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LXT red, grey
leather, sunroof
03 DODGE STRATUS SE
Red
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
99 CHEVY CONCORDE
Gold
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
09 DODGE JOURNEY
SXT white, V6,
AWD
08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
green, auto, 4x4
07 CADILLAC SRX
silver, 3rd seat,
navigation, AWD
06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
06 FORD EXPLORTER
LTD black/tan
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4
06 PONTIAC TORRENT
black/black
leather, sunroof,
AWD
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
04 FORD F150 XF4
Super Cab truck,
black, 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
Z71, green,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
V6, silver, 3rd seat
AWD
04 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB SLT SILVER,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT white, 3rd seat,
4x4
03 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER black,
V6, 4x4
03 SATURN VUE
orange, auto,
4 cyl, awd
03 DODGE DURANGO RT
red, 2 tone black,
leather int, 3rd
seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
01 CHEVY BLAZER
green, 4 door,
4x4
01 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
PEWTER, V6, 4X4
01 FORD EXPLORER
sport silver, grey
leather, 3x4 sunroof
00 CHEVY SILVERADO
XCAB, 2WD truck,
burgundy
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS
black, auto,
2 door AWD
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
08 ESCAPE 4X4 $12,495
09JourneySE $12,495
07Spectra EX $9,495
10 FUSION SEL $13,995
10 FOCUS SE $9,995
05Stratus SXT $6,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
BMW `00 528I
Premium sound
package, very
clean, recently
tuned, seat memo-
ry, silver. 26 mpg
on trips, Low
mileage for the age
of the car 122,500
$6,100
570-704-7286
CHEVY ‘07 IMPALA LS
Only 40k miles
$11,500
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD `12 ESCAPE
4 x 4, V6, all pow-
er, A/C, Sirius satel-
lite, cloth interior,
3,000 miles. Great
on gas. $23,000
570-822-3328
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$14,975 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
CHRYSLER ‘04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $4900.
570-991-5558
CHRYSLER ‘07
SEBRING
Low miles, heated
seats, moonroof,
1 owner.
$11,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
‘11 DODGE
DAKOTA CREW
4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl.
14k, Factory
Warranty.
$21,899
‘11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$20,999
‘11 Nissan Rogue
AWD, 17k, Factory
Warranty.
$19,999
‘10 Dodge Nitro
21k alloys, tint,
Factory Warranty
$18,599
‘08 Chrysler
Sebring Conv.
Touring 6 cyl.
32k $12,999
‘08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed,
Factory warranty.
$12,399
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
4x4 65k, a title.
$12,799
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7999
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,499
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
DODGE `00 DURANGO
SPORT
4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd
row seat, runs
good, needs body
work $1900.
570-902-5623
FORD `93 MUSTANG
Convertible. 5.0. 5
speed. New top.
Professional paint
job. Show car.
$6,500. Call
570-283-8235
FORD `94 MUSTANG
GT
Convertible, 5.0
auto, very nice car,
(R Title). $4,600.
570-283-8235
FORD `95
CROWN VICTORIA
V-8, power windows
& seats, cruise con-
trol. Recent inspec-
tion. Asking $1,000.
Call 570-604-9325
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
35
40
MPG
lousgarage.com
570-825-3368
HONDA `07 ACCORD
SPECIAL EDITION
4 cylinder, low
mileage, fully
equipped, excellent
condition. $13,250
570-654-8371
HONDA ‘01 CIVIC
Sedan, gold exterior
5-speed great on
gas comes with a 3-
month power train
warranty $ 4,500.
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
HONDA ‘02
CIVIC EX
Auto, moonroof,
1 owner. $8,888
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX
Leather,
moonroof
$9,977
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HONDA ‘05 CIVIC
Sedan, red exterior,
102k, automatic,
reliable & economi-
cal car comes with
a 3-month power
train warranty Clean
title. $5,999.99
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
HONDA 07 FIT
Auto. 4 door.
Keyless entry.
Hatchback.
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA ‘08 ACCORD
4 door, EXL with
navigation system.
4 cyl, silver w/
black interior. Satel-
lite radio, 6CD
changer, heated
leather seats, high,
highway miles. Well
maintained. Monthly
service record
available. Call Bob.
570-479-0195
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
HYUNDAI ‘04
ELANTRA
Black exterior, auto-
matic , 4-door,
power doors, win-
dows, mirrors R-title
$4,500
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
HYUNDAI ‘06
ELANTRA
Tan, 4 door,
clean title, 4
cylinder, auto,
115k miles.
Power windows,
& keyless entry,
CD player,
cruise, central
console heated
power mirrors.
$3990.
570-991-5558
HYUNDAI ‘07
SANTE FE
AWD, auto, alloys
$14,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA
GLS, 1 Owner,
only 11k miles
$18,800
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
412 Autos for Sale
KIA ‘11 SORENTO LX
1 owner, AWD, low
miles. $22,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LEXUS `01 ES 300
80,000 miles,
excellent condi-
tion, all options.
Recently serv-
iced. New tires.
$9,300.
570-388-6669
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
LEXUS `10 RX 350
Excellent condition,
garage kept, navi-
gation, keyless
entry & start,
heated seats,
CD changer, ipod
hookup, rear cam-
era, light blue, 64K,
new tires, balance
of 100,000 mile
warranty.
$31,000.
570-881-6426
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 ‘08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$13,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MERCEDES ‘99 BENZ
S320
Silver exterior,
loaded r-title.
$6,999.99
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
MERCURY `05 SABLE
LS PREMIUM
Moon roof, alloys,
all power, 24 valve
V6. Original owner,
perfectly maintain-
ed, needs nothing
49,200 miles.
$9,495
570-474-6205
MERCURY 2008
GRAND MARQUIS LS
23,000 original
miles, all power,
leather interior.
NADA book value
$17,975. Priced for
quick sale to settle
estate. $15,950, or
best offer. Car is in
mint condition.
570-735-4760
570-954-1257
Travel
Travel
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 3G
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes .
As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 4 /3 0 /12 .
®
THE NUM BER 1NISSAN DEAL ER IN THE
NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
G
R
E
A
T
S
E
R
V
I
C
E
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S
4 Cyl, CVT , AC, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y FOR
$
18 ,960
*
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE,
$750 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
18 9
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$189 PerM o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,459.20; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e
@ d elivery $2,202.50. $1330 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
SA VE $5000 O N
O FF M SR P
STK#N21404
M O DEL# 13112
M SRP $23,960
V IN# 196876
IN STO C K
O NLY
25 @ TH IS
P R IC E
M
A
S
S
I
V
E
I
N
V
E
N
T
O
R
Y
BB
II
GG
AA
PP
RR
II
LL
‘S ‘S
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S H O W ER S H O W ER
O F O F
S AVINGS ! S AVINGS !
THE O NL Y THING DRO PPING ARE THE PRIC ES !
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2012N IS S A N ROGUE
S FW D
4 Cyl, CVT , AC,
AM / F M / CD,
PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts &
S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y FOR
$
19,999
*
W / $50 0 N IS S AN CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
199
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,216.50; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
SA VE O VER
$3000 O FF M SR P
STK#N21536
M O DEL# 22112
M SRP $23,050
V IN# 273561
IN STO C K
O NLY
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
30 @ TH IS
P R IC E
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2012N IS S A N FRON TIE R
S V K C 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C,
S p o rtPkg,
PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T Ilt,
F lo o rM a ts &
M u ch M o re!
B U Y FOR
$
23,995
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
OR
$
229
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,530; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2,699 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,891.50.
SA VE $4500 O R M O R E
O N M O ST NEW 2012
FR O NTIER ! STK#N21686
M O DEL# 31412
M SRP $28,500
V IN# 432945
IN STO C K
O NLY
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2012N IS S A N M URA N O S
A W D
V-6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts
& S p la s h Gu a rd s !
B U Y FOR
$
27,495
*
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.
STK#N21472
M O DEL# 23212
M SRP $32,525
V IN#211509
SA VE $5000 O R M O R E O N
A LL 2012 M U R A NO ’S
IN STO C K
O NLY $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S V S E DA N
V6, CVT , Co ld W ea ther
Pa cka ge, M o n ito rPkg, L ea ther,
M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d , F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y FOR
$
31,925
*
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,939.50;
M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1700 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
W H A T A LEA SE!
STK#N21297
M O DEL# 16212
M SRP $36,925
V IN# 815839
IN STO C K
O NLY
SA VE $5000 O FF
M SR P O N A LL
SV M A XIM A S
$
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
6 A VA ILA B LE
@ TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N JUK E
S L A W D
T u rb o 4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, M o o n ro o f,
Na viga tio n , Allo ys , Pu re Drive, Blu eto o th,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
B U Y FOR
$
25,495
*
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
*Price is p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
STK#N21665
M O DEL# 20612
M SRP $27,240
V IN# 115052
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6 A VA ILA B LE
@ TH IS P R IC E
IN STO C K
O NLY
2012N IS S A N S E N TRA
2.0S R S P E CIA L E DITION
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C,
M o o n ro o f, Na viga tio n ,
Allo ys , S p o iler, F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
B U Y FOR
$
17,695
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
169
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FOR
*$169 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e
@ d elivery= $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.
STK#N21795
M O DEL# 12212
M SRP $20,530
V IN# 705857
IN STO C K
O NLY
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
H U R R Y O NLY
6 A VA ILA B LE
@ TH IS P R IC E
2011N IS S A N M URA N O
CROS S -CA BRIOL E T A W D
V6, CVT , Na viga tio n ,
Po w erT o p , L ea ther,
Hea ted S ea ts , Bo s e
S o u n d M u s ic Bo x,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
B U Y FOR
$
37,520
*
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
EXEC U TIVE
DEM O !
STK#N20877
M O DEL# 27011
M SRP $47,520 SA VE $10,000 O FF
M SR P O NLY O NE! $
$
$
$
$ $
$
$ $
$
$
P R IC E & TO P
DR O P !
*Price is p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ $
2 A VA ILA B LE
@ TH IS P R IC E
6 A VA ILA B LE
@ TH IS P R IC E
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
E XI T 170B OFF I -81 TO E XI T 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW W YO M IN G V ALLEY M ALL. E XI T 170B OFF I -81 TO E XI T 1.
821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
M O N D AY-THUR SD AY 8 :3 0 -8 :0 0 pm ; FR ID AY 8 :3 0 -7:0 0 PM ; SATUR D AY 8 :3 0 -5 :0 0 pm
V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET
www.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S
THE B EST COV ER AG E IN AM ER ICA.
100,000-M IL E
5 Y EA R P O W ER TR A IN LIM ITED W A R R A NTY
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F C O U R TESY TR A NSP O R TA TIO N
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA R S O F R O A DSIDE A SSISTA NC E
W hichever com es first.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details.
S E RV ICE & P A RTS HOURS
M O N . -FR I. 8 AM -4 :3 0 PM
O PEN SATUR D AY 8 AM -12 N O O N
2 2 1 Co nyngha m Ave.,
W ilk es -B a rre
5 70 .8 2 1.2 778
Fin d the ve hic le
you w a n tto b uy
from your
m ob ile d e vic e !
S CA N HE RE >
*Price of vehicle plus tax and tags. Prices include all applicable rebates. *Price also includes Trade-In Bonus Cash (see dealer for qualification). *† Price includes AARP incentive (See dealer for details); SILVERADO - Lease for $299 per month plus tax & tags, 39 month lease, 10K miles per
year; $853.41 due at leasing signing. Lease payment includes GM competitive lease incentive (must currently lease a 1999 or newer non-GM vehicle to qualify, GM competitive lease can be transferred in same household; LowAPR in lieu of rebates; †CRUZE- $149 per month plus tax, 24
month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing $2418.38=includes tax, tags and 1st payment; †MALIBU- $169 per month plus tax, 24 month lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2198.83. Includes tax, tags and 1st payment; †EQUINOX- $219 per month plus tax, 24 month
lease, 12K miles per year, Total due at signing=$2354. Includes tax, tags and 1st payment; Lease Specials are to well qualified buyers (S-Tier 800+) Artwork for illustration only. Must take delivery by April 30, 2012. Not responsible for typographical errors.
w w w .va lleych evro let.co m
Fo r72 M o s .
Fo r72 M o s .
$
24,599
*†
STAR TIN G AT
M S RP $
27,400
Stk. #12506,Vortec 4.3L V 6 M F I 4 Sp eed A utom atic,
A ir C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,17” Steel
W heels,40/20/40 Sp litB ench Seat,Stabilitrak
201 2 C HEV Y S ILV ERADO
1 500 REG UL AR CAB 4W D
0
%
APR $
22,999
*
STAR TIN G AT
Stk. #12333,5.3L V 8,AT ,A /C ,Pow erW ind ow s,Pow er D oor
L ocks,E Z L ift T ailgate,L ocking R ear D ifferential,A lum .
W heels,O nStar T urn-by-T urn N avigation,X M Satellite
201 2 C HEV Y S ILV ERADO
1 500 4W D C REW CAB
0
%
APR $
31,999
*
STAR TIN G AT
O V ER O V ER O V ER
10 0
10 0 10 0
SILV ER A D O S SILV ER A D O S SILV ER A D O S
IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K &
IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D
Stk. #12301,5.3L SF I V 8 6 Sp eed
A utom atic,18” A lum inum W heels,C lim ate
C ontrol,K eyless E ntry,PW ,PD L ,O ff-R oad
Z 71 Susp ension Package,& M ore!
TR AD E- IN
BONU S
CASH
ON SELECT
M OD ELS
0
%
AP R
f o r
72
o n m o s t
2 0 1 2 T r u cks
M o n th s
Ava ila b le
This Is N o “Plain
Jane” Truck
201 2C HEV Y
S ILV ERADO 1 500
EX TEN DED CAB
L T4W D Z7 1
Fo r72 M o s . Fo r72 M o s .
Z7 1 AL L S TAR EDITIO N
M S RP $
38,090
M S RP $
28,350
201 2 C HEV Y C O L O RADO
EX TEN DED CAB 4W D
Stk. #12157,3.7L I5 A utom atic,K eyless R em ote D oor
L ock,A ir,PW ,PD L ,L ocking R ear D ifferential,O nstar w /
T urn-B y-T urn N avigation,B luetooth,X M Satellite R ad io
L EASE
FO R
O N LY
P ER
M O N TH
Fo r
39 M o s .
$
29 9
$
29 ,9 9 9
Sa le Price Sta rting At
O
R
M S RP
$
36,550
$
149

L EASE
FO R
O N LY
P ER
M O N TH
Fo r
24 M o s .
Stk. #12198,1.8 E C O T E C V V T D O H C 4 C ylind er,6 Sp eed A uto,A ir
C ond itioning,Pow erW ind ow s,Pow er D oor L ocks,Pow er M irrors,
B luetooth,O nStar w / T urn-B y-T urn N avigation,X M Satellite R ad io,
FrontB ucketSeats,U SB A ud io Interface
M S RP
$
18,740
201 2 CHEV Y M AL IBU L S
$
169

L EASE
FO R
O N LY
P ER
M O N TH
Fo r
24 M o s .
Stk. #12418,2.4L D O H C ,6 Sp eed A utom atic T ransm ission,
A ir C ond itioning,Pow erW ind ow s,Pow er D oor L ocks,
O nStar w / T urn-B y-T urn N avigation,R em ote K eyless E ntry,
A M /F M /C D /M P3,X M Satellite R ad io
M S RP
$
22,755
201 2 CHEV Y EQ UIN OX L S FW D
$
219

L EASE
FO R
O N LY
P ER
M O N TH
Fo r
24 M o s .
Stk. #12554,2.4L D O H C 4 C ylind er,6 Sp eed A utom atic,
R em ote K eyless E ntry,Pow erW ind ow s,Pow er D oor
L ocks,Pow er M irrors,17” W heels,A M /F M /C D ,C ruise
C ontrol,O nStar w / T urn-B y-T urn N avigation,X M
Satellite R ad io,T iltSteering W heel M S RP
$
24,355
201 2 C HEV Y IM P AL A
L S S EDAN
M S RP
$
26,665
Stk. #12063,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
2 0
AV AILAB LE
$
20,999
*†
STAR TIN G AT
30
M PG
hw y
M S RP
$
51,828
$
46,999
*
STAR TIN G AT
201 2 C HEV Y S O N IC L S
$
15,999
*
35
M PG
hw y
Stk. #12212,1.8L E C O T E C -V V T D O H C 4 C yl,
A uto,Stabilitrak,X M R ad io,A M /F M /C D ,PD L ,
A /C ,R earW ip erW asher,Sp oiler,O nStar
STAR TIN G AT
STAR TIN G AT
8
CAM ARO
C O N V ERTIBL ES
AV AIL ABL E
201 2 C HEV Y CAM ARO
C O UP E
$
23,999
*
30
M PG
hw y
Stk. #12490
1 L T • 2L T • 1 S S • 2S S
C O N V ERTIBL E
STAR TIN G AT
201 2 C HEV Y EX P RES S
2500 CARG O V AN
Stk. #12060,4.8L V 8,A ir C ond itioning,A M /F M
Stereo,L ocking R ear D ifferential,16” W heel,
F ull F loor C overing,C ustom C loth Seats
M S RP
$
28,125
$
25,999
*
STAR TIN G AT
L S • L T• L TZ • EC O
201 2 CHEV Y CRUZE
Stk. #12296
42
M PG
hw y
(ECO )
$
16,995
*
M S RP
$
17,450
STAR TIN G AT
L S • L T • L TZ
M S RP
$
30,680
Stk. #12281
201 2 C HEV Y TRAV ERS E
FW D & AW D
$
27,599
*
0
%
APR
Fo r6 0 M o s .
201 2 C HEV Y TAHO E
L T4W D
Stk. #12294,5.3L V 8 6 Sp eed A uto.,PW ,PD L ,
3rd R ow Seat,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io,
H eated Front& 2nd Seats,B ose Stereo & M ore!
ULTRAS O N IC
P ARK AS S IS T
5 0
AV AILAB LE
2 8
AV AILAB LE
2 5
AV AILAB LE
201 2 CHEV Y CRUZEL S
201 2 C HEV Y S ILV ERADO
1 500 REG UL AR CAB
M S RP
$
24,175
Stk. #12525,Vortec 4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic T ransm ission,
A ir C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,C ruise C ontrol,
17” SteelW heels,40/20/40 Sp litB ench R eclining FrontSeat
STAR TIN G AT
$
19,888
*
0
%
APR
Fo r72 M o s .
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 5G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
START THE YEAR
OFF RIGHT
*PRICESAND LEASESARE PLUSTAX,TAGS &TITLE. PHOTOSARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FORTYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATESAND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED.ALL OFFERS SUBJECTTO MANUFACTURES PROGRAMCHANGES. PRICESAVAILABLE ON
ADVERTISEDVEHICLES ONLY. MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESSWEAR. NOTAVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIREDATTIME OF DELIVERY. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELSTHRUALLY FINANCIAL, MUST QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/12.
LEASE FOR
$
289
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$
359
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$
459
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$
499
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
2012
CADILLAC CTS AWD
2012
CADILLAC CTS LUXURY AWD
2012
CADILLAC SRX LUXURY AWDWITH NAVIGATION
2012
CADILLAC CTS PERFORMANCE SPORT WAGON AWD
*LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
PLUS TAX
CADILLAC SRX LUXURY AWDWITH NA
STK# C3574
PLUS TAX
*LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGN
LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO
,
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
STK# C3528
PLUS TAX
STK# C3560
*LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
*LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
PLUS TAX
CADILLAC CTS PERFORMANCE SPORT
*LEASE WITH 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
LEASE INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE. MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
STK#C3554
1. 866. 356. 9383 MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM MOTORWORLD DRIVE JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81 WILKES-BARRE, PA
SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
North Eastern Pennsylvania’s #1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
412 Autos for Sale
NISSAN `05 SENTRA
SE/R 2.5L 4cylinder.
Bl ack. Moonroof .
Remote Start. Runs
excellent. 102K.
Well maintained.
$5,900. Negotiable.
570-457-5838
PORSCHE `85 944
Coupe. Low
mileage, 110,000
miles, 5 speed, per-
formance chip,
extra exhaust sys-
tem, abs, a/c,
power accessories,
Radio/CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $5,750.
(570) 817-1803
SUBARU
FORESTER’S
6 to choose
From
starting at $11,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
SUBARU
IMPREZA’S
4 to choose
From
starting at
$12,400
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 09 COROLLA LE
Keyless entry, well
equipped including
alloy wheels
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA YARIS ‘10
Great Gas Saver
$11,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN ‘04
TOUREG
95k, V-8 , HID
Headlights, 1 owner
never in accident,
loaded super clean,
$13,999.
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `’57
BEL AIR
2 door, hardtop, im-
maculate, full res-
toration, white with
red interior $48,500
570-237-0968
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
DESOTO CUSTOM
‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SLC
80,000 miles, sun-
roof, excellent
condition.
