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The student voice since 1904
Kansas swept by texas
First-time award named after former Chancellor Hemenway. aWaRD 8a
award honors volunteers
MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2010 www.kANsAN.cOM vOLuMe 121 Issue 133
BY ZACH GETZ
zgetz@kansan.com
It was easy to think a party was
going on outside the Kansas Union
Friday morning. Britney Spears was
being pumped into a dancing crowd
where almost 300 people were blowing
bubbles, tossing balls around and even
doing the occasional wave.
Looking closer, it was actually a coun-
ter-protest to a local religious extremist
group from Topeka, which was there
to protest the Brown Bag Drag, part of
Queers & Allies’ Pride Week.
Daniel Held, a sophomore from
Seattle, wanted to counter-protest the
group, but also wanted to do something
extra than just help discourage the pro-
testers. Held started raising money for
Planned Parenthood, an organization
the religious group strongly disapproves
of.
“I chose Planned Parenthood because
I thought it would be something a
majority of people would support, and
is against the things that they stand for,”
Held said. “It’s a great charity and they
do amazing work.”
Held said he raised about $1,161,
almost double his original goal of $600.
To ensure that everyone, including the
extremist group, knew of his efforts,
he created a sign that read, “Thanks
to you we have raised $X to Planned
Parenthood,” and updated it with each
new donation.
Chris Farley, a freshman from
campus
Students participate
in counter-protest
InauguratIon
BY ALEESE KOPF
akopf@kansan.com
More than a semester in the mak-
ing, the newest volunteer organiza-
tion, KU Advocacy Corps, finally
sealed its hard work and planning
during a Saturday training and
address from Chancellor Bernadette
Gray-Little.
The new corps coexists beside a
multitude of service-related events
leading up to the chancellor’s inau-
guration on Sunday. The group
seeks to partner some 100 students,
staff and faculty with 50 or more
community-based organizations
ranging from the American Red
Cross to the Douglas County AIDS
Project. The group will serve as on-
campus advocates and essentially
the go-to people when an organiza-
tion wants to reach out to KU.
Erika Dvorske, director of United
Way of Douglas County, said the
idea was to connect KU human
resources with community-based
organizations. She said they were
striving to fill the gap between stu-
dents and the community by cre-
ating something more sustainable
than just a single day of service.
“We’re more interested in sus-
tained volunteerism — someone
who is committed to an organiza-
tion and really able to help them
grow and be stronger,” she said.
Erin Atwood, a sophomore from
Topeka, will be serving as one of
those volunteers. She also serves as
co-coordinator for the Center for
Community Outreach program Into
the Streets Week, which provided
numerous volunteer opportunities
to students throughout last week.
She said nearly 75 people, includ-
ing 10 or 12 students, attended the
Saturday morning Advocacy Corps
training.
Atwood said the Chancellor made
it clear in her address at the training
that she thought service was an
important aspect of the KU com-
munity and should be encouraged.
Atwood said the Chancellor light-
heartedly referenced her excitement
of possibly volunteering with some
of the organizations to demonstrate
Chancellor receives formal welcome
Academics,
research top goals
Jerry Wang/KaNsaN
Jill Docking, chair of the Kansas Board of Regents, presents Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little with the Chancellor’s ceremonial collar Sunday afternoon at the Lied Center as part of the Chancellor’s inauguration. The silver collar features the university
seal surrounded by rubies and sapphires and was frst used in 1964.
Service group seeks to create new volunteering opportunities
BY ERIN BROWN
ebrown@kansan.com
To a crowd of about 1,000 people,
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little
delivered a message of commitment
and optimism in her inaugural
address Sunday.
“This University was founded by
a people who looked west, at the
vast opportunities that stretched
before them across this great con-
tinent,” Gray-Little said. “We must
maintain that same optimistic, pio-
neering spirit.”
In her address, Gray-Little also
spoke of her experiences traveling
in Kansas and the diverse people
she met throughout the state and at
the University. She also emphasized
her goals for the University, includ-
ing using scholarship money more
strategically to attract quality high
school seniors.
To ensure that more students
graduate, Gray-Little also suggested
that the University embrace some
systems already in place by KU
Athletics. These include a warning
system that identifies students who
are struggling academically and then
provides intervention, enhanced
financial aid, and an online tool that
allows students to make sure they
are on track for graduation.
Gray-Little also discussed her
dedication to research initiatives
see protest oN page 3a
see service oN page 3a
see Gray-LittLe oN page 3a
Collin Johnson/KaNsaN
A member of the Westboro Baptist Church holds up signs protesting homosexuality on Friday afternoon. Students across the street held
a counter protest and raised funds for Planned Parenthood. The church’s controversial pastor, Fred Phelps, didn’t make an appearance.
ElEctIons quIckly
approachIng
Read bios from each
candidate before
Student Senate elections
on Wednesday and
Thursday.
pagE 4a
to see footage
from the inau-
guration visit
kansan.com.
2A / NEWS / mondAy, April 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kAnsAn.com
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“The surest sign that intelligent life
exists elsewhere in the universe is
that it has never tried to contact us.”
— Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes
FACT OF THE DAY
The frst calvin and Hobbes strip was
published on november 18, 1985.
— www.billwatterson.net
chancellor Gray-little was
inaugurated on sunday
as the seventeenth kU
chancellor. The youngest
chancellor was Franklin
murphy (age 35) and the
longest-tenured chancellor
was Ernest lindley (1920-
1939).
ET CETERA
The University daily kansan is the student newspaper of the University of
kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies
of The kansan are 25 cents. subscriptions can be purchased at the kansan
business office, 119 stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., lawrence, ks 66045.
The University daily kansan (issn 0746-4967) is published daily during the
school year except saturday, sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and
weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. periodical postage is
paid in lawrence, ks 66044. Annual subscriptions by mail are $120 plus tax.
student subscriptions are paid through the student activity fee. postmaster:
send address changes to The University daily kansan, 119 stauffer-Flint Hall,
1435 Jayhawk Blvd., lawrence, ks 66045
— Monday, April 12, 2010
TUESDAY
April 13
nstudent Health services will host “kU
smokeout: ‘its never Too late to Quit’”
from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Anschutz
library and The Underground.
nstudent legal services will ofer a
free tax workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. in the
Harris computer lab of the kansas Union.
WEDNESDAY
April 14
nThe kansas relays will be from 8 a.m.
to 7 p.m. at the memorial stadium. The
event is free with kUid.
nWatkins memorial Health center will
ofer a free runners clinic from 9 to 11
a.m. at its southwest entrance. call 864-
9592 to reserve a spot.
THURSDAY
April 15
FRIDAY
April 16
SATURDAY
April 17
nThe kansas relays continue from 8
a.m. to 7 p.m. at the memorial stadium.
The event is free with kUid.
nThe annual kU spring pow Wow
will be from 5 to 10 p.m. at the robinson
center auditorium.
SUNDAY
April 18
nThe kU opera chamber Ensemble
will present XErXEs by Georg Friedrich
Handel from 2 to 3 p.m. at the spencer
museum of Art.
npulitzer prize-winning poet Ted kooser will read
a selection of his works from 7 to 8 p.m. at The oread,
1200 oread Ave.
nAuthor Edward drea will present the lecture “From
samurai to soldiers” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Hall
center as part of the annual Grant Goodman distin-
guished lecture in Japanese studies.
nFrench hornist paul stevens will perform from 7:30
to 8:30 p.m. in swarthout recital Hall in murphy Hall as
part of the kU school of music Faculty recital series.
CONTACT US
Tell us your news. contact stephen
montemayor, lauren cunningham,
Jennifer Torline, Brianne pfannenstiel,
Vicky lu, kevin Hardy, lauren Hendrick
or Aly Van dyke at (785) 864-4810
or editor@kansan.com. Follow The
kansan on Twitter at Thekansan_news.
kansan newsroom
111 stauffer-Flint Hall
1435 Jayhawk Blvd.
lawrence, ks 66045
(785) 864-4810
kJHk is the student voice in
radio. Each day there is news,
music, sports,
talk shows
and other
content made
for students,
by students.
Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reg-
gae, sports or special events,
kJHk 90.7 is for you.
MEDIA PARTNERS
If you would like to submit an event to be included
on our weekly calendar, send us an e-mail at
news@kansan.com with the subject “Calendar.”
check out kansan.com or kUJH-TV
on sunflower Broadband channel 31
in lawrence for more on what you’ve
read in today’s
kansan and
other news.
The student-
produced news
airs at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., 10 p.m., 11 p.m.
every monday through Friday. Also
see kUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
What’s going on today?
STAYING CONNECTED
WITH THE KANSAN
Get the latest news and give us
your feedback by following The
kansan on Twitter @Thekan-
san_news, or become a fan of
The University daily kansan on
Facebook.
nThe kansas relays continue from 8
a.m. to 7 p.m. at memorial stadium. The
event is free with kUid.
nValerie Hudson, a professor of politi-
cal science at Brigham young University,
will present the lecture, “The Heart of the
matter: The security of Women and the
security of states,”from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in
room 116 of the sabatini multicultural
resource center.
nThe kansas relays continue from 8
a.m. to 7 p.m. at the memorial stadium.
