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Unit Cover Page Unit Title: Unit 1 Becoming a Scientist Grade Level: 5th Subject: Science Time Frame:

24 Instructional Days (July 30 Aug 31) Navigation: Stage 1 . Resources . 2 GRASPS . PT Blueprint . 3 WHERETO . Calendar Strand(s) Addressed: Primary: Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science [ETS]Scientific Inquiry o Experimental Design [ED], Use of Scientific Tools [ST], Data Analysis [DA], Explanation and Communication of Results [EC] Secondary: Life Science [LS] Structures of Life o Cells [C], Matter and Energy in Ecosystems [MEE] Designed by: C. Guanajuato, L. Swaboda, S. Staab, S. Kamrul Brief Summary of Unit (including curricular context and unit goal(s)): The science program in the fifth grade is designed to lay the foundation for understanding scientific phenomena by providing hands on experiences. At the same time, students develop the scientific inquiry skills of observing, experimenting, predicting, hypothesizing, measuring, interpreting and recording data through a wide variety of activities. The application of these skills through investigations will enrich and enhance the learning of science content leading to a greater understanding of the content and the ability to make connections between concepts and the real world. This unit is designed to introduce the basic skills needed to conduct scientific inquiry. These include: the ability to make detailed observations and conduct basic research; the ability to identify questions and science concepts that guide investigations; the development of good experimental design; the use of appropriate tools and procedures for gathering data and analyzing and interpreting results; the proper use of mathematics; the development of explanations and descriptions based on evidence; and the communication of scientific procedures and explanations. In addition, students must learn to analyze the validity of data and address validity in their experimental design. These skills will be systematically taught through simple activities, building to guided investigations, and resulting in inquiry experiences that will build background knowledge for subsequent units. Specifically, students will be guided through two investigations dealing with observable characteristics of plants. Students will investigate structures of seeds and plants and learn how some of the structures function in growth and survival. In the culminating performance task, students will be asked to develop questions and conduct research on what affects the early growth of a specific type of plant. Students will be asked to develop and implement a controlled scientific experiment and report on their findings in a scientific report. The conclusion developed in their report will be used to inform their creation of a scholarly communication, whether written, oral, or multi-media formats, for a school publication that includes peer feedback and furthers discussions that synthesize ideas about plants and how to best grow them in specific conditions.

Stage 1Identify Desired Results Established Goals:

Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science [ETS]


5.ETS.ED [Experimental Design] Select an investigation that could be used to answer a specific question. 5.ETS.ED.1 Explore different scientific phenomena by asking questions. o 5.ETS.ED.1.1 Write a detailed and descriptive observation that includes qualitative and quantitative measures, including measurements and sketches.

5.ETS.ED.2 Identify whether a question is a testable question. 5.ETS.ED.3 Write a testable question in the proper format, How will [one variable I change] affect [the outcome of what is measured]? 5.ETS.ED.4 Recognize the variables that need to be controlled in order for the experiment to be considered fair.

5.ETS.ST [Use of Scientific Tools] Select tools and procedures needed to conduct a simple experiment. 5.ETS.ST.1 Identify common scientific tools and what they measure, such as a thermometer, graduated cylinder, beaker, ruler (metric), timer, and pan balance (scale). 5.ETS.ST.2 Select and use the appropriate tools, with guidance, to investigate a specific question. o 5.ETS.ST.2.1 Identify dimensions, such as length, width, height, speed, acceleration, temperature, volume, and record the units of measure associated with a scientific tool, such as Fahrenheit and Celsius for temperature; liters for volume of liquid; the Newton for unit of force, grams for mass; milliseconds/ seconds/ minutes/hours for time.

