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The new Sugar Pine mill spread over many acres of farm land north of Fresno.

The bucolic scene above, taken during construction, shows the 520-foot green chain that stretched from the sawmill to the sorting sheds. (C. C. Laval)

T h e 20-foot-long fire boxes in the concrete powerhouse (under construction a t left) burned sawdust and other residue from the sawmill, box factory, and planing mill. ( T o m Higgason collection)

View of the powerhouse cooling pond (right) was photographed by C. C. Laval on May 6,1923.

Innovative brick-and-concrcte dry kiln (left)was used to Season one-fifth of the lumber annual output. (Tom Higgason collection)

(C. C. Laval)

The first trainload of logs is ready to be unloaded at "Lake Pinedale" o n July 1 2 , 1923. (C. C. Laval)

nwtai refuse burner lined with fire brick, a yard officc, shipping dock, completely equipped nuchine shop, and a 100,000-gallon metal water tower. The drying yards, which were capable o f storing 7 5 million feet of lumber, spread over 140 acres. Seven-ton, battery-powered electric locomotives pulled 750 lumber cars through the yards on SO miles of 20-pound track. The entire plant W A S protected by sprinklers and fire hydrants supplicd by two turbine-driven, 1,000-gallon-a~nirlute fire pumps. I q s arriving by railroad from the woods were dumpcd into a mill pond in front of the sawmill, two cars at a time, by two electric A-frame hoists. Originally 14 acres in size, the pond was enlarged to .32% acres (capacity 30-million feet) in 1925 to provide additional log storage. Four deep wells with a combined output of 4,800 gallons per nlir~~~ supplied tc the 91-million gallons of water

required t o fill the half-mile-long lake. Other improvements made in subsequent years included a five-stall locomotive house, 8 4 feet by 120 feet, a nine-room general manager's residence, and an 11,000-square-foot administration building. East of the Sugar Pine mill property, a new town called ''~inedaL" was also- being -developed in 1922. Independently financed by the Gorham Land C o m p a n y of Santa Monica, in which Fleming and Gillis reportedly had a substantial interest, the townsite covered several hundred acres, with room for future expansion. "Pinedale, Fresno County's newest city, is now under construction," said the Fresno Republican o n November 26, 1922. "Lots will be sold with rigid restrictions placed o n them by the townsite owners. A population of 2,500 is expected, the majority being workers at the Sugar Pine mill, and the ultimate expectation is t o increase the popula-

i
I

Average load carried by either the all-steel cars (top) or the wooden flatcars (center) was eight logs totalling some 7,800 board feet of lumber. (C. C. Laval)

up by a big electric hoist known as the 'sinker derrick.' By means of this machinery, a sinker anywhere near the unloading dock can be lifted and carried over to the log conveyor that takes it up t o the mill. When logs sink in other parts of the pond, they are raised by a hand winch on a small floating 'A' frame raft and are kept afloat by tying them t o floating logs. "Logs are sorted according t o species and floated t o those parts of the pond assigned t o them. Single logs are pushed along with pike poles, but by tying several logs together it is possible for one o r two men t o pull several hundred logs through the water - if the wind is not against them. "The pond men move around on floating timbers, chained end to end, called 'booms,' which are anchored t o posts. By means of these booms, they can reach any part of the pond deep enough to float logs. They are required to wear spiked shoes t o prevent slipping. T w o men always work together as an additional safeguard in case of accident&?

"In the winter it is necessary t o drain the pond and clean out the debris that accumulates through the season. Nearly 2,500 cubic yards of debris were removed from the pond last winter. "The pond is not only the connecting link between the railroad and the mill, but it also serves a very useful purpose in another way. It enables either the woods crews or the mill t o produce as fast as possible without reference t o the other. For example, if the mill is shut down, it doesn't affect the woods, and vice versa. "One of the most difficult features of working o n the pond is that the men get so 'leg weary.' It requires a continual effort just t o stand o n the constantly swaying booms, not t o mention pushing heavy logs through the water all day long." From the pond, logs entered the second story of the sawmill building by means of an endless jack
Log cars were pulled into position at the unloading dock at Pinedale by an electrically driven cable. T w o cars arc simultaneously being unloaded here in June, 1923, by the Afranie hoists. ( C . C. Laval)