PRICE REDUCED
$9,000.
570-489-8026
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
418 Auto
Miscellaneous
DONATE YOUR
DONATE YOUR
CAR, TRUCK OR
BOAT TO HERITAGE
FOR THE BLIND.
Free 3 Day Vaca-
tion, Tax Deductible,
Free Towing, All
Paperwork Taken
Care Of. 888-643-
5496
421 Boats &
Marinas
MIRRORCRAFT ‘01
FISHING BOAT
LOADED. 30 hp
Johnson, Bow
mounted trolling
motor, 2 fish find-
ers, live well, bilge,
lights, swivel seats
and trailer. Garage
kept. $5,900.
Call Chuck at
570-466-2819
SILVERCRAFT
Heavy duty 14’ alu-
minum boat with
trailer, great shape.
$1,500.
570-822-8704 or
cell 570-498-5327
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY
DAVIDSON ‘01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HONDA ‘84
XL200R
8,000 original miles,
excellent condition.
$1,000.
570-379-3713
POLARIS ‘00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
SUZUKI 2001 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
570-410-1026
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
WILDWOOD ‘99
27’ bunk house
model, A/C, sleeps
8, 30 lb. gas tank,
new battery & tires,
garage kept. Very
good condition for
age. $6,500.
570-814-5012
WINNEBAGO ‘02
ADVENTURER
35 Foot, double
slides, V-10 Ford.
Central air, full awn-
ings, one owner,
pet & smoke free.
Excellent condition
and low mileage.
$68,000.
Call 570-594-6496
442 RVs & Campers
FLEETWOOD ‘06
PROWLER
30’ model #300FQS
1 slide out, living
/dining area, Queen
bed, sofa/double
bed, large bath, AM/
FM CD player, micro
wave, large refrig-
erator. Upgrades
include scissor lev-
eling jacks, ducted
heat & air, glass
shower door, sky-
light in bath. Water
filter system, spare
tire & cover + ex-
tras. Trailer is at
campground. Site
fee paid 05/1/12
through 09/30/12
or can be moved.
Asking $15,500.
Call 570-233-8652
570-443-9260
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
BUICK ‘04
Rendezvous
Heritage Edition,
leather, sunroof,
3rd seat
1 Owner, local
trade $6995
all For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVROLET ‘02
BLAZER
Maroon exterior,
4wd , looks & runs
great, 58k r-title.
$4,500.
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
CHEVROLET ‘05 TRAIL-
BLAZER EXT LS
White exterior,
entertainment pack-
age, front & rear
heat & A/C 119k R-
Title $8,999.99.
SPRING
STREET AUTO
570-825-3313
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8’
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 99K miles.
$4,400 or best offer
570-823-8196
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
FORD `06 F150 XLT
124,000 miles,
automatic, A/C, air
bags, all power.
Silver, excellent
condition. $10,000
(570) 840-3971
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘04
MONTE CARLO
Silver with Black
Leather, Sunroof,
Very Sharp!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `01 RAM
4 x 4 off road & tow
package, after
market ram air
functional hood.
Headers, advanced
performance chip.
Oil always changed
with synthetic Royal
Purple. Satellite
radio with two
1,000 watt amps.
10” Memphis bass
speakers. Clarion
Speakers through-
out. Almost
200,000 miles, runs
good, some rust.
$2,300
570-499-5431
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Price reduced
$10,250. Call
570-474-6028
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `10 F150
BLACK KING RANCH
4X4 LARIAT 145”
WB STYLESIDE
5.4L V8 engine
Electronic
6 speed auto-
matic. Brown
leather “King
Ranch” interior.
Heat/cool front
seats. Power
moonroof, rear
view camera,
18” aluminum
wheels, tow
package,
navigation
system.
23,000 miles.
Asking $33,000
Call Jeff @
570-829-7172
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$11,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD ‘08 ESCAPE XLT
Leather, alloys &
moonroof $16,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘04 EXPLORER
2V6. Clean,
Clean SUV!
$5995
WD. Extra cab.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘04 RANGER
Super Cab
One Owner, 4x4,
5 Speed,
Highway miles.
Sharp Truck!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$15,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `00 CHEROKEE
CLASSIC
4.0 6 cylinder, auto
all power, new tires,
recent inspection,
121,000 miles, R
title, nice shape.
$4,500.
570-735-9989 or
570-262-1046
JEEP `08 LIBERTY
SPORT
45,000 miles, good
condition,
automatic. $13,500
570-675-2620
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 7G
2012 SUZUKI SX4
SPORTBACK
8 Standard Airbags, Alloy Wheels,
Electronic Stability Control, Power
Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Fog Lamps,
6 Speed Transmission
$
14,499*
Stk# S1734
BUY NOW FOR:
Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual
Zone Digital Climate Control,
Automatic CVT Transmission,
TouchFree Smart Key, Power
Windows, Power Locks
2012 SUZUKI
KIZASHI S AWD
Stk#S2050
$
19,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
$
19,799*
BUY NOW FOR:
MSRP
$
23,519*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
MSRP
$
17,689*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
15,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
23,889*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,299*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
2,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
2.5L DOHC 4 Cylinder w/ Auto-
matic Transmission, Dual Stage
Airbags, 16” Aluminum Wheels,
4-Wheel Anti-Lock Braking
System, Six Standard Airbags
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR
EXT CAB
Stk#S2006
NEW NEW
NEW
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WE’RE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, Grand Vitara 4x4, Sportback, SX4 Sedan, and Kizashi.
Buy now sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer rebate of $2,000 on Suzuki Equator. $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator, SX4 Crossover, and SX4
Sportback. $1,000 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki Kizashi and Grand Vitara. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for
typographical errors. 0% financing in lieu of Suzuki Manufacturers rebates, Owner Loyalty is applicable. Buy now for sale prices valid on IN STOCK vehicles only.
0
%
APR
FINANCING AVAILABLE
TO QUALIFIED
BUYERS*
2012 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4WD
4 Wheel Drive, Voice
Activated Navigation w/ Blue
Tooth, Automatic Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors,
Electronic Stability Control
Stk# S1976
$
20,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, 6 Spd Transmission
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
$
14,899*
BUY NOW FOR:
Stk#S1838
MSRP
$
18,019*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,399*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
MSRP
$
24,284*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
NEW
NEW
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING**
ONLY AT
I
L
ove
M
y
S
u
zu
k
i
C
a
r
C
lu
b
!
J
o
in
th
e
...
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 SEDAN
MSRP
$
16,570*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
15,299*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
NEW
Stk#S2009
LE Popular Package, 8 Standard
Airbags, 6 Speed Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels
$
13,799*
BUY NOW FOR:
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI METALS
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487
GOLD - SILVER
COINS - JEWELRY
Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee
We will beat any competitors
advertised price by up to 20%
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP 03 WRANGLER X
6 cylinder. Auto.
4x4.
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
KIA ‘07 SPORTAGE EX
4WD, Leather,
Moonroof $12,724
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
KIA ‘08 SPORTAGE EX
4WD, Low Miles.
$14,800
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LEXUS `05 RX 330
All wheel drive,
Savannah metallic,
navigation, backup
camera, lift gate,
ivory leather with
memory, auto, 3.3
liter V6, regular gas,
garaged, non-
smoker, exceptional
condition, all serv-
ice records. 6 disc
CD. Private seller
with transferable
one year warranty,
96K. $16,900
570-563-5056
LEXUS 08 RX350
Navigation. Back
up camera. 45K
miles. 4 WD.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
TOYOTA 04 TACOMA
4X2.
4 cylinder
Auto. $6,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA ‘08
4 RUNNER
1 Owner, moon-
roof & alloys.
$22,500
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TOYOTA ‘08
4 RUNNER
1 Owner, moon-
roof & alloys.
$22,500
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
CHILDREN’S SHOESTORE
Established 50+
years, owner retir-
ing, looking for the
right person as
successor. Call
570-288-9323
FIRE FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!! YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR
YOURSELF”
INVEST IN
YOURSELF
WITH
JAN – PRO
*Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
*Insurance &
Bonding
* Training & Ongoing
Support
* Low Start Up
Costs
*Veterans Financing
Program
* Accounts available
through
0ut Wilkes-Barre
& Scranton
570-824-5774
Janpro.com
Landscaper
Dry Cleaner
Home Health Care
Car Wash
570-407-2716
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Including delivery
van, coolers, all
inventory, displays,
computer system,
customer list, web-
site and much
more. Turn key
operation in prime
retail location. Seri-
ous inquiries please
call
570-592-3327
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
TURN KEY OPERATION
Located at
Wyoming Valley Mall
must sell. $125,000
negotiable. Ask for
Rob 570-693-3323
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
GOVERNMENT
INSURED LOANS!
Residential remod-
eling. Many pro-
grams require no
equity, bad credit
often O.K. Consoli-
date, extra $ in your
pocket. www.TRIS-
TATECREATIONS.C
OM 1-888-990-
8886
700
MERCHANDISE
706 Arts/Crafts/
Hobbies
PAINTBALLS 3000!!
Custom 98 tippman,
cleaning kit, belt.
$100. 570-430-9231
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUES
3 piece Mahogany
stack bookcase
with drawer, 6ft x
20” hand carved
Hitler made of pine,
Dersuhrer carved
on bottom signed
by carver Gallagher.
Needs some repair.
Tiffany style lamps
with stained glass
shades, caramel in
color. 1912 Gustave
Stickley rocking
chair with new rush
seat, tag on bot-
tom. Jewelry
armoire, (4) 1912
chairs, original paint
with newly rushed
seats. 12 OldPA
metal hunting
licenses, 1927 &
up. Two Oak bow
china closets, one
very ornate. Lots of
smalls.
134 Route 11
Larksville, PA
570-283-3987
570-328-3428
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COINS. Washington
quarters ‘32-’34D,
‘35, ‘36, ‘36D-37.
$70. 570-287-4135
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
BEER FRIDGE
unique; old single
door GE; drilled and
tapped; with tank &
lines $85.
570-696-9024
DISHWASHER 24”
white, 2 years old
$150. obo.
RANGE HOOD 30”
Broan, white $50.
obo. 570-574-3899
FOOD PROCESSOR
B & D, glass blender
jar $20. Cooks
Essential fryer, 1 qt.
stainless steel $5.
Hamilton beach
toaster oven $12.
570-696-9086
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
JUICE EXTRACTOR
Waring, commercial
quality, stainless
steel blade, internal
mechanisms plus
powerful 550 motor.
Citrus juice attach-
ment PCA45 bought
for $200. Sell for
$120. OBO. Cuisi-
nart Smart Power 7
speed electronic
blender $40.
735-2661
RANGE 40” Tappan
electric, white,
excellent condition.
Cost over $1200
new sell for $350.
570-474-0974
WASHER, metal,
oversized heavy
duty, 15 cycle $75.
570-909-7621
712 Baby Items
CRADLE SWING
baby girl purple F. P.
Paid $169. Asking
$70. Hardly used.
Mark @ 570-301-
3484 or Allison @
631-6635.
TODDLER BEDS
boys Cars bed $30.
Girls white metal
toddler bed $30.
Thomas the tank
table, trains,tracks
& accessories $125.
All excellent condi-
tion. 570-417-2555.
716 Building
Materials
CABINETS Omni
Merillat 24 linear
feet of laminated
cabinets with lami-
nated countertops.
Includes sink in
island. Good condi-
tion. Almond color
with oak trim.
$1,000 OBO.
570-696-1999.
DOOR antique round
top oak door, lead-
ed glass window 77
1/2x30x1 3/4” solid
brass hinges & knob
some work needed
$250.
570-824-6278
PATIO PAVERS 250
8” x 16” gray $1
each. GRANITE
TILES new 12x12 50
tan with black $8.
each. 60 black with
light brown $8.
each. 570-735-2661
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
COMMUNION SUIT
black, size 14 like
new $35. White
Roman shade 23” w
new $15. F.P. travel
tender crib $25.
Children’s pool $20.
Thomas organ,
needs tuning $375.
570-654-4113
FOX STOLE head,
legs tail $15.
570-909-7621
TOTAL GYM XLS
$200.
570-825-0905
732 Exercise
Equipment
STEPPER Nordic
Trac, portable $10.
Leg magic $5. Man-
ual folding treadmill
$20. 570-696-9086
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER, electric,
portable, $15. 2
hoover vacuums
$25 for 1 or both for
$40, 12” TV color
good working con-
dition $25.
570-825-5847
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUE hutch
breakfront china
cabinet, traditional
oak finish, $125.
Bedroom furniture
set, 2 dressers 1
with mirror, queen
bed frame, side
rails, head & foot-
board, nightstand,
cherry finish $275.
All good condition.
570-430-4054
BEDROOM SET:
Light wood, Bed,
chest, dresser & 2
night stands. $325
570-826-1743
COFFEE TABLE & 2
end tables, light
oak, excellent con-
dition $50.
570-696-4494
DINING SET rattan
48” glass table top
4 chairs, removable
cushions on coast-
ers $375. Dining set
40x60” glass table
with bevel edge 4
chairs, upholstered
arm, neutral beige
$375. Space Saver
rattan table 24x42
$275. 570.474.0514
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
LAMPS (2) parlor
stand up, grey metal
& black. $20 each.
570-740-1246
Mattress
Queen P-Top Set
New in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $139
Full sets: $159
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
RECLINER beige,
good condition $30.
570-736-6239
ROCKER, wood/tap-
estry, $75. RECLIN-
ER, Burgundy velour
cloth, $125. SOFA,
chair, ottoman, 3
tables, great for
den. Wood and
cloth, all in excellent
condition. $450.
Call after 6 PM
570-675-5046
SOFA Berkline, dou-
ble reclining, excel-
lent condition $225.
570-655-1508
VENDORS WANTED
For Flea Market /
Farmers Market to
be held at Nanti-
coke Patriot Square
on June 9, July 14
and August 11, from
8am to 3pm.
For more info,
Call Claudine at
570-256-9728
Or Dave at
570-262-9022
Sponsored by the
Greater Nanticoke
Area Rotary and
Junior Interact Club
SUGARLOAF
FOR SALE:Ki tchen
Table, with 6 chairs,
corner covered
hatch, All wood,
Excellent condition!
Living Room set,
Johnston Bench-
works. Sofa, 2
chairs & ottoman.
Please call
570-956-6587
WILKES-BARRE
SALVATION ARMY
INDOOR
FLEA MARKET
17 S. Penna. Ave
APRIL 14TH
8AM TO 2PM
Over 40
Vendor Tables
Food Conces-
sions, Bake Sale,
& Silent Auction.
570-824-8741
750 Jewelry
JACK IS PAYING TOP
DOLLAR !!!!!
for gold and sil-
ver, diamonds,
platinum, watch-
es. Also buying
scrap jewelry.
Cash on the
spot!!!!!
We make house
calls. 328-3428,
855-7197 or visit
us 134 Route 11
Larksville, Pa
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
FOUNTAIN Little girl
& boy fountain, &
pump. Tan, 38” H.
Excellent condition,
$75. 570-477-2604
754 Machinery &
Equipment
GENERATOR Troy-
built, 10HOP, 5500
watts, 8550 starting
watts, 4 way electri-
cal splitter, used
once. $495.
570-817-8981
SAWMILLS from
only $3997-MAKE &
SAVE MONEY with
your own bandmill-
Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
756 Medical
Equipment
HOSPITAL BED, twin
size, good condition
$175. 430-4054
JAZZY Select Mobil-
ity Chair by pride.
Never used, but
replaced with new
batteries. paid
$1200 sell $600
obo. 570-466-0239
758 Miscellaneous
WANTED
ALL JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
6’ cab $15. Gong
Show movie DVD
$10. 5 storm win-
dows $10. each.
New 6 or 12 volt
battery charger $25
V6 HEI distributor
cap from ‘80 Monte
Carlo, very good
$15. 570-740-1246
BEDROOM SET - 5
piece, cream color
with wood tops.
$125 or obo. Wood
storage bench with
pillow top. $75. Oak
topped pedestal
table. $50. Comput-
er desk, dark oak
$150. 570-474-2375
ENGINE BLOCK ‘65
Corvette with pist-
tons & cam shaft,
casting number
3858180, very good
condition $475.
570-430-4054
LAWNMOWERS
Craftsman selfpro-
pelled, no bag, $125
firm. Craftsman
lawnmower with
bag not selfpro-
pelled runs good
$100. Murray 6hp
side discharge not
selfpropelled runs
good $75. 655-3197
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LUGGAGE SET 3
piece, black & gray
tweed, like new
$30. 570-824-6278
PAMPERS women’s
3 packs, $20. 12
count $20. 4 packs
bed pads 10 count
$20. All for $35.
570-824-6278
TAILGATE EXTEN-
DER 48” wide stain-
less steel good con-
dition $75 firm.
570-655-3197
TV STAND 40”lx
22”wx25”tall, 2
multi shelf, cabinets
below with glass
doors $25. Flea
market items -
records, cassettes,
cds, electronics,
tables, chairs &
much more. $75.
570-909-7621
WALL MURAL Tus-
cany, beautiful,
same as the one at
local Bartolei Wine
place, new in box,
$99. LOADHANDLE
pickup truck bed
unloader, $85.
570-735-2661
762 Musical
Instruments
TUBE AMP HEAD
Marshall JCM600
50 watt master vol-
ume & overdrive.
sounds great, with
footswitch $495.
Traynor ycv 40 watt
tube combo amp,
1x12 Celestion80
speaker, awesome!
$345. Jimi Hendrix-
style octave pedal.
Like new. $89. Pro
Co turbo rat distor-
tion pedal with box
usa $59. Rick 283-
2552 rick@ wyoming
valley.net
776 Sporting Goods
BIKE girls 20” pink,
used a few times.
$45. includes
Schwinn water bot-
tle holder. Montana
helmet, gloves,
elbow/ knee pads
$25. Buy all for $70.
735-2661
ROD & REEL
Anglers Touch 7’ 2
piece rod & Zebco
Spin Cast Omega
Z03 Reel $65. Micro
Lite IMG Graphite 8’
2 piece rod & Shi-
mano Symetre Reel
$60. Fenwick 6’ 6” 2
piece rod &d Shi-
mano spinning side
Stab Reel $35. 570-
825-7251 after 5pm
784 Tools
TORQUE WRENCH
Snap-On 3/4” drive
with case new con-
dition $325.
570-655-3197
786 Toys & Games
BANK atm kids pink,
$20. LEAPFROG
Leapzone turbo
twist spelling wand
$10. SPONGEBOB
BUNDLE alarm
clock & electronic
book of 5 games,
selling both for $20.
TWILIGHT DELUXE
Scene it dvd game,
$20. 22 KIDS VHS
movies lot & VHS
stand $2. each or all
for $35. Stand is $5.
LITTLE TYKES
Snacks & Snow
cones cart $40.
OBO. 735-2661
MOTORCYCLE: Indi-
an battery operated
children’s motorcy-
cle. Max speed 2.5
MPH. Recommend
age 2+ Like new
condition. Asking
$50. 570-592-1234
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
TV Sony Wega 27” ,
flat screen, not flat
panel with compo-
nent inputs. Excel-
lent condition , com-
plete with remote &
manual. $150.
570-283-8202
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
VIDEO SYSTEM
Rock Band $15.
570-417-2555
WII GAMING SYS-
TEM Wii fit, Band
Hero, Dance Dance
Revolution, 15 Wii
games, 2 game
controls, Charging
station, SD card
$350. OBO
570-823-9320
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
ANTIQUE TOYS
WANTED
Lead soldiers, tin
wind-up, Ger-
man, cast iron,
large pressed
steel trucks,
Tootsie toy,
Dinky.
Larry - Mt. Top
474-9202
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
April 5th: $1,631.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
805 Birds
Pair of Green
Cheek Conures
with cage $150.00
570-902-5330
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
CHOW PUPPIES
Sweet, affectionate,
loving puppies.
5 1/2 months old.
Second shots &
papers. $300/each.
570-466-2252
570-954-1231
815 Dogs
ENGLISH BULLDOG
PUPPIES
AKC, quality pup-
pies, vet checked,
champion parents,
references
available.
570-922-4888 or
570-716-4864
ROTTWEILER
1 year old. AKC
Registered. $500.
Call 570-704-8134
SHELTIE
2 year old male.
Fenced yard a
must! $250.
570-578-5619
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Pure Bred & Mixes
$400
570-250-9690
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
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570-453-6900
570-389-7877
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 9G
55
11
33
AM ERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE AM ERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
290 M U N D Y S TR EET, W IL K ES - B AR R E AT TH E W YOM IN G VAL L EY M AL L CAL L 30 1- CAR S
B U Y B U Y
N ATIO N W ID E N ATIO N W ID E
A N D S AV E A N D S AV E
TH O U S A N D S ! TH O U S A N D S !
n a tion w id e c a rs a le s .n e t
CH ECK OU T OU R
FU L L IN VEN TOR Y AT
M on d a y- Frid a y 9a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9a m - 5p m
*PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
OFFERS END 4/30/12. **UP TO 63 MONTHS WITH BANK APPROVAL.
