Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 28

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday July 26, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 295
WATER TUNNEL PLAN
STATE PAGE 3
U.S. WOMEN
BEAT FRANCE
SPORTS PAGE 11
SENATE OKS
TAX-CUT BILL
NATION PAGE 6
OFFICIALS REVEAL AMBITIOUS $24 BILLION PLAN FOR ENDING THE
STATES WATER WARS
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Cities in California are ready to
sue the state over a redevelopment
trailer bill the Legislature passed
last month that opponents say con-
tains unconstitutional sales and
property tax clawbacks.
Last week, the League of
California Cities board unanimous-
ly voted to sue the state over the
constitutional validity of Assembly
Bill 1484, legislation that authorizes
the state Department of Finance to
clawback city sales taxes and city
property taxes to satisfy the states
funding demands imposed on legal-
ly separate redevelopment succes-
sor agencies by AB 1484.
The Legislature approved the bill
June 27.
The legislation demands local
successor agencies, formed after the
dismantling of RDAs, to make pay-
ments to local taxing agencies, such
as the county or schools, or have
sales tax payments suspended to
cities by the state Board of
Equalization.
A deadline was set for July 12 for
cities to make the payments but has
now been pushed back to the middle
of August. The state dissolved the
agencies to tackle its decit last
year and anticipates netting more
than $3 billion by the action.
Redevelopment agencies were
used by cities to build affordable
housing, clean up blighted areas
and create jobs.
The process has been more than a
little confusing, local ofcials told
the Daily Journal.
It is totally understandable the
confusion in this area. The changes
in redevelopment are unclear for all.
The deadlines keep changing, the
Redevelopment dissolution unclear for all
Lawsuit to challenge Californias clawback of city sales taxes and city property taxes
See UNCLEAR, Page 16
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The former child psychiatrist who
escaped a retrial on multiple
molestation charges by being hospi-
talized as mentally incompetent
could be ready to stand trial, accord-
ing to a recent doctors evaluation.
Representatives for William
Hamilton Ayres who is 80, has
Alzheimers-related dementia and is
currently being treated at Napa State
Hospital gathered in court
Wednesday for a six-month progress
report. Doctors indicated Ayres has
regained competency, said Assistant
District Attorney
Morley Pitt.
Defense attor-
ney Jonathan
McDougall must
now decide to
either agree with
the finding or
contest it, which
will be complet-
ed at the next
court date
Friday, Aug. 3. If McDougall does
not dispute the ndings, criminal
proceedings can move forward, said
Prominent doctor accused of
molesting multiple patients
Court: Ayres
has regained
competency
William Ayres
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
South San Francisco school of-
cials are once again being asked to
consider how long an elected of-
cial should be absent from his or her
post as they weigh excusing Shirlee
Hoch from the board for another six
months.
Hoch, rst elected the South San
Francisco Unied School District
Board of
Trustees in 1990,
took a leave of
absence for med-
ical reasons
starting May 26,
2011. In
February, the
board extended
the excused
Board considers excusing trustee
Shirlee Hoch has been absent from
South City school post since May 2011
Shirlee Hoch
See AYRES, Page 18
See HOCH, Page 16
SALLY SCHILLING/DAILY JOURNAL
The Johnston House as it sat in 1965, top, and how it looks today.The Half Moon Bay landmark is open for free
tours the third Saturday of each month from 11 p.m to 3 p.m.
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Residents of Half Moon Bay all
know that white house on the hill.
People cruising south of downtown
on Highway 1 can spot the Johnston
House nestled in the rolling hills to
the east.
Many people venture to these hills
for a peaceful walk or bike ride. But
they are often unaware of the mys-
tery, romance and long history of
the White House of Half Moon Bay.
Built around 1885, the Johnston
House was the rst wood house on
the coast south of San Francisco.
The house was originally the
romantic gesture of a wealthy
American man, James Johnston, to
his Californiano wife Petra de Jara.
After its short heyday from 1855
to 1861 the Johnston home
turned into a symbol of despair. The
house was abandoned some time
after World War II and over time it
became the mysterious haunted
house to passers-by.
A pair of Smithsonian historians
stumbled upon the house and vowed
to resurrect the glory and history of
the place. Today the house is a sense
of communal pride for many dedi-
cated volunteers.
The life of a house
Long history to the White House of Half Moon Bay
See HOUSE, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Sandra
Bullock is 48.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1952
Argentinas rst lady, Eva Peron, died
in Buenos Aires at age 33. King Farouk
I of Egypt abdicated in the wake of a
coup led by Gamal Abdel Nasser.
One brave deed makes no hero.
John Greenleaf Whittier, American
poet and essayist (1807-1892)
Rock star Mick
Jagger is 69.
Actor Jason
Statham is 45.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Jonathan Horton of the United States attends a gymnastics training session at the O2 Arena before the start of the London
2012 Olympic Games.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s.
Southwest winds 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15
mph.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 08 Gor-
geous George in rst place; No. 01 Gold Rush in
second place; and No. 12 Lucky Charms in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:44.33.
(Answers tomorrow)
MONTH TOKEN WALLOP PIGSTY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After finally finishing the mural, the artist
wanted to do this PAINT THE TOWN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NUCHH
CLUHM
LEYTIV
OLOINT
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
Ans:
0 3 2
5 9 38 46 51 5
Mega number
July 24 Mega Millions
11 15 19 21 30
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 1 9 2
Daily Four
4 7 4
Daily three evening
In 1775, Benjamin Franklin became Americas rst postmaster
general.
In 1788, New York became the 11th state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1882, the Richard Wagner opera Parsifal premiered in
Bayreuth, Germany.
In 1908, U.S. Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte ordered
creation of a force of special agents that was a forerunner of the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
In 1912, the Edison Studios production What Happened to
Mary, one of the rst, if not very rst, movie serials, was
released with Mary Fuller in the title role.
In 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed the National
Security Act, which established the National Military
Establishment (later renamed the Department of Defense).
In 1953, Fidel Castro began his revolt against Fulgencio
Batista with an unsuccessful attack on an army barracks in
eastern Cuba. (Castro ousted Batista in 1959.)
In 1962, the pilot episode of The French Chef starring Julia
Child aired on WGBH-TV in Boston.
In 1971, Apollo 15 was launched from Cape Kennedy on
Americas fourth manned mission to the moon. Photographer
Diane Arbus died in New York at age 48.
In 1986, kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Lawrence
Martin Jenco, an American hostage held for nearly 19 months.
American statesman W. Averell Harriman died in Yorktown
Heights, N.Y., at age 94.
In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990.
In 1992, singer Mary Wells died in Los Angeles at age 49.
Ten years ago: The Republican-led House voted, 295-132, to
create an enormous Homeland Security Department in the
biggest government reorganization in decades.
Actress Marjorie Lord is 94. Actor James Best is 86. Actress-
singer Darlene Love is 71. Singer Brenton Wood is 71. Movie
director Peter Hyams is 69. Actress Helen Mirren is 67. Rock
musician Roger Taylor (Queen) is 63. Actress Susan George is 62.
Olympic gold medal gure skater Dorothy Hamill is 56. Actor
Kevin Spacey is 53. Rock singer Gary Cherone is 51. Rock singer
Jim Lindberg (Pennywise) is 47. Actor Jeremy Piven is 47. Rapper-
reggae singer Wayne Wonder is 46. Actor Cress Williams is 42. TV
host Chris Harrison (The Bachelor) is 41. Actress Kate
Beckinsale is 39. Rock musician Dan Konopka (OK Go) is 38.
Gospel/Contemporary Christian singer Rebecca St. James is 35.
Man charged for
refusing to leave jail
WENTWORTH, N.C. A man
whod just been released from jail in
northern North Carolina was arrested
again for refusing to leave the jail after
authorities wouldnt give him a ride to a
motel.
The News & Record of Greensboro
reports that 37-year-old Rodney Dwayne
Valentine was charged with trespassing.
Valentine was released from the
Rockingham County jail Saturday morn-
ing after being behind bars since May 22.
The sheriffs ofce says he asked them to
drive him to a local motel and they
refused. Deputies charged Valentine with
second-degree trespassing when he had
refused to leave the jail by Saturday after-
noon.
Hes being held on $500 bond and is
scheduled to appear in court Aug. 9. It
was not clear if he has a lawyer.
Goat man in Utah
mountains identified as hunter
SALT LAKE CITY A man spotted
dressed in a goat suit among a herd of
wild goats in the mountains of northern
Utah has been identied as a hunter
preparing for a Canadian archery season.
After a hiker spotted the so-called goat
man on July 15 in the mountains above
Ogden, about 40 miles north of Salt Lake
City, wildlife ofcials said they wanted to
talk to the person to be certain he was
aware of the dangers as hunting season
approaches.
They speculated he might have been an
extreme wildlife enthusiast who just
wanted to get as close as possible to the
goats. A few days after the spotting, state
wildlife authorities received an anony-
mous call from an agitated man who
simply said, Leave goat man alone. Hes
done nothing wrong.
This week, however, the mystery was
solved.
Phil Douglass of the Utah Division of
Wildlife Resources said he received a call
Monday from a 57-year-old Southern
California hunter who explained he was
merely trying out his goat suit in prepara-
tion for a mountain goat hunt in Canada
next year.
He gave me enough details about the
area and the situation that it made me feel
condent this was him, Douglass said
Tuesday.
In talking to him, I felt he was very
knowledgeable, a very experienced
hunter. Hes hunted internationally,
Douglass added. My concern all along
was that this person needed to understand
the risks, and certainly after talking to
him, I felt he was doing the best he could
to understand and mitigate those risks ...
He was simply preparing for a hunt.
The man did not identify himself,
Douglass said, noting the hunter was con-
cerned for his safety after widespread
media coverage of the sighting, rst
reported by the Standard-Examiner of
Ogden.
Coty Creighton, 33, spotted the goat
man July 15 during his hike. He said he
came across a herd, but noticed some-
thing odd about one goat that was trailing
behind the rest.
I thought maybe it was injured,
Creighton said last week. It just looked
odd.
He said he pulled out binoculars to get
a closer look at the goats about 200 yards
away and was shocked. The man
appeared to be acting like a goat while
wearing a crudely made costume, which
had fake horns and a cloth mask with cut-
out eye holes, Creighton said.
We were the only ones around for
miles, he said. It was real creepy.
Douglass said 60 permits will be issued
for goat hunting season in that area,
which begins in September, and he had
worried the man in the goat suit might be
accidentally shot or could be attacked by
a real goat.
3 8 17 20 44 23
Mega number
July 25 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
SAN CARLOS
Grand theft. A car was stolen on the 1200
block of Arroyo Avenue before 9:12 p.m.
Monday, July 23.
Vandalism. Vandalism occurred on the 1100
block of El Camino Real before 12:16 p.m.
Monday, July 23.
Warrant arrest. A man was arrested and
booked into the county jail on a San Francisco
County warrant on the 2200 block of Brittan
Avenue before 11:01 a.m. Monday, July 23.
Vandalism. Vandalism was reported on the 700
block of Industrial Road before 2:40 p.m.
Saturday, July 21.
Hit and run. Someone was arrested in a hit and
run that occurred at Holly Street and Industrial
Road before 10:39 p.m. Friday, July 20.
MENLO PARK
Grand theft. Someone reported that miscella-
neous tools were stolen on the 1900 block of
Menalto Avenue before 3:12 p.m. Tuesday, July
24.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone reported
a suspicious person was watching them on the
700 block of Santa Cruz Avenue before 3:14
p.m. Tuesday, July 24.
Burglary. Someone reported a stolen bicycle
on the 600 block of Roble Avenue before 9:38
p.m. Monday, July 23.
Fraud. A case of identity theft was reported on
the 700 block of Laurel Street before 9:32 p.m.
Monday, July 23.
Police reports
For a good time call ...
Words were carved into the mens rest
room door at Orange Avenue Library on
West Orange Avenue in South San
Francisco before 9:22 a.m. Saturday, July
14.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
South Citys school serving expelled stu-
dents will be housed at the Boys and Girls
Club this fall a change both say will offer
more electives and nicer facilities for the teens
attending.
On Thursday, the South San Francisco
Unied School District Board of Trustees will
vote on an agreement with the Boys and Girls
Club of North San Mateo County to jointly
provide services for Foxridge Community
Day School at 201 W. Orange Ave. in South
San Francisco. Under the agreement, the pro-
gram for expelled students would move to the
Boys and Girls Club and the two groups
would split responsibilities. For the Boys and
Girls Club, it gives teens access to facilities
that would otherwise be unused during school
hours. For the district, the partnership will
give students access to improved facilities and
electives.
Its a match made it heaven, said Sharon
Dolan, executive director of the Boys and
Girls Club of North San Mateo County.
Trustee Maurice Goodman described it as a
welcomed change, adding the most recent facil-
ities and academic curriculum were subpar.
It was insulting, as a parent, as a board
member. Its always been on my radar,
Goodman said.
Foxridge Elementary opened in 1966. It was
one of two schools closed in 1992 after years
of declining enrollment and has since housed
students who were expelled from the districts
other schools.
Students in Foxridge have not had access to
a gym or electives, said Trustee Phil Weise.
Board President Judy Bush is also very
excited. The location is a more centralized
option for students.
I really believe (students) will be better
served, she said.
The Boys and Girls Club previously hosted
a county community school at the location. In
the fall, the county will be unveiling a newly
revamped, centrally located community
school. With that, Dolan said the facilities
would go unused, which she considered a big
loss. Over the spring, ofcials from both
organizations began to talk about using the
space.
We love having the teens around, said
Dolan, who said the facilities are most often
used after school.
After school, Foxridge students will also
have direct access to volunteer opportunities
often a requirement for high school stu-
dents. Together, the district and nonprot are
working to create elective opportunities for
students such as physical education, visual
arts and leadership.
Under the proposed agreement, which
runs from Aug. 1 through June 1, 2013, stu-
dents would attend school from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. with 30 minutes for lunch at the Boys
and Girls Club of North San Mateo County
facility. Classes will take in the learning cen-
ter and the Foxridge staff will supervise stu-
dents at all times. Office equipment required
to run the school will be provided by the dis-
trict. The district will pay the Boys and Girls
Club $15,000 for the years use of the site,
$1,500 for supplies and $35 per hour for the
instructors salary starting Aug. 1. Foxridge
students will attend a get to know you
event with Boys and Girls Club staff. In
addition, students will be provided a club
membership and access to regular after-
school activities.
The agreement was previously approved by
the Boys and Girls Club board.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, July 26 at
the District Ofce, 398 B St., South San
Francisco.
District, nonprofit partner to provide community school
By Gosia Wozniacka and Hannh Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Californias ambitious
$24 billion plan for ending the states water
wars was unveiled Wednesday, but standing in
its way are unanswered questions and hurdles
that will take years to surmount if thats
even possible.
With fanfare, Gov. Jerry Brown and Interior
Secretary Ken Salazar touted a massive twin-
tunnel system to carry water from the
Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to vast
farmlands and thirsty cities. The proposal also
includes plans for more than 100,000 acres of
oodplain and tidal marsh habitat restoration.
This plan is essential to stopping
California water wars, Salazar said about the
long-running ght among competing regions
for the essential resource.
But it seemed the plan only polarized
Californians, including some of Browns fel-
low Democrats.
Delta residents, environmental groups and
Northern California legislators said it calls for
costly construction before scientists can deter-
mine the impacts on the fragile delta ecosys-
tem, including its imperiled sh species such
as salmon and smelt.
Theres an effort to push this faster than the
science allows and before the facts and evi-
dence are developed, said Rep. George
Miller, D-Martinez.
During the announcement by Brown and
Salazar, dozens of opponents gathered on the
Capitol steps with signs reading kill the
canal and the tunnel will suck California
dry.
State, federal officials reveal water tunnel plan
4
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
For more information call 650-344-5200
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Saturday, August 25 from 9:00am to 1:00pm
Little House
800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Park
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure Check
Ask the Pharmacist
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
kegest 25, 2012 ||tt|e heese, Nea|e Pctk kegest 25, 2012 ||tt|e heese, Nea|e Pctk
Senior Resources and Services from all of San Mateo County over 40 exhibitors!
2
0
1
2
2
0
1
2
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
CITY
GOVERNMENT
The Belmont
City Council
directed staff
Tuesday night to
make some amend-
ments to the citys
sign ordinance. The amendments will allow
real estate agents, during an open house, to
display four signs giving directions to the
property or open house and may be dis-
played on private property, while the prop-
erty is on the market, as long as the signs do
not exceed four square feet and are not dis-
played ve feet above the sidewalk, or exist-
ing grade.
San Carlos City Manager Jeff Maltbie
announced the appointment of Jay Walter
as the director of Public Works effective
July 30.
Two teens allegedly invade home,
bind 68-year-old man with duct tape
Two teenagers who allegedly bound and
robbed a 68-year-old man in his Daly City home
on Monday have been arrested, police said.
Just before noon, the suspects believed to
be a 14-year-old boy and an 18-year-old man
knocked on the door of a home in the rst block
of Poncetta Drive, Daly City police Sgt.
Michael Barton said.
When the victim answered the door, the sus-
pects knocked him down and bound him with
duct tape, Barton said.
The two suspects then stole an ATM card and
a laptop computer, and ed the scene in the vic-
tims car.
The victim was not injured in the robbery, and
was able to contact police after the suspects left,
Barton said.
The stolen vehicle was spotted later that day
by police in San Francisco. The two suspects,
who were inside the car, were taken into cus-
tody.
They were questioned by Daly City police
and arrested on suspicion of robbery, burglary,
elder abuse and car theft.
The 18-year-old was identied as Jose
Rodriguez, and was and booked into San Mateo
County Jail. The 14-year-old, whose name has
been withheld because of his age, was booked
into the San Mateo County Youth Guidance
Center.
Man wanted for exposing himself
Police are on the lookout for a man driving a
black Camaro who exposed himself to a female
walking outside of the Pep Boys auto parts store
on Old County Road in San Carlos Monday
evening.
At approximately, 5:40 p.m., sheriffs
deputies responded to the store at 1087 Old
County Road after a woman reported the man
pulled up next to her and exposed himself to her.
She yelled at the driver, which caused him to
ee west on Brittan Avenue, according to
police.
The man was described as white or Hispanic,
35 or 40 years old, with a shaved head. The
Camara was a newer model with a partial
California license plate of 6CTU, according to
police.