The first trainload of logs is ready to be unloaded at "Lake Pinedale" o n July 12,1923. (C. C. Laval)

metal refuse burner lined with fire brick, a yard office, shipping dock, completely equipped machine shop, and a 100,000-gallon metal water tower. The drying yards, which were capable of storing 75 million feet af lumber, spread over 140 acres. Seven-ton, battery-powered electric locomotives pulled 750 lumber cars through the yards on 50 miles of.20-pound track. T h e entire plant was protected by sprinklers a n d fire hydrants supplied by two turbine-driven, 1,000-gallon-aminute fire pumps. Logs arriving by railroad from the woods were dumped into a mill pond in front of the sawmill, two cars at a time. by two electric A-frame hoists.

a five-stall locomotive house, 84 feet by 120 feet, a nine-room general manager's residence, and an 11,000-square-foot administration building. East of the Sugar Pine mill property, a new town called "Pinedale" was also being developed in 1922. Independently financed by the Gorham Land Company of Santa Monica, in which Fleming and Gillis reportedly had a substantial interest, the townsite covered several hundred acres, with room for future expansion. "Pinedale, Fresno County's newest city, is now under construction," said the Fresno Republican on November 26, 1922. "Lots will be sold with rigid restrictions placed o n them by the townsite owners. A population of 2,500 is expected, the majority being workers at the Sugar Pine mill, and the ultimate expectation is to increase the popula-

twelve cents on the dollar for their bonds. On November 18, 1935, the remaining properties of the ? X i g F ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ y o a r a b ~ ~ ~ ~for~ % f 3 5 i0 , 0 o0 O nd4%%ssx3t-p -63, the only bidder. T h e Pensacola Company had been incorporated by the Lloyd-Smiths o n October 29 t o handle the disposition of SPL land and equipment, a task that

Corns. At the height of its wartime activities, the

.. .-

numb& of other industrial concerns. Although a


Deterioration of the big logging railroad trestles is clearly evident in these two views. The picture at the upper left wnc taken in the mid-1930's after rails and ties had been removcd from trestle No. 14, but with the main structure otherwiw almost intact. The bottom photograph, taken in 1966, revenls mostly rubble remaining after some thirty more years. All thc bridges have since been demolished by the Forest Service because of the fire hazard. (Hank Johnston)

Water sprayed under pressure cleaned logs entering the mill of gravel, grit, and other foreign matter that might dull the bandsaws. The big "sinker derrick" crane at right was used to raise non-floating logs from the mill pond. (C. C. Laval)

THE FINEST SAWMILL IN THE WEST


Don DeVere's excellent map of the sawmill complex at Pinedale details the complex layout as it appeared during most of its ten-year operation. In later years the mill pond was enlarged by a series of dams and ditches.

Drying yards at the Pinedale mill spread over more than 140 acres and contained some 5 0 miles of narrow-gauge railroad track. Piles of lumber (right) were reached by means of the railroad network, on which seven-ton, battery-operated engines pulled lumbe'r carts. (C. C . Laval)

The aerial view below, taken before the project was fully completed, illustrates how 75 million board feet of lumber could be stored in the drying yards at any one time. (PG & E collection)

S I T E SURVEY SUMMARY SHEET FOR DERP-FUDS S I T E NO. J09CA077200 CAMP PINEDALE, CA 11 JUNE 2003

(Revised from May 90)

S I T E NAME: LOCATION:

Camp Pinedale

Camp Pinedale was located in Fresno County seven miles north of Fresno, CA; see site map attached.

S I T E HISTORY:

The Army began lease of 569.40 acres on 24 March 1942 for use as a Japanese Reception Center. On 5 July 1944 the
acreage was divided between two Army Corps stations - the 840 Specialized Depot and the Western Signal Aviation Unit Training
Center. The site was primarily used for storage, vehicle
maintenance, and radar equipment training. A rifle range, gas
chamber training facility, Quartermaster services, and numerous
other facilities were included. On 3 December 1946, 379.52
acres were declared surplus and the remaining 189.88 acres were
declared surplus 1 March 1947.
A site visit was conducted on 31 October 1988. Sharon Bruno and Harvey Jones, CESPK-ED, visited the site. They
spoke with two representatives from the Fresno area Regional
Water Quality Control Board. Names of all persons contacted are
in the project file.