5.ETS.DA [Data Analysis] Record raw data into a given table, graph, or diagram. 5.ETS.DA.1 Maintain a science notebook that includes observations, questions, hypotheses, procedure, materials, data, diagrams, and explanations. 5.ETS.DA.2 Identify the key parts of a table, graph or diagram. 5.ETS.DA.3 Interpret the results of a set of recorded data. 5.ETS.DA.4 Identify and interpret simple patterns of evidence to communicate the findings of multiple investigations. o 5.ETS.DA.1.1 Compare the results of a set of data across multiple investigations by finding central modes of tendency, such as mean, median, mode, and range.

5.ETS.DA.5 Recognize a faulty interpretation of data that is due to experimental error. 5.ETS.DA.6 Recognize that people may interpret the same results in different ways.

5.ETS.EC [Explanation and Communication of Results] Draw a conclusion supported by evidence. 5.ETS.EC.1 Draw a conclusion based on findings from multiple investigations of similar phenomena. 5.ETS.EC.2 Compare the results of an investigation with what scientists already accept about this question.

5.ETS.EC.3 Effectively communicate the results gathered from an investigation in written, visual and/or verbal formats.

Life Science [LS]


5.LS.C.1 Distinguish between the basic structure and function of plant and animal cells. 5.LS.C.1.1 Identify and label the major parts of plant and animal cells, including mitochondria, cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, cytoplasm, and chloroplast.

5.LS.MEE.2 Design and construct a model to describe the interactions of systems within an ecosystem in terms of the flow of energy, cycling of matter, and the conditions for a healthy ecosystem. 5.11 5.LS.MEE.2.2 Identify the cell structure, chloroplasts, that enable plants to conduct photosynthesis. 5.LS.MEE.2.3 Identify photosynthesis as the food manufacturing process in plants. 5.LS.MEE.2.6 Use models to describe how decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil for plants to use.

What understandings are desired? To meet the established goals, students will need to understand that Scientists use different kinds of investigations and tools to develop explanations by using evidence and knowledge. [ETS] Organisms have basic needs and can survive only in environments in which their needs can be met. [LS] What essential questions will be considered? To understand, students will need to consider such questions as How are scientific questions developed and answered? [ETS] How does a change in any one environmental factor affect an organisms growth and/or survival? [LS] What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? Students will know Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science [ETS] Scientific Inquiry The scientific method is a step-by-step process scientists practice to design and conduct controlled experiments to develop explanations about specific questions about the natural world. Key terms related to scientific inquiry [Vocabulary terms include, but are not limited to, the words in blue in the Established Goals section] The components of a scientific observation. The purpose and format for a testable question and hypothesis. Common scientific tools and what they measure. Raw data must be organized in the form tables or graphs. Conclusions must be based on evidence, with consideration of possible differences in interpretation and experimental error.

Life Science [LS] Structures of Life Organisms have basic needs and can survive only in environments in which their needs can be met. Each plant and animal has different structures that serve different functions in growth, survival, and reproduction. Plants and animals have life cycles. The details of this cycle are different for different organisms. Plants and animals closely resemble their parents, and many characteristics of an organism are inherited from their parents. Other (Personal and Social Perspectives) Resources are things that we get from the living and nonliving environment to meet human needs. Some environmental changes occur slowly, and other occur rapidly. Causes of environmental degradation and resource depletion vary from region to region and country to country.
Origin of Seeds Investigation Students conduct a seed hunt by opening fresh fruit and locating the seeds. They describe and compare seed properties. Students examine and sort a selection of seeds bean, pea, sunflower, and corn. They investigate the effect water has on the seeds by setting up seed sprouters and observing and recording changes over a week. Students systemically find out how much water lima beans soak up in a day.

Seeds are found in the plant part called a fruit. Different kinds of fruits have different kinds and numbers of seeds. Seeds have a variety of properties. Seeds undergo changes in the presence of water. A seed is an organism, a living thing. A seed contains the embryo plant and stores food and water.

Growing Further Investigation Students examine germinated seeds to determine similarities and differences in the way the organisms grow. They set up a hydroponic garden to observe the life cycle of a bean plant.