#18429, Alloys, P . W in d ows, Rem ain d erof
F actoryW arran ty
2 011 DODGE NITRO 4 X 4
$
17,549
*
#18470, AW D , P W , P L ,
Cru ise, K eylessEn try
2 011 TOYOTA RAV 4
$
20 ,98 0
*
#18499, AW D , P W , P L , CD
2 011 M ITSUBISHIENDEAV OR
$
17,499
*
#18551, Au to, P W , P L , CD , K eyless
$
15,8 95
*
2 010 V W JETTA
$
16,8 8 8
*
2 010 K IA SEDONA LX
#18579, 7 P assen ger, 2n d Row Bu ckets,
RearAirCon d ition in g, Alloys
#18496P , 4X4, On ly5K M iles,
Alloys, Bed lin er, Au to
$
23,779
*
2 011 NISSAN FRONTIER
CREW CAB SV
#18575, P . W in d ows, P . L ocks, Au to,
K eylessEn try, GreatM P G!
2 012 CHEV Y M ALIBU LT
$
16,360
*
#18443A, 4X4, P W , P L , CD , 7 P assen ger
2 010 FORD EX P LORER X LT
$
18 ,965
*
#18555, 4 Cyl, Au to, CD ,
Alloys, GreatM P G!
2 011 FORD FUSION SE
$
16,995
*
2 010 NISSAN
X TERRA S 4 X 4
Au to, Alloys, CD , K eylessEn try, Rem ain d er
ofF actoryW arran ty, 3 To Choose F rom
$
19,98 9
*
#18491A, L eather, M oon roof, Heated S eats, On ly33K M iles
2 006 HUM M ER H3 LUX URY 4 X 4
$
18 ,599
*
1.99
%
AP R
**
FIN AN CIN G AS L OW AS
M ANAGER’S SPECIAL!
2 011 K IA SORENTO LX
#18638, AW D , Alloys,
P W , P L , CD
$
18 ,496
**
#18535A, AW D , Alloys, CD , K eylessEn try
2 011 K IA SORENTO LX
$
17,398
*
GAS
Don’tChase The High Cost
OfFuel!START SAVING NOW !
SPECIAL
FLEET
PURCHASE
PRICING
S
T
A
R
T
S
A
V
I
N
G
N
O
W
S
T
A
R
T
S
A
V
I
N
G
N
O
W
#18602, Alloys, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 011 TOYOTA
CAM RY LE
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
16,8 8 0
*
Up To 32 M PG Hw y
#18611, P W , P L ,
CD , K eyless
2 011 HYUNDAI
SONATA GLS
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
17,8 95
*
Up To 35 M PG Hw y
55
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18583, Alloys, P W ,
P L , CD , Au to
2 010 FORD
FOCUS SE & SES
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,622
*
Up To 33 M PG Hw y
44
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18589, Alloys, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 011 K IA
OP TIM A LX
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
17,930
*
Up To 34 M PG Hw y
55
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18405, Au to, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 010 NISSAN
ALTIM A S
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,999
*
Up To 32 M PG Hw y
44
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18556, Au to, Air,
CD , L ow M iles
2 011 HYUNDAI
ACCENTS GLS
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
12,769
*
Up To 36 M PG Hw y
88
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18552, P W , P L , CD ,
Alloys, K eyless
2 010 TOYOTA
COROLLA LE & S
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,8 95
*
Up To 34 M PG Hw y
#18615, Au to, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 010 NISSAN
SENTRA
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,28 8
*
Up To 34 M PG Hw y
77
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18550, Alloys, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 010 M ITSUBISHI
GALANT FE
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
14,715
*
Up To 30 M PG Hw y
#18560, P W , P L , CD ,
Au to, K eyless
2 010 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,98 5
*
Up To 34 M PG Hw y
#18546, Alloys, P W ,
P L , CD , K eyless
2 010
M AZDA 6
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
13,998
*
Up To 30 M PG Hw y
33
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18612, P W , P L , CD , Au to, Air
2 010 NISSAN V ERSA SDN & HB
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
12,318
*
Up To 34 M PG Hw y
77
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18628, P wrS lid in g D oors, S tow- N- Go, Alloys, Backu p Cam era
2 011 DODGE GRAND CARAV AN
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
20 ,368
*
44
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18530, Alloys, P W , P L , CD , K eyless
2 011 CHEV Y IM P ALA LT
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
14,58 8
*
Up To 29 M PG Hw y
33
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
#18578, P W , P L , CD , Au to, Air
2 011 HYUNDAIELANTRA GLS
S TAR TIN G AS L OW AS
$
16,595
*
Up To 40 M PG Hw y
14 14
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
Alloys, P W , P L , CD , L ow M iles
$
24,765
*
2 012 DODGE RAM
QUAD CAB SLT 4 X 4
44
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
22
44
10 10
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
77
11
33
HURRY!
HURRY! HURRY!
W HILE
W HILE W HILE
THEY
THEY THEY
LAST!
LAST! LAST!
55 33 55
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
22
33
55
TO CH O O SE FRO M TO CH O O SE FRO M
66
22
99
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
(570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 • 1 -800-822-21 1 0
M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 • F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30 M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 • F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30
1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509 1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . • S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509
w w w .m a ttbu rnehonda .com
M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R
SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A
D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m osthru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H onda’shave
1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.
09 PILO T EXL R DV D B urgandy,62K.............NO W $23,950
09 PILO T EX S ilver,33K........................................NO W $25,950
09 PILO T EX S ilver,34K........................................NO W $25,950
09 PILO T EX B lack,42K........................................NO W $26,950
09 PILO T EXL B lack,38K.....................................NO W $26,950
09 PILO T EXL-DV D N avy,33K........................NO W $27,950
10 PILO T EX N avy,16K.........................................NO W $28,500
11 PILO T EXL W hite,10K....................................NO W $32,500
PIL OT 4W D
H O N D A ’S
08 ELEM ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W $15,750
08 ELEM ENT EX B lack,43K...............................NO W $17,500
08 ELEM ENT EX S ilver,33K...............................NO W $18,950
10 ELEM ENT EX Om inP earl,24K........................NO W $20,950
EL EM EN T 4W D
10 INSIG HT EX G ray,22K...................................NO W $17,950
IN S IGHT HYBRID
CRV 4W D
ACCORDS 2.9%
60 m os
1.9%
36 m os
10 O DY SSEY TO URING DV D/NA V IS ilver,29K....NO W $32,500
10 O DY SSEY EXLG ray,24K...............................NO W $28,950
ODYS S EY
CIV IC
08 C IV IC EX 5-SPD SDN W hite,42K.............NO W $14,750
09 C IV IC LX SDN S ilver,36K...............................NO W $15,500
10 C IV IC V P SDN S ilver,11K..............................NO W $15,950
09 C IV IC LX-S SDN S ilver,15K.........................NO W $16,250
09 C IV IC LX SDN R ed,11K................................NO W $16,250
09 C IV IC EX SDN B lue,23K................................NO W $16,750
09 C IV IC EX SDN W hite,36K..............................NO W $16,950
11 C IV IC LX C PE B lue,19K.................................NO W $16,950
09 C IV IC LX-S Titanium ,9K...................................NO W $16,950
11 C IV IC LX C PE W hite,19K...............................NO W $16,950
10 C IV IC LX-S SDN S ilver,16K.........................NO W $17,250
07 FIT G ray,47K.......................................................NO W $11,950
FIT
A CCO R D S
1
.9%
1
.9%
36 M O S. 36 M O S. 2
.9%
2
.9%
60 M O S. 60 M O S.
07A C C O RD EX C arbonB ronze,49K................................NO W $14,950
09A C C O RD LX SDN R ed,40K..................................NO W $16,500
10A C C O RD EXLSDN S ilver,53K.............................NO W $18,500
09A C C O RD EX C PER ed,34K....................................NO W $18,500
09A C C O RD EXLSDN N avy,36K..............................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EXLSDN G old,21K..............................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EXLSDN G reen,37K............................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EXLSDN W hite,34K............................NO W $19,950
09A C C O RD EXLV 6SDN S ilver,37K....................NO W $20,950
09A C C O RD EXLSDN B lack,11K.............................NO W $21,500
Y O UR
NIC E
TRA DE
HERE
D O N’T B E A SIL L Y W AB B IT!
D O N’T B E A SIL L Y W AB B IT!
UsO utBefore Y ou Buy
UsO utBefore Y ou Buy
Y ourNextUsed Ca r!
Y ourNextUsed Ca r!
08 C RV LX Lt B lue,63K...........................................NO W $15,750
07 C RV LX N avy,47K.............................................NO W $15,950
07 C RV EX Lt B lue,47K...........................................NO W $16,350
08 C RV EX B eige,60K.............................................NO W $16,950
07 C RV EX Lt B lue,63K...........................................NO W $16,950
07 C RV EX S ilver,53K.............................................NO W $17,950
07 C RV EX S ilver,50K.............................................NO W $17,950
07 C RV EX G reen,46K............................................NO W $17,950
09 C RV LX G reen,36K............................................NO W $18,500
09 C RV EX B lack,48K.............................................NO W $18,950
08 C RV LX B eige,17K.............................................NO W $18,950
08 C RV EXLR ed,65K............................................NO W $18,950
08 C RV EX N avy,43K.............................................NO W $18,950
07 C RV EXLB lue,39K...........................................NO W $19,350
07 C RV EXLS ilver,19K..........................................NO W $19,950
09 C RV EX W hite,21K............................................NO W $20,500
08 C RV EXL NA V IW hite,53K...........................NO W $20,950
09 C RV EX W hite,19K............................................NO W $20,950
09 C RV EXLLt.B lue,28K.......................................NO W $22,500
10 C RV EXLB lack,30K..........................................NO W $23,500
10 C RV EXLLt B lue,23K.......................................NO W $23,750
D ON ’T M IS S IT! D ON ’T M IS S IT!
H U GE TR AD E- IN
AL L OW AN CES !
D R IVE IT
H OM E TOD AY!
25TH AN N U AL
EVEN T!
S
p
r
in
g
S
a
le
S
p
r
in
g
S
a
le
O N LY $999
.00
TO TAL DUE AT
LEAS E S IG N IN G !
OVER 40 0 N EW
& P R EOW N ED
AP R IL 9 TH R U
S AT. AP R IL 14
M ATT BURNE H O NDA
M ATT BURNE H O NDA M ATT BURNE H O NDA
1110 WYOMINGAVE. • SCRANTON • 1-800-NEXT-HONDA• 570-341-1400
www.MattBurneHonda.com
OpenMonday - Thursday 9-9; Friday & Saturday 9-5
*W ith Ap p roved Cred itThrou gh AHF C. All P ricesare p lu sTax an d Tags.
LEAS ES BAS ED ON APPROV ED C REDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC .
2012 Hon d a
CIV IC L X
$
195/M O.***
$
195/M O.***
$
195/M O.***
$
215/M O.**
$
215/M O.**
$
215/M O.**
2012 Hon d a
A CCORD L X
$
315/M O.****
$
315/M O.****
$
315/M O.****
2012 Hon d a
P IL OT L X
2012 Hon d a
CR-V E X
G AS
M ILEAG E
28CITY/ 39HW Y
***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0
DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT PAID BY HONDA. TAG S
DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,043 .50
$0DO W N
PAYM EN T
HO N DA W ILL
M AKE 1S T PAYM EN T
*M u stfin a n ce o rlea se AHFC.
• M odel#FB2F5C EW • 140-hp 16-
V alve SO HC i-V TEC ® • 5-Speed
A utom atic Transm ission • A ir
C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration
System • Pow er W indow s/Locks/
M irrors • C ruise C ontrol• Rem ote
Entry • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio
System w ith 4 Speakers • A BS
• Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold
Front A irbags (SRS) • Front Side
A irbags w ith Passenger-Side
O ccupant Position Detection System
(O PDS) • Side C urtain A irbags
$0DO W N
PAYM EN T
HO N DA W ILL
M AKE 1S T PAYM EN T
*M u stfin a n ce o rlea se AHFC.
**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N.
1S T PAY M ENT PAID BY HONDA. TAG S DUE AT
DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,081.50
G AS
M ILEAG E
23CITY/ 34HW Y
• M odel#C P2f3C EW • 177-hp 16-V alve DO HC
i-V TEC ® Engine • 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission
• Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors
• Rem ote Entry • C ruise C ontrol• A ir C onditioning
w ith A ir-Filtration System • 160-W att A M /FM /C D
A udio System w ith 6 Speakers • V ehicle Stability
A ssist
TM
(V SA ® ) w ith Traction C ontrol• A BS •
Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags
(SRS) • Dual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith
Passenger-Side O ccupant Position Detection
System (O PDS) • Side C urtain A irbags
*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT
COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 4/ 30/ 2012.
0.9% for24 to 36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on n e w 2012
A c c ord , Civic , Cros s tour, Od ys s e y, P ilot, a n d Rid ge lin e m od e ls .
$0DO W N
PAYM EN T
G AS
M ILEAG E
17CITY/ 24HW Y
****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0
DOW N PAY M ENT. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT
DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $17,601.60
• 250-hp 24-V alve SO HC i-V TEC ®
• 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission
• 8 Passenger Seating • V ariable Torque
M anagem ent® 4-W heelDrive System (V TM -4® )
• V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ® ) w ith Traction
C ontrol• Pow er W Indow s/Locks/M irrors • Front and
Rear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System
• 229-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 7 Speakers
including Subw oofer • Rem ote Entry
• A BS • Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags
(SRS) • Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side
O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)
G AS
M ILEAG E
22CITY/ 30HW Y
• M odelRM 4H5C JW • 185-hp • 2.4-Liter,16-V alve
SO HC i-V TEC ® 4-C ylinder Engine
• RealTim e A W D w ith Intelligent C ontrolSystem ™
• V ehicle Stability A ssist™ (V SA ® ) w ith Traction
C ontrol• A utom atic Transm ission • C ruise C ontrol
• A /C • O ne-Touch Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt
Feature • Rem ote Entry System • Bluetooth®
HandsFreeLink® • M ulti-angle rearview cam era
w ith guidelines • 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio
System w ith 6 Speakers • Bluetooth® Stream ing
A udio • Pandora® Internet Radio com patibility
• SM S Text M essage Function • USB A udio Interface
• A nti-Lock Braking System (A BS)
• Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SRS)
• Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side
O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)
• Side C urtain A irbags w ith Rollover Sensor
I N S TOCK ! I N S TOCK ! I N S TOCK !
06 C A DILLA C
SRX A W D
W hite,52K M iles
Now $17,750
04 HY UNDA IXG
350 SDN
S ilver,97K M iles
Now $6,950
07 HY UNDA I
SO NA TA SE SDN
B eige,89K M iles
Now $9,950
HY UNDA ISA NTA FE 4W D
02 HO NDA
C IV IC LX C PE
S ilver,67K M iles
Now $8,750
07 M A ZDA C X-7
G RA ND TO URING A /N
B lack,58K
$14,950
05 JEEP G RA ND
C HERO KEE 4W D
Laredo,Khaki,68K M iles
Now $12,500
04 HO NDA A C C O RD
EX SEDA N
B lack,101K M iles
Now $10,500
08 HY UNDA I
V ERA C RUZ A W D
B lack,29K M iles
Now $20,950
08 C HRY SLER
A SPEN LTD 4W D
B lack,42K M iles
Now $22,500
08 NISSA N
V ERSA SDN
W hite,42K M iles
Now $11,950
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPO RT 4X4
R ed,41K M iles
Now $15,950
03 BUIC K
PA RK A V E SEDA N
B row n,76K M iles
Now $8,950
06 NISSA N
FRO NTIER XC A B 4X4
S ilver,68K M iles
Now $15,950
06 V O LV O
S-80 2.5T SDN
N avy,29K M iles
Now $11,950
10 V W
RO UTA N V A N
D V D ,N avi,R ed,33K M iles
Now $20,950
W hite,58K
08 C A DILLA C STS
A W D SDN
D iam ond,43K,N avi
Now $22,500
08 HO NDA
RIDG ELINE RTL 4W D
G ray,82K M iles
Now $20,950
HO NDA PILO T 4W D
$13,500 04 EXL,N avi,B lack,75K
06 EX,B lack,71K $16,500
09 TO Y O TA
M A TRIX “S”
B lack,41K M iles
Now $14,950
04 HO NDA C RV
EX 4W D
S ilver,36K M iles
Now $14,950
06 HO NDA C RV LX 4W D
$12,750 M oss,82K
S ilver,35K $15,950
C HEV Y C O BA LT SDN
$8,950 05 “LS ”,W hite,76K
09 “LT”S ilver,36K $13,500
04 C HEV Y SILV ERA DO
1500 XC A B 4X4
Z71,W hite,70K
HO NDA A C C O RD SDN
$12,500 05 EX,G ray,56K
06 EXL V 6,B ronze,33K $14,950
10 HY UNDA I
ELA NTRA G LS SDN
Khaki,3K M iles
Now $15,950
08 SA TURN
V UE XE A W D
V -6,N avy,64K M iles
Now $14,950
10 TO Y O TA
RA V 4 4W D
G reen,30K M iles
Now $19,950
10 TO Y O TA
C O RO LLA SDN
LE,W hite,21K $14,950
S ,W hite,21K $16,950
C
H
O
IC
E
$11,500 05 G LS ,R ed,31K
07 Ltd,W hite,71K $14,950
07 Ltd,C herry,60K $15,950
05 HY UNDA ITUSC O N
G LS 4W D
S ilver,50K M iles
Now $9,950
06 HO NDA
C IV IC SDN
LX,G ray,122K M iles
Now $9,750
Now $16,950
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 11G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior painting &
drywall install
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom &
Room Remodeling,
Carpentry & Whole
House Renovations.
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
HUGHES
Construction
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
NORTHEAST
CONTRACTING
GROUP
Decks, Sunrooms,
Additions, Windows,
Kitchens & Baths.
Concrete
Driveways,
Walkways & Patios
570-338-2269
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1024 Building &
Remodeling
SPRING
BUILDING/
REMODELING?
Call the
Building Industry
Association
for a list of
qualified members
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY
ALL CHIMNEY
REPAIR
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel
Lining, Parging,
Stucco, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed &
Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOUSE CLEANING
We would love to
clean your home.
We clean around
your schedule.
We clean weekly,
bi-weekly, and
monthly. We also
do one time clean-
ing. Call Eddie
570-677-0344 or
online at www.
empresacleaning.
com
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
C&C Masonry
and Concrete.
Absolutely free
estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-766-1114
570-346-4103
PA084504
COVERT & SONS
CONCRETE CO.
All types of con-
crete & foundation
work. Specials &
discounts for Veter-
ans & Sr . Citizens.
Give us a call we
will beat any
written estimate
by 10% or more.
570-696-3488 or
570-239-2780
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry Contrac Masonry Contrac- -
tors tors. Chimney,
stucco, concrete,
and stonework.
Clean outs and
hauling service.
570-466-2916
WYOMING VALLEY
MASONRY
Concrete, stucco,
foundations,pavers,
retaining wall sys-
tems, dryvit, flag-
stone, brick work.
Senior Citizen Dis-
count.570-287-4144
or 570-760-0551
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
WYOMING VALLEY
PROPERTY MGT.
Mini-Excavating
/Hauling
Stone, mulch, top-
soil, etc. Lawn care.
Reasonable rates.
570-466-4176
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
ETERNITY
FLOORING
*Hardwood
*Laminate
*Ceramic
*Porcelain
Installations
570-820-0233
Free Estimates
PA 089377
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
Mark’s
Handyman
Service
Give us a call
We do it all!
Licensed &Insured
570-578-8599
1132 Handyman
Services
NEPA HANDYMAN
30 Years Experi-
ence Remodeling
Homes
Pittston & Surround-
ing Areas
Dave 570-479-8076
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
AAA Bob & Ray’s
Hauling: Friendly &
Courteous. We take
anything & every-
thing. Attic to base-
ment. Garage, yard,
free estimates. Call
570-655-7458 or
570-905-4820
AFFORDABLE
Junk removal
cleanups,
cleanouts, Large or
small jobs. Fast
free estimates.
(570) 814-4631
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SPRING CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Moving, Deliver-
ies, Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN A
DUMPSTER!!
Free Metal
Removal
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
HAUL ALL
HAULING &
PAINTING SERVICES.
Free Estimates.