SITE VISIT: CATEGORY OF HAZARD: PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

PRP/HTW, HTW, BD/DR, and OE. There are two potential projects at this

site.
a. PRP/HTW. TCE groundwater contamination has been found.
Monitoring wells have been installed by the current owner, Vendo
Corporation, in cooperation with the California Regional Water
Quality Control Board. Determination of HTW source may require
investigation beyond the scope of this PA.
b. HTW. There was also an alleged abandoned landfill at
this site that may contain toxic materials. The landfill is not
proposed for remediation under this PA, and is hereby considered
category NDAI.

c. BD/DR. There are numerous buildings and a sewage ? treatment plant from DOD use by the current owners. The sewage
treatment was in beneficial use by the Pinedale Water District
and is now property of the current owners also. Neither the
buildings nor the sewage treatment plant are proposed for
removal under this PA, and are hereby considered category NDAI.
d. OE. A rifle range and a gas chamber training facility
were on-site. As there were no detailed maps showing the
location of these facilities or detailed findings from the site
visit about OE, it must be assumed that this area has not been
developed yet, and still may have subsurface presence of OE on
it. The limited research conducted failed to provide sufficient
historical information regarding OE at this site during this
time period. Recommend a more extensive research be
accomplished by completing an ASR.

AVAILABLE STUDIES AND REPORTS:

A real estate file maintained by the Real Estate Division,


Sacramento District, Corps of Engineers, contains Leasing and
Surplus Records. An extensive history of personnel and training
had been compiled during Camp Pinedale's existence. Records are
available through the United States Air Force Historical
Research Center, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. In addition,
the following publications concerning non-DOD use are available:
Rails to the Minarets, by Hank Johnson (a history of the
land use in the 1920's by the Sugar Pine Lumber
Company) Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Contamination of
Groundwater in North Fresno prepared by Kenneth D.
Schmidt and Associates, Fresno, California, September,
1988.
Groundwater Investigation Results, Geomatrix
Consultants, prepared for the Vendo Company, May, 1989.
Work Plan Proposal. Proposal prepared by BSK and
Associates for the Calcot Company describing future work
required for remediation of ground water contamination
on Calcot Limited property, 1989.

SACRAMENTO DISTRICT POC:

Gerald Vincent, 916-557-7452

DEFEMSZ ENV1RONKENTA.L RES!l'OFtATION ACCOUNT FOR FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES FINDINGS AND DETERHINATION OF ELIGIBILITP CAMP PINEDALE FRESNO, CALIFORNIA SITE NO. J09CA077200
PINDI?GS OF FACT

1. The D o D acquired a leasehold interest of 569.40 acres by condemnation on 24 March 1942 from the Valley Cotton Products Company. The site was originally known as Camp Pinedale.
DoD originally housed Japanese Americans at the site. It was called the Japanese Reception Center from 24 March 1942 to 6 August 1942. At the t i m e of acquisition there were 21 warehouses as well as 11 other buildings on the premises which had been used to stose cotton, sugar, and machinery. After use as a Japanese Reception center, the proposed use was for the Air Service Command to store clothing, parachutes, equipment, o f f i c e supplies, and s a l v a g e material. A Memorandum of Agreement dated 5 J u l y 1944 provided for joint use of Camp Pinedale by two Air Corps stations - the 840 Specialized Depot and the Western S i g n a l Aviation Unit Training Center. The 840 Specialized Depot used t h e i r 1 8 9 . 8 8 acres and improvements for storage, salvage, and a reconditioning depot. The Western Signal Aviation Unit Training Center used their 379.52 acres and improvements for a signal training center. A Mt. Owens Rifle Range was located on this 379.52 acre portion of the leased area. Both stations jointly used the railroad facilities located on the site. Camp Pinedale remained active until 1947 when most of its functions were moved elsewhere in the US. 2,

3. Effective 3 December 1946, 379.52 acres of the installation were declared surplus. The remaining 189.88 acres occupied by the 840th AAF Specialized Depot were declared surplus effective 1 March 1947. By Supplemental Agreement No. 2 to Lease No. W04-193-Eng-2816 dated 24 September 1947 the U.S. surrendered its leasehold interest to a l l 569.40 acres and improvements effective 10 October 1947. This agreement also states that in lieu of restoration by the U.S. requested in the lease, t h e lessor would "accept certain Government improvements " and $71,000. No other information about this monetary settlement could be found. This agreement made no mention of the U. S having recapture rights.