The event is free with a kUid.
nstudent Union Activities will host lo-
cal bandst to play for its Tunes and noon
from noon to 1 p.m. in the plaza of the
kansas Union.
International event
to raise awareness
Today marks the start of
international Awareness Week,
hosted by kU’s international
student Association.
maya Tao, public relations
chair of isA, said this week is the
group’s biggest event of the year.
“We’re helping the local
community develop a complete
understanding of the world,”
said Tao, a junior from shanghai,
china.
international students make
up almost seven percent of the
student body population, ac-
cording to resources provided by
international student and schol-
ar services. in the international
student population of campus,
110 countries are represented.
Tao said that number of
countries would allow for a
broad cultural experience for at-
tendees, especially at events like
Thursday’s World Expo.
All of the events are open to
the University and lawrence
community. Tao said the group
invited local schools to the
events as well.
“The purpose of this is to give
the community cultural aware-
ness, so that we have a better
understanding of the world.”
—Roshni Oomen
CAMPUS
Today
Flavors of the World
First presbyterian church, 2415
clinton pkwy.
6:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Helping others in natural di-
sasters (panel discussion)
Alderson Auditorium, kansas
Union
7 p.m.
Wednesday
Fashion show and Game night
Hawk’s nest, kansas Union
7 p.m.
Thursday
World Expo culture showcase
Ballroom, kansas Union
noon- 4:30 pm.
Friday
Festival of nations
Woodruf Auditorium, kansas
Union
7 p.m.
dance party
Wilde’s château 24, 2412 iowa
st.
10:30 p.m.
Sunday
soccer Tournament
shenk Field
9 a.m.
CALENDAR
nstudents respond to concealed weapons bill
— 50 comments
nEditorial: conceal and carry bill dangerous, unwanted
— 49 comments
ncosby: proceed with caution in concealed carry
consideration — 39 comments
nFolmsbee: Why can’t we all get along? — 13 comments
nEnvision candidates still on ballot pending appeal
— 6 comments
Featured
gallery
kansan.com
photos from the Jayhawks’ 2-1 victory
against saint louis in their third exhibition
match of the spring season.
Kansas Soccer vs. Saint Louis
Photos by Weston White/KANSAN
POPULAR STORIES ON KANSAN.COM
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how accessible volunteering was in
the community. The organizations
were eager to get students involved,
but not in just a typical or standard
way Atwood said.
“They don’t want us stuffing let-
ters, they want us to advocate to
bring in more volunteers and be
able to help them do these projects,
with us as the leaders,” Atwood
said.
David Wilcox, a senior from
Manhattan, also participated in the
new program and said he looked
forward to seeing it in action.
Wilcox serves as co-director of the
Center for Community Outreach
and helped with the committee that
created the new group. He said that
any time students can get more
options to volunteer it would help
them, as well as the campus and
community as a whole.
“I think the bridge makes it easier
for these options to come to stu-
dents rather than students having to
seek them out in Lawrence,” Wilcox
said.
In honor of the chancellor, the
inauguration committee also
declared a semester of service.
Students, faculty, staff, alumni,
friends and community part-
ners could log volunteer hours as
a means of noting their contribu-
tion to service. The goal was to log
100,000 hours and as of Sunday
there were 101,641.
Linda Luckey, Assistant to the
Provost and co-chair of the ser-
vice component to the chancellor’s
inauguration, said the goal of the
dedication was to pay tribute to the
new chancellor, but also honor KU’s
long-standing tradition of commu-
nity service, civic engagement and
service learning.
“We mostly wanted to celebrate
the linkages between KU the com-
munity in a tangible way,” Luckey
said.
The goal of 100,000 volunteer
hours may have ended yesterday,
but the idea of service is something
Dvorske thinks the KU Advocacy
Corps can maintain throughout the
chancellor’s time at KU.
The group plans to try to recon-
nect once again before the end of
the school year and start program-
ming projects at the beginning of
next school year.
— Edited by Becky Howlett
Environmental group
unveils events web site
In an efort to combine all the cam-
pus organizations that work with the KU
Center of Sustainability, From Blue to
Green unveiled its new web site, www.
conserveku.com, today.
“We are trying to make it the student
vehicle for the Center of Sustainabil-
ity,” said Tyler Enders, a junior from
Leawood.
The environmental group is working
to educate students and make campus
more sustainable, Enders said. The web
site will list events happening around
campus from all organizations, particu-
larly for Earth Month.
— Brenna Long
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, AprIL 12, 2010 / NEWS / 3A
Service (continued from 1A)
Ryan Waggoner/KANSAN
KeithWood, Executive Director of Big Brothers and Big Sisters in Lawrence, speaks to the newly formed KU Advocates Corps in the Burge Union
Saturday morning. The group met for the frst time Saturday to receive training and orientation and were commissioned by Chancellor Gray-Little.
CAmpUS
THIS WEEK foR
EARTH moNTH
TUESDAY
drop City Lecture by Gene Bernof-
sky
Time: 7 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Big 12 room
WEDNESDAY
Environmental Film by Gene Ber-
nofsky
Time: 7 p.m.
Where: Smith Hall, rm 108
THURSDAY
Urban planning Lecture
Time: 6 p.m.
Where: The Oread, Hancock Ball-
room
fRIDAY
Critical Earth Bike ride
Time: 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Where: Meet at Wescoe Hall
SATURDAY
Earth day parade and Celebration
Time: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: South park
Look, Listen, and Share Education
Fair
Time: 3 to 6 p.m.
Where: The Barrel House, 729 New
Hampshire St.
For more information and more
events, check out the calendar at
http://www.sustainability.ku.edu/
calendar.shtml
Leavenworth, said he donat-
ed money because it was a
good cause. Farley heard
about the counter-protest
from Facebook, and said he
knew he had to show his
support.
“When I found out we were
doing a protest of the protest,
I couldn’t help myself,” Farley
said. “It’s nice to know there
is a huge crowd to support
gays on campus.”
Spokesperson for Planned
Parenthood of Kansas & Mid-
Missouri, Sarah Gillooly, said
the organization was very
pleased with the way the
money was raised.
“I think any time hate can
be turned into donations to
a non-profit organization,
that’s a victory for our com-
munity,” Gillooly said. “We’re
just completely thrilled.”
Held said he expected
around 10 people to show
up, not the nearly 300 that
hung around to join in the
festivities. While the protest-
ers for the extremist group
were there to spread a mes-
sage of fear and hate, the
counter-protesters seemed to
be more about love and sup-
port, holding signs advocat-
ing gay rights.
Drew Wille, a freshman
from Iona, said it was great
to see the camaraderie from
KU students.
“It’s good to see people at
KU unite, whether they sup-
port being gay or not,” Wille
said.
Protester for the extremist
group, Paulette Phelps, said
she didn’t mind the counter-
protest.
“It just brings more atten-
tion to our message,” Paulette
Phelps said.
Jacob Phelps said he wasn’t
impressed with the counter-
protest, and the group gets
counter-protested at nearly
every demonstration it makes
— and sometimes when the
group can’t make a demon-
stration.
“If I would rank it on a
system of one to 10, I would
probably give it about a five,”
Jacob Phelps said.
Held said he planned on
holding another counter-
protest next year, but wants
it to be bigger with more
charities.
— Edited by Drew Anderson
pRotESt (continued from 1A)
Ryan Waggoner/KANSAN
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little addresses the crowd at the KU Advocacy Corps meeting. The
newgroup plans to formUniversity connections with local volunteer organizations.
and proposed measures to
gauge research conducted at
the University by comparing
units within KU with their
counterparts at other univer-
sities.
“If we do this, and if we
make the changes to our
academic programs that will
lead to greater student suc-
cess, then KU will expand
the horizons of its students,
of the state, and of the world,”
she said.
Secretary of Health and
Human Services Kathleen
Sebelius also spoke at the
inauguration ceremony,
discussing the challenges
universities face during eco-
nomic recessions and her
confidence in Gray-Little to
overcome these challenges.
“As challenging as this
economy is, the goals should
never be less,” said Sebelius,
the former governor of
Kansas. “In these tough times
it couldn’t be more important
to refuse to settle for less, and
I’m convinced that’s what
the new chancellor is already
doing.”
Presidents from Kansas
Board of Regents universities
were in attendance, as well
as delegates from 34 other
academic institutions and
learned societies. Members
of the audience also included
Sen. Sam Brownback, Rep.
Lynn Jenkins, Rep. Jerry
Moran, Rep. Dennis Moore,
and past KU chancellors
Archie Dykes, Del Shankel,
and Robert Hemenway.
Gov. Mark Parkinson
spoke about the importance
of the University to the state
economy and the future of
Kansas.
“Although our ances-
tors started this University
because of their commitment
to education and a hope that
Kansas would be a progres-
sive state, we’ve also learned
along the way that investment
in the University of Kansas
is great economic develop-
ment,” Parkinson said.
— Edited by Kelly Gibson
GRAy-LittLE (continued from 1A)
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Editor’s Note: The follow-
ing biographies provide
background information on
candidates in the Student
Senate elections slated for
Wednesday and Thursday.
Because the biographies
were provided by the
candidates and coalitions,
The University Daily Kansan
does not take responsibility
for the views, opinions and
information contained.
