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002

copyright notice

COPYRIGHT NOTICE The computer program and its associated documentation and materials are protected by National and International Copyright Laws. Storage of the computer program and its associated documentation and materials in a retrieval system, reproduction, translation, copying, hiring, lending, broadcasting and public performance are prohibited without the express written permission of Rage Software PLC. All rights of the author and owner are reserved world-wide. Publisher: Rage Games Ltd., Martins Bank Building, Water Street, Liverpool, L2 3SP Developer: Rage Games Ltd., 84 Sankey Street, Warrington, WA1 1SF. Technical support: UK. Telephone 0121 4528405. DATA VALIDITY All data for Eurofighter Typhoon have been secured from public sources. Rage Software stress that all simulated elements are our interpretation of the facts, and are intended for entertainment purposes only. Because the real aircraft is still in development, some of the systems represented in the game may not be associated with the real plane. Any trade names or trademarks are the exclusive property of the respective manufacturers. CAUTION! The CD-ROM that holds Eurofighter Typhoon can be damaged by mishandling. EPILEPSY WARNING! READ THIS BEFORE PLAYING EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON A very small percentage of individuals may experience epileptic seizures when exposed to certain light patterns or flashing lights. Exposure to certain light patterns of backgrounds on a television screen or while playing computer games may induce an epileptic seizure in these individuals. Certain conditions may induce undetected epileptic symptoms in persons who have no history of prior seizures of epilepsy. If you, or anyone in your family, has an epileptic condition, consult your doctor prior to playing. If you experience any of the following symptoms while playing the game: dizziness, altered vision, eye or muscle twitches, loss of awareness, disorientation, any involuntary movement, or convulsions, IMMEDIATELY discontinue use and consult your doctor before resuming play. PACK CONTENTS Accompanying the manual inside this box, you will find one CD-ROM and a guarantee card. Please remember to return your guarantee card, and fill in the questions. This gives us clues for developing the products you want in the future.

CONTENTS
FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . minimum system specification . . . . . . . . installing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . uninstalling eurofighter typhoon . . . . running the configuration program . . . before you start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . QUICK GAME KEYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE GAME KEYS IN FULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . interface shortcut keys . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STARTING THE GAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . how to log-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . start in peacetime or wartime? . . . . . . . training missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pilot selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pilot profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . editing call signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . top gun awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . once you are in the game . . . . . . . . . . . discipline and compassion . . . . . . . . . . . THE CONTROL BARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the pilot control bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pilot status icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . smartcam intelligent viewing system observer mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

003

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011 013 013 013 013 014 014 015 016 018 019 020 020 020 022 022 023 025 025 028 028 029 029 030 030 032 032

004

CONTENTS

THE CONTROL BARS Continued

the game control bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . game control bar icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . game options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the tactical map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . planning missions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . flight roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mission types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . transferring personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . interpreting reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SINGLE PLAYER GAME: FIGHTING A CAMPAIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . the invasion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the air war . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the ground war . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . saving and loading campaigns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . saving a campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . loading a campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . icefor aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . russian aircraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE SECRET OF TYPHOONS DYNAMIC CAMPAIGN . . . . . . . . . . MULTIPLAYER GAMES: SOLO AND TEAM PLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . the multiplayer interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hosting a game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . finding your ip address when hosting tcp/ip games choosing the game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . join a game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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032 032 033 034 035 039 038 043 043 045 045 045 045 046 046 046 047 047 047 048 050 050 051 051 051 052

CONTENTS
MULTIPLAYER GAMES Continued

005

choose team colour and join game . . multiplay games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . head-to-head king of the skies . . . . . team king of the skies . . . . . . . . . . . . head-to-head touch and go . . . . . . . . team touch and go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . head-to-head racer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . team typhoon racer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . co-operative missions . . . . . . . . . . . . COMMUNICATIONS SET-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . serial or parallel cables . . . . . . . . . . . . modem to modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT . . . . . . . the multifunction displays (mfds) . . . . . . the hud and hmd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hud declutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hud components: pitch ladder & vicinity terprom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . compass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . airspeed indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . altimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . weapons indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . g indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . airbrake indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . target indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . hud symbology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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052 053 053 053 053 053 053 053 053 054 054 054 055 055 055 056 056 056 057 057 057 057 058 058 058 058

006

CONTENTS

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT Continued

advanced hud components . . . energy management display radio frequency display . . complex waypoint display . USING THE VIEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . full virtual cockpit . . . . . . . . hud only view . . . . . . . . . . . . . internal padlock views . . . . . . external padlock views . . . . . . moveable external view . . . . . looped fly-by view . . . . . . . . . . weapon view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . target view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . smartviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . zoom views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LEARNING BASIC FLYING SKILLS . . . . . take off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . using the brakes . . . . . . . . . . . climbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . basic manoeuvring . . . . . . . . . descending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . turning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . final approach and landing . . navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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059 059 059 059 060 060 060 060 060 060 060 061 061 061 061 062 062 062 062 062 062 062 063 063

CONTENTS
COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS . . . . . . . . . . . command menus (tab key) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wingman menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . strike menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . escort menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wild weasel menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . airbase menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mission menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ASSESSING YOUR SITUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the defensive aids subsystem (dass) . . . . . . the moving map display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACQUIRING TARGETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the ecr-90 radar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . identifiying tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . identifying ground and sea tracks . . . . using the track history feature . . . . . . checking launch parameters . . . . . . . . . the pirate infra-red (ir) system . . . . . . . . . . the thermal imaging (ti) system . . . . . . . . . the artificial horizon and compass display MANAGING YOUR WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the stores display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . jettisoning stores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIRING AIR-TO-AIR WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the mauser 27mm cannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the meteor bvr missile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the asraam short-range missile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

007

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064 064 065 066 067 068 069 069 070 070 070 071 071 071 071 071 071 072 072 072 073 073 073 074 074 075 076

008

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077 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 086 086 086 087 087 087 088 090 099 099 099 099 099 099 101

FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the mauser 27mm air-to-ground cannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the crv-7 unguided rocket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the brimstone guided air-to-ground missile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the penguin anti-ship missile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the alarm anti-radiation missile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the paveway iii guided bomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the mark 80 series unguided bombs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the bl-755 cluster bomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ASSESSING AIRCRAFT DAMAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FLYING WITH THE AUTOPILOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . waypoint tracking mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . throttle tracking mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the autopilot in practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MANAGING YOUR FUEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . engines and fuel display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . managing your fuel in practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TYPHOON PILOT SPEECH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TECHNICAL SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . troubleshooting guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . driver problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . video problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cd rom problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sound problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

009

Figure 1: Game Flow Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 021 Figure 2: The log-in screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 020 Figure 3: Entering the game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 022 Figure 4: The pilot selection screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 022 Figure 5: Pilots in the briefing room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 023 Figure 6: If you eject over enemy territory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 023 Figure 7: Once captured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 024 Figure 8: If you are lucky, the SAS will rescue you from jail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 024 Figure 9: Cockpit check ready to roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 025 Figure 10: The PILOT CONTROL BAR at the bottom of the screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 029 Figure 11: The GAME CONTROL BAR at the top of the screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 029 Figure 12: The Smartcam view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 032 Figure 13: The options screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 033 Figure 14: The tactical map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 034 Figure 15: When the pilot is in the planning room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 035 Figure 16: When this icon appears on the PILOT CONTROL BAR, you may influence the flight planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 035 Figure 17: This button on the GAME CONTROL BAR will take you to the Mission Roster screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 035 Figure 18: The Mission Roster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 036 Figure 19: The briefing screen showing map and text information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 036 Figure 20: To edit the route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 037 Figure 21: The weapon loading screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 037 Figure 22: Air-to-air Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 038 Figure 23: Interdiction (Strike) Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 038 Figure 24: Wild Weasel Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 038 Figure 25: Close Air Support Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 038 Figure 26: Anti-shipping Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 039 Figure 27: The Transfer pilot Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 043 Figure 28: A page from the online newspaper Europe Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 044 Figure 29: News from the European Broadcast Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 044 Figure 30: You are able to save many instances of the campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 046 Figure 31: The Main Menu where you select Multiplay Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 050 Figure 32: The four options available, showing IPX Directplay or TCP/IP connection types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 050 Figure 33: Type IPCONFIG in a DOS box under Windows to see your IP address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 051

010

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure 34: The Multiplayer Host screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 051 Figure 35: When joining a TCP/IP game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 052 Figure 36: Choose the game where your hosts name or call-sign appears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 052 Figure 37: In the Multiplayer Join menu, select your team colour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 053 Figure 38: The Eurofighter Typhoon glass cockpit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 055 Figure 39: An overview of the principle HUD components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 056 Figure 40: The warning arrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 056 Figure 41: The caret . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 057 Figure 42: Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 057 Figure 43: The altimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 057 Figure 44: The weapons indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 057 Figure 45: The G indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 057 Figure 46: The DASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 070 Figure 47: The map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 070 Figure 48: The radar MFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 071 Figure 49: The IRST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 072 Figure 50: The TI system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 072 Figure 51: Analogue instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 072 Figure 52: The stores display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 073 Figure 53: The Typhoons cannon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 074 Figure 54: Meteor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 075 Figure 55: ASRAAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 076 Figure 56: CRV-7 Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 078 Figure 57: Brimstone guided missiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 079 Figure 58: The Penguin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 080 Figure 59: On Wild Weasel missions, ALARM is the weapon of choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 081 Figure 60: The LGB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 082 Figure 61: The unguided bombs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 083 Figure 62: The cluster bomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 084 Figure 63: The systems status display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 085 Figure 64: The autopilot waypoint mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 086 Figure 65: The fuel display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 087

FOREWORD
The Eurofighter Typhoon has been designed to counter any known 21st Century threat whilst at the same time, fulfiling a large number of air superiority and air interdiction roles. With 620 aircraft on order for the air forces of Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK, the Eurofighter Typhoon is one of the largest combat aircraft programmes in the world. But Eurofighter Typhoon is not just about the size of the programme. Its quality as a combat aircraft is second to none and it is for this reason that more and more air forces are considering the aircraft for their specific air power needs. Designed and built by EADS Deutschland, Alenia Aerospazio, EADS Espana and BAE Systems, Eurofighter Typhoon represents the latest in military aerospace technology. From its avionics through to its power plants, use of high-tech materials to the weapons that it carries, Eurofighter Typhoon offers tremendous advantages over its competitors. The inherent flexibility of Eurofighter Typhoon to undertake high-end air-to-air combat and precision air-to-surface strike roles delivers an unmatched mission capability to the air force commander. This capability is derived from a design process which has brought together man and machine into a single weapon system. A unique cockpit environment provides the pilot with Voice Activation and Sensor Fusion technologies to achieve optimal performance. When facing Eurofighter Typhoon, the enemy has nowhere to hide. Modern air forces demand a combat aircraft that can operate in all-weathers, 24 hours a day and survive in a high-threat environment. The aircraft must be able to combat diverse and complex threats and offer a complete spectrum of responses. The aircraft must be easily deployable, able to survive and offer the air forces that operate the aircraft, a sustainable asset which is simple to maintain and able to sustain high sortie rates. This flexibility is assisted by the aircraft's unique swing-role capability. This

011

capability means that the aircraft can swing from role to role during the same mission. Diverse, high-capability sensors such as the CAPTOR multirole radar, PIRATE Infra-Red Search and Track (IRST) electro-optical sensor, the on-board Defensive Aids Sub-System (DASS) and the Multiple Information Distribution System (MIDS) provides the pilot with a plethora of tactical information. Information overload is not an issue as the aircraft's highly secure mission computer refines this sensor input through a process of sensor fusion, to present the pilot with an accurate, unambiguous and timely picture of the air situation. This information may be presented through the pilot's Helmet Mounted Display (HMD), the wide-angle Head-Up Display (HUD) or the three full-colour, large screen Multi-function Head Down Displays (MHDD). Eurofighter Typhoon's sensor fusion capabilities are second to none and help to make the aircraft a major battle winning asset. Sensor fusion is just one of the technological factors that gives Eurofighter Typhoon the battle winning edge. In terms of its aerodynamic performance, the aircraft is in a class of its own. Powered by two EJ200 turbofan engines providing a combined thrust of 180 kN in full reheat, the aircraft has tremendous acceleration and exhilarating raw power performance. In dry power, Eurofighter Typhoon produces 120 kN of thrust, thereby enabling the aircraft to enter the supersonic envelope without the use of continuous reheat. This not only reduces fuel consumption but also provides a major element of the aircraft's stealth capability. With the aircraft's EJ200s providing the power, the use of carbon fibre and composite materials reduce weight whilst adding immense strength to the aircraft's basic structure. Canard flight control surfaces provide added agility and manoeuvrability whilst the Flight Control System (FCS) ensures

012

FOREWORD
the air commander always retains the initiative and is able to keep the enemy guessing. To summarise, Eurofighter Typhoon is one of the most capable modern combat aircraft available on the market today. Its high thrust-to-weight ratio gives the pilot high instantaneous and sustained turn rates. Combined with rapid acceleration, low wing-loading and high agility, Eurofighter Typhoon possesses the battle winning capabilities that air forces demand. Combine these attributes with sensor fusion and excellent cockpit ergonomics and Eurofighter Typhoon can be seen as the aircraft air forces cannot afford not to have. Now you can fly it too!

optimal overall performance throughout the aircraft's flight envelope. So sophisticated is the FCS that the Eurofighter Typhoon has become renowned for its carefree handling, a term coined to describe how the aircraft protects the pilot from flying outside the envelope. Eurofighter Typhoon's use of sensor fusion technologies, voice activated controls, a sophisticated FCS and its carefree handling capabilities, it can be clearly seen that the aircraft has been designed to reduce the pilot's workload to the absolute minimum. In the complex, high-threat air environment that Eurofighter Typhoon will be operating in, its user air forces want their pilots to concentrate on fighting the air battle and not fighting the aircraft. As a weapon system, the Eurofighter Typhoon is without equal. With 13 weapons hardpoints, four on each wing and five under the fuselage, the aircraft can carry a variety of ordnance. The standard air-to-air configuration comprises four Medium Range Air-to-Air Missiles (MRAAM) carried in under fuselage recesses, and two Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missiles (ASRAAM) on outboard pylons. If required, the aircraft can carry a mix of 10 ASRAAM and MRAAM weapons. Over the coming years, Eurofighter Typhoon's long-range air-to-air capability will be enhanced through the integration of the long-range METEOR air-to-air missile. Eurofighter Typhoon will also be able to carry the current range of air-to-surface weapons such as 500, 1000 and 2000 lb bombs, cluster bombs, laser guided Paveway munitions, anti-armour weapons and anti-radiation missiles. Normal missions will see Eurofighter Typhoon carrying a range of weapon systems to allow the aircraft to operate in its unique swing-role profile. Here, the aircraft can be tasked in-flight, to undertake a range of missions from ground attack to air-to-air. This inherent flexibility ensures that

Ian Bustin, Vice President Communications Eurofighter GmBH.

INSTALLATION
MINIMUM SYSTEM SPECIFICATION
Pentium 266mhz or equivalent DirectX 7 Compatible 3D Graphics Accelerator card with at least 8 Mb of onboard RAM 2x CD-ROM drive 350 MB HDD Install space 250 MB HDD Swap space available A 16-bit stereo sound card compatible with DirectX 5 or above Mouse, keyboard Windows 95OSR2, 98SE, WindowsME or Windows 2000 64 Mb of RAM is the minimum; the game will take advantage of more. If you suffer from prolonged loading periods try de-fragmenting your hard disk using the Microsoft de-fragmentation tool. This can be accessed from the start menu by selecting 'Run' and typing 'defrag' [Return]. You can also reduce loading times by having a permanent swap file on a separate physical drive to the drive that the game is installed. Changing the configuration of the Windows swap file should only be undertaken by advanced users. At the time of going to press, not all graphics card manufacturers have ensured that their cards are properly compliant with DirectX 7. As a result, some cards may produce unpredictable results. Check the Eurofighter Typhoon support web site for advice, and your card manufacturers web site for newer drivers. Please ensure you have the latest drivers available for your graphics/sound card. These should be available on the web sites of the respective manufacturers.

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INSTALLING THE SOFTWARE


Open the CD-ROM by clicking on the CD icon in My Computer. Next click the mouse on the set-up icon; choose set-up language will appear. Make your choice and press OK. The Installshield wizard will now run. Click on the Next button to begin the install. Read the license agreement, and if you agree to its terms, click on the Yes button. Next you will be presented with the default installation folder, where the files will be installed. If you wish to use this destination folder, click the Next button, otherwise enter your own destination folder and click the Next button. The following screen will add icons to the Program Folder. We suggest you leave the default selection and simply click the Next button. Files will now be installed from the CD-ROM to the Destination Folder. This process may take a few minutes. Next you will receive a message asking you to reboot your machine should you choose to install DirectX 7. Click the OK button. If you have not already installed DirectX 7, click the Yes button on the DirectX Setup screen that will appear next, then the Reinstall DirectX button. When promoted to restart your machine, press the OK button.

UNINSTALLING EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON


Eurofighter Typhoon can be uninstalled in two ways: select the uninstall program from the "Start->programs->Rage Software->Eurofighter Typhoon" menu. This will remove the main program and data files. You can also uninstall using Add/Remove programs in the control panel: Select the "Add/Remove Programs" from the Control Panel and highlight "Eurofighter Typhoon" component before clicking the "Add/Remove" button.

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INSTALLATION

Please note that saved games files created by the user while playing the game will remain after uninstall. These must be manually deleted, especially if you would like to re-install the game. After uninstalling the game, we recommend that you delete the Eurofighter Typhoon folder prior to re-installing the game.

BEFORE YOU START


Before running Eurofighter Typhoon it is strongly recommended that all other applications are closed. While installing and playing the game, ensure the following: Power Management is switched off on your computer. Screen-savers are disabled. Media players of any kind are not running at the same time as the game. The Windows Task-bar and any card utility software is not set to Always on Top, otherwise card utility software may be displayed on top of the game screens and disrupt normal play; e.g. sound-card splash screens. The more memory you have available the less time the program will spend accessing the hard disk. 64 Mb of RAM is the minimum; the game will take advantage of more.