570-332-5946
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
1156 Insurance
NEP NEPA A LONG LONG
TERM CARE TERM CARE
AGENCY AGENCY
Long Term/Short
Term Care
Products
Life Insurance
Tax Deferred
Annuities
Medicare Supple-
ment Plans
Dental/Vision
Estate Planning
Ideas
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www nepalong www nepalong
termcare.com termcare.com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
26 years
experience,
landscape designs,
retaining walls,
pavers, patios,
decks, walkways,
ponds, lighting,
seeding, mulch, etc
Free Estimates.
570-288-5177
Brizzy’s
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump grinding,
Cabling. Shrub and
hedge sculpting
and trimming.
Spring cleanup,
retaining walls
and repair.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
GARDEN TILLING
call Stan at
570-574-3050
JAY’S LAWN SERVICE
Spring clean-ups,
mowing, mulching
and more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
P PA ATRICK & DEB’S TRICK & DEB’S
LANDSCAPING LANDSCAPING
Landscaping, basic
handy man, house
cleaning,painting,
moving & free sal-
vage pick up.
AVAILABLE FOR
SPRING CLEAN
UPS!
Call 570-793-4773
RESIDENTIAL
LAWN SERVICE
Grass cutting, trim-
ming, leaf clean-up.
Free Est. 574-5800
TOUGH BRUSH,
mowing, edging,
mulching, trimming
shrubs, hedges,
trees, lawn care,
leaf removal, Spring
clean up. Accepting
new customers &
applications this
season. Weekly &
bi-weekly
lawn care.
Fully Insured.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, Haz-
ard tree removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot clearing, Stone/
Soil delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1165 Lawn Care
B & R LAWN
SERVICE
Grass & Shrub
Cutting
Reasonable Rates
Senior Discount
Free Estimates
Call Butch at
570-954-6009
or Ron at
570-640-3458
Country Gentleman
Total Yard Care
Lawns - Shrubs
Tilling - Mulch
Senior Discount
Westside Specials
Family Owned
570-287-3852
1165 Lawn Care
DC LAWNCARE
Cleanups, mowing,
mulching, shrub &
tree trimming.
Residential &
Commercial
Accounts Wanted
Call Doug at
570-574-4367
LOW COST
LAWN CARE SERVICE
Specializing in
grass cutting
rates start at $20
Free Estimates
570-706-5035
PORTANOVA’S LAWN
CARE Weekly & Bi-
Weekly Lawn Cut-
ting, Landscaping.
Reasonable rates.
Now accepting new
customers. Email
DanPortanova@
gmail.com or call
570-650-3985
RAINERI’S LAWN
CARE & SHRUBS
Lawns Trimmed &
Edged, Hedges Cut,
Mulch & More
Free Estimates
570-825-2779
570-954-2302
SPIKE & GORILLA’S
LAWNCARE
Silly Name, Serious
Results! Residential
& Commercial
Services Available.
570-702-2497
YARD CLEAN UP
Attics & Basements
Complete clean ups
Garden tilling
Call for quotes
570-953-7699 or
570-926-9029
1183 Masonry
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Licensed - Insured
Certified - Masonry
Concrete - Roofing
Quality Craftsman-
ship
Guaranteed.
Unbeatable Prices
Senior Citizen Dis-
counts
Free Estimates
570-574-4618 or
570-709-3577
JAMES ATHERTON
MASONRY
Free Estimates
All phases of
masonry,
foundations, brick,
concrete,
chimneys & roofs
570-417-7688
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AMERICA
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior.
20 years experi-
ence. Insured.
Senior Discount
570-855-0387
David Wayne
PAINTING
CALL ABOUT
OUR EXTERIOR
SPECIALS
570-762-6889
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIPS
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1252 Roofing &
Siding
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1297 Tree Care
GASHI AND SONS
TREE SERVICE
AND STUMP
REMOVAL.
Fully Insured.
570-693-1875
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tial buyers with an
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section!
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8 LINES
STARTING AT
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
2.9%
APR
to 72 Months
1.9%
APR
to 72 Months
List Price $37,465
Santo Discount -$1,866
Conquest Savings or
Volvo Owner Loyalty -$1,000
Your New 2012 VOLVO XC60 AWD
JUST$34,599
LEASE FOR
PER MONTH
36 MONTH
$
1999DOWN
$
399
APRIL CONQUEST EVENT
Payments based on 36 month closed end lease. Tax and fees not included with $999 down (S60) and $1,999 Down (XC60) or equal trade in value. First pmt
and bank acquisition fee ($695). Due on delivery. No security deposit required. 30,000 miles allowed. Balance due S60 $1,993. Balance due XC60 $3093 +
tax and tags. Special APR available with approved credit. Offer ends 4-30-2012.
SANTOVOLVO
5YEAR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
Attention: Current owners or lesees of Acura, Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Lexus,
Mercedes, SAAB, Honda, Nissan, Toyota or Volkswagen Cars or SUVs,
YOU ARE ELIGIBLE FOR $1000 OFF THE PURCHASE
OR LEASE OF A NEW S60 OR XC60
APRIL CONQUEST EVENT
List Price $32,175
Santo Discount -$1,576
Conquest Savings or
Volvo Owner Loyalty -$1,000
Your New 2012 VOLVO S60 T5
2.5 Litre Turbo, Dynamic Stability, Traction Control, City Safety
3.2 Litre All Wheel Drive, Heated Seats, City Safety
JUST$29,599
LEASE FOR
PER MONTH
36 MONTH
$
999DOWN
$
299
207-8149
All prices plus tax and tags.
Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
BLUE RIDGE MOTORS
bl uer i dgecar s . net
C A R S - V A N S - S U V S
100%
Credit
Approval
Finance with a National Company
Don’t Overpay Due To Credit
OVER 150 VEHICLES AVAILABLE!
NOWWITHTWOLOCATIONS
TOSERVE YOU!
51 S. Wyoming Ave.
Edwardsville, PA
Ph. 570-714-2621
4150 Birney Ave.
Moosic, PA
(Next To Grande Pizza)
Ph. 570-871-4299
05 CHEVY
EQUINOX AWD
$
9,900
114K
07 CHRYSLER
SEBRING
$
9,700
4 Cyl
05 DODGE
DURANGO 4X4
$
9,975
95K
$
8,900
$
4,950
00 FORD F150
STEPSIDE 4X4
$
8,900
02 SAAB
CONVERTIBLE
$
8,900
90K
00 CHRYSLER
300M
$
5,900
Leather, Roof
03 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
$
9,998
4.0L, 5 Speed Manual, Soft Top
02 GMC SIERRA
1500 4X4
$
10,995
Power Windows/Locks, Tow Pkg, 5.3L V8
06 CHEVROLET
TRAILBLAZER 4X4
$
11,779
Power Windows/Locks, Sunroof,
Tow Pkg, 63K Miles
08
MAZDA 6
$
10,995
Power Windows/Locks,
Leather, Sunroof
07 FORD
FUSION SEL AWD
$
9,975
Power Windows/Locks, 6-CD Player
06 HYUNDAI
AZERA
$
10,899
Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof,
Alloy Wheels
Tax and Tags additional. Not responsible for typographical errors.
04 FORD
EXPLORER 4X4
$
10,880
Power Windows/Locks, V8,
Only 79K Miles, 3rd Row Seating
07 FORD FOCUS SE
HATCHBACK
$
8,850
Power Windows/Locks,
4 Cyl, Low Miles
03 FORD
TAURUS
$
5,900
SES, PW, PL
05 FORD
EXPLORER 4X4
$
9,990
Alloys, 4.0L V6, Just Fully Serviced
GET A
BASKET FULL
OF
DEALS!
00 MERCURY
COUGAR
Auto, 84K
00 CHEVY
S-10 4X4
67K, EXT Cab
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
7
4
3
8
8
8
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AAA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
04 VW Jetta 59K.........................
$
8,250
06 Kia Spectra 54K...................
$
7,995
08 Chevy Cobalt 61K...............
$
7,495
07 Chevy Aveo 84K..................
$
6,950
04 Ford Focus Wagon..........
$
5,995
02 Dodge Neon 77K................
$
5,995
04 Pontiac Grand Am 4 Cyl
$
5,495
04 Hyundai Elantra 84K....
$
5,495
04 Chevy Malibu........................
$
4,995
04 Suzuki Forenza 86K........
$
4,995
97 Ford Mustang GT Conv..
$
4,995
04 Hyundai Sonata.................
$
4,975
00 Mitsubishi Eclipse..........
$
4,695
99 Chrysler Sebring Convt. 59K
$
4,550
02 Saturn SL2...............................
$
4,100
99 Dodge Stratus 4 Cyl............
$
3,650
99 Ford Ranger XLT...............
$
3,495
Cars
04 Chevy Venture.....................
$
5,995
03 Chevy Tracker 4x4.........
$
5,950
02 Chevy Venture Warner Bros. Edit .
$
5,750
02 Ford Windstar 88K..........
$
5,450
4x4’s & Vans
GAS SAVER SPECIALS
WE BEAT ANYBODY’S DEALS
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
P
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TH OUS AND S
CL E AN R E L IABL E
L OW M IL E CAR S
2007 H O NDA A C C O R D
VIEW M O R E A T
P ETILLO M O TO R S.C O M
G O O D C R EDIT G ETS
LO W INTER EST R A TES!
SP EC IA L O F TH E W EEK
$
11,495
V -Tech 4 C yl,5-S peed,
Tinted W indow s,S unroof,
C lean,1 Ow ner,6 m o.
U nlim ited W arranty
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Happy Easter from Our Family to Yours.
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
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6
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Se Habla
Espanol
~
12-841
Old fashioned charm
abounds in this
3 bedroom 2-story on
5.95 acres. Huge
master Bedroom with
vaulted ceilings, den
with gas fireplace, peg
oak floors, spacious
living room/dining
room combo with
fireplace, modern
kitchen with breakfast nook, office, 2 car garage and wonderful
country acreage with public water and sewer and natural gas.
CALL LYNNE 574-7093 $254,900
Nestled on a Picturesque 5+ Acres!
D
a
lla
s
12-708
Pristine Cape Cod
located on
37+ acres with
spring-fed pond.
This well kept
2 bedroom home
features oak
kitchen, deck, and
garage. If you
need, this home offers room to grow with an
unfinished 2nd level and pre-insulated basement with
high ceilings. CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $275,000
Cape Cod on 37+ Acres!
H
unlock
C
reek
12-869
Life is lovely in
this 3/4 bedroom
home. Enticing
residence offering
full landscaping
and brick
walkways. Tiled
foyer new carpet,
granite kitchen.
Two-car garage, finished lower level, screened patio
overlooking the large yard. Enjoy its hominess!
CALL PAT 793-4055 $259,900
Luxury In This Great Space!
H
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Happy Easter!
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Office
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
is Luzerne County’s
ONLY Gated Community
Community Building
Gym ~ Swimming Pool
Brand new luxury Townhomes
Starting at
$179,900
in Duryea, PA
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM
Pat Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
KINGSTON
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY!
“Fun to Run Business”
$ Great Earning
Potentional $
Turn Key Operation, High
Traffc Location. Call Pat
Busch Today!
$149,000
LUZERNE HIGH TRAFFIC
BUSINESS LOCATION
Luzerne long established
food business location,
paved parking, rental in-
come. Located across
from high traffc commer-
cial area. Realtor owned.
Call Jerry Busch Jr.
$169,900
You Better Call Jerry Busch
Jr Today! Located on a fan-
tastic street this home fea-
tures a foyer, spacious living
room, dining room, large
eat-in kitchen, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, laundry, fenced
yard, porch, private drive
and comfortable gas heat.
Don’t Wait! $79,900
SWOYERSVILLE -
4 BEDROOMS
PLAINS -
HUDSON GARDENS
Come Relax in the
Gardens! 9 spacious
rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, fnished base-
ment, generous room
sizes, garage and beau-
tiful lot. Call Pat Busch
885-4165 $149,000
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Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
THORNHURST
Low maintanence, single
story ranch home located in
a private golf course commu-
nity in the Poconos for week-
end or year round enjoyment.
Modern kit w/ breakfast bar,
formal living room and din-
ning room. Family room
w/gas FP. Walk-up master
bedroom w/bonus room ideal for an office. New front and rear decks in a
private setting within 30 minutes to W-B or Scranton. $115,000
NANTICOKE
Totally Remodeled 3 Bedroom
home on large lot on a well-
kept street in move-in condi-
tion! Home Includes 1 1/2
Modern Baths w/ stone coun-
tertops, tile floors, spacious
kitchen with all new appli-
ances & plenty of countertop
space! New carpet throughout!
An Amazing Price- Tis home can be yours with very little out-of-pocket
money. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468. $49,900
HUNLOCK CREEK
No home for sale in Sweet Val-
ley/Hunlock Creek area comes
close. Newly restored 2280sq
ft, 3 bedroom, 3 bath Colonial
on its own private, secluded
1.55 acre lot, this energy effi-
cient home, soaked in history
and restored with loving care
is Simply Magnificent! Presti-
gious Lehman School District, Low LowTaxes and a great country location
next to lakes, hiking, fishing and more, make this a GEM! $199,900
SALESPERSONS WANTED!
Join a GROWING FIRM servicing the Greater Wyoming Valley
with offices strategically located in SHAVERTOWN & W-B.
Enjoy a challenging career with EXCELLENT INCOME
POTENTIAL for intelligent, industrious, motivated individuals.
We have professional office space available and WILL TRAIN
QUALIFIED PEOPLE. If you have a license or have always
wanted to obtain one call for a confidential interview. Learn
how you can become a part of our
EXCELLENT ORGANIZATION!
R
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7
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837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
549 CHARLES AVENUE,
KINGSTON
A quality home in a superior location!
Features: large living room; formal din-
ing room with parquet fooring; oak
kitchen with breakfast area; 1st foor
master bedroom suite;knotty pine den;
half-bath. 2nd foor: 2 bedrooms and
bath. Finished room with newer carpet-
ing & wet bar in lower level. Central air.
2-car garage. In-ground concrete pool
with jacuzzi. MLS#12-1203
JOE MOORE $299,000
565 OLD NEWPORT ST.,
NEWPORT TWP.
Unique ‘’Deck House’’ contem-
porary-styled home with brick &
redwood exterior. 5 bedrooms & 3
baths. Features: living room with
freplace & vaulted ceiling with
exposed beams, modern, cherry
kitchen. Lower level family room
with kitchenette. Hardwood foors.
All on 1 acre. MLS#12-170
JOE MOORE $257,500
1 TRIPP MANOR,
FORTY FORT
2-story home in Tripp Manor.
3 bedrooms; 1 1/2 baths; liv-
ing room with brick freplace;
3- season room (17 x 15).
Hardwood foors. Central Air.
1-car garage. MLS#12-894
JOE MOORE $127,500
N
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G
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100
12-1173 $329,900
2-story, 3bedroom, 2bath, very
well maintainedhome. Modern
kitchenwithnewer appliances.
Laundry roomandfull bathon
first floor. Beautiful 3-season
roomoverlooking the sparkling
in-groundpool.
Pat Silvi 283-9100 x21
12-1193 $109,000
Attention to detail and fine
craftsmanship is noticeable in
every roomof this 4 bedroom,
2-story home on over 2 acres
overlooking a tranquil stream.
Open floor plan, spacious
master suite with large walk-in
shower. Composite deck.
7-roomCape Codw/beautiful
hardwoodfloors onthe 1st floor,
handicappedaccessible w/over-
sizeddoors andhallways. New
carpet andextra basement ceiling
height make this a great family
home! Landscapedyardwith
Koi pond, customdeck.
Chris Jones 696-6558
12-1197 $199,900
Paul Pukatch 696-6559
12-1183 $104,900
Love the outdoors? You’re close
to it all, hunting, fishing, skiing,
water sports. Near Nescopeck
State Park andState Game lands.
Home Warranty includedfor
peace of mind. Newcarpeting
inall 3 bedrooms andhall.
Family roomwithfireplace.
Lain-Great Family Home! Dallas-Fine Detail! White Haven-Outdoorsman? Wilkes-Barre-Lovely Home
© 2012 BRERAfliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
D Wilk B L l H
!!!
L i G D ll Fi D t il! D t F il H ! Whit H O td ?
YOUR EASTER HUNT ENDS HERE! Call us today!
Story and photos
by Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
The Easter Bunny would be happy to
call 59 Yorktown Rd. in Mountain Top
home. This three-bedroom, two-bath
beauty in Walden Park has more than
enough amenities to fill any holiday
basket. Among your favorites are sure
to be the large rear deck that overlooks
the heated, in-ground pool with outdoor
hot tub, as well as the fully finished lower
level with wet bar, sunroom and indoor
hot tub.
Listed by Michael O’Boyle of Trade-
Mark Realty Group for $219,000, you can
see all this totally up-to-date bi-level has
to offer at an Open House next Sun-
day, April 15 from 12-2 p.m.
Sure to please, the L-shaped pool’s two
sections measure 36’-by’18’ and 12’-by-12’
and include a sliding board. The separate
built-in outdoor hot tub adds to the fun.
The yard is well landscaped and provides
a shed for storage.
The exterior offers pale yellow vinyl
siding accented by a hunter green front
door and garage door. You enter into a
foyer with stairs down to the finished
lower level or up to the 22’-by-16’ living
room. The living room features a picture
window front with hunter green carpet-
ing and pale mauve walls. This space
opens to the rear to the 10’-by-9’ dining
room. Here, burgundy walls accent a
cream ceramic tile floor with sliding
doors that open rear to a large deck
that overlooks the pool. Vertical blinds
provide privacy.
To the right of the dining room is the
13’-by-10’ kitchen. The cream tile floor
continues here matched by cream tile
countertops over cream laminate cabi-
nets with oak trim. A peninsula breakfast
bar adds to the countertop workspace
along with a built-in desk designed to
control clutter. A single window faces
rear. Appliances include a side-by-side
refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave and
stove.
A nearby full bath measures 12’-by-13’
and offers a jetted tub set into a tiled
surround and a corner-set shower with
glass walls. A triple oak vanity has two
cultured marble sinks and matches a
linen cabinet for storage. Blue and tan
carpeting and an octagon accent window
complete the picture.
The first bedroom measures 12’-by-16’
and has mauve carpeting, white walls,
Pool and Hot Tubs Highlight Walden Park Bi-Level
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012
OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 12-2PM
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 4/15 -- 12-2 pm
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
a double closet and two rear-facing windows. Bed-
rooms two and three measure 13’-by-12’ and 13’-by-14’,
respectively, each with a double closet, white walls and
carpeting.
The fully finished lower level is designed with enter-
taining in mind and offers an 18’-by-12’ recreation room
that provides a hanging light and room for a pool table.
This area has light brown carpeting and a double front
window. It opens rear to the adjacent 21’-by-12’ family
room that comes complete with an oak wet bar. Pocket
doors take you rear to a sunroom that hosts an eight-
person hot tub set into a corner of windows overlook-
ing the back yard. A side door leads to the pool.
A half bath/laundry room on this level has an oak
vanity with tan cultured marble sink and tan walls. The
washer and dryer are included in the sale.
A nearby door leads to the heated, two-car garage
that includes a workbench and storage area.
This home has gas hot water baseboard heat, and
public sewer and water utilities.
To get to the Sunday, April 15 Open House from
Wilkes-Barre, take Route 309 south into Mountain Top.
Go past the intersection with Church Rd. The entrance
to Walden Park is further ahead on the right. Turn
right onto Walden Dr. and make the first left onto York-
town Rd. For additional information, contact Michael
O’Boyle at TradeMark Realty Group, (570) 901-1020;
TeamTrademark1@gmail.com.
SPECIFICATIONS:
Bi-Level
2,032 square feet
BEDROOMS: 3
BATHS: 1 full, 1 half
PRICE: $219,000
LOCATION: 59 Yorktown Rd., Mountain Top
AGENT: Michael O’Boyle
REALTOR: TradeMark Realty Group, (570) 901-1020;
TeamTrademark1@gmail.com
Walden Park
Continued from front page
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
• Title Insurance
• Rapid Title Search & Closing
• Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
4
2
2
5
9
45 acres/pasture/woods
2 producing horizontal gas well units
8-room log home with newer roof, full basement
2-story barn & detached 2-car garage
Also, commercial building on 8.5 acres
+
-
+
-
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
1215 South St.
Spacious 4 bed-
room home with in
law suite with sepa-
rate entrance.
Large lot, large
room sizes. Split
system A/C in fami-
ly room. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-963
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
AVOCA
214 Gedding St.
Cozy Cape Cod
home with 2 bed-
rooms, 1st floor
laundry, nice yard
with deck. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-668
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
901 Main St.
Stately 4 bedroom
home with beautiful
woodwork, extra
large rooms with
gas heat and
nice yard.
MLS 12-884
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search homes in
Tunkhannock.
$275,000.
Negotiable
For appointment,
call: 570-310-1552
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
$214,900
Motivated Seller.
Very spacious home
with great floor plan
features hardwood
floors & pocket
doors on main level.