PrEsidENt
aNd VicE PrEsidENt
ross ringer
(Envision- President)*
Sophomore
Political Science and English
Prairie Village
I am running
for President
to implement
programs and
change policy
in ways that will
have profound
impacts on
current KU students and future KU
students because I believe that stu-
dent government should serve to
facilitate long term improvements
for the university. I also want to
ensure that there is more coop-
eration between the students and
administration so student interests
are adequately addressed.
*Pending appeal
devon cantwell
(Envision- Vice President)*
Sophomore
Political Science and Women’s
Studies
Topeka
I am running
for Vice-Pres-
ident in order
to establish a
cooperative edu-
cation program,
substantially
reduce the cost
of textbooks for students through
stricter regulations on publishers
on campus, and create a new air-
port shuttle that would be free for
students at the beginning and end
of each semester. I will also strive
to create a peer-to-peer diversity
training program to incorporate
into New Student Orientation and
improve relations with student
organizations on campus.
*Pending appeal
Michael Wade smith
(KUnited- President)
Junior
English and American Studies
Goodland
I am excited
to be running
for Student
Body President
because KU is
a great place
already and by
committing to
make it better I feel that we will
make a lasting impact on KU for
future Jayhawks. That is what
leadership is all about—leaving a
great place even better than you
found it.
Megan ritter
(KUnited- Vice President)
Sophomore
Philosophy and International
Studies
Overland Park
Leadership is
about passion,
which I have
an enormous
amount of for
this University.
I hope to rep-
resent student
voice and create positive changes
to better the lives of current KU stu-
dents as well as future Jayhawks.
architEctUrE
Mahsa Faghan (KUnited)
Sophomore
Overland Park
I feel that
KUnited has
the capacity
to change the
campus for
the better and
improve the KU
experience for
future students. I look forward to
representing Architecture students
with the hope of raising their voice
expressing their feelings to make
positive changes on campus.
Bailey Knott (Envision)
Junior
Wichita
I am a mem-
ber of the Delta
Gamma Soror-
ity, where I have
served as a So-
cial Chair and
Sustainability
Representa-
tive. I have also served on Student
Senate, and the University Afairs
Committee.
Godfrey riddle (KUnited)
Junior
Olathe
I greatly value
the opportunity
to represent my
fellow students
as a Senator
for the School
of Architecture,
Design, and
Planning with KUnited because
I want to see that KU recognizes
and appropriately addresses all
students’ needs.
BUsiNEss
andrew campbell
(Envision)
Junior
Accounting
Overland Park
I am running
for senator
for the School
of Business
because he
supports Envi-
sion’s “Work for
Credit” initia-
tive. This cooperative education
program is a structured method of
combining classroom-based edu-
cation with practical work experi-
ence and take on the importance
in helping college students with the
school-to-work transition, service
learning, and experiential learning
initiatives.
david cohen (KUnited)
Junior
Accounting and Information
Systems
Leawood
KUnited
embodies the
passion that all
students have
for The Univer-
sity of Kansas
and gaining a
seat on student
senate will give me the opportunity
to express that voice. I look forward
to representing Business students
in an efort to lower textbook costs,
and make other benefcial changes
on this campus.

Meg dysart (KUnited)
Junior
Marketing
Wichita
I am so excit-
ed to be a part
of KUnited this
year and have
the opportunity
to improve the
student experi-
ence with all of
our innovative platform ideas. I look
forward to running as the business
school candidate and if elected,
promise to positively represent the
B-school in any future decisions.
cameron Walker (Envision)
Junior
Accounting
Derby
I am involved
in Beta Alpha
Psi Account-
ing Fraternity
(Gold Status
Member), and
am a Jubilee
Café Volunteer
and youth bas-
ketball coach. I am running for stu-
dent senate with Envision because
I would like to become more active
in helping KU become an even bet-
ter place to get an education.
EdUcatioN
chris Friedl-Buckland
(KUnited)
Junior
Topeka
I have not
been active
in campus
activities before,
so I would like to
thank KUnited
for giving me
the opportunity
to become ac-
tive in this great university. I hope
to be able to do as much as I can to
help out the School of Education.
BLUE LOVE!

alex Muninger (KUnited)
Junior
Salina
I am cur-
rently a member
of the Finance
Committee as
well as a mem-
ber of several
Senate boards
and committees
and am a member of the Board of
Class Ofcers. I want to be a part
of Student Senate to meet great
people, bring fun additions to
campus, and continue the strong
tradition that KU holds.
ENGiNEEriNG
Gabe Bliss (KUnited)
Freshman
Olathe
I feel strongly
that KUnited
has the ideas
and ability to
make improve-
ments that wil
make KU the
campus we
want it to be. I look forward to run-
ning with KUnited as a Engineering
candidate and working towards
better representation of Engineer-
ing groups on campus and making
KU an even better campus.
Michael humphrey
(Envision)
Senior
Lee’s Summit, Mo.
I have years
of frsthand
knowledge and
experience of
the efects of
senate policies
on students. I
wish, in my fnal
year, to return
the knowledge I have gained in a
way that will do the most good.
Megan Ketchum (KUnited)
Sophomore
Ottawa
I am an active
member of
Engineering
Student Council
serving as EXPO
Co-Chair and I
also give tours
as a KU Student
Ambassador. As a representa-
tive, I would like to help further
the advancement of platforms
that would improve the lives and
academic careers of the students in
the School of Engineering.
Nancy Xiao Liang (Envision)
Junior
Luoyang, China
Since
coming to
KU, I have
been very
involved with
international
awareness
and environ-
mental issues.
I also looking forward to continu-
ing working with engineering
organizations to achieve success in
making more contributions for KU.
chris Martin (Envision)
Senior
Lawrence
I would like
to continue
to serve my
constituents
and foster
the relation-
ships I have
developed
with the groups I represent. I feel
that Envision embodies the spirit
of the School of Engineering with
their emphasis on the progression
toward a more sustainable cam-
pus and would like to participate in
that venture.
abby rimel (KUnited)
Junior
Aurora, Colo.
I am cur-
rently an
engineering
ambassa-
dor and Vice
President of
Engineer-
ing Student
Council. I am running to support
the great leadership of KUnited
and to serve as a representative of
the wonderful student groups and
projects in the School of Engineer-
ing.
MUsic
Lindsay ryan (Envision)
Sophomore
Overland Park
I am a
member of the
Music Therapy
Association,
and KU Afri-
can Drum En-
semble. In my
free time, I enjoy awesome food,
dancing, and belting out songs.
JoUrNaLisM
Whitlee douthitt (KUnited)
Sophomore
Oak Grove, Mo.
I’m excited
to be running
with KUnited
as a Journal-
ism and Mass
Communica-
tions School
candidate. I
am ready to
see more positive and productive
changes to the already wonderful
school that will beneft not only
the current students, but for many
more students to come.
Jay trump (KUnited)
Junior
Tulsa, Okla.
The one
goal I have
for Student
Senate is to
create a new
technology
system for the
Rec to allow
students entry
without a student ID (in progress).
I am excited for the opportunity to
represent the School of Journalism
in Student Senate.
LaW
adam orosco (KUnited)
San Francisco,
Today, I join
the great
KUnited team
at the frontier
of imagination
and innova-
tion. On behalf
of KUnited,
I pledge to help build a campus
where the demands and needs can
be realized in the life of the current
students. KUnited has the power to
shape the school that the students
want.
Nathan Behncke (Envision)
Fennimore,
Wis.
I am a
member of the
KU Student Law
Ambassadors,
Trafc Court,
Asian Law
Students As-
sociation. I am running for Student
Senate and with Envision because I
would like to see a greater involve-
ment of the law school with the rest
of campus.
FrEshMaN/
soPhoMorE coLLEGE
oF LiBEraL arts aNd
sciENcEs
Mackenzie abernathy
(KUnited)
Sophomore
Exercise Science
Plano, Texas
I am a strong
Christian and
live my life
for the glory
of the Lord. I
enjoy KUnited
because of the
drive of my
coalition and the feasibility of our
platforms, which were created by
and for KU students.

Myles Barbula (Envision)
Sophomore
Political Science
Colorado
Springs, Colo.
I am a Former
Lewis/Templin
Hall govern-
ment member,
Association
of University
Residence Halls
member, and I participate in KU
Veterans Day Run. After initially
getting involved with Student Sen-
ate last year, I realized that it was
evident that the aims and goals of
the Envision coalition align best
with the student body.
hannah Bolton (KUnited)
Freshman
Biology
St. Libory, Neb.
I am running
for a seat in Stu-
dent Senate to
help establish
a more well-
rounded cam-
pus. KUnited
will provide
eforts necessary for these inputs by
creating online teacher evaluations
to enhancing campus safety.
casey Briner (KUnited)
Sophomore
Journalism
Flower Mound,
Texas
I feel that
KUnited has the
ability to make
KU a better
place for future
students. I look
forward to
running with KUnited as a Fresh-
man/Sophore CLAS candidate and
working for positive changes on
campus!