RUNNING THE CONFIGURATION PROGRAM


Before you start Eurofighter Typhoon, you should run the Configuration program from the Start/Programs menu. Here you may set the resolution of the game, and the colour depth (16 or 32bpp) depending on the capabilities of your graphics card. To improve frame rate, you can select a lower texture resolution prior to starting the game. This is particularly useful on PCI graphics cards and cards with less than 16 MB RAM. The Audio tab in the Configuration program allows you to set up your sound card according to its capabilities.

QUICK GAME KEYS


Esc F1
Eject (pressed twice) Cycle between full virtual cockpit and HUD only view

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Z X B

Cycle target selection backwards Cycle target selection forwards Air brake Wheel brakes

Pressing the Escape (Esc) key twice will eject you from the aircraft. The Head Up Display (HUD) represents flight information projected into the helmet and a reflective glass plate set in front of the pilot. Because it is easy to understand the relative motion of your aircraft in the HUD view, it is good for tracking targets directly in front of you, especially on ground attack missions.

Press to change to the next suitable target. Press to change to the next suitable target. In the air this deploys your airbrake.

Spacebar

-/_

Throttle down

On the ground this deploys your wheel brakes.

Reduce throttle. Remember this not only slows down the plane, but is used to assist descent.

Joystick Trigger Wheel brakes


When on the runway, the joystick trigger will activate the wheel brakes.

+/=

Throttle up

Increase throttle. Remember this not only accelerates the plane, but is used to assist climb.

Spacebar

Fire Weapons

In the air, the spacebar fires your weapon.

Choose best target for current weapon

Whichever weapon is selected, pressing T will result in the most suitable target being selected for that weapon on the basis of range and threat value.

Backspace Cycle air-to-ground weapons


To select a different AG weapon, press backspace. If you select the Stores MFD, you will also see a visual representation of the aircrafts load-out.

Return

Cycle air-to-air weapons

To select a different AA weapon, press the Return key. If you select the Stores MFD, you will also see a visual representation of the aircrafts load-out.

/@ //?

Multi-function display (MFD) range up Multi-function display (MFD) range down

Toggles the range up on all range-dependent MFDs simultaneously. Toggles the range down on all range-dependent MFDs simultaneously.

016

THE GAME KEYS IN FULL


cursor arrow keys. To set the camera zoom, hold down the SHIFT key while pressing 7 or 1 on the numeric keypad.

SEE ALSO THE ACCOMPANYING KEYBOARD LEAFLET

Esc

Eject (pressed twice)

Pressing the Escape (Esc) key twice will eject you from the aircraft. To avoid capture, we recommend ejecting only over friendly territory.

F6 F7

Looped fly-by view Weapon view

In this view you will see your aircraft fly past the camera. Use this view to observe the flight of the most recently released weapon. It is a useful view for confirming weapon effectiveness, and for understanding the flight characteristics of powered and free-fall weapons.

F1

Cycle between full virtual cockpit and HUD only view

The Head Up Display (HUD) represents flight information projected into the helmet and a reflective glass plate set in front of the pilot. The full virtual cockpit is a realistic representation of the real Typhoon cockpit; to pan around this view hold SHIFT while pressing the any of the cursor keys.

F8

Target view

F2

Cycle between target padlock internal and external view

In combat, pilots lock their vision onto a target and track it by turning their head. The internal target padlock view simulates this, enabling you to track targets that fly out of your forward view. The external version of this view keeps your plane and a targeted enemy within the screen. These views are available only when you have a valid lock on a visible target, indicated by a tracking box containing a diamond indicator.

Press to obtain a view of your currently selected target. Pressing the target cycle keys X and C will cycle this view.

F9

Smartviews

Smartviews are created by the virtual movie director. This picks the most interesting action and shows you edited sequences. Smartviews have wide-screen borders and running text commentary that describes what is happening in the scene being viewed. Smartviews are automatically selected when your currently selected pilot dies.

F3

Cycle between threat padlock internal and external view

When an incoming missile threatens you, pressing this key will padlock your view onto the threat, enabling you to track its progress.

F11

Zoom out view

F4

Cycle between wingman padlock internal and external view

Does the opposite of the F12 key, and allows you to quickly restore your normal field-of-view.

This view enables you to keep track of your wingman, and works the same way as the target and threat padlocks. Alternating between the internal and external version of this view will help you gain an understanding of your wingmans position in space relative to you.

F12

Zoom in view

F5

Moveable external view (use with Num keypad)

While in the HUD or cockpit view, pressing this key will zoom your field of view. It is a handy feature for ground attack missions, where tanks are so small that they would normally be too difficult to see clearly, or in air-to-air combat where a plane is too distant for easy visual identification.

Select this view to see you aircraft from the outside. You may reposition the camera by holding down the SHIFT key while pressing any of the

Tab

Access wingman menus

Press TAB to bring up the main menu set, then select the unit you wish to

THE GAME KEYS IN FULL


communicate with: wingman, strike flight, escort, wild weasel or airbase. Pressing numbers selects sub-menus (see Communicating with other units).

017

Autopilot activate/deactivate Autopilot mode switch

Switches the autopilot on and off using the currently selected mode.

-/_

Throttle down

Shift A

Reduce throttle. Remember this not only slows down the plane, but is used to assist descent.

+/=

Throttle up

Increase throttle. Remember this not only accelerates the plane, but is used to assist climb.

Make a choice of waypoint mode or throttle mode. Waypoint mode makes the aircraft head to the currently selected waypoint at the altitude being flown when the autopilot was set; throttle mode attempts to maintain the aircraft speed at the speed being flown when the autopilot was set.

U H J

Gear up/down HUD contrast adjust Jettison stores menu

Backspace Cycle air-to-ground weapons


To select a different AG weapon, press backspace. If you select the Stores MFD, you will also see a visual representation of the aircrafts load-out.

Retract and lower the aircrafts landing gear. Adjust the HUD/HMD contrast to suit the lighting conditions of the game. Brings up a menu that allows you to jettison stores selectively. If you are heavily laden and are attacked by fighters, dump everything to improve aircraft performance.

Return

Cycle air-to-air weapons

To select a different AA weapon, press Enter. If you select the Stores MFD, you will also see a visual representation of the aircrafts load-out.

Previous waypoint

To select previous waypoints in your Nav computer, press Q. The waypoint currently selected is shown on the Helmet Mounted Display (HMD).

Shift M /@ //? Z X

Toggle moving map on/off

Superimposes the moving map on the DASS display, or removes it.

Next waypoint

Multi-function display (MFD) range up Multi-function display (MFD) range down Cycle target selection backwards Cycle target selection forwards

To select following waypoints in your Nav computer, press W. The waypoint currently selected is shown on the Helmet Mounted Display (HMD).

Toggles the range up on all range-dependent MFDs simultaneously. Toggles the range down on all range-dependent MFDs simultaneously. Press to change to the next suitable target. Press to change to the next suitable target.

Choose best target for current weapon

Whichever weapon is selected, pressing T will result in the most suitable target being selected for that weapon on the basis of range and threat value.

Pause game

Pauses game. Press again to un-pause the game.

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THE GAME KEYS IN FULL


Cursor keys Num Num Num Num Num 2 4 8 6 +
Control aircraft Pan view down Pan view left Pan view right Pan view up Throttle up Throttle down
Use instead of a joystick if desired (not recommended)

B Spacebar

Air brake Wheel brakes Wheel brakes

In the air this deploys your airbrake. On the ground this deploys your wheel brakes.

Joystick Trigger Spacebar Insert Home Page Up


Fire Weapons MFD 1 on/off MFD 2 on/off MFD 3 on/off Cycle MFD 1 Cycle MFD 2

When on the runway, the joystick trigger will activate the wheel brakes. In the air, the spacebar fires your weapon. Turns the left-hand MFD on or off. Turns the middle MFD on or off. Turns the right-hand MFD on or off.

Increase throttle. Remember this not only accelerates the plane, but is used to assist climb.

Num -

Reduce throttle. Remember this not only slows down the plane, but is used to assist descent.

Delete
End

Changes the available displays for the left-hand MFD. Changes the available displays for the middle MFD.

INTERFACE SHORTCUT KEYS Accelerated time Shift T Map view Control M War report menu Control W Mission Roster Control R Transfer pilot menu Control T

Page Down Cycle MFD 3


Changes the available displays for the right-hand MFD.

INTRODUCTION

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In Eurofighter Typhoon you will control and manage six pilots in real time, a feature made possible by the event-driven dynamic campaign. Set in Iceland sometime in the first half of the twenty-first century, Eurofighter Typhoon combines the tension and excitement of WWII style air combat with the power and agility of fifth generation fighters. When a war erupts in Europe, sparked by troubles in the former Soviet Union, Iceland is drawn into the conflict, becoming the balance point of an immense conflict that threatens to escalate into World War III. Your performance in pitting a small team of Typhoon pilots against waves of

determined invaders will make the difference between Peace and a New Order in Europe. The game starts in peacetime, giving you opportunity to train and familiarise yourself with the aircraft. Gradually, you will learn of escalating violence in Europe before being placed on maximum alert. Before long, the first signs of invasion will appear, and youll begin to feel your isolation from NATOs main forces. Next, the invasion will arrive in fullforce and you will represent the few against the many.

020

STARTING THE GAME

The user interface allows you to navigate effortlessly through your management responsibilities as well as your pilot duties. You never leave the 3D as the game plays out in real time around the clock. Menus slide into view when you move the mouse cursor to the top or bottom of the screen. All aspects of the interface are controllable with the mouse, although we have provided some keyboard shortcuts for players who prefer this approach, or who wish to program a peripheral controller with interface functions. The two principle components of the interface are the GAME CONTROL BAR accessed by moving the mouse to the top of the screen, and the PILOT CONTROL BAR accessed by moving the cursor to the bottom of the screen. The GAME CONTROL BAR will give you access to options, mission editors, reports, time acceleration and the mission roster; the PILOT CONTROL BAR is where your central point for managing and monitoring the activities of the pilots.

Figure 2: The log-in screen. Type your name in the bottom window and press OK.

HOW TO LOG-IN
The first time that Eurofighter Typhoon loads, you will be presented with the Log-in menu. Enter your name here by typing in the box at the bottom of the screen, and click on OK; when you save the campaign, it will be associated with this name. If you want to save several campaigns, use different log-in names. This feature is also useful when several different players use the same PC to play Eurofighter Typhoon. Your log-in name will also be used to identify you in multi-player games. Use the Next Players key if the list is full.

START IN PEACETIME OR WARTIME?


The core of the game is an event-driven dynamic campaign, which combines the uncertainty of dynamic events with a dramatic storyline. You enter either in peacetime or at the outbreak of hostilities. When you start in peacetime, you will fly practice missions that will familiarise you with the aircraft controls and user interface. This is recommended the first time you play Eurofighter Typhoon. Gradually, you will become aware of the fact that Europe is going to war and that Iceland will come under threat. If you are already an experienced simulation pilot, or playing the campaign for the second time, you may wish to start the campaign in wartime. Figure 1: Game Flow Diagram (FAR RIGHT) Each box represents an individual component of the game. Inside the dotted box are the main 3D modes. Outside are the interface and management menus.

STARTING THE GAME


Start

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Login

Game Intro

Quit

Hall of Fame

Timeout Move Mouse

Main Menu
Quit Load Game New Game

Timeout Move Mouse

CREDITS

Multiplay

Campaign Selection Pilot Selection Options

Save Game Mission Roster

War Report Observe The Action

Mission Briefing Play Mission Mission Editor


Main Play Components

Theatre Map

Transfer Request

Figure 1: Game Flow Diagram

022

STARTING THE GAME

Figure 3: Entering the game. Choose whether to load a saved game, or start a new game. Start in peacetime if you want time to train.

Figure 4: The pilot selection screen.

PILOT SELECTION TRAINING MISSIONS


There are two ways to access training missions. The first is by starting in peacetime and waiting for the missions to be briefed to your pilots. Another method is to access the multiplayer games offline, and fly the co-operative missions. In these missions you will have a variety of air and ground targets to deal with. You select six pilots at the beginning of the game. Look carefully at their background and skills, and choose the combination that you think will give you the winning edge (see Pilot Intelligence Files). The pilots that you pick will also influence the types of missions that are generated; for example, if the majority of pilots you choose are air-to-ground experts, expect to fly mainly strike missions. Each pilot will be posted at one of the many airfields around the island. During the game, you must assess whether their airfield is in danger via the report menus, then transfer those pilots at high risk to safer airfields using the Transfer pilot Menu.

STARTING THE GAME


PILOT PROFILES Name: Robert Turner
Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: British ARROW 40 Royal Air Force Djupivogjur Wild Weasel (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses) 1,000 Average. Good stamina for his age but has shown symptoms of stress-related illness. Excellent. Escaped capture in Bosnia after his Jaguar 2000 was hit by a Serbian shoulder-launched SAM. Outspoken and brusque. Robert is a veteran, having seen action in Bosnia and Northern Iraq. He is likely to prove a handful if captured.

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Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

Lars Borgvall
Swedish CHEF 28 Svenska Flygvapnet Budhardaur Strike 300 Variable. Suffered from Hepatitis A, requiring a prolonged recovery period. Excellent. Lars is a natural survivor. Charming and sophisticated but with an arrogant streak.

Personality:

Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

Harmi Nehara
British HARMONY 26 Royal Air Force Blonduos Strike 100 Poor. Broke a leg prior to the ICEFOR posting. Below average. Hard-working rookie and a good team player popular with peers and superiors.

Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

Salvador Rodriguez
Spanish ASSASSIN 29 Ejercito del Aire Bolung Strike 500 Excellent. Has never taken time off for illness. Below average in training. Cold and calculating. Salvador is known for his machine-like precision, hence his callsign. Not a social animal.

024

STARTING THE GAME


Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality: Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills:

Jon Vik
Norwegian REDHAT 24 Kongelige Norske Luftsforsvaret (KNL) Kongelige Wild Weasel (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses) 500 Average. Susceptible to colds and influenza. Average. Performed best on the desert courses. Level-headed and good in a crisis. A natural leader.

David Teo
British BALDRICK 28 Royal Air Force Bakkafjordhur Strike 100 Variable. Has sporadic problems with blood pressure. Below average. Short-tempered and a poor socialiser. A rookie but with excellent flying abilities.

Markus Ziegler
German BARON 24 Luftwaffe Arkranes Wild Weasel (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses), trainer. 500 Variable. Has been advised to give up smoking and drinking. Excellent. Holds records for survival and evasion of capture during NATO exercises, and has combat experience. Ex-trainer, aggressive and direct as many of his students will testify. Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

Heather OConner
British MIDNIGHT 25 Royal Air Force Holmavik Air-to-air 450 Excellent health. Below average. Extremely popular team-player. Has good leadership skills and is not afraid to make difficult decisions.

Personality:

STARTING THE GAME


Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills: Personality:

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Paulo Armani
Italian DUKE 35 Aeronautica Militare Italiana Egilsstadir Air-to-air 450 Excellent health. Average. Serious and opinionated individual who has also flown Tornados.

Name: Nationality: Callsign: Age: Service: ICEFOR Base: Expertise: Hours on Typhoon: Health: Survival skills:

Pierre Corbin
Belgian VILLAIN 35 Belgische Luchtmacht Dalvik Air-to-air 450 Excellent health. Good. Walked 200 miles to friendly lines in Northern Iraq after crash-landing in a rescue helicopter. Popular individual with sound leadership skills and a good combat record. Once you have chosen six pilots, press the OK button to proceed into the campaign.

EDITING CALL SIGNS It is possible to edit the call sign for each pilot. Simply place the cursor near to the call sign shown in bold on the pilot information panel, click the left mouse button and enter the new text. TOP GUN AWARDS Achieving a notable score will result in your inclusion in the Top Gun Awards, which will appear during the demo mode shortly after starting the game.

Personality:

026

STARTING THE GAME

Figure 5: Pilots in the briefing room, prior to planning. You should choose your pilots with care, because your decisions at the beginning of the game will have repercussions later on. Look carefully at the number of hours each pilot has logged on the Typhoon. This will give you and indication of the pilots knowledge of the plane and flying ability. Look also at the pilots age: those with low hours may be inexperienced youngsters, or more experienced pilots with low hours on the type.

Figure 6: If you eject over enemy territory, the bad guys will almost certainly get you. Check the pilots health record. A poor health record will affect the pilots recovery time if injured, and may spell the difference between life and death. The fittest pilots will have the best chance of recovery and the fastest recovery times, ensuring the pilots are back in the air after spells in hospital. Being captured by the enemy will take its toll on the less fit.

STARTING THE GAME

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Figure 7: Once captured, you will be interrogated. Your personality will determine the severity of the beatings, and your health determines whether you survive. Survival skills determines firstly how likely the pilot is to avoid death by ejection once the aircraft has become critically damaged while not under your control. Secondly, it determines how well the pilot is able to cope when out in the wilderness after ejection or forced landing. Good survival skill mean that the pilot has a much better chance of being rescued and is much more likely to evade capture by the enemy. In captivity, survival skills will also help to keep the pilot alive in adverse conditions.

Figure 8: If you are lucky, the SAS will rescue you from jail and before long, youll be flying again ..if your health hasnt suffered too badly, that is... Personality is important, because it determines whether the pilot will be able to negotiate out of awkward situations or whether he or she is more likely to antagonise captors. This is also important when incarcerated by your own side, and the pilot needs to convince superior officers to turn a blind eye to misdemeanours. It could mean shorter spells in allied jails. In enemy captivity, an amenable personality will escape prolonged and brutal interrogation, and may avoid it altogether.