University of Virginia professor
named next Stanford Law School dean
Stanford University has tapped a University
of Virginia constitutional law professor to be its
next law school dean.
Mary Elizabeth Magill is currently the vice
dean of the University of Virginia Law School
and a professor of constitutional and adminis-
trative law.
Her appointment was announced Tuesday by
Stanford University Provost John Etchemendy.
Everyone who knows Liz Magill is
impressed by her creative and insightful
approach to problems and her skill at engaging
a community in their solution, Etchemendy
said.
Local briefs
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
To ensure a vacant lot in a prime spot will be
developed into what San Bruno ofcials say is
a much-needed hotel, the City Council is mak-
ing moves toward purchasing the land.
During an update Tuesday evening, City
Manager Connie Jackson shared the details of
the citys bid to purchase the vacant lot south
of Jacks Restaurant, 1050 Admiral Court, and
north of Interstate 380. The city is moving for-
ward with a $1.4 million purchase. A $25,000
good faith payment was made, said Jackson.
The due diligence period ends Aug. 1 allowing
for the transaction to be completed by Aug.
15.
In the big picture, its better if we could
own that [land] ourselves to have total con-
trol, said Mayor Jim Ruane, who noted a
number of inquiries for hotel possibilities have
come in. I think its a good move for the city.
The city currently doesnt have any large
space for meetings or wedding receptions,
said Ruane. The city promised the public a
hotel, he added.
In December, the council voted against giv-
ing Riverside, Calif.-based Destination
Properties, LLC exclusive negotiating agree-
ments to develop a hotel. Instead, the city
learned another party was interested and
began entertaining the idea of purchasing the
land itself, which would give the city more
power in deciding what is ultimately built.
Jackson said acquiring the property will
allow the city more power in determining
which project ultimately lls the space. San
Bruno could benet from an all-suites hotel
with conference facilities, she said.
Paying for the site will come from one-time
funds like developer fees and taxes the city has
collected over the years, said Jackson.
Over the years, that area has been built up to
include the Crossings and then Jacks
Restaurant. A hotel has always been part of
the plan but the economic downturn slowed
possibilities.
Ruane previously said weighing the possi-
bility of purchasing the land would allow San
Bruno to nd the best t. He pointed to Jacks
Restaurant as a wonderful example of what
can happen when patient. Numerous restau-
rants were suggested for that site but never
quite t before a local family decided to open
Jacks, which has been well received since
opening last year.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
City aims to buy land for hotel
San Bruno takes steps toward buying prime spot
5
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The reportedly intoxicated driver who
collided into a disabled vehicle in
Millbrae last fall, killing a 19-year-old
college student and injuring himself and
several passengers, was sentenced to time
served Wednesday.
Dennis Dallas Leffew Jr., 43, previous-
ly pleaded not guilty to gross vehicular
manslaughter and drunk driving charges.
But on Tuesday, a different charge was
added misdemeanor driving under the
inuence. Leffew pleaded guilty to the
new charge and was sentenced to six
months in county jail but got credit for
eight months already served, said
Assistant District Attorney Morley Pitt.
An accident reconstruction specialist
hired by the defense found that even a
sober driver could not have avoided the
accident, said Pitt. Experts for the
California Highway Patrol came to the
same conclusion. As a result, Leffew
could not be consid-
ered negligent except
for the drunk driving
charge.
Sadly, what you
have is a drunk driv-
er with an unfortu-
nate outcome, said
Pitt.
Leffew surrendered
on an arrest warrant
in March in the
November 2011 death of Andrel Norcel
Gaines. Gaines mother spoke prior to
sentencing. While holding a photo of her
son, she asked Leffew to look at what was
taken from her and to consider her son
before ever drinking and driving, Pitt said.
Prosecutors took several months to
make a charging decision in the case
which is complicated by the fact the vehi-
cle carrying Gaines and several others was
in an accident just prior to Leffews car
striking it just after 1 a.m. Nov. 6.
Gaines, a student and basketball player
at Gavilan College in Gilroy, was a pas-
senger in a Cadillac traveling south on
Highway 101 north of Millbrae Avenue.
The group of four was heading home from
a night in San Francisco when the driver
lost control after swerving to avoid a tire in
the road, collided with the center divider
and stopped in the middle lane. Minutes
later, prosecutors say Leffew crashed his
Nissan 300ZX into the car, pushing it
down the highway for a distance.
Three other passengers inside the
Cadillac were injured. Gaines suffered a
traumatic head injury and remained on life
support until Nov. 18 when he was
removed. Leffew suffered a head injury,
severe facial cuts and broken bones,
according to his defense attorney Steven
Clark.
While in the hospital, a blood sample
placed his blood alcohol level at .12 per-
cent, according to the District Attorneys
Ofce. Leffew will also enter the rst
offenders program. He will be back in
court for a restitution hearing Oct. 16.
Driver gets time served in fatal crash
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Three people connected with a San
Carlos marijuana growing operation
were sentenced to jail time and proba-
tion Wednesday.
Alexis Morgan Bennight, 58, John
Scott Breisch, 52, and Ryan Arthur
Schofield, 34, were sentenced
Wednesday in connection with growing
marijuana at 1340 Elm St. and 956
Terminal Way in San Carlos. Bennight
and Breisch were both given six months
in county jail and three years probation,
said Assistant District Attorney Morley
Pitt. Schoeld, who wasnt as involved
with the operation, was given 120 days
in county jail, he said. The trio will get
credit for time served, which ranges
from two to 12 days, and is due back in
court Aug. 31 for a
restitution hearing,
he said.
The marijuana-
growing operation
was discovered in
August 2011 after
tenants in a neigh-
boring warehouse
space on Terminal
Way in the industrial
area of San Carlos
notified the build-
ings owner about
the strong smell of
marijuana in the
area.
The owner then
contacted police to
conduct a civil stand-
by while he inspect-
ed the building,
according to the San
Mateo County
Sheriffs Ofce.
Upon entering the
building, officers
detained Breisch and
Schoeld who were
in the middle of dis-
mantling an indoor
marijuana grow
operation. As police detained the two
men, another suspect, Belmont spa
owner Bennight, arrived at the ware-
house and was also detained.
The San Mateo County Narcotics Task
Force then obtained search warrants for
both the warehouse and an associated
residence on the 1300 block of Elm
Three sentenced for San Carlos drug operation
Dennis Leffew
Alexis Bennight
John Breisch
Ryan Schoeld
See DRUGS, Page 16
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Bruno school ofcials are hoping
to raise about $2 million annually with a
ve-year parcel tax it voted to put on the
November ballot last night.
The San Bruno Park School District
Board of Trustees voted 3-1, with
Trustee Jennifer Blanco in opposition
and Trustee Jim Prescott absent, to place
a ve-year $199 annual parcel tax on the
November ballot. Trustees pointed to
budget issues as the main reason for
seeking the tax.
Its taken a while to see that this (uti-
lizing a parcel tax) is the new normal,
said Trustee Kevin Martinez, who
worked on the measure details with
Trustee Henry Sanchez. Its not a mat-
ter of staying the course and getting to
the next year. We really do need to take
care of ourselves.
Local funding, Martinez said, is also
key since the state has recently gotten
San Bruno places parcel tax on November ballot
See TAX, Page 20
Brown breaks silence on state parks fund debacle
SACRAMENTO Gov. Jerry Brown broke his silence
Wednesday on the discovery of hidden money at Californias
cash-strapped state parks department.
The Democratic governor downplayed
the scandal, saying it was the rst time hes
seen government get in trouble for saving
money.
When somebody comes and says, Hey,
guess what, we have some money over
here, thats better than saying, Whoops
we dont have the money, he said.
Nonprot groups were blindsided last
week by reports that state parks accounts
hold $53 million more than was previously disclosed, even as
they raised money to keep 70 state parks open past a July 1 clo-
sure deadline.
No revote on high-speed plan for now
SACRAMENTO Californians having second thoughts
about a proposed $68 billion high-speed train system linking
Northern and Southern California are going to have to wait if
they want to vote again on the project.
State Sen. Doug LaMalfa, a Republican from Willows, and
former Republican Congressman George Radanovich
announced Wednesday that they are suspending their cam-
paign to put the states high-speed rail bond measure to a sec-
ond vote.
Around the state
Jerry Brown
6
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
6 5 0 - 4 7 7 - 6 9 2 0 | 3 2 0 N . S a n M a t e o D r . S u i t e 2 , S a n M a t e o
D r . S a mi r N a n j a p a D D S
Dr. Nanjapa received his dental de-
gree from MAHE, India (1997) and a
Masters in Dental Biomaterials at the
University of Alabama at Birmingham
in 1999.
He moved to Chicago to pursue a
dental postgraduate program in Full
Mouth Restoration and in 2003 re-
ceived both a DDS license and Certi-
cate in Advanced Prosthodontics.
Dr. Nanjapa began private practice
while maintaining a teaching position
as Assistant Clinical Professor at
College of Dentistry, Chicago.
In 2007 he moved to San Francisco for
private practice and a continued
academic role teaching at UC San
Francisco Dental School. His San
Mateo practice opened in 2011.
I had not been to the dentist in 20 years! For good reason,
they are scary! However, I nally bit the bullet and through a
friend found Dr Nanjapa. Wow... - Julie H.
He does a great teeth cleaning, is very attentive and not once
got impatient amid all my questions... - Vince E.
I highly, highly recommend him. - C.B.
He did a super job. I love his gentle touch - Hardial A.
5/5 Stars on ratemds.com
5/5 Stars on healthgrades.com
REVI EWS:
By Kasie Hunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON Mitt Romney a
one-term governor untested on the
worlds political stage faces
high stakes in the coming week
during visits to England, Israel and
Poland. Its a trip that amounts to
an international audition.
The Republican presidential can-
didate is seeking to persuade voters
back home to elect him their leader
in a complex, dangerous world.
And his trip will invite compar-
isons to Barack Obamas success-
ful overseas 2008 tour before he
won the White House.
Romney, whose decades in pri-
vate business gave him ample
exposure to international affairs,
hopes to prove that he is no novice
on foreign policy. At the same time
hell be highlighting a key part of
his resume the successful Salt
Lake City Olympics he managed
with a visit to the opening days
of the London Games. Hes also
planned a series of meetings and
photo events with political lead-
ers in the three countries hes visit-
ing in hopes of projecting an image
of leadership.
His itinerary is limited to a few
tightly controlled appearances in
countries that are close allies of the
United States, suggesting that
Romney knows there are risks as
well as potential benefits to his
trip.
Romney will be visiting two
countries in Europe, a region hes
spent most of his campaign criti-
cizing. Beyond that, hes certain to
face pressure to outline where he
stands on such weighty matters as
missile defense, Afghanistan troop
levels, violence raging in Syria, the
nuclear threat from Iran and the
Middle East peace process, putting
him on the spot to add details to a
foreign policy vision that so far has
been short on them.
He also faces the tricky task of
contrasting himself with Obama
while staying true to his promise
not to openly assail the president
while on foreign soil, honoring
longstanding tradition that
American politicians dont criti-
cize their government while
abroad.
Romney faces high stakes abroad
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Democrats
pushed a yearlong extension of tax
cuts for all but the highest-earning
Americans through the Senate on
Wednesday, giving President
Barack Obama and his party a sig-
nicant political victory on a meas-
ure that is fated to go no further in
Congress.
Senators approved the
Democratic bill by a near party-line
51-48 vote, with Vice President Joe
Biden presiding over the chamber in
case his vote was needed to break a
tie. Minutes earlier, lawmakers
voted 54-45 to kill a rival
Republican package that would
have included the best-off in the tax
reductions.
The $250 billion Democratic
measure would extend tax cuts in
2013 for millions of Americans that
otherwise would expire in January.
But it would deny those reductions
to the earnings of individuals
exceeding $200,000 yearly and of
couples surpassing $250,000.
With control of the White House
and Congress at stake in elections
less than four months off, passage
of the Democratic bill aligned the
Senate with Obamas tax-cutting
vision. Obama has made tax fair-
ness which includes tax increas-
es on the rich an overarching
theme of his re-election campaign,
and rejection of the measure would
have been an embarrassment for the
president and Senate Democrats.
The vote also served as a counter-
point to the GOP-run House, which
next week will approve tax cuts
nearly identical to the $405 billion
Republican plan the Senate rejected
Wednesday. And it lets Democrats
argue that only the GOP stands in
the way of tax cuts for millions of
Americans.
With the Senates vote, the
House Republicans are now the
only people left in Washington
holding hostage the middle-class
tax cuts for 98 percent of Americans
and nearly every small business
owner, Obama said in a written
statement after the vote.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, restated his plan for next
weeks vote, citing the Democratic
measures tax boosts on higher
earners.
Senate OKs Dem tax-cut bill in showdown with GOP
House GOP rejects Obama
plan for offshore drilling
WASHINGTON In an elec-
tion-year swipe at President Barack
Obamas energy policies, the
Republican-led House on
Wednesday voted to revoke Obamas
ve-year plan for offshore drilling,
replacing it with its own plan that
calls for more ambitious oil and gas
development off the U.S. coast.
The legislation will likely go
nowhere in the Senate and the White
House has issued a veto threat, but
as with the tax and regulatory bills
the House is also taking up this
month, it puts lawmakers on the
record on the issues that divide the
two parties.
Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash.,
chairman of the Natural Resources
Committee, said the bill would offer
lawmakers a choice between
Obamas restrictive plan and the far
more expansive Republican version
that opens up areas off the Atlantic
and southern California for drilling.
The Republican proposal passed
253-170 with 25 Democrats sup-
porting it. The House also voted
261-164 to reject the presidents
plan.
No medical bills for some
Colo. shooting victims
DENVER Some of the victims
ghting for their lives after being
wounded in the movie-theater shoot-
ing rampage may face another chal-
lenge when they get out of the hos-
pital: enormous medical bills with-
out the benet of health insurance.
Members of the public, along with
Warner Bros., the studio that
released the Batman movie The
Dark Knight Rises, have con-
tributed nearly $2 million to help
victims, though its not clear how
much of that will cover medical
expenses. One family is raising
money on its own online.
And three of the ve hospitals that
treated victims said Wednesday they
will limit or completely wipe out
medical bills.
Around the nation
REUTERS
Mitt Romney gives a statement to reporters gathered at Middlesex Truck and Coach after he toured the facility
during a campaign event in Roxbury, Mass.
NATION/WORLD 7
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Breakaway Alawite state
may be Assads last resort
BEIRUT In the recent sectarian violence
in Syria, some observers see a grim pattern:
Alawite fighters from President Bashar
Assads minority sect, they say, are trying to
carve out a breakaway enclave for themselves
by driving out local Sunnis, killing entire fam-
ilies and threatening anybody who stays
behind.
The Alawite sect that makes up the back-
bone of Assads regime has historically been
centered in towns and villages of Syrias
mountainous Mediterranean coast. If the
regime falls, that heartland could become a
refuge for the community and even for
Assad himself from which to ght for sur-
vival against a Sunni majority that has long
resented their domination.
That would mean a bloody Balkanization of
Syrias 17-month-old conict, an ominous sce-
nario for a country that sits along the Middle
Easts most turbulent fault lines. Any attempt
to create a breakaway state could trigger a
wave of sectarian killings and have dangerous
repercussions in a region where many reli-
gious, ethnic and tribal communities have sep-
aratist aspirations.
Mexico fines HSBC $28
million in laundering case
MEXICO CITY Mexican regulators
have levied a $28 million ne against the
Mexico subsidiary of London-based HSBC
bank for failing to prevent money laundering
through accounts at the bank.
Mexicos National Securities and Banking
Commission said Wednesday that HSBC has
paid the nes, equivalent to 379 million pesos,
or about half of the subsidiarys 2011 annual
prots.
The commission, and a report by a U.S. sen-
ate investigative committee, found the bank
failed to control suspicious ows of billions of
dollars through its accounts and didnt respond
promptly after being warned about a huge
swell in dollar cash transactions at the bank.
Around the world
By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Relentless GOP criti-
cism of a 12-day-old remark about business
owners has taken a campaign toll on President
Barack Obama, forcing him to defend himself
and giving Republican Mitt Romney a break
from steady attacks.
The development has delighted
Republicans, who were eager to shift the cam-
paign focus from Romneys tax returns, over-
seas assets and Bain Capital record.
Acknowledging that the Republicans criti-
cisms were hitting a mark, Obamas team
rolled out two new TV ads this week in which
he employed for the rst time what many
Democrats consider a powerful tool: the presi-
dent talking directly into the camera and coun-
tering GOP claims.
Those ads taking my words about small
business out of context theyre at-out
wrong, Obama says in the newest ad.
Democrats say the direct to camera format
plays to the presidents strength, and they dont
think Romney can match it. But like any strat-
egy deployed 15 weeks before Election Day, it
might lose some of its impact over time.
In the immediate future, Democrats hope
Obamas response will help him move past the
ap about business owners. But Romney aides
kept up the pressure Wednesday, sponsoring
24 events on the topic while Romney was
overseas.
Democratic strategists acknowledged
Wednesday that Obama was being hurt, at
least a little, by Romneys repeated jabs at
comments the president made in Virginia on
July 13, which originally drew little notice.
If youve got a business, you didnt build
that, Obama said, in part. Somebody else
made that happen.
Most GOP attacks ignored the broader con-
text of the speech. In it, Obama discussed a
favorite theme: the claim that government-
assisted infrastructure including roads,
research and schools help sustain American
society, including private enterprise.
Romney and his allies have used the quote in
countless ads, videos, statements and confer-
ence calls, painting Obama as contemptuous of
hard-working entrepreneurs and business own-
ers.
Its a presidential topic so familiar that few
reporters or Obama critics took note of the spe-
cic remarks for a few days.
If you were successful, somebody along the
line gave you some help, Obama said in the
July 13 speech. He cited teachers and mentors
who helped create this unbelievable
American system that we have that allowed
you to thrive. Somebody invested in roads and
bridges.
When we succeed, we succeed because of
our individual initiative, but also because we
do things together, he said.
Late on July 16, the Romney campaign
began a drumbeat of attacks quoting only the
line, If youve got a business, you didnt build
that.
Democrats responded cautiously at rst.
Eventually, aides began saying Obamas that
referred to the infrastructure he cited else-
where in the Virginia speech.
In an interview with a Florida TV station
that aired Friday a full week after the orig-
inal remarks Obama said: What I said was,
together we build roads and we build
bridges...Anybody who actually watched the
tape knows that was what I was referring to.