Jeni Burrows (Envision)
Freshman
Human Biology and Journalism
Belle Plaine
I am an
Assistant Coor-
dinator for SUA,
an Intramural
Chair for Kappa
Alpha Theta,
an Orientation
Assistant, and
a group leader for Boys and Girls
Club. As an active student at KU, I
want to make sure student dollars
are spent the right way — to bet-
ter the overall KU experience and
the place we call home. I feel that
Envision is dedicated to these issues
and passionate about following
through with positive changes.
Lexie clark (Envision)
Freshman
Political Science
Fort Collins,
Colo.
I am a
Student
Advisory Board
Member at the
Dole Institute
of Politics, a
member of the
KU Equestrian Team, a planning
committee member for Sexual
Assault Awareness Month, and a
participant in KU Dance Marathon.
I’m running for senate because I
feel that it is important to be active
in the KU community and senate
is an opportunity to be part of the
discussions that lead to the deci-
sions that impact myself and the
school community.
Josh dean (Envision)
Freshman
Political Science and Economics
Overland Park
I am involved
in Oxfam, Am-
nesty Interna-
tional, Concert
Choir, and serve
on Student
Senate Finance
Committee as
an Associate Senator. I afrm that
Student Senate is the voice of the
student body, which means who
speaks for us matters. Envision will
provide a clear and efective voice
to solve the very real problems we
have on campus, and I would like
to be a part of it.
sean Elliot (Envision)
Sophomore
Political Science
Overland Park
I am the
President
of Amnesty
International
at KU. I enjoy a
good round of
Mario Kart 64,
even though I
never win.
Noopur Goel (Envision)
Freshman
Human Biology and Journalism
Overland Park
I am a
freshman
representative
to the South
Asian Student
Association, a
Multicultural
Educational
Fund Board Member, Oliver Hall
Government Vice-President, a
research volunteer in Dr. Jennifer
Gleason’s lab, and I am a dancer at
Narathan Academy of Dance. As a
student at KU I think it is important
to have some say in how University
funds are used.
Zack Korte (KUnited)
Freshman
Sports Management
Lawrence
I believe
that KUnited
has the desire
and means to
change KU, its
students, and
4A / NEWs / MONDAy, APrIL 12, 2010 / thE UNiVErsitY daiLY KaNsaN / KANSAN.COM
ringer
Faghan
Walker
Liang
Orosco Burrows
Clark
Dean
Elliot
Goel
Korte
Behncke
Abernathy
Barbula
Bolton
Briner
Martin
rimel
Douthitt
Trump
Friedl-Buckland
Muninger
Bliss
Humphrey
Ketchum
Knott
riddle
Campbell
Cohen
Dysart
Cantwell
Smith
ritter
Student Senate candidate biographies
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, April 12, 2010 / NEWS / 5A
the campus in a positive direction
and I am honored to be a part of
it. I look forward to running for
KUnited as the Freshman/Sopho-
more CLAS candidate and working
to bring in Blockbuster kiosks
around campus and our other posi-
tive platforms.
Christine Lee (KUnited)
Freshman
Microbiology
Omaha, Neb.
I am
confdent and
excited about
the changes
and improve-
ments that the
KUnited coali-
tion has to ofer
the KU student body, Lawrence,
and the entire state of Kansas. I
would appreciate your support
to continue building on a strong
tradition!
Rob Lohse (KUnited)
Freshman
Finance
Topeka
I feel that this
year more than
ever KUnited
has the poten-
tial to help the
University of
Kansas take the
right steps in
improving the college experience
for future students. I’m looking
forward to running with KUnited
as a Freshman/Sophomore CLAS
candidate and doing my best to
represent the opinions of my peers.
Shenji Pan (Envision)
Freshman
Undecided
Changshu,
China
I am current-
ly an Associate
Senator on the
Multicultural
Afairs Com-
mittee. I love
being actively
involved on campus and attend as
many on campus events as pos-
sible- come say hi!
Jenny Pisklo (KUnited)
Freshman
Tulsa, Okla.
Business
I am very
excited about
the opportunity
to represent the
freshmen and
sophomores in
the College of
Liberal Arts and
Sciences at KU. I feel I can make a
positive diference on campus, in
the community and for Student
Senate.
Brad Rector (KUnited)
Sophomore
English Education
Shawnee
I believe that
KUnited has
the ability to
change KU for
the better for
current and
future students.
I am looking
forward to running with KUnited
as a Freshman/Sophomore CLAS
candidate and working to lower
the cost of textbooks to make KU
more afordable for everyone, and
to make other positive changes on
campus.
Lauryn Reinhart (KUnited)
Freshman
Architecture
Kansas City, Mo.
I am running
for student
senate with
KUnited be-
cause there are
a lot of positive
people who
work hard to
bring positive
change to KU. I am excited to be
running with KUnited as a Fresh-
man/Sophomore CLAS candidate
and working to make KU a sustain-
able campus!
Alex Rippberger (KUnited)
Freshman
Biology
Olathe
If we don’t
start preparing
the campus
today, then
it may be too
late to stave of
disaster. I am
running with
KUnited as a Freshman/Sopho-
more CLAS candidate, and I hope
that I have your support against
the undead hordes.
Brandon Rogers (KUnited)
Freshman
English
dallas
I am actively
involved with
Phi Delta Theta
Fraternity, the
Freshman Lead-
ership Council,
Student Union
Activities, and
the Student Alumni Leadership
Board, and am an Interfraternity
Council Appointed Ofcer. My
unique and well-balanced perspec-
tive provides me with a great
understanding of the diverse wants
and needs of the student body, al-
lowing me to better serve the Fresh-
man/Sophomore constituency.
Sirus Saeedipour (Envision)
Sophomore
Microbiology
Overland park
I am the Vice
President of the
KU Persian Stu-
dent Associa-
tion, a member
of the KU
Debate Team,
and a member
of the Senate Student Rights Com-
mittee. I am running because I feel
like I can make a positive diference
on campus and make the voices of
students heard.
Javon Shackelford (KUnited)
Freshman
Finance and French
Salina
I am ex-
tremely excited
to have the
opportunity to
serve as a Stu-
dent Senator
for my second
year. If elected I
promise to continue the legacy and
really take this University to the
next level.
Sadie Simon (Envision)
Sophomore
Sociology
Minneapolis
I currently
participate in
Dance Mara-
thon as part
of the facilities
and operations
committee and
I am involved
with CREATE and Alternative
Breaks. I am running for Student
Senate with Envision because she
shares the commitment of Envision
for recycling, environmental stew-
ardship, safety, and fscal responsi-
bility and is committed to ensuring
that our student funds are spent
in ways that refect our values and
needs.
Rebecca Stout (Envision)
Freshman
psychology
Chapman
I currently
serve as an As-
sociate Senator
for Rights Com-
mittee and a
Student Ambas-
sador. Envision
is a dedicated,
hardworking, and respectable
group of Students striving to make
you the ultimate place to get a
quality education and I would like
this position so I can do my part in
making this happen!
Abbie Tish (Envision)
Junior
American Studies
Minneapolis
While seek-
ing to get more
involved at KU, I
came across the
opportunity to
sit in on a few
Envision meet-
ings. Learn-
ing more about student senate,
especially Envision allow me to feel
strongly about the ideas presented
on the platform and I believe I
can make a great contribution to
student senate with dedication,
passion and most of all action!
Kevin Wright (Envision)
Sophomore
English and American Studies
Olathe
I am the
treasurer for
Hashinger Hall,
an Assistant
Debate Coach
for St. Thomas
Aquinas, and
an intern for
Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins. I
am running to inspire fear in my
student constituents by creating an
environment of random, irrational
terror.
Lizzy Watson (KUnited)
Freshman
Exercise Science
Colleyville,
Texas
I think Stu-
dent Senate is
a great way to
make a positive
impact on the
KU campus
and student
body. I am running as a Freshman/
Sophomore CLAS candidate with
KUnited and am looking forward to
getting more involved on campus
here at KU.

Sarah Weaver (KUnited)
Sophomore
Journalism
Overland park
I’m excited
about running
as Freshman/
Sophomore
CLAS candi-
date. I am run-
ning because
I love KU and
want to make it an even better
place for all!
JUNIoR/SENIoR
CoLLEgE of LIBERAL
ARTS AND SCIENCES
Amanda Allison (Envision)
Junior
History
prairie Village
As a transfer
student from
Syracuse
University, I
have had the
privilege of
seeing how
two completely
diferent universities are run—
what works and what needs to
be changed. Envision exemplifes
transparency and highlights the
true impact students could have
not only on campus, but also in the
world in terms of conservation and
responsible leadership.
Jessica Brooks (Envision)
Senior
Environmental Studies
pleasanton
I am involved
with Stu-
dent Senate,
University
Senate, hold
an internship
at the Kansas
State Capitol,
founded Corporate Accountability
International at KU, and participate
in Alternative Spring Breaks, and
have started as a Boys and Girls
club volunteer. I believe Student
Senate is the organization that will
best allow me to make a diference
at KU, and Envision has goals that
will help the lives of KU students
today and throughout their future
endeavors.
Katy Clagett (KUnited)
Junior
Accounting and Spanish
Colorado
Springs, Colo.
I have been
involved in
Student Senate
in the past and
look forward
to getting
involved once
more to try and help make Student
Senate an entity that truly afects
KU students in a positive manner.