028

STARTING THE GAME


DISCIPLINE AND COMPASSION
Eurofighter Typhoon tracks your pilots actions, records misdemeanors and meters out discipline. As a player, the punishment is having one of your pilots out of action for an unspecified time. Missing a waypoint where action is specified will result in a severe reprimand. If you repeat this offense on several occasions, you will be disciplined and forced to spend a time in jail. The length of time depends on how well the war is going. Heavy landings will also invoke the wrath of the bases Commanding Officer. Shooting your own side a blue-on blue incident will also result in disciplinary procedure, possibly jail. So will landing at the wrong airbase without a valid reason. If your aircraft is out of fuel, badly damaged or out of weapons, there is less likelihood of being reprimanded. If you do land at the wrong airbase, your plane will be repaired, re-armed and re-fuelled. Pilots who are forced to eject may be captured if they are over enemy territory. If you are lucky, a rescue helicopter and recovery team will search for you and pick you up. You will not last long in the freezing Icelandic waters, which is why you must try to reach dry land before ejecting. If you are captured, an SAS team may try to rescue you, if you are lucky. However this could take a considerable time to organise. Those who are rescued and fail a medical check-up will spend time in hospital before being returned to duty. If you do well, you can also expect to be rewarded not only with official recognition, but with increasingly tougher missions!

Figure 9: Cockpit check ready to roll.

ONCE YOU ARE IN THE GAME


Remember, you will start in the pilots mess. Each pilot will be relaxing in the canteen of the relevant airbase. Watch the PILOT CONTROL BAR to see when a pilots status changes. If you have started during peacetime, the first training mission will be generated shortly after entering the mess. If you have the Helper function switched on, cards will pop-up to tell you what to do. If you prefer, these may be switched off from the options menu that is accessed from the GAME CONTROL BAR (via the spanner icon).

THE CONTROL BARS


INTRODUCTION
Once in the game, you will find yourself in the pilots mess hall. Your main interface to game functions is via two menu bars that appear at the top and bottom of the screen, the GAME CONTROL BAR and PILOT CONTROL BAR. To access the PILOT CONTROL BAR, move the cursor to the bottom of the screen; to access the GAME CONTROL BAR, move the cursor to the top of the screen.

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Figure 11: The GAME CONTROL BAR at the top of the screen. NOTE: if you are flying a plane when you access a menu, the plane may crash if you do not pay attention. We suggest that you activate the autopilot waypoint mode before activating a menu from the cockpit, or use the pause key.

Figure 10: The PILOT CONTROL BAR at the bottom of the screen. Note the icons that describe the current activity of each pilot.

030

THE CONTROL BARS


Planning. When this icon appears, you will be able to adjust the route and weapons load by calling the relevant menus through the GAME CONTROL BAR. Plane damaged. This plane has been hit and the pilot is in trouble. You might want to help and ensure that the pilot at least reaches friendly territory, in order to avoid capture after ejection. Pilot dead. Death may occur at any time in the air, or on the ground and in captivity. Let it serve as a grim reminder to keep your other pilots in good health. Dogfighting. This pilot is engaged in a dogfight, so if you are not already too busy you might like to help. Ejection. This pilot has ejected. You may wish to check whether the pilot has ejected over enemy territory, in which case he or she may be captured. Returning from mission. The pilot has reached the final mission waypoint and is about to land. Flying on mission. This pilot has been briefed and is on the way to the target or area of action. Pre-flight check. The pilot is getting into the aircraft ready for a mission. Jail. This pilot is in an allied jail for committing an offense, or an enemy jail after being captured. Mess. The pilot is relaxing in the mess, eating and trying to forget the war for a minute or two.

THE PILOT CONTROL BAR


The PILOT CONTROL BAR in the game will show you the status and current activity of each pilot under your care. Once you have selected the pilots, move the mouse cursor to the bottom of the screen to access the PILOT CONTROL BAR. Icons represent the current activities of each pilot (see below). Even if you are not in control of a pilot he will still perform his military duties in addition to personal activities such as resting and sleeping. If one of your pilots dies, that resource is lost for the rest of the campaign. If you are lucky, pilots captured after ejecting over enemy territory may be rescued. In this event, each pilot will eventually be returned to duty after a ride in the rescue helicopter and a spell in hospital (so if a pilot has to eject, make sure its over friendly territory). If you lose all your pilots then that is the end of the game. Your pilots will be precious resources that you will need to protect if you are to win the war. PILOT STATUS ICONS Check the icons to see what your pilots are up to. If one gets into danger, the PILOT CONTROL BAR will draw your attention to the fact. The colour of the border surrounding the icon denotes the level of danger that the pilot is in, and how much your attention is required. Red is the highest level, and means that the pilot is in mortal danger. Green means that the pilot is in no danger. Award. Youll see this when a pilot has done well.

Pilot briefing. During this phase it is not possible to alter the flight planning

THE CONTROL BARS


Reprimand. The pilot has endangered his colleagues and is being disciplined. If the offense is serious enough, a jail sentence will follow. Rescue. The helicopter has picked up the pilot and is returning him or her to safety. Sleeping. Everyone needs to take a break. A well-rested pilot will perform better than a tired one. Ground attack. The pilot is on a ground-attack mission.

031

Dying in hospital. You have sustained serious injuries from which there is little likelihood of recovery. Captured. You have ejected over enemy territory and their troops have found you. This is the beginning of your ordeal in captivity. The PILOT CONTROL BAR In Use You will be able to jump around and control any of these pilots at will by clicking on one of the icons. While you are not in command of a pilot the computer will take over control of that pilot. When the pilot becomes endangered or makes a change in routine, the PILOT CONTROL BAR will alert you to the fact by popping up at the bottom of the screen. At this point you may decide whether to act on behalf of that pilot. If you decide to do nothing, the bar will disappear until the next event occurs. The icon backgrounds will also change colour to reflect the risk level to that pilot; e.g. green is low risk; amber is medium risk; and red is high risk. NOTE: If you have a joystick with a throttle: when you swap aircraft via the PILOT CONTROL BAR, the last used throttle setting is maintained. Take care when swapping aircraft to ensure you always check the throttle settings.

Interrogation. The pilot is in enemy hands and is under interrogation. If you are lucky, the pilot will survive and may be rescued. Waiting for rescue. The pilot has ejected safely and is using a TACAN radio transmitter to call a rescue helicopter. With luck, the pilot will be picked up and returned to base. A short spell in hospital may follow. Waiting for rescue (sea). The pilot has ejected safely and is in water waiting for a rescue helicopter. With luck, the pilot will survive, be picked up and returned to base. A spell in hospital will certainly follow. Hospital. The pilot has sustained injuries and is recovering in hospital. The severity of the injuries determines the length of stay. Some pilots may never make it out alive! SAS jail-break. This is your get out of jail card. It means that the SAS have arrived to spring you out of jail. Expect to be onboard a helicopter next, on your way back home.

032

THE CONTROL BARS


At key moments in the game, Smartcam will automatically focus on an item of highest importance. This may disrupt normal Smartcam viewing momentarily, but do not be alarmed. You need to know what is happening when a special event occurs, and this is one way to get your attention. OBSERVER MODE If you click twice in succession on the pilot icons showing aircraft in flight, you will be put in observer mode. Now you will be able to watch the action from a third person perspective, while the computer flies the aircraft. This is particularly useful while learning about the game.

SMARTCAM INTELLIGENT VIEWING SYSTEM If you press the Smartcam icon shown here, located on the PILOT CONTROL BAR, you will be shown selected scenes from around the theatre of war. The Smartcam system has been developed to deliver cinematic style cuts of the action. Youll know when you are in this mode because the 3D is shown in a wide-screen letterbox format so that you dont get confused into thinking that you are on an external view such as F5. A teleprinter style system will inform you of where the action is taking place, and what each aircraft is doing.

THE GAME CONTROL BAR


This bar is accessed by moving the mouse up to the top of the screen. It carries the functions needed for game set-up and control. From here, for example, you will change the audio and graphics set-up, receive reports about progress of the war and plan missions. GAME CONTROL BAR ICONS Quit the game. Pause the game. Run the game at normal speed. Run the game at high speed. Access the Game Information screen. Figure 12: The Smartcam view also gives you information on the evolving scene.

THE CONTROL BARS


Save the game. Access the Options Screen. Access the Tactical Map screen. Access the Mission Roster screen. Access the Transfer pilot screen. Access the War Reports.

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Graphics: Depending on your PC configuration, it may be necessary to balance graphical detail against a good frame-rate for smooth gameplay. Eurofighter Typhoon lets you do this in several ways. Horizon distance: These buttons control how far into the distance you are able to see. On slower machines, choosing a closer horizon will improve your frame-rate. The settings are 20 km, 30 km or 40 km (12 miles, 19 miles or 25 miles). Clouds: Inclusion of the complex cloud formations does much to enhance the look and feel of Eurofighter Typhoon. However, even on the most basic setting, there will be clouds that have an impact on your missions. Narrow field-of-view: works like a zoom lens. Less of the scene is drawn, which helps to improve the frame rate. N.B. In some cases, upgrading your graphics card may be all thats needed to improve the games performance. Audio: Mix the elements of Eurofighter Typhoons sounds to suit yourself using these sliders. Note that the music does not play all the time during the game, but plays a variety of discrete pieces triggered by dramatic events. Music: Use the slider to adjust the volume. With the slider set to the left, no music will play. Sound Effects: Use the slider to adjust the volume. With the slider set to the left, no sound effects will play. Speech: Use the slider to adjust the volume. With the slider set to the left, no speech will play.

GAME OPTIONS

Figure 13: The options screen. You are able to change options in-game.

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Other: Use these buttons if you use the mouse to control the aircraft but are having trouble with the orientation of the pointer, or you do not need in-game assistance. Mouse sensitivity: when using the mouse as a flight controller, this slider adjusts the sensitivity of the aircraft to movements of the mouse. G-effects: when you pull a tight turn inside a circle, gravity or G is amplified. When this exceeds a certain limit, the blood moves away from the brain causing a black-out. Pulling tight turns outside of a circle forces blood into the head and causes a red-out. The default setting is for these effects to be simulated in the game, for added realism. If you feel they detract from your game, simply switch them off here. Invert mouse: when using the mouse to control the aircraft, the default setting pitches the aircraft up when the mouse is moved up the screen. Press this button to reverse the mouse input in pitch, so that moving the mouse up the screen will pitch the nose down. Help mode: when first using the game, help screens will appear each time a function must be activated, showing which keys need to be pressed. If you are a complete beginner, we suggest that you leave this function on the first time that you play the game. More advanced users may prefer to de-activate this function. Difficulty level: there are three settings, easy, medium and hard. The difference between the three is controlled by the effectiveness of your weapons, with easier kills being scored in easy mode.

Figure 14: The tactical map gives a handy overview of the wars progress THE TACTICAL MAP To gain a fast overview of the war, access the tactical map from the GAME CONTROL BAR or by pressing CTRL M. The tactical map has several overlays. It shows you where your pilots are, plus the location of the airfields and SAM sites. It will also give you an overview of the enemys current position and the location of the Forward Edge of Battle Area (FEBA).

THE CONTROL BARS


PLANNING MISSIONS

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As the game runs, Air Tasking Orders (ATO) and flight planning are handled by the campaign AI. However, when a pilot enters the flight planning phase, you have the opportunity to alter the planning and weapons load-out of your aircraft. Watch out for the scene in the map room, or watch for the icon shown in Figure 16 to appear. Figure 16: When this icon appears on the PILOT CONTROL BAR, you may influence the flight planning. To access the planning facility, make the GAME CONTROL BAR visible and press the button shown in Figure 17. Figure 15: When the pilot is in the planning room, you have the opportunity to alter waypoint routes and weapons. The silhouette shows where in Iceland your pilots are located at the present time. The SAM icon shows the position of air defence systems. The flag icon shows you the location of all airbases. The shaded icon shows you zones of occupation: red for the enemy; green for the allies. The T icon shows you any targets that are relevant to your current mission. The magnifying glass icon allows you to select one of two scales for the map. Figure 17: This button on the GAME CONTROL BAR will take you to the Mission Roster screen, where all currently active missions for your pilots are shown. You will now be presented with the Mission Roster (Figure 18), which will show you who is doing what at the present time. Select any pilot who is in planning and click once with the left mouse button. A red highlight appears around the pilots details and you will then be taken to the Mission Briefing screen (Figure 19). From time to time you will see cancelled in the roster. This simply means that a slot had become available to launch a mission, but insufficient resources were available to execute that mission. At this stage, no objectives have been identified. When there are three or fewer player pilots available to take missions, computer controlled pilots will fly them. This is indicated in the mission roster where you see OTHER in the pilot column. This will not impair your chances of winning.

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Figure 18: The Mission Roster. To plan a mission, look for a pilot whose status is Planning and click on that pilot. You will be presented with the Mission Briefing screen (Figure 19), which shows a map of the route to the target and a description of the important mission elements. Briefing information will include your take-off time, the mission, your role in the mission and your objectives.

Figure 19: The briefing screen showing map and text information. From here you access screens to edit your weapons and waypoints. Editing Your Route

Waypoint editing is accessed by pressing the Edit Waypoint icon shown above. You will be able to pick up a waypoint by placing the mouse over it and holding down the left mouse button.

Additional briefing information can be obtained by pressing the small icon shown above.

THE CONTROL BARS

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Figure 20: To edit the route, pick up the key nodes and drag them using the mouse. Waypoints can be added by pressing the mouse cursor onto the small 'x' on each line. Editing your weapons

Figure 21: The weapon loading screen offers the choice of single weapons or packages. Under the buttons 1 - 5 you will be offered up to five pre-selected packages suitable for the mission you are currently flying. Press the button with the gunsight icon to remove all weapons from their pylons and leave the aircraft armed with guns only. When you are happy with the weapons on the plane, press the OK button.

If you do not use this facility, an optimum package will be selected for you. To select your own choose the Edit Weapons button (shown above) from the Briefing Screen (see above). To place a single weapon, select the relevant button, place the cursor over an appropriate pylon and press the left mouse button. Weapons not suitable for certain pylons will not be mounted. To de-select a weapon, choose from the list on the right, hold the cursor over the weapon to be removed and press the left-hand mouse button.

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Figure 22: Air-to-air Package.

Figure 24: Wild Weasel Package.

Figure 23: Interdiction (Strike) Package

Figure 25: Close Air Support Package.

THE CONTROL BARS

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Escort Patrolling the skies demands an aircraft with fuel economy and endurance while on station, plus speed and agility while engaging the enemy. Typical missions for an aircraft capable of this role are escort, strike flight or Combat Air Patrol (CAP). Wild Weasel The Wild Weasel role is synonymous with air-to-ground missions designed specifically to destroy an enemys air-defence system. Typically, a flight tasked with this mission will enter enemy airspace ahead of a strike flight, clearing a path through the Surface to Air Missile batteries. Specialised weapons have also been developed for the role. In Typhoon, these are the ALARM anti-radiation missile, which homes in on the SAMs radar, and cluster bombs, which are used to devastate a wide area around SAM sites. Figure 26: Anti-shipping Package. FLIGHT ROLES Air Intercept This role involves intercepting targets entering friendly airspace. Eurofighter Typhoon is ideally suited to the task, with its superb acceleration and high speed for pursuit, agility for close combat, and outstanding sensors. Weapons will include the Meteor BVR (Beyond Visual Range) missile, the ASRAAM short-range missile and cannon. Air Kill To kill designated, High Value Assets (HVAs) requires an aircraft with stealthy qualities, speed and reliable missiles with effective all-aspect tracking. Strike Any type of mission that involves hitting ground or sea targets uses aircraft in the strike role. Weapons used include unguided bombs, guided bombs, unguided rockets, guided missiles and cannon. Transport To carry materiel and people from A to B demands an aircraft optimised for the transport role. This is also a typical role for helicopters such as the Chinook.

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MISSION TYPES Interdiction Interdiction involves destroying identified targets behind enemy lines, typically with guided weapons. Deep interdiction means travelling far behind enemy lines, although battlefield air interdiction (BAI) may involve just a short trip over the front-line. Interdiction missions typically involve one or more strike flights, wild weasel flights to take care of the air defenses, and an escort to provide top cover against air interception. NOTE: Aircraft will generally make one pass over a target and drop only the number of weapons deemed sufficient to destroy the target.

Close Air Support (CAS) On the CAS mission, you will be expected to attack moving targets on the battlefield in support of your own tanks and infantry. The relative speed of the attacking aircraft, coupled with the danger of strikes from shoulder launched weapons conspire to make CAS one of the riskiest mission types. Airfield Denial If any enemy is unable to use their airfield, planes will stay on the ground where they are no threat and are easier to destroy. Airfield denial missions will target runways, hangars and communications facilities. Weapons will vary but typically include guided and unguided bombs.

THE CONTROL BARS


Ground Intercept Attacks against categories of moving ground targets with no clearly defined co-ordinates are called ground-intercepts. They may include vehicles such as tanks and trucks. Typical weapons will include unguided bombs, cluster bombs, unguided rockets and guided missiles.

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Scramble At times of highest alert, pilots often sit in their cockpits for long hours awaiting the order to scramble to intercept an incoming attack. In Iceland, the close distances between enemy and allied forces invariably means that your airbase is the focus of an attack. The emphasis is on getting airborne fast and within firing parameters before the attack hits.

Air superiority Air Superiority missions aim to achieve total domination of the skies over the battlefield. Air-to-air engagements at long, medium and short range are typical of the mission, using Beyond Visual Range (BVR) missiles, and the highly agile Advanced Short Range Air-to Air Missile (ASRAAM) for dogfights.

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THE CONTROL BARS

Combat Air Patrol (CAP) Combat Air Patrols comprise one or more aircraft flying a racetrack pattern at 20,000ft over a designated point. If a pair of aircraft is involved, each plane will fly opposite the other so that the maximum area of sky is covered by both radar. The moment enemy intruders are detected, the aircraft will intercept them and if fuel allows they will return to the CAP station after launching their Meteor missiles. Supply/MEDEVAC These are missions flown by transport aircraft, and involve bringing supplies and evacuating casualties. You may be escorting someone into the war zone, so be prepared.

Ferry Whenever you transfer a pilot, a ferry mission is generated between the existing airbase and the new destination. It is a simple, direct flight designed to get the pilot and the aircraft to the new destination as quickly as possible. Training Missions There will be no specialised training section in Typhoon, but the player may begin the game in peacetime and fly training missions there. Training information will also be given to the player as they play the game. Instructions will also be given on how to use the interface. Please note that training is given only to the first pilot you select. Changing pilots will result in de-activation of the help function. In addition, once help is switched off in a game, it cannot be used again in that particular game.