Germination is the onset of a seeds growth. Plants need water, light, and nutrients to grow. The life cycle is the process of a seed growing into a mature plant, which in turn produces seeds. The fruit of the plant develops from the flower.

Students will be able to Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science [ETS] Scientific Inquiry and Life Science [LS] Understand that scientists use different kinds of investigations and tools to develop explanations using evidence and knowledge. Organize and maintain scientific investigation work in a Science Notebook. Write detailed scientific observations. o Write descriptions and/or draw diagrams of a sequence of steps, events, or observations of changes over time. Origin of Seeds Investigation Estimate numbers of seeds. Describe and sort seeds in terms of properties. Compare and record the number and properties of seeds from a variety of fruits. Growing Further Investigation Grow plants hydroponically and observe the life cycle changes over time. Record information systematically for later analysis. Observe and sort seedlings by properties of germination. Compare germination in different types of seeds. Apply mathematics in the context of science. o Employ appropriate tools to gather data such as measures of length, weight, temperature, and liquid volume. Conduct basic research by developing a KWL chart. o Acquire vocabulary associated with scientific inquiry and life science. o Gain experience with organisms various types of plants. o Develop an attitude of respect and understanding for life. Identify questions based on careful observations of phenomena and information. o Ask questions of others to clarify ideas or request evidence. o Develop at least one specific question so that it can be answered through the design and conduction of a scientific investigation. Make predictions based on patterns of observation and information gathered (rather than guessing). o Develop at least one specific hypothesis that is confirmed or rejected after conducting a scientific investigation. Apply scientific thinking processes to conduct investigations and build explanations: observing, communicating, comparing, organizing, and relating. Performance Task: Growing Further Formal Investigation Investigate the effect of water on seeds. Organize and analyze data from experiments and investigations with

plants to construct reasonable explanations. o Analyze alternative explanations and predictions. Exercise language, math, and social studies skills in the context of life science investigations to communicate investigations and explanations. Curricular and Instructional Resources

LEAD Science 5 Curriculum Development Site Investigations & Correlated FOSS Modules
[3-4: Structure of Life Module]

Origin Seeds Growing Further

FOSSweb Interactive activities FOSS Middle School Science Notebooks (reference) Interactive Science with Interactive Notebooks The 5 E Learning Cycle Model Inquiry Approach Friends of LEAD Community Garden

Stage 2Determine Acceptable Evidence What evidence will show that students understand? Performance Task Growing your Own Food and Beyond! Students develop a scholarly communication for a school newsletter or other media outlet that informs the students, staff, and parents and potentially outside organizations of the value of growing your own food and propose what type of seed would grow best under specific conditions. In this statement, students provide information about the type of seed and its life cycle, the best time and conditions for germination, maintenance, and harvesting time. Students must support this description with the results of their own scientific investigation and propose new questions and/or insights related to the science of plants. Goal: Your task is to create a scholarly communication for our first LEAD Science Times publication and/or other media outlet. The goal is to teach the general community, grant organizations, LEAD students, parents, and staff about how we can grow our own food. The problem or challenge is that we live in a fast paced world, where we rely increasingly on fast and/or processed food that is not always the healthiest option. Maintaining a garden is difficult, back-breaking work. How can we grow our own food, which is nutritious and healthy, while at the same time learn, educate, exercise, have fun, and even make money and/or address health/hunger issues? What role can growing your own food take in promoting and sustaining healthy communities? In addition, there are environmental factors, such as temperature and water tolerance that we must take into consideration when deciding what seeds to plant in a particular season and climate. The obstacles to overcome are that we lack the general resources and knowledge to grow our own food. Most people also do not have the time. So how can we present the simplest and most efficient way to grow our favorite herbs, fruits and /or veggies? We will need to learn and apply the scientific method to develop the knowledge and skills to best answer these questions. Role: You are a young scientist (naturalist/botanist), researcher, writer, artist/illustrator and/or educator. You have been asked to address the problem of learning how to grow our own food to decrease our dependence on fast and/or processed foods and possibly discover how to grow specific seeds under specific conditions. Your job is to learn as much as possible about what makes plants grow successfully by