I am running with KUnited as a
Junior/Senior CLAS candidate in
order to accomplish this goal.

Kelly Cosby (KUnited)
Junior
political Science
Overland park
I’m running
for Student
Senate as a
junior/senior
CLAS candidate
because I want
to represent
the interests
of ALL students who have ideas or
concerns. I am excited to run with
KUnited because this coalition has
developed its platforms directly
from student input.
Loren Cressler (KUnited)
Senior
English and Classics
Hoxie
I am running
as a candidate
for Junior/Se-
nior CLAS and
believe KUnit-
ed’s ambitious
list of platforms
will gener-
ate legit results. I am especially
interested in helping KUnited work
with the Ofce of Study Abroad to
increase opportunities and funding
for our already stellar study abroad
program.
Aaron Dollinger (KUnited)
Junior
political Science and Communica-
tions
leawood
Through
my work
with KUnited
I have loved
interacting with
students and
hearing diverse
opinions on
what will better KU. As a Jr/Sr CLAS
senator, I am looking forward to
bringing students more opportuni-
ties to study abroad and explore
the world through frst hand experi-
ence.
Alex Earles (KUnited)
Junior
political Science and Communica-
tions
Salina
I look
forward to
running with
KUnited as
a Junior/Se-
nior CLAS can-
didate. KUnited
can build on the
strong traditions at KU and work
with faculty and students to ensure
KU is competitive and great place
to call home.
Brian Jay gilmore (Envision)
Junior
political Science and psychology
Topeka
I have been
in Senate for
one year and
am committed
to ethics reform,
student group
promotion, and
general awe-
someness.
Julia Johnson (KUnited)
Junior
Cell Biology
leawood
Hello stu-
dents! I have
contributed to
the advance-
ment of the
undergradu-
ate biology
department
with my involvement in the Biology
Majors Advisory Committee, and
would like to expand my eforts to
include the concerns and well-be-
ing of all KU students by represent-
ing the platforms of KUnited in
student senate.
Patrick Kennedy (Envision)
Junior
Spanish and Economics
leawood
I am cur-
rently involved
with the Uni-
versity’s debate
team. I work
teaching high-
school-age kids
why public speech is not the end of
the world, and help them knock out
that annoying COMS 130 require-
ment before college. I am doin’ it
for Sherron!
Laura Kozak (Envision)
Junior
Art History and African- American
Studies
Kansas City, Mo.
I am the
Co-President
of CSW, a
volunteer with
the Willow
Domestic
Violence
Center, and
an accom-
plished Pokemon master. I want to
continue the tradition of giving KU
Women’s issues a voice in Senate
and I frmly believe in the platform
Envision is running on.
Meredith Pavicic (Envision)
Junior
Women, Gender and Sexuality
Studies
leawood
I am run-
ning to pro-
mote women’s
issues on
campus, make
cool logos,
and make
Student Sen-
ate a voice for
all students. I am also secretly a
superwoman, but try not to tell
everyone that.
Mike Perry (KUnited)
Junior
Chemistry and Finance
prairie Village
I know
that KUnited
has what it
takes to make
a benefcial
impact in the
lives of the
students today
and for the future. I am running
with KUnited as a Junior/Senior
CLAS candidate, and I am looking
forward to the elections and the
opportunity to serve you!
Monica Saha (KUnited)
Junior
Neurobiology
Overland park
I am excited
to run with
KUnited
because of their
dedication
to multicul-
turalism and
education. I am
specifcally looking forward to ex-
pand Study Abroad to more places
than we already do.
Rachel Schultz (KUnited)
Junior
English and Journalism
Hays
I was elected last year for Stu-
dent Senate as a Freshman/Sopho-
more CLAS
Senator and am
now running as
a Junior/Senior
CLAS Candi-
date. KUnited
is a coalition
of strong and
intelligent people wanting to
better the University of Kansas for
all students and I look forward to
representing the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences in an efort to do
just that.
Jon Sabillon (Envision)
Senior
Communication Studies
lawrence
Student
Senate is all
about creating
opportunities
and facilitating
constructive
change for
everyone at
the University.
Envision has benefcial, practical,
and realistic platforms that address
real issues and that will impact the
University in a positive way and I
am excited to be a part of Envision
and looks forward to the possibility
of making KU a better place.
Sameer Sharma (Envision)
Senior
History
Overland park
I am a
member of
SASA, the Social
Chair ISA, a Jr/
Sr CLAS senator
and served as a
sub-committee
member of the
Alcohol Task
Force. I am committed to making
sure that we promote multicul-
turalism and diversity at KU as
good ideas come from all places
and innovation is predicated on
good ideas. And I have no life on
Wednesdays so it all works out.
Sarah Shier (KUnited)
Junior
political Science and History
Salina
I have previ-
ously served in
Student Senate
as a Freshman
Senator and
Freshman/
Sophomore
CLAS Senator,
and currently serve as vice-chair
of the Student Rights Committee
and a member of the Legal Services
for Students Advisory Board. I feel
that KUnited’s platform compre-
hensively addresses the needs of KU
students and I look forward to help
making our campus a better place!
Kyle Turbitt
Junior
Finance
Overland park
I feel that
KUnited has the
potential to bet-
ter the campus
as well as make
the experience
for KU’s past,
current, and
future students
better. I look forward to running
with KUnited as a Junior/Senior
CLAS candidate, and helping the
university have a positive afect on
its students and alumni.
Rebecca Tolman
Junior
religious Studies
Chicago
I’m a Former Senator who took
of a Year to help create the Alpha
Kappa Chapter Of Omega Phi Al-
pha National Service Sorority here
at KU. I’m an innovator who wishes
to see if I can buck the system and
prove that you don’t need coalition
politics to have an elected voice in
Senate.
lee
rippberger
Tish
Clagett
Johnson
Kozak
pavicic
perry
Schultz
Sabillon
Sharma
Shier
Turbitt
Saha
Cosby
Cressler
dollinger
Earles
Gilmore
Wright
Watson
Weaver
Allison
Brooks
rogers
Saeedipour
Shackelford
Simon
Stout
lohse
pan
pisklo
rector
reinhart
see SENATE on page 6a
6A / NEWS / mondAy, April 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kAnsAn.com
Kristina Villardi
Junior
communications
palos Verdes, calif.
I like being a
part of KUnited
because I feel
that everyone
involved really
cares about im-
proving the KU
experience for
every student.
I am excited to be running with
KUnited as a Jr/Sr CLAS candidate
and look forward to making our
platforms a reality!
Aubrey Whippo
Junior
communications
Garden city
I found it
very hard to
adjust here at
KU while not
being involved
and busy. With
KUnited I would
like to give back to my school and
be involved, working to make a
diference with the great platforms
of KUnited!
Forrest Woods
Junior
Geology and Geography
Wichita
I am Co-
President of
Viva el Bosque
so I’m all about
them trees. I’ve
fought alot
of Pokemon
battles, and if
there is one thing I can say about
KUnited it would be that they are
Super efective! My Pikachu votes
KUnited, what about yours?
GRADUATE STUDIES
Bruce L. Blair (Envision)
political science
lawrence
I am the cur-
rent Graduate
and Profession-
al Association
Executive Direc-
tor, a board
member of the
Emily Taylor
Women’s Resource Center, Chair of
the Graduate Afairs Committee, a
member of the Graduate Execu-
tive Council, and a member of the
Student Executive Committee for
Student Senate. Some of the issues
that I currently and will continue
to work on are the ten-semester
policy for GTA/GRA funding, the
continuing enrollment policy, and
increasing the voice of graduate
students on this campus.
Sharla Cruse (Envision)
Educational psychology and
research (Epr)
post, Texas
I am inter-
ested in serving
in a second
term of Student
Senate in order
to promote
diversity issues
and expand representation.
SCHooL oF
ARCHITECTURE
SENAToR:
Derek Glasgow (Envision)
political science
Winfeld
I am a member of the Political
Science Graduate Students As-
sociation and Environs. I believe
graduate students are underrep-
resented in
Student Senate
and believe
that Envision
will work tooth
and nail to
make graduate
students’ voices
heard.
Stephanie Kirk (Envision)
Education
lawrence
I am involved
with the School
of Education
Student Organi-
zation and am
a Collegiate
Veterans Asso-
ciation Ofcer.
Kellee J. Kirkpatrick
(Envision)
political science
Ellinwood
I am cur-
rently a Gradu-
ate Student
Senator, on the
Student Execu-
tive Commit-
tee, University
Senate, Senate
Executive Com-
mittee, Graduate Executive Com-
mittee, and Graduate and Profes-
sional Afairs Committee, and am
involved with the Political Science
Graduate Association (President,
Vice President, Social Chair),
Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society
(Political Science - President, Vice
President), Golden Key National
Honor Society, and Kappa Tau
Alpha National Honor Society. As
a graduate senator, I have worked
to have graduate student inter-
ests better represented on the KU
campus and believe that Envision
has shown a strong and consistent
commitment to graduate student
issues, and am impressed with their
thoughtful platform issues at both
the graduate and undergraduate
level.