THE CONTROL BARS

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relevant personality by clicking on the relevant image. Next place your cursor on the map and point to the airfield where you want to transfer the pilot. The name of the original airbase and the new airbase are shown in the From and To boxes. Click on the following icon to generate the necessary ferry mission from one base to the other.

Once you are happy with your selection and ferry mission, click on the following icon.

Figure 27: The Transfer Pilot Screen. In training, mission types will range from simple take-off and landing exercises, to weapons usage. In addition, players can use the multiplay section for additional training. Simply host a TCP/IP game, then select any mission against computer controlled opponents.

TRANSFERRING PERSONNEL
When you enter the game, your pilots are posted to airfields around the island. As the Russians invade, youll need to check that none of your pilots remain at an airfield that is endangered by advancing troops. If your pilot is at an airbase that is captured, the enemy will jail that pilot. Conversely, you might find it necessary to move pilots closer to the front-line in order to ensure participation in the battle. Its also possible to deliberately move pilots to airfields out of harms way in order to ensure that you have fresh pilots on hand. To transfer a pilot, first choose the

INTERPRETING REPORTS You will discover distinctive phases in your war that reflect the changing fortunes of both sides. You will learn of your situation on a theatre-wide and international level through the media of Internet reports and television. One thing to remember is that information on public channels may sometimes be incorrect, which often happens in wartime. This is the fog-of-war effect that will sometimes keep you guessing. In addition, your intelligence reports are not absolute reflections of the game data, but rough and ready assessments. Occasionally, you may find their inaccuracy is in your favour; more likely you will find a nasty surprise. Beware! Internet War reports The player will get regular war updates telling him the progress of the war, the current strategy and the reasons for the strategy. The player will appreciate the wider issues are in the war without having to interpret complex graphs and statistics.

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Figure 28: A page from the online newspaper Europe Today, which will reveal information about your progress in the war. The reports are accessed via the GAME CONTROL BAR using the icon shown below.

Figure 29: News from the European Broadcast Company. TV Reports Reporting will be supplemented by TV newsroom reports, providing peripheral information from the wider theatre of war. A flashing icon will appear on the GAME CONTROL BAR to tell you that a report is being broadcast. You can opt to watch it there and then, or wait for a more convenient moment and access it through the GAME CONTROL BAR. You should pay careful attention to these reports, because they contain useful hints on the wars influence on Iceland.

NOTE: Internet war reports will not be generated until the war is well under way.

SINGLE PLAYER: FIGHTING A CAMPAIGN


The hub of Typhoon is the war that is fought in campaign mode. Virtual commanders determine the appropriate strategy and tactics as the war unfolds. Each commander determines a list of targets for airbases to act on. Each air base will then from time to time look at the list and pick a target to attack. At this point a planned mission is generated and scheduled for departure and placed in a queue of pending missions. The campaign module is responsible for fighting the war. It does this by considering each protagonist in turn, examining its current objectives and strategy, then generating appropriate missions for both air and ground vehicles. In the campaign, virtual commanders deduce the objectives and strategies of each protagonist. It is they who calculate the balance of power and decide whether a change of strategy is called for. They also portray qualities of aggressiveness or fear that will determine whether the chosen strategy leans towards attack or defence. In other words, the campaign engine simulates the commanders willingness to take risks. During the campaign, you will be able to see evidence of this at work by the various headlines generated in the WWW reports, and the newscasts.

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aircraft into captured airbases and re-supply their forces. You will need to keep a close eye on where your pilots are located, and if they are under threat, you should transfer them to a safer airfield further from the Forward Edge of Battle Area (FEBA). Your objective is to keep the invaders at bay and drive them back into the sea with the limited resources at your disposal.

THE AIR WAR


Principle roles of the Eurofighter Typhoon are to gain Air Superiority over the battlefield, then to clear the way for ground forces to take and occupy territory. You will be pitched against a variety of aerial targets. These will include supersonic bombers, whose main objective is to hit centres of gravity that allow your forces to operate, such as communication nodes and airfields. They will be backed up by air and submarine launched cruise missiles, which are small and relatively fast moving targets that are difficult to hit. Youll have a range of fighters to deal with, including advanced types that will appear later in the game. Theyll be challenging you for superiority in the air. Finally, you will be tasked with destroying ground-attack aircraft and attack helicopters that could decimate your ground forces and severely weaken your ability to wage war.

THE INVASION
The crux of the campaign is the invasion of Iceland. The enemy forces will come and they will overwhelm the islands defenses initially, allowing them to secure a beachhead and foothold. However, your performance from the onset of hostilities is critical in determining how long the conflict lasts. Initially, you will fly a variety of air-intercept missions, together with anti-shipping attacks designed to hit the amphibious landing and its support ships. Once established on the island, the enemy will attempt to gain air superiority and capture territory. They will also attempt to ferry military

THE GROUND WAR


An intense ground war is a key feature of the Typhoon campaign. The ground units pick targets just as the airbases do. The ground groups follow a road system, routing towards the selected target, as they approach they will attack, defend or pick a new target. In Typhoon, the war will be won or lost by the territory won and held by ground forces. As a pilot, it is your job to ensure that your army gains the upper hand. Youll do this firstly by ensuring Air Superiority over the enemy, and secondly by destroying key targets and forces from the air. For

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SINGLE PLAYER: FIGHTING A CAMPAIGN

example, by clearing enemy tanks from a freshly captured sector, your troops will be able to recapture the area and dig-in. The targets to be attacked from the air will be many and varied, and will have different strategic and tactical values. For example, air defence radar and communication nodes are high-value targets whose destruction will erode a forces ability to wage coordinated warfare. Destruction of fuel and ammo supplies will also deteriorate a forces fighting ability. Important ground targets will be well defended by Surface to Air Missiles (SAMs), making the approach dangerous. On attack missions to well defended targets, you may be accompanied by Wild Weasel flights, which are equipped with radar-seeking missiles designed to destroy SAMs. You might also wish to carry your own anti-SAM weapons, just in case. At sea, it is vital that you prevent enemy supplies from reaching occupied ports. You will therefore fly anti-ship missions using standoff weapons, but when stocks of these weapons are depleted you will be forced to use rockets, anti-armour missiles and bombs, forcing you into the highly dangerous defensive envelope of the Russian fleet. Figure 30: You are able to save many instances of the campaign by saving them in a different slot. Saving them under a different log-in name is also possible. LOADING A CAMPAIGN After logging on using an existing user identity, you will be offered the possibility to load a saved game.

SAVING AND LOADING CAMPAIGNS


SAVING A CAMPAIGN At any point in the game you may save a game by clicking on the diskette icon on the Game Control Bar. The game is saved using the log-on identity, enabling you to save different campaigns under different slots. Towards the later stages of the game, you will not be able to save the game. This is deliberate, to ensure that the end game is a real challenge for the player. When this point is reached, you will be presented with a last chance to save the game. We suggest you save at this point.

SINGLE PLAYER: FIGHTING A CAMPAIGN

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ICEFOR AIRCRAFT
Type Eurofighter Gripen Viggen Tornado Harrier Sea Harrier Lynx C-17 Hercules Chinook Apache Role Swing-role Multi-role Fighter Strike Ground attack Multi-role Anti-submarine Transport Transport Transport helicopter Attack helicopter Roles 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 1, 2, 3 4, 5 4, 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 5 6 6 6 5 Turn rate Very fast Fast Medium Slow Medium Medium NA Slow Slow NA NA Weapons AA, AG, AS AA, AG, AS AA AG, AS AG, AS AA, AG, AS AS NA NA NA AG

RUSSIAN AIRCRAFT
Type MiG-27 MiG-29 Su-25 Su-27m Tu-22 An255 Il-76 Halo Ka-50 Hind Role Ground-attack Multi-role Ground attack Multi-role Bomber Transport Transport Transport helicopter Attack helicopter Attack helicopter Roles 4, 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 4, 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 5 6 6 6 5 5, 6 Turn rate Medium Fast Medium Very fast Slow Slow Slow NA NA NA Weapons AG, AS AA, AG, AS AG, AS AA, AG, AS AG NA NA NA AG AG

1. Air Intercept 2. Air Kill 3. Escort 4. Wild Weasel 5. Strike 6. Transport

1. Air Intercept 2. Air Kill 3. Escort 4. Wild Weasel 5. Strike 6. Transport

AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE
At the time of the campaign, a varied collection of aircraft is stationed on Iceland, conducting joint military operations in light of the increased tension in Europe.

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THE SECRET OF TYPHOONS DYNAMIC CAMPAIGN


Typhoon is a truly dynamic campaign within the theatre of conflict. Events in other parts of the world will affect the campaign system. It is the first time we have modelled a campaign at so many levels. Few if any other products boast such a comprehensive system. Typhoons campaign makes decisions in real time. That is to say, it constantly monitors and reacts to changes in the system. In our previous product, Total Air War (TAW) the campaign is a real time system, like Typhoons. EF2000, on the other hand, was not real time at the campaign level: campaign decisions were made in a turn based way every 8 hours. It's easier to have a system pause and think every 8 hours and make decisions. To make decisions in real time for hundreds of planes and tanks, missions and groups, while at the same time displaying a full 3D world and running flight models, etcetera, is much more difficult. A real time system is not only harder to design and implement, but also much more difficult to test and balance. This is in general true for any dynamic system, but once it works you have the best representation of reality possible.
Game TFX EF2000 TAW TYPHOON Combat AI Dynamic Dynamic Dynamic Dynamic Mission Planning Scripted Semi-dyn. Dynamic Dynamic Resource Modelling Scripted Semi-dyn. Semi-dyn. Dynamic Strategic Modelling NA Scripted Semi-dyn. Dynamic Extra Theatre Influences NA NA NA Scripted

Many air combat games offer simple scripted missions, where the events and challenges are all pre-programmed. With a scripted mission, you must always complete prescribed events in order to progress. Objects, aircraft, vehicles have pre-programmed behaviour for each mission, so when you play the game again, everything is just as it was before. If you fail, you simply go back and try again. Real life is far more unpredictable. Our dynamic campaign is unique in the way it mimics real life. The missions are generated on-the-fly to cope with emerging events; for example a scramble mission is generated if an airbase is attacked. Whether this happens is down to the state of the games logic, not a pre-programmed file. Most importantly, you must keep your pilots alive because this is the real key to winning the war. If you fail on a mission, make sure you fly to fight another day rather than lose your aircraft and pilot. In many simulations, such a loss is a minor inconvenience and the game will just present you with another aircraft. Not in Eurofighter Typhoon! Hitting targets is critical to your success, and failure to destroy secret weapons may well cost you the war. Events are defined that are capable of altering the course of the war, and we insert these into the campaign to create new, exciting and unusual missions. The result is an absorbing challenge that no other air combat simulation can offer. Because of the unpredictable nature of events in Eurofighter Typhoon, we have included the possibility to save games. If you feel that you could have done better, then this offers you a way to retrace some of your steps. But remember, the next time you replay a dogfight, it may not evolve the same way, leading to an entirely new outcome. This alone marks Eurofighter Typhoon one of the most truly immersive products of its genre.

A campaign like Typhoon's is far more complex to design, code and test than a branching system. You can see from the table above that it has taken a number of products to get to Typhoons technology.

THE SECRET OF TYPHOONS DYNAMIC CAMPAIGN

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The main areas added to Typhoon are: a fully dynamic ground war, resource modelling, a territory system and a strategic planner. In addition to this we've also added an extra-theatre module. This allows us to model global effects and influences on the theatre of conflict. There will be no more re-spawning of planes in Typhoon as in TAW and EF2000. There will also be a real fully dynamic ground war with territory capture. The ground and air wars are also fully integrated with the strategic system, so all three will work together to win the war.

One last and important addition is that of pilot modelling. In Typhoon we model the pilots 24 hours a day. This means that even when pilots are not in their planes their existence and states are modelled. This last point is the corner stone of Typhoon and will be one of the reasons why it is so different from most other flight simulations.

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MULTIPLAYER GAMES: HEAD-TO-HEAD AND TEAM PLAY

Figure 31: The Main Menu where you select Multiplay Game Multiplayer gaming in Typhoon will support up to eight players, and includes head-to-head, team and co-operative missions. In the head-to-head player games, its everyone for themselves, while in the team games you may join any one of three teams. Remember that when you host or join a multiplayer game, you will be identified by the name that you selected when you first logged in to Eurofighter Typhoon. N.B. When playing multiplay games, particularly over the internet, allow enough time for people to join. If you rush to start the game, some data may not have time to register and it will be necessary to start the joining process again. You may also experience blank menu screens from time to time. Give them a chance to update before assuming that the game has ceased to function.

Figure 32: The four options available, showing IPX Directplay or TCP/IP connection types.

THE MULTIPLAYER INTERFACE


When the main menu appears after starting the game, choose the Multiplay Game. Next, the Multiplayer Options menu will appear offering you four choices. You need to decide whether you are hosting the game or joining it. Only one of the players may host the game, the rest join the game that the host has set-up. There are two basic connection options available: IPX Directplay, which is used mainly for Local Area Networks and Serial Connections; and TCP/IP, which is used mainly for play over the Internet or via modems. If you wish to play via serial cable or modem, see the section entitled Setting up Serial Connections and Modems.

MULTIPLAYER GAMES: SOLO AND TEAM PLAY

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Figure 33: Type IPCONFIG in a DOS box under Windows to see your IP address.

Figure 34: The Multiplayer Host screen. When all the players are in, press OK to start the game. Choosing the Game In the Multiplayer Host menu there are several panels. The top left-hand panel shows the names of the players. These will be the call-signs selected when they started Eurofighter Typhoon. The second column in this panel indicates which team they belong to if a team game has been selected. The top right-hand panel shows the game type and the arrows let the host scroll through the game types. These arrows are missing from the Join Game screen, but each player will see what the host is selecting. The panel on the right gives a description of the game, the completion conditions and any special rules. If a team game has been selected, both the host and the players may choose the colour of their team from the three coloured buttons shown.

HOSTING A GAME
One person must be designated as the host, and others then join the game that the host selects. If you choose to host a game via TCP/IP you will need to let other players know your IP address. If you do not know your IP address, follow the procedure in the next paragraph. Finding your IP address when hosting TCP/IP games To find out your IP address, go to the Start button and open the Windows menu. Select the programs folder and followed by the MS-DOS prompt. When the DOS box has opened in windows, type IPCONFIG at the command prompt. You should be able to read off the IP Address from the information shown on the active Ethernet adaptor.

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The bottom two panels are for the chat mode. Enter any text you wish to send to other players in the bottom window. Press RETURN to send the text.

Figure 35: When joining a TCP/IP game, type your hosts IP address here and press OK. Watch the column in the top left-hand box as players join, and when everyone is in press OK to start the game. JOIN A GAME When you elect to join a TCP/IP game, the following menu will be presented. Ask the host for his IP address, type it in the box, then press OK. Next, you will be presented with the Choose Game menu. You should see your hosts call sign in a box. Click on it to access the Join Game menu. If you are connected via Directplay IPX, you will get to this screen straight away.

Figure 36: Choose the game where your hosts name or call-sign appears. When there are one or more games in the Games In Progress box you can select a game. This will result in either Open or Closed being appended to the game name. If the game is closed then the game is not accepting any more players and you cannot join it. If the game is Open then a list of current players will appear in the Current Players box and the selected mission details will appear in the Game Details box. You can then either join the game or select (and hence interrogate) another in the list. CHOOSE TEAM COLOUR AND JOIN GAME Once you have selected a game, you will be presented with the Multiplayer Join screen. Here you are able to chat with the other players prior to the mission and choose your team colours. When the host presses the OK button, all players will enter the game.

MULTIPLAYER GAMES: SOLO AND TEAM PLAY

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first player to do this gets the ammo for the cannon only, and the others will have to wait 20 seconds before you can pick up ammo. If you shoot a plane down you get four points and the victim loses one point. If you crash into the ground, you lose three points. The winner is the first to reach 20 points. TEAM TOUCH AND GO This is the same as the head-to-head game, except that you have team mates to help you reach your objectives. HEAD-TO-HEAD TYPHOON RACER This is a point-to-point race with a difference. Altitude controls your throttle, so the lower you go, the faster you travel. To reach maximum speed you must travel well below 500 feet. In addition to this, you are able to shoot weapons at your fellow racers. If you hit someone with a missile, their speed will halve, giving you a chance to overtake. If you hit them with cannon, each round will reduce their speed by 10%. If you hit the ground, you will be catapulted high into the air and your speed will be severely reduced. Use the terrain to mask yourself against missiles, and remember to keep a missile or two for the home run! TEAM TYPHOON RACER This is the same as the head-to-head game, except that you have team mates to help you reach your objectives. Each team has only to ensure that one member crosses the finish line! CO-OPERATIVE MISSIONS These are pre-scripted battles that pit you and your fellow pilots against computer-controlled opponents from the game. NOTE: co-operative missions may not play satisfactorily over standard internet connections.

Figure 37: In the Multiplayer Join menu, select your team colour (if applicable) and chat with the other players.

MULTIPLAY GAMES
HEAD-TO-HEAD KING OF THE SKIES In this classic game everyone starts above an airbase, armed only with cannons. Each time you shoot someone down, you receive points. If you are hit, you will lose points. If you are hit and die, you will lose points. The game will end with the first player to reach the number of points shown. TEAM KING OF THE SKIES In this version of KoTS, you team up with other players to do battle. The rules are the same as for head-to-head KoTS, except that the teams score is accumulated and the first team to reach the number of points shown. HEAD-TO-HEAD TOUCH AND GO In this game everyone starts above an airbase, without ammunition. To arm the plane you must dive to the airbase and touch-down briefly. The

054

COMMUNICATIONS SET-UP

SERIAL OR PARALLEL CABLES


Windows allows two computers to communicate using a serial or parallel cable. For fastest results connect two computers using ECP parallel ports. You must meet the following criteria: NetBUI, TCP/IP or IPX must be loaded. Check using the Start/Settings/ Control Panel/Network menu options. Your Configuration list should show one of these. If not, use the Add feature to install one. The Client for Microsoft Networks must be enabled. The Configuration list needs to show this feature. If it does not, use the Add feature to install it. File and Printer Sharing must be enabled. The Configuration list should show sharing as enabled. If not, click the File and Print Sharing button and activate both facilities. Ensure that Direct Cable Connection is installed. If it is not, do the following: From the Windows Start key, select Accessories then Communications and finally Direct Connection. One computer must be the host. Check the relevant box. On the second computer follow the same procedure and check the Guest box. The two computers will now be able to connect.