3 bedrooms, 3
baths, rear screen-
ed patio, attached
garage, as well as a
2-car detached
garage, all located
on a 1 acre country
size lot with beauti-
ful views.
Please Call Deb
Roccograndi at
570-696-6671
MLS#12-691.
DALLAS
143 Nevel Hollow
Road
Great country living
in this 3 bedroom, 2
& 1/2 bath home
with 1 car attached
garage, large enter-
tainment room
lower level. Plus a
30'x30' detached
garage with open
2nd floor ready to
finish & mechanics
pit in one stall.
MLS 11-4124
$195,000
570-675-4400
To place your
ad call...829-7130
DALLAS
244 Overbrook Rd.
Great starter home
- move-in condition
3 bedroom. All
appliances included.
Rear Deck with
Mountain View.
MLS 12-234
$109,000
570-675-4400
S
O
L
D
DALLAS
5 HEMLOCK ST.
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 2.5 bath,
2,350 sq. ft. on
quiet street. Built in
2008 with hard-
wood floors, gran-
ite countertops,
fireplace, fenced
yard & more.
$309,000
Call 570-466-5968
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Four bedroom
Colonial with hard-
wood floors in for-
mal dining and living
room. Modern eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with 24”
x 30” recreation
room. Deck, hot tub
and ceiling fans.
MLS#11-4504
$229,900
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
Two bedroom
condo, 2nd floor.
Living/dining room
combination. 1,200
square feet of easy
living. Two bal-
conies, one car
garage nearby.
Security system,
cedar closet, use of
in ground pool.
$109,000
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
Private & beautiful
lovely brick chalet
on 11.85 acres.
Custom brick work,
tongue & groove
interior & oversized
3 car garage.
Features whirlpool
tub, heated sun-
room, kitchen island
& hickory cabinets,
laundry room. Base-
ment is plumbed &
ready to finish.
MLS# 12-817
$315,000
Call Ken Williams
Five Mountain
Realty
570-542-8800
906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS
Bright & spacious
raised ranch on
level lot in cul-de-
sac. Tiled foyer.
Living room with
fireplace. Lovely
oak kitchen opens
to dining area with
4 skylights &
beamed ceiling.
French doors to
deck. Large family
room plus craft
room. Huge garage
w/plenty of space
for workshop.
MLS#12-606
$179,000
Call
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain Top
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
DRUMS
Comfortable,
affordable 3 bed-
room ranch on just
over an acre. 2
fireplaces. One in
living room and one
in backyard pavil-
ion. 1st floor laun-
dry and built in one
car garage.
$94,900
MLS #12-1101
Call Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain Top
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
140 Bear Creek
Boulevard
Beautiful family
home
on over 1/2
acre with 3 bed-
rooms, 4 bath-
rooms and fin-
ished lower
level.
For more info
and photos visit:
www. atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 12-918
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
DURYEA
$159,900
Good visibility com-
mercial location.
Room for up to 3
businesses! Also
has 2 apartments.,
off-street parking
for 8 w/ possibility.
of much more in
rear. Great for
Beauty/Nail Salon,
Fitness Studio,
Shop, and Garage
type businesses.
Call
CHRISTINE KUTZ
for more
information.
570-332-8232
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
621 Donnelly St.
Great starter home,
already furnished,
newer roof and
vinyl windows.
Move right into this
2 bedroom, 1/2
double home.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 12-1042
$34,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
DURYEA
97 Chittenden St.
Flood damaged
home with new fur-
nace, electric box,
water heater, out-
lets and switches.
1st floor gutted but
already insulated
and ready for
sheetrock. 2nd floor
has 4 bedrooms
and bath with dou-
ble sinks. Large
yard. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1225
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
REDUCED
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
you’re looking for a
Ranch, don’t miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$154,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$309,860
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
263 Lawrence St
Pride of ownership
shows in this nicely
updated & well
maintained home
with possible in-law
suite/apartment.
Enjoy off street
parking, spacious
yard & large deck
with beautiful views
of the valley. 1st
floor has large sep-
arate eat-in kitchen,
living room, bed-
room & bath. 2nd
floor has large eat-
in kitchen, living/din-
ing combo, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath & 2nd
floor laundry. Many
possibilities to fit
your needs! Must
see! MLS#11-4434
Reduced to
$88,900
Call Christina @
(570) 714-9235
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
530 Cherry Drive
Spacious 2 bed-
room townhome
with hardwood
floor, gas heat, cen-
tral air, end unit
with one garage. All
appliances, move in
condition.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-712
$169,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level
home on quiet
street. Updated
exterior. Large
family room,
extra deep lot.
2 car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and cov-
ered patio. For
more informa-
tion and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.co
m
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
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in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
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special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 15G
Discover Buyers Top Choice for Homes Searches
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Lewith & Freeman homes appear on all major real estate websites, 600 & Growing...
Kingston 570.288.9371
Shavertown 570.696.3801
Mountain Top 570.474.9801
Hazleton/Drums 570.788.1999
Wilkes-Barre 570.822.1160
Clarks Summit 570.585.0600
Did you Know? More sellers choose L&F to display their homes for sale.
www.lewith-freeman.com
LF Homefinder – Search and save your
favorite homes right on our website
Call the experts!
SHAVERTOWN NEW LISTING Updated
3BR, 1 bath Ranch. Kitchen features cus-
tom cabinets & stainless steel applianc-
es. New fooring throughout. OSP in rear.
MLS# 12-1213 KATHY M. 696-0870 or
RHEA 696-6677 $112,000
SHAVERTOWN Spacious home. Wonderful fr
plan & elegant detail throughout. Fantastic 2
story great rm w/gas FP, great kitchen, MSTR on
1st fr, 5BRs, 5 baths & great fnished LL w/cus-
tom cabinetry. MLS# 11-3697
MARGY 696-0891 $425,000
HARVEY’S LAKE Live the life in this charm-
ing Chalet on 50’ of PRIME LAKEFRONT sit-
uated on a deep level lot. 3BRs, 2.5 bath,
dock, freplace, coal stove, awesome view
of lake. You will love it! MLS# 12-263
MARK 696-0724 $399,000
LAFLIN Elegant brick ranch in charming
neighborhood! Kit w/bkfast rm, heated Fla
rm & basement, tiled baths, 4 cedar clos-
ets. Hw in LR & DR. It’s a beauty!
MLS#12-1057
TERRY D 715-9317 $368,900
KINGSTON A must see! Steel & concrete con-
struction put together this exceptional 4BR, 5 bath
home. Great location & fenced yard, property fea-
tures maple HW frs - cherry kitchen cabs - unique
bronze staircase ñ tile baths & much more.
MLS# 12-531
JULIO 239-6408 or RHEA 696-6677 $319,900
SHAVERTOWN Elegant home w/wonder-
ful foor plan-5BRs, 6baths & huge kitchen
w/Garland range & bright breakfast area.
Great fnished lower walks out to patio &
stunning Sylvan pool! MLS# 11-37
MARGY 696-0891 $695,000
GLEN SUMMIT Glen Summit Community - Beautiful
Victorian home renovated w/new open foor plan,
6BRs, 4.5 elegant baths & stunning new kitchen -
HW frs, spacious rms, handsome FP’s, front & back
staircases, delightful Gazebo & huge wrap around
porch. MLS# 10-2874 MARGY 696-0891
or RHEA 696-6677 $650,000
DALLAS Elegant home in beautiful setting over-
looks Irem Golf Course - Spacious rooms w/
handsome beamed ceilings & wonderful detail
- 4BRs, 3 full & 2.5 baths - French doors lead to
lovely patio & pool. MLS# 12-1104
MARGY 696-0891 or
RHEA 696-6677 $500,000
MOUNTAINTOP
REDUCED
Don’t miss this bright
front brick home
w/4BRs, 3 baths on
tree lined landscaped
lot. Ultra kitchen w/all
appliances, huge Island
opens to deck, FP in FR.
Lots of upgrades. Prime
location! MLS# 12-921
TERRY D. 715-9317
$284,900
MOUNTAINTOP
Move-in ready 3BR,
1.5 bath townhouse.
Features hw foors,
tile, and new carpet.
Updated kit & baths.
MLS#12-1072
EVELYN 715-9339
$119,900
HARVEY’S LAKE REDUCED! Breathtaking beauty - 88 feet of
lake frontage. 5BR home w/new Master Suite & gourmet kitch-
en, exceptional boathouse w/dream view. MLS# 11-605
VIRGINIA ROSE 714-9253 $950,000
SHAVERTOWN
Bulford Farms custom built
brick 2sty, 5BR, 4 full & 2 1/2
baths home on 4acres w/
open fr plan. Quality thru-out
includes mod kitchen w/island
& granite open to FR w/FP &
bar. Walls of windows overlook
grounds, 2stry fyr, sunken LR
w/FP, 1st fr offce. Finished LL
w/2nd kitchen, rec rm & wine
cellar. Amazing storage, 4 car
garage, tennis court & large
patio. MLS# 09-4567
TINA 714-9277 or
VIRGINIA 714-9253
$750,000
TUNKHANNOCK Spacious 2-story in beau-
tiful Clarendon Acres offers many custom
features w/exquisite interior. Don’t miss it!
MLS#12-1266
RENEE 585-0625 $338,000
MOUNTAINTOP Classic 4BR - 2 Story.
Lg MBR suite. Modern kitchen, lg formal
DR, cedar sunroom, Level lot & much
more! MLS#12-1065
PAT S 715-9338 $238,000
FORTY FORT NEWLISTING Attractive move-
in condition Cape boasts 3BR, 1.5 baths,
LR, DR, PLUS eat-in kitchen, lower level pri-
vate drive on quiet street. MLS# 12-1119
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $117,000
PITTSTON Live on one side while the other
helps pay the mortgage! Remodeled double
with many upgrades. Must see!
MLS# 11-862
TINA 714-9277 $160,000
WYOMING Complete remodel. Everything
new in this cute Ranch. Modern kitchen w/
granite counters, new roof, siding, windows,
electric & plumbing. MLS# 12-323
MARCIE 714-9267 $109,000
DUPONT Move-in ready! LR, DR, eat-in kitch-
en, 1st fr laundry. Generous room sizes,
newer roof & gutters. MLS#12-1088
MARY D 696-0730 $84,900
PLYMOUTH Well maintained double block.
Separate utilities. Both sides have 3BRs &
laundry rooms. MLS# 12-583
NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240 $79,900
DRUMS Country living at its best! Move-in to
this 3BR, 2 bath Ranch with C/A & lots of
privacy! MLS# 11-4254
PATTY A. 715-9332 $144,900
WILKES-BARRE Elevations is a new Condo-
minium Living that features: 1 & 2BR lofts
& fats w/high ceilings, open fr plans, qual-
ity fnishes, secured indoor parking w/direct
elevator access. PEG 714-9247, VIRGINIA
714-9253 or RHEA 696-6677 $199,900
HANOVER TWP. Lovely home w/ 3BRs, 2
baths, mod kit, LR/DR, 1 car det. gar. sec
sys, patio, pond & above grnd pool. Just a
few of the touches that make this home so
appealing. Close to major highways!
MLS# 11-2370
DEB 714-5802 $124,500
DALLAS Elevator - great feature! Beautiful
3BR Condo. Wood foors, custom kitchen,
dramatic windows, 2 car garage.
MLS# 12-970
VIRGINIA 714-9253 $292,000
621 GIBSON AVE., KINGSTON
Spacious Brick “Cape Cod” w/ 4BR’s, 2 bths & over-
sized 2 car gar w/lge storage loft. HW frs + add’l
space for a LL Family room, Lge kitc & some knotty
pine walls. MLS# 11-4162
DEBORAH ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671 $179,900
Dir: From Forty Fort take Rt 11 then make L on E.
Dorrance then L on Gibson.
4 NOBLE LANE, DALLAS
Enjoy carefree living in the villas at Masonic Village.
Located at Irem Temple Country Club, this entrance
fee community offers interior & exterior home main-
tenance. Call for details on this unique community.
MLS# 12-880. RHEA 696-6677 $256,000
Dir: 309N to L on Country Club Road - L onto Wedge-
wood Way. Follow into Masonic Village.
30 COVE ROAD, BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
Fall in love w ‘’Whispering Pines’’ in scenic Historic Bear
Creek Village set on a knoll w/lake glimpses. Spacious,
comfortable traditional features 3FP’s, HW frs, mod kit, GE
appls. Come for a visit & stay for the lifestyle! MLS# 12-186
Ann Lewis 714-9245 $269,500
Dir: FROM WILKES-BARRE: RT 115 S (TOWARDS BLAKESLEE)
TURN L ONTO BEAUPLAND RD., JUST AFTER THE DAM. COVE
ROAD IS FIRST ROAD ON THE L. NO DRIVE-BYS PLEASE. PRI-
VATE DRIVE.
800 GROVE STREET, AVOCA
Beautifully updated 2BR, 1 bath house in desirable
Avoca neighborhood. All appliances included. Lots
of closet space & great view from backyard. MLS#
12-962 ANDREA 714-9244 $91,900
Dir: Traveling N, Main St Avoca, R on McAlpine, L on
Grove. House is in the 4th block on right-hand side
1 WORTHINGTON ROAD, SHAVERTOWN
Sprawling 3BR Ranch in excellent condition features
beautiful Brazilian cherry foors, stunning new baths, walls
of windows, lovely deck & stone patio. MLS# 12-429
MARGY 696-0891 $375,000
Dir: Rt 309N - L on Sutton - Home on corner of Worthing-
ton & Sutton Road.
4145 LAKEVIEW DR., NORTH LAKE
GREAT HOUSE w/ 90ft of lakefront! 3BR, 2.5 bath Cape Cod
w/ Open f plan has extensive views, 1 f Master opens to
screened porch & large deck. MLS# 11-2958
RHEA 570-696-6677 $328,500
Dir: Rt.118W L @ Sheldon’s Diner - Go 2.5 miles - Turn R
@ Davis Trophy - At stop sign turn R on Lakeview - Property
on L.
1000 LAUREL RUN ROAD, BEAR CREEK
Custom Designed - New Construction -2 Story w/open
fr plan. 4 BR’s, 3.5 baths, ultra kit, formal DR, LR w/FP,
oversized laundry. Hardwood on 1st foor. Many amenities!
MLS# 12-353. CLYDETTE 696-0897 $469,000
Dir: Rt 115S to R on Laurel Run Rd, L on Golf Course Rd,
property on L corner
TWINS AT WOODBERRY
MANOR, MOUNTAINTOP
Spectacular 3br 2 1/2 bath twin on great lot offers beautiful
hardwood foors on 1st fr and stunning kitchen with granite
counter tops and stainless steel appl. Large master suite
with wonderful bath & closet. All modern amenities, stately
entry and staircase, composite deck, central air, gas heat, 1
car garage. MLS# 11-2000
$219,900
Call Lisa Joseph at 715-9335
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-2:30PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-3:00PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-2:30PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
2:00-3:30PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-2:30PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-2:30PM
OPEN HOUSE • SUN, 4/15
1:00-3:00PM
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Why live in a town house or condo, when you can live in one of
these“River Shores” style TWIN Ranch homes. These homes come
with an outstanding viewof the valley and river island. Included is
a stainless kitchen, hardwood floors, tile baths, sunken tub, tiled
master bath, two car garage, tankless hot water, the best materials,
the best finishes and a covered porch overlooking the beautiful
views. All for $299,000. High on a ridge in Jenkins Township,
Eagle Viewoffers outstanding custombuilt single family homes as
well as these great Twins. Limited number of lots available,
Call now881-2144 Brokers Welcome
WWh Wh W lli lli ii tt hh dddd h li i l ii fff
7
4
1
9
4
3
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
CHEAPER THAN
RENT!
38 Oak Street. Spa-
cious 1/2 double
block. Living room /
dining room combo.
3 bedrooms on sec-
ond floor, 3 on the
third. 1 1/2 baths. lst.
fl. laundry. 3 porch-
es. Large yard with
loads of parking.
Aluminum siding.
Concrete driveway.
Many extras! MLS #
12-711. Conventional
financing - ($3,125
dn., 4 1/4% int. , 30
yrs., $339 month).
$62,500.
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER GREEN
2 Zack Street
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath bi-level hard-
wood floors on
upper & lower level.
65’x100’ lot. New
Corian kitchen
including new appli-
ances, central air,
gas heat, 3 bed-
rooms, living room
& dining room, new
carpeting, heated 1
car garage. 2 large
sheds, 16’x32’ in
ground pool. Cov-
ered upper deck &
lower covered
patio. Walking dis-
tance to schools.
On bus route. Much
More! $179,000
Kwiatkowski
Real Estate
570-825-7988
HANOVER
Great multi-family
home. Fully rented
double block offers
large updated
rooms, 3 bedrooms
each side. Nice
location. MLS 11-
4390 $129,900
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
171 Boland Avenue
Motivated seller!
Well kept starter
home with nice size
rooms, 2nd floor
replacement win-
dows and great
yard with possible
off street parking
from alley access.
MLS 11-3043
$59,900
570-675-4400
S
O
L
D
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, finished
basement,
screened patio,
new paint & carpet.
Move in condition.
$139,900. Call
570-301-9590
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
Lovely home with
many upgrades,
new roof, windows,
flooring and plumb-
ing. Above ground
pool with fenced
yard, home features
gas, hot water,
baseboard heating,
modern kitchen, liv-
ing room, dining
room, family room,
large foyer, master
bedroom with walk
in closet, 2 car
detached garage
with private drive-
way. MLS# 12-467
$100,000
Call Lynda at
570-262-1196
(570) 696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$139,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
12 Spring St.
Enjoy the nice yard
in this 2 bedroom
home in Newtown.
Double lot with off
street parking, 2
year old furnace,
nicely maintained.
Lots of possibilities.
Great value for
the price.
MLS 11-4488
$39,900
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL
ESTATE
570-821-7022
HANOVER TWP.
146-148 Regal St..
Š Newer kitchens
Š Large baths
Š Tenant occupied
Š 3 bedroom each
side.
Call for appointment
$74,900
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
19 Lee Park Ave.
Nice 3 bedroom
single with 1.5
baths. Home site on
large lot, with pri-
vate drive and 2 car
detached garage.
Home features
large eat in kitchen,
1/2 bath on 1st floor,
living room and
family room with
w/w. Bedroom clos-
ets, attic for stor-
age, replacement
windows, full con-
crete basement
and gas heat.
MLS 12-541
$79,900
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Ext. 304
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. Convenient
location. To settle
estate. Reduced to
$34,900
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
HANOVER TWP.
78 Luzerne St.
Not a drive-by.
Move right into this
sparkling clean,
bright and cheery
1/2 double. All new
floor coverings and
freshly painted inte-
rior. 2 zone gas hot
water baseboard
heat. W/d hookups
in basement which
has a concrete
floor. All measure-
ments are
approximate.
MLS 12-1129
$45,000
Call Michelle T.
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on
nice sized lot.
Newer windows,
walk up attic. 3
bedrooms, nice
room sizes,
walk out base-
ment. Great
price you could
move right in.
For more info
and photos visit:
www. atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
Constitution Avenue
5 year old, 8 room,
2 story, 4 bedroom
3 bath, vinyl sided
home with large lot.
Deck, patio,
security system,
hardwood floors &
sooooo much more!
MLS# 11-2429
$289,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HANOVER
Multi-family. large 3
unit building, beauti-
fully updated apart-
ments. Two 3 bed-
room apartments &
one efficiency
apartment. Great
location also offers
street parking. This
is a must see.
$139,900. MLS 11-
4389. Call/text for
Details Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARVEYS LAKE
Nice country home
with almost a full
acre of land. 1 mile
from Harveys Lake.
Home offers some
new windows, new
copper piping and
updated electric cir-
cuits. Come relax in
the nice screen
porch. MLS 12-476
$148,000
Call Tony
570-855-2424
HUDSON
Archaic 2 floor, 5.5
room homestead,
new washer, dryer,
sump pump, roof
3.5 years old. Lot
over 4,000 sq. ft. 50
East Stanton St.
$50,000. Call 9am-
7pm 570-239-5672
or 570-822-1940
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise Drive
PRICED TO SELL!
This 4 bedroom has
2 car garage with
extra driveway,
central air, veranda
over garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and wet
bar. Sunroom
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
JENKINS
TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
Traditional 4 bed-
room home with 2.5
baths, 2 car
garage, private
yard with above
ground pool. Large
deck with
retractable awning.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-945
$254,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom starter
home with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
41 Chestnut Street
7 years old,
4 bedroom plus
den, 3 full bath
rooms plus one
unfinished one,
large kitchen, dining
room. $155,000
(570)704-6194
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
$399,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space thru-
out, enjoy the priva-
cy of deck & patio
with fenced yard.
MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
Condo with archi-
tect designed
interior on three
floors. Large well
equipped kitchen
with breakfast
room, den with fire-
place with brick and
granite hearth.
Open floor plan in
living room/dining
room. Attached 2
car garage, walk-
out basement with
family room, den &
bath, could be 4th
bedroom. Pets
accepted, must be
approved by Mead-
ows Association.
Gas heat, abundant
closet space.
$269,000
MLS-12-1203
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
A must see. Steel &
concrete construc-
tion put together
this exceptional 4
bedroom 5 bath
home. Great loca-
tion & fenced yard,
property features
maple hardwood
floors, tile baths,
cherry kitchen cabi-
nets, unique bronze
staircase, & much
more. MLS#12-531
$319,900 Call
Julio 570-239-6408
or Rhea
570-696-6677
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
REDUCED!
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$115,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
REDUCED
794 Woodland Drive
Deceptively spa-
cious. Very well
kept. Quiet location.
Move in condition.
Attractive neighbor-
ing properties.
Modest taxes.
Newish furnace and
roofing. Nicely
fenced yard.
$119,900. 11-4547
Call Dale Williams
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-256-3343
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON TWP
573 Carverton Rd
Privacy & serenity!
This 40 acre estate
features living room
with fireplace &
hardwood floor;
family room with
vaulted ceiling &
fireplace; 1st floor
master bedroom &
bath with jetted tub
& stall shower; pan-
elled den; dining
room with stone
floor & skylight; 3
additional bedrooms
& 2 baths. Central
Air, 3 outbuildings.
REDUCED
$695,000
MLS 11-4056
Call Nancy Judd
Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
Beautiful well kept
home in the heart of
Kingston. Walk into
your new beautiful
foyer,leading into
the charming living
room with fireplace.
Beautiful wood
floors throughout,2
bonus finished
rooms on the 3rd
fl.Plenty of closets
and ample storage
throughout. Base-
ment is finished and
the yard fenced.
MLS 12-249
$109,000
Call / text Donna
Cain 570-947-3824
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
NEW LISTING!
Convenient Laflin
location just minutes
from I-81, Rt. 315 &
PA Turnpike. 4 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, liv-
ing room open to
the modern kitchen,
dining room and first
floor with beautiful
hardwood floors.
H a n d i c a p p e d
accessible with
oversized doors and
hallways. New car-
pet & extra base-
ment ceiling height
make this a great
family home. Land-
scaped yard with
Koi pond & custom
deck that sits in a
quiet, private loca-
tion on a dead-end
street. Move-in
ready! mls 12-1197
$199,900
Chris Jones
696-6558
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE NUANGOLA
28 Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
LARKSVILLE
REDUCED
10 E. Second St.
Property in nice
neighborhood.
Includes 4 room
apartment over
garage.
MLS 12-253
$75,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
NEW PRICE
$182,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
MOUNTAIN TOP
Cheerful, bright,
surprisingly roomy
ranch in a great
neighborhood.
Hardwood floors,
brick fireplace with
gas insert. 1st floor
laundry, porch,
patio, & workshop
in basement. Many
updates. Huge
floored attic with
walk in cedar
closet.
$164,900
MLS#12-899
Call
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain Top
906 Homes for Sale
WHITE HAVEN
NEW LISTING!
Woodhaven Estates
You can just settle
right into this impec-
cably maintained
home located in the
Crestwood School
District. This 3-bed-
room home offers
numerous features
you will be sure to
love; covered rear
deck, lower deck
leading to the pool,
ductless air, zoned
heating system,
detached heated 2
stall garage in addi-
tion to the built in
garage. Lake
access to enjoy a
row boat ride or
perhaps some fish-
ing! Major intestates
just minutes away.
Take a look!
MLS#12-872
$224,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
MOTIVATED SELLER
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage.
Modern kitchen &
bath, tile floors.
Energy efficient
Ceramic Heat.
MLS#11-2500
$174,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAINTOP
Move right into this
beautiful 4 bedroom
home in desirable
Rockledge develop-
ment. Many
upgrades & fea-
tures including mod-
ern kitchen with
granite countertops,
22x20 great room,
2 fireplaces, new
paint, carpet, gor-
geous 2 tier deck
& much more.
$245,000. For more
information or to
schedule a viewing
please Call
570-242-5381
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#12-165
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Find a
newcar
online
at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
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570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
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in classified
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Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 17G
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
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or worry!
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with classified!
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1/2 DOUBLE
Great starter home
in nice area. Close
to schools and
recreation. Large 3
season porch with
cabinetry, great for
entertaining. New
plumbing, lots of
light & huge walk
up attic for storage
or rec room.
$38,500
Call CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is “high
and dry”, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$104,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
203 W. SOUTH ST
Well kept 6 room
brick front ranch, 3
bedrooms, modern
kitchen, separate
dining room, 1.5
modern baths, large
fenced level lot with
prIvate drive. all
appliances.
MLS 12-331
$115,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
PENDING
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
Adorable home with
charm & character.
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, eat-in kit-
chen, formal dining
room, family room
with gas fireplace.
3 season room,
fenced in yard with
rear deck & shed.
$119,000
MLS#12-498
Michael Nocera
570-357-4300
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5412
NEWPORT TWP.
Five bedroom
Contemporary has
a vaulted ceiling in
living room with
fireplace.
Hardwood floors in
dining & living
rooms. 1st floor
master bedroom
with walk in closet.
Lower level family
room. Deck,
garage, separate
laundry.
$257,500
MLS#12-170
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
PITTSTON
175 Oak Street
NEW FURNANCE
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 1st floor
laundry room, 3
season porch,
fenced yard and off
street parking.
MLS#12-721
$89,000
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
238 S. Main St.
Ten room home
with 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, 2 car
garage, great drive-
way, central air,
large yard. A must
see home!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-477
$139,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
Johnson St.
Great home, move
in ready, with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large yard
with lots of outdoor
living space. Hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, modern
eat in kitchen. New
gas furnace, roof
and windows. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-328
$139,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
PITTSTON
Price Reduced! Price Reduced!
168 Elizabeth Street
Sturdy ranch in Ore-
gon Section. 3/4
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Price $89,000.
Call Stephen
570-814-4183
PITTSTON
REDUCED
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bed-
room home with
2 full baths. 7
rooms on nice
lot with above
ground pool. 1
car garage. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$79,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$76,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$159,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
137 Hollywood Ave.
Beautiful 2 bed-
room Townhouse in
the River Ridge
neighborhood.
Modern kitchen/din-
ing area with tile
flooring, laundry
area on main floor.
Living room with
gas fireplace and
French doors lead-
ing to back deck.
MLS 12-1109
$164,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own “cabin
in the woods.”
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
Birchwood hills, 4
bedroom, 2.5 bath,
2 story family room
with fireplace, fin-
ished basement,
built in pool,
$399,900
(570)824-2471
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
MUST SEE!
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 6 car
garage, eat-in
kitchen, dining
room, large living
room, utility room,
gas fireplace,
oil/steam heat,
finished basement,
fully fenced,
screened deck.
$144,900.
570-606-6850
PLAINS TWP
20 NITTANY LANE
Vinyl sided 3 level
townhouse with
central air & vacu-
um, 4 baths, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 car
garage. Deck &
patio. A Must See!
$195,900
century21shgroup.
com
MLS 12-927
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$99,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLYMOUTH
Fixer upper on a
deep large lot, close
to everything. Home
offers off street
parking, 4 bed-
rooms, laundry
room and 1 full bath.
Brand new furnace
installed last year.
Great investment
opportunity here
don't pass it by this
house has lots of
potential. Seller
says bring all offers.
MLS 12-367
$30,000
Contact Tony,
570-855-2424 for
more information or
to schedule your
showing.
PLYMOUTH
Roomy 2 bedroom
single with eat-in
kitchen, tile bath,
gas heat & 2 car
detached garage.
Priced to sell at
$34,900
MLS 11-2653
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PLYMOUTH
This 4 bedroom 2
story has a full bath
on the 1st floor and
rough in for bath on
2nd floor. An
enclosed side patio
from the kitchen
dinette area & side
drive are a big plus.
MLS 12-553
Only $33,000
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
PRICE REDUCED
$425,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
12 Windy Drive
New construction in
the exclusive
Slocum Estates.
Stucco exterior. All
the finest appoint-
ments: office or 5th
bedroom, hard-
wood floors, crown
moldings, 9' ceil-
ings 1st & 2nd floor.
Buy now select
cabinetry & flooring.
MLS #11-1987
$525,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SUGARLOAF
Beautiful setting in a
fabulous location.
Well maintained 4
bedroom, 2.5 bath
home sits on a full
beautiful acre of
land. 3 car garage
with a breezeway,
first fl master bed-
room suite and a
great porch to sit
and relax on all
while enjoying your
new serene sur-
roundings.
MLS 12-392
$225,000
Call Tony
570-855-2424
SWEET VALLEY
5411 Main Road
Commercial zoned
property on busy
corner. Country
Colonial home with
detached 2 car
garage, with addi-
tional office space
and entrance door.
Perfect property for
home based busi-
ness. Eat in kitchen
with brick gas fire-
place, large dining
room and living
room with coal
stove. Finished
basement with 2
rooms & 1/2 bath.
Old fashioned root
cellar off the
kitchen. Large
paved parking area.
MLS 11-2554
$188,000
570-675-4400
SWEET VALLEY
Enjoy easy summer
living in this
adorable 2 bedroom
cottage with lake
rights located on
North Lake. Motivat-
ed Seller. $68,900
Shari Philmeck
ERA Brady
Associates
570-836-3848
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner. Call Bob at
570-654-1490
TAYLOR
Featured on
WNEP’s Home &
Backyard. Move
right into this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
immaculate home
with custom maple
eat in kitchen,
stainless steel
appliances, hard-
wood floors,
Jacuzzi tub, 2 fire-
places, abundance
of storage leading
outside to a private
sanctuary with
deck/pergola & Koi
pond. Off street
parking. MUST SEE.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-733
$189,900
Call Keri
570-885-5082
TUNKHANNOCK
Historic Tunkhan-
nock Borough.
Affordable 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath fami-
ly home with
detached garage.
All appliances and
many furnishings
included. $166,800.
Shari Philmeck
ERA Brady
Associates
570-836-3848
W. NANTICOKE
71 George Ave.
Nice house with
lots of potential.
Priced right. Great
for handy young
couple. Close to
just about every-
thing. Out of
flood zone.
MLS 12-195
$76,000
Call Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldn’t
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$64,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST PITTSTON
313 Race St.
This home
needs someone
to rebuild the
former finished
basement and
1st floor. Being
sold as is. 2nd
floor is move in
ready.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-255
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
A bargain at
$68,900
A f f o r d a b l e ,
Updated & Move
in Ready 3 Bed-
room, 2 Bath home
- entry foyer with
closet, large fully
applianced eat-in
kitchen with Corian
countertops & tile
floor, 1st floor laun-
dry complete with
washer & dryer;
hardwood floors in
some rooms, under
carpet in others,
large bedroom clos-
ets, quiet dead end
street.
MLS #12-361
Call Pat today @
Century 21 Smith
Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED
18 Atlantic Ave.
Large 2 story
home with 2
baths, attached
garage. Being
sold as-is. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4475
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
WEST WYOMING
REDUCED
550 Johnson St.
Nicely landscaped
corner lot sur-
rounds this brick
front Colonial in
desirable neighbor-
hood. This home
features a spacious
eat in kitchen, 4
bedrooms, 4 baths
including Master
bedroom with mas-
ter bath. 1st floor
laundry and finished
lower level. Enjoy
entertaining under
the covered patio
with hot tub, rear
deck for BBQ’s and
an above ground
pool. Economical
gas heat only $1224
per yr. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-157
$249,900
Call Michele
Reap
570-905-2336
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new apartment?
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you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING
Nice double block,
not in the flood area!
3 vehicle detached
garage, off-street
parking for 4 vehi-
cles, front & rear
porches, patio,
fenced yard, nice &
private. Home also
has central air, #410
is updated & in very
good condition,
modern kitchen &
bath. Kitchen has
oak cabinets, stain-
less steel refrigera-
tor, center aisle, half
bath on 1st floor &
4th bedroom on 3rd
floor. Both sides
have hardwood
floors on 2nd floor.
MLS#12-737
$175,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
WILKES-BARRE
115 Noble Lane
3 bedroom, 2 bath
end unit townhome
with finished lower
level. Natural gas
fireplace, 3 tiered
deck, newer roof,
cul de sac. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1006
$68,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Come invest your
time for a great
return. Fixer Upper
in a nice location,
nice neighborhood
out of the flood
zone. Offers 4 bed-
rooms and a beauti-
ful large lot. Don’t
miss out Call for
your showing today.
MLS 12-432
$29,900
Call / text Donna
Cain 570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
260 Brown Street
Move right into this
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath in very good
condition with mod-
ern kitchen and
bathrooms and a 3
season sunroom off
of the kitchen.
MLS 11-4244
$64,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
285 Blackman St
Great property.
Priced to sell quickly
and in move-in con-
dition! Easy access
to Interstate 81 &
shopping! 11-3215
$36,500
570-675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
298 Lehigh Street
Lovely 2 story with
new roof, furnace,
water heater, new
cabinets and appli-
ances. Whole house
newly insulated.
Nice deck and
fenced-in yard. Call
Chris at 570-885-
0900 for additional
info or to tour.
MLS 11-4505
$82,000
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
38 E. Thomas St.
Former St. Francis
Church. Sale
includes Church,
Rectory and 2
paved lots.
$130,000
MLS# 12-877
Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
WILKES-BARRE
40 Solomon Street
4 bedroom, 1 bath,
aluminum siding
with awnings, drive-
way with carport,
corner lot in quiet
neighborhood, low
taxes. $55,000.
570-824-7123
WILKES-BARRE
46 Bradford Street
SALE BY OWNER
OUT OF FLOOD
ZONE
Single, 3 Bedroom,
1 Bath. Newer roof,
windows & vinyl
siding. Gas heat, off
street parking with
extra lot. One way
street.
A Must See!
$69,900
Call 570-417-4884
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
54 PENN ST.
SALE BY OWNER
EAST END
BEAUTY
All lookers say the
house is gorgeous,
but too small. 1500
SF, but one of the 3
bedrooms is a pass
thru. Great for a den
or office. Eat in
kitchen and large
oak floor dining
room. Ceramic tile
master bath with
walk in linen. Laun-
dry and powder
room on first floor.
Large master bed-
room. Lots of closet
space. Gas heat,
concrete floor base-
ment. Private side
yard, wrap porch.
Safe neighborhood
out of the flood
zone. New concrete
driveway. Minutes
to the mall and
other shopping.
Nice view. Motivat-
ed seller, as I need a
smaller house. Will
consider trading for
a ranch style house
of equal value. New
price: $85,700. Call
570-970-8065
or email
aleta59@msn.com
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
77 Schuler St.
Newly renovated
with new windows,
door flooring, etc.
“Goose Island”
gem. Large home
with 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, screened
in porch overlook-
ing fenced in yard,
driveway, laminate
floors throughout.
Fresh paint, move
in condition. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-845
$99,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
Beautifully main-
tained double block
on large landscaped
lot. Newer roof and
windows, hard-
wood under carpet,
ceiling fans, plaster
walls and ample off
street parking. Live
in one side and let
rent from other side
help pay your mort-
gage. Must see!
$108,000
Call
CHRISTINE KUTZ
for details
570-332-8832
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, nice double
block at very attrac-
tive price. 750
square feet each
side. 2 bedrooms
per side. Separate
utilities. Quick show.
One side vacant.
Only $34,900, but
owner anxious to
sell and is listening
for reasonable
offers. May be best
2 unit for the price
around. Call today.
570-674-3120
day or night
Marilyn K. Snyder
Real Estate
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Just on the market
this 2 story offers a
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
1st floor laundry
plus 2/3 bedrooms
On 2nd floor.
Affordably priced at
$ 27,900
MLS 12-50
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
WILKES-BARRE
Large well main-
tained gas heated
multi-unit property.
2 apartments, air
conditioned office
suite, 3 car garage
with office area.
Close to General
Hospital. 11-1268
Price reduced to
$165,000
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Lovely home with
many upgrades,
new roof, win-
dows, flooring &
plumbing. Pool &
fenced yard. Home
features gas hot
water heat. Modern
kitchen, Living, din-
ing and family
rooms. large foyer,
Master Bedroom
with walk-in-closet.
2 car detached
garage with private
driveway.
MLS#12-467
$100,000
Call
Lynda Rowinski
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING
All brick ranch. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Large lower level
family room. 2 car
garage. Fenced
yard. Gas heat and
central a/c. Great
South Wilkes-Barre
location. 12-1045
$125,000
BESECKER REALTY
570-675-3611
WILKES-BARRE
Nicely remodeled
fully rented Duplex,
near schools, hospi-
tal, parks & bus
route. Separate utili-
ties and off street
parking. MLS 12-
599 $96,500.
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
T I M E S L E A D E R PAGE 18G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 19G
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
Patrick Deats Contractor
Back Mountain Lots Now Available!
Integrity • Quality • Value
Custom Home Builder
with over 25 years
experience in Luzerne
and Lackawanna Counties
570-696-1041
www.patrickdeats.com
Lot/Home Packages or Custom Homes on Your Lot
Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres
All Underground / Public Utilities
Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks
Rental / Lease Options Available
Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park
NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction
Alternative Energy Solutions
Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40,000
LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION
For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40 000
EVERY NEWHOME CONTRACT INCLUDES
HEATINGANDCOOLINGBILLS FOR
10YEARS
COUNTRYWOOD
ESTATES
EILEEN R. MELONE
Real Estate 821-7022
EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022
Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre
SHAVERTOWN MOUNTAINTOP
DALLAS DALLAS
AVOCA Great home in pretty neighborhood. Buy now & enjoy
the C/A, fenced yard & pool this summer! MLS# 12-881
TRACY 696-0723 or LORI 585-0627 $219,000
DUNMORE Remodeled 4BR Ranch home w/panoramic views of
the city. New carpet, new windows, new roof. Granite counters,
marble & HW foors, cathedral ceilings & 2 car garage. A must
see! MLS# 11-4558
TINA 714-9277 $315,000
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BR’s, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208. RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
DURYEA Beautiful 3BR home w/modern eat-in kitchen w/Island,
1st foor laundry room, FR w/gas FP, 2 full baths & 1 3/4 bath.
Finished LL w/FR & gas FP. 2 car garage. Fenced in lot. MLS#
12-1150 MATT 714-9229 $349,900
MOUNTAINTOP Located on a cul-de-sac with .9acres this home
boasts 3500SF. 3 freplaces, classic moldings, HW foors, gran-
ite, 2-5BRs. MLS# 12-1111
DAVID 970-1117 $324,975
FRANKLIN TWP. Stunning & immaculate 4BR, 4 bath tradition-
al set on 2.68 A. Cozy up to the warm FP & enjoy the breathtak-
ing views from French doors that lead to spacious decks. Enjoy
the great outdoors only 10 min from schools & shopping. Too
many amenities to mention. MLS# 11-1252
Shirley 714-9281 $469,900
DALLAS Recently remodeled, open foor plan, 1st foor MBR,
4BR, 3 bath, 2 car garage, in-ground pool, hot tub on 1+ acres.
MLS# 12-246
REBECCA D. 696-0885 $320,000
DUNMORE AVOCA
DURYEA MOUNTAINTOP FRANKLIN TWP.
SHAVERTOWN Spacious home. Wonderful fr plan & elegant
detail throughout. Fantastic 2 story great rm w/gas FP, great
kitchen, MSTR on 1st fr, 5BRs, 5 baths & great fnished LL w/
custom cabinetry. MLS# 11-3697
MARGY 696-0891 $425,000
MOUNTAINTOP Don’t miss this bright front brick home w/4BRs, 3
baths on tree lined landscaped lot. Ultra kitchen w/all appliances,
huge Island opens to deck, FP in FR. Lots of upgrades. Prime loca-
tion! MLS# 12-921 TERRY D. 715-9317 $284,900
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LARKSVILLE
DALLAS
DALLAS
KINGSTON
DALLAS Very spacious “Split Level” on approx. 1acre
w/ a beautiful view! Hardwood foors, pocket doors,
2.5 baths & fnished LL. MLS# 12-691 DEBORAH
ROCCOGRANDI 696-6671 $214,900
LARKSVILLE Larkmount Manor Bi-level w/4BR’s, 2
baths, newly fnished basement. Lg fenced yard. 2 car
garage. Home Warranty. MLS#12-1105
NANCY P 714-9240 $189,900
DALLAS Ranch home, 3BR, modern kitchen, large
FR, stone FP, HW foors, C/A, above-ground pool &
deck. MLS# 12-1149
SUSAN 696-0876 $119,900
KINGSTON Lovely 3BR, 1.1 bath 2 story. LR & DR;
modern eat-in kitchen w/all appliances, gas heat &
A/C; garage, screened porch, LL + attic ready to be
fnished. MLS# 12-479 RAE 714-9234 $149,900
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MOUNTAINTOP
Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop
Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story
model w/ lots of HW & tile. Gran-
ite counters in kit, MSTR Suite
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath
w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirl-
pool. Home/lot packages avail-
able. TERRY D. 715-9317
DALLAS
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ONLY 6 LOTS LEFT
Custom Homes by
Romanowski Homes
Spec Home offered at $525,000
Or
Have Romanowski Homes build your
Dream Home on any of these
6 remaining lots
Call Geri for details
Happy Easter!