A. Bryce Myers (Envision)
political science
overland park
I am a
member of
the Political
Science Gradu-
ate Student
Association and
participates in
AIDS charities
and Cystic Fibrosis charities. I am
running because I feels that Gradu-
ate students are, plainly stated,
underrepresented and Envision has
the ONLY platform that will help
ALL students—graduate students
included.
Mark Pacey (Envision)
mechanical Engineering
manhattan
I am the chair
of the Student
Senate Finance
Committee,
the lottery
coordinator
for basketball
camping, a department repre-
sentative for Engineering Student
Council, a member of KU Curling
Club, and show that I have a heart
by volunteering at the Lawrence
Humane Society. I am running to
represent grad student needs to
the student senate and university
governance and ensure responsible
assessment and use of student fees.
Jake Rapp (Envision)
ph.d. student
spanish and portuguese
lawrence
I am currently the President of
the Graduate Students of Span-
ish and Portuguese, a member of
the Graduate Executive Commit-
tee (GradEx), and a volunteer at
the Lawrence Open Shelter and
Habitat for Humanity. The voices
and interests
of graduate
students must
participate in
University-wide
decisions and
debates, and
as a graduate
student senator,I will enthusiasti-
cally and actively represent those
voices.
James W. Stoutenborough
(Envision)
political science
louisburg
I am
currently a
Graduate Sena-
tor, a gradu-
ate student
representative
for University
Senate, and a
member of
the Political Science Graduate
Association, Pi Sigma Alpha, and
Golden Key International Honor
Societies. I am running for Student
Senate because I feel that graduate
students are underrepresented, and
I believe I can do a good job voicing
the concerns of this group
Brad Thorson (KUnited)
Economics
milwaukee
I am enter-
ing my senior
year with the
football team
and am a
member of sev-
eral leadership
groups within KU Athletics. KUnited
is the right coalition to continue
the excellent student experience at
KU and bring insightful solutions
to increasingly complex problems
facing the university.
Kristina Youngblood
(Envision)
political science
college station, Texas
I currently
serve as the
Political Science
Graduate As-
sociation Sec-
retary. I believe
that graduate
student needs
and issues have
been neglected by the administra-
tion and student senate and that
Envision is actively working with
graduate students to address their
concerns and promote graduate
student issues throughout student
senate
NoN-TRADITIoNAL
Aaron Harris (KUnited)
Junior
Journalism and History
kansas city, kan.
I’m a
25-year-old
Marine Corps
veteran. I’m
running for the
Non-Traditional
seat because
I believe that
non-trads are
sometimes overlooked because of
their unique situations. I would like
to help change that.
Kamran Hameed (Envision)
Junior
management and leadership and
marketing
islamabad, pakistan
I believe
non-traditional
students
have as much
responsibility
towards mak-
ing decisions
regarding KU’s
future as much
as traditional students, however, I
have noticed that non-traditional
students are one of the lowest
represented groups at KU. By rep-
resenting non-traditional students
at KU senate, I feel that it would not
only fulfll my civic obligation, but
also help non-traditional students
from a better place.
oFF CAMPUS
Julia Barnard (KUnited)
sophomore
History
lawrence
I am an
active member
of Sigma Delta
Tau, KU Hillel,
and am a
Service Learn-
ing Student
Ambassador.
I am currently
working on co-coordinating KU
Alternative Summer Breaks. I look
forward to running with KUnited
and working for positive changes
on campus!

Tyler Enders (Envision)
Junior
Finance
leawood
Next year, I
look forward
to continuing
to promote
sustainability
by reevaluat-
ing the Student
Environmental
Advisory Board and by looking into
permanent Student Environmental
positions within Senate. I am run-
ning with Envision for the second
year due to their devotion to these
issues and their ability to see them
through to fruition.
Emily Fike (KUnited)
sophomore
French
Enid, okla.
I am an
active member
of Kappa Delta
sorority, KU
Tennis Club,
and I am cur-
rently a student
senator. What I love most about
student senate and KUnited is they
have the students interests at heart
and they have the power to efect
change.
Ian McGonigle (KUnited)
sophomore
Finance and Accounting
Wichita
I have served
on several
boards and
committees
during my
two years of
experience as a
student senator
and look forward to running with
KUnited this year to continue bring-
ing positive change to students at
KU.
Sida Niu (Envision)
sophomore
chemical Engineering
overland park
I am involved
in the Self
Engineering
Leadership
Fellowship, Uni-
versity Scholars,
Into the Streets
Week Co-
Coordinator, an Honors Ambas-
sador, Lambda Sigma Sophomore
Honors Society, Beta Theta Pi
Fraternity, am a Greek Endeavor
Facilitator, participate in the Center
for Community Outreach, and
a Lawrence Memorial Hospital
Volunteer. I want to have a say in
where student fees are going every
semester and I feel that Envision
ofers exciting new platforms an-
chored by well-equipped executive
candidates.
Matt Rissien (Envision)
senior
religious studies
overland park
While being
on Senate this
past year, I was
able to make
a lot of friends
while afect-
ing our school
as well. I have
a YouTube video explaining his
senate aspirations. YouTube search:
Matt Rissien Senate
Matt Vance (KUnited)
Junior
political science
overland park
I am cur-
rently a Junior/
Senior Senator
and am run-
ning for an
Of-Campus
senator posi-
tion for the next
year. I feel that Student Senate has
the capacity to change the campus
for the better and would like to im-
prove upon the school that I enjoy
so much.
Kris Velasco (Envision)
Freshman
political science and communica-
tions
Wamego
I am the
Social Issues
Coordinator
for Student
Union Activities,
Multicultural
Education Fund
Board Vice
Chair, a mem-
ber of Navigators, National Society
of Collegiate Scholars, and an
Orientation Assistant. I am running
with Envision because a) we actu-
ally get things done b) we know
how to represent the student body
and c) Envision is defnitely the best
looking coalition.
Megan Waters (Envision)
sophomore
management and leadership and
supply chain management
overland park
I am the Vice
President of
Finance and
Accounts Pay-
able for Pi Beta
Phi, the social
chair for Alpha
Kappa Psi Busi-
ness Fraternity,
and volunteer with the Ali Kemp
Foundation, and Ovarian Cancer
Awareness. I think Student Senate
is a great way to make a positive
impact on campus and meet a
great group of people.
Ben Wilinsky (KUnited)
sophomore
Journalism and spanish
overland park
My funda-
mental goal in
Student Senate
and KUnited,
other than
funding numer-
ous student
groups, has
been lessening partisan aspects
of Student Senate by encouraging
meaningful legislation and com-
munity outreach. A vote for Ben
Wilinsky is a vote for America.
PHARMACY
Katie Blackbourn (KUnited)
senior
Girard
I am an
active member
of Kappa Psi
Pharmaceuti-
cal Fraternity,
Academy of
Student Pharmacists, and Alpha
Chi Omega Sorority. I look forward
to running with KUnited as a Phar-
macy Student candidate and work-
ing to better our already amazing
University!

Emily Littrell (KUnited)
senior
lee’s summit,
mo.
I am a mem-
ber of Alpha Chi
Omega soror-
ity, Kappa Psi
Pharmaceutical
Fraternity, and
the Recreation
Center Advisory Board. I hope to
represent the School of Pharmacy
this upcoming year because I feel
that Student Senate plays a vital
role in shaping the experience of
every KU student.
RESIDENTIAL
Mathew Shepard (KUnited)
Junior
Economics and Environmental
studies
norton
As a student
who has lived
on campus for
three years, I
have witnessed
the powerful
contributions
that on-campus
students can make to the Univer-
sity, and I hope to make sure their
voice is heard in Senate.
Tanya Martinez (Envision)
Freshman
Applied Behavioral sciences
Wichita
I am the His-
panic American
Leadership
Organization
Senator, and
am involved
in a plethora
of things
including Chabad, Hillel, Lewis and
Templin Hall Government, Polar
Plunge, Relay For Life, Kansas Hu-
mane Society. I am the Lewis and
Templin Academic Resource Center
Committee President and I judge at
local debate and forensics tourna-
ments. I am running because I love
making a diference, and feel that
representing the students would
make policies better.
SoCIAL WELFARE
Matthew Blankers (KUnited)
senior
los Angeles,
calif.
I currently
represent the
School of Social
Welfare in
Student Senate
and serve as a
student repre-
sentative to the Bachelor of Social
Welfare Program Committee. I am
very excited about all of KUnited’s
ideas to improve KU, and I look
forward to serving as a School of
Social Welfare senator again next
year.
Rachel Gadd-Nelson
(KUnited)
Junior
kansas city,
kan.
I am also
currently the
Educational
Outreach
Coordinator for
Queers & Allies
and a board
member for EQUAL, Kansas City’s
queer youth activist network. I’m
really excited to be working with
KUnited to make sure KU is an
accessible and productive environ-
ment for everyone!
Glasgow
kirk
myers
kirkpatrick
rapp
rissien
littrell
shepard
martinez
Blankers
Gadd-nelson
Vance
Velasco
Waters
Wilinsky
Barnard
Enders
mcGonigle
niu
stoutenbourough
youngblood
Harris
Hameed
Villardi
Woods
Blair
SENATE
(continued from 5A)
Blackbourn
Unavailable: sabrina Ahmed (Envision) Journalism
John Hart (Envision) Freshman/sophomore
college of liberal Arts and sciences
Biographies compiled by Annie Vangsnes and edited by Ashley Montgomery.