MODEM TO MODEM
Follow the Windows procedure for setting-up a Dial-Up Network connection. From the Windows Start key, select Accessories then Communications and finally Dial-Up Networking. Once you have a connect icon for the target computer, check that both PCs are connected to their modems and establish a link between the two machines. Once this is completed successfully, start Eurofighter Typhoon and follow the procedure for a TCP/IP game. Restrictions on modem games The quality of the game you play via the modem depends upon the speed of the modems, the Internet bandwidth available through the service providers (ISPs) and the number of players wishing to join. Co-operative games are the most demanding and under poor conditions will not be rewarding and may even prove unstable. Head-to-head games with two players should be no problem under average conditions, and satisfactory play may be possible with standard 56K modems at a time when the Internet traffic is low.

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT


THE HUD AND HMD

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Figure 38: The Eurofighter Typhoon has a glass cockpit almost devoid of traditional aircraft instrumentation.

Information relating to aircraft pitch and roll in the direction of travel is projected onto a glass plate ahead of the pilot called the Head Up Display (HUD). Other information that is not directly related to forward travel, or the boresight view is projected inside the helmet visor, which is also known as the Helmet Mounted Display (HMD). The HMD has the advantage of moving with the pilots head (because it is projected into the visor). Most importantly, weapon targeting is projected into the HMD, enabling the pilot to acquire targets simply by turning his or her head towards the adversary. The HMD is ideally used together with the Air-to-Air missile ASRAAM and the Air-to-Ground weapon Brimstone, both of which may be fired at wide angles to the direction of aircraft travel. These weapons are also described as having over-the-shoulder launch capability, although in practice these weapons will have a higher success rate if fired in a more conventional manner to the front of the aircraft. Note: with the game set to its lowest difficulty level, a simple HUD is displayed. With difficulty settings of two or above, an advanced HUD will be displayed giving the pilot more information. The HUD and HMD in practice Press the F1 key to switch the cockpit HUD views on and off. Press the F2 key to try the internal and external padlock views. Press the F11 and F12 keys to zoom the view in and out.

THE MULTIFUNCTION DISPLAYS (MFDs)


Eurofighter Typhoons cockpit is characterised by three colour MFDs, which appear at the bottom of the screen. You choose whether you have all three displays available, or a combination. Each MFD is used for several functions and these can be scrolled through, enabling you to configure the displays to suit your needs. Altering range on a display such as the radar will adjust all tactical displays in unison, ensuring that you maintain the correct perspective for situational awareness. The MFDs in practice Press INSERT, HOME and PAGE UP keys to switch each MFD on or off. Press DELETE, END and PAGE DOWN keys while the MFDs are visible to change the displays. Press the / and keys to adjust range up or down.

056

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT

The following HUD modes have various components: All Modes Pitch Ladder Compass Speed Altimeter Weapons Next WP info Targeting display Air-to-Air & Air-to-Ground Weapon range Weapon targeting Weapons available Landing Speed drift indicator Vertical drift indicator Gear state With difficulty settings of 2 or above, the following components are also displayed: Energy management indicators Radio frequency setting Full waypoint data HUD DECLUTTER On the numeric keypad, the Num 3 key will declutter the HUD by removing air and ground tracks. Figure 39: An overview of the principle HUD components.

HUD COMPONENTS: PITCH LADDER & VICINITY


TERPROM Figure 40: This warning arrow will be accompanied by vocal warnings. PULL UP

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT


The arrow is part of the TERPROM ground avoidance system and appears at the bottom centre of the pitch ladder when altitude is low. It flashes on and off and is accompanied by a female vocal warning. To remain a safe distance from the terrain, keep your velocity vector centred in the TERPROM letterbox shape on the HUD. As you go faster, TERPROM will account for your reduced ability to manoeuvre quickly and automatically compensate to keep you safe. COMPASS ALTIMETER

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Figure 43: The altimeter also gives an impression of your rate of climb.

Inside the circle is the height of the aircraft above sea level. The dashed lines represent one thousand feet and each segment thickens up to first 10,000 ft to help you quickly assess your height. Your vertical speed is represented by a pointer that spins around the altimeter display. WEAPONS INDICATOR Figure 44: This indicator appears on the right of the HUD.

Figure 41: The caret represents your waypoint heading, and the left or right arrows indicate which way to turn when this caret is not visible. Standard compass ribbon. Numbers represent tens of degrees with 0 degrees as north. The waypoint caret represents the current waypoint direction. When this is not visible, arrow-head indicators at the edge of the ribbon will tell you to fly left or right to find the waypoint direction. AIRSPEED INDICATOR Figure 42: Speed is shown in knots up to Mach 1, and thereafter as a Mach number.

Shows which weapon is selected and how many are left. G INDICATOR Figure 45: The G indicator appears on the left of the HUD and shows positive or negative G.

Below the speed of sound the speed is shown in knots. The moment you break the sound barrier, the speed is shown as a Mach number.

A simple + / - G-indicator show whether you are pulling positive or negative gs. If you pull too many positive gs, for example when turning

058

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT


Target has weapon allocated Gun pipper with range clock Clock begins to unwind within three miles of the target. Gun pipper with predictor snake Snake shows path of the cannon shells arriving at the pipper.

too tightly, you will black out. If you pull an excess of negative gs, for example while pushing the aircraft nose down, you will suffer red-out. AIRBRAKE INDICATOR The airbrake or speed brake is located on the spine of the aircraft behind the cockpit. It is extended by pressing the B key. When activated a line appears above the velocity vector. TARGET INDICATOR Shown on the right of the HUD. Distant targets start as unknowns and are orange. As you draw nearer, the CAPTOR radar and IFF systems (Identify Friend or Foe) will help to decide whether it is enemy or friendly, and eventually what type it is. Enemies are shown in red and friendlies in green.

Gear up and locked.

HUD SYMBOLOGY
Air target and target heading indicator With the indicator on the top of the box, the target is heading away from you. When it is at the bottom of the box, it is heading towards you. Ship Ground vehicle Surface to-Air Missile (SAM) or AAA Target lock Object masked

Gear travelling. Gear down and locked. Aircraft centreline Indicates where the nose is pointing. Velocity vector Indicates where the aircraft is travelling to. Airbrake indicator Flashes when the airbrake is on and appears above the velocity vector.

UNDERSTANDING THE COCKPIT LAYOUT


ADVANCED HUD COMPONENTS
ENERGY MANAGEMENT DISPLAY On difficulty levels 2 and 3, an energy management display appears on the HUD as two inward pointing arrowheads. These rise or fall in the HUD to indicate a rise or fall in aircraft energy. If the arrows lock at the top of the HUD, the aircraft has very high energy and you may want to reduce the throttle in level flight or apply the airbrake in a dive. If the arrows lock to the bottom of the HUD, you are losing energy and will need to apply throttle or point your aircraft's nose down. Two rate of change ticks appear in addition to the arrow heads. If the rate of energy increase or decrease is great, these ticks move far above or below the arrowheads respectively. Again, this suggests that you may need to revise the way you are flying the plane. To test the energy management display, try a loop on 70% throttle to see the variations. RADIO FREQUENCY DISPLAY On difficulty levels 2 and 3, a radio frequency display appears on the HUD. The frequency selected will reflect the mode of your aircraft; e.g. in combat, cruising, landing. COMPLEX WAYPOINT DATA The waypoint information will include distance and time to waypoint, together with and early (E) and late (L) indicator.

059

060

USING THE VIEWS


Beginners may find the internal padlock views disorientating at first. Arrows on the canopy point to the front of the aircraft to help you get a feel for the direction of your view relative to the direction of the aircrafts flight. Once mastered, this view is the most realistic and rewarding in close dogfights.

In Eurofighter Typhoon the views and cameras are designed to reveal all the detail made possible by the dynamic campaign engine. Internal cockpit cameras include virtual views that simulate head-motion while tracking targets. External views, while less realistic from a pilot perspective are highly cinematic and reveal the high quality of the games modelling and physics.

EXTERNAL PADLOCK VIEWS


All padlock views have an external equivalents which, although unrealistic, provide an excellent way to understand the complex three dimensional game that is an aerial dogfight. The external padlock views, though unrealistic, gives you an excellent viewpoint of the relationship between your aircraft and an opponent in a dogfight. Alternating between the internal and external padlock views will help you to figure out where other aircraft are in relation to you. Similarly, if you alternate between the internal and external target views, you will get a better idea of where your enemy is located.

FULL VIRTUAL COCKPIT


The full virtual cockpit is a realistic representation of the actual Typhoon cockpit; to pan around this view press any of the numeric cursor keys (or use a joystick hat switch, if configured). Panning this view is useful when flying a circuit of an airfield prior to landing, allowing you to maintain the correct holding pattern.

HUD ONL VIEW Y


Switching off the virtual cockpit improves your frame rate and provides an unhindered forward view. It is ideal when attacking static or slow moving targets, or for tracking targets directly in front of you, especially on ground attack missions.

MOVEABLE EXTERNAL VIEW (F5)


The moveable external view is good for watching your performance at critical tasks such as taking-off, landing or dropping ordinance. It also helps for identifying damage when your aircraft has been hit.

INTERNAL PADLOCK VIEWS


Several types of padlock are available. The F2 key padlocks you onto your selected target; the F3 key padlocks you onto the nearest threat, for example a closing missile; and the F4 key padlocks you onto your wingman. These internal views may all be used effectively in combination with the F11 and F12 zoom keys. When landing and ILS has been activated, F2 padlocks your view to the nearest runway.

LOOPED FL Y-BY VIEW (F6)


It is a useful view for understanding aerial manoeuvres, and watching critical tasks such as taking-off, landing or dropping ordnance. It is of limited value in dogfights.

USING THE VIEWS

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WEAPON VIEW (F7)


This is a useful view for confirming weapon effectiveness, and for understanding the flight characteristics of powered and free-fall weapons.

ZOOM VIEWS (F11 & F12)


Much of the time, targets are so far away that you never get to see them close up, especially when they are hit by your weapons. This view changes all that, and although not strictly realistic is a lot of fun. It is a handy feature for ground attack missions, where tanks are so small that they would normally be too difficult to see clearly, or in air-to-air combat where a plane is too distant for easy visual identification.

SMARTVIEWS (F9)
Smartviews are created by a virtual movie director, who picks the most interesting action and shows you edited sequences. Smartviews may be accessed from the PILOT CONTROL BAR using the following button.

062

LEARNING BASIC FL YING SKILLS


BASIC MANOEUVRING
You can change your throttle by pressing the + and - keys. The ENG: display on the left of the HUD show the current setting. 0% is engines off, 100% is full throttle and 140% is full afterburner. Reduce your throttle to 70% for cruising. Reduce your throttle to descend, increase it to ascend. To pick up speed quickly, point the aircraft nose down. To slow the aircraft, pull the nose up or fly a series of steeply banked turns.

TAKE OFF
Once your plane has taxied out onto the runway, you will be positioned in the cockpit ready for take off. To spool up your engines hold down +. You will see ENG: 020% on the left of the HUD. Hold down + again to raise your engine power to 100%. Hold down + a third time to engage the afterburner (ENG: 140). Your airspeed is shown in the top left of the HUD. It is the number in the box and it is displayed in knots (kts). When you reach 150kts, pull back on the stick and the aircraft will become airborne. To raise your undercarriage press 'U'. You should see the DDD change to UUU.

DESCENDING
Descent needs care, particularly when you are close to the ground. In bad weather or poor visibility, it is easy to lose sight of the ground. To descend, reduce your throttle to around 40%. To speed-up your descent, push the aircrafts nose down, but remember that this will increase your airspeed. Extending the air brake by pressing the B key will reduce your speed dramatically.

USING THE BRAKES


In the air, the B key applies the airbrake. It is useful for rapid deceleration in combat and when landing. On the ground the spacebar or joystick trigger apply the wheel brakes.

TURNING CLIMBING
The altitude of the plane is shown in the top right of the HUD. The reading is in feet (ft) above the ground. The clock symbols are a handy way of determining your altitude quickly. To climb quickly, open the throttle to full, but remember that this will consume large amounts of fuel. Pull back on the stick gently to pull the nose up. Note the angle of climb on the pitch bar. From take-off it will take you around 20 seconds to reach 20,000 feet, climbing at 60 degrees on full afterburner. Remember that turning will cause you to lose speed, as the surface area of the wings create greater resistance to the air in a turn. To bank, tilt your joystick to the left or right. In order to keep your nose level, you will need to pull back slightly on the stick.

LEARNING BASIC FL YING SKILLS


FINAL APPROACH AND LANDING
Landing the Typhoon is straightforward, and once you have the knack it becomes second nature. Head for the airfield where you want to land. With 20nm to go, press TAB to bring up the communications menu. Select AIRFIELD. Now select REQUEST PERMISSION TO LAND. When the tower responds, your Instrument Landing System will be activated. Ensure you are approaching the correct end of the runway, where you will see ILS boxes in the HUD, describing the best approach corridor to the runway. Descend and pass through the first ILS box. Throttle back to around 30% in order to achieve an airspeed of around 130 knots. Use the airbrake to adjust your speed. Press U to lower the undercarriage. You should see the UUU change to DDD. If it doesnt, there may be a problem with the undercarriage and ejection is advised. If all is well, set the velocity vector on the end-of the runway and try to hold it there. When you are just three or four ILS boxes from the runway end, move the velocity vector about half way up the runway. Apply the airbrake to reduce your speed to about 100 kts. Just prior to touchdown, pull back slightly on the stick to ensure the main wheels make contact before the nose wheel. Once landed the wheel brakes may be applied by pressing the spacebar or joystick trigger.

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NAVIGATION
To navigate your waypoint route, follow these guidelines. Examine the Situation MFD in the bottom left corner. Your waypoint route is displayed as a light blue line. Each waypoint is represented by a circle. The circles are joined by lines and therefore show your route. The thick blue line indicates the current leg on the route. To study your route in more detail, zoom in and out using the @ and / keys. The big red triangle on the route represents your main destination At the top of your HUD is the heading bar. This shows the direction you are flying in 10s of degrees: 36 is 360 which is North, 9 is 90 which is East, 18 is 180 which is South and 27 is 270 which is West. Within the heading bar is the waypoint caret an arrow that indicates the `` direction of your next waypoint. If you need to turn left you will see a < symbol. If you need to turn right you will see a > symbol. When you are pointing towards to waypoint you will see a v symbol; when this is in the middle of the heading bar you are on track. Further waypoint information is displayed on your HUD is your current waypoint number. TASK: is what you will have to do when you reach that waypoint. A Pass task means you just carry on flying. ALT: is the waypoint altitude. When within range of waypoint 2, the display will move on to indicate the next waypoint. The chosen waypoint is also indicated as a small X in the HUD. On the Map MFD, the target or objective is shown as a big red triangle.

064

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS

In Typhoon you can communicate with other aeroplanes and with airbases by radio. Pressing TAB activates the communications menu system. A series of messages or commands will appear on screen, each preceded by a number. Simply press the number of the one you want on the main keyboard. Commands followed by allow you to return to the previous menu. Messages will be spoken by your pilot, and acted on by whoever you are speaking with. Commands shown in red are unavailable; e.g. if the Strike flight menu is red, there is no strike flight with your mission!

COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)


1. WINGMAN COMMAND MENU 2. STRIKE COMMAND MENU (If flight available) 3. ESCORT COMMAND MENU (If flight available) 4. WILD WEASEL COMMAND MENU (If flight available) 5. AIRBASE COMMUNICATIONS MENU 6. MISSION MENU Control of the wingman and mission flights in Typhoon provide you with a great many options for real time tactics. The possibilities are virtually endless, but a typical mission might entail moving your wild weasel flight ahead at medium altitude to clear SAMs, while you send the strike flight in at low level, while you CAP at medium altitude. Novice players will not need to use any of the functionality to start with, but more experienced players will be able to take advantage of the more advanced instructions. Note that in addition to the control of your wingman, you will also be able to command escort, wild weasel and strike flights, giving a new level of control to the tactical game.
NOTE: Dont expect other flights to follow you to the ends of the earth. They are on strictly planned missions, and will obey your commands only with respect to the mission flight plan; for example, asking them to fly with you might mean that an earlier flight simply slows down until you catch up.

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS


COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)
1. WINGMAN COMMAND MENU

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WINGMAN MENU
1. ENGAGE MY TARGET 2. ENGAGE AIR TARGETS 3. ENGAGE GROUND TARGETS 4. DISENGAGE 5. TACTICAL MENU 1. Bracket left! 2. Bracket right! 3. Drag left 4. Drag right 5. Flight abort mission! 6. Previous Menu 6. FORMATION MENU 1. Cruise formation 2. Attack formation 3. Previous Menu 7. Previous Menu The wingman menu in practice step 1 To control your wingman press TAB then 1. Using key 1, command your wingman to attack your currently selected target. Using key 2, command your wingman to attack any air targets in the area. Using key 3, command your wingman to attack any ground targets in the area.