DETERMINATION

Based on the foregoing findings of fact, the s i t e has been determined to be formerly used DoD p r o p e r t y . It is therefore eligible for the Defense Environmental Restoration Program -Formerly Used Defense sites established under 10 USC 2 7 0 1 et
seq.

GER F . YANKOUPE General, U.S. Army Commanding

PROJECT SUMMARY SHEET FOR DERP-FUDS PRP/HTW PROJECT NO. J09CAO77201


CAMP PINEDALE

SITE NO. J09CA077200 MAY 1990


PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Under the authority of Section 13267, Chapter 4, Division 7 of the California Water Code, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - Central Valley Region requested facility and chemical use information from CESPD on 12 October, 1988. This request initiated an INPR.
In 1988, TCE concentrations over 300 ppb were found in the two water supply wells in the Pinedale Water ~istrict. During that same year lower TCE concentrations (less than 3 0 ppb) were found in water from five other public water supply wells in the area. Three of these wells were subsequently taken out of service. The California Regional Water Quality Control Board has contracted with two firms to monitor groundwater concentrations. It is not clear when the releases may have occurred.
PROJECT ELIGIBILITY: Records indicate that vehicle maintenance and supply storage were activities carried out by DoD during World War 11. All these activities ceased in 1947 at t h e site.
POLICY CONSIDERATION: The site would be eligible for DERP-FUDS i f it is determined that the hazardous substances emanating from the area are determined to be caused as a consequence of DoD use of the site. hazard.
E P A FORM 1290-12:

Attached

PROPOSED ACTIVITIES: The INPR should be referred to MRD for a determination of further action.
POC:

Sharon Bruno,

CESPK-ED-M-DI,

(916) 551-1049

PROJECT SUMMARY SHEET


FOR
DERP-E'UDS OE PROJECT J09CA077202
CAMP PINEDALE
11 JUNE 2003

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The site was primarily used for storage,


vehicle maintenance, and radar equipment training. A rifle
range, gas chamber training facility, Quartermaster services,
and numerous other facilities were included. A site visit was
conducted on 31 October 1988. As there were no detailed maps
showing the location of this rifle range or detailed findings
from the site visit about OE, it must be assumed that this area
has not been developed yet, and still may have unfired small
arms ammunition on it.
PROJECT ELIGIBILITY: Records indicate that this site had a
rifle range and a gas chamber facility. Any ordnance presence
at the site is the result of DOD activities and is, therefore,
eligible for removal under DERP-FUDS.
POLICY CONSIDERATIONS: The site may have been contaminated by
the United States military. Currently, DOD policy permits
remediation of DOD-generated ordnance.
PROPOSED PROJECT: The Inventory Project Report should be
referred to the Huntsville Center OE-MCX for a determination of
further action.
RISK ASSESSMENT CODE (RAC): Attached. The RAC score for this
site is 4, indicating the site warrants further action.
SACRAMENTO DISTRICT POC:

Gerald Vincent, 916-557-7452

cry 1 3

WTWtUL HAZAIIDOUS WASTE YTE W W W E C T i O M REPORT

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O m r w 4 A J0?~&77&dO

POTENTIAL nMARDOUS WASTE WE

I #W~CICATK~

W E INSPECTION REPORT

2 4 Apr 00 Previous editions obsolete


RlSK ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVES (OE) SITES Site Name: Camp Pinedale Site Location: Fresno. CA DERP Project # ~ 0 9 ~ ~ 0 7 7 2 0 d q Date Completed: 10 April 03 OE RlSK ASSESSMENT: This risk assessment procedure was developed in accordance with MIL-STD 882C and AR 385-10. The Risk Assessment Code (RAC) score will be used by the U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), Ordnance and Explosives Team (USAESCH-OE) to prioritize the remedial action(s) at Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS). The risk assessment should be based upon best available information resulting from records searches, reports of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Detachments actions, field observations, interviews, and measurements. This information is used to assess the risk involved based upon the potential OE hazards identified at the site. The risk assessment is composed of two factors, hazard severity and hazard ~robability.Personnel involved in visits to potential OE sites should view the USAESCH-OE videotape entitled "A Life Threatening Encounter: OEW."
/ /

Rater's Name: Frederick J. Allan Jr. Phone Number: 256-426-0664 Organization: CEHNC-OE-S Score: jl