Voting begins Wednesday and continues
through Thursday at students.ku.edu
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, April 12, 2010 / NEWS / 7A
DAVID CRARY
Associated press
NEW YORK — Logistical chal-
lenges and potentially bitter dis-
putes lie ahead as passionate advo-
cates of adoption press for changes
that might enable thousands of
Haitian children affected by the
earthquake to be placed in U.S.
homes.
The obstacles are daunting,
starting with a need to register
Haiti’s dislocated children. If done
right, this would enable authorities
to distinguish between children
who might be good candidates for
adoption and those with surviving
relatives willing to care for them.
There also will be efforts to
overhaul Haiti’s troubled child
protection system, update its
adoption laws and boost support
for family reunification programs
in Haiti.
But even before those goals are
pursued, there are sharp divisions
over how vigorously and quickly to
seek an expansion of adoptions.
A prominent leader of the cam-
paign to bring more orphans to
American homes is Sen. Mary
Landrieu (D-La.) who believes
some of the major aid organiza-
tions active in Haiti — including
UNICEF — are not sufficiently
supportive of international adop-
tion.
“Either UNICEF is going to
change or have a very difficult
time getting support from the U.S.
Congress,” Landrieu said in a tele-
phone interview.
Landrieu and a few other mem-
bers of Congress visited Haiti last
week, meeting with top Haitian
officials to discuss the plight of the
devastated nation’s orphans.
Since the Jan. 12 earthquake,
about 1,000 Haitian children have
been brought to U.S. families who
had filed adoption applications
before the quake. That pool of
children in Haiti is dwindling, and
adoption advocates — including
many religious-
ly affiliated
agencies — are
now ratcheting
up their efforts
to get a new,
larger stream
of adoptions in
the works.
“There is
great support
in the United
States to begin
to open up
opportunities
for adoption as soon as possible,”
Landrieu said. “There are thou-
sands of children who don’t have
parents or even extended families
to be reunified with.”
UNICEF says a time may come
when large-scale foreign adoptions
would be appropriate — notably
for older children and those with
disabilities. But the U.N. agency
and like-minded groups are ask-
ing for patience, saying the next
priorities should be to register
vulnerable children and try to
improve conditions for them and
their families in Haiti.
“It’s complicated,” said Susan
Bissell, UNICEF’s chief of child
protection. “We’ve got to get a
registration system in place. Once
we have that, we want families
for children — and that includes
adoption. We are not against
intercountry adoption, but we are
against exploitation.”
Bissell said she was frustrated
by the hostility toward UNICEF
that is commonly expressed by
leading supporters of international
adoption in the United States.
“I find myself saddened by it,
but it’s not
going to take
the wind out of
our sails,” she
said.
The chief
operating offi-
cer for Save
the Children,
which is deep-
ly engaged in
helping Haitian
orphans, said
the tensions
and disputes
were likely to revolve around tim-
ing — with some groups seeking
to resume large-scale adoptions
much more quickly than other
groups.
“It’s hard to know how big the
problem is without taking the time
to go through this registration
process, and I know for many it’s
an excruciating process,” Carolyn
Miles said.
“There are no records,” she
added. “To be sure that a child is
an orphan, that will be difficult —
going back to their villages, trying
to find people who know their
families.”
The challenge of verifying chil-
dren’s statuses was illustrated in
the weeks after the quake, when
members of an Idaho church group
were arrested for trying to take
children they falsely claimed were
parentless out of Haiti without
government approval. The group’s
leader remains in custody, facing a
possible trial for kidnapping.
The church members have said
they only wished to rescue desper-
ate children from suffering.
An estimated 40 percent of
Haiti’s pre-
quake popula-
tion was under
14, includ-
ing about
50,000 living
in orphanages
and more than
200,000 others
not living with
their parents.
It’s been com-
monplace for
poor parents to
abandon their
children, and some are taken in by
wealthier families who use them
as household labor.
Hundreds of thousands of
Haitian children lack birth certifi-
cates or other identification, which
could complicate adoption efforts.
The Organization of American
States is proposing a plan to pro-
vide all Haitian minors with ID
cards, but estimates this wouldn’t
be completed until 2013.
Landrieu hopes significant
headway on registration can be
made much faster than that — but
says the many groups working on
the task need to coordinate better.
Looking ahead, she hopes for
a sizable number of new foreign
adoptions by the end of this year
— compared with just a handful
at present now that the backlog of
pre-quake applications has been
largely dealt with.
In recent years, about 300
Haitian children annually were
adopted by Americans. Landrieu
believes that number could rise
to several thousand a year in the
future.
“Children belong in families,
not in orphan-
ages or in some
a mo r p h o u s
kibbutz,” she
said.
L a n d r i e u
and other
members of
her delega-
tion to Haiti
came away
convinced that
gove r nme nt
officials there
would support
expansion of adoption as long as
steps were taken to guard against
trafficking and ensure that chil-
dren weren’t being sent away from
parents who wanted them.
The head of Haiti’s child welfare
agency, Jeanne Bernard Pierre, has
conveyed some skepticism about
efforts to speed up adoptions, say-
ing Americans have taken advan-
tage of the disaster to flout Haitian
adoption laws.
Haiti’s child welfare system put into focus
INTERNATIONAL
“Either UNICEF is going
to change or have a very
difcult time getting
support from the U.S.
Congress.”
MAry lANdriEU
U.S. Senator (d-la.)
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS — The dustup
over Virginia’s proclamation for
Confederate History Month seems
like a lot of noise over something
that “doesn’t amount to diddly,”
Mississippi’s governor said in an
interview aired Sunday.
Virginia’s Republican governor,
Bob McDonnell, apologized for
leaving out of his proclamation any
reference to slavery. He added lan-
guage to the decree calling slavery
“evil and inhumane” after being
criticized for reviving what many
Virginians believe is an insensitive
commemoration of its Confederate
past.
Fellow GOP
Gov. Haley
Barbour of
Mississippi said
he doesn’t think
the proclama-
tion was a mis-
take.
“To me, it’s a
sort of feeling
that it’s a nit,
that it is not sig-
nificant, that it’s not a — it’s trying
to make a big deal out of something
(that) doesn’t amount to diddly,”
Barbour said in
the interview
aired on CNN’s
“State of the
Union.”
“I think it’s
u n f o r t u n a t e
that the gover-
nor is so insen-
sitive to the
atrocities made
against African-
A m e r i c a n s
in this country by the for-
mer Confederate States,” said
Derrick Johnson, president of the
Mississippi NAACP. “As governor
of the state with a higher percent-
age of African-Americans that any
other, we would hope he would be
more sensitive to them.”
McDonnell revised the proc-
lamation after a day of scalding
denunciations as the story became
grist for cable news shows and
caught fire on political blogs and in
social media.
McDonnell was the first Virginia
governor to issue such a proclama-
tion since 2001.
NATIONAL
Miss. governor says Va. controversy is ‘diddly’
Woman sold goats,
collected benefts
SyrACUSE, N.y. — Take note:
Selling goats and collecting work-
ers comp don’t mix. An upstate
New york woman faces up to fve
years in prison and a fne up to
$250,000 after admitting she sold
goats while collecting more than
$60,000 in workers compensation.
Susan Tansosch pleaded guilty
in U.S. district Court to making
false statements to the U.S. de-
partment of labor.
in the plea announced Tuesday,
U.S. Attorney richard Hartunian
said Tansosch collected the ben-
efts after she told authorities she
wasn’t making money from other
employment. She was selling
goats near Syracuse.
Tansosch, 53, was to be sen-
tenced Aug. 4. A message left
at a listing for Tansosch was not
returned Tuesday.
Patrol says man had
marijuana in mowers
SAN diEGO — Border authori-
ties arrested a man trying to cross
the border with two mowers
stufed with the type of grass not
usually found in machinery. U.S.
Customs and Border protection
arrested an unidentifed Mexican
man who tried to smuggle 53
pounds’ worth of marijuana across
the border on Friday. A dog alerted
agents and a search turned up 21
packages of pot crammed inside
the chassis of the mowers.
The driver was arrested and
booked into San diego county jail
on suspicion of drug trafcking.
— Associated Press
ODD NEWS
Virginia governor Bob Mc-
Donnell made the proc-
lamation for Confederate
History Month earlier this
month without mention-
ing slavery.
“Since the earthquake,
the U.S. embassy has said
‘if you see a kid you like,
here’s the paper, you can
take them with you.”
JEANNE BErNArd piErrE
Head of Haiti’s
child welfare agency
Changes might be
ahead for adoption
system after quake
WIN A
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200 GIFT CARD. FIND AN APARTMENT.
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NATIONAL
Community mourns death of 29 miners
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PETTUS, W.Va. — A pair of tall
black boots and a lunch pail sat
near the altar Sunday at the New
Life Assembly church — a memo-
rial to the 29 men killed in the
worst U.S. mining disaster since
1970 and a thank-you to those
who make their living inside the
mountains.
This day, the first Sunday since
last Monday’s explosion killed
28 workers and a contractor at
Massey Energy Co.’s Upper Big
Branch mine in Montcoal, was
for many a time to honor the
profession. Tears of mourning
fell, and arms swayed in worship
among the 50 people gathered at
the church.