ERA1.com
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
Mountaintop (570) 403-3000
*Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to: seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the home’s appraised value.
Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC.
©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
appraised value
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner
Accredited Buyer Representative
Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro
Graduate Realtors Institute
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
C bbased upon a ddisc dd asedd upo
Pure Indulgence... Luxury Condominums nestled in a
quiet corner of Northeast Pennsylvania
Two-story
Townhomes
• 1st floor master
• Formal Dining Room
• Eat-in Kitchen
• Loft
• Valuted Ceilings
• Front Porch
• Garage
• Garden Area
Watch this Community come to life by becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere has never been a
better time to join us…
Prices Starting in the $140s
Find us in our convenient Location: Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne
GLENMAURA
9 rooms, 4,500 SF, 4BR, luxury amenities,
Golfing community
$479,900 MLS#12-229
SUGARLOAF
Petite Farmette, split-level, wood stove,
new roof, 2 garages
$239,900 MLS#11-3966
DURYEA
Attention investors! Multi use property,
store front and 3 apartments.
$169,900 MLS#12-390
DURYEA
Multi-Family property has been completely
gutted and renovated.
$104,900 MLS#11-4228
MOUNTAINTOP
Polonia Estates 4BR, finished basement with
theater room
$369,000 MLS#11-2051
DURYEA
4BR, totally renovated home on a
lovely level corner lot.
$205,000 MLS#12-762
BUSHKILL
Saw Creek Estates contemporary home in
amenity filled community
$157,500 MLS#11-2746
WILKESBARRE
Renovated 3-unit, 3BR and 1BRs
Georgetown Wilkesbarre Township
$100,999 MLS#11-473
WILKESBARRE
2BR dollhouse, fireplace, new carpet, trek deck
with retractable awning
$69,000 MLS#12-26
DURYEA
Blueberry Hills home, granite kitchen,
family room w/ fireplace
$329,900 MLS#11-3974
SWOYERSVILLE
3BR bi-level, 2,200 SF, some appliances included
$189,900 MLS#12-1051
LAFLIN
Updated ranch, 4BR, French doors open to
large deck, finished LL
$149,500 MLS#11-3557
PLAINS
Double block, 3BR and 2BR, garage,
rental history - info available
$94,000 MLS#11-2398
PITTSTON
2-story home, eat-in kitchen, den, 3-season porch,
large yard, OSP
$67,500 MLS#11-4229
MOUNTAINTOP
New construction, 2,700 SF, 4BR
in Crestwood school district.
$299,000 MLS#12-163
DRUMS
Custom built Cedar Sided Chalet
in Beech Mountain Lakes
$182,500 MLS#11-4487
HANOVER
Easy living! 2BR, 2BA townhome in
Hanover School District
$93,000 MLS#12-967
EDWARDSVILLE
3BR, formal dining room w/ bay window,
eat-in kitchen
$59,900 MLS#12-706
MOUNTAINTOP
Alberdeen Acres home, near 7th hole of
Blue Ridge Golf Course
$269,000 MLS#11-3813
DUPONT
Brick home, wood floors, fireplace,
finished LL, in-ground pool
$175,900 MLS#11-4082
TOBYHANNA
4BR, fresh paint, living room fireplace,
large family room, rear deck
$139,900 MLS#10-4667
MULTIFAMILY
150 agents serving 12 counties from 8 offices
put the talent of ERA One Source Realty to work for you.
EARN A GOLD STAR!
On average our Gold Star Properties
spend 80% less time on the market
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
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IC
E!
(570) 474-9801
If you are buying or selling anywhere
in the county, I can help you!
Only if you call!
Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323 Jim Graham
Associate Broker
3BR End Unit Townhouse
w/9’ ceilings 1st foor, gran-
ite countertops in kitchen. 1st
foor MBR & bath. Very bright.
MLS#10-3180 $179,500
Stunning 3BR Bi-level! LR,
DR, eat-in kitchen, lower level
FR w/FP, 2 car garage, paved
drive. Move-in condition. Nice
yard & deck.
MLS#12-543 $189,000
WILKES-BARRE MOUNTAINTOP
(570) 288-9371
Rae Dziak
714-9234
rae@lewith-freeman.com
Pole 272 Pole 271
Totally Remodeled
Pole 265
Modern 3BR brick ranch,
4 acres, 105’ of lakefront,
oversized 2 car heated garage,
boathouse and dock, AC,
handicap accessible.
$595,000
Modern 3BR, 2 bath, 2,200
sq. ft. home. 50’ of lakefront,
modern kit. w/appl., AC, plus
finished dock w/entertaining
area, vaulted ceilings, FP and
half bath.
$595,000
Renovated 3BR, 2 bath 2 story,
cherry kit. w/all appls.,
25’ lakefront @ dock.
$299,000
Lakefront Homes at Harveys Lake
LOTS: NEW PRICE! 3 and 4 available - Beech Street,
wooded, Lake Lehman Schools $24,900
Barbara F. Metcalf
Associate Broker
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct
metcalf@epix.net Bar B bbbbara F. Metc t alf alf alf alf
oci k rrrr Ass A ociate Brokerrr
Barbara F. Metcalf
Associate Broker
Easter...
it’s what perfect love
looks like.
May your heart be filled with humble praise
as we celebrate God’s greatest gift.
He is risen!
69 N. MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA18708
199 Clearview Ave., Trucksville
$123,500
159 Terrace Ave., Trucksville
$179,900
4 BR Back Mountain Home
Modern 2 BR Cape Cod
4 BR Victorian, 5.2 Acres
3 BR Split Level Near Barney Farms
54 Church Road, Tunkhannock
Reduced! $224,500
4444444444 BR BR VV VVVVic ic ic cto to ori ri rian an a ,,,,,,,, 5. 555.2222 Ac AAAcre resss
48 Marjorie Ave., Wilkes-Barre
$154,900
I’m Sue Barre and I sell houses, and I can
SELL YOURS! (570) 696-5417
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
(570) 696-1195
We’re moving lots and this exclusive development
will sell out soon to a fortunate few!
Convenient to Wilkes-Barre with spectacular views
and 1 to 4.5 acre parcels.
16 - Estate sized sites on a private rolling hillside
between Hillside Road and Huntsville Reservoir,
Shavertown.
Public Sewer - Natural Gas
Another Quality Halbing – Amato Development
Expert Construction with attention to every detail
by Summit Pointe Builders – Your plan or ours!
Contact: Kevin Smith (570) 696-1195
Kevin.Smith@Century21.com Kevin.Smith@
Smith Hourigan Group
W ’ i l t d thi l i d l t
Exclusive Jackson Township Location Just Off Hillside Road
Homesites From $155,900
Ready for custom build by
Summit Pointe Builders
www.gordonlong.com
BLOOMINGDALE -
ROSS TOWNSHIP
10 Acre Farm field with
Country Views from
this Immaculate Ranch
Home, Ultra Modern
Kitchen, Oversized
Garage Listing #12-1067
All for $274,900
Call Cherub for details
570-762-4641
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
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PAGE 20G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
REASONS
MORE
8
©2012 BRER Afliates, Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo
and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions
worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Edmund H. Poggi, III
Broker/Owner
283-9100 ext. 25
1149 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
Phone: 570.283.9100
Fax: 570.283.9101
Two Ofces to Help Serve Our Customers Better!
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown
Phone: 570.696.2600
Fax: 570.696.0677
The Team That Gets Results!
If you’re thinking about making a change, think about teaming up with Prudential Poggi & Jones,
REALTORS. It’s a brand with more than a century of integrity and pride.
Online Power Like No Other Company!
Online Buyer Advantage, the Gateway for Buyers looking for a home.
Online Sellers Advantage, enables sellers to automatically receive real time updates.
Both available ONLY to Prudential Real Estate sales professionals!
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Prudential Real Estate and Relocation Services boasts the highest average home sale price among
independently owned brokerages.
Leveraging the Power of the Internet!
Prudential Real Estate Media Center, a powerful marketing tool for Prudential Real Estate
professionals. Customize and print materials with a click of a mouse.
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professionally designed eCards.
A Network Designed for Results!
Prudential Real Estate sales professionals are able to leverage robust tools, products and
highly effective programs that position them as undisputed market leaders.
PREA Center: A One-Stop Storehouse!
Everything you could possibly want is right at your fingertips. From affluent markets, education
opportunities to commercial real estate & more. It’s all there in one place. Available to all
Prudential Real Estate professionals.
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The University Learn Center provides courses that will help you gain the knowledge and skills to
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Thinking about making a change? Here are . . . .
Why you should consider Prudential Poggi & Jones
The Power of the Brand Can Work for You too!
Call for a confidential
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 21G
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
South
3 bedroom, 2 story,
with brick & stucco
siding. Beautiful
hardwood floors.
Semi - modern
kitchen. Finished
basement with fire-
place. Covered
back porch. Priced
to sell. $79,900.
MLS 11-2987
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Wilkes-Barre
Terrific family home
with lots to offer.
Large kitchen/dining
area. Family room,
rec room, enclosed
porch with knotty
pine & hot tub.
Separate screened
porch. All appli-
ances stay. Lovely
yard with many
perennial plantings,
a covered patio & 2
sheds.
$117,900
MLS # 11-4234
Cal570-715-7733
Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
Mountain
Top
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$65,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WILKES-BARRE
Nice home located
on a quiet street. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath
well kept & ready
for new owner. MLS
12-73. $55,000.
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Come take a look at
this value. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Sit
back & relax on the
rear deck of your
new home. MLS 12-
75. $42,500. Call/
text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WYOMING
DOUBLE BLOCK
Easily converts to
single home. New
roof, electric,
windows & 2 car
garage. Remod-
eled. 66 x 100 feet,
fenced lot,
$130,000.
570-693-2408
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WE BUY
HOMES!
Any Situation
570-956-2385
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
BEAR CREEK
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DUPONT
100 Lincoln St.
MULTI FAMILY
3 bedroom home
with attached
apartment and
beauty shop. Apart-
ment is rented. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-941
$82,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HUGHESTOWN
115 New St.
Office building
with over 2600
sq. ft. can be
divided for up to
3 tenants with
own central air
and utilities and
entrances. New
roof. 20-25
parking spots in
excellent condi-
tion.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-607
$249,900
Call Tom
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
KINGSTON
388 Schuyler Ave.
Well cared for
Duplex in great
location. 1st floor
has ne bathroom
and large kitchen,
2nd floor has all
new carpeting and
long term tenant.
Large lot and off
street parking for 2
cars. Separate fur-
naces and electrici-
ty, Make an offer!
MLS 12-1125
$119,000
Call Shelby
Watchilla
570-762-6969
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$149,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEASE SPACE
Kingston Wellness
Center / profession-
al offices.
-Modern Decor and
Loft Style Offices
-Four Lane Street
Frontage
-100+ Parking
-Established
Professional &
Wellness Businesses
On-Site
-Custom Leases
Available
-Triple Net
Spaces Available:
600SF, 1400SF,
2610SF, and
4300SF.
4300SF Warehouse
Space available
Built to Suit.
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
NANTICOKE
OPEN HOUSE
APRIL 7
1 - 3 PM
REDUCED
414 Front St.
Move right into this
modern office build-
ing featuring 4
offices, receptionist
office, large confer-
ence room, modern
kitchen, storage
room, full base-
ment, central air,
handicap access. 2
car garage and 5
additional off street
parking spaces.
This property is also
available for lease.
Lease price is
$675/mo + $675
security deposit.
Tenant pays all
utilities. Sells for
$85,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
5 Mountains
Realty
42 N. Main St.
Shickshinny, PA
570-542-2141
PITTSTON
166 Vine St.
Nice PPthree
family home in
good location,
fully occupied.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-220
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
PITTSTON
Rear 49 James
St.
Two 2 bedroom
apartments,
fully rented with
separate utili-
ties on a quiet
street. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-219
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
57 Carey Ave.
Good investment
property. 4 apart-
ments needing a lit-
tle TLC. Two 1 bed-
room apartments.
One 2 bedroom and
one 3 bedroom.
Separate water and
electric. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1026
$79,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
PRICE REDUCED!
$65,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
39 Wedgewood Dr.
Laurelbrook Estates
Lot featuring 3.22
acres with great
privacy on cul-de-
sac. Has been perc
tested and has
underground utili-
ties. 4 miles to PA
Turnpike entrance.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-114
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Line up a place to live
in classified!
DALLAS AREA
3 lots. 70 x 125.
City water and
sewer, gas avail-
able. $36,500
per lot.
570-675-5873
Earth
Conservancy
Land For Sale
61 +/- Acres
Nuangola - $99,000
46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$79,000
Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp.
3+/- Acres
11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
32 +/- Acres
Zoned R-3
See additional land
for sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
570-823-3445
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HARVEYS LAKE
2 ACRES
$35,000
WOODED LAND.
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
912 Lots & Acreage
HUGHESTOWN
Cleared lot in Stauf-
fer Heights. Ready
for your dream
home just in time
for Spring!
MLS 12-549
$32,500
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
Potter County:
11 acres near Keat-
ing Summit. Adjoins
state forest, wood-
ed, gently rolling,
electric, perc
approved, near
trout streams.
$51,500. Owner
financing. 800-668-
8679
MOOSIC
VACANT LAND
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
MOUNTAIN TOP
Beautiful 2.66 Acre
building lot/lake
view. Public sewer
& natural gas. Use
any builder!
Call Jim
for private showing.
$126,500.00
570-715-9323.
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAINTOP LAND
Level building lot.
1/2 acre, 100 ft
frontage, all utili-
ties including gas.
$42,900 Call
570-417-4177
Ready for
construction.
NEWPORT TOWNSHIP
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C. 2 lots
available.
100’ frontage
x 228’ deep.
Modular home
with basement
accepted.
Each lot $17,500.
Call
570-714-1296
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
To place your
ad call...829-7130
SHAVERTOWN LAND
Harford Ave.
4 buildable residen-
tial lots for sale indi-
vidually or take all
4! Buyer to confirm
water and sewer
with zoning officer.
Directions: R. on
E. Franklin, R. on
Lawn to L. on
Harford.
$22,500 per lot
Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SHICKSHINNY
Level *7.5 acres*
building lot with a
mountain view.
Great for horses or
organic farming.
MLS 12-306
$59,000
570-675-4400
WYOMING
FIRST ST.
4 building lots each
measuring 68x102
with public utilities.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-439
$39,900 EACH
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
915 Manufactured
Homes
EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE
(Formerly Pocono
Park) and San Souci
Park. Like new, sev-
eral to choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
915 Manufactured
Homes
HUNLOCK CREEK
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 2 bath double
wide in quiet coun-
try setting. $20,000.
Financing available
Call 717-439-7716
MOUNTAIN TOP
Valley Stream Park
24 x 48. 3 Bedroom
2 bath double wide
Skyline 2001.
$20,000. Serious
Inquiries only
Please, do not
waste my time.
570-406-7318
927 Vacation
Locations
Virginia Seaside
Lots: Absolute buy
of a lifetime! Fully
improved 3 acre
lots, exclusive
development on the
seaside (the main-
land) overlooking
Chincoteague Bay
and islands. Gated
entrance, paved
roads, caretaker,
community dock,
pool and club house
including owners
guest suites. Build
the house of your
dreams! Unique
bank foreclosure
situation makes
these lots available
at 1/3 of original
cost. Great climate,
low taxes and
National Seashore
beaches nearby.
Only $49,000 each
or pond lots
$65,000. Tel. (757)
824-5284 website:
http://ViewWeb-
Page.com/5EUO or
email:oceanland
trust@yahoo.com
938 Apartments/
Furnished
PLYMOUTH
FURNISHED
APARTMENT
Available immedi-
ately, refrigerator
and stove provid-
ed, off-street park-
ing, no pets, utili-
ties all paid, Call
(570) 881-0636
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
ŠShort or long term
ŠExcellent
Neighborhood
ŠPrivate Tenant
Parking
Š$500 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
2nd floor,
1 bedroom, living
room, dining room,
off-street parking,
yard. Washer /
dryer hookup.
Gas heat included.
$550.
Call 570-991-1883
ASHLEY
Available Now
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. Off street
parking. Washer
dryer hookup. Appli-
ances. Bus stop at
the door. Water
Included.$575 + util-
ities & security. No
pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
CHASE
1ST FLOOR
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom, off-
street parking, no
pets, $500/month,
plus utilities.
570-696-5602
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
DURYEA/PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, gas
heat, washer &
dryer hookup, tile
kitchen & bath.
Large yard. $545 +
utilities, security &
references. Call
570-840-4534
EXETER
1 BEDROOM. $450.
Newly remodeled,
off street parking.
570-602-0758
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
850 SQ. FT.
2nd Story apart-
ment for rent.
1086 Wyoming Ave
Apt A
1 Bedroom/1Bath/
Living room/full
Kitchen.
New exterior
doors with locks.
Cleaned before
showing. Private
off street parking
space included.
Right on Wyoming
Ave in the middle
of town. Great
Area. $475 a
month. Water and
Sewer included.
you just pay
electrical and your
garbage sticker.
Call Charlie at
570-760-7504
for showings
and details.
EXETER
First floor,
1 bedroom.
Freshly painted,
washer/dryer
hook-up. $425/
month + utilities.
Security required.
NO PETS.
570-477-6018
leave message.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. Stove &
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer hook up.
No pets. $475 +
security & utilities
Call 570-822-7657
HANOVER TWP.
30 Garrahan St.
QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR
UNIVERSITIES
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, off street
parking & quiet back
yard. $650/month
heat & water includ-
ed. security & refer-
ences required.
Call Rich @
570-542-7620
HANOVER TWP.
Beautiful 2 bed-
room second floor
apartment with
modern kitchen,
refinished hard-
wood floors
throughout, gas
heat, 1 car garage.
$575/month + secu-
rity. All utilities by
tenant. Call Lynda
570-262-1196
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HARDING
Renovated 1st floor,
2 bedroom apart-
ment. New carpet-
ing and paint. Fridge
& stove. Water
Included. $600 +
security & utilities.
Call 570-240-6620
or 570-388-6503
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
Located in quiet
neighborhood. Kit-
chen, living room,
dining room, sun
room, bathroom. 2
large and 1 small
bedroom, lots of
closets, built in linen,
built in hutch, hard-
wood floors, fire-
place, storage room,
yard. New washer/
dryer, stove & fridge.
Heat and hot water
included. 1 year lease
+ security. $950
570-406-1411
KINGSTON
Beautiful 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, mod-
ern kitchen with
appliances, large
dining & living
rooms, central air,
decks, ample park-
ing. No pets. $595
per month.
570-696-1866
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,200
monthly plus util-
ities. No pets. No
smoking. Call
570-472-1110
KINGSTON DUPLEX
Beautiful 1st floor. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
5 rooms. Conve-
nient residential
location. Hardwood
floors, natural wood
-work, French
doors, laundry with
washer & dryer
included. Refrigera-
tor, gas range, dish-
washer, oak cabi-
nets, off street
parking, fenced in
back yard, storage.
Available May 1.
$695 + utilities &
security.
570-690-0633
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpeted,
security system.
Garage. Extra stor-
age & cable TV
included. Laundry
facilities. Air Con-
ditioned. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $765 +
utilities. Call.
570-287-0900
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
PARK PLACE
Beautiful area.
2nd floor 4 room.
Kitchen with wash-
er/dryer, stove, and
refrigerator. Heat,
water, and electric
included. $760 a
month. Call Jim:
570-288-3375
KINGSTON
Two 1 bedroom &
two 2 bedroom
apartments avail-
able in a renovated
building with OSP.
Great location within
walking distance to
shopping & restau-
rants. 1 year lease,
1st month rent,
credit check &
security required.
No pets. Utilities by
tenant. 1 bedroom -
$550/month, 2 bed-
room $650/month.
Call Nicole
570-474-6307 or
570-715-7757
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, appliances,
laundry room. $465
+ electric. Security
& references.
570-696-1600
LARKSVILLE
2 bedroom, 1 bath.
All New
Off Street Parking
Dining Room or
Office
Brand New
Hardwood Floors
& Tile Floors
Dishwasher, Wash-
er/Dryer Hookup
$725. + utilities
Double Security
BOVO Rentals
570-328-9984
Visit Us
LARKSVILLE
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Cute and clean 2
bedroom, off street
parking, w/d
hookup, eat in
kitchen. Immacu-
late. $435 + utilities.