making observations, conducting research and a simple experiment to answer a specific question about how to best grow a plant of your choice. Audience: Your clients are organizations that may consider a grant to award you money to buy the resources you need to continue your plant experiments and/or to develop a garden at your school, community, or at home. The target audience is the general LEAD community, including parents, staff, and students, as well as outside organizations that support our cause. You need to convince the general LEAD community and outside organizations that you possess the knowledge and skills to use science to grow your own food and that you merit their support in the form of volunteer time and/or monetary donation/grant/sponsorship. Situation: The context you find yourself in is a situation with few resources and a general lack of knowledge and skills to grow our own food that is nutritious and healthy. We also live in times where growing food is becoming increasingly challenging because of an increasing human population and climate change. The challenge involves dealing with understanding information and developing the observation and scientific skills to learn how to best grow our own food and then to effectively communicate and convince our audience that we merit support in helping us develop our own community and/or home garden. Product, Performance, and Purpose: You need to develop detailed observations and research to design and conduct a simple plant experiment in order to communicate your findings through a written science report. You will create an article other media piece in order to communicate how we can best grow our own food based on scientific evidence. Standards and Criteria for Success: Your performance needs to demonstrate that you can conduct a simple scientific experiment and communicate your findings about how to best grow a plant of choice. Your work will be judged by select LEAD Public Schools community members, which may include family members, peers, staff, and members of other organizations. Your product must meet the following standards: I can o Select an investigation that could be used to answer a specific question. o Select and use tools and procedures needed to conduct a simple experiment. o Record raw data into a given table, graph, or diagram. o Draw a conclusion supported by evidence.

A successful result will be a scholarly communication that describes the purpose, results and significance of your scientific investigation.

Other Evidence (quizzes, tests, prompts, observations, dialogues, work samples):


Quizzes and Investigations (Labs) on vocabulary and process skills (standards/benchmarks) Questioning/Prompts o Explanation: What is science? How are scientific questions answered? o Interpretation: Why/where does using the scientific method matter? How are you like a scientist? o Application: How and where can you use the knowledge gained in a scientific investigation? o Perspective: Is there adequate evidence to support your conclusion? o Empathy: What may be some of the challenges for people in different situations or parts of the world to growing their own food? o Self-Knowledge: After conducting your scientific investigation, what new questions do you have? What can you improve on to become a better scientist? If caught in a situation where you needed to grow your own food, what would you do? Science Notebook o Notes and Labs o Scientific Report Homework Assignments Participation by contributing and responding to peer feedback/questions

Student Self-Assessment and Reflection:


Self-Assess their article, The Science of Growing Plants against a rubric and feedback/evaluation Reflect: Questioning/Prompts [above]

Performance Task Blueprint What understandings and goals will be assessed through this task?
Students will plan and conduct a simple experiment by applying the scientific method.

What criteria are implied in the standards and understandings regardless of the task specifics? What qualities must student work demonstrate to signify that standards were met?
An understanding of the steps of the scientific method and key vocabulary A viable testable question and hypothesis in the recommended format Accurate use of measuring tools Accurate recording and organization of observations and data Interpretation of data and recognition of experimental errors Communication of results that reference research and supported by evidence/data

Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate understanding?


Task Overview: Since we have been learning about plants and the scientific method, you are developing the knowledge and skills to conduct your own experiments and discover knowledge that can be used to make a difference. Using your observations and research on plants, choose one specific type of plant you think would be useful to know how to grow. Your goal is to plan and conduct a simple scientific experiment to learn about how to best grow this plant. You will then share your findings in our first publication of LPS Science Times, which will be used to educate and reach out to LEAD Academy families, staff, and students, as well as outside organizations about how to best grow our own food, as well as the benefits of growing your own food. You will use your scientific report to help you create a scholarly communication in which you will explain the purpose and results of your experiment, and persuade your audience why this topic is important and why/how they can help.