Pastor Gary Williams, who has
worked at Massey Energy mines
for 18 years, knew many of the
victims. On his way to church
Sunday morning, he heard Ricky
Workman’s name among them for
the first time.
“I know his child. I know his
wife. He’s a part of my family.
He’s a part of my life,” Williams
said, tears falling. “Over time, our
hearts and the emptiness that we
have inside will fade away, but I
don’t never want to forget what
happened April 5, 2010.”
Some of those who died have
already been laid to rest. Crews
worked Sunday to remove the
bodies of several others who didn’t
make it out, but the recovery had
to be halted because of high gas
readings in the mine. Crews need
to drill another hole to vent the
mine before they can continue.
Four funerals were held Friday,
with more scheduled for the
weekend. Nearly two dozen will
follow in the weeks ahead. Despite
hope that four missing miners
might survive long enough for
rescuers to reach them, officials
announced early Saturday morn-
ing that the four had apparently
died instantly.
A complete list of victims has
yet to be released. Two other min-
ers were injured in the blast, and
one remains hospitalized.
A team of federal investigators
will arrive Monday as officials
try to figure out what caused the
blast. Virginia-based Massey has
been under scrutiny for a string
of safety violations at the mine,
though CEO Don Blankenship has
defended the company’s record
and disputed accusations that he
puts profits ahead of safety.
Authorities have said that high
levels of volatile methane gas may
have played a role in the disaster.
Massey has been repeatedly cited
and fined for problems with the
system that vents methane and
for allowing combustible dust to
build up.
During a homily in Wheeling
on Sunday, Catholic Bishop
Michael J. Bransfield said four
years is too short a time between
West Virginia mine disasters. The
last was at the Sago Mine in 2006,
where 12 men perished.
Musical successes
contradict history
Once upon a time, a celebrated
producer put his clout behind a
one-hour series about competing
cliques who share a passion for
spontaneously breaking into rap,
gospel, R&B and power ballads.
It was called “Cop Rock.” Ste-
phen Bochco’s short-lived 1990
experiment _ the “Ishtar” of net-
work TV _ convinced the industry
that characters on dramas and
sitcoms shouldn’t even whistle,
much less sing and dance.
But 20 years later, brash new-
comers have turned a deaf ear to
history _ and reaped the rewards.
Disney Channel and Nickelodeon
have built empires on programs
like “High School Musical,”“Han-
nah Montana” and “Big Time
Rush,” bland sitcom fare enlivened
by karaoke-quality perfor-
mances. “How I Met Your Mother”
and “Scrubs” haven’t been afraid
to allow their characters to slip
into la-la land where they foat
through choreographed song-
and-dance numbers. “Family
Guy” got much media attention
in February for an of-handed
reference to Sarah Palin.
—Associated Press
8A / ENTERTAINMENT / MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANSAN.COM
10 is the easiest day, 0 the
most challenging.
Todd Pickrell and Scott A. Winer
LITTLE SCOTTIE
CHICKEN STRIP: 2010
SKETCHBOOK
HOROSCOPES
Charlie Hoogner
Drew Stearns
ARIES (March21-April 19)
Today is a 7
If you can take the day of with
your signifcant other, you’ll
discover romance at your fnger-
tips. If you can’t, plan an evening
that starts as early as possible.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Take extra care when working
on creative projects, especially
when using sharp instruments.
Make refnements in small incre-
ments, and evaluate as you go.

GEMINI (May 21-June 21)
Today is a 6
Every time you meet a deadline,
you turn an obstacle into op-
portunity. Delivering ahead of
time eliminates pressure for
everyone and frees you for the
next great idea.
CANCER (June 22-July 22)
Today is a 5
You fnd yourself in the spotlight
without part of your costume.
Oops! Grab an associate or two
and ask them to fx it, now!
They’ll jump to help.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 5
You may be tempted to tiptoe
around a problem today. A
better strategy would be to face
obstacles head-on while pulling
strings in the background.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 5
Be aware of your partner’s
unusual needs. The challenge
is to meet demands even
when neither of you enjoys the
process. Add empathy, and then
just take care of it.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
A solid strategy for work would
be to challenge all participants.
Inspire enthusiasm by focusing
on practical outcomes that
everyone can appreciate.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 5
Spread your charm as far as you
like. There’s plenty to go around.
Meanwhile, keep your opinions
to yourself.

SAGITTARIUS(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
You’ll get more done today if
you work around everyone else.
They have their own challenges,
unrelated to yours. Leave them
to their own devices.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Everything will work out the way
you want if you pay attention to
your partner’s requests. If you
don’t, you’ll face major obstacles.
AqUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 5
You surprise even yourself with
your careful management.
You recognize the challenge in
stretching dollars to cover it all.
Reward yourself, too.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March20)
Today is a 6
What a diference it makes to be
aware of your partner’s foibles,
and vice versa. Both of you feel
a bit compulsive today. Creative
teasing is in order.
MOVIES
MOVIES
Violent content increasing in flms for younger viewers
Mcclatchy-tribune
WASHINGTON — You don't
need to be a pacifist to notice that
American movies have gotten way
more violent, and that younger
and younger audiences are see-
ing more intense violence on the
big screen. A new study, pub-
lished in the Journal of Adolescent
Health, offers some validation of
the point.
Researchers from the University
of Pennsylvania coded each year's
top-grossing 30 films from 1950
to 2006 to gauge the extent and
intensity of sexual content and
violence. They then sought to dis-
cern trends within ratings catego-
ries, and the migration of sexual
and violent content into movies
intended for the broadest circula-
tion — P, PG and PG-13 movies.
The sexual content of PG and
R movies accelerated in the late
1960s, when the Motion Picture
Association of America's ratings
system was instituted. It stabilized
in the late 1970s and even declined
after that. Since then, movies bear-
ing PG and PG-13 ratings have
not become more sexually explicit,
the study found.
Not so with violent content. It
exploded across the PG-and-up
ratings categories, cascading heav-
ily into a new category introduced
in 1984 — PG-13.
3-D flms ofer proft
without movie stars
Mcclatchy-tribune
Since the astounding grosses
for "Avatar" started rolling in,
Hollywood has been going gaga
at 3-D. At a time when DVD rev-
enues have been plummeting, who
would've believed that 3-D would
help save the studios' bacon?
According to Warners distribu-
tion chief Dan Fellman, roughly 52
percent of the studio's box-office
take for last weekend's "Clash of
the Titans" was from 3-D tick-
et sales. According to industry
marketers, the 3-D ticket price
premium gave a huge boost to
"Clash's " $61.4-million box-office
take, which would've been closer
to $41.4 million if it was only play-
ing in 2-D.
The film, which was retrofit-
ted with 3-D at the last minute,
inspired my colleague Kenny
Turan to write that "Clash" could
be "the first film to actually be
made worse by being in 3-D." The
tech geeks seemed to agree.
But who will be the real haters of
3-D? Movie stars. If there was ever
a new technology that made movie
stars feel less indispensable and
more outmoded than they already
are, it would be 3-D. By definition,
3-D extravaganzas are genre films
dominated by splashy computer-
generated visual effects — exactly
the kinds of movies that don't need
a movie star in the first place.
Put yourself in the position of
a studio executive, staring at your
profit-and-loss statement, as you
ponder what movies to greenlight
for your 2012 slate. Most of the
recent mega-hits (i.e., "Hangover,")
had triumphed without any true
movie stars while scads of mov-
ie-star vehicles had crashed and
burned.
TELEVISION
5
$
all you can eat
buffet ANYTIME
Rock Chalk Cafe located inside Naismith Hall
*valid with KU ID or coupon
THE ONLY
PRIVATELY OWNED
DORM ON CAMPUS!
a lecture by
Michael Ward,
author of PLANET NARNIA,
Oxford University Press, 2008.
“The foremost C.S. Lewish scholar.” N.T. Wright
(The London Times)
Brown-bag lunch and discussion for KU students and faculty
TODAY from 12:00 to 1:00pm,
Parlor ABC (5th foor), Kansan Union
TONIGHT at 7pm
Woodruff Auditorium
Kansan Union
(5th foor)
“Narnia, CS Lewis, and
the Classical Cosmology”
To contribute to Free For
All, visit Kansan.com, call
785-864-0500 or try our
Facebook App.
n n n
I painted my girlfriend’s
toenails tonight.
n n n
To transfer or not to
transfer? That is the question!
n n n

Why the debate over
whether it’s called soda or
pop? Personally I just thought
it was called a chaser.
n n n
I just found out I’ve had
more sex than my best friend.
I never thought this day would
come.

n n n
I predict — nay, I decree —
that this weekend shall be the
stuf of legend.
n n n
Dude, lots of chicks think
that architects are hot.
Think about that, you create
something out of nothing.
You’re like God. There is no
one hotter than God.
n n n
Discouraging premarital sex is
against my religion.
n n n
I fear the incredible lack
of correlation between my
good grades and the amount
of study time I put in is not
conducive to success in the
real world.
n n n
I’m writing my letter of
resignation this weekend!
n n n
Mmm, I love