1 mo. security. NO
DOGS 845-386-1011
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin
laundry, water,
sewer & garbage
included. $495/
month + security
& lease. HUD
accepted. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
Ultra clean, safe and
private. 1.5 bed-
rooms, 2nd floor. All
appliances. Wall to
wall. No pets. Non
smoking. $465 +
utilities, lease &
security. Call
570-288-9735
Midtowne
Apartments
100 E. 6th
Street,
Wyoming PA
18644
Housing for
Extremely Low &
Very Low Income
Elderly,
Handicapped &
Disabled.
570-693-4256
ALL UTILITIES
INCLUDED
Rents based on
income.
Managed by EEI
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
NANTICOKE
1st floor 1 bedroom
apartment with
detached garage in
a great location.
Hardwood floors.
Appliances includ-
ed. Shared washer /
dryer. Large yard.
Landlord pays heat,
water, WVSA &
Garbage. Tenants
responsible for
electric, cable &
phone. $800 + secu-
rity & references.
570-371-3271
NANTICOKE
1st floor. 1 bed-
room. ALL UTILI-
TIES INCLUDED!
Off street parking.
Fresh paint.
NO PETS
$525 + security
570-477-6018
leave message
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking, $495
per month+ utilities,
security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
NANTICOKE
Honeypot Section
2nd floor, 3 room
apartment. Nice
neighborhood. $400
+ utilities & security.
No pets. Call
570-885-6878
NANTICOKE
LARGE EFFICIENCY.
New carpeting,
clean. Garbage
Included. $350 +
utilities, security &
references.
Call 570-815-2265
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
Eat-in kitchen, living
room, full bath,
stove/fridge, wash-
er/dryer, $475 + util-
ities. No Pets. Call
570-760-3637 or
570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Spacious 1 bed-
room 1st floor. New
carpeting, gas
range and fridge
included. Garage
parking, no dogs.
References and
security required.
$450/mo. Water,
sewer, garbage fee
incl. Tenant pays
gas and electric
570-696-3596
PARSONS SECTION
46 Govier St.
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, W/D hookup,
fridge & stove. Off
street parking
water included.
freshly painted
$525/mo + utilities,
lease & security
No pets.
570-328-1875
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apart-
ment, 2nd floor.
Includes heat,
water, sewer, trash,
fridge, range &
washer/dryer hook-
up. $575 month plus
$575 month security
deposit.
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
Rothstein Realtors
570-288-7594
PITTSTON
2 or 3 bedroom, 1st
floor, full kitchen.
Heat included, no
pets. $650 + 1
month security. Call
570-451-1038
PITTSTON
3 bedroom. Living
room, kitchen, 1
bath. Off street
parking, on site
laundry, enclosed
porch, fenced yard.
$695/mo + utilities.
Security required.
Call
(570) 881-1747
PITTSTON
SINGLE DELUXE
APARTMENT
2 large bedrooms
over two car heated
garage. Wall to wall
carpet, large kit-
chen & living room,
1.5 baths. Master
bath has shower &
whirlpool tub, cus-
tom vanities & tile.
Gas heat, central
vacuum & air, all
appliances. Sun-
deck off kitchen.
$950/month, plus
utilities, & security.
No pets.
570-654-1621 or
570-654-6720
PLAINS
MODERN 1ST FLOOR
2 bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location.
Washer/dryer hook-
up. No smoking. No
pets. $550 + utili-
ties.
570-714-9234
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PLAINS
Newly remodeled, 2
bedroom. Living
room, dining room,
eat in kitchen, stove
w/d hookup. Heat,
water, sewer
included. No smok-
ing or pets.
$625/month, secu-
rity and references.
570-905-0186
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath, $525/
month + utilities &
security. No pets.
570-417-3427
SCRANTON
Green Ridge Area
Modern, nice,
clean. Fresh paint,
new carpet. 3 bed-
rooms (1 small)
living room, kitchen,
bath, & laundry
room. $575,
includes sewer.
No pets.
570-344-3608 or
973-541-0686
SHAVERTOWN
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, 1.5 baths,
refrigerator, stove &
microwave. wash-
er/dryer, off-street
parking, no pets,
$750/month, utilities
and wi-fi included.
No smoking. Avail-
able May 1st.
570-905-6865
WEST PITTSTON
Newly renovated,
charming & spa-
cious 1st floor, 2
bedroom apart-
ment. Off street
parking. $760. Heat
/hot water included.
570-881-0546
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST SIDE
1 bedroom, appli-
ances.W/D hook-
up, carpet, deck,
parking. Trash &
sewer included. No
smoking, no pets.
$440 + Security
and lease
Call 570-693-2586
WEST WYOMING
1st floor, 1 bed-
room, $450 per
month + utilities.
No pets, no smok-
ing. Call
570-693-1000
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
New 1st floor, 2
bedroom with off
street parking,
washer/dryer hook
up, stove. No pets.
$550/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WEST WYOMING
Spacious 2nd floor,
6 room, 2 bedroom
apartment, heat,
water & sewer
furnished, 1 bath,
off-street parking,
no pets, $600/
month + security &
references Call
570-288-9831
after 5 pm.
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
155 W. River St.
1 bedroom, some
appliances included,
all utilities included
except electric,
hardwood floors,
Pet friendly. $600.
570-969-9268
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 2nd
floor apartment, off
street parking,
washer & dryer
hookup, no pets.
$550 + security &
utilities. Call
570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
Cozy 1 bedroom,
with living room,
kitchen and private
porch in the East
End. Refrigerator,
stove & water pro-
vided. Great closet
space, no pets, 1
month security &
references
required. $450 +
electric.
570 301-7723
WILKES-BARRE
HUGE, modern effi-
ciency, includes all
new appliances & all
utilities. $725/month
+ security.
Call 570-574-3065
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 +
tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower Section
1 bedroom apart-
ment available. Nice
Area. Stove, fridge,
heat & hot water
included. Storage.
No pets. Call
570-823-7587
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 22G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
Each apartment features:
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NOW LEASING!
Leasing Office located at:
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T. (o/O¦ 28/.9998 | TTO. (8OO¦ o4o.1888 /O4O
*income restrictions apply
For seniors age 62+ or disabled according to social security guidelines
Spring into
your own space
We offer a panoramic
view of the Valley
Now accepting
applicants for a limited
number of available
Apartments.
Featuring:
Private entrances!
New kitchens!
24-hour emergency
maintenance!
On-site laundry!
Close to shopping,
schools and public
transportation!
Visit us today
517 Roosevelt St.
Edwardsville, PA 18704
570-287-8886
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
Fire damaged
former restaurant tavern w/apt,
garage & parking lot. MLS#11-4410
JULIO ACOSTA 239-6408
Former Tavern w/2 apts. No
liquor license. Needs work. Add’l lot for OSP.
MLS#12-421
JULIO 714-9252 or ANDY 714-9225
Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2
BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned
Community Business. MLS#11-4416
MATT 714-9229
900 SF Commercial space on
1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr.
Billboard also available to rent on bldg.
MLS#10-4309
TINA 714-9251
Large 8000 SF building looking
for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial.
MLS#11-4058
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117
Excellent opportunity-
Established Restaurant for sale in busy
shop ctr. Business only. MLS#11-2782
PAT G 788-7514
6000+ SF former furniture
store, plus apt. & lots more space. High
traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport.
MLS#11-3865
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
Multi-Purpose Bldg -
Convenient location on State St - Adjacent lot
available. MLS#10-4590
MARGY 696-0891 or MIKE J 970-1100
Unique bldg currently used
as single residence. May be converted to
suit your needs (w/zoning approval).
MLS#12-844
DAVID 970-1117
Nicely maintained offices
& garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great
for many uses. Near highways. MLS#11-
4561
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Auto repair & body
shop w/state certified paint booth.
2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842
ANDY 714-9225
Great corner property.
Ranch style home includes 2990SF
Commercial space. MLS#11-459
LISA 715-9335
Prime commercial
storefront + 3 spacious Apts.
Parking lot in rear. MLS#12-687
DONNA S 788-7504
Currently business on 1st
flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear
w/storage. Owner financing or lease
purchase available. MLS#11-4015
ANDY 714-9225
High traffic Route 11
w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, &
Apt above. MLS#11-2106
ANITA REBER 788-7501
Established turn-key
restaurant w/2 apts. Business &
building priced to sell! MLS#11-130
ANDY 714-9225
Great location for professional
office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3.
Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362
TINA 714-9251
3 BR, Ranch w/gar+
attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal
for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367
RAE 714-9234
Prime location -
ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape
Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229
RAE 714-9234
Brick & block prime office bldg.
Includes professional office space +
restaurant. MLS#12-366
GERALD PALERMO 788-7509
Charming 2-family farmhouse on
8.72 acres + detached garage &
separate ranch style home. MLS#12-757
DONNA S 788-7504
Wonderful opportunity for
commercial bldg w/ice cream stand,
storefront & apt. Also storage bldg.
MLS#12-370
CORINE 715-9321
4 Sty brick office bldg, more
than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots
included for pkg. MLS#11-1045
ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891
Established restaurant/bar.
Equip & liquor license included + 3 Apts.
MLS#11-3896
MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119
Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg.
Prime location/high traffic area. Add’l pkg
available. 1st flr office/commercial space &
2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
High traffic location. 2900 SF
professional office space w/basement
storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12-
416
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
5700 SF in Prime downtown
location. Suitable for office/residence. Full
basement, private parking, Zoned C3.
MLS#11-345
MARGY 696-0891
Retail, Office, Medical -
Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can
accommadate it! Parking for 10. MLS#12-
276
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Outstanding brick
bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars.
MLS#08-2790
PEG 714-9247
Lg Commercial warehouse &
office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner
financing or lease purchase available.
MLS#11-4014
ANDY 714-9225
Turnkey restaurant/bar.
Liquor license & inventory included + 3 Apts.
MLS#11-3895
MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119
Commercial - Vacant Land -
Perfect downtown corner location near Coal
Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12-
181
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
3.895 Acres on W-B Blvd-
700 front feet provides excellent exposure.
Utilities, access road, possible KOZ
opportunity. MLS#11-1346
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Commercial opportunity awaits
your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices.
2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres.
MLS#10-1110
JUDY 714-9230
Prime location - former
Convention Hall. Wonderful opportunity for
professional offices. Pkg for 100+ cars.
Zoned Hwy Business. MLS#11-3654
MARGY SIMMS 696-0891
32,000SF,
30+ parking, including trailer spaces
MLS#08-1305
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Join the other Professionals at
this Class A Office Bldg w/Atrium. 4000SF
available. Can be divided. MLS#11-2162
JUDY RICE 714-9230
1st floor modern office
space w/private restroom. OSP &
handicap access. MLS#12-621
MATT 714-9229
Prime Location -
1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09-
3085
MARGY 696-0891
Lease this building
w/nice offices, conference room & Kit.
Ample parking. MLS#11-419
JUDY 714-9230
Highly visible commercial
space on busy blvd, across from Wegman’s
& Price Chopper. Plenty of pkg. MLS#12-316
TERRY ECKERT 696-0843
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH WELLES ST.
Available Now.
2 bedrooms, 1st
floor. New paint &
carpet, heat, hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
$635 + security.
Pets OK with
approval.
Section 8 Welcome.
570-589-9767
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Wilkes-University
Campus
Studio, 1, 2, 3 & 4
bedroom. Starting
at $425. All utilities
included. Call
570-826-1934
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE TWP
3 bedroom. Includes
heat, all appliances,
washer / dryer, off
street parking, back
yard. $725 + security.
570-704-8134
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WYOMING
1 bedroom 2nd floor
at $625/month. Off
street parking. Non
smoking. No pets.
Bonus walk up attic
with tons of stor-
age. Heat, water,
garbage, sewer
included. 1 month
security, credit
check & references.
1 year lease.
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WYOMING
AVAILABLE MAY 1
2nd floor. Bright &
cheery. One bed-
room. Quiet build-
ing & neighborhood.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, heat,
water, sewer &
trash. No
smoking. No pets.
Security, references
& credit check.
$595/month
Call (570) 609-5133
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Commercial Lease
Courtdale location
Ideal for:
Veterinarian Office
Manufacturing /
Industrial Space
Storage Space
1000 SF - 5000 SF
Space Available.
5000 SF Warehouse
Space with loading
docks, office, heat,
and plumbing. $3.60
- $12 sf/yr + NNN,
lease negotiable.
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,000 &
3,800 Sq. Ft.
WILL DIVIDE
OFFICE / RETAIL
Call 570-829-1206
KINGSTON
OFFICE SPACE
2nd floor. Up to
1,000 sq. ft. open
space. Call
570-696-1600
OFFICE SPACE
PLAINS
Total space 30,000
sf. Build to suit. Per-
fect for Doctors
suite, day care, etc.
High visibility. Lots of
parking. Rent starting
$10/sf. MLS 11-4200
Call Nancy or Holly
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
OFFICE/RETAIL
BLOOMSBURG
150 East 9th Street,
3891 square feet.
Newly remodeled.
Offices, conference
area, large open
area, energy effi-
cient & parking.
Call 570-387-3300
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON
5,000 sq. ft. No
loading dock. Off
street parking.
$550 mo. + utilities
570-540-0746
944 Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
OFFICE SPACE
Attractive modern
office space. 2
suites available.
Suite A-4 offices,
plus restroom and
storage includes
utilities, 700 sq. ft.
$650/month
Suite B-2, large
offices, 2 average
size offices, plus
restroom and stor-
age plus utilities,
1,160 sq. ft.
$1000/month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
RETAIL BUILDING
WILKES-BARRE TWP
12,000 sf. Route
309. Exit 165 off I81.
570-823-1719
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WILKES-BARRE
518 N. Main St.
Approximately 1000
sq. ft. Large glass
storefront, formerly
used as floral shop.
Priced right at
$350/mo., water
incl. Tenant pays
gas & electric
570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
GREAT LOCATION!
Close to all
Major Highways
Commercial space
for lease. 21,600
sq. ft. Distribution/
Warehouse/Retail
/Offices, etc +
large 80,000 sq.
ft. parking lot
fenced in with
automatic dusk to
dawn lighting sys-
tem. Will divide.
570-822-2021.
Ask for
Betty or Dave
947 Garages
COMMERCIAL
GARAGE SPACE
Kingston. 1,250 sf.
Excellent for
mechanic or ship-
ping & receiving.
Separate over
head and entrance
doors. Gas Heat.
Easy Access.
$450 + security &
references.
570-706-5628
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
1 locking garage/
storage unit for rent.
13’x15’. $55/month.
No electric.
Call 570-357-1138
947 Garages
WILKES-BARRE
GARAGE FOR RENT
Large 43x63
garage with high
overhead door.
Contractors,
delivery truck
routes, etc. who
need good size
garage. Also for
storage / vehi-
cles. Located
near W.B. Gener-
al on Chestnut St.
Electrical. $650
per month. Call
night or day.
570-674-3120
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
950 Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
44 Wesley St
3 bedrooms. Finished
attic. Living room /
dining room. All
appliances including
1st floor washer /
dryer. Off street
parking. $850 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-650-0010
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TWP.
$650/month, 2
bedroom, 1 bath,
living dining room
& eat in kitchen.
Appliances, wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Off street parking.
Water, sewer &
recyclables
included. Securi-
ty, references &
credit check.
No pets.
570-824-3223
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
1st floor duplex,
New w/w carpeting
& hardwood floors.
Convenient to
Wyoming Ave.
Washer/dryer hook-
up, basement stor-
age. Reduced!
$540/month
+ utilities, security,
lease & NO PETS.
570-793-6294
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
TOWNSHIP
Available immedi-
ately. 2 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, back-
yard, front porch,
large kitchen, $570
per month, Call
570-332-5723
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LUZERNE
2 bedrooms, off
street parking, stove
& refrigerator, wash-
er / dryer. No pets.
Non smoking. $450 +
utilities, security &
references. Call
Mark 570-262-2896
NANTICOKE
Large 1/2 Double, 3
bedrooms, large
kitchen, fenced in
yard. $550 per
month + utilities.
Garbage & mainte-
nance fees includ-
ed. No Pets, 1
month security
deposit. Refer-
ences. Available
May 1st. 477-1415
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 PAGE 23G
950 Half Doubles
PLAINS
2 bedroom, modern
quiet, w/w, w/d
hookup, gas heat.
$500. No pets.
Security & lease.
570-332-1216
570-592-1328
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
“Must See!”
$850 + utilities,
lease & security. NO
PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
WEST WYOMING
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator &
stove, washer/
dryer hookup. Nice
yard. $500/month +
utilities by tenant.
Security &
references
570-693-7535
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
Nice, spacious 4
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
half double. Close to
schools, Wilkes U &
downtown Wilkes-
Barre. Eat in
kitchen. Rear handi-
cap ramp. 2nd floor
laundry hook-up.
Full basement. Off
street parking. $850
+ utilities. Call
570-793-9449
953Houses for Rent
ALDEN ALDEN
Large single family
home. 4 bedrooms,
1.5 bath, huge family
room & fenced yard,
off street parking,
pets OK on
approval. $1000 +
security. Tenant
pays utilities. Call
570-592-7918
DALLAS
Gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Quiet 55
plus community. No
Pets. $1675/mo +
utilities & security.
Monthly mainte-
nance fee included.
570-592-3023
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,000 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
EDWARDSVILLE
150 Green St.
Newly remodeled
ranch, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths.
Handicap
accessible. Corner
lot with nice yard.
$1100. monthly
plus own utilities
(570) 283-0587
HANOVER TWP
Modern 3 bedroom.
1 1/2 bath. Driveway.
Gas heat. Lease. No
pets. No smoking.
$725 + utilities. Call
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
HARVEYS LAKE
2 small bedrooms,
All appliances. New
wall to wall. Secu-
rity & first
month’s rent.
NO PETS.
570-762-6792
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
PITTSTON
Newly remodeled
single family Ranch
home. Excellent
condition with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths. Hardwood
floors, granite
counter tops, cen-
tral air, garage,
driveway, full base-
ment. No pets or
smoking. Garbage
& maintenance
included. Utilities
not included.
$1200/mo. Contact
Pat 570-237-0425
953Houses for Rent
PLYMOUTH
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths. Gas heat.
Carpeted. Off street
parking. $800 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-430-7901
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Full kitchen, wash-
er/dryer hookup,
off-street parking,
no pets. $675/
month, plus utilities
& security. Call
570-760-8116
WILKES-BARRE
3-4 bedroom
house, yard.
Section 8
welcomed. $650
+ utilities & security.
570-735-2285
WILKES-BARRE
One 3 bedroom
$700
One 3 Bedroom
$625
One 2 bedroom
$585
Plus all utilities Ref-
erences & security.
No pets.
570-766-1881
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
NEEDED: St r ong
Female willing to
care for disabled
woman in exchange
for Room / Board
and $200 monthly
spending money.
Call 570-822-2051
WILKES-BARRE
Furnished room for
rent. Close to down-
town. $90/week +
security. Everything
included. Call
570-704-8288
965 Roommate
Wanted
Female roommate
wanted. 2nd floor of
house, 1.5 rooms, all
utilities included.
$400/month.
Call 570-212-2594
MOUNTAIN TOP
Male homeowner
looking for responsi-
ble male roommate
to share house.
Minutes away from
Industrial Park. Off
street parking. Plen-
ty of storage. Fur-
nished room. Large
basement with bil-
liards and air hock-
ey. All utilities includ-
ed. $425. Call Doug
570-817-2990
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
NANTICOKE
2 Males looking for
3rd roommate to
share 3 bedroom
apartment.
$85 / week. Call
570-735-8015
WILKES-BARRE
To share 3 bed-
room apartment. All
utilities included.
$300/month
570-212-8332
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Summer
Home. Weekly and/
or Monthly. Starting
June to end of
August. Washer &
dryer. Free boat
slips. Call for more
details.
570-639-5041
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
LAKE SALE, NY: 2.5
acres on West Bass
Pond $19,900. 10
acres lake peninsu-
la, 2300’ waterfront
$59,900. 8 acre
waterfront home
$119,900.
www.LandFirstNY.c
om 1-888-683-2626
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
974 Wanted to Rent
Real Estate
WILKES-BARRE
& Surrounding
Areas
Seeking a Ranch
Home. 3+ bed-
rooms. 1 1/2 baths
or more. Call Jean
570-829-3477
ext. 152
More than
172,000mobile
readers per month.
Advertise your business on
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Call 970-7101
timesleader.com
PAGE 24G SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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1
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9%
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FREE STATE INSPECTION AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE CAR!
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000
allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments
subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices
are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only.
Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends APRIL 30, 2012.