GOP puts Obama on defense
By Danica Kirka
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON The widows of two Israeli
Olympians killed by Palestinian gunmen at
the 1972 Munich Olympics are urging spec-
tators to stage a silent protest during
Fridays opening ceremony for the London
Games.
Ankie Spitzer and Ilana Romano are
demanding that London organizers recognize
their husbands deaths and honor them at
Olympic Stadium 40 years after the slayings.
The two women have asked audience mem-
bers to stand in silence when International
Olympic Committee chief Jacques Rogge
rises to speak at Fridays ceremony. Since
Olympic organizers have rejected a moment
of silence for the 11 slain Israeli athletes and
coaches, the widows say the silent protest will
be a victory in their ght to have the men
remembered at the proper place and time.
They were not accidental tourists, Spitzer
told reporters Wednesday, her hoarse voice
rising with indignation. They came with
dreams and came home in cofns.
The 1972 Munich Olympics were the rst
held in Germany since the 1936 Olympics in
Berlin, and was designed to blot out the taint-
ed images of competition in Nazi Germany.
But in the second week, the Black September
militant group penetrated the laxly secured
village and took Israeli team members
hostage. Within a day of Sept. 5, 11 died.
The games were briey suspended, but the
Olympics were forever changed. Security
costs soared and just kept rising with every
games.
For Spitzer and Romano, it was a simpler
time. Ankie Spitzer and her fencing coach
husband, Andrei, had just had a daughter,
Anouk, who is also pressing the ght for the
silent protest. They say Andrei was thrilled to
be an Olympian and rmly believed in the
higher goals of the games.
Ilana Romano, meanwhile, had had a bad
feeling about her husband Yossefs trip to the
games.
Munich widows calling for
Olympic ceremony protest
REUTERS
Barack Obama shakes hands at a campaign event in Portland, Ore.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Advertisement
N
eed a new iPad? Enjoy
shopping at the San
Bruno Farmers
Market? Along with getting the
freshest fruit and vegetables
around, you could also win a
brand new 16g iPad wireless val-
ued at $500. All you have to do is
fill out an official entry form at
the market information booth. As
an added bonus, if you are the
winner and you like the San
Bruno Farmers Market
Facebook page you can win a
$50 iTunes gift card. Check out
whats going on at the San Bruno
Farmers Market Facebook page
at
www.facebook.com/SanBrunoFar
mersMarket. Like us and then
visit the market to enter to win.
The contest runs through Aug.
26.
***
Burlingame Parks and
Recreation is delighted to pres-
ent yet another entertaining musi-
cal production for the whole fam-
ily. Fame Jr., based on the
popular Broadway musical and
movie, will be performed 7 p.m.
July 27 and 1 p.m. July 28 at
Burlingame Intermediate
School auditorium, 1715 Quesada
Way, Burlingame. This produc-
tion is free and open to the public
of all ages. The performance fea-
tures 26 students ages 8 to 14.
Students, such as Carmen
(Mariana Cardenas),
Schlomo (Christian Yoder),
Nick (Grant Wendt),
Serena (Francesca Quilici),
Tyrone (Matthew Silverman),
Joe Vegas (Agustin Ortiz),
Lambchops (Clara Kennedy),
Iris (Allison Kennedy),
Mabel (Kiana Ansari) and
Goody (Dillon Jew) are all
praying that they will be admitted
to New Yorks High School of
the Performing Arts. The stu-
dents are divided into the three
performing arts disciplines act-
ing, dance and music. The teach-
ers (Kate Linenbach, Samantha
Hale, Katie Buntic and Jessica
Orford) explain how hard the
next four years will be.
***
The Rotary Club of Redwood
City dispersed a record $104,000
to 13 local charities at its July 24
meeting at the Old Spaghetti
Factory in Redwood City. Ticket
sales surpassed last years total
by almost $20,000. The winning
ticket was purchased by Barbara
Schaarschmidt of Soquel. She
will have the choice of selecting
a 2012 Honda Insight LX or
$18,000 in cash. All previous
winners have opted for the cash.
The Sheriffs Activities
League topped all charities with
close to $21,000 in tickets sold.
Pets in Need ranked second in
sales with more than $17,000
while Family Connections came
in third topping more than
$16,000.
Weve taken our car raffle to a
new level, said Lilia Ledezma,
club president. Rotarians work
hard at making this event a suc-
cess, and this year theyve out-
done themselves.
***
The Burlingame Lions Clubs
eighth annual Cars-in-the-
Park car show and barbecue
will be held 9 a.m. Saturday, July
28. The fun begins under the
trees in Burlingames
Washington Park, at the corner
of Burlingame Avenue and
Carolan Drive. The event should
have more than 200 unique car
entries including antique, hot
rod, custom, vintage, funny cars
and unique cars.
Its a free event for anyone who
enjoys cars of all sizes, shapes
and descriptions. All of the pro-
ceeds from the event go back into
the Burlingame community, so
come on out and enjoy a hot dog
or hamburger while seeing some
great cars.
***
Have you missed the holiday
train? Good news! Reports are
that the Caltrain holiday train
returns this December after a
two-year hiatus.
***
The Toys R Us/Babies R
Us store in Redwood City will be
unveiled Friday after undergoing
a significant transformation over
the last few months. The compa-
nys Chief Executive Officer
Jerry Storch will be on hand and
Make-A-Wish Greater Bay
Area will receive a special grant
from the store. The store is locat-
ed at 202 Walnut St., Redwood
City.
The reporters notebook is a weekly
collection of facts culled from the
notebooks of the Daily Journal staff.
It appears in the Thursday edition.
Reporters notebook
Voluntary South City
ban targets Styrofoam
The week of July 27, 2007, the
South San Francisco City Council
approved a resolution asking busi-
nesses to phase in recyclable food
containers instead of Styrofoam
forms. The voluntary resolution
was to act as an adjustment period
for businesses. At the same time,
the city planned to begin meeting
with businesses and drafting a law.
The voluntary ban focuses on poly-
styrene a product found in items
like take-out containers which is
difcult to recycle.
Sequoia site of
laparoscopic hysterectomy
A Sequoia Hospital surgeon per-
formed the rst ever laparoscopic
hysterectomy procedure in which
no visible scar was left behind the
week of July 27, 2007.
RealHand High Dexterity instru-
ments allowed Dr. Kate OHanlan
to enter the patients abdomen
through a pre-existing scar the
belly button so that no addition-
al scars remained on the body. In
the past, laparoscopic surgeons
have used as many as ve incisions
to perform the operation.
It causes the patient less dis-
comfort, OHanlan said of the new
procedure, which has been termed
a Single Port Total Laparoscopic
Hysterectomy.
RealHand instruments were
designed with minimally invasive
surgery in mind. The RealHand
High Dexterity technology is
designed to mirror the surgeons
hand direction as well as provide
tactile feedback and greater dexter-
ity and precision, according to the
Cupertino-based Novare Surgical
Systems, which designed the
RealHand. When the surgeons
hand moves in one direction, the
tip of the instrument moves in the
same direction.
Its like having your own hand
inside the patients abdomen, said
OHanlan. I use the RealHand
technology as much as I can. It
allows for a lot more precision.
The hysterectomy was performed
in under 65 minutes; OHanlan also
removed the patients appendix
during the operation.
Bank robbed at gunpoint
A brazen midday Burlingame
bank robbery the week of July 27,
2007 had police looking for two
armed men after one jumped over
the teller counter and demanded
cash grabbing a large amount,
according to police.
The suspects dressed all in black
and armed with a handgun robbed
the Bank of America at 400 El
Camino Real at noon on Monday
of that week. The men entered the
building through the east door and
escaped through the same door,
according to police.
The man jumped back over the
tellers counter and into the lobby.
Both men ed on foot out of the
same door they entered.
From the archives highlights stories
originally printed ve years ago this
week. It appears in the Thursday edition
of the Daily Journal.
Police: Cal Ripkens
mom abducted, now safe
ABERDEEN, Md. Cal Ripken Jr.s 74-
year-old mother was found with her hands
bound and blindfolded in the back seat of her
car Wednesday after being kidnapped at gun-
point at her home outside Baltimore a day ear-
lier, police and friends said.
Investigators do not know the kidnappers
motive and there was no ransom demand for
Vi Ripkens release, Aberdeen Police Chief
Henry Trabert said at a news conference.
The gunman forced Ripken into her silver
Lincoln Continental between 7 a.m. and 8
a.m. Tuesday, police said. She was found
unharmed but shaken about 6:15 a.m.
Wednesday near her home in Aberdeen,
about 30 miles northeast of Baltimore, where
her sons Ripken Baseball complex is locat-
ed.
When asked if police believe the kidnapper
knew who he was abducting, Trabert did not
answer, saying police dont know the motive
or if the suspect any ties to the Ripken fami-
ly.
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
U-T San Diego
E
ven by Sacramentos appallingly low
standards, this scandal is a doozy:
The state Department of Parks and
Recreation has been sitting on $54 million in
untapped funds while claiming poverty and
seeking to close more than a quarter of the
278 state parks. The closings were averted,
mostly through painstaking, time-consuming
fundraising drives led by volunteer groups.
But its still awful that park supporters had to
do all that hard work because of bureaucrats
deceptions.
So far two top department executives have
been forced out over the scandal, which came
to light in an investigation of a secret,
improper vacation cashout program. More
heads could roll in coming days.
But now its time for the state investigation
to broaden to cover all 560 special funds in
the budget. Theyre believed to have more
than $33 billion. How many agencies, like
Parks and Recreation, have underreported
what theyre taking in from fees and various
sources? It seems extremely unlikely that
there is only one.
Given the cynical way Gov. Jerry Brown
has tried to rig passage of a tax measure on
the November ballot which would supply
billions in revenue that he needs to balance
the state budget he may not be inclined to
want to nd more evidence of an allegedly
broke state government sitting on cash
reserves. But we hope maybe against
hope that he wont stall this needed
inquiry.
A faux front
Editor,
I was recently considering all of the vacant
retail space in Burlingame, San Mateo and
other Peninsula cities. Many cities have ordi-
nances that prohibit retail space from being
converted to ofce space or some other non-
retail business.
I thought of a possible solution. A non-
retail business would be allowed to make the
conversion if it agreed to make a faux front
for actual retail businesses in the city. The
business would display the retailers mer-
chandise and address. The merchandise
would be rotated periodically, and neither
side would charge the other. This would be a
natural solution for book stores and clothing
stores but a challenge for restaurants and
those who sell perishable products.
It seems to be a win-win all around.
Retailers get increased visibility of their mer-
chandise. The new business gets street-level
ofce space. The city gets more sales tax rev-
enue from the increased pedestrian trafc
downtown.
I would be interested in what others think.
Robert Baker
San Mateo
CalFresh in San Mateo County
Editor,
Thank you for focusing attention on
CalFresh (food stamps) in Michelle Durands
July 20 column (Getting carded). Over the
last ve years, CalFresh enrollment in San
Mateo County has increased from 14,500 to
41,000 individuals per year. Of these, more
than half are children. Despite this growth,
county residents are still going hungry and
relying on food banks and school lunches to
get by.
Some facts about hunger and CalFresh:
CalFresh can only be used to purchase
food. Alcohol, tobacco, even vitamins are off
the list, as are most prepared foods. A person
living in a vehicle or a rented room without
access to a kitchen cannot purchase hot soup
at a grocery store deli.
Since the start of the recession, the need
for food has increased sharply. Second
Harvest Food Bank provides food to one in
10 county residents and has seen the number
of people it serves monthly increase by near-
ly 50 percent over the last ve years. Since
2007, CalFresh enrollment has tripled in
Belmont, Burlingame, Millbrae and San
Bruno communities traditionally thought
of as middle-class communities.
Because of our countys high rents, our
friends and neighbors have even less money
for food than residents of less expensive
counties. Last year, Samaritan House staff
helped 11,000 individuals who were working
at least one job and often two or three, but
werent earning enough to keep food on the
table and a roof over their heads.
CalFresh helps the local economy. More
than 270 local grocery stores, markets and
mom and pop shops benet nancially from
CalFresh, as do all of their employees and
vendors.
In our wonderful county, where there is so
much afuence, there is also hunger and
we are committed to ensuring that every per-
son who is eligible, receives CalFresh so our
entire community can thrive. When the food
needs of a family or individual are met, they
lead healthier lives, learn more in school, are
more productive members of society and
contribute more to the local economy.
Beverly Beasley Johnson
Director, Human Services Agency
Cindy McCown
Senior director of Programs and Services,
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara
and San Mateo counties
Kitty Lopez
Executive director, Samaritan House
Bill Somerville
President and founder, Philanthropic
Ventures Foundation
Will Brown scrutinize all state reserves or stall?
Other voices
The Akron (Ohio) Beacon-Journal
C
ongress has a plan, or at least has
arranged the steps, for dealing with
the countrys decit and debt prob-
lems. Come the end of the year, lawmakers
will send all of us over a scal cliff.
Among other things, cuts in income, divi-
dend and capital-gains taxes will expire.
Defense and domestic spending will be
whacked. All told, the approach would
reduce the countrys debt by a projected $8
trillion during the next decade, the federal
budget in balance by 2016.
A good thing? The word cliff points to
the likely pain, breaks and bruises.
The Congressional Budget Ofce reported
last week that in 2009, Americans paid the
lowest federal tax rate in three decades, an
average 17.4 percent. That points to the room
available for raising taxes. More, the Obama
White House hardly proposes going to excess
on higher taxes.
A strong case can be made for an even
split of spending reductions and tax increas-
es, including a step the president has
eschewed, taxing capital gains as ordinary
income. As it is, Republicans have been shar-
ing their fears about defense reductions (part
of a deal they brokered). Spare defense, and
other priorities, such as education, research
and parks, are vulnerable. These factors high-
light why a careful balance must be struck,
putting rst the recovery, anchoring long-
term decit reduction and avoiding the haz-
ards of a scal cliff.
The fiscal cliff
Other voices
Leading the way
in health reform
implementation
By Carole Groom and Adrienne Tissier
H
ealth insurance is not broccoli. That is
the essence of the U.S. Supreme
Courts landmark
decision to uphold the con-
stitutionality of the
Affordable Care Act,
President Obamas signature
legislative achievement to
date.
Heres the good news for
San Mateo County: 57,000
uninsured residents will
receive affordable health
coverage, young adults can
stay on their parents plans
until age 26 and individuals
can no longer be discriminat-
ed against by insurance com-
panies because of pre-exist-
ing conditions such as can-
cer, depression or even wom-
anhood.
Long before the Supreme Courts decision,
the County of San Mateo was hard at work
implementing the Act. We began by forming
the Community Health Reform Advocacy
Committee shortly after the bill was signed into
law by the president in 2010. To date, CHRAC
has created a website to educate residents about
health care reform, conducted an education and
outreach campaign to inform small businesses
about tax credits currently available to them if
they choose to offer insurance to their employ-
ees and written a white paper to inform
Californias Health Benet Exchange Board
about San Mateo Countys successful commu-
nity approach to enrollment.
Weve also taken advantage of federal incen-
tives to provide insurance now to those individ-
uals who will become eligible for it in 2014
under the acts Medicaid expansion. Eight-
thousand residents are covered under this early
enrollment program, which will help the county
and the state hit the ground running when the
law takes full effect.
Everyone will use health care services at
some point in their lives. Unless the uninsured
pay out of pocket, the uncompensated cost of
their care is picked up by everyone else through
higher insurance premiums and higher costs for
medical services. Thats the difference between
health insurance and broccoli: The decision to
forgo broccoli doesnt carry with it negative
consequences for others, which is one reason
why the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable
Care Acts provision requiring everyone who
can afford it to purchase health insurance.
To help individuals fulll this responsibility,
the state of California is creating a marketplace,
known as the Exchange, where individuals can
purchase affordable insurance and receive any
subsidies for which they are eligible. These
insurance offerings will be standardized to
cover the same basic health services, making it
simpler to compare different plans and premi-
um levels, and will have no lifetime coverage
caps. Pursuant to the acts consumer protec-
tions individuals in this marketplace cannot be
excluded due to pre-existing conditions, their
coverage cannot be rescinded retroactively and
excessive premium hikes will be subject to
review. We are actively working with the
Exchange Board to create an easy and efcient
consumer experience for residents who partici-
pate in this new marketplace.
The county of San Mateo is a leader in local
health care reform implementation. Weve
taken this proactive role because we believe
any law that expands health coverage to 30 mil-
lion people while reducing the federal budget
decit by $210 billion over the next 10 years is
worth supporting. Most importantly, we believe
health care is a basic human right that should
be accessible to all, not just the privileged few.
Carole Groom and Adrienne Tissier are mem-
bers of the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors and co-chairs of its Community
Health Reform Advocacy Committee. Learn
more about CHRAC by visiting
www.smcgov.org/healthreform.
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Jim Dresser
Blanca Frasier Charles Gould
Gale Green Jeff Palter
Kris Skarston Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Jenna Chambers Kore Chan
Elizabeth Cortes JD Crayne
Rachel Feder Darold Fredricks
Brian Grabianowski Ashley Hansen
Kevin Harris Drake Herrador
Erin Hurley Rosie Linares
Melanie Lindow Andrew Lyu
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments please.
Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,676.05 +0.47% 10-Yr Bond 1.406 +0.14%
Nasdaq2,854.24 -0.31% Oil (per barrel) 90.669998
S&P 500 1,337.89 -0.03% Gold 1,603.50
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Whipsawed by strong
earnings from some companies, weak
ones from others, including the once
infallible Apple, investors couldnt make
up their mind whether to buy or sell on
Wednesday. In the end, they mostly sold,
but barely.
The Standard & Poors 500 slipped
0.42 points, or 0.03 percent, to end
1,337.89. The tiny loss extended the
broad indexs losses to a fourth straight
day. A big reason was Apple, which
dropped $22.12 to $578.80, a loss of 4
percent. A sharp drop in new home sales
also fed the selling.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
58.73 points, or 0.5 percent, to 12,676.05.
That snapped a three-day, triple-digit los-
ing streak for the index.
Helping the Dow were big gains from
two of its components, Boeing and
Caterpillar. The duo contributed 24 points
to the index, or nearly half of its gain.
Boeing rose $2, nearly 3 percent, to
$74.03 after reporting surprisingly strong
earnings. The aircraft maker also raised
its prot forecast for all of 2012.