PART I. Hazard Severity. Hazard severity categories are defined to provide a qualitative measure of the worst credible event resulting from personnel exposure to various types and quantities of unexploded ordnance items. TYPE OF ORDNANCE: (Circle all that apply) A. Conventional Ordnance and Ammunition: MediumlLarge Caliber (20mm and larger) Bombs, Explosive Grenades, Hand or Rifle, Explosive Landmine, Explosive Rockets, Guided Missile, Explosive Detonators, Blasting Caps, Fuzes, Boosters, Bursters Bombs, Practice (wlspotting charges) Grenades, Practice (wlspotting charges) Landmine, Practice (wlspotting charges) Small Arms, Complete Round (.22 cal .50 cal) Small Arms, Expended Practice ordnance (wlo spotting charges) VALUE

Conventional Ordnance and Ammunition (Largest single value)

What evidence do you have regarding conventional unexploded ordnance? There is the Dossibilitv of small arms at the old rifle ranae.
Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 1

B. Pyrotechnics (for munitions not described above): Munitions (Containers) containing White Phosphorus (WP) or other Pyrophoric Material (i.e., Spontaneously Flammable) Munitions containing a flame or incendiary material (i.e., Napalm, Triethylaluminum Metal Incendiaries) Flares, Signals, Simulators, Screening Smokes (other than WP) Pyrotechnics (Select the largest single value) What evidence do you have regarding pyrotechnics? C. Bulk High Explosives (Not an integral part of conventional ordnance; uncontainerized): Primary or initiating explosives (Lead Styphnate, Lead Azide, Nitroglycerin, Mercury Azide, Mercury Fulminate, Tetracene, etc.) Demolition Charges Secondary Explosives (PETN, Compositions A, B, C, Tetryl, TNT, RDX, HMX, HBX, Black Powder, etc.) Military Dynamite Less Sensitive Explosives (Ammonium Nitrate, Explosive D, etc.) High Explosives (Select the largest single value) What evidence do you have regarding bulk explosives?

VALUE 10

VALUE

10

D. Bulk Propellants (Not an integral part of rockets, guided missiles, or other conventional ordnance; uncontainerized): VALUE Solid or Liquid Propellants Propellants What evidence do you have regarding bulk propellants?

Site Name

RACWorksheet Page 2

E.

Chemical Warfare Materiel (CWM) and Radiological Weapons: Toxic Chemical Agents (Choking, Nerve, Blood, Blister) War Gas Identification Sets Radiological Riot Control Agents (Vomiting, Tear) Chemical and Radiological (Select the largest single value) What evidence do you have regarding chemicallradiological OEW?

VALUE

20

TOTAL HAZARD SEVERITY VALUE [Sum of the Values for A throuah E--Maximum of 61) Apply this value to Table 1 to determine Hazard Severity Category. TABLE 1 HAZARD SEVERITY*

CATASTROPHlC CRITICAL MARGINAL NEGLIGIBLE

21 and/or greater
10 to 20

5 to 9
1 to4

SEVERITY CATEGORY * APPLY HAZARD TO TABLE 3. ** IF HAZARD SEVERITY IS 0, YOU DO NOT NEED TO COMPLETE PART 11 OF THIS FORM. PROCEED TO PART 111 AND
USE A RAC SCORE OF 5 TO DETERMINE YOUR APPROPRlATE ACTION.

Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 3

PART II. Hazard Probability. The probability that a hazard has been, or will be, created due to the '
predence and other rated factors of unexploded ordnance or explosive materials on a formerly used Department of Defense (DoD) site.

AREA, EXTENT, ACCESSIBILITY OF OEW HAZARD (Circle all that apply) A. Location of OEW Hazards: On the surface Within tanks, pipes, vessels or other confined areas Inside walls, ceilings, or other building/structure Subsurface Location (Select the single largest value) What evidence do you have regarding location of OE? Small arms could be located on the surface. VALUE

6. Distance to nearest inhabited locationlstructure likely to be at risk from OE hazard (road, park, playground, building, etc.):

VALUE 5
4

Less than 1250 feet 1250 feet to 0.5 miles 0.5 miles to 1.O miles 1.O miles to 2.0 miles Over 2 miles Distance (Select the single largest value) What are the nearest inhabited structures/buildings? Roads. residential, commercial.