What student products and performances will provide evidence of desired understandings?
Scientific Report Scholarly Communication Artifact Reflection responses Responses to Peer/Audience Feedback

By what criteria will student products and performances be evaluated?


Scientific report meets performance benchmarks and guidelines Scholarly communication artifact effectively communicates the purpose, results, and the significance of the results of a scientific investigation At least one articulate response to peer/audience feedback to consider new questions and possible answers to those questions.

Stage 3Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction


Where Hooking/holding Engage Rethink/revise/refine Evaluate Tailored Organized [WHERETO]: 1. Begin with an entry object, event, myth buster, mystery, challenge, problem/issue, or provocative question (How do you know anything is true?) to engage students in considering the process of how one comes to know anything. Consider the questions: What is science? What is your vision of what a scientist is? How are you like a scientist? Anchor charts can be created and developed around these questions. [H] 2. Introduce the unit and essential questions. [W] a. Directly state the rationale, benefits, goals and schedule of the unit. b. Post and discuss essential questions. c. Diagnosis: Invite students to generate questions; Use K-W-L to have students identify things they want to learn and what they already know; Students create a visual organizer to reveal their initial knowledge and understandings; Check for possible misconceptions. d. Ask students to identify personal goals. 3. Discuss the culminating unit performance tasks (Growing Your Own Food and Beyond!). [W] [H] a. Present the culminating performance task requirements. b. Review scoring rubrics. c. Show models and exemplars for expected products and performances. d. Involve students in identifying preliminary evaluation criteria. 4. Science Notebook setup and overview of the scientific method. Note: Key vocabulary terms are introduced as needed by the various learning activities and performance tasks. [O] 5. Present scientific investigation and process skills (Part I) Origin of Seeds [E] a. Conduct a seed hunt by opening fresh fruit and locating the seeds. b. Describe and compare seed properties. c. Examine and sort a selection of seeds bean, pea, sunflower, and corn. d. Investigate the effect water has on the seeds by setting up seed sprouters and observing and recording changes over a week. e. Systemically find out how much water lima beans soak up in a day. f. Read Science Stories folio: Seeds Are Everywhere; The Most Important Seed by Barbara McClintock. g. Language Extension: Think about plant idioms. h. Math Extensions: Problem of the week; Estimate the mass of multiple seeds. i. Social Studies and Art Extensions: Research fruits in grocery stores; make seed art. j. Science Extensions: Research seed dispersal; plant seeds in soil; hold a sprout taste test. k. Home/School Connection: Look for seeds at home. Draw or collect and describe the seeds, identifying their similarities and differences. 6. Present scientific investigation and process skills (Part III) Growing Further [E] a. Set up a hydroponic garden to observe the life cycle of a bean plant. b. Examine germinated seeds to determine similarities and differences in the way the organisms grow. c. Read Science Stories folio: Hydro-growing; Seeding Space. d. Language Extensions: Keep journals of the growth of plants; Play concentration with life-cycle pictures. e. Math Extension: Problem of the week. f. Social Studies Extension: Research staple crops around the world.

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g. Science Extensions in connection to the Performance Task: Take home hydroponics; Explore other conditions for plant growth; Compare plants grown in soil; Develop a testable question and hypothesis. h. Home/School Connection: Look around their neighborhood for plants and observe the different plant structures. Growing Further Formal InvestigationObservations, Research, Testable Question and Hypothesis steps of the scientific method as the model lab for Performance Task [R] a. Model Experiment Design components of Performance Task with a controlled experiment. [E2] b. Guide students in developing their own design and prepare for individual/collaborative team experiment as part of their Performance Task. [T] c. Students undergo a revision process of their experimental design before being approved to conduct their experiment. [R] Growing Further Formal Investigation Procedure, Materials, Data Collection, Data Analysis and Conclusion steps of the scientific method as the model lab for Performance Task; a. Model conducting the Controlled Experiment component of Performance Task based on the model experimental design. [E2] b. Students conduct simple experiment independently/collaborative teams after at least 3 revisions of experimental design. [T] Growing Further Formal Investigation Model the writing of a scientific report component of the model experiment for the Performance Task; Quiz [E] a. Students work on numerous drafts of scientific report. [R] [E2] Scholarly Communication Artifact Performance Task a. Review the purpose and goals of Science Times publication and/or media outlets and model preparing a scholarly communication artifact by adapting the Conclusion of the model scientific experiment report. b. Model the scholarly communication artifact peer-review process. [E2] c. Students respond to one peer-review feedback based on rubric. [R] d. Design and production of Science Times publication and/or media outlet (paper based and online [optional]).[H] e. Conclude the unit with student self-evaluation and reflection; Test. [E2] [R] f. Students may possibly exchange artifacts to other LPS classes for peer review or actually visit each other for such an exchange.

Stage 3Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction Calendar


Day 1 Introduction 1. 2. 3. Hook Students with Provocative Question [H] Introduce essential questions [W] Discuss the culminating unit performance tasks (Growing Your Own Food and Beyond). [W] [H] Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5

Origin of Seeds Investigation & Observations Focus on procedures 4. 5. Science Notebook setup and overview of the scientific method. Present scientific investigation and process skills (Part I) Origin of Seeds [E]

Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

Day 10

Origin of Seeds Observations (continued) Growing Further Observations

6. Present scientific investigation and process skills (Part III) Growing Further [E] a. Set up a hydroponic garden to observe the life cycle of a bean plant. b. Examine germinated seeds to determine similarities and differences in the way the organisms grow. c. Read Science Stories folio: Hydro-growing; Seeding Space. d. Language Extensions: Keep journals of the growth of plants; Play concentration with life-cycle pictures. e. Math Extension: Problem of the week. f. Social Studies Extension: Research staple crops around the world. g. Science Extensions in connection to the Performance Task: Take home hydroponics; Explore other conditions for plant growth; Compare plants grown in soil; Develop a testable question and hypothesis. h. Home/School Connection: Look around their neighborhood for plants and observe the different plant structures.
Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15

Growing Further Observations (continued) Growing Further Formal Investigation

7. Growing Further Formal InvestigationObservations, Research, Testable Question and Hypothesis steps of the scientific method as the model lab for Performance Task [R] a. Model Experiment Design components of Performance Task with a controlled experiment. [E2] b. Guide students in developing their own design and prepare for individual/collaborative team experiment as part of their Performance Task. [T]

c. Students undergo a revision process of their experimental design before being approved to conduct their experiment. [R]
Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20

Growing Further Formal Investigation (Continued)

8. Growing Further Formal Investigation Procedure, Materials, Data Collection, Data Analysis and Conclusion steps of the scientific method as the model lab for Performance Task; a. Model conducting the Controlled Experiment component of Performance Task based on the model experimental design. [E2] b. Students conduct simple experiment independently/collaborative teams after at least 3 revisions of experimental design. [T] 9. Growing Further Formal Investigation Model the writing of a scientific report component of the model experiment for the Performance Task; Quiz [E] a. Students work on numerous drafts of scientific report. [R] [E2]

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Day 24

Scholarly Communication Artifact Performance Task 10. Scholarly Communication Artifact Performance Task a. Review the purpose and goals of Science Times publication and/or media outlets and model preparing a scholarly communication artifact by adapting the Conclusion of the model scientific experiment report. b. Model the scholarly communication artifact peer-review process. [E2] c. Students respond to one peer-review feedback based on rubric. [R] d. Design and production of Science Times publication and/or media outlet (paper based and online [optional]).[H] e. Conclude the unit with student self-evaluation and reflection; Test. [E2] [R] f. Students may possibly exchange artifacts to other LPS classes for peer review or actually visit each other for such an exchange.