Using key 5, go to the menu that allows tactical manoeuvres. Bracket commands tell your wingmen to execute one side of an enveloping or pincer manoeuvre. You complete the opposite side of the manoeuvre. Drag commands tell your wingman to execute a decoy manoeuvre to the left or right, with the objective of 'luring' or 'dragging' an opponent after the wingman's aircraft. Using key 6, go to the formation menu. The wingman menu in practice step 2 Tactics To control your wingmans tactical manoeuvres, press 5 in the wingman menu. If you have a target track, make your wingman perform the left hand curve of a pincer-movement on that target by pressing 1. Bracket left. You should now complete the right hand part of the movement yourself. To have the wingman perform this manoeuvre on the right, press 2. Bracket right, instead. If you have a target track, make your wingman perform a left hand drag or luring manoeuvre by pressing 3. Drag Left. You should now hang back to see if the enemy takes the bait, and launch an attack from the rear. To have the wingman perform this manoeuvre on the right, press 4. Drag Right, instead. To make the wingman abort his current action and reformate with you, press 5. The wingman menu in practice step 3 Formations When cruising to targets or trying to minimise your radar profile, select 1. Cruise formation from the Wingman menu. When attacking targets, command your wingman to spread out to a distance of one mile by pressing 2. Attack formation. This gives the defenders a more difficult problem to deal with.

066

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS


The strike menu in practice step 1 To control your strike flight press TAB then 2. Press key 1 to command the strike flight to attack your currently selected target. Press key 2 to command strike flight to attack any air targets in the area. Press key 3 to command your strike flight to attack any ground targets in the area. Press key 4 to command the strike flight to disengage from the current target. Press key 5 to access the menu that allows tactical manoeuvres. The strike menu in practice step 2 To control your strike flights tactical manoeuvres, press TAB, 2 and 5. Press key 1 to command your strike flight to bracket your current target. Press key 2 to command your strike flight to fly ahead of you; e.g. when a rear attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 3 to command your strike flight to fly close to you; e.g. when you need to keep a close eye on them. Press key 4 to command your strike flight to fly behind you; e.g. when a frontal attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 5 to command your strike flight to fly at around 30,000ft; e.g. when en-route to a target defended by AAA. Press key 6 to command your strike flight to fly at around 15,000ft; e.g. when en-route to a target to be attacked by guided munitions. Press key 7 to command your strike flight to fly low at around 2,000ft; e.g. to use terrain masking to avoid enemy radar Press key 8 to tell the flight to abort its mission and return home.

COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)


2. STRIKE COMMAND MENU (If flight available)

STRIKE MENU
1. ENGAGE MY TARGET 2. ENGAGE AIR TARGETS 3. ENGAGE GROUND TARGETS 4. DISENGAGE 5. TACTICAL MENU 1. Bracket 2. Fly ahead 3. Fly with me 4. Fly behind me 5. Fly high 6. Fly medium 7. Fly high 8. Flight abort mission 9. Previous Menu 6. Previous Menu

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS


COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)
3. ESCORT COMMAND MENU (If flight available)

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ESCORT MENU
1. ENGAGE MY TARGET 2. ENGAGE AIR TARGETS 3. ENGAGE GROUND TARGETS 4. DISENGAGE 5. TACTICAL MENU 1. Bracket 2. Fly ahead 3. Fly with me 4. Fly behind me 5. Fly high 6. Fly medium 7. Fly high 8. Flight abort mission 9. Previous Menu 6. Previous Menu

The escort menu in practice step 1 To control your escort flight press TAB then 3. Press key 1 to command the escort flight to attack your currently selected target. Press key 2 to command escort flight to attack any air targets in the area. Press key 3 to command your escort flight to attack any ground targets in the area. Press key 4 to command the escort flight to disengage from the current target. Press key 5 to access the menu that allows tactical manoeuvres. The escort menu in practice step 2 To control your escort flights tactical manoeuvres, press TAB, 3 and 5. Press key 1 to command your escort flight to bracket your current target. Press key 2 to command your escort flight to fly ahead of you; e.g. when a rear attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 3 to command your escort flight to fly close to you; e.g. when you need to keep a close eye on them. Press key 4 to command your escort flight to fly behind you; e.g. when a frontal attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 5 to command your escort flight to fly at around 30,000ft; e.g. when en-route to a target defended by AAA. Press key 6 to command your escort flight to fly at around 15,000ft; e.g. when en-route to a target to be attacked by guided munitions. Press key 7 to command your escort flight to fly low at around 2,000 ft; e.g. to use terrain masking to avoid enemy radar. Press key 8 to tell the flight to abort its mission and return home.

068

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS


The Wild Weasel menu in practice step 1 To control your wild weasel flight press TAB then 4. Press key 1 to command the wild weasel flight to attack your currently selected target. Press key 2 to command wild weasel escort flight to attack any air targets in the area. Press key 3 to command your wild weasel flight to attack any ground targets in the area. Press key 4 to command the wild weasel flight to disengage from the current target. Press key 5 to access the menu that allows tactical manoeuvres. The Wild Weasel menu in practice step 2 To control your wild weasel flights tactical manoeuvres, press TAB, 2 and 5. Press key 1 to command your wild weasel flight to bracket your current target. Press key 2 to command your wild weasel flight to fly ahead of you; e.g. when a rear attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 3 to command your wild weasel flight to fly close to you; e.g. when you need to keep a close eye on them. Press key 4 to command your wild weasel flight to fly behind you; e.g. when a frontal attack by enemy fighters is anticipated. Press key 5 to command your wild weasel flight to fly at around 30,000ft; e.g. when you are cruising to a target and dont need protection against air defenses. Press key 6 to command your wild weasel flight to fly at around 15,000ft; e.g. when approaching air defence sites for the first time. Press key 7 to command your wild weasel flight to fly low at around 2,000 ft; e.g. to use terrain masking to avoid enemy radar. Press key 8 to tell the flight to abort its mission and return home.

COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)


4. WILD WEASEL COMMAND MENU (If flight available)

WILD WEASEL MENU


1. ENGAGE MY TARGET 2. ENGAGE AIR TARGETS 3. ENGAGE GROUND TARGETS 4. DISENGAGE 5. TACTICAL MENU 1. Bracket 2. Fly ahead 3. Fly with me 4. Fly behind me 5. Fly high 6. Fly medium 7. Fly high 8. Flight abort mission 9. Previous Menu 6. Previous Menu

COMMUNICATING WITH OTHER UNITS


COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)
5. AIRBASE COMMUNICATIONS MENU

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COMMAND MENUS (TAB KEY)


6. MISSION MENU

AIRBASE MENU
1. VECTOR TO AIRBASE 2. REQUEST LANDING (Request permission to land). 3. FINAL APPROACH (Landing at selected airfield). 4. Previous Menu The airbase menu in practice To open communications with an airfield near you, press TAB then 5. Press key 1 to get directions to the nearest airfield. Press key 2 to request permission to land at the nearest airfield. Press key 3 to announce your final approach.

MISSION MENU
1. RADAR ON (Search for targets) 2. RADAR OFF (Go stealthy) 3. ABORT MISSION (Everyone go home) 4. Previous Menu The mission menu in practice To give tactical instructions to all flights in your mission, press TAB then 6. Press key 1 to command everyone to turn their radar on to search for targets. Press key 2 to command everyone to turn their radar off to avoid early detection by radar warning receivers. Press key 3 to command every flight to abort the mission and return home. Do this if the odds are against you. Save the pilots and equipment for another mission.

070

ASSESSING YOUR SITUATION


The Defensive Aids Subsystem in practice Press an MFD on/off key (INSERT, HOME, PAGE UP) Press the appropriate MFD cycle key (DELETE, END PAGE DOWN) to select the map display. Press SHIFT M to toggle map. Zoom this display in and out using the / and keys. Ground targets will be identified with red or green crosses for enemy or allied forces respectively. Air targets will be identified with with red, orange or green squares, for enemy, unidentified traces, or confirmed targets. Missiles will be marked as yellow squares.

THE DEFENSIVE AIDS SUBSYSTEM (DASS)


Figure 46: The DASS is an invaluable aid to aircraft defence, giving you a Gods eye view of who is tracking you and which missiles are aimed at you.

The Defensive Aids Subsystem (DASS) MFD gathers its data from various passive sensors on the aircraft and data gathering systems around the battlefield. It cannot be used for weapons targeting, but is vital for defence especially when being attacked by missiles. The Missile Approach Warning System (MAWS) that integrates with the DASS will show you which aircraft have locked you in their radar, and provides a 360 degree view of missiles approaching from as far away as 60 miles. To access the DASS, first select the map then press SHIFT M. Small yellow tracks indicate airborne weapons. When missiles are in close proximity, the DASS will warn you of time to missile impact through voice cues, will show you whether it is an IR (I) or Radar (R) guided missile, and will automatically deploy chaff and flares. To evade a missile, try to position it so that it is approaching you from the front at 45 degrees to your direction of travel. As it gets close turn sharply in across its path with luck the missile will not be able to turn quickly enough and will fly past harmlessly. However, beware of turning back into the missiles path, as it may re-acquire you.

THE MOVING MAP DISPLAY


Figure 47: The map is an essential tool for navigation. At low level it helps you avoid obstacles; above the clouds it is the only way to find out where you are going.

The Moving Map Display (MMD) is useful for checking your waypoint route, which is shown as a light blue overlay. Waypoints are shown as dots, and the target appears as a big red triangle. You are also able to determine the topology from the colours of the map. High points are dark in tone, while low ground is shown as a light-green colour. Place names are shown next to small triangles with one of three colours: red for airfields; yellow for towns; and blue for ports. As you zoom out of the map, the place names will disappear in order to declutter the display.

ASSESSING YOUR SITUATION


The moving map display in practice Press an MFD on/off key (INSERT, HOME, PAGE UP) Press the appropriate MFD cycle key (DELETE, END PAGE DOWN). Zoom this display in and out using the / and keys.

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cross on the Radar MFD, and a ship appears as an inverted T. The colour of the track indicates whether it is a friend (green) or foe (red). USING THE TRACK HISTORY FEATURE It is possible to see trace history on the Moving Map Display (MMD) and DASS, revealing the path that an aircraft is taking. This is very useful for analysing both enemy and friendly tactics, improving your tactical decision-making. For example, a pair of enemy fighters initiating a bracket manoeuvre becomes very apparent with trace history turned on. CHECKING LAUNCH PARAMETERS When a weapon is selected, a white range bar appears on the radar MFD and indicates the optimum launch parameters for that weapon. You will notice that this bar will lengthen and shorten depending on altitude and aspect to the target. At higher altitudes, you will get improved range as the air gets thinner and you have a greater ballistic envelope. When flying towards an enemy at high speed, range will increase as the distance will be closed more quickly, while engagements on an enemy flying away from you will result in a shorter range because the missile has to play catch-up. The CAPTOR radar in practice To acquire the most favourable target for a selected weapon, simply press T. Cycle through available targets with the X and Z keys. Increase or decrease range with the / and keys.

THE CAPTOR RADAR


Figure 48: The radar MFD works closely with the HUD/HMD, and offers a tactical gods eye view that extends to a range of 100 miles.

IDENTIFYING TRACKS On the radar, unidentified traces are shown in orange, while the designation of the currently selected trace is shown as unknown on the HUD. At closer ranges, an unidentified trace may gain a category designation, such as fighter or bomber, but remains an unknown trace in terms of aircraft type and allegiance. At closer ranges, Non-Cooperative Target Recognition will identify the type of aircraft and Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems will determine the allegiance. In the Icelandic theatre, the lack of AWACS and JSTARS aircraft means that pilots will have to work harder to identify radar traces. Beware the unknown traces, and approach them with caution. A simple rule of thumb is to assume they are enemies until their identity is confirmed. IDENTIFYING GROUND AND SEA TARGETS Ground targets are fed into the display from a variety of sources, including a data uplink from ground forces. A ground trace appears as a

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ACQUIRING TARGETS
If you select an air-to-ground guided weapon, such as Brimstone or an LGB, thermal imaging will show the currently tracked target on the same MFD as the IRST display. Other information on the display will show you the speed of the target if it is moving. The Thermal Imaging (TI) system in practice To acquire the most favourable target for a selected AG weapon, simply press T. Cycle through available targets with the X and C keys.

THE PIRATE INFRA-RED (IR) SYSTEM


Figure 49: The IRST provides visual cues about your enemy, even when the radar is turned off. It also works as an imaging system for various weapons.

At ranges of around 20nm, the PIRATE Infra Red Search and Track (IRST) comes into its own. This sensor detects heat emissions from targets and is passive, which means that it emits no signals that could give away your position, unlike the radar. Information from the IRST on enemy positions is integrated with the radar signals and appears on the same MFD. IRST is also capable of providing TV-like images which aids in aircraft recognition. Information at the top of the IRST indicates the absolute speed of the target and its range. IRST is invaluable in dogfights, or when hunting for cruise missiles. The Pirate Infra-Red (Ir) System in practice To acquire the most favourable target for a selected weapon, press T. Cycle through available targets with the X and Z keys.

THE ARTIFICIAL HORIZON AND COMPASS


Figure 51: Analogue instruments provide back-up in case of HUD and MFD failure.

These are the backup analogue instruments located on the right-hand glare shield. They are to be used to get home in case of catastrophic damage to the HUD and MFDs. Analogue instruments in practice On the analog compass, the next waypoint is indicated by a small marker moving around the rim of the compass.

THE THERMAL IMAGING (TI) SYSTEM


Figure 50: The TI system uses the same display as the IRST, but is used with air-to-ground weapons.

MANAGING YOUR WEAPONS


THE STORES DISPLAY
The mass of the weapons you carry will make a difference to the performance of your Eurofighter Typhoon. The more weapons you carry, the slower you will accelerate and the aircraft will handle more sluggishly. While firing weapons returns you to a more agile state, be careful not to fire all your weapons at the first sign of trouble particularly your air-to-air missiles that are your principle defence. Figure 52: The stores display gives you a quick visual reminder of what is on your aircraft. The currently selected weapons and the number are displayed on the right of the HUD.

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Press the J key to bring up the jettison stores menu. To jettison fuel tanks, press 1 on the Jettison Stores menu. To jettison air-to-ground weapons, press 2 on the Jettison Stores menu. To jettison all stores, press 3 on the Jettison Stores menu.

JETTISONING STORES Press the J key to bring up the jettison stores menu. This will give you the option to jettison all your weapons, your fuel tanks or all air-to-ground stores. If you are on an air-to-ground mission and are jumped by enemy fighters, the least you should do is jettison your tanks. If that doesnt help, you may need to jettison all air-to-ground ordinance. Finally, if your aircraft is badly damaged, eject all stores in order to clean-up the planes aerodynamics and increase your chances of getting back to friendly territory. Stores management in practice Press the Home key to bring up the centre MFD. If necessary, press the End key until the stores MFD is visible. Press the Enter or Backspace keys to view the number of AA or AG weapons left.

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FIRING AIR-TO-AIR WEAPONS

THE MAUSER 27MM CANNON

Figure 53: The Typhoons cannon is lethal in both air-to-air and air-to-ground combat. The air-to-air cannon sight has a predictor snake that shows the path of your bullets from the aircraft up to the aiming point. This device is particularly useful in a turning dogfight when you need to get lead on the target, firing into its path of travel. As you are banking, get the line to flatten so that it lies in the same plane as the target and pull your nose in front of him before firing. A complete circle shows that the target is at three miles or more, which represents a tough shot. As you get closer, the line moves around and at the half-way mark you are with one-and-a-half miles, which is a good range to go for a kill. Lead the snake through the target. You may also consider using the zoom keys (F11 and F12), to enlarge the objects you are shooting at and see the results of your gunnery. Remember that you only have 1760 rounds, or enough for a twenty second burst, and the best shots are always made from the target's six o'clock position. You will use cannon extensively when dealing with cruise missiles and drones, because the targets do not manoeuvre against you and it would be a waste to fire an expensive guided missile. A similar role was performed by the Typhoon of World War II against the V1 flying bombs. They had the same problem as you if you get too close when you open fire, they could blow-up in your face. Beware! Firing the air-to-air cannon in practice Select the cannon using the Enter key. Lock a target with the T key. Try to fly the snake or circular sight over the target. Start firing the moment you are in range and confident of a good shot. Use the zoom keys to assist in targeting. target to be sure of getting shells to hit their mark.

FIRING AIR-TO-AIR WEAPONS


THE METEOR BVR MISSILE

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Figure 54: Meteor is an advanced missile designed to kill targets Beyond Visual Range (BVR). Meteor is an ramjet missile with advanced seeker capabilities that will enable the RAFs pilots to defend the skies in safety thanks to its speed, range and agility. Meteor has been specifically designed for Eurofighter Typhoon, to replace the AMRAAM. Meteor gives its greatest range at high-altitude in high-speed, head-on engagements. It is an ideal weapon for Combat Air Patrol missions, or rapid-reaction interception from the airfield. It is not a dogfighting weapon and is therefore not suited to close-in combat, where ASRAAM or guns should be used. In Eurofighter Typhoon there is a choice of long and medium range versions. The long-range weapons carry a weight penalty, so when you are fully laden for an air-to ground mission, it is unwise to choose the long-range variant. However, on CAP missions, it is a good choice for hitting the enemy first. Firing the Meteor in practice To achieve the optimum launch envelope, climb to 20,000ft+ and go to full throttle prior to obtaining a launch solution. Press T to engage the most appropriate target for the weapon. Ensure the target falls within the measure of the white range bar on the radar MFD. Meteor is a full active homing missile, so once fired requires no further guidance from your aircraft.

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FIRING AIR-TO-AIR WEAPONS

THE ASRAAM SHORT-RANGE MISSILE

Figure 55: Agile and capable of being launched off-boresight, ASRAAM is your best weapon in a dogfight. ASRAAM, or Advanced Short Range Air to Air Missile is an agile short-range dogfighting missile with a range of around 10 nautical miles. It has a highly-sensitive infra-red seeker which can lock on to target before or after launch, giving the pilot a fire-and-forget capability, and has outstanding resistance to electronic countermeasures. Firing the ASRAAM in practice Close to between 10 and 1 nautical mile on the target. Select the weapon and press T to get a lock. Approach from behind if you can. This type of shot has the best chance of success. ASRAAM cannot be fired over your shoulder but it can be fired at targets that are a high angle off the nose of your aircraft.

FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS

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THE MAUSER 27MM AIR-TO-GROUND CANNON


The air to ground cannon sight lacks the predictor snake of the airto-air cannon. Instead it has a small flat bar in the centre to help you line up on targets. It is best to strafe at relatively shallow angles to give yourself time to pull up. The circle around the pipper is a range clock set at one mile; it will start to unwind when you are within range. You may also consider using the zoom keys (F11 and F12), to enlarge the objects you are shooting at and see the results of your gunnery. Remember that debris from exploding targets might hit your aircraft if you are too close, causing catastrophic damage while you are at low altitude. Firing the air-to-ground cannon in practice Select the cannon using the Backspace key Dive in a shallow angle of around 5 to 10 degrees Place the aiming pipper over the target and wait until the range clock begins to unwind. Start firing the moment you are in range and confident of a good shot. Use the zoom keys to assist in targeting.

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FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS

THE CRV-7 UNGUIDED ROCKET

Figure 56: Rockets are effective weapons against soft-skinned vehicles, SAM sites, parked aircraft and shipping. Unguided rockets are aimed and fired in the same manner as the air-to-ground cannon. The range clock around the pipper has a slightly greater range than the cannon but remember that the rockets have a much greater explosive effect, and you are more likely to incur damage if you fly too close to the target. Approach targets at a shallow angle and give yourself time to pull away. Use of the zoom keys (F11 and F12) will assist in scoring hits and give you the satisfaction of seeing the results of your shooting. Firing the unguided rockets in practice Select the CRV-7 using the Backspace key Dive in a shallow angle of around 5 to 10 degrees Place the aiming pipper over the target and wait until the range clock begins to unwind. Start firing the moment you are in range and confident of a good shot. Use the zoom keys to assist in targeting.

FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS


THE BRIMSTONE GUIDED AIR-TO-GROUND MISSILE

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Figure 57: Brimstone guided missiles can be carried on triple launchers, giving the Typhoon tremendous punch against deployed armour. The Brimstone missile system is an autonomous millimetre-wave version of the U.S. HELLFIRE anti-armour missile. The Brimstone missile system includes three missiles mounted on a three-rail launcher, integrated to operate off Harrier, Tornado and Eurofighter 2000 aircraft. Press the T key to acquire a target and check the image in the TI MFD. If you do not have the right target, use the X and C keys to cycle through available targets. Once you have the right vehicle in sight and the shoot cue appears, release the weapon. Once you have fired, you are free to acquire another target. Firing the Brimstone in practice Press the Insert or Page-up key to bring up a tactical display. Scroll through the display using either the Delete or Page-up keys until the Infra red screen shows (green display). Select the Brimstone using the Backspace key. Select the nearest available target using the T key. You should now see the target in the display, with its range indicated. Press the trigger to release the weapon.

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FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS

THE PENGUIN ANTI-SHIP MISSILE

Figure 58: The Penguin is relatively compact compared with other NATO anti-ship missiles, allowing more to be carried on the Typhoon. This Norwegian developed missile was originally a ship-to-ship weapon, but was later modified for helicopters and fighters. It is an effective weapon, but has a range of only twenty miles, making an approach close to surface vessels necessary. Low level flight to the target will help to avoid early warning radar, but the pilot must pop-up to acquire a target and launch the weapon. Press the T key to acquire a target and check the image in the TI MFD. If you do not have the right target, use the X and C keys to cycle through available targets. Once you have the right vessel in sight and the shoot cue appears, release the weapon. Once you have fired, you are free to acquire another target. Firing the Penguin in practice Press the Insert or Page-up key to bring up a tactical display. Scroll through the display using either the Delete or Page-up keys until the Infra red screen shows (green display). Select the Penguin using the Backspace key. Select the nearest available target using the T key. You should now see the target in the display, with its range indicated. Press the trigger to release the weapon.

FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS


THE ALARM ANTI-RADIATION MISSILE

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Figure 59: On Wild Weasel missions, ALARM is the weapon of choice for destroying radar sites and SAM guidance systems. The Air Launched Anti-Radiation Missile (ALARM) operates by homing on to the emissions of enemy radar. Careful radar operators have adopted the practice of switching on their radar only for brief intervals. However, ALARM can defeat this tactic by memorising the location of the last detected emission. The moment a radar lights-up when you have the weapon selected, the ALARM will lock-on. Fire the weapon if you are within range. Some SAM sites, however, will not switch on the radar until you have flown past. This is very dangerous because the retreating hot end of the airplane is an easy target for a SAM. This is why Wild Weasel flights often carry cluster bombs, using these when sites refuse to switch their radar on. Firing the ALARM in practice Press the Insert or Page-up key to bring up a tactical display. Scroll through the display using either the Delete or Page-up keys until the Infra red screen shows (green display). Select the ALARM using the Backspace key. Select the nearest available target using the T key. You should now see the target in the display, with its range indicated. When it is in range, press the trigger to release the weapon.

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FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS

THE PAVEWAY III GUIDED BOMB

Figure 60: Although designed to be a precision weapon, the LGB may be tough to drop when the weather is cloudy, breaking the laser tracking. Version III of the battle-proven Paveway series of laser guided bombs (LGBs) was designed specifically to allow low-altitude delivery and to ensure greater stand-off distances. In Typhoon, designation will be done by ground forces, so all you need to do is get within range of the target with a clear line of sight cloud will obstruct the laser guidance system in the bombs nose. Once you are within range of the target, it will appear in the IRST display. The system will automatically zoom onto the target. Once you have released the bomb, it will be tracked in the IRST MFD. Dropping the LGB in practice Press the Insert or Page-up key to bring up a tactical display. Scroll through the display using either the Delete or Page-up keys until the TI screen shows (green display). Select the LGB using the Backspace key. Select the nearest available target using the T key. You should now see the target in the display, with its range indicated. When it is in range, the shoot cue will flash and you should press the trigger to release the weapon.

FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS


THE MARK 80 SERIES UNGUIDED BOMBS

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Figure 61: The unguided bombs are in plentiful supply, and with skillful delivery are effective weapons. The Mk 80 bombs have standard HE (High Explosive) warheads, which are devastating if a direct hit was scored on tanks, ships, SAM sites or buildings. You have a choice of 500lb Mk82 or 1000lb Mk84 bombs. For large targets, choose the larger bomb. Bombs can be released in shallow dives from medium to low altitudes, or in steep, dive-bombing attacks. The latter help to keep you above Man Portable Air Defenses (MANPAD shoulder-launched weapons) and AAA. Ingress at 20 30, 000 ft and navigate to within five miles of the target. At this point begin a steep dive, closing your throttle and opening the airbrake to help slow your descent. Fly the CCIP through the target and release the weapons at around 15,000 ft, pulling up and egressing at around 10,000 ft. When dive bombing, the steeper the dive, the more accurate your bombing will be. The bombs should not be released below 2000ft, or your plane will be damaged by the blast. Dropping the free-fall bomb in practice Select the weapon using the Backspace key. Fly towards the ingress waypoint above 2000ft, at a speed of 450 - 500 knots. Keep the wings level on your approach; i.e do not bank the aircraft. Try to acquire the target visually. Smoothly fly the bomb fall line through the target. Release the weapon when the CCIP mark crosses the target. Run out fast and low over the target.

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FIRING AIR-TO-GROUND WEAPONS

THE BL-755 CLUSTER BOMB

Figure 62: The cluster bomb is an area weapon, most useful for ensuring destruction of soft targets such as SAM sites and small ships. This weapon is ideally used where destruction of a soft-skinned target is necessary and a precision approach cannot be guaranteed, for example when flying fast and low. The best height for delivery will be between 250 and 500 ft. Only 5 seconds spacing is required between aircraft delivering this weapon. If your wingman is flying close formation when the bombs are dropped, you will saturate the area and cause widespread destruction. It is an ideal weapon for missions against small vessels at sea. Dropping the cluster bomb in practice Select the weapon using the Backspace key. Fly towards the ingress waypoint at low-level to avoid radar, at a speed of 450 - 500 knots. Keep the wings level on your approach. Try to acquire the target visually. Smoothly fly the bomb fall line through the target. Release the weapon when the CCIP mark crosses the target. Run out fast and low over the target.

ASSESSING AIRCRAFT DAMAGE


Figure 63: The systems status display describes the current status of each vital system in the aircraft.

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Available on the centre MFD, the systems status display shows the state of every essential system in the aircraft. With all systems go after spool-up, the boxes representing each system will go green. An aircraft system that enters a damaged state prior to declaring a total system malfunction, will appear in an orange box. Total system malfunction is heralded by the damaged systems box turning red. When damaged, you will notice that Typhoon starts to behave unpredictably. The flight control system will reconfigure itself in an attempt to correct the problems. This may make matters better or unfortunately worse. Once the majority of aircraft systems have shut down, ejection is your only available recourse. Remember, it is best to eject over friendly territory, so attempt to fly to safety if at all possible. Assessing aircraft damage in practice To bring up the System Status MFD, switch on the centre MFD using the HOME key. If the Status MFD is not visible, cycle the MFD using the END key. Check to see that all systems are green.

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FL YING WITH THE AUTOPILOT


The autopilot in practice To bring up the Autopilot MFD, switch on the centre MFD using the HOME key. If the Autopilot MFD is not visible, cycle the MFD using the END key. The selected mode is shown in green. To change mode, press SHIFT A. Press A to activate the autopilot. NOTE. It is possible to change mode without the Autopilot MFD on display. Simply press SHIFT A to switch modes and the A key to activate or de-activate the autopilot.

Figure 64: The autopilot waypoint mode is handy for navigation, and the auto-throttle is useful in dogfights and landing.

The autopilot has two modes: the waypoint-track mode and the tracking throttle mode. The autopilot display is on a centre MFD, and this is where you set the desired mode. Modes can also be switched using SHIFT A. To activate and de-activate the autopilot press A.

WAYPOINT TRACKING MODE


In waypoint mode, the aircraft will head for the selected waypoint with an altitude equivalent to the altitude being flown when the autopilot was set. You are able to alter the waypoint selected with the Q and W keys, for last waypoint or next waypoint. This mode is particularly useful if you have become disoriented after combat or when heading for your target point. The autopilot waypoint mode will always take you to an altitude where you will be safe from impact with mountains and hills.

THROTTLE TRACKING MODE


In tracking throttle mode, the engines will try to hold the same airspeed as the airspeed that was being flown when the autopilot was set. This is particularly handy for setups without throttles, as the autopilot will attempt to maintain a constant velocity.

MANAGING YOUR FUEL


Engines and Fuel Display
Figure 65: Keep an eye on the fuel display, especially after combat using afterburners.

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The fuel display is handy for calculating fuel left and fuel required to reach an indicated waypoint, your next waypoint, home base or nearest airbase. Three colours are used to indicate critical fuel levels: green means adequate fuel; orange indicates that fuels levels are becoming critical; red indicates that you have insufficient fuel for the specified destination. For example, if you see an orange bar on your Home Airbase indicator, this indicates Bingo fuel or the fact that you have just enough fuel to get home. The display is dynamic: as you open the throttle, you will see the effects of the increased fuel consumption. However, as you accelerate, the speed increase has a positive effect on fuel consumption, because you are able to travel further. Flying high at supersonic speeds will be better than flying low and fast, because you have the added benefit of being able to glide for long distances if you should run out of fuel. If you are flying with drop tanks, their load is added to the total fuel load. When the tanks are empty, you will see a message on the display telling you to jettison the tanks. This will be accompanied by a similar message from Nagging Nora, the aircrafts voice prompt.

The fuel display also reveals the tremendous fuel consumption caused by using afterburners. This is an instrument you should learn to use, because fuel will be critical on some missions. Note: the top bar will only indicate full capacity when you are carrying all possible drop-tanks. Managing your fuel in practice Switch on the centre MFD with the Home key. Toggle the display with the End key until you see the Fuel display. Observe the effects of your speed and throttle setting on fuel consumption. When your drop tanks become empty, press the J key to access the Jettison Loads menu.

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TYPHOON PILOT SPEECH

Voices from the following characters can be heard in the game: Player pilot male Player pilot female Wingman male Wingman female Flights in player mission male(strike, escort, wild weasel, transport) Flights outside player mission male Tower female Pilot Chat Lead, roger/copy that Knock it off! Two, disengage Engage my target/bandit Engage ground threat Bracket Two, bracket left/right Bracket complete Commencing attack run Weapons hot. Commencing attack! Mayday, Mayday, Punching out/ejecting Missile inbound!/Incoming missile Splash! I'm hit! Lead on the hold Lead ready for departure Airborne Spread/close formation, go card All flights abort mission. Repeat abort mission! Meaning Confirmation that an order is being executed Stop whatever you are doing Break away from an engagement with the enemy Attack the air target I have locked Attack the ground target I have locked Start pincer movement against enemy Form on side of a pincer movement Pincer movement completed Beginning a ground attack Weapons are active. Attack is starting. Help, help, I am going to eject from the aircraft Missile heading for an airplane You have hit a target and killed it You are hit Waiting for permission to land/take-off Ready to take-off After take-off, when the wheels are off the ground Open or close the formation, or distance between player and wingman Stop the mission and go home, jettisoning unused air-to-ground weapons.

TYPHOON PILOT SPEECH

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Pilot Chat Weapons hot, engaging Negative Lead, I'm low fuel Negative Lead, I'm out of weapons Negative Lead, my aircraft is damaged Fox one Fox two Guns, guns Weapons free Radar on. Nose hot. Radar off. Nose cold Unidentified contact Bugging out Ground threat Out of fuel, looking for somewhere to ditch Request vector for recovery Pan pan pan! Request emergency landing Request clearance to land On the brake. Coming in for final approach. Gear up/down

Meaning Weapons are live and I am engaging an enemy. I cant oblige, I have a fuel shortage to worry about I cant oblige, I have a weapons shortage to worry about I cant oblige, I have damage to worry about I have fired a BVR missile (Meteor) I have fired a short-range missile (ASRAAM) Watch out, I am using guns Bombs have left the aircraft When the radar is on, the nose is said to be hot and, conversely, cold. I dont know who that is I am leaving the fight and heading home There is a SAM or AAA unit nearby No fuel, I need somewhere to land quickly I need directions to the airfield, please! Emergency, listen to me and give me priority for landing I would like to land, if possible. Airbrake on, making final approach to the runway Undercarriage up/down

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


The Eurofighter project is managed by the NATO Eurofighter & Tornado Management Agency (NETMA), set up to oversee the procurement of weapon systems for all four partner country air forces.

HISTORY
The operational requirements for the Eurofighter aircraft, the worlds most advanced swing role combat aircraft, were set out in the European Staff Requirement (ESR-D) of January 1994, agreed and signed by the Chiefs of Air Staff of Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. ESR-D specified an extremely agile single seat, twin engined, delta canard fighter with optimal performance in both supersonic and sub-sonic regions of Beyond-Visual-Range (BVR) and Close-In-Combat, while at the same time retaining a very significant Air-to-Ground capability. Maximum operational effectiveness and flexibility, high survivability, extensive technological growth potential as well as high reliability and maintainability at low operating costs were defined as the major design criteria. Several industrial consortia were set up as part of the project, including: Eurofighter GmbH, set up to manage the development of the complete weapon system. It is owned by the four partner companies, with agreed development workshares of: BAE SYSTEMS (BAE UK) 33 per cent Alenia Aerospazio (Italy) 21 per cent EADS (Formerly DASA, Germany and CASA, Spain) 46 per cent Eurojet Turbo GmbH, set up by Fiat Aviazione (Italy), ITP (Spain), MTU-Munchen (Germany), and Rolls-Royce (UK), to develop the EJ200 engine for the new fighter aircraft. Euroradar, a consortium brought together to develop the all-new CAPTOR radar. It is led by BAE SYSTEMS (UK), and includes FIAR (Italy), EADS Defence Electronics, and ENOSA (Spain).

TEST PROGRAMME
Seven development aircraft (DA) have been built by the four partner companies, and are all involved in an intense flight test programme in the four countries. The first flight of a Eurofighter aircraft took place on 27 March 1994. Development Aircraft DA1 made its maiden flight from EADS flight-test facility in Manching, Germany. At this time DA1 was powered by two RB199 interim engines, the engine of the Tornado and the EAP technology demonstrator. The first flight was a total success. The plane handled well and all checks were successfully completed. The EADS test pilot described it as a perfect aircraft. A few days later, DA2, the first BAE SYSTEMS-built Development Aircraft, made its maiden flight from BAE SYSTEMS Warton on 6 April 1994. The plane was also equipped with the RB199 engine. The test pilot was highly enthusiastic, commenting that even this early in its development, the aircraft was showing impressive potential. DA3, the first of the two Italian Development Aircraft, flew from Caselle, near Turin, in June 1994, and was the first to be equipped with the EJ200 engine. In the flight test programme, this Development Aircraft is used for engine integration testing as well as weapons testing, including missiles and the 27mm gun. DA4, the second BAE SYSTEMS Development Aircraft and a two-seater variant, flew for the first time in March 1997 from Warton. It is also used for training pilots new to the Eurofighter Typhoon.

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


The second German Development Aircraft, DA5, made its first flight in February 1997. It was the first complete weapon system with the CAPTOR radar system installed. In the flight test programme, this Development Aircraft is also involved in testing avionics integration and weapons integration. The two-seater DA6 was the built by EADS in Spain and flew for the first time in August 1996. Built to train pilots new to Eurofighter Typhoon, DA6s main mission in the development programme is to test avionics systems and the carefree handling of the two-seater variant. DA7, the second Development Aircraft built by Alenia Aerospazio in Italy, made its maiden flight in January 1997. In the flight test programme, this Development Aircraft is used for weapons integration, navigation systems and performance. By September 2000, the seven Development Aircraft had logged a total of more than 1300 flying hours and well over 1400 test sorties.

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In mid-1996, trials were started for the integration of a new radar system into the aircraft. The CAPTOR, a new multimode pulse-Doppler radar, developed by the Euroradar consortium, was initially tested in a BAC1-11 flying test-bed, before being integrated into the main test programme.

PRODUCTION PHASE
The UK government announced its commitment to signing the four-nation Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the start of the production investment phase in September 1996. Spain followed in November of the same year, while the decisions by the German and Italian Governments were confirmed in late 1997. The Defence Ministers of the four partner countries signed the MoUs covering Production and Support on 22 December 1997 in Bonn. NETMA and Eurofighter GmbH subsequently signed the production and support contracts for 620 aircraft on 30 January 1998. In September 1998, the industrial consortium responsible for the Eurofighter programme announced that the aircraft was being named Typhoon for the export market. On 18 September 1998 the Supplement 2 agreements to the production contract were signed in Munich. This fixed-price contract covers the production of the first tranche of 148 aircraft. Work on the first sub-assemblies for series production Eurofighter aircraft commenced in late 1998. At Samlesbury in the UK, BAE SYSTEMS has begun assembly of the front fuselage cockpit half sections. At Bremen in Germany EADS has started assembly of the centre fuselage rear section, at EADS in Spain work has commenced on the first right, and at EADS in Italy on the first left, wing.

EVOLUTION OF THE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME


With the flight test programme well underway, in early 1996 the four nations signed a further contract in preparation for the production phase of the programme. This included a re-orientation of the requirements of the four countries air forces. The contract also formalised a change in the workshare for the production phase of the programme, due to a revision of the procurement requirements for the four nations. The final aircraft requirement figures, agreed in January 1996: 232 for the UK 180 for Germany 121 for Italy 87 for Spain 37% workshare 30% workshare 19% workshare, and 14% workshare.

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


EFI is fully backed by the strengths and resources of the Partner Companies in the Eurofighter consortium - European Aeronautic, Defence and Space. (EADS), BAE SYSTEMS, and Alenia Aerospazio. EFI is currently running active campaigns in the Netherlands, Greece, Norway and South Korea.

In September 2000 BAE SYSTEMS commenced the final assembly of the first production Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft at Warton in Lancashire. BAE SYSTEMS was the first of the four partner assembly lines to start the final stage of production of Eurofighter Typhoon. EADS-Germany and Alenia Aerospazio of Italy launched their final assembly sites late in 2000, while EADS-Spain followed in early 2001.

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON DESIGN FEATURES AND PERFORMANCE:


Performance/Weight Two Eurojet EJ200 turbofan engines, each approximately 60kN (13,490lb) dry, 90kN (20,250lb) with reheat Maximum speed of Mach 2.0 plus Runway requirement of 700m (2,300ft) g limits +9/-3 Basic Mass Empty (enhanced air to ground capability) 10,995kg (24,239lb) Maximum take-off weight 23,000kg (50,700lb) External stores load (weapons and fuel) 6,500 - 8,000kg (14,330 - 17,636lb) Weapons and stores Internally mounted 27mm Mauser gun Total of 13 external stores stations: five (incl one wet) under fuselage and four (incl one wet) under each wing Mix of Beyond Visual Range Air-to-Air missiles (BVRAAM) and Short-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (SRAAM) carried externally Four BVRAAM underfuselage in semi-conformal carriage configuration Full range of Air-to-Surface weaponry including: Laser guided bombs Advanced anti armour weapons Conventionally armed stand-off missiles

EXPORT
Eurofighter Typhoon targets markets for the replacement of 2nd/3rd generation aircraft and those countries seeking to enter the 4th generation combat aircraft market with the worlds most advanced swing-role combat aircraft. Over the past two years the opportunity for Eurofighter Typhoon export has progressed rapidly. The replacement 2nd and 3rd generation military aircraft requires an option for an advanced swing-role aircraft. Eurofighter Typhoon is well placed to meet this demand. A potential export market of up to 800 aircraft between 2005 and 2025 is foreseen in Eurofighters own market analysis (not including US, CIS and the four EUROFIGHTER Nations (D, I, E, GB). The aim is to capture over 50% of this available market i.e. >400 aircraft. This would bring the total production up to over 1000 aircraft, which will be the largest military aircraft programme in Europe. The EUROFIGHTER Partner Companies created a single organisation, Eurofighter International (EFI), based in London to address this issue. EFIs responsibilities are: Export related marketing sales and commercial activities Export Customer interfaces Export financing and contracting including support aspects of export contracts (Industrial participation etc.)

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON HELMET
The Eurofighter Head Equipment Assembly (HEA) comprises the aircrew helmet and all the sub-system elements needed to display a real world overlaid picture on the helmet visor.

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The HEA fulfils all of the normal functions of an aircrew helmet, such as: Life support Oxygen mask positive pressure breathing for high g manoeuvres. Communications Microphone direct voice input (DVI) compatible. Earphones including high attenuation of external noise. Aircrew protection High Speed Ejection tough helmet shell, blast visor, secure fastening. NBC NBC hood can be fitted. Laser anti-laser visor. Additional Features: Aircrew comfort Lightweight Advanced helmet suspension system Comfortable and stable, air-cooled temperature control Logistics support Display of target/flight information High performance symbol/image generation Binocular fully overlapped wide (40) field of view Capture and display of the Night Vision Enhanced (NVE) outside world picture Twin Night Vision Enhancement (NVE) cameras - wide (40) field of view. The outstanding achievement of HEA is to bring together an array of advanced technologies and systems in a single integrated operational helmet. The capabilities offered by HEA set Eurofighter Typhoon apart and offer aircrew a key tactical advantage in combat.

The HEA provides a 24-hour, all-weather capability to track targets using the visor display, and designate them for attack using the microphone to communicate via the aircraft Direct Voice Input (DVI). Information is displayed wherever aircrew look as the HEA includes a high-speed optical tracking system to determine which way the helmet is pointing.

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


Production of 232 aircraft for the UK, 180 aircraft for Germany, 121 aircraft for Italy, and 87 aircraft for Spain will be in three tranches each of 148, 236 and 236 aircraft respectively. First metal was cut in the second quarter of 1998 and assembly of the front and centre fuselage for the first production aircraft began by the end of 1998. Work on the first right and left wing started early 1999 and major subassemblies are now underway. Deliveries of aircraft from this order will begin in 2001 with five Instrumented Production Aircraft (IPA). These will join the seven aircraft already in the flight test programme. First deliveries of operational aircraft to the Air Forces are planned for 2002. Production of Eurofighter Typhoon is characterised by modern manufacturing techniques and principles. Integrated product teams look at lean manufacturing methods to cut down delivery lead-times, to keep cost down and to increase productivity. The use of advanced materials like carbon-fibre keeps the complexity of parts low and reduces the total number of parts. A high level of automation will be achieved by using CATIA for designing the tools and programming numerical controlled machines on the shop floor. Following the single-source principle, the four partners share production as follows: Alenia Aerospazio left wing, outboard flaperons, second and third stage of aft fuselage BAE SYSTEMS front fuselage, canards, windscreen and canopy, dorsal spine, vertical stabiliser, inboard flaperons and stage one of aft fuselage EADS MA (Spain) right wing and leading-edge slats EADS MA (Germany) central fuselage.

PRODUCTION PROGRAMME
The overall production contract for the initial purchase of 620 aircraft plus an option for 90 aircraft was signed by NETMA and Eurofighter GmbH on January 30th 1998. Under this maximum price Umbrella Contract, were the following agreements: Supplement 1 for Production Investment for the 620 aircraft, and long lead items for the first batch of 148 aircraft. A framing agreement for Integrated Logistic Support for the whole programme, Two Procurement contracts: PC 1 for ILS services and PC 2 for defining and tendering for the design and development of four major ground support items including the Aircrew Synthetic Training Aids (ASTA) the Ground Support System, Ground Training Aids for technicians and the International Weapon System Support System. On 18 September 1998 the Supplement 2 fixed price agreements were signed between the NATO Eurofighter Management Agency (NEMTA), Eurofighter GmbH and Eurojet GmbH. These agreements translate the maximum prices defined in the Production Umbrella contracts into firm orders at fixed prices for a first Tranche of weapon systems comprising 148 aircraft and 363 engines. The value of the order is in the region of 14 Billion DM. The agreements also include spare engines and role equipment for the Tranche 1 aircraft, and long lead-time items for Tranche 2 of 236 aircraft. Further orders for the full range of spares, ground support equipment, training aids, and support for the first Tranche of aircraft followed.

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION

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Four final assembly lines are being set up by the four partner companies: Alenia Aerospazio BAE SYSTEMS EADS (Spain) EADS (Germany) Production by Tranches Tranche 1 2 3 total aircraft 148 236 236 620 engines 363 519 500 1382 Timescale for deliveries 2001 to 2005 2005 to 2010 2010 to 2014 Caselle near Turin Warton Getafe near Madrid Manching

Production by Nation Country UK Germany Italy Spain Tranche 1 total 55 232 44 180 29 121 20 87 workshare percentage 37 30 19 14

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION


vision equipment the Eurofighter Typhoon pilot is able to operate low level at night, detecting and engaging ground targets without emitting tell-tale radar transmissions. Defensive Aids: Eurofighter Typhoons self-protection system has a number of passive modes, allowing the detection of enemy emissions without revealing the Eurofighter aircraft's presence. Communications: any radio transmission can reveal an aircrafts position but the Eurofighter Typhoon is able to receive information, both in the form of voice and data - such as target information - from its datalink and secure radio systems; equally, all voice transmission is encrypted to prevent its detection. These features, inherent within the aircraft airframe and onboard system design, are supported by a cockpit, which gives the pilot continuous and instant control over the level of emissions from his aircraft. Therefore he can operate completely silent, yet still receive target information from other aircraft and his own passive sensors, even to the end of an engagement, at the same time relying on Eurofighter Typhoons stealth features to protect him against detection. All these features ensure that the Eurofighter Typhoon has high survivability and the ability to operate independently from ground and airborne control agencies in dense electronic warfare environments. The Eurofighter Typhoon is by any standard a stealthy aircraft.

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON STEALTH


To survive in a present day, hostile, combat scenario, all modern fighter aircraft must be designed with stealth in mind and some aircraft have been designed with stealth as the overriding design objective, regardless of the impact that this approach might have on other critically important features such as manoeuvrability, weapon payload and, more importantly, affordability. Designing a fighter aircraft for stealth alone means making compromises to its aerodynamic and manoeuvre performance as well as restricting the number of weapons that aircraft can carry. The carriage of weapons on conventional under-wing pylons negates the stealth design. The design of the aircraft has not sacrificed flexibility of weapon carriage, manoeuvrability or performance to produce an inflexible stealth aircraft but it does contain a comprehensive suite of stealth features. Visual Detection: the combination of small airframe and low engine emissions makes the Eurofighter Typhoon very difficult to detect visually. Radar Reflections: although not of the classic angular, zigzag edged shape usually associated with stealth designs, Eurofighter Typhoons shape balances aerodynamic requirements, such as low drag and high lift, with the need to minimise reflected radar energy in all directions producing a signature which is smaller than that of all other combat aircraft currently in production. Passive Systems: using a combination of IRST (Infra-Red Search and Track), ASRAAM (Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile) and helmet aiming, the Eurofighter Typhoon pilot can electronically detect, engage and kill other aircraft without the other pilot ever being aware of the aircraft's presence. Similarly, with FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red) and night

EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON THE TWO SEATER


The two-seat variant of Eurofighter Typhoon is a key part of the Eurofighter programme. It is designed for training while retaining full operational capability. Of the seven Eurofighter aircraft currently involved in the flight test programme, two are of the two-seat variant - UK's DA4 and Spain's DA6. DA6 made its maiden flight on 31 August 1996, piloted by Alfonso de Miguel, the Director of Flight Operations for EADS Spain. DA4, flown by BAE SYSTEMS' Derek Reeh, made its maiden flight on 14 March 1997. The Eurofighter two-seater design enables full operation from the front seat, with provision for an instructional role, including weapon training, from the back seat. The overall dimensions of the two-seat variant are identical to that of the single-seater. This was achieved by removing the forward transfer fuel

tank to accommodate the second cockpit. The reduction in fuel capacity is partly offset by an auxiliary fuel tank in the enlarged spine of the twoseater. In comparison to the single-seater there is a minimal reduction in mission radius of action and combat-air-patrol loiter time due to additional weight and reduced internal fuel. The point performance data remain almost unchanged. A total of 100 two-seaters are under contract. 52 will be built as part of the first production tranche of 148 aircraft, 25 as part of the second production batch and 23 aircraft in the third batch. When it enters service, the two-seater Eurofighter will be used for conversion and weapon training.

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EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Type 27 mm cannon Meteor AIM-120 AMRAAM ERAAM FMRAAM AIM-9L ASRAAM IRIS-T ALARM Penguin Harpoon Brimstone Taurus Paveway GBU-10/16 Paveway III BL 755 Bombs 500-2000lb Rockets CRV-7

Mission Short range defence Beyond Visual Range Air-to-Air Missile (BVRAAM) Advanced Medium Range AAM Extended Range AAM Future Medium Range AAM Short range AAM Advanced Short Range AAM Advanced Short Range AAM Anti-radiation Missile Anti-ship Missile Anti-ship Missile Anti-tank Missile Cruise Missile Laser Guided bomb Laser Guided bomb Cluster bomb Unguided bombs Unguided rockets

Features internally mounted Ramjet propulsion Active radar seeker Active radar seeker Dual pulse rocket motor Liquid fuel ramjet propulsion Focal-plane array seeker Infrared imaging seeker Loiter capability Mk 3 version range 50 km Low level flight, active radar seeker Millimetric wave seeker Terrain-following, range 150-350 km Mk 83/84 bomb with laser guidance Advanced Laser Guided bomb 147 bomblets 19 rockets per pod

Max. EF load 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 4 18 4 3 6 12 4

TECHNICAL SUPPORT
If you are experiencing problems with the software and have followed the instructions in this manual carefully, please call our customer support help-line and speak with one of our technical representatives, or alternatively visit our website at http://www.rage.com where the majority of common problems and solutions will be displayed. When you contact our support line, please try to have information about your PC configuration available, together with a detailed description on the problem you are experiencing. If at all possible, try to be seated in front of your computer. Our representatives will endeavour to structure their instructions according your level of PC competency, but it may not always be possible to avoid technical jargon. Always have a pen and paper ready to take down their instructions. Rage Customer Support is available from 9.30am-1.00pm, and from 2.00pm-5.30pm (UK times), Monday to Friday, with the exception of national holidays. The number is +44 (0) 121 452 8400. VIDEO PROBLEMS

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Typhoon makes use of many of the features which are provided exclusively under DirectX 7.0A. During our testing, we found that some older video cards did not have DX7 compliant drivers and so were unable to play the game without problems being displayed. Please note that simply having Microsoft DirectX 7.0A installed is not sufficient to ensure that the game runs correctly on your system. The drivers for your video card must also be DX 7 compliant or you will experience visual problems. In order to obtain the latest drivers for your video card, please contact the manufacturer of the device. CD ROM PROBLEMS Make sure that the CD ROM disk is in the drive, with the label facing upwards. The CD ROM disk must be in the drive to install or run the game. Ensure that the CD ROM disk is free from any markings or scratches that may interfere with normal operation. If the disk requires cleaning, gently wipe the surface with a dry, non-abrasive cloth. If at any time the disk vibrates excessively in the drive, remove the disk immediately and return it to the retailer to be exchanged. The disk may be defective and prolonged use may damage the CD ROM drive. SOUND PROBLEMS Make sure that your speakers or headphones are plugged into the correct socket, and that the volume control is at an appropriate level. Ensure that the speakers are switched on. If you continue to experience problems, ensure that the Volume Control taskbar icon (depicted by a small yellow speaker) is present. Double-

TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
DRIVER PROBLEMS The vast majority of problems that you are likely to encounter will be related to drivers, which should allow the game to make optimum use of your system resources. Typhoon is dependent on Microsoft DirectX drivers, which are responsible for various aspects of your system including: video, sound, controller input, 3D graphic functions, CD ROM access and other functions. If you do experience problems, always ensure that you are using the latest drivers for these devices, and that your DirectX installation shows these devices as being certified. Run the application dxdiag.exe to confirm this. The latest version of DirectX can always be downloaded from http://www.microsoft.com/directx

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TECHNICAL SUPPORT

clicking this icon will open the Volume Control window. Make sure that the Wave and Master Volume controls are set at an appropriate level and that the Mute feature is not enabled. Typhoon makes use of 3D positional sound if your sound card supports it. However, in order to experience this, you will need to have suitable

speakers that are correctly positioned, and the sound card will also need to be aware of your speaker orientation. If you are not sure about this and you would like to make use of this feature, please consult the documentation supplied with your sound card and speakers.

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CREDITS
Don Whiteford PROGRAMMING Steve Hunt Mark Gornall Kevin Gee Project Manager Design & Lead Programmer Programmer Programmer PUBLISHER SUPPORT John Schorah Deputy Managing Director Simon Lilley Marketing Director Colin Stokes Commercial Director Phil Wright Sales Director Glen OConnell Corporate PR Tony Fitzgerald European Sales Manager Jane Hickey Marketing Manager Pat Kavanagh Production Sevices Manager Bill Bird Manual Design & Layout Martin Kitney Product PR Lisa OConnor Sales Administrator ADDITIONAL SUPPORT Nev Cook IT Support Clare Montgomery News Presenter Andrew Diey Sound Design Steve Lord Sound Design Bill Scanlon Multimedia Content Ally Noble Project Services Ian Bustin Eurofighter GmBH Peter Scaramanga Biss-Lancaster Lisa Hillary-Tree Biss-Lancaster Jay Posseter Biss-Lancaster John Turner Typhoon Test Pilot Warton Keith Hartley Typhoon Test Pilot Warton Mike Waterworth Animations support QA Dean Bent Nick Hall Stuart Williams David Dixon Jody Craddock

QA Manager Lead Tester Tester Tester Tester

GAME ARTWORK Martin Carter Lead Artist Neil Ambler Artist Richard Thomas Artist PILOT SCENES Donna Jennet Andrew Stewart Paul Dolan R&D Robin Anderson Mark Lomas Kam Yin Yip Paul Bonner Lead Artist Artist Artist Senior Programmer Programmer Programmer Programmer

ALSO THANKS TO Colin Bell David Ewing Paul Finnigan Peter Desmier Jon Oldham Nick White Joanne Barnes Nao Itoh Julia Young Dave Birkhead (get well soon) Liam Risnes Luke Boorman And all the friends and families.

ADDITIONAL ARTWORK Andy Bate Senior Artist Allan Duggan Artist Paul McHugh Animator MUSIC Buster Field Musician

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NOTES

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NOTES HEADING

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