Caterpillar, which makes mining and
construction equipment, rose $1.17, or
1.4 percent, to $82.60. The company blew
away analysts estimates with a 67 per-
cent surge in prots for the second quar-
ter. Caterpillar credited strong sales of
mining equipment overseas and a
strengthening housing market.
Shortly after Caterpillar announced its
results, the optimism about housing took
a hit. The Commerce Department said
sales of new homes plunged 8 percent last
month, the steepest drop since February
last year. Sales in the Northeastern U.S.
plummeted 60 percent. The decline sug-
gests a weaker job market is dampening
any pickup in the industry.
Housing is not really recovering, its
bottoming, said Steven Ricchiuto, chief
economist at Mizuho Securities, a broker-
age rm. Thats still a problem with the
economy.
Home builders were hit hard. Beazer
Homes fell 13 cents, or 5 percent, to
$2.35. KB Home lost 32 cents, or 3 per-
cent, to $9.31.
The biggest loser in the S&P was
Netix, the video subscription company.
It fell $20.11 to $60.28, a loss of 25 per-
cent. The company reported late Tuesday
that its net income plunged 91 percent in
the latest quarter. Investors are worried
about rising licensing fees and slowing
subscriber growth.
S&P down 500, Dow gains
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
WellPoint Inc., down $7.41 at $54.01
The health insurer cut its 2012 earnings forecast
after its second-quarter net income fell over 8
percent and enrollment dropped.
RadioShack Corp., down $1.05 at $2.60
The electronics seller reported a $21 million
second-quarter loss as sales for electronics and
personal computer accessories fell.
Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc., up $8.73 at
$41.31
The hardwood ooring retailers second-quarter
prot more than doubled on higher sales
during the spring remodeling season.
Tupperware Brands Corp.,down $1.21 at $52.79
The maker of plastic storage containers said
that its second-quarter revenue fell and it cut its
2012 adjusted earnings guidance.
The Jones Group Inc., up 32 cents at $9.90
The apparel makers second-quarter net income
rose 56 percent as it acquired higher-end
brands like shoe maker Kurt Geiger.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., down $25.95 at $574.97
The iPhone maker posted third-quarter results
that missed Wall Street expectations,as people
bought its least expensive products.
Netix Inc., down $20.11 at $60.28
Shares of the video subscription service fell after
it said that its second-quarter subscriber growth
slowed from a year ago.
iRobot Corp., up $3.50 at $22.99
The robot company,which makes the Roomba
vacuum cleaner, said that its second-quarter
prot fell but still beat expectations.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PALO ALTO Electric vehicle
maker Tesla Motors Inc. said
Wednesday that its second-quarter net
loss nearly doubled as it invested heavi-
ly to launch its second vehicle, the
Model S.
Shares of the Palo Alto company fell
3 percent, or 89 cents, to $28.95 before
the market closed. They fell another 3.2
percent, or 92 cents, to $28.03 in after-
hours trading.
The company said it lost $105.6 mil-
lion, or $1 per share, from April through
June. That compares with $58.9 million,
or 60 cents per share, a year earlier.
Revenue was $26.7 million, less than
half the $58.2 million reported in the
second quarter of last year.
Excluding stock-based compensation
expenses, the company lost 89 cents per
share for the quarter. That beat Wall
Street estimates. Analysts polled by
FactSet expected a loss of 93 cents per
share on revenue of $30.9 million.
Tesla, the brainchild of PayPal bil-
lionaire and SpaceX founder Elon
Musk, now has two all-electric models
on the market, the $109,000 Roadster
and the new Model S, which starts at
$49,900 after a federal tax credit. The
Model S went on sale last month, and
Tesla said it had more than 11,500 reser-
vations for the sedan by June 30.
Tesla has lost money since sales of the
Roadster began in 2008, and the compa-
ny is banking on the cheaper Model S to
expand its market. Tesla began selling
stock to the public in June 2010 at an
initial price of $17 per share.
The company said its maintaining
revenue guidance of $560 million to
$600 million for the year, and it still
plans to produce 5,000 of the Model S
this year. It expects a gross margin of 25
percent next year and has a goal of
20,000 deliveries in 2013.
Tesla second quarter net loss widens
European losses hurt Ford s 2Q profit
DEARBORN, Mich. Just three years after Ford revived its
American business, the company is planning an even trickier
turnaround in Europe, where mounting losses weighed down its
second-quarter results.
Fords net income fell 57 percent to $1 billion in the April-June
period, largely because of a $404 million loss in Europe. Car
sales there have tumbled to 20-year lows because consumers lack
condence in the economy. Ford expects to lose more than $1 bil-
lion in Europe in 2012, double its estimate from the beginning of
the year.
The company wouldnt give details about its turnaround plans
on Wednesday, but analysts say layoffs and plant closures are
inevitable. Europe is vital to Ford. A quarter of its sales and prof-
its come from the region, which is Fords largest market after
North America. Four straight quarters of losses in Europe are tak-
ing a toll.
This is a very serious situation, Chief Financial Ofcer Bob
Shanks said after Ford announced quarterly results Wednesday.
Its going to take quite a long time for Europe to work through
these issues.
Zynga stock tanks after weak 2Q report
NEW YORK Zyngas stock is tanking after the online game
maker reported a loss in the second quarter, with adjusted earn-
ings and revenue below Wall Streets already-low expectations.
The company behind games such as CityVille and
FarmVille also lowered its outlook for the year because of
delayed games, reduced expectations for its Draw Something
game and what it called a more challenging environment on the
Facebook Web platform.
Zynga derives nearly all of its revenue from games played on
Facebook, and a growing number of Facebook users are access-
ing the social network using mobile devices rather than comput-
ers. That hurts Web-based games such as Zyngas.
Zynga Inc. said Wednesday that it lost $22.8 million, or 3 cents
per share, in the April-June quarter. Thats down from earnings of
$1.4 million a year ago when it was still privately held. Its per-
share results last year were at breakeven.
Business briefs
<< Dodgers trade for Miamis Ramirez, page 12
Oakland puts beat down on Blue Jays, page 12
Thursday, July 26, 2012
LINCECUM KNOCKED AROUND: SAN DIEGO AVOIDS SWEEP, BEATS GIANTS 6-3 >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One ghter is in the middle of her amateur
career, while the other takes his next step in
pursuit of professional glory.
B Street Boxings Casey Morton and San
Bruno native Joe The Punisher Gumina will
both be in action next month as they both con-
tinue their boxing careers.
Morton is coming off a
1-1 performance at the
Showdown in the Desert
tournament in Indio, where
she made it to the 114-
pound championship
match. Next up is the
Ringside 2012 tournament
in Kansas City, Mo.
Aug.1-4.
Morton normally ghts
at 119 pounds and will
do so again in Kansas City
but the coach who was
working her corner in
Indio, Gary Sullenger out
of Concord Youth Center
in the East Bay, forgot he
already had a ghter at 119
pounds and it was decided
Morton would be the one to cut weight.
I found out less than a week before the
tournament I had to drop (a weight class),
Morton said. It was a good experience. Ive
always been good on weight. Ive never had to
drop weight.
While ve pounds may not seem a lot, in the
boxing world Morton said its the equivalent of
Morton, Gumina back in the ring
REUTERS
France's Elodie Thomis,center,ghts for the ball against Shannon Boxx,left,and Christie Rampone right,of the U.S.during their womens Group
G soccer match at the London 2012 Olympic Games at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland.
By Joseph White
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLASGOW, Scotland An early start to
the Olympics turned into an early hole for the
U.S. womens soccer team, which gave up
two quick goals before unleashing an attack
the rest of the world will nd hard to stop.
Abby Wambach used her size and strength
to put in a header, Alex Morgan applied her
speed to chip one over the goalkeeper and
Carli Lloyd broke the tie with a 25-yard rock-
et. All of which sent the two-time defending
goal medalists to a 4-2 victory over France on
Wednesday as they opened their London
Games far from London.
Morgan added an insurance goal created
by a nice run from Tobin Heath for the
Americans, which began play two days before
the opening ceremony and 400-plus miles
from the British capital. Soccer starts its
Olympics early so it has time to play a full
tournament of games.
The Americans allowed more goals in the
rst handful of minutes than they had allowed
in any game since the World Cup nal loss to
Japan last year. Gaetane Thiney (12th minute)
and Marie-Laure Delie (14th) found holes in a
supposedly impenetrable defense a poten-
tial cause for U.S. concern as the grueling
tournament progresses.
But Wambach scored in the 19th, Morgan in
the 32nd, Lloyd in the 56th and Morgan again
in the 66th. Wambach now has 139 interna-
tional goals in her pursuit of Mia Hamms
record of 158, and 23-year-old Baby Horse
Morgan the second-youngest player on the
team has a remarkable 19 this year alone.
While the Americans are favored to win
gold again and even though the U.S. is now
13-0-1 all-time against France it was hard-
ly a surprise to see the French make it a game.
The teams were tied late in the second half in
last years World Cup seminals before the
Americans nished off a 3-1 win, and France
entered these Olympics on a 17-game win-
ning streak.
The United States plays Colombia in its
second group game on Saturday. France will
face North Korea.
The French took the lead on a deected
long ball that ended up at the foot of Thiney,
who had plenty of time and space to unleash a
22-yard shot into the upper right corner of the
net, grazing the ngertips of leaping goal-
keeper Hope Solo.
Two minutes later, the Americans played a
dangerous game of pinball deep in their own
end, failing in ve separate chances to clear a
corner kick. Inevitably, the ball bounced to a
French player, Delie, who put the easy shot
U.S. women rally to beat France
S
erra basketball coach Chuck Rapp
wont say if he is superstitious. He
does, however, recognize trends. So
before Mondays Skyline Summer
Tournament championship game against
Riordan, Rapp told his team, Whenever we
win this tournament, good things tend to
happen during the season, Rapp said. I
think (the tournament) is important. It kind
of brings us togeth-
er.
Looks like the rest
of the Central Coast
Section better gear up
for another potential
title run by the Padres
during the 2012-13
season as Serra beat
West Catholic
Athletic League rival
Riordan to win its
f o u r t h - s t r a i g h t
Skyline tournament
championship. It is
the eighth Skyline title for the Padres in the
10 years.
I thought we played pretty well. Riordan
was missing some potential starters. We had
pretty much our whole squad, Rapp said.
We were able to exert a lot of defensive
pressure. We were able to create offense
with our defense. All in all, it was a good
Casey Morton Joe Gumina
See FIGHTERS, Page 14
Preparing
for success
See LOUNGE, Page 13
See SOCCER, Page 14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Penn State faced the threat of a four-year
ban on playing football before the NCAA
imposed sanctions this week over the schools
handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molesta-
tion scandal, a university spokesman said
Wednesday.
David La Torre said the potential for the
multiyear death penalty was oated during
discussions between Penn State President
Rodney Erickson and NCAA ofcials before
Penn State was hit Monday with a $60 million
ne, a four-year bowl game ban, reduced foot-
ball scholarships and the forfeiture of 112
wins.
The school trustees met on the subject at a
State College hotel Wednesday, and afterward
issued a statement calling the NCAA punish-
ment unfortunate but better than the alterna-
tive the so-called death penalty.
Reporters were barred from the conference
room where they met, and trustees avoided
them after the meeting broke up.
The potential for a four-year ban, first
Death Penalty
for Penn State
was on the table
See PENN ST, Page 13
SPORTS 12
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sports Teams, Clinics, Camps, Classes & Training
Serving Peninsula Youth since 2002
SPORTS CLINICS & CAMPS
Boys & Girls, Ages 1st-8th grade
Each clinic and camp includes
Sport FUNdamentals and athletic training
Basketball
Volleyball
Lacrosse
Soccer
Baseball
Football
Speed & Agility
All Sports Camp
Experienced coaching by those
who know and play the game
Featuring:
Vol l eybal l Coach Jenni f er Agresti
Lacrosse Coach Jen Lee
Free Nike T-Shirt for each participant
Beginning May 29, 2012
Daily sessions Monday through Friday
9am-12pm or 1pm-4pm or 9am-4pm
Extended hours available by reservation
Daily and weekly rates. Ask about our multiple week pricing.
650-654-4444
www.payesplace.com
595 Industrial Road, San Carlos 94070
(Mid-Peninsula at Hwy 101 & Holly Street)
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Jesus Guzman hit two
home runs and Chase Headley had one to hand
Tim Lincecum another setback, powering the San
Diego Padres past the San Francisco Giants 6-3 on
Wednesday to avoid a three-game sweep.
Will Venable also hit a two-run double to help
the Padres chase Lincecum (4-11) after he allowed
ve runs in 4 2-3 innings. The two-time NL Cy
Young Award winner had shown signs of progress
in his previous two outings. Instead, hes still try-
ing to put three straight solid starts together and
turnaround the worst season of his career.
Jason Marquis (4-5) gave up three hits and one
earned run in 7 1-3 innings. He struck out eight
and walked one to send the NL West-leading
Giants to only their third loss in 12 games.
Huston Street extended his scoreless streak to
15 straight innings with a four-out save, including
striking out All-Star MVP Melky Cabrera with
two on to end the eighth. Street has converted all
16 save opportunities this season.
After allowing two runs in 15 innings over his
previous two starts, Lincecum and the Giants were
optimistic The Freak had nally snapped out of his
funk.
So much for that.
Headley hammered a 1-1 fastball over the wall
in center in the rst to match his career-high of 12
home runs and give the Padres a 1-0 lead. It was
the sixth home run allowed in the rst inning this
year by Lincecum, tying the mark he gave up all
of last season.
The Giants answered back in the bottom of the
inning when Gregor Blanco singled, stole second
and eventually scored on Cabreras y out to left.
The run did little for Lincecums condence.
Lincecum loaded the bases in the fourth with
one out. He struck out Marquis on three pitches
and almost escaped until Venables two-run dou-
ble landed in front of a diving Angel Pagan in left-
center, putting the Padres ahead 3-1 and extending
Lincecums season-long slump.
San Franciscos shaggy-haired starter slumped
around the mound, covering his face with his
glove, never regaining his composure. Lincecum
lofted a fastball clocked at 89 mph over the middle
of the plate in the fth that Guzman crushed over
the wall in left.
Guzman also hit a solo shot off Brad Penny
leading off the eighth for his sixth home run of the
season to give San Diego a 6-1 lead.
After Lincecum walked John Baker, manager
Bruce Bochy took that familiar trot to the mound
to relieve his former ace before the sixth inning
again. Lincecum left after giving up seven hits,
ve runs and three walks. He tossed 102 pitches
62 for strikes and struck out eight.
Lincecum now has a 5.88 ERA, the highest
among any qualifying National League pitcher,
and has only lasted six innings in nine of his 21
starts. The Giants are 6-15 this season when
Lincecum takes the mound.
San Franciscos nal effort to save Lincecum
from another loss fell short.
Brandon Belt reached on a throwing error by
shortstop Everth Cabrera that landed in the dugout
to start the bottom of the eighth. Joaquin Arias sin-
gled home Belt and Theriot delivered an RBI sin-
gle with two outs to slice San Diegos lead to 6-3.
Street entered and struck out Cabrera to end San
Franciscos best shot.
NOTES: Headley also hit 12 home runs in
2009. ... Giants 3B Pablo Sandoval sat out with a
strained left hamstring he injured Tuesday night
stretching for a catch to nish off a double play
when he was at rst base. The team will wait until
Friday to decide whether he needs to be put on the
disabled list. ... San Franciscos Hector Sanchez
(sprained left knee) is scheduled to catch ve
innings for Triple-A Fresno on Thursday. Sanchez
was put through catching and elding drills
Wednesday, including at rst base.
Padres deny Giants sweep
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI Former NL batting champion
Hanley Ramirez was traded from Miami to the
Los Angeles Dodgers on Wednesday, part of
what appears to be the third big re sale in
Marlins history.
Left-handed reliever Randy Choate also was
dealt to the Dodgers. The Marlins received right-
hander Nathan Eovaldi and
minor league pitcher Scott
McGough.
The trade came two days
after the Marlins sent pitch-
er Anibal Sanchez and
inelder Omar Infante to
the Detroit Tigers for pitch-
ing prospect Jacob Turner
and two minor leaguers.
As the team prepared to
move into its new $634
million retractable-roof ballpark, Marlins owner
Jeffrey Loria hired Ozzie Guillen as manager
and committed $191 million in a ve-day span
during the offseason to sign All-Stars Jose
Reyes, Mark Buehrle and Heath Bell. The team
agreed to star in a Showtime reality series, The
Franchise.
In their colorful new uniforms, the Marlins
were 31-23 through June 3, just percentage
points out of rst place, then lost 17 of their next
20 games. They started Wednesday 45-52, fourth
in the NL East and 12 1/2 games out of rst
place.
Padres 6, Giants 3
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO Coco Crisp hit two home
runs and Yoenis Cespedes had a pair of RBI
doubles, leading A.J. Grifn and the Oakland
Athletics over the Toronto Blue Jays 16-0
Wednesday night for their season-high seventh
straight win.
It was the most-lopsided shutout loss ever for
Toronto. Things got so out of hand that the
Blue Jays used catcher Jeff Mathis to pitch the
ninth inning, and he gave up two runs on an
RBI double by Brandon Hicks and an RBI sin-
gle by Brandon Moss.
Chris Carter homered and drove in three
runs. He drew a bases-loaded walk from Ricky
Romero during an eight-run second inning as
Oakland improved to 16-2 in July.
Grifn (3-0) gave up three hits in six innings.
The rookie struck out nine in winning his third
straight start and leaving with a 2.25 ERA.
Romero (8-7) lasted only 1 1-3 innings in the
shortest start of his career. He lost his sixth
decision in a row.
Crisp hit a leadoff drive to right in the third
and went deep to almost the same spot in the
fth, his rst multihomer game of the season
and the third of his career.
The As posted their fth 16-0 shutout in
franchise history and their rst since a lopsided
win over San Francisco on June 26, 2005.
Jonny Gomes reached base four times for
Oakland, now 10-1 since the All-Star break.
Mathis came into the game in the second
after Toronto lost catcher J.P. Arencibia to a
broken right hand after he was hit by Brandon
Inges foul tip. Arencibia stayed in the game
until the half-inning ended, and is expected to
miss six weeks.
Romero, who came in 4-0 with a 1.70 ERA
in six career starts against the Athletics,
allowed eight runs on four hits and six walks.
Already leading on Cespedes RBI double in
the rst, Oakland broke it open in the second.
Left elder Travis Sniders error on Crisps
single led to the rst run, and Gomes followed
with an RBI single. Josh Reddick added an
RBI double and, after an intentional walk to
Cespedes loaded the bases, Romero ended his
night by walking Carter to force home a fth
run.
Streaking As hammer Jays
Dodgers trade for
Miamis Ramirez
2013 World Baseball
Classic final at AT&T Park
NEW YORK The seminals and nal of
next years World Baseball Classic will be
played at San Franciscos AT&T Park.
First-round games will be played at Chase
Field in Phoenix and Salt River Fields at
Talking Stick in Scottsdale, Ariz., Major
League Baseball said Wednesday.
Second-round games will take place at
Marlins Park in Miami.
Japan, which won the rst two tournaments
in 2006 and 2009, has threatened not to par-
ticipate because its demand for a larger share
of revenue hasnt been met.
Baseball brief
Hanley Ramirez
As 16, Blue Jays 0
SPORTS 13
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
way to end the summer campaign.
Serra went 7-0 over the tournaments two-
weekend schedule. The Padres went undefeat-
ed in pool play and then beat Menlo-Atherton,
American-Fremont, Half Moon Bay and
Riordan to capture the tournament title.
The Skyline tournament is one well try to
win. The other summer games, its more about
development, Rapp said.
Rapp said the Skyline tournament is a little
more personal than the other events his team
participates in during the summer. Its hosted
by a San Mateo County school and is attend-
ed by mostly San Mateo County teams. Even
during the casual run of summer play, there is
still a lot of bragging rights on the line when
county schools face off against each other.
You have built-in local rivalries in that
(tournament) and it is a San Mateo County
event, Rapp said. I think all the teams feel
that way.
And [Skyline coach Justin Piergrossi] runs
it as a championship. Other tournaments only
give you a certain amount of games. And we
want to defend our home turf.
It wasnt too long ago the summer was the
domain of baseball and softball while nearly
all other sports used those months as their off
season.
There is no such thing as an off season any-
more. In high school especially, if teams want
to have success during the regular season, it
starts during the months games arent played.
Rapp said the Padres will play 30 to 40 games
as a squad during the summer. They partici-
pate in a summer league run by City College
of San Francisco, which is two games once a
week, along with a couple of tournaments and
one-day camps on college campuses, such as
St. Marys and San Jose State.
But the main reason for the summer season
is to start melding together a team.
Its important to start to build chemistry,
Rapp said, especially among players in the
junior and senior classes, who get a bulk of
the playing minutes.
(The goal is to) just develop chemistry and
play with each other. Thats probably the most
important thing you do during the summer.
And thats just with the high school team. It
doesnt take into account a players commit-
ment to a club team or an AAU squad that
travels around the country and plays in show-
case events.
While attendance at Serras summer pro-
gram is not required, it behooves the athletes
to be there as much as possible.
Its important the kids make a commitment
to the Serra basketball program in the sum-
mer, Rapp said. Were not taking atten-
dance, but we expect them to be there when
they got nothing better to do.
We had, for the most part, good atten-
dance. When they missed (summer games),
they were usually out playing basketball.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
reported by ESPN, showed how high the
stakes were as college sports governing body
considered how to respond to an internal
school investigation by former FBI Director
Louis Freeh that found former coach Joe
Paterno and three other top college ofcials
helped conceal reports that Sandusky was
abusing children.
NCAA president Mark Emmert said this
week that if a total football ban had been
imposed, other penalties would have accompa-
nied it.
If the death penalty were to be imposed,
Im quite sure that the executive committee
and I ... would not have agreed to just the death
penalty. It would have included other penalties
as well, Emmert said as the sanctions were
unveiled.
An NCAA spokeswoman declined further
comment Wednesday on negotiations with
Penn State.
Many alumni and some trustees were
incensed over the unprecedented NCAA
penalty which will cost Penn State tens of
millions of dollars and likely cripple its foot-
ball team for years to come and Penn
States quick acceptance of it.
A person with knowledge of the meeting
said earlier Wednesday that trustees were to
discuss whether Erickson had the authority
to agree to the sanctions without first getting
the boards approval. The person was not
authorized to discuss the meeting and spoke
on condition of anonymity.
Some trustees had expressed concern that
Erickson may have violated a board rule that
says the board must authorize the signing of
contracts, legal documents, and other obliga-
tions.
The board statement made no reference to
the proprietary of what Erickson had done,
saying trustees held a discussion but did not
take any votes.
The board nds the punitive sanctions dif-
cult and the process with the NCAA unfortu-
nate, the statement said. But as we under-
stand it, the alternatives were worse as con-
rmed by NCAA President Mark Emmerts
recent statement that Penn State was likely
facing a multi-year death sentence.
La Torre said Wednesday that Erickson had
authority to act without the approval of the full
board.
Continued from page 11
PENN ST
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BARCELONA, Spain The question
sounded more like a concession.
The U.S. mens Olympic basketball team
had come to Barcelona and put a 100-78 beat-
ing on Spain, the country given the best
chance of stopping the Americans bid for a
second straight gold medal. It was such a
dominating performance over the nal three
quarters Tuesday that it was hard to imagine
what could be much different if the teams
meet again in London.
So, one Spanish journalist asked Chris Paul,
is this U.S. team invincible?
No, Paul said. I mean, I wish we were.
Wed get to live a long time.
OK, so theyre not immortal, either.
What the Americans have, after a ve-game
exhibition schedule, is a team that is unbeaten,
though not unbeatable. The Americans have a
weakness that can be exploited, though also
the ability to turn it into a strength.
They head to London as the clear favorites,
and maybe among the few who believe win-
ning gold again will require much more than
just showing up.
I think for us, its about going out there and
playing the right way and worrying about us,
Paul said. We go into games, fortunately we
know that were probably going to be the most
talented team there, but that doesnt always
win games for you.
It worked during this tour, which started
nearly three weeks ago in Las Vegas and
ended with an off day Wednesday in
Barcelona. The U.S. flies to London on
Thursday, then plays its Olympic opener
Sunday against France.
Games against overmatched Britain and the
Dominican Republic werent competitive, but
the Americans were challenged at times dur-
ing the three contests against medal con-
tenders. Brazil had a 10-point lead after one
quarter before the U.S. won by 11. Argentina
cut a 20-point decit to four in the nal min-
utes of the Americans 86-80 victory here
Sunday. And Spain was ahead by nine points
in the opening period before the U.S. got the
game under control.
We got better. We got better and at the end
of the day thats what its all about, LeBron
James said of the pre-Olympic schedule.
Weve got to continue to improve and it was
a good test.
U.S. mens basketball unbeaten, not unbeatable
SPORTS 14
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
by
4:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Bar Only
of a normal person having to lose 20 pounds in
a short period of time.
We never know when were going to ght,
so its good to be ready (weight wise), Morton
said.
She said most of the extra pounds was water
weight so when she arrived in Indio, she went
to work dropping the weight.
[Indio, a small town in the desert near Palm
Springs] is a weight-cutters paradise, Morton
said. It was 118 degrees outside and I was in
the hot tub. I lost three pounds in 15 minutes.
Mentally, I was just so much meaner, I didnt
care (about all the hard work to cut weight).
Morton won her rst bout with relative ease
and thought she had won the championship
ght, only to see the decision go the other way.
It was tough not to come home with the
belt. It got me more red up for next week,
Morton said. It was exciting going up
against a much [more experienced] opponent.
I thought I did enough to win, but I should
have done more.
Morton now heads to Kansas City in a bit of
ux. Her regular trainer, B Street Boxings
Eddie Croft, is unavailable to work her corner
at the tournament, and her backup trainer who
cornered her in Indio, is promoting a show of
his own that week. So Morton is heading to the
Midwest without a coach or corner crew,
although she thinks she has someone lined up.
Dont expect that little speed bump to slow
her down.
At this point, Ive been working extra hard
so I want to keep going, Morton said. I dont
care I have to corner myself. If worse comes to
worst, Ill ask a random (coach to help me
out).
While Morton continues to bounce around
the country in search of ghts, Gumina returns
home for an Aug. 17 cruiserweight ght in
Richmond against an opponent to be deter-
mined. This will be Guminas fourth profes-
sional ght and he is 2-1 with a pair of rst-
round knockouts. With his exciting, knockout
style of boxing, he is a ghter in demand by
promoters.
The reason they like Joe here (in the Bay
Area) is, he draws, said Jim Gumina, Joes
father and co-manager. He sells lots of tick-
ets.
Others ghters, however, have not been
quick to step into the ring with Gumina.
Hes been turned down a lot (by other ght-
ers and managers). No one wants to [ght
him], Jim Gumina said.
Guminas bout Aug. 17 is on the undercard
of San Francisco native Karim Mayeld and
Mauricio Herrera junior welterweight bout,
which will be broadcast on ESPN2 as part of
the networks Friday Night Fights series.
Guminas bout, however, will not be tele-
vised.
It could only be a matter of time before
Gumina, a 2002 Capuchino graduate, nds
himself on television. Gumina is not one to
dance around and box. He has one thing on his
mind: knockout. He knocked out 16 of 26
amateur opponents quite a feat considering
knockouts in amateur bouts are rare given the
bigger size of the gloves and the head protec-
tion worn by ghters. Since turning pro, hes
still pounding opponents into oblivion.
In his pro debut at San Francisco
Longshoremens Hall last February, Gumina
knocked out Jose Jesus Hurtado in 60 seconds.
He followed that up with a 90-second demoli-
tion of Harry Gopaul a couple months later.
Last September, Gumina suffered his rst pro
defeat, losing a four-round decision to
Anthony Johnson.
Gumina spent about a year living, training
and sparring in Hollywood and is currently
trained by Jesse Reid, who has trained 23
world champions.
There are a lot more ghters down there
(with whom to train and spar), Jim Gumina
said.
Gumina now splits his time between the
Peninsula and Southern California. He trains
out of San Franciscos Ring of Fire boxing
club when he is not in training camp.
The elder Gumina said he has already lined
up a sponsorship deal with San Mateos Man
Cave Memorabilia, which allows Joe Gumina
to concentrate on ghting instead of dealing
with a full-time job.
If Gumina keeps trending upward, however,
sponsors may start coming to him.
Hes sparred with some of the best, Jim
Gumina said. He was a paid sparring partner
for Andre Ward, who liked his power.
Continued from page 11
FIGHTERS
past Solo, again off the goalies outstretched
left hand, to make it 2-0.
But the Americans are arguably stronger,
deeper and more diverse than theyve ever
been, and they have the repower to overcome
such a decit and quickly. Wambach, who
has the best header in womens soccer, started
the comeback by nodding in Megan Rapinoes
corner kick.
The goal awakened some of a crowd that so
far had behaved as if watching a BBC docu-
mentary. Chants of U-S-A! began to echo in
sections of Hampden Park, the 109-year-old
landmark that serves as Scotlands national
stadium.
The 52,000-seat stadium was perhaps one-
third full at kickoff, but the game needed to
draw only a couple of thousand to surpass the
all-time Scottish record for attendance at a
womens game. Organizers gave away some
30,000 tickets to schools and local clubs to
keep the stands from being embarrassingly
empty in a region where soccer is overwhelm-
ingly a mans game.
The American fans who made the trip had
their enthusiasm rewarded when goalkeeper
Solo got an assist when her long ball was
chased down on the rst bounce by Morgan,
who chipped it over goalkeeper Sarah
Bouhaddi to tie the score.
Lloyds tiebreaker was never in doubt, a
blast that left Bouhaddi helpless as it found
the left side of the net. Heath made the margin
a comfortable one with a long run down the
left side deep into the penalty area before run-
ning into interference. The ball slid over to
Morgan, who merely had to tap it in for the
games nal goal.
Continued from page 11
SOCCER
SPORTS 15
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
|ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
|ocrease mob|||ty & ex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
Look 8etter
Fee| 8etter
|mprove Post0re
|mprove 8a|aoce
8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 Sao Nateo 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
VIP Orientation
and get started today!
DojoUSA - San Bruno
www.dojousa.net Schedule your
650.589.9148
Specializing in
.arate training
7aeBo fi tness
8BC body makeovers
Celebrate Freedom!
Train with us free this month!
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 58 39 .598
Atlanta 54 44 .551 4 1/2
New York 47 51 .480 11 1/2
Miami 45 53 .459 13 1/2
Philadelphia 45 54 .455 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 58 40 .592
Pittsburgh 55 42 .567 2 1/2
St. Louis 52 46 .531 6
Milwaukee 44 53 .454 13 1/2
Chicago 40 57 .412 17 1/2
Houston 34 65 .343 24 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 55 43 .561
Los Angeles 53 46 .535 2 1/2
Arizona 49 48 .505 5 1/2
San Diego 42 58 .420 14
Colorado 36 60 .375 18
TuesdaysGames
Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Atlanta 7, Miami 1
Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
San Diego 6, San Francisco 3
Cincinnati 5, Houston 3
St. Louis 3, L.A. Dodgers 2, 12 innings
Colorado at Arizona, late
ThursdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 10-5) at St. Louis (West-
brook 8-8), 10:45 a.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 11-3) at Houston (Keuchel
1-2), 5:05 p.m.
Washington(E.Jackson5-6) at Milwaukee(Gallardo
8-7), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y.Mets (Harvey 0-0) at Arizona (Miley 11-5), 6:40
p.m.
FridaysGames
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 5:05 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 5:40 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 59 39 .602
Baltimore 51 47 .520 8
Tampa Bay 51 47 .520 8
Boston 49 50 .495 10 1/2
Toronto 48 49 .495 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 53 45 .541
Detroit 53 45 .541
Cleveland 49 49 .500 4
Kansas City 41 56 .423 11 1/2
Minnesota 40 58 .408 13
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 58 39 .598
Oakland 53 44 .546 5
Los Angeles 54 45 .545 5
Seattle 43 57 .430 16 1/2
WednesdaysGames
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 2
L.A. Angels 11, Kansas City 6
N.Y.Yankees 5, Seattle 2
Detroit 5, Cleveland 3
Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 1
Oakland 16,Toronto 0
Texas 5, Boston 3
ThursdaysGames
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-6) at Baltimore (Tillman 2-
1), 9:35 a.m.
Oakland (Milone 9-6) at Toronto (Laffey 2-1), 9:37
a.m.
Detroit (Verlander 11-5) at Cleveland (McAllister
4-2), 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 4-6) at Seattle (Vargas 10-7),
7:10 p.m.
FridaysGames
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
vs.Dodgers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/29
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/11
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.Chivas
6p.m.
NBCSN
9/2
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
vs.Dodgers
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/28
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
vs. Rays
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/1
@Orioles
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/27
@Toronto
9:37a.m.
CSN-CAL
7/26
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/30
@Orioles
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
@Orioles
10:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/29
vs.Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/31
vs. Mets
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/1
vs.Mets
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/2
vs.Rays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/30
vs. Dodgers
7:15p.m.
NBC
7/27
vs.Rays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/31
BASEBALL
National League
LOSANGELESDODGERSOptioned RHP Shawn
Tolleson to Albuquerque (PCL). Transferred RHP
Todd Coffey to 60-day DL.
MIAMI MARLINS Traded 3B Hanley Ramirez
and LHP Randy Choate to the L.A.Dodgers for RHP
NathanEovaldi andRHPScott McGough.
NEWYORKMETSOptioned C Mike Nickeas to
Buffalo (IL).
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIESAgreedtoterms with
LHP Cole Hamels on a six-year contract through
2018. Assigned OF Jason Pridie outright to Lehigh
Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGHPIRATES Promoted RHP Logan
Kensing from Altoona (EL) to Indianapolis (IL) and
LHP Jhonathan Ramos from Bradenton (FSL) to Al-
toona. Optioned RHP Evan Meek to Indianapolis.
Recalled OF Starling Marte from Indianapolis.
NFL
ARIZONA CARDINALS Placed G Blake
DeChristopher on the waived-injured list.
BUFFALOBILLSSigned DE Sean Ferguson. Re-
leased DE Lionel Dotson.
CHICAGOBEARS Placed WR Johnny Knox on
the physically-unable-to-perform list.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Signed DT Brandon
Thompson.
DALLAS COWBOYS Placed G Mackenzy
Bernadeau, WR Danny Coale, CB Mike Jenkins, S
Matt Johnson and C/G Kevin Kowalski on the phys-
ically-unable-to-perform list.
DETROITLIONSReleasedOTJohnnyCulbreath.
Signed OT Jonathan Scott, CB Drew Coleman and
CB Justin Miller.
GREENBAYPACKERSSignedGGregVanRoten.
Released G Grant Cook and S Charlie Peprah.
TRANSACTIONS
AMERICANLEAGUE
BATTINGTrout, Los Angeles, .356; Konerko,
Chicago, .336; Mauer, Minnesota, .328; MiCabrera,
Detroit,.328;Cano,New York,.319;Beltre,Texas,.316;
Ortiz, Boston, .316; AJackson, Detroit, .316.
RUNSTrout, Los Angeles, 74; Kinsler, Texas, 69;
Granderson, New York, 68; MiCabrera, Detroit, 65;
Cano, New York, 65; De Aza, Chicago, 65; Ortiz,
Boston, 65.
RBIMiCabrera, Detroit, 82; Hamilton, Texas, 81;
Willingham, Minnesota, 72; ADunn, Chicago, 71;
Fielder, Detroit, 69; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 68; Encar-
nacion,Toronto, 67;Teixeira, New York, 67.
HITSMiCabrera,Detroit,128;Jeter,New York,127;
Cano,NewYork,122;AGordon,KansasCity,116;Rios,
Chicago,115; AdJones,Baltimore,114; Beltre,Texas,
113.
DOUBLESAGordon,Kansas City,33; Choo,Cleve-
land,31; Cano,New York,29; Brantley,Cleveland,28;
Kinsler, Texas, 28; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27; AdGonza-
lez, Boston, 27.
TRIPLESJWeeks, Oakland, 6; Andrus, Texas, 5;
Berry,Detroit,5;DeAza,Chicago,5;AJackson,Detroit,
5; Rios, Chicago, 5; ISuzuki, New York, 5; Trout, Los
Angeles, 5; Zobrist,Tampa Bay, 5.
HOME RUNSADunn, Chicago, 30; Hamilton,
Texas, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 27; Granderson, New
York, 27; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 27; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 26; Willingham, Minnesota, 25.
STOLEN BASESTrout, Los Angeles, 31; RDavis,
Toronto,25;Kipnis,Cleveland,21;Revere,Minnesota,
21; Crisp,Oakland,20;De Aza,Chicago,18;JDyson,
Kansas City, 17; DeJennings,Tampa Bay, 17.
PITCHINGPrice,Tampa Bay,14-4;Weaver,Los An-
geles, 13-1; MHarrison, Texas, 12-5; Sale, Chicago,
11-3;Verlander, Detroit, 11-5; Darvish,Texas, 11-6; 6
tied at 10.
LEAGUE LEADERS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 11 5 5 38 37 29
Kansas City 11 6 4 37 26 19
Houston 9 5 7 34 31 25
D.C. 10 7 3 33 34 27
Chicago 9 7 4 31 22 22
Columbus 7 7 4 25 18 19
Montreal 7 13 3 24 30 42
New England 6 9 5 23 25 25
Philadelphia 6 10 2 20 20 21
Toronto FC 5 11 4 19 24 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 13 5 4 43 44 27
Real Salt Lake 12 7 3 39 33 26
Vancouver 9 6 7 34 25 26
Seattle 8 5 7 31 25 21
Los Angeles 9 10 3 30 38 35
Chivas USA 6 8 5 23 13 21
Colorado 7 13 1 22 27 30
FC Dallas 5 10 7 22 25 30
Portland 5 11 4 19 19 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesdays Games
MLS All-Stars 3, Chelsea 2
Fridays Games
Vancouver at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Houston at Toronto FC, 1:30 p.m.
New York at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Chivas USA at Portland, 8 p.m.
Sundays Games
New England at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
16
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Street in San Carlos. A search of the Elm
Street residence uncovered nearly 1,300 mar-
ijuana plants, six pounds of processed mari-
juana and evidence related to sales, according
to the Sheriffs Ofce.
The plants were discovered in a backyard
shed and some of which had been apparently
moved from the Terminal Way warehouse,
according to the Sheriffs Ofce. A search of
the warehouse revealed evidence associated
with the cultivation of marijuana.
At both locations, evidence of an illegal
electrical bypass was also discovered. At the
time of the bust, police estimate the street
value of the entire haul to be more than
$922,000.
In May, Bennight and Breisch both pleaded
no contest to one count of maintaining a house
for narcotics while Schofield pleaded to
felony theft of utility services. All entered
pleas in exchange for no more than one year
in county jail, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 5
DRUGS
rules keep being altered and there is such
divergent interpretation of all aspects of the
dissolution, San Mateo City Manager Susan
Loftus wrote in an email to the Daily Journal.
In San Mateo, the city will likely lose some
properties it purchased with its redevelopment
funds such as the vacant Kinkos site at Fifth
Avenue and Claremont Street.
The city will not be able to afford to buy it
at fair market value, Deputy Mayor David
Lim said.
It is an already bad situation and we are
going to lose properties, he said. He does not
anticipate, however, the city losing any core
services due to the dissolution of RDAs.
In San Carlos, the citys Wheeler Plaza
mixed-use residential project is at risk
because two of the ve parcels in the down-
town project area were purchased by the citys
RDA, City Manager Jeff Maltbie told the
Daily Journal.
It has been difcult, Maltbie said about
winding down the agency. The laws imple-
mented are not very well thought out. It is dif-
cult to understand the specics of all these
actions although we understand the spirit of
it.
Cities contend the state cannot touch local
tax revenue after the passage of Proposition
1A in 2004 and Proposition 22 in 2010.
Questions on oversight
Linda Koelling, former mayor in Foster
City, is now on the citys oversight committee
for its RDA successor agency.
While she is no longer on the City Council,
she has fought the states actions against
raiding local tax revenue for the past two
years.
The whole process for dismantling is
absurd, Koelling told the Daily Journal.
She is also concerned by the extended pow-
ers the state Department of Finance has been
given with the legislation.
As she sits on Foster Citys oversight com-
mittee to nd ways to protect city assets while
meeting state mandates, she says that ulti-
mately the state will have nal say on dissolu-
tion and that local oversight boards will be
mostly ignored.
She questions why oversight boards are
even needed if the state continues on its cur-
rent path.
It is disappointing the way different taxing
agencies have tried to take from cities, she
said.
The states actions, she said, will cripple
Foster Citys ability to build affordable hous-
ing and create jobs.
What they are doing is making the rules as
they continue to play the game, Koelling said
about Gov. Jerry Brown and state lawmakers
as they tackle Californias $9.2 billion decit.
Local legislative support
The bill was supported locally in the
Assembly by Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco,
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, and Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park.
The bill went a long way toward helping the
state meet its budget this year, Gordon said.
AB 1484 was a trailer bill that included
over $3 billion in budget solutions, and was a
critical piece of the recently-signed state
budget, Gordon wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
For Hill, the decision to support RDA dis-
solution will ultimately help the states
schools avoid drastic cuts.
We prioritized economic development
when times were good. But when times go
bad, that money is needed to maintain our
schools. The state decided it can no longer
backfill education, Hill told the Daily
Journal.
Cities in San Mateo County did well with
redevelopment, he said, and the Legislature
will work on restoring some of the housing
components lost with the dissolution of rede-
velopment.
In the state Senate, Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo, and Joe Simitian, D-
Palo Alto, also supported AB 1484.
Fall guys
The leagues Executive Director Chris
McKenzie contends the legislation will jeop-
ardize public safety and other critical city
services.
We also strongly believe the sales tax and
property tax clawback provisions violate the
Constitution and are inconsistent with other
parts of AB 1484 that declare that redevelop-
ment successor agencies are separate and
apart from city governments, McKenzie
wrote in a statement.
Koelling thinks the state needs to gure out
other ways to solve its decit rather than
raid local tax coffers.
Local government cannot be the fall guys
for the inept governing in Sacramento, she
said.
AB 1484 gives the state Department of
Finance the authority to divert local sales and
property taxes and impose $10,000 per day
nes, putting local public safety and other
vital services at risk while ignoring the state
Constitution, according to the League of
California Cities.
The states nonpartisan Legislative Analyst
Ofce reported that projections of redevelop-
ment revenue in the budget is overly opti-
mistic given the amount of local redevelop-
ment debts that must rst be paid.
Flawed measure
The LAO further characterized AB 1484 as
a signicant expansion of the authority of
Department of Finance, including the
unprecedented ability for it to delay and divert
local sales and property taxes to satisfy the
states cash demands.
In my opinion, this entire exercise brought
on by the governors decision to continue to
take funds from local government is terribly
confusing and a waste of time and money. It
takes from one agency and gives to another,
the old shell game, pass it back and forth. He
should concentrate on the pensions issue and
trying to encourage companies to do business
in California, not raising taxes, Koelling said
about Gov. Brown.
The states haste to pass the budget trailer
bill without consulting with cities will pro-
mote more conict and litigation, McKenzie
said.
We had hoped this year that state and local
ofcials could pull together and fashion a
trailer bill that truly worked for cities while
balancing state needs. Unfortunately, the pas-
sage of this awed measure ... without the
involvement of local ofcials in its drafting
will only perpetuate conict at a time when a
more collaborative approach would have pro-
moted unity, McKenzie wrote in a statement.
Redevelopment agencies were funded by
property tax revenue in designated areas. With
dissolution, tax revenue, unless obligated by
contracts such as bond payments, is supposed
to be distributed to other local agencies such
as school or re districts.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
UNCLEAR
absence through June. Tonight, the board
will consider excusing Hoch through
December.
Hoch, who spoke with the Daily Journal
earlier this month, is on medical leave. Shes
going to physical therapy most days and has
worked hard to get back to health. Her doc-
tor has warned that the meetings might be
too stressful. Hoch said she hopes to return
as soon as she can citing a strong desire to
remain involved.
The conversation puts the sitting trustees
in a difficult position. Having only four
members means not having a tie-breaking
vote for split decisions.
Trustee Maurice Goodman is open to a dia-
logue thats respectful for both the health of
Hoch but also that her absence isnt imped-
ing the boards responsibilities.
Board President Judy Bush was also neu-
tral. She described Hoch as a big contributor
to the community whose presence and
knowledge are missed. Bush added she sim-
ply wants Hoch to get better.
Trustee Phil Weise will vote against
extending the excused absences.
I like Shirlee. I would like to see a five-
member board. The voters are entitled to
that, he said.
Even if the majority of the board votes
with Weise, the decision to vacate the seat is
with Hoch.
South San Franciscos policy allows for
trustees to be excused. In the bylaw cited for
the resolution going before the board
Thursday, there is no limitation for such
excuse. Other rules discussing reasons that
could cause a vacancy allow for up to a year
for someone called to serve in the military.
There is no time limit when it comes to med-
ical reasons.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, July 26
at the District Office, 398 B St., South San
Francisco.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
HOCH
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Find out why were one of the fastest growing construction companies in the Bay Area!
t: 650.274.4484
dom@risecon.com
P.O. Box 117414
Burlingame CA 94011
www.risecon.com
L#926933
t 650 274 4484 P O Bo 117414 risecon com
Fin Findd o d o t ut ut h why why we were re on one o e o e of t f t f the he he ffas fasttes test g t grow rowiing ing co co t nst nstruc ructio tio tion c n c n com omp omp i ani anies es iin in th the the BBa Ba A y A y Area rea!!!
t 650 274 4484 P O B 117414 i
Call us today for a FREE design consultation
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ah, summer. Theres something about these
warm and languid days and nights that makes
many of us want to throw together a little
gathering.
Picking a cocktail party theme makes plan-
ning the menu and dicor more fun. Here are
just a few to get your creative wheels turning.
Invite your favorite people, add some fairy
lights and lanterns, and get the party started.
60s SOUTH BEACH
Showtimes new Magic City TV series,
set in mid-century Miami, is inspiration for
party dicor and music with a retro vibe, served
with Cuban-inuenced canapis.
At Pottery Barn, youll nd a collection of
melamine plates, serveware and coordinating
linens in muted vintage tropical prints.
Palm-leaf-patterned ceramic serveware in
deep blues and olive greens are part of Cindy
Crawford Styles Eden collection at JC
Penney.
And even if youre land-bound, craft stores
offer shells, coral and starsh you can add to
baskets and trays lled with store-bought play
sand to create table decor. Or place one dra-
matic tropical ower or frond in a tall slim
vase.
Serve appetizers with Latin air, such as
Cuban shrimp skewers, mini empanadas and
spicy popcorn. Play the Rat Pack music that
was popular in the era at Miamis big hotels
Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sammy Davis Jr.
COCKTAILS IN CORTONA
You may not be under the Tuscan sun this
summer, but you can still set a similar scene
for your guests. Fill a large glass vase with
water, lemons and sunowers. Or take a cue
from London-based stylist Sania Pell and ll
clear vessels with untrimmed vegetables such
as radishes, celery and carrots for a rustic
look.
Pottery Barn has melamine versions of the
iconic Talavera pottery, while Williams-
Sonoma has unbreakable dishware in
Mediterranean patterns.
Small bites are the way to go with any
cocktail party; theyre easy for guests to han-
dle, and your food trays will be easier to
refresh. For this one, consider tiny tomato
tarts, a sampler of Italian ices, and shot glass-
es lled with cold soups like cucumber dill or
tomato basil.
TOKYO TERRACE
A city balconys the perfect place for a chic,
Asian-inspired cocktail party. Set up the Zen
zone with baby conifer pots or moss nestled
into interesting dishes. Wrap votives in origa-
mi paper.
Branchhome.com has Wasaras elegant
bamboo and sugarcane-ber disposable table-
ware thats great looking and eco-friendly.
CB2s Format orange enamel tray and an
array of colorful, user-friendly, clothespin-
style chopsticks would be stylish options.
Mini crabcakes, salmon satays and melon
ball lollipops, along with bowls of Japanese
crackers and wasabi nuts, will satisfy snack-
ing guests.
CABIN FEVER
Bring the woodsy cabin vibe home to the
city or suburbia with a few playful acces-
sories, and a comfort food menu. A few inex-
pensive bandanas, a plaid blanket, or an old
quilt make colorful table coverings; a wind-
downed branch or group of interesting rocks
wrapped in lights would look wonderful as a
rustic centerpiece.
Homegoods has a canoe-shaped condiment
server complete with paddle spoons. Youll
nd patchwork-patterned acrylic plates here
too, as well as coordinating drink pitchers and
utensils.
Set out mini sliders, roasted vegetable
skewers and paper cups lled with seasoned
fries. Consider a avored water or gourmet
soda bar; its a unique idea for any cocktail
soiree, and keeps things just as much fun for
teetotalers or designated drivers.
A theme adds punch to summer party
Picking a cocktail party theme makes planning the menu and dicor more fun.
18
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
By Cedar Bernett
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE I feel like Alice in
Wonderland. Sprinting past an alli-
gator drinking a soda pop and a T-
Rex playing guitar, I lean toward a
family of colorful metal toadstools
that come to my knee.
Arent those great? asks Jim
Honold as he ushers me through a
forest of recycled oil drum statues at
his Home & Garden Art store.
Ive come to this Disneyland for
gardeners seeking inspiration for
easy ways to add whimsy to gar-
dens, and Honold is giving me the
rundown.
Adding art to your garden is an
extension of your identity, he says
as we brush past a murder of con-
crete crows. You decorate the
inside, why not the outside? Any
personality, any hobby, can be rep-
resented classical, funky, season-
al you name it.
Looking around, it appears hes
right. Theres the giant metal
umbrella coat-stand for a classy
infusion of humor; a multitude of
hobby-inspired birdhouses; 4-foot
metal lobsters for shing enthusi-
asts with no attachment to subtlety;
and an old tricycle planter box
aimed at the nostalgic set.
Everywhere, whimsy abounds.
But how do you actually start
adding lawn art to an outdoor living
space?
Instead of throwing stuff in the
attic or garage, put it out in the
open, Honold says.
He suggests displaying old gar-
den tools, metal toys, or wine glass-
es and decanters. Chipped plates
can nd new life in concrete step-
ping stones, and wooden kid-size
furniture always adds a nice touch.
Focus on whats readily avail-
able or representative of your area,
Honold adds. Coastal areas might
have shing nets and glass oats,
and places close to rural communi-
ties will have farm equipment. In
Washington state, he says, people
bring us old saws and ask us to
laser-cut their name or address on
them.
For a big splash, Honold recom-
mends an artistic gate. Whether
installing custom wrought-iron
doors with elaborate scenes on them
or simply taking a can of bright red
paint to a basic home-store model,
gates can reect personality and set
the tone for the rest of the house.
Think about all the things a gate
can say, Honold says. Stay out!
or Were fun people!
If the message youre trying to
send is Were magical, nd ways
to add fairy elements to your gar-
den. For kids and anyone with more
than a passing fancy for Harry
Potter, theres nothing quite as
charming as coming across traces of
pixies in the yard.
Greenspirit Arts Sally Smith
knows the power of a good fairy
house. She creates high-end custom
ones in her studio in Wadhams,
N.Y., that have inspired a calendar
and greeting card line.
While most of her houses arent
made for extensive outdoor use, she
says her calendars and online tutori-
al often serve as inspiration for peo-
ple to create their own more durable
models.
Making a fairy house is some-
thing we all innately know how to
do because of the child in us, Smith
says.
For a do-it-yourself fairy house
that can stand up to the elements,
Smith suggests working with stone
as a base, and attaching a stick and
moss roof and a wooden door.
Decorations can be found objects
beach glass, pine cones, welcome
mats woven from grasses or pine
even tiny dollhouse furniture.
And what about the garden itself?
Plant choices can add whimsy to
the garden as well, or simply com-
plement the art youve chosen, says
New Albany, Ohio, landscape
designer Nick McCullough.
He suggests incorporating
climbers like clematis, honeysuckle,
roses or golden hops to vertical art
and trellises, then adding lower
plantings at the base.
Climbers add a mystique to the
garden, McCullough says. They
make the garden feel established.
For other art, McCullough recom-
mends thinking about scale and
complementary colors.
Art can add whimsy to a garden
Adding art to your garden is an extension of your identity.
Pitt. Should the finding be contested,
however, then the court would need to
hold a competency hearing. At the
same court appearance, a judge will
decide if bail should be set. Before
going to Napa, Ayres was out on
$250,000 bail, which was revoked
when he was sent to treatment, said
Pitt.
McDougall did not return a call for
comment.
Prosecutors efforts to convict Ayres
has spanned more than five years. He
was arrested in 2007 and tried in 2009
for allegedly abusing six former male
patients under the guise of medical
exams between 1988 and 1996 when
they were 9 to 13 years old.
The jury hung in varying amounts on
every count and his mental fitness was
called into question before he could
stand trial again. The jury deadlocked
and the prosecution agreed to allow
Ayres hospitalization rather than
launch another trial.
Ayres practice included private
clients and referrals from both the
juvenile justice system and school dis-
tricts. He also became known as presi-
dent of the American Academy of
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and
for hosting the sex education series
Time of Your Life. Ayres received
juvenile court referrals up through
2004.
San Mateo police first began looking
at Ayres in 2002 after a former patient
accused him of molestation during the
1970s when he was 13. After a U.S.
Supreme Court ruling on the statute of
limitations nixed criminal prosecution,
the victim and Ayres reached a confi-
dential settlement in July 2005. In a
deposition for the lawsuit, Ayres
reportedly admitted conducting physi-
cal exams of patients as part of his
care.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
AYRES
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SHOWROOM HOURS:
Wednesday Saturday 12:00 noon 5:30 PM
All other times by appointment
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
(Between Brittan & Holly)
652-388-8836
Making Peninsula homes more beautiful since 1996
www.cinnabarhome.com
FREE DESIGN SERVICE WITH PURCHASE
Home furnishings & accessories
Drapery & window treatments, blinds & shades
Free in-home consultation with purchase
Gifts Interior Design
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes Mu|ti-Fami|y Mixed-Use Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Renance / Cash Out
Investors We|come Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If it happens to be raining hard
when you read this, my words might
make you want to pelt me with ripe
tomatoes if you had them yet.
Still, Ill say it: Timely watering can
eke the best plant growth from any
plot of ground in any season.
Even in wet seasons, watering usu-
ally helps, because the water that
falls then isnt all available to plants.
Roots need air to function, and a
cats and dogs rain temporarily
drives all the air out of the ground.
Roots start to breathe and function
again only after gravity has pulled
excess water deeper into the ground.
A timely watering will spur plant
growth in those drier periods
between rains.
WATERING TRIAGE
This doesnt mean you need to set
up elaborate irrigation systems to
water every maple, marigold, lettuce
leaf and lawn grass. Such a degree of
control would take too much of what
is natural out of gardening.
Too much perfection in watering
can even cause trouble in some set-
tings, such as when it spurs invasion
of aggressive grasses into a wild-
ower garden. Depending on what
you grow, how you take care of your
plants, and general rainfall patterns
in the region, most of your yard
might not justify being watered.
The part of the garden that cries
out most for timely watering almost
everywhere is the vegetable garden.
Most vegetables are annual plants, so
have their thirst quenched by just a
seasons growth of roots. Whats
more, we want our vegetables tender
and juicy, qualities that come from
cells plumped full of water.
Not all vegetables, though, are
equally demanding of water. Lettuce
and radishes do reach perfection
only in consistently moist soil, but
tomatoes actually taste best if kept
slightly dry.
Lets sidle over to the ower bed
now. Annual owers need water until
their roots establish themselves.
Beyond the establishment phase,
though, there are plenty of annual,
biennial and perennial owers that
grow well with little or no watering.
Some such owers that come to
mind are Russian sage, potentilla,
pinks, coneflower, lavender and
yarrow, as well as globe-
ower, strawower and
other owers known to
dry well after cutting.
Of course, if your goal
is an English ower gar-
den lush with roses and
spires of delphinium,
supplemental watering is
probably needed. In that
case, moving your garden
to England also might be
justied.
Like annuals, newly
planted or young trees,
shrubs and vines need to be watered
until they get established. These
plants also eventually get along ne
without supplemental watering if
plants are chosen that are adapted to
their locations.
Smaller plants establish them-
selves more quickly than larger
plants, so think twice before planting
a 10-foot-high tree; it will require
years of timely and abundant water-
ing.
MAKING THE MOST OF WATER
Whether youre growing vegeta-
bles, owers or trees, how you care
for the soil can have as much impact
on satisfying your plants thirst as
can watering itself.
Applying plenty of organic materi-
als, such as compost, leaves and
straw, makes any soil better able to
sponge up extra moisture.
Another way to preserve moisture
is to avoid digging or tilling these
activities disrupt capillary water con-
nections in the soil and burn up
those water-retaining organic materi-
als.
Laid on top of the ground as
mulches, those organic materials
prevent evaporation of water from
the grounds surface at the same time
they enrich the soil with organic mat-
ter and obviate the need for tilling to
control weeds.
Whenever some plants justify
watering because of a freak dry sea-
son or just because of the kinds of
plants they are, do it right. Figure, on
average, on plants needing a 1-inch
depth of water per week, as rainfall
or sprinkler-fall, measured into a
straight-sided container. If you use
drip irrigation, a watering can or a
hose, translate that gure into a half-
gallon per square foot of planted area
or estimated spread of roots. Double
or triple that amount for deep-rooted
plants, such as larger trees.
If youre going to stand there with
hose in hand, supplying that much
water is going to take you longer
than you think. No matter how you
water, dig down into the soil occa-
sionally and check for moisture
yourself.
Even when it rains, dont forget to water
Even in wet seasons, watering usually helps, because the water that falls then isnt all available to plants. Roots
need air to function, and a cats and dogs rain temporarily drives all the air out of the ground.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, JULY 26
Adidas Giant Warehouse Clearance
Event. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cow Palace,
2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City. Free. For
more information visit adidas.com.
Foster City Village Update
Meetings. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Wind
Room above the Foster City Library,
1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Updates for seniors and others on the
Village progress. For more information
call the Foster City Village at 378-8541.
Free Childrens Concert. 11 a.m.
Otter Books, 86 E.Third St., San Mateo.
Featuring Plink and Plunk, the
concertina and banjo singing duo. For
more information call 579-7341.
Burlingame Lions Club
Membership Drive with
Motivational Speaker Larry
Jacobson. Noon. 990 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Larry Jacobson will
speak on Leadership Lessons Learned
at Sea. As a leaders in sales and
marketing for 20 years, Larry speaks
with a unique authority and
credibility. For more information call
348-0799.
Summer Vacation Book Club. 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. 800 Alma St., Menlo Park. For
more information visit
www.menloparklibrary.org.
Movies for School-Age Children:
How to Train Your Dragon. 3:30
p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Come see the
Dreamworks Animated movie How
to Train Your Dragon. The movie is
rate PG and lasts 98 minutes. Free
popcorn as available before the movie
from Whole Foods. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Dancin Off the Avenue. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. Adjacent to Fresh Market on Park
Road off Burlingame Avenue Live
music and dancing. Free.
Central Park Music Series. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Central Park, downtown San
Mateo, corner of Fifth Avenue and El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Enjoy
country music by California Cowboys.
Free. For more information call 522-
7522 ext. 2767.
Cooking Demo: Summer Barbecue
Dishes. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Chef Amy
Fothergill will teach you some
delicious and easy summer sides, like
zucchini pancakes with herb yogurt,
roasted tomatoes over polenta with
mascarpone and more. $15. To
register call 726-3110.
Family Fun Night. 7 p.m. Easton
Branch Library, 1800 Easton Drive,
Burlingame. Featuring Steve Chaney,
a ventriloquist. Free. Space is limited.
Thursday Group Series Dance
Classes. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City
Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. Includes level
II Viennese Waltz, level I Viennese
Waltz, all level Bachata and all level
Salsa. For more information call 627-
4854.
Dear Edwina Junior. 7:30 p.m.
Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. $12. For more
information call 349-6411 or visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Movies on the Square: The Lion
King. 8:30 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. This
movie is rated G. Free. For more
information call 780-7340 or visit
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
movies.html.
FRIDAY, JULY 27
Adidas Giant Warehouse Clearance
Event. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cow Palace,
2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City. Free. For
more information visit adidas.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents The Velveteen Rabbit. 1
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst served. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
call 594-2730 or visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Vampires versus Werewolves. 3 p.m.
to 4 p.m. South San Francisco Main
Library. 840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Free. For more information
call 829-3860.
Frank Bey with The Anthony Paule
Blues Band. 6 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. For more information call 556-
1650.
The PAL Blues, Arts and Barbecue
Festival. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Redwood
City Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Presented
by the San Mateo Credit Union, the
festival features blues musicians from
the Bay Area. Proceeds go to the
Redwood City Police Activities
League. Free. For more information
call 556-1650 or visit
www.palbluesfestival.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst served. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
and for tickets visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Burlingame Parks and Recreation
Presents Summer Musical:Fame Jr.
7 p.m. Burlingame Intermediate
School auditorium, 1715 Quesada
Way, Burlingame. This production
features students ages 8-14. Free. For
more information call 697-6936.
FBO Ballroom Dance Classes. 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Learn the Cha Cha 2. For more
information call 627-4854.
Dear Edwina Junior. 7:30 p.m.
Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. $12. For more
information call 349-6411 or visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Monthly Rhythm Dance Party. 8
p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Includes Hustle lesson and a three
hour Rhythm Dance Party. At 8 p.m.
cost is $12. At 9 p.m. cost is $10. For
more information call 627-4854.
SATURDAY, JULY 28
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8. $5 for children under 10. For
more information call 583-1740.
Burlingame Lions Club Cars in the
Park. 9 a.m. Washington Park, Corner
of Burlingame Avenue and Carolan
Drive, Burlingame. The event should
have more than 200 unique car
entries, including antique, hot rod,
custom, vintage, funny cars and
unique cars. Free. For more
information or to join Burlingame
Lions Club call 348-0799.
Adidas Giant Warehouse Clearance
Event. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cow Palace,
2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City. Free. For
more information visit adidas.com.
The PAL Blues, Arts and Barbecue
Festival. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Redwood
City Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Presented
by the San Mateo Credit Union, the
festival features blues musicians from
the Bay Area. Proceeds go to the
Redwood City Police Activities
League. Free. For more information
call 556-1650 or visit
www.palbluesfestival.com.
Music on the Square Dave Earl.
11 a.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. For more
information call 556-1650.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents The Velveteen Rabbit. 1
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst served. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
call 594-2730 or visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Burlingame Parks and Recreation
Presents Summer Musical:Fame Jr.
1 p.m. Burlingame Intermediate
School auditorium, 1715 Quesada
Way, Burlingame. This production
features students ages 8-14. Free. For
more information call 697-6936.
Soccer for Kids Benefit Raffle and
Dining. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Behans Irish
Pub, 1327 Broadway, Burlingame.
Soccer for kids helps alleviate poverty
and violence in Niger. This event will
have live music, food, a rafe, surprise
celebrity and more. For more
information call (415) 710-6891.
Lies My Mother Told Me. 6:30 p.m.
Angelicas Bell Theatre and Bistro, 863
Main St., Redwood City. Presented by
Dented Can Cabaret. Dinner seating
begins at 6:30 p.m. and show begins
at 8:30 p.m. $25 in advance. $30 at the
door. $15 menu minimum per person.
For more information call 365-3226
or visit angelicasbistro.com.
San Carlos Childrens Theater
presents Little Shop of Horrors. 7
p.m. Central Middle School, 828
Chestnut St., San Carlos. Seating is rst
come rst served. $12 in advance and
$14 at the door. For more information
and for tickets visit
sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
Dear Edwina Junior. 7:30 p.m.
Hillbarn Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. $12. For more
information call 349-6411 or visit
hillbarntheatre.org.
Saturday Ballroom Dance Party. 8
p.m. to Midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. Includes Bachata lessons
and ballroom dance party. At 8 p.m.
cost is $12. At 9 p.m. cost is $10. For
more information call 627-4854.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
A new haunt
John Ryan remembers seeing the
Johnston House when he was driving out
from Redwood City to Half Moon Bay
as a kid.
Back then, it was the haunted house,
he said.
When Ryan later moved to Half Moon
Bay as an adult he remembers looking
up at the renovated house.
I couldnt believe it, said Ryan, who
is now president of the Johnston House
board. I was shocked at what they had
done.
Since Smithsonian historians Malcolm
and Joan Watkins stumbled upon the
architectural diamond in the rough,
almost all renovating has been done by
volunteers, said Ryan.
Its been a labor of love for a lot of
people, said Ryan, who frequently
comes up to the house from his ofce
down the road to work on the house and
enjoy the calm.
Johnstons love and loss
The New England saltbox-style home
brings Barbara VonGlahns local history
books to life. The house was built before
Half Moon Bay became a city, she said.
Johnston was trying to make a state-
ment with the house, said Barbara
VonGlahn, a Johnston House docent.
And he still is today.
Walking through the house, VonGlahn
constantly lights up with stories to tell.
Johnston built a chapel room in the
house for his Catholic mother-in-law
Molita, she said.
VonGlahn suspects that the Johnstons
were great hosts to more than just fami-
ly members. They fostered a community
of many races. In fact, their Chinese ser-
vant Sam ended up marrying a Mexican
woman, said VonGlahn. And Molita then
baptized Sam to be Catholic.
Its important to know about our
ancestors, said Carolyn Waring, who
runs the Johnston House holiday bou-
tique. There are not many buildings in
California that are this old, she said.
The inside of the house has been fur-
nished with pieces from the era when it
was built, with a few of the original
pieces. Much of the remaking of the
interior and south garden are based on
written accounts of a 14-year-old girl
who visited the Johnstons.
Waring, who moved to Half Moon
Bay a year ago, is captivated by the
romance and tragedy of the house.
Before starting to build the house,
Johnston asked two of his brothers to
bring 800 dairy cattle to California from
Ohio. The animals that survived the griz-
zly bears became the rst dairy cattle on
the West Coast. Johnston also owned a
popular saloon in San Francisco.
While the vision of a grand family
home came to life for James Johnston,
the dream realized was short-lived, said
Waring. Petra died after childbirth com-
plications in having their fourth child.
Unable to cope, Johnston left his
mother-in-law and four children and
moved to San Francisco where he later
died alone in a hotel room.
Waring and VonGlahn suspect that
Johnston lost his money in an 1873 eco-
nomic bust, which they explained was
similar to todays economic downturn.
Mysterious construction
The volunteers agreed that the houses
original construction is one of its many
marvels.
The mystery is who could construct
something like this, said VonGlahn,
adding that the surrounding habitants in
the 1850s were in mere adobe huts.
It was a momentous challenge to get
the timber transported to the site, said
Ryan. Logs from the Santa Cruz moun-
tains were loaded onto a ship and then
thrown overboard in the Bay.
The house has its original redwood
frame construction, said Ryan. The
frame is not nailed together, but made by
mortice-and-tenon construction fas-
tening of beams using holes and dowels.
Continued from page 1
HOUSE
The house is open for free tours the
third Saturday of the month 11 p.m
to 3 p.m. Private tours also available.
The Johnston House holiday
boutique is on the rst two weekends
in November.
For more information visit
johnstonhouse.org.
If you go
creative in its cuts.
As proposed, the tax would be used to
sustain neighborhood schools, reduce
the number of combination classes,
attract and retain teachers, reduce the
cost of special education and fund cur-
riculum modernization, according to the
proposed measure language. It requires
two-thirds support to pass. If passed, the
tax would go into effect July 1, 2013.
Sanchez said the measure is not just
about this year. The district could lose
$1.17 million if the states sales tax
measures do not pass. Who knows what
the future years will require in terms of
cuts, he said.
We just know the cuts for this year,
said Sanchez. We need to take a strate-
gic planning approach to be ahead of the
curve.
Blanco, who generally favors the idea
of a parcel tax, shared concerns. She felt
the proposed language was too vague
and the timing was poor. The November
ballot, she said, has many measures
already.
I dont feel that the community trusts
the district enough to pass this parcel
tax, she said.
Board President Skip Henderson dis-
agreed. He felt the support was there and
it could pass. But that will require every-
one to work together, he said. Being
more specic about how the money will
support academic achievement will be
addressed in the future, he said.
San Bruno voters have not historically
been supportive of tax measures.
Measure O, a $40 million bond, failed
to achieve the 55 percent threshold need-
ed to pass in 2011. The board placed the
measure on the ballot in hopes of fund-
ing facility upgrades including nishing
upgrades at Parkside Intermediate
School.
While the district hasnt previously
gone to the voters for a parcel tax, it did
consider an $87 annual levy in 2008. In
fact, the board voted to put it on the
March 2009 ballot. But in November
2008, the measure was brought back
before the board after parents expressed
an understanding for the need, but did
not think the timing nor the approved
ballot language was right. The decision
was rescinded, in a 3-2 vote, with
trustees Jennifer Blanco and Kevin
Martinez dissenting.
San Bruno is the third district to place
a measure on the November ballot.
The San Carlos Elementary School
District Board of Trustees previously
placed a $72 million bond measure on
the November ballot, which could be
used for updating technology, repairing
schools, improving trafc safety, reduc-
ing overcrowding and upgrading energy
efciencies to create long-term savings,
according to the district.
On Tuesday, the Burlingame
Elementary School District placed a $56
million bond measure on the November
ballot to increase capacity and technolo-
gy.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 5
TAX
THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There is a possibility that
certain key elements might not be as advantageous
as you frst thought, so be smart and carefully screen
all proposals that are presented to you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Although your percep-
tions and insights are quite sharp, the methods you
use to implement them might be impractical. Try to
execute your ideas as cleverly as they deserve.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You might know what you
want, but if you are clueless about how to transmit
your ideas, you wont get anywhere. Try to do your
best to lucidly communicate your brainstorms.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- The possibilities for
achieving success look quite encouraging, but only if
you do not involve yourself with persons who have no
real interests in your aims. Stick with supporters only.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Honor all the
commitments youve made, even if you have second
thoughts. Though other alternatives may look promis-
ing, keeping your word will count the most.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be sure to render
full service for what you are being paid to do. If your
performance fails to meet expectations, it could
damage your reputation.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- When risky involve-
ments are at stake, follow your instincts and dont
go against your prudent judgment. If your inner voice
warns you about taking a chance, heed it.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you do something
kind for another, do it without making the recipient
feel as if he or she is now obligated to you in some
manner. That would negate whatever nice thing
youve just done.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Dont hesitate to revive
some of your long-standing plans if they didnt
produce as hoped. Some kind of minor change might
turn out to be just what the doctor ordered.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Spend any small sur-
plus you might have on something you consider to be
worthwhile, instead of frittering it away. At least youll
have something to show for it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you feel what is being
asked of you is unjust, dont make any concessions,
even if youre under pressure. Make sure to take a
frm position and stand up for what you believe.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Even though they might
not be as substantial as youd hoped, be appreciative
of any gains that come your way. Anything is better
than coming up empty-handed.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
7-26-12
wEDNESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
7
-
2
6
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Bowies last stand
6 Camera lens
10 Cowboy skill
12 Overpower
14 Gourd-shaped rattle
15 Clergy member
16 Rum drink (2 wds.)
18 Jiffy
19 Potting material
21 St. Louis landmark
23 Long sigh
24 Permissive
26 Corn covering
29 Beat, as wings
31 Hi-f records
33 Thick head of hair
35 Part of NWT
36 Meadow murmur
37 -- so much
38 Tabbys plea
40 Fabric meas.
42 Grand -- Opry
43 Sit opposite
45 Dainty pastry
47 New socialite
50 Lay in wait
52 Oval-nest builder
54 Mounted the soapbox
58 Slogans
59 Ms. Lansbury
60 Traffc sign
61 Looks for
DOwN
1 Sofa end
2 Hawaiis Mauna --
3 Loan abbr.
4 Marlins city
5 Carrying a beeper (2 wds.)
6 Major banking center
7 -- -Wan Kenobi
8 Lyric poems
9 Mull over
11 Moo goo -- pan
12 Practice boxing
13 Catchall abbr.
17 W-2 receiver
19 Oregons capital
20 Midwest airport
22 Actor Cronyn --
23 Behind, at sea
25 White vestment
27 Really enjoy
28 Prepared to propose
30 Univ. staffer
32 Long-faced
34 Prior to
39 Smack
41 Prow opposites
44 Billiard sticks
46 Familiar saying
47 Mr. DeLuise
48 Greek god of love
49 Mooring post
51 RV haven
53 Plains tribe
55 Kickoff stand
56 Moose kin
57 They prosecute perps
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Thursday July 26, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
APPLY NOW- F/T WORK
Up to $900 wk
PAID TRAINING
INCENTIVE
IMMEDIATE START
No experience needed
Full Training provided
1-866-363-9895
RESTAURANT -
Mai Cuisine is hiring Sushi Chefs for a
new location in Redwood City,
Sushi/Asian Cuisine experience is prefer-
red but not required. Please
email job@genjiweb.com with your re-
sume.
110 Employment
ENGINEERING
INFORMATICA Corporation has the fol-
lowing job opportunity available in Red-
wood City, CA :
Software Quality Assurance Engineer
(RC08RIN) - Design and develop test
plans and test cases based upon func-
tional and design specifications.
ENGINEERING
PHILIPS Electronics North America Cor-
poration has the following job opportunity
available in Foster City, CA :
Software Quality Assurance Engineer
(SWQA-CA) Ensure customer and
functional requirements are testable and
complete with no conflicting require-
ments.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line, Night / Weekends.
Apply in person,1201 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TELEPHONE WORK
Appointment Setting -
From Leads
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
not required
TOP PAY & BONUSES
Training Provided
Mr. Tempus
(650)570-7663
WEEKLY
SALARY + BONUS
Flexible Hour,
Outside Position,
Full Training
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
to $38.75 per hour
Call Mr. Cannon
(650)372-2810
VETERANS WELCOME
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514730
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ji Hyun Park Chen
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ji Hyun Park Chen filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Ji Hyun Park Chen
Proposed name: Jamie Park Chen
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 23,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/12/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/11/2012
(Published, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/2/12,
08/9/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251533
The following person is doing business
as: AB&C Services, 1860 El Camino Re-
al Ste. #55, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alvaro Begazo and Claudia Giraldo,
3155 Frontera Way, #216, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Claudia Giraldo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/12, 08/02/12, 08/09/12, 08/16/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514911
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Daniel Louis Malone
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Daniel Louis Malone filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Daniel Louis Malone, aka
Connie Servative
Proposed name: Constance Servative-
Daniella Malone
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 21,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/12/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/11/2012
(Published, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/2/12,
08/9/12)
CASE# CIV 515265
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Julie Ann Swanson-Bellomo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Julie Ann Swanson-Bellomo
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a.Present name: Julie Ann Swanson-Bel-
lomo
a.Proposed name: Julie Ann Bellomo
b.Present name: Julie Ann Treft
b.Proposed name: Jule Ann Bellomo
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
6, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/19/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/18/2012
(Published, 07/26/12, 08/02/12,
08/09/12, 08/16/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251139
The following person is doing business
as: International Auto Body & Paint, 1172
Montgomery Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: International Auto Body &
Paint, Inc., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Thelma Kotik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251322
The following person is doing business
as: Brisbane Stables, 402 Industrial
Way., BRISBANE, CA 94005 is hereby
registered by the following owner: David
B. Peters, Po Box 612, Brisbane, CA
94005. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
0709/2012
/s/ David B. Peters /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
23 Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
SUMMONS
CITATION JUDICIAL
(860 et seq. of the Code of Civil Procedure)
Case No. CIV 515323
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
UNLIMITED CIVIL JURISDICTION
CITY OF SAN BRUNO, Plaintiff,
vs.
ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE MATTER OF THE ISSUANCE AND SALE
OF BONDS FOR THE PURPOSE OF REFUNDING CERTAIN OBLIGATIONS OW-
ED BY THE CITY OF SAN BRUNO TO THE CALIFORNIA PUBLIC EMPLOYEES'
RETIREMENT SYSTEM UNDER THE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT LAW,
AND ALL PROCEEDINGS LEADING THERETO, INCLUDING THE ADOPTION OF
A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF SUCH BONDS,
Defendants.
NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU
WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND NOT LATER THAN
THE 10TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2012, WHICH IS AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS
AFTER COMPLETION OF PUBLICATION OF THIS SUMMONS. READ THE IN-
FORMATION BELOW.
AVISO! USTED HA SIDO DEMANDADO. EL TRIBUNAL PUEDE DECIDIR CON-
TRA UD. SIN AUDIENCIA A MENOS QUE UD. RESPONDA NO MAS TARDE DE
EL 10 DE SEPTIEMBRE, 2012, QUE ES DIEZ (10) DIAS DESPUES DE TERMINA-
CION DE PUBLICACION DE ESTA CITACION. LEA LA INFORMACION QUE SI-
GUE.
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE MATTER OF THE ISSUANCE AND
SALE OF BONDS FOR THE PURPOSE OF REFUNDING CERTAIN OBLIGA-
TIONS OWED BY THE CITY OF SAN BRUNO TO THE CALIFORNIA PUBLIC EM-
PLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM UNDER THE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES' RETIRE-
MENT LAW, AND ALL PROCEEDINGS LEADING THERETO, INCLUDING THE
ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF
SUCH BONDS.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a complaint has been filed by plaintiff against you pur-
suant to 860 et seq. of the California Code of Civil Procedure and 53589.5 and
53511 of the California Government Code for the purpose of validating the pro-
posed issuance of Bonds and related contracts, the proceeds of which will be used
for the purpose of refunding and discharging the Citys unfunded accrued actuarial
liability with respect to the Safety Plan Side Fund to the California Public Employ-
ees Retirement System, and to validate other related matters. If you wish to contest
the legality or validity of this lawsuit you must appear and answer said complaint by
filing a written pleading in response to said complaint not later than the 10th day of
September, 2012, which date is at least 10 days after completion of publication of
this summons. Your pleading must be in the form required by the California Rules of
Court. Your original pleading must be filed in this Court with proper filing fees and
proof that a copy thereof was served on Plaintiff's attorneys.
Unless you do so, your default will be entered upon application by the plaintiff, the
plaintiff may apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint.
PERSONS WHO CONTEST THE LEGALITY OR VALIDITY OF THE MATTER
WILL NOT BE SUBJECT TO PUNITIVE ACTION, SUCH AS WAGE GARNISH-
MENT OR SEIZURE OF THEIR REAL OR PERSONAL PROPERTY.
YOU MAY SEEK THE ADVICE OF AN ATTORNEY IN ANY MATTER CONNECT-
ED WITH THE COMPLAINT OR THIS SUMMONS. SUCH ATTORNEY SHOULD
BE CONSULTED PROMPTLY SO THAT YOUR PLEADING MAY BE FILED OR
ENTERED WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY THIS SUMMONS.
SI USTED DESEA SOLICITAR EL CONSEJO DE UN ABOGADO EN ESTE ASUN-
TO, DEBERIA HACERLO IMEDIATAMENTE, DE ESTA MANERA, SU REPUESTA
ESCRITA, SI HAY ALGUNA, PUEDE SER REGISTRADA A TIEMPO.
The name and address of the Court is (El nombre y direccion del Superior Tribunal
es):
Superior Court of the State of California
In and for the County of San Mateo
Hall of Justice & Records
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The names and addresses of Plaintiffs' attorneys are (Los nombres y direcciones
del abogado del demandante son):
David T. Fama (State Bar #83376)
Katherine S. Thursby (State Bar #247600)
Jones Hall, A Professional Law Corporation
650 California Street, 18th Floor
San Francisco, California 94108
Telephone: (415) 391-5780
DATED July 12, 2012
By G. Marquez, Clerk(Actuario)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251201
The following person is doing business
as: Sb Flooring, 2821 Fordham St EAST
PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Sergio Bar-
raza, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Sergio Barraza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/2/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251239
The following person is doing business
as: Lizardo Consulting, 1204 Burlingame
Ave., #10, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lauren Lizardo, 1411 Floribunda Ave.,
8A, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/01/2012.
/s/ Lauren Lizardo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/5/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251219
The following person is doing business
as: Divine Home Care, 2555 Flores St.
Ste 260, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Wild Karma, INC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/2007.
/s/ Robbin Beebe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/3/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/12/12, 07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/02/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251049
The following person is doing business
as: HI Logics, 36 Camelot Ct., DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Henry C. Isaacs, III,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Henry C. Isaacs, III /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/2/12, 08/9/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251309
The following person is doing business
as: Raymond Travel, 57 Elm St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Henry C. Isaacs,
III, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 0709/2012
/s/ Henry C. Isaacs, III /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/2/12, 08/9/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251166
The following person is doing business
as: Kings Creations, 1815 Harding Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shel-
ley Auger, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/19/2012
/s/ Shelley Auger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/12, 08/02/12, 08/09/12, 08/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251489
The following person is doing business
as: West Auto Sale, 830 El Camino Real,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Alireza Ra-
ji, 2610 Alamida De Las Plugas, Sn Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Alireza Raji /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/12, 08/02/12, 08/09/12, 08/16/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251480
The following person is doing business
as: The Mountain Goat Farmers Market,
17285 Skyline Blvd., Woodside, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Maggie Foard, Star Route 2
Box 265, La Honda, CA 94020. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Maggie Foard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/12, 08/02/12, 08/09/12, 08/16/12).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Elias Khenaisser
Case Number 122542
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Elias Khenaisser. A Pe-
tition for Probate has been filed by Ste-
ven N. Khenaisser in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Steven
N. Khenaisser be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This
athourity will allow the personal repre-
sentative to take many actions without
obtaining court approval. Before taking
certain very important actions, however,
the personal representative will be re-
quired to give notice to interested per-
sons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The
independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person
files an objection to the petition and
shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: August 20, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Stanley Dale Radtke
1290 Howard Ave.,Ste 300
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
(650)373-1122
Dated: 07/18/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on July 19, 26, August 2, 2012.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE File No.
8325.20121 Title Order No. 4522127
MIN No. APN 140-260-180-9 YOU ARE
IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST, DATED 05/29/03. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD
AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN
EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF
THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU,
YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
A public auction sale to the highest bid-
der for cash, cashier's check drawn on a
state or national bank, check drawn by
state or federal credit union, or a check
drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, or savings association,
or savings bank specified in 5102 to the
Financial code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state, will be held by duly
appointed trustee. The sale will be
made, but without covenant or warranty,
expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy
the obligation secured by said Deed of
Trust. The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness
of the property address or other com-
mon designation, if any, shown herein.
Trustor(s): Rita A. Chase, Trustee of The
Rita A. Chase Trust UTD August 15,
1993 Recorded: 06/05/03, as Instrument
No. 2003-154223,of Official Records of
San Mateo County, California. Date of
Sale: 08/08/12 at 12:30 PM Place of
Sale: At the Marshall Street entrance to
the Hall of Justice, 400 County Center.,
Redwood City, CA The purported prop-
erty address is: 847 N. Humboldt Street
#208, San Mateo, CA 94401 Assessors
Parcel No. 140-260-180-9 The total
amount of the unpaid balance of the obli-
gation secured by the property to be sold
and reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of
the initial publication of the Notice of
Sale is $249,268.04. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the purchaser at
the sale shall be entitled only to a return
of the deposit paid, plus interest. The
purchaser shall have no further recourse
against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the
trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on the property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction,
you are or may be responsible for paying
off all liens senior to the lien being auc-
tioned off, before you can receive clear
title to the property. You are encouraged
to investigate the existence, priority and
size of outstanding liens that may exist
on this property by contacting the county
recorder's office or a title insurance com-
pany, either of which may charge you a
fee for this information. If you consult ei-
ther of these resources, you should be
aware that the same lender may hold
more than one mortgage or deed of trust
on the property. NOTICE TO PROPER-
TY OWNER The sale date shown on this
notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficia-
ry, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Sec-
tion 2924g of the California Civil Code.
The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the
sale. If you wish to learn whether your
sale date has been postponed, and if ap-
plicable, the rescheduled time and date
for the sale of this property, you may call
877-484-9942 or visit this Internet Web
site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com using the file number
assigned to this case 8325.20121. In-
formation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
203 Public Notices
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: July 16, 2012 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee
Jeffrey Mosher, Authorized Signatory
1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa
Ana, CA 92705 Reinstatement and Pay-
Off Requests: (866) 387-NWTS THIS
OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT
A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OB-
TAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT
PURPOSE ORDER # 8325.20121:
07/19/2012,07/26/2012,08/02/2012
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$65., (650)290-1960
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress,
1970s/1980s, $25, (650)873-8167
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all. SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE TRAIN set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
COMIC BOOK Collection, Many Titles
from 60s, 70s, & 80s, $75 obo,
(650)271-0731
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GUMBIE AUTOGRAPH Newsletter Art
and Gloria Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. SOLD!
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
TIME LIFE Art books collection. 28 Vols.
$75 all (650)701-0276
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
LEGO'S (2) Unopened, NINJAGO, La-
sha's Bite Cycle, 250 pieces; MONSTER
FIGHTERS, Swamp Creature, ages 7-14
$27.00 both, SOLD!
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
303 Electronics
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $30.00
(650)344-7214
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, SOLD!
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B.SOLD!
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TALE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
24
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Makes the cut, in
a way
5 Soviet news
acronym
9 Boating stopover
14 Century threshold
15 Like many
churches: Abbr.
16 Class
17 Impression
18 Empty-vehicle
weight
19 Thanksgiving Day
Parade sponsor
20 *Sounds familiar
23 Whats left
24 Show done at 30
Rock
25 Beneficiaries of
some drives
27 You-here
connector
30 Tree in some
Constable
paintings
32 FDRs mother
33 180-degree lenses
36 Valentines Day
quantities
40 Utahs gemstone
41 Jar topper
43 1992 upstart
candidate
44 Observes Yom
Kippur
46 On ones tax
return
48 Durantes that is
50 Blue __: certain
strike action
51 2002 British Open
champ
52 Auto insurance
giant
56 DOJ enforcer
58 Favorable
59 *Easy place to go
downhill
64 A noble gas
66 Grouse
67 I got it! reactions
68 Experiencing
reverence
69 First name in
fashion
70 Country retreats
71 __ goat
72 One partner?
73 What the start of
each starred
answer is part of,
for a company
that intersects
that answer
DOWN
1 Move a bit
2 Volkswagen
brand
3 Singer of complex
songs
4 Impediments
5 Of course, dude!
6 __ League
7 Throat ailment
8 Natural necklace
components
9 Systemic suffix
10 *Daydreamer
11 Baccalaurat
awarder
12 Family Ties
mom
13 Measures ability
in
21 Scorn
22 Coveted role
26 They dont
graduate
27 Old Spice
alternative
28 Knee-slapper
29 Nickname on the
Boston Garden
ice
31 Blanc with voices
34 *Easily
35 Isaac Newton,
e.g.
37 One-named Deco
artist
38 Seasonal song
39 Stylebook entries:
Abbr.
42 HDTV part,
briefly
45 Rough guess
47 Marilyn Monroe
was its first cover
girl
49 Siding plaster
52 Encore!
53 Lizas half-sister
Luft
54 Boston airport
55 Scandal-plagued
energy giant
57 Thrash
60 Salt letters
61 Heaven help
me!
62 Sudden ache
63 Canadian gas
65 Napoleonic
marshal
By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/26/12
07/26/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, SOLD!
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
KITCHEN FAUCET- single handle,
W/spray - not used $19 (650)494-1687
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
2 CANES 1 Irish Shillelagh 1 regular $25
SOLD
310 Misc. For Sale
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
SOLD!
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65., SOLD!
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
SOLD!
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
SOLD!
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, SOLD!
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree
SOLD!
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
SOLD!
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45.,
(650)344-7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., (650)755-8238
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TO THE MOON The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual $10
b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
12 STRING epiphone guitar. New, with
fender gig bag. $150 firm SOLD!
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
BONGO DRUM with instruction $30
(650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition
Large size 36L x 24W x 26H Firm $25
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
25 Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, (650)355-0236
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Pincess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19., SOLD!
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$50 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
NORDIC TRACK Treadmill, Model
ESP2000 Fold Up, space saver Perfect
condition $100, (650)284-9345
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., (650)339-3195
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
318 Sports Equipment
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
FLEA
MARKET
San Bruno
City Park
(Crystal Springs and
Oak Ave).
Sunday,
July 29
9am-4pm
Don't miss
shopping
for great deals
from
85 vendors.
Furniture,
sporting goods,
antiques and
more!
THE THRIFT SHOP
BAG SALE !!!
July 14, 21, 28
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES &
PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY- 1 Bedroom, all elec-
tric kitchen, close to downtown,
$1095./month, plus $700 deposit. Call
Jean (650)361-1200.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA 07 Corolla, 38k miles, one
owner, sliver, $10895, (650)212-6666
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
SOLD!
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
670 Auto Parts
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
SOMOZA
CASEWORK INSTALLATION
Interior, kitchen cabinets,
counter tops, Crown molding,
Trim, Windows & Doors.
Our Number One Concern is
Customer Satisfaction.
(415) 724- 4447
scc.jsomoza@gmail.com
Cleaning Cleaning
MORANAS
HOUSECLEANING
Homes and Apartments
Excellent Service
30 Years Experience
Great Rates
(650)375-8149
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers
Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured
Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
De Hoyos
Framing Foundations
(650) 387-8950
General Framing
Doors & Windows
Siding
(Hardy Plank Specialist)
Dry Rot & Termite
Additions
Finely Crafted Decks
Repairs
Lic# 968477 Ins/Bons
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
26
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
to the
Burlingame
Leafblower
Law
Fully Compliant
Quality
Gardening
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
ADW SERVICES
Small Jobs, Hauling, Car-
pentry, Flooring, Decks,
Dry Rot Repair, Siding,
Bathrooms
(650)438-0454
Lic. 968619
DISCOUNT
HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
HOUSE REPAIR & REMODELING
HANDYMAN
Plumbing, Electrical, Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath Rem, Floor Tile,
Wood Fences,Painting Work
Free Estimates
PLEASE CALL
(650)504-4199
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe Call Joe
(650)722-3925 (650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss?
Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600 (650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868 (650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
27 Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
To advertise in our speical sections call (650) 344-5200
WHAT interests YOU?
Find what interests you...
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
DAILY
Mature Lifestyles
To Your Health
Family Resource Guide
Dining Guide
Mature Lifestyles
Pamper Me Beauty Guide
Dining Guide
Auto Row
Home & Properties
Home & Garden
Professional Services
Local Classifed Ads
Family Resource Guide
House of Worships
Travel Guide
Home & Properties
Explore Your Coast
Suburban Living
Travel Guide
Explore Your Coast
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733 (650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641 (650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908 (650)652-4908
Food
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
$60 one hour
body massage + table shower
45 mins $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday July 26, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY