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Stanley Meyer: WO Patent # 92/07861 -- Control & Driver Circuit for Hy...

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WO 92/07861 A Control and Driver Circuit for a Hydrogen Gas Fuel Producing Cell
Intl. Cl. C07G 13/00, H03K 3/30 14 May 1992 Abstract A control circuit for a capacitive resonant cavity water capacitor cell (7) for the production of a hydrogen containing fuel gas has a resonant scanning circuit cooperating with a resonance detector and PLL circuit to produce pulses. The pulses are fed into the primary (TX1) transformer. The secondary (TX2) transformer is connected to the resonant cavity water capacitor cell (7) via a diode and a resonant charging chokes (TX4, TX5). Description This invention relates to electrical circuit systems useful in the operation of a water fuel cell including a water capacitor/resonant cavity for the production of a hydrogen containing fuel gas, such as that described in my US Patent # 4,936,961, Method for the Production of a Fuel Gas (26 June 1990). In my aforesaid Patent for a method for the production of a fuel gas, voltage pulses applied to plates of a water capacitor tune into the dielectric properties of the water and attenuate the electrical forces between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms of the molecule. The attenuation of the electrical forces results in a change in the molecular electrical field and the covalent atomic binding forces of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms. When resonance is achieved, the atomic bond of the molecule is broken, and the atoms of the molecule disassociate. At resonance, the current (amp) draw from a power source to the water capacitor is minimized and voltage across the water capacitor increases. Electron flow is not permitted (except at the minimum, corresponding to leakage resulting from the residual conductive properties of water). For the process to continue, however, a resonant condition

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Stanley Meyer: WO Patent # 92/07861 -- Control & Driver Circuit for Hy...

http://www.rexresearch.com/meyerhy/wo92.htm

must be maintained. Because of the electrical polarity of the water molecule, the fields produced in the water capacitor respectively attract and repel the opposite and like charges in the molecule, and the forces eventually achieved at resonance are such that the strength of the covalent bonding force in the water molecule is exceeded, and the atoms of the water molecule (which are normally in an electron sharing mode) disassociate. Upon disassociation, the formerly shared bonding electrons migrate to the hydrogen nuclei, and both the hydrogen and oxygen revert to net zero electrical charge. The atoms are released from the water as a gas mixture. In the invention herein, a control circuit for a resonant cavity water capacitor cell utilized for the production of a hydrogen containing fuel gas is provided. The circuit includes an isolation means such as a transformer having a ferromagnetic, ceramic or other electromagnetic material core and having one side of a secondary coil connected in series with a high speed switching diode to one plate of the water capacitor of the resonant capacitor and the other side of the secondary coil connected to the other plate of the water capacitor to form a closed loop electronic circuit utilizing the dielectric properties of water as part of the electronic resonant circuit. The primary coil of the isolation transformer is connected to a pulse generation means. The secondary coil of the transformer may include segments that form resonant charging choke circuits in series with the water capacitor plates. In the pulse generation means, an adjustable first, resonant frequency generator and a second gated pulse frequency generator are provided. A gate pulse controls the number of the pulses produced by the resonant frequency generator sent to the primary could during a period determined by the gate frequency of the second pulse generator. The invention also includes a means for sensing the occurrence of a resonant condition in the water capacitor/resonant cavity, which when a ferromagnetic or electromagnetic core is used, may be a pickup coil on the transformer core. The sensing means is interconnected to a scanning circuit and a phase lock loop circuit, whereby the pulsing frequency to the primary coil of the transformer is maintained at a sensed frequency corresponding to a resonant condition in the water capacitor. Control means are provided in the circuit for adjusting the amplitude of a pulsing cycle sent to the primary coil and for maintaining the frequency of the pulsing cycle at a constant frequency regardless of pulse magnitude. In addition, the gated pulse frequency generator may be operatively interconnected with a sensor that monitors the rate of gas production from the cell and controls the number of pulses from the resonant frequency generator sent to the cell in a gated frequency in a correspondence with the rate of gas production. The sensor may be a gas pressure sensor in an enclosed water capacitor resonant cavity which also includes a gas outlet. E gas pressure sensor is operatively connected to the circuit to determine the rate of gas production with respect to ambient gas pressure in the water capacitor enclosure. Thus, an omnibus control circuit and its discrete elements for maintaining and controlling the resonance and other aspects of the release of gas from a resonant cavity water cell is described herein and illustrated in the drawings which depict the following: Figure 1 is a block diagram of an overall control circuit showing the interrelationship of sub-circuits, the pulsing core/resonant circuit and the water capacitor resonant cavity. Figure 2 shows a type of digital control means for regulating the ultimate rate of gas production as determined by an external input. (Such a control means would corresponding, for example, to the accelerator in an automobile or a building thermostat control.) Figure 3 shows an analog voltage generator. Figure 4 is a voltage amplitude control circuit interconnected with the voltage generator and one side of the primary coil of the pulsing core. Figure 5 is the cell driver circuit that is connected with the opposite side of the primary coil of the pulsing core. Figures 6, Fig. 7, Fig. 8, and Fig. 9 relate to pulsing control means including a gated pulse frequency generator (Figure 6); a phase lock circuit (Figure 7); a resonant scanning circuit (Figure 8); and the pulse indicator circuit (Figure 9) that control pulses transmitted to the resonant cavity/water fuel cell capacitor. Figure 10 shows the pulsing core and the voltage intensifier circuit that is the interface between the control circuit and the resonant cavity. Figure 11 is a gas feedback control circuit. Figure 12 is an adjustable frequency generator circuit.

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Stanley Meyer: WO Patent # 92/07861 -- Control & Driver Circuit for Hy...

http://www.rexresearch.com/meyerhy/wo92.htm

The circuits are operatively interconnected as in Figure 1 and to the pulsing core voltage intensifier circuit of Figure 10, which, inter alia, electrically isolates the water capcitor so that it becomes an electrically isolated cavity for the processing of water in accordance with its dielectric resonance properties. By reason of the isolation, power consumption in the control and driving circuits is minimized as voltage is maximized in the gas production mode of the water capacitor/fuel cell. The reference letters appearing in the Figures, A, B, C, D, E, etc., to M and M1 show, with respect to each separate circuit depicted, the point at which a connection in that circuit is made to a companion or interrelated circuit. In the invention, the water capacitor is subjected to a duty pulse which builds up in the resonant changing choke coil and then collapses. This occurrence permits a unipolar pulse to be applied to the fuel cell capacitor. When a resonant condition of the circuit is locked-in by the circuit, amp leakage is held to a minimum as the voltage which creates the dielectric field tends to infinity. Thus, when high voltage is detected upon resonance, the phase lock loop circuit that controls the cell driver circuit maintains the resonance at the detected (or sensed) frequency. The resonance of the water capacitor cell is affected by the volume of water in the cell. The resonance of any given volume of water maintained in the water capacitor cell is also affected by contaminants in the water which act as a damper. For example, at an applied potential difference of 2000 to 5000 volts to the cell, an amp spike or surge may be caused by inconsistencies in water characteristics that cause an out-of-resonance condition which is remedied instantaneously by the control circuits. In the invention, the adjustable frequency generator (Figure 12) tunes into the resonant condition of the circuit including the water cell and the water therein. The generator has a frequency capability of 0-10 KHz in a typical 3.0 inch water capacitor formed of a 0.5 inch rod enclosed within a 0.75 inside diameter cylinder. At start up, in this example, current draw through the water cell will measure about 25 milliamp; however, when the circuit finds a tuned resonant condition, current drops to a 1-2 milliamp minimum leakage condition. The voltage to the capacitor water cell increases according to the turns of the winding and size of the coils, as in a typical transformer circuit. For example, if 12 volts are sent to the primary coil of the pulsing core and the secondary coil resonant charging choke ration is 30 to 1, then 360 volts are sent to the capacitor water cell. Turns are a design variable that control the voltage of the unipolar pulses sent to the capacitor. The high speed switching diode shown in Figure 10 prevents charge leakage from the charged water in the water capacitor cavity, and the water capacitor as an overall capacitor circuit element, i.e., the pulse and charge status of the water/capacitor never pass through an arbitrary ground. The pulse to the water capacitor is always unipolar. The water capacitor is electrically isolated from the control, input and driver circuits by the electromagnetic coupling through the core. The switching diode in the VIC circuit (Figure 10) performs several functions in the pulsing. The diode is an electronic switch that determines the generation and collapse of an electromagnetic field to permit the resonant charging choke(s) to double the applied frequency and also allows the pulse to be sent to the resonant cavity without discharging the capacitor therein. The diode, of course, is selected in accordance with the maximum voltage encountered in the pulsing circuit. A 600 PIV fast switching diode, such as an NVR 1550 high speed switching diode, has been found to be useful in the circuit herein. The VIC circuit of Figure 10 also includes a ferromagnetic or ceramic ferromagnetic pulsing core capable of producing electromagnetic flux lines in response to an electrical pulse input. The flux lines equally affect the secondary coil and the resonant charging choke windings. Preferably, the core is a closed loop construction. The effect of the core is to isolate the water capacitor and to prevent the pulsing signal from going below an arbitrary ground and to maintain the charge of the already charged water and water capacitor. In the pulsing core, the coils are preferably wound in the same direction to maximize the additive effect of the electromagnetic field therein. The magnetic field of the pulsing core is in synchronization with the pulse input to the primary coil. The potential from the secondary coil is introduced to the resonant charging choke(s) series circuit elements which are subjected to the same synchronous applied electromagnetic field, simultaneously with the primary pulse. When resonance occurs, control of the gas output is achieved by varying voltage amplitude or varying the time of the duty gate cycle. The transformer core is a pulse frequency doubler. In a figurative explanation of the workings of the fuel gas generator water capacitor cell, when a water molecule is hit by a pulse, electron time share is affected, and the molecule is charged. When the time of the duty cycle is changed, the number of pulses that hit the molecules in the fuel cell is correspondingly modified. More hits result in a greater rate of molecular disassociation. With reference to the overall circuit of Figure 1, Figure 3 receives a digital input signal, and Figure 4 depicts the control means that directs 0-12 volts across the primary coil of the pulsing core. Depending upon design parameters of primary coil voltage and other factors relevant t core design, the secondary coil of the pulsing core

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Stanley Meyer: WO Patent # 92/07861 -- Control & Driver Circuit for Hy...

http://www.rexresearch.com/meyerhy/wo92.htm

can be set up for a predetermined maximum, such as 2000 volts. Figure 5, the cell driver circuit, allows a gated pulse to be varied in direct relation to voltage amplitude. As noted above, the circuit of Figure 6 produces a gate pulse frequency. The gate pulse is superimposed over the resonant frequency pulse to create a duty cycle that determines the number of discrete pulses sent to the primary coil. For example, assuming a resonant pulse o 5 KHz, a 0.5 Hz gate pulse may be superimposed over the 5 KHz pulse to provide 2500 discrete pulses in a 50% duty cycle per Hz. The relationship of resonant pulse to the gate pulse is determined by conventional signal addition/subtraction techniques. Figure 7, a phase lock loop, allows pulse frequency to be maintained at a predetermined resonant condition sensed by the circuit. Together, the circuits of Figures 7 and 8 determine an output signal to the pulsing core until the peak voltage signal sensed at resonance is achieved. A resonant condition occurs when the pulse frequency and the voltage input attenuates the covalent bonding forces of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms of the water molecule. When this occurs, amp leakage through the water capacitor is minimized. The tendency of voltage to maximize at resonance increases the force of the electric potential applied to the water molecules, which ultimately disassociate into atoms. Because resonances of different waters, water volumes, and capacitor cells vary, the resonant scanning circuit of Figure 8 is useful. The scanning circuit o Figure 8 scans frequency from high to low to high repeating until a signal lock is determined. The ferromagnetic core of the voltage intensifier circuit transformer suppresses electron surge in an out-of-resonance condition of the fuel cell. In an example, the circuit scans at frequencies from 0 Hz to 10 KHz t 0 Hz. In water having contaminants in the range of 1 ppm to 20 ppm, a 20% variance in resonant frequency is encountered. Depending on water flow rate into fuel cell, the normal variance range is about 8-10%. For example, iron in well water affects the status of molecular disassociation. Also, at a resonant condition harmonic effects occur. In a typical operation of the cell with a representative water capacitor described below, at a frequency of about 5 KHz at unipolar pulses from 0 to 650 volts at a sensed resonant condition into the resonant cavity, conversion of about 5 gallons of water per hour into a fuel gas will occur on average. To increase the rate, multiple resonant cavities can be used and/or the surfaces of the water capacitor can be increased, however, the water capacitor cell is preferably small in scale. A typical water capacitor may be formed from a 0.5 inch in diameter stainless steel rod and a 0.75 inch inside diameter cylinder that together extend concentrically about 3.0 inches with respect to each other. Shape and size of the resonant cavity may vary. Larger resonant cavities and higher rates of consumption of water in the conversion process require higher frequencies such as up to 50 KHz and above. The pulsing rate, to sustain such high rates of conversion must be correspondingly increased. From the foregoing description of the preferred embodiment, other variations and modifications of the system disclosed will be evident to those of skill in the art.
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Stomping in Clown Shoes WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster

http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=45

Stomping in Clown Shoes


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Home VIC and inductors Status - unproductive vacation, hooray! 26 10 2008

WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster


Posted by: Visual Echo in Mad Scientist - Boo

Notes on phase-lock-loop circuitry of a Meyer resonant water fuel cell Heres the schematics. They are improving daily. Note: all POV-Ray images on this site are just for laughs and are inherently inaccurate. Files: THESE ARE NOT DONE! DRAFT! THIS DOES NOT WORK! oscillation_overthruster.zip

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Candy Band Clock Crimson Dark I Can Has Cheezburger? InterSpike Its Furious Balancing LFG Comic News Pirates The Noob The Whiteboard ZeroFossilFuel has a fabulous idea in this video: http://www.youtube.com /watch?v=vKjUzsNj8NM (also see http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ru8YQ6HUwbU ). I have not tried this yet, but the more I look at it, the more I like it. Picture Right: Lawton style gated pulse circuit, 4 toroid, 3/8 ferrite rod, E-core ferrite, new meter Referring to WO 92/07861 ( http://www.rexresearch.com/meyerhy/wo92.htm ) , the A27 chip in Figure 7 is equivalent to a 4046 PLL chip. The write up on Figure 8 is particularly interesting. Note that A31 chip looks like a 555, there are many of these throughout the drawings. The scanning circuit o Figure 8 scans frequency from high to low to high repeating until a signal lock is determined. : it runs a siren! I had thought about this as a way to initially discover the resonant frequency on start up. The next statement is incredibly enlightening: The ferromagnetic core of the voltage intensifier circuit transformer suppresses electron surge in an out-of-resonance condition of the fuel cell. The pulse monitor tap on the VIC circuit toroid in Figure 1 gets cleaned up like in Figure 9 and feeds the PLL control.

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I was having trouble figuring out how to pickup and feed back the resonance, this is helping a lot. The original Puharich design also addresses this. 09-AUG-2008 The preliminary circuit design is nearing completion. I need to get breadboarding! 12-AUG-2008 Im getting some help on the forums at WaterFuelCell.org . Files and schematic picture updated.

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Stomping in Clown Shoes WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster

http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=45

17-AUG-2008 I had to split the schematic into two parts, the frequency counter is now on its own board. The free version of Eagle wouldnt handle one big board, not that I could handle it either. 25-AUG-2008 Files updated. There are new driver transistors on the MOSFET, and the board layout is pretty close. Currently breadboarding the Frequency Counter. This is still DRAFT. 1-SEP-2008 Files updated. The Frequency Counter is complete, PC boards are ordered and should be here in a week. Now breadboarding the PLL circuit. The Resonance Scanner is working, but sensitive. VCO-IN is responsive to 1 volt - 4.9 volts, but can go to VCC. The top quarter volt is VERY reactive. 15-SEP-2008 With the frequency counters built, and me ramping up my metalworking capability, Im concentrating on the PLL now. The best values for the PLL chip itself seem to be 0.22uF and 10K, with a 1uF lock detect cap. I might make a scan speed select on the resonance scanner, its a lot easier to adjust the scale and shift of the output when it goes fast, but Im worried that the equipment wont be able to handle too quick a scan speed. Ive got the dwell side of the 556 making a standard astable square wave, and feeding it into the PLL SIG-IN line. When power is applied, it scans once, finds it, and locks. Its working well, I can adjust the frequency to simulate skewing and it keeps track. Ive also worked out the driver circuit after a few different tries. Ive settled on a push-pull totem pole design which Ive tested up to 100KHz with the ST8NKy MOSFET, this is working very well. Schematic updated. Id like to add a lot of goofy cool blinky lights, but Im running out of real estate. Im considering a hybrid design which uses surface mount components for lots of little indicator LEDs, they arent required for circuit operation but look nice. 16-SEP-2008 Ive decided to split the safety circuits off to a daughter board, like the frequency counter. As sad as I am to admit it, some peoples kids just arent going to use the safety circuits, and removing them from the main board will give me lots more room for blinky LEDs. 18-SEP-2008 Schematic updated. PLL capacitor 0.22uF is good for 20Hz - 35KHz locking. 0.1uF is working for ~200Hz to 120KHz, but I need to do more testing on this range. Sometimes it wont re-lock after losing it at high frequency, but will initialize and lock if power is cycled. 21-SEP-2008 Lots and lots of blinky LEDs! Ive added 5 different color LEDs to the board now: red = fault, blue = pulse, green = lock, yellow = dwell, and white = gate. Im also adding in an LM3914N chip to drive a bar array of LEDs to the scanner voltage. Thatt should be interesting. It will do a sawtooth back-and-forth of the LEDs, this will allow limited adjustments to be made without an oscilloscope. Lots of lights! Ive ordered 10K millicandela (so like, 10 candle) LEDs from SparkFun.com , so a big Hello to them and the China Young Sun LED Technology Co., Ltd. 24-SEP-2008 On the breadboard I have the resonance scanner circuit working, the dwell disable signal is working, the PLL is interfaced to the scanner and dwell with logic gates, the MOSFET driver works, the pulse pickup circuit kinda works. Ive got a store-bought dual coil choke on the pulse circuit and the MOSFET driving a resistor + LED + capacitor + the other side of the choke. Given this primitive testing setup, Im feeding the MOSFET output back into the pulse pickup circuit. The scanner display looks pretty cool, and will allow fine tuning of the scanner without a scope. That could be critical to operation in some iffy combinations. Power on: it starts up and locks. Sometimes it scans a couple of times, other times the lock is instantaneous. Changing the value of the feedback capacitor makes it unstable (smaller caps are more stable too) for a while then it seems to mellow out. Freq rises slowly while doing this, which I think is some type of slow magnetization of the choke core, not significant. I have a magnet I took out of a hard drive, pretty powerful and polarized right across the flat center on one side. I hold this magnet near the D-core of the choke and the frequency goes up . I tend to pull the choke coil out of the breadboard about this time, but if I hold it down, I can hold the magnet very close to the top and it goes fast . When the magnet gets too close or I click it onto the coil core, it loses lock and wont regain until I hold the choke and pull the magnet off. Im guessing the magnet blocks the transfer of the pulse in the coil, so the lock is lost and the scanner switches into circuit. When I pull the magnet away, it scans a couple of times and locks. Ill bet Im demagnetizing my magnet too. Bottom line I can modify the environment, this changes the frequency of the pulse, and the PLL keeps lock. Its doing what its supposed to do. The frequency counter is a big help with this As far as Im concerned, Ive got a circuit that mostly works. I need to work out the final design of the pulse pickup amp, and its ready for the proto shop. I dont have all the LEDs hooked up (just gate and lock for now), but Ive tested the transistor driver for them and theyll work. Ill put the whole thing in a blue translucent NEMA box and it will glow . Ive discovered McMaster-Carr. I have good stuff on the way, delrin, nylon, stainless steel, pressure switches. I need to get outside and get to working on the test tube, I just cant seem to get motivated to get off the breadboard now that Im having some luck with it. I got a really nice 12VDC brass water valve from Omega.com . Im about to send the safety circuit design off for prototyping. 24-SEP-2008 (Later) Schematic and POV-Ray updated. I cut some tubes with the new saw, its scary.

27-SEP-2008 Made test cell. Tired.

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Stomping in Clown Shoes WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster

http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=45

28-SEP-2008 Delrin sucks, no way to glue it, but it will be useful one day with mechanical sealing. Remade holder out of some of the 2 clear PVC. It looks great! Schematics, files, pics updated. I added a nice trick with one of the spare 4066 gates, now the scanner display gets brighter when the PLL is not locked, and dimmed when it locks. I ordered more from Digikey, some very nice switches and knobbies for the front panel, a bunch of forgotten resistor values, and the relays for the safety board. When I can test the optoisolator circuits with the relay, I can send the safety board design off for prototyping. 03-OCT-2008 Files and images updated. Its very close. 06-OCT-2008 Okay, so the circuit is close, but everything else is still far away. Its not delivering the voltage through the power transformer, and Im confused. Im trying distilled water in the test cell and getting almost nothing. Yes, I actually see tiny bubbles, but with the amount of juice Im giving it, I should be melting wires. Very very low current, and I cant raise it even with the dwell gate defeated. I blew an oscilloscope probe, I think I overvolted it, but Im not sure how. This is confusing. I need a proper VIC transformer, thats for sure. I have a small heat sink on the output MOSFET, and it doesnt even get warm. Maybe I already cooked it, but I dont think so. I have to look at this another way and go back and reread the old tomes. I tried using the Triad power transformer as the step-up, it just doesnt seem to be drawing much from the MOSFET. I probably need to (minimally) heat sink the MOSFET properly, but the current draw is very small, I cant get it to draw more than 200mA, and the regular breadboarded PLL circuit draws 100mA or so of that. The other side of the transformer shows like 20mV (MILLI volts), maybe that transformer is just a lot screwier than I thought. Im using a 7.5 inch ferrite rod bifilar (two wires) choke with another few turns (third winding) as the pulse pickup, that much seems to work, but the polarity of the pulse pickup seems to be the big factor on that part of the circuit. This choke measured like 1.75mH a side when I measured it before with the cheap meter (now with blown fuses and mostly burned out). With the pickup coil loosely wrapped over the ferrite one way, it works great, the other way, the response is very awkward in that a signal only appears when the dwell is off. Thats strange, I have to play with that some more, at least it seems to be working. With the diodes across the +/- inputs to the pulse op-amp, anything bigger than about 1.5 - 1.75 volts (forward bias of the MUR800E diodes) should be clipped. Output from that op-amp is between VCC and GND. I can see that output pulse on the scope, it works with the dwell and a little bit more after the dwell cuts. Ive noticed that its rather stable oscillation (unless the pickup coil is reversed), for all I know, its working perfectly and picking up too much garbage electrical interference from computers, oscilloscopes, video monitors the other electronics in the room. Ive already noticed that with no pulse coil (open leads), it readily locks onto a 60Hz line signal out of the air. At any rate, Im becoming convinced that the circuit is doing what its supposed to do, and not much will need to change even if I get the right inductor(s). If I determine that there wont be anything I could add to the circuit to make up for any deficiency, I may send the PLL PCB off to get made anyway. Ill probably add in the manual override again, but thats about all I can think to do. Ill take some pictures soon, maybe that will help. 07-OCT-2008 Pictures of Oscillation Overthruster output measured with a Tektronix 475 oscilloscope.

1189. Top trace is dwell, about 25% at 878Hz (active low) taken at TP3 in the schematic (2V,0.5ms). Bottom trace is MOSFET gate (2V,0.5ms). MOSFET is driven by 9 volt supply, dwell is from one side of a 556 dual timer running on 5 volts.

1188. Top trace is dwell, same as above. Bottom trace is the pulse output and PLL pin 14 SIGIN (2V,0.5ms). Notice that pulses are detected after the dwell has shut off.

1190. Close up of one dwell cycle with PLL VCO output. Top trace is dwell (2V,50s). Bottom trace is PLL VCO OUT at TP6 (2V,50s). Here you can see the VCO is following the pulses. Frequency counter at the VCO OUT says about 30K, it varies from 31K cold to 29K warm. About 33 pulses in this picture per 878Hz dwell cycle is 28974, thats about right.

1191. Measurement at the test cell using 1.75mH dual choke, blocking diode, but no VIC transformer (1V,50uS, GND at center) Input DC Amperage is 90 - 120 mA, sorry my cheap meter wont do better than that

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Stomping in Clown Shoes WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster

http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=45

right now. The circuit normally uses that much juice, I dont know why its not pulling more power. Obviously, theres no bubbles. No hydrogen here, move along. Note: I just saw something strange. I noticed that after I turned the power off, the test cell had some voltage still on it. I thought the scope was just decalibrated, but on GND it was at center. Flipped back to DC, it was still showing 1.75 volts DC offset, same as in the picture above (the line at center of the waveform). Huh? I disconnected one of the cell wires, and the voltage is still there. As much as I can figure, the cell is pulling some DC from the scope, and when it gets to the forward bias of the blocking diode, it stops. So I short the cell, and it bounces back to about 0.6 volts. I turned the circuit on, and voltage rose slowly to around 1.8 volts DC offset. I turned the power off again, and it stays around 1.7V. It looks like its sinking, very very slowly. Its a little weird. Its actually acting like a capacitor? Naw, that couldnt happen. Okay, I disconnected the scope, shorted the cell, reconnected the scope (0 volts), and then unshorted the cell. The voltage started rising. Its acting like a capacitor and charging from the oscilloscope probe leakage. Very cool, thats a nice clue. If Im right. Its been a long day, I might be hallucinating. This might explain a few things, theres not even enough impurities for the water to conduct at all, so I cant pump any current through it. Maybe tomorrow Ill try tap water. Heres a picture of my desk, dont make me regret this:

Left to right: roll of solder, oil can of Tap Magic cutting fluid, one-tube-set test water fuel cell (4 inch tubes), connection box with rod inductor choke, Tektronix 475 oscilloscope, yellow cased ampmeter behind banana connectors and wires, breadboard with 7046 PLL circuit, roll of Scotch 92 kapton tape, frequency counter (30579 Hz), stereo boom microscope 16-OCT-2008 Ive done some rewiring. The MOSFET and regulator diode are heat sinked, the test cell is hooked up. Its taking amperage, not a huge amount amount, but Im still using distilled water. It locks too easily, Im thinking I might add the divider chip. For some reason, the scanner circuit is invading the locked signal and knocking it out of lock. Im under the impression that once locked, it should really stay that way. It falls out of lock regularly with the scanner, usually at the top when the frequency is highest. I need it to stop scanning when locked, maybe I can tie the lock signal into the reset on that side of the 556. 26-OCT-2008 Okay, thats doing something. Now the scanner stops when the PLL locks, and this has a big effect. The Triad still isnt putting out the voltage that it should, but Im getting a few tiny bubbles, what I might call an hour-old Alka-Seltzer. I hooked up the cell directly (no VIC transformer) but with chokes, and I saw some hot spot frequencies. There was one around 44KHz, but that spot was not very stable and usually jumped to 22Khz or 11KHz fairly quickly. Sometimes the scanning would rest at 22KHz, but more often between 10 and 11 KHz. This is interesting in that these are (reasonable) harmonics of each other and so this would tend to indicate something good. Sometimes the circuit would jump to these points on its own, but more often I would cycle the power and these occured on first scan. Im trying the full circuit now, with reversed chokes. If I run it with the dwell disabled, it soaks 1.82 DC Amps total circuit. The control circuitry uses about 100 DC milliAmps. The secondary of the Triad power transformer Im trying as a VIC transformer is 0.92 Henries inductance according to my half burned out VC9808+ Sinometer. Both sides of the choke measure 1.8 milliHenries. The dwell at 150Hz and ON about %40 draws about 0.9 DC Amps (1.20 AC Amps). When running this way there are some spikes in the +5VDC power supply, they occur on the MOSFET on times, as would be expected. There are thick pulses during the gating times 50 millivolts high, and thin spikes at 0.1 volt. This is ugly, it probably deprecates performance of the PLL. I may experiment with powering the control circuitry completely separately. This would involve cutting a fat trace on the safety board, but nothing a dremel wont handle. Im also using the divider (CD4040) chip. The chip divides the PLL Comparator input from the VCO output by 2^(the number of the pin), so Q1 = 1/2, Q2 = 1/4, Q3 = 1/8, et cetera. This is providing a manner to adjust something but Im not sure what. The frequencies change, things move around, but not really sure if its helping. It will probably be a nice option to have a switch on the front of the box for it even if its a LOT of wires, so Im thinking it might be permanent. Note that Meyers circuit used 4017 decade counters, and so he could divide by 10, 100, or 1000. Not sure if I want to try that. I just tried using the JW Miller / Bourns choke instead of the 1/2 rod choke. It seems to be working well, the circuit does everything the same but the frequency is much lower.

Copyright (c) 2008 MDVE.NET. Some rights reserved. This Oscillation Overthruster design is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License .
This entry was posted on Sunday, October 26th, 2008 at 17:30:32 and is filed under Mad Scientist - Boo. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

15 Responses to WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster 1. Bui Xuan Ngoc says: September 24th, 2008 at 21:40:02 Good work. I read your blog everyday. If you agree Ill replicate your circuit. Cheers Ngoc 2. Visual Echo says: September 25th, 2008 at 00:35:37

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Stomping in Clown Shoes WFC PLL - the Oscillation Overthruster

http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=45

I dont have any problem with this as long as you respect the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ . This circuit is not finished yet, but its getting close. I appreciate you asking. Im glad youre interested, and thank you for your comment! Comment here or email me at mr.crankypants@pyroflatulence.tv if you have questions or I can help. I can have extra boards made from the prototype shop if you are interested, but no promises as to when that will be, I have to keep my day job for now I mentioned that this isnt finished yet, right? 3. Bui Xuan Ngoc says: September 26th, 2008 at 10:24:49 What frequency do you expect the circuit works at? Did you see circuit of Chris on Yahoo group meyer_wfc_replication? He said he is running car on water now. Chris was talking 30-100mhz. Anyway Im not an electronics engineer so I dont understand the circuit much. But when you say the circuit makes water resonance Ill replicate your circuit immediately. Now Im collecting stuff to build cell. Keep good work. Im watching now! Best regards, Ngoc 4. Visual Echo says: September 26th, 2008 at 11:55:36 With my experimentation, using a 0.22uF capacitor on pins 6 & 7 of the PLL VCO gives a locking range of 0.5Hz 100KHz, realistically more like 20Hz - 80KHz. Dropping that to 0.1uF raises the range to 100Hz - 120Khz and a little higher, I didnt test higher than that because thats the best I could get out of one side of a 556 chip. Meyer ran his cells at under 10KHz, so I dont know anything about 30-100MHz, that just doesnt make any sense at all. Thats FM transmitter speed. The PLL chip Im using here can go upwards towards 13MHz if I remember correctly, but there would have to be some significant changes to the rest of the circuit to support this speed. Oh, and I dont mean to be cranky, but I did not say this circuit makes water resonate, nor will I ever say that. I make no claims whatsoever. This is an electronic circuit for entertainment purposes only. It makes LEDs blink. When it is completed, if somebody wanted to hook it up to a Meyer water fuel cell, it might track the changing resonant frequency of the cell, but I dont know anybody who has done this because its not completed yet. Making any claims about suitability of purpose on this circuit could open me to criticism, liability, and ridicule. Sorry, but Im not here to feed the trolls. It blinks light emitting diodes, nothing more is claimed. Achieving a resonant frequency in the circuitry of a Stanley Meyer water fuel cell causes the most efficient catastrophic breakdown of the water dielectric, or at least thats the subject of several patents that he owns and owned. Ive never seen this, I dont personally know anyone who has done this. From what I have read, water resonates in a microwave oven at something like 2.45GHz, if thats what you want, try making a nice cup of tea Hey, Im not picking on you, youre just the first 5. Bui Xuan Ngoc says: October 7th, 2008 at 02:39:47 Can you measure voltage that output from VIC transformer? What kind of VIC transformer core do you use? Im going take a core from flyback transformer. Is it OK? 6. Visual Echo says: October 7th, 2008 at 21:16:00 Im currently using a Triad brand power transformer, 115/120VAC to 5/10VAC. Its hooked in series for 10V:230V or 23:1 ratio. No, its not good, and I need to wrap a new VIC. Ill get measurements and pictures soon. 7. Visual Echo says: October 12th, 2008 at 21:30:36 New post shows all my parts, I still need to get a few scope pics after doing a little rewiring. I know some experimenters are using flyback coils, so that should be fine. In particular, take a look at the forums on http://waterfuelcell.org/phpBB2/, I know they discuss flyback coils and circuits in detail there. Take a look at the design by 2curious4WFC at http://waterfuelcell.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=5167#5167 , its quite impressive. 8. Frog says: October 22nd, 2008 at 18:05:04 WOW, you are truly amazing this is electronics in einstein although I have no friggin clue how all this works together, its easy to read and Im glad you are releasing this to the public . 9. Visual Echo says: October 24th, 2008 at 18:18:00 Thank you! Now if only it actually worked Day job has been rough lately, I havent been able to spend time on it that I would like. The rot is here, all the leaves are falling, rain is forecast for the next week solid, snow will be here soon, and I have a few more weather-related tasks to perform before I can get back to this. I have to make jigs to wind coils, all different types and sizes. Im convinced some function of this circuit will work, but Im not getting any voltage out of the Triad, I need to find something that works better. 10. Hi Ill be in line for a set of your prototype circuit boards when youre ready! I havent seen you post on the other wesite lately so I thought Id better leave a comment here with my email address. DonL DonL says: November 7th, 2008 at 12:58:15 Thanks again for your comments.

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11.

Visual Echo says: November 7th, 2008 at 13:32:26 Sorry, I did get a email that there was a response from the forum, Im just swamped. Im hammering on a software release at my day job, and researching about it in the evenings. Once every few days I take a break to pee. I should have some time coming into the holidays to wind come coils and get a little more done on this, but Ive had to do a few small miracles elsewhere lately. All right, Ill admit to a playing a little Fallout 3. Just a smidgen.

12.

DonL says: November 7th, 2008 at 13:52:55 I know how those software deadlines can come and go.. I work for a software development company. My wife will say something about church tomorrow and I think to myself that I didnt even know it was Saturday already! We all need some down time (brainless game play) now and then. DonL

13.

Don L (a different one) says: March 3rd, 2009 at 10:11:41 Hello, and great work here. I am wondering what has happend with the PLL scanner, have you gotten any good signs of Hydrogen yield? I have 2 Lawton circuits, and I have been all over the net trying to find a simpler way to create a scanning PLL circuit. I keep looking for a Lawton based scanner and Pll? do you have any info or ideas thanks the Other Don L

14.

Visual Echo says: March 3rd, 2009 at 12:16:13 No on the yield, the voltages arent going through the Triad transformer, Im still not sure why. It works better if I use the Direct with Chokes hookup (see http://pyroflatulence.tv/?p=162 ). A Lawton type circuit uses two 555 timers to provide (for lack of terminology Ill invent a couple of word usements here) a hum high-frequency square wave, modulated by a gate lower frequency square wave. The composite output wave biases a MOSFET and pulses a relatively high power voltage through stainless steel electrodes in water. The Oscillation Overthruster circuit shown here replaces the hum timer with the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) in a 74HC7046 Phase Locked Loop (PLL) chip. This oscillator can be controlled manually with a potentiometer at Test Point 10 (TP10), or can be hooked into supporting circuitry that A) provides a moving scanner voltage that attempts to lock-on to a resonant frequency, and B) when the PLL locks, switches the scanner voltage to feedback from the VIC coil back into the PLL. The 7046 and one side of the 556 dual timer (dwell) act like a Lawton type circuit with PLL, so if thats what youre looking for, this is an example. However, Im not Dave, so I get to call it something else. I go a bit further and provide some support circuits which feedback the VIC pulses to the PLL, provide an initial scanning voltage when the PLL isnt locked, safety shut-off circuitry, and lots of blinky LEDs. Dont get lost in the supporting circuits the 7046 PLL and the Dwell timer to the left in the schematic are the guts of the circuit. The driver circuit is just a fancy interface to the MOSFET, it all performs the same functions. Now, if I just had another life, I could get back to work on it. Im coming to decisions about some of the problems I was seeing, so new post soon I hope.

15.

help Feedback winding for resonance with pll 4046 - Page 4 - Electronic Circuits Projects Diagrams Free says:
May 24th, 2009 at 15:04:20

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____ PIC-I/O Multifunction I/O Board ____________ J R KERR


AUTOMATION ENGINEERING

The PIC-I/O multifunction I/O board is compatible with the PIC-SERVO and PIC-STEP motor control modules and provides the following I/O capabilities: 12 digital I/O lines independently programmable as inputs or outputs. Three 8-bit analog input channels (0 - 5v input). Two 20 KHz PWM output channels with high current (10 amp) output drivers. One 32 bit counter/timer. RS485 serial interface allows up to 32 modules (PIC-I/O, PIC-SERVO or PIC-STEP) to be controlled from a single serial port. Connects to an RS232 port through commonly available adapters or using the Z232-485 converter board. A small prototyping area allows for customization. The 2" x 3" board can be stacked with other controller boards. Test software provided including Window95/98 test example source code. 1. Quick Start What you will need: PIC-I/O Board Z232-485 Converter Board (or equivalent) Logic power supply (7.5 - 12vdc, 500 ma) 10 pin flat ribbon cable with standard IDC socket connectors at both ends Straight DB9 male / DB9 female cable to PC COM port PC compatible computer running Windows95/98 Test software NMCTest.zip for Windows95/98 (download software from http://www.jrkerr.com) Interconnections and Jumpers: Basic interconnections and jumpers are shown in Figure 1 for both a single module and for a multiple module configuration. Modules may be PIC-I/O modules or PIC-SERVO or PIC-STEP motor controllers. On the Z232-485 converter, jumpers JP3 and JP4 are installed in the 1-2 position for use as a simple converter. Jumper JP5 is installed to distribute logic power to the controller boards over the communications cable. Logic power is supplied on connector JP6. (If CAUTION The PIC-I/O board does not incorporate safeguards for fail-safe operation. As such, this board should not be used in any device which could cause injury, loss of life, or property damage. J.R. Kerr makes no warranties whatsoever regarding the performance, operation, or fitness of this board for any particular purpose. J R KERR
A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

you are not using the Z232-485 converter, please refer to the pin definitions for JP1 and JP2 in Section 2.1 for connecting logic power and RS485 signals from your RS485 COM port.) On the PIC-I/O board, jumpers JP6 and JP7 are installed to connect logic power supplied by the communications cable to the board's logic supply. Connector JP8 should be left unconnected. In the single module configuration, the three jumpers near the label JP3 should be installed as shown. In the multiple module configuration, these jumpers should only be installed on last module furthest from the PC host; on all other modules, jumpers on JP3 should be left uninstalled. Power for the high current PWM drivers should be connected to the two uppermost screw terminals, with 6 - 48vdc connected to the terminal towards the edge of the board and GND connected to the adjacent terminal as shown in Figure 1. Loading and Running Software: Unzip (using PKUNZIP) NMCTEST.ZIP into a single directory. Before starting up the test code, make sure all of your jumpers and interconnections are as shown in Figure 1. Also make sure you have logic power supplied to the Z232-485 converter. Run the program NMCTest.exe. You will be prompted for the COM port and baud rate you would like to use. Choose the appropriate COM port, and initially, use a baud rate of 19200. The program will attempt to locate NMC (Networked Modular Control) modules (PIC-I/O, PICSERVO or PIC-STEP), connected to the selected COM port. If no modules are found, make sure that everything is connected correctly, that jumpers are set correctly, and that logic power is applied. Click on Reset Network to try again or with a different COM port. Once modules are found, the list box on the left side of the window will display the list of modules found. Module 1 will be the last controller which is furthest from the host PC. Clicking on different modules in the list will display the status and controls for that particular module. The PIC-I/O control panel will display all of the modules inputs and allow you to control the outputs. Operation of the PIC-I/O from this control panel is fairly straightforward, but you can click on the Help button for specific details of operation.

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

Single Module Configuration


Z232-485 Converter JP2 JP1 +9v JP6 GND JP5 1 1 JP3 JP4 JP7 JP9 DB9 Straight M/F to PC COM Port JP1 10 wire ribbon cable JP3 JP8 JP6 JP2 JP10 PIC-IO Module JP11
pin 1

6-48VDC GND PWM1(+) PWM1(-) PWM2(+) PWM2(-)

Multiple Module Configuration


PIC-IO or other NMC module JP1 JP7 JP3 JP8 JP6 JP2 JP1 JP7 JP3 JP8 JP6 JP2 Z232-485 Converter JP2 JP1 +9v JP6 GND JP5 1 1 JP3 JP4 JP7 JP3 JP8 JP6 10 wire ribbon cable JP2

DB9 Straight M/F to PC COM Port

JP1

CAUTION: Connecting communications cables incorrectly, or installing jumpers JP3, JP4 and JP5 (on the PIC-I/O board) in the wrong location may damage the PIC-I/O or other NMC controller chip! Figure 1 - Basic Interconnections.

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

2. Connectors and Jumpers 2.1 Pinouts Digital I/O Connector: PIC-I/O Multifunction I/O Board JP9 Pin Definition 1 Ground - towards the edge of the board 2 I/O 1 (all pins: TTL level input, CMOS, TTL compatible output - 15 ma max.) 3 I/O 2 4 I/O 3 5 I/O 4 6 I/O 5 7 I/O 6 8 +5v Digital I/O Connector: PIC-I/O Multifunction I/O Board JP10 Pin Definition 1 Ground - towards the edge of the board 2 I/O 7 3 I/O 8 4 I/O 9 5 I/O 10 (or Counter input) 6 I/O 11 7 I/O 12 8 +5v Analog Input Connector: PIC-I/O Multifunction I/O Board JP11 Pin Definition 1 Ground - towards the edge of the board 2 Analog Input 1 (all pins: 0 - 5v input) 3 Analog Input 2 4 Analog Input 3 5 +5v Power Connections: PIC-I/O Screw Terminals Pin Definition 1 PWM driver power input (6 - 48vdc) - at upper edge of board 2 Ground 3 PWM Channel 1 (+) 4 PWM Channel 1 (-) 5 PWM Channel 2 (+) 6 PWM Channel 2 (-)

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

Network Connectors: PIC-I/O Board JP1, JP2 Pin Definition 1 RCV+ (Z232-485 XMT+) 2 RCV- (Z232-485 XMT-) 3 XMT+ (Z232-485 RCV+) 4 XMT- (Z232-485 RCV-) 5 ADDR_IN on JP1, ADDR_OUT on JP2 6 GND 7 Logic power (7.5 - 12vdc) 8 GND 9 Logic power (7.5 - 12vdc) 10 GND 2.2 Jumpers PIC-I/O Board Jumpers: Jumper Description JP3 Connects ADDR_IN to GND. Insert jumper for the last module on the network (or if only 1 module is used) JP3,JP4 Enables termination resistors on RX and TX. Insert these jumpers for the last module on the network (or if only 1 module is used). JP6,JP7 Logic power interconnection. Inserting JP6 connects logic power to network connector JP2. Inserting JP7 connects logic power to JP1. These are used to control the distribution of logic power over the network cables. Normally both of these jumpers are installed.

Figure 2 - PIC-I/O Schematic Diagram. www.jrkerr.com

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

2.3 Ordering Information Part Number Description KAE-T2V1-BDV1 PIC-I/O Multifunction I/O Controller Board

3. PIC-I/O Board Description The PIC-I/O board is a multifunction I/O expansion board compatible with PIC-SERVO and PICSTEP motor control modules. The board is designed so that up to 32 modules can be connected directly to a single standard serial port (using an RS232-RS485 converter if necessary). 3.1 PIC-I/O Controller The heart of the PIC-I/O controller board is the PIC-I/O controller chip. It controls all of the communications and I/O functions. Please refer to the PIC-I/O data sheet for details on the PIC-I/O command set and communications protocol. 3.2 Digital I/O The PIC-I/O has 12 general purpose TTL/CMOS compatible I/O bits appearing on connectors JP9 and JP10. I/O pins 1-8 have 20K pull-up resistors, and I/O pins 9-12 have 10K pull-up resistors. As outputs, each I/O pin can source or sink up to 20 ma, but only a total of 200 ma may be sourced or sunk for the total 12 I/O pins. I/O pin 10, when configured as an input, can also be used as an event counter which is triggered on a rising signal edge. 3.3 PWM Outputs The PIC-I/O has 2 PWM outputs with low-side high-current drivers. The PWM output is a 20 KHz square wave of programmable duty cycle. A high-current supply (6-48vdc) can be connected to the screw terminals 1&2, a load for PWM output 1 can be connected to screw terminals 3&4, and a load for PWM output 2 can be connected to screw terminals 5&6. Non-inductive loads of up to 10 amps may be driven from each output, or inductive loads up to 2 amps may be used. Larger inductive loads may be used if an appropriately sized protection diode is placed across the inductive load to absorb the inductive kick-back. If more than 2 amps is driven by either of the PWM outputs, the power transistors T1 and T2 should be attached to a heat sink using electrically insulating hardware. 3.4 Analog Inputs Three 8-bit analog inputs appear on connector JP11. The input voltage should be in the range of 0 to +5v. 3.5 Logic Power Output & Prototyping Area +5vdc appears on connectors JP9, JP10 and JP11, and may be used for powering sensors or other circuitry. No more than 300 ma should be drawn from this supply. (Note that the +5vdc is derived from the logic power supplied to the board, which may also limit the output.) The PIC-I/O board also has a small prototyping area, an array of 74 pads on 0.10 spacing. This may be used for small amounts of custom circuitry such as opto-isolation or analog filtering.

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

4. Contact Information Additional information may be found from these sources: J R Kerr Automation Engineering www.jrkerr.com Information about the PIC-SERVO motor controller and related products including ordering information, product documentation and test software. Datasheets, application notes and test code may be downloaded from the page: http://www.jrkerr.com/docs.html. Technical support is provided via e-mail. Send your questions to techsupport@jrkerr.com. HdB Electronics www.hdbelectronics.com Distributor of PIC-SERVO products as well as of other electronic components, accessories and tools.

J R KERR

A U T O M A T I O N ENGINEERING

www.jrkerr.com

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Message
Post subject: Patent Discovered! - Driver Circuit for the VIC

Hi Guys I have never seen this patent before, it was somehow overlooked.
Joined: 25 Aug 2005 Posts: 182

Patent 9207861 "A Control and Driver Circuit For a Hydrogen Gas Fuel Producing Cell" Download it Please http://www.waterfuelcell.org/WFCprojects/Patents/WO9207861A1.pdf This Patent has been brought to my attention by a private email from a person I will keep anonymous. This is what was needed to progress, I have high hopes now. cheers Site Admin
Last edited by Site admin on Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:46 pm

Back to top Site admin


Site Admin Post subject:

Quote from patent.....

Joined: 25 Aug 2005 Posts: 182

Quote:

"Conversion of about 5 gallons of water per hour into fuel gas will occur on average. To increase the rate, multiple resonant cavities can be used and/or the surfaces of the water capacitor can be increased, however, the water capacitor cell is preferably small in scale. A typical water capacitor may be formed from a 0.5 inch in diameter stainless steel rod and a 0.75 inch inside diameter cylinder that together extend concentrically about 3 inches with respect to each other."

It has been said that 1 gallon = aprox. 2000 L of e-gas, 5 gallons = aprox. 10,000 L of e-gas, this is equal to 166 L per Min. , 2.8 L per second, or 2,800 CC per second.. This is pretty amazing using High Voltage and minimal to no amperage to produce this amount of gas!

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The Water Fuel Cell :: View topic - Patent Discovered! - Driver Circuit fo...

http://www.waterfuelcell.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=79

Can someone help me find the exact calculations for litres of water dissociated into H/O? Thanks Site Admin
Back to top w.elliott
Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 2:34 am Post subject:

Joined: 10 Jan 2006 Posts: 2 Location: Manitoaba, Canada

Dear Site Admin, 3 inches of cell composed of 3/4 inch pipe and 1/2 inch pipe. No electrolyte! Voltages of about 600 volts across the water. I don't believe it. If this amount of gas can be produced by this little cell I'll eat my shirt. Best regards, Willard _________________ Best regards, Willard

Back to top softtom


Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:25 am Post subject:

Joined: 11 Mar 2006 Posts: 3 Location: Germany

Hi Site Admin, hi everyone, I read the document now for about 4 hours, have to think about it some time. Be careful in using the things inside, i think it's scanned via OCR-software and there are several errors. For instance the switching diode "NVR 1550" is not existing, i think the real type is MUR 1560 (a ultra fast rectifier with 15A, 600V and trr 60ns). For me personally the part with the the PLL is most interesting. It shows to me the importance of the frequency in the process. The ratio of the secondary to primary coil is given at 30 to 1, in the patent ...961 it is termed as 3 to 1 (600 to 200 turns). Best regards Tom

Back to top warj1990


Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 6:49 am Post subject:

Joined: 01 Feb 2006 Posts: 253 Location: USA

Tom, Thanks for figuring out the diode, that was driving me nuts searching for it. Looking at figure 12 I will attemt to analize what the compoents are, should be easy for anyone that can build it. A40 looks to be a 555 timer, with the standard RC time constant for frequency adjustments. A41,42,42 look to be J/K flip flop circuits. The last one (trangle) is an inverter, I think it will be easy to construct most of the circuits in this patent, the main problem is still the resonating of the WFC itself. Maybe this patent is a missing link in the design of the WFC, but I still think the WFC needs some missing compoents filled in before all this gets put together and working correctly. Warj1990

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Back to top warj1990


Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 7:09 am Post subject:

Joined: 01 Feb 2006 Posts: 253 Location: USA

Willard, 4 QT = 1 gallon 1 QT = 946.35 cc 3,785.4 cc per gallon 3,785.4 cc h20 = 2000 L E-Gas (over) X = 2.8 L E-Gas 3,785.4 * 2.8 = 10,599.12 10,599.2 cc / 2000 L = 5.23 cc H2O So the question is can a 3/4 inch tube 3 inches long hold 5.23 cc h2o with a center of 1/2 inch cut out?

Back to top kingrs


Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 9:16 am Post subject:

Joined: 23 Jan 2006 Posts: 43 Location: Vostok Base, Antarctica

Cylinder volume = 0.25 * pi * diameter * diameter * height cylinder 1 volume = 3.142 * 1.705 cm * 1.705 cm * 7.76cm = 17.4cm3 cylinder 2 volume = 3.142 * 1.27 cm * 1.27 cm * 7.76cm = 9.65cm3 Volume of electrolyte is therefore 17.4 - 9.65 = 7.75cm3 I am guessing the thickness of the outer tube is 1mm so I have subtracted 2mm from the outer tube diameter. Its more than I thought there would be so feel free to check my maths. Regards Rob

Back to top kingrs


Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:56 am Post subject:

Joined: 23 Jan 2006 Posts: 43 Location: Vostok Base, Antarctica

Quote: Maybe this patent is a missing link in the design of the WFC, but I still think the WFC needs some missing components filled in before all this gets put together and working correctly.

While watching one of my favourite shows Stargate SG1 the other night one of the Asgar mentioned a device for immobilsing ascended beings, and he mentioned using a standing wave. Maybe the circuit for the water fuel is all there, just only half the quantity. What if you need to pulse one cell with the first pulse and the adjacent cells with a second pulse, and so on. So that you get a to and fro motion of sonic waves in the water 180 degrees out of phase of each other. I'm not sure but with the right frequency can you setup a standing wave where the two meet? Did the video with Meyer and his cell show 3 wires going to the cell or 2 (he could have got away with 2 wires and put diodes in the cell)?

Just a thought Rob

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Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:40 am Post subject:

Hi, this is my first post here at the request of Site Admin. Following notification of this patent on the egaspower list I wrote some PIC code to replicate the waveform which appears on page 27 marked 'Pulse Input'. The idea being to make this available to
Joined: 05 Mar 2006 Posts: 4 Location: UK

anyone interested as a hex file for downloading and programming into a PIC 16F88. Two variable resistors are used to independently set the pulse frequency and symmetrical blanking count for experimental purposes, the output is a 5 Volt signal. Page 9 of the patent suggests 5KHz as being the optimum frequency for resonance and my code can currently range from 470Hz to 6.7KHz but I plan to extend this. Two aspects of the patent concern me, one is the waveform shown after choke TX4 and the other is the feedback mechanism for the PLL. I have insufficient experience to understand these without further research. Comments welcomed. Regards, Nigel

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Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 9:29 am Post subject:

Joined: 23 Jan 2006 Posts: 43 Location: Vostok Base, Antarctica

Hi Torkfreak, I am also looking at a PIC microcontroller solution for the pulse generator. For the feedback I plan to use an op amp to measure the low voltage drop across a shut resistor supplying the driver power mosfet. This can be read through the A to D input on the PIC. I am about to order a series of different op amps to experiment with so that I can build a high speed amp meter that monitors the current drawn by the cell so that it can turn off the pulse train for a set period of pulses. I want to use the PIC 16F873 and drive an LCD display to show the frequency, peak current, mark/space, train pulses, rest pulses etc. Are you using the timer interrupt? Rob

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Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:19 pm Post subject:

Hi Rob, After posting here I read some of your posts about PICs.
Joined: 05 Mar 2006 Posts: 4 Location: UK

I've been using PICs for over ten years and apart from a couple of early projects in assembler I code exclusively in HiTech C. Yes, I used interrupts and the pot reading provides the reload value for Timer 1. Using the 16F88s internal 8MHz oscillator I can get a steady 6.7KHz pulse stream using firmware or up to 10KHz but with jitter due to periodic reading of the A to D. I could write my own interrupt handler in assembler to increase the output frequency or use a faster crystal. You may wish to consider the 18F252 as an alternative to the 16F873 as it has an internal PLL enabling it to run at 40MHz (10MHz after / 4). I have quite a bit of experience writing to character LCDs so please contact me directly if you'd like some code examples. Regards, Nigel

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Posted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 12:51 am Post subject:

Joined: 05 Jan 2006 Posts: 3 Location: web

In figure 10 of the patent TX5 is shown as a variable inductor. Then on figure 1 both inductors TX4 and TX5 are not variable. I think Meyer actually states TX4 and TX5 are bifilar wound and equal lengths in other patents and the Tech Manual. I think with figure 10 the step charging effect is from the inductor TX4. The pulse voltage should always be "high", since inductors act as a resistor to DC I think the same effect is being shown with the step charging effect. Power supplies use inductors as "soft start" systems for preventing current spikes during start-up, basically the same effect.

Don't get stuck on the 30 : 1 ratio on the voltage step-up (bottom page 9) that was just an example for the top of page 9 so you have an idea how Meyer got 2000 to 5000 volts across the cell. ( or this could have been a condition of resonance ) Many of my experiments have been with regular diodes, I look forward to getting the diode specified in the patent (MUR 1560 crosses to NTE 6248) The NTE diode is about $4 usd. NTE Website: www.nteinc.com
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Posted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:34 am Post subject:

Joined: 23 Jan 2006 Posts: 43 Location: Vostok Base, Antarctica

Hi Nigel, Thanks for the reply, I am coding in assembler as I want to know whats happening at the lowest level - cycles required for each step in the program, the pulses are generated in code, although I did look at the PWM feature of the chip and decided it was not flexible enough. I developed the LCD code some years ago but probably need to update it for the faster clock speed of 20MHz. Send me your code for the LCD anyway as this will probably be more code efficient than mine is. I was considering using an standard function generator chip, but setting the frequency is tricky to control. Its interesting to note that the whole patent may have been OCR'ed at some time, it means all sorts of figures could be wrong. Regards Rob PS. Ooh and Site Admin, had a bit of a oops tonight while cutting out the sink hole in my kitchen worktop, it fell off the bench while I was recipro sawing it and broke it in two pieces, blasted chipboard worktops. Dohhh!

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Posted: Sun Mar 26, 2006 10:52 am Post subject:

Joined: 23 Jan 2006 Posts: 43 Location: Vostok Base, Antarctica

After reading through the patent a bit closer I realise that it is not separate pulse circuits but parts of one large circuit. There appears to be lots of 555 timers in there,OR gates, AND gates, dividers, hex inverters and so forth. The bit I find interesting is the frequency scanner, how on earth does that work? If it can be built it will be a work of art.

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The first bit that does not make any sense is the two additional resonant charging chokes wound on the same former as the secondary, surely they (all 3 windings) would represent the same winding. If we each tackle a section each using Multisim 8 or Eagle I am sure we can piece together the whole circuit. Any suggestions? Regards Rob
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Posted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:21 pm Post subject:

Hi Rob, I've been trying to simulate part of the resonant circuit using 5spice (free evaluation download www.5spice.com) but it just wants to generate noise waveforms at the moment.
Joined: 05 Mar 2006 Posts: 4 Location: UK

Did you get my private message sent a few days ago (about LCD code)? Regards, Nigel

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