3
2 1 5 -

Site Name RAC Worksheet Page 4

C. Number of buildings within a 2-mile radius measured from the OE hazard area, not the installation boundary:
26 and over 16 to 25

VALUE

11 to 15
6 to 10

1 to5

0
Number of Buildings (Select the single largest value) Narrative. Residential, commercial, School.

D. Types of Buildings (within a 2-mile radius) Educational, Child Care, Residential, Hospitals, Hotels, Commercial, Shopping Centers Industrial, Warehouse, etc. Agricultural, Forestry, etc. Detention, Correctional No Buildings Types of Buildings (Select the largest single value) Describe the types of buildings. Residential, commercial, School.

VALUE 5

Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 5

E. Accessibility to site refers to access by humans to ordnance and explosives. Use the following' guidance: BARRIER No barrier or security system Barrier is incomplete (e.g. in disrepair or does nof completely surround the site). Barrier is intended to deny egress from the site, as for a barbed wire fence for grazing. A barrier (any kind of fence in good repair) but no separate means to control entry. Barrier is intended to deny access to the site. Security guard, but no barrier Isolated site VALUE

A 24-hour surveillance system (e.g., television monitoring or su~eillance by guards or facility personnel) which continuously monitors and controls entry; or an artificial or natural barrier (e.g., a fence combined with a cliff), which completely surrounds the area; and a means to control entry, at all times, through the gates or other entrances to the facility (e.g., an attendant, television monitors, locked entrances, or controlled roadway access to the facility).
Accessibility (Select the single largest value) Describe the site accessibility.

F. Site Dynamics This deals with site conditions that are subject to change in the future, but may be stable at the present. Examples would be excessive soil erosion on beaches or streams, increasing land development that could reduce distances from the site to inhabited areas or otherwise increase accessibility. VALUE
Expected None Anticipated Site Dynamics (Select value) Describe the site dynamics.

5
0

Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 6

TOTAL HAZARD PROBABILITY VALUE (Sum of Largest Values for A through F--Maximum of 30) Apply this value to Hazard Probability Table 2 to determine Hazard Probability Level. TABLE 2 HAZARD PROBABILITY'

Descri~tion FREQUENT PROBABLE OCCASIONAL REMOTE IMPROBABLE

Level
A B

Hazard Probabilitv Value

27 or greater
21 to 26

C
D E

15 to 20

8 to I 4
less than 8

Apply Hazard Probability Level to Table 3.

Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 7

PART Ill. Risk Assessment. The risk assessment value for this site is determined using the followihg Table. Enter the results of the Hazard Probability and Hazard Severity values. TABLE 3 Probability Level Severity Category: CATASTROPHIC CRITICAL MARGINAL NEGLIGIBLE
1

FREQUENT A

PROBABLE B

OCCASIONAL C

REMOTE D

IMPROBABLE E

RISK ASSESSMENT CODE (RAC) RAC I RAC 2 RAC 3 RAC 4 RAC 5 Expedite INPR, recommending further action by USAESCH Immediately call USAESCH-OE-S--commercial (256) 895-158211598 High priority on completion of INPR Recommend further action by USAESCH. Complete INPR Recommend further action by USAESCH

Complete INPR - Recommend further action by USAESCH

Usually indicates that No DoD Action Indicated (NDAI) is necessary. Submit NDAI and RAC to USAESCH.

PART IV. Narrative. Summarize the documented evidence that supports this risk assessment. If no documented evidence was available, explain all the assumptions that you made. Camp Pinedale was

located in Fresno County 7 miles north of Fresno, California. 569.40 acres of land where leased to the Army on 24 March 1942. The site was used as a Japanese Reception Center. Later the site was divided between the 840'~ specialized Depot and the Western Sianal Aviation Unit Traininq Center. The site was ~rimarily used for storaae. vehicle maintenance, and radar equipment traininq. A rifle ranae, aas chamber trainina facility. Quartermaster services, and numerous other facilities were included. A site visit was conducted on 31 October 1988, but no site visit report was in the INPR. As there were no detailed maps showina the location of this rifle ranae or detailed findinas from the site visit about OE, I must assume that this area has not been developed yet. I therefore qive this site a RAC Score of 4.
--p p

Site Name

RAC Worksheet Page 8

$EF'ENS&

ENVIRONNENTAL RESTOIRATION PROQRAI( FORMERLY USED DEFENSE S I T E S L I S T OF ALL O111111111111111111 FOR A S I T E S i t . Nan.: CAMP PINEDALm S i t . Numbart J 0 9 C A 0 7 7 2 01/25/94

FFID: CA99799F571300 County t FRESNO Latitude: d

Geographical FOA : SPK State: CA

City: PINEDALE Zip Code t

sN

Longitude:

sW

Former Service: OTHER


NPL Lieted(Y/N/P): N NPL Name:
Site Description:
SITE IS IN FRESNO COUNTY 7 MILES N OF FRESNO, CA AND CONSISTS OF 560.4 ACRES
CURRENTLY USED AS AN INDUSTRIAL PARK FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF VENDING MACHINES
AND COTTON STORAGE. THE SITE IS NOT A NPL SITE
Site History:
THE SITE CONSISTED 0Fq560.4 ACRES AND WAS LEASED ON 24 MARCH 1942 FOR USE AS A
JAPANESE RECEPTION CENTER. ON 5 JULY 1944 THE ACREAGE WAS DIVIDED BETWEEN 2 AIR CORPS STATIONS AND WAS PRIMARILY USED FOR STORAGE, RADAR EQUIPMENT TRAINING,
CHEMICAL WARP'
Current Site Name : Current Owner(@): T B D
Current Owner Description:
EPA Lieted(Y/N)r N

PROJ MGR: DISTRICT: DIVISION: HQ : OTHER :

LARRY WOSCYNA WILLIAM MULLERY TONY ME1 SARA ANGUS

CEMRO-MD-HA CESPK-ED-EB CESPD-ED-GH CEMP-RF

(402)221-7715~ (916)557-6944x (415)705-1468~ (202)504-5223x

( 1 x ...............................................................................

01/10/93
01/10/93
01/10/93
01/10/93 01/10/93

Page 1

-- - -

- - ---

LIST OF ALL DATA FOR A SITE


Site N a m t CAW PINEDALB Site Number: J09CA0772

01/25/94

PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT (PA) Schedule Actual Start Start

- INPR ..................................

.................................................

Schedule Actual
Complete Complete
:

Potential OEW: P Remarks : MRD HAS PRP

Potential CWM: U

FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS

-----------------------*---

Were hazarde found (Y/N): Y


Site Eligible/Ineligible/Categorical Exclusion (E/I/C): E
Categorical Exclueion:
Ineligible Findings:
Ineligible/Categorical Exclusion Remarks:

*Category

Project NOFA *Number Y/N

Project Approval OEW


Req Date RAC Description

Page 2

FIGURE 1

- LOCATION OF WELLS

FIGURE 2 - LOCATION OF SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC CROSS SECTIONS

ORTW

SOUTH

A
P S 98

A'

m i 1 , -

Cobt;les, gravel and sand

. .

Sand

T.D. 350'

TD 252'

well and total depth (feet)

FIGURE 3 - SUBSURFACE ($EOLOGIC I

CROSS SECTION A - A'

T O 333'

Wclll a n d Yb.'

FIGURE 5

- WATER-LEVEL ELEVATION CONTOURS FOR JULY 1988

CALIFORNIA STATE ,,,,,,,,,-,-,,,,,,,,-^-------I, L A N D OWNER


ACREAGE
LEASE
569. 40
\

FRESNO COUMTY,,,,,,,,,,,-------------LREMARKS
Lease W 04-193-Eng.-2816 ,
SACRAMEN

DIVISION

, , , , , , I -

SOUTH PACIFIC

PINEDALE COMPRESS & WAREHOUSE CO,

DISTRICT

, , , , . , , , , , , , , _ , I ^ . l -

SAN FRANCISCO

-.

NOTE:.

Comp Pinedale used jointly by 8 4 0 Specialized Depot and Western

Signal Aviotion Unit Training Center per ogreement dated 5th. July 1944

7 rMILES---N O F , , , ------FRESNO .---

SPORTAXION FACILtTIES RAILROADS -w --, -,,-,,-. 41 STATE ROADS , , , , , , -----

STATE INDEX .

FEDERAL ROADS'

99

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ACQUISITION AUTHORIZATIOh

RE- D 1022

6 th. May 194

MAOERA

Camp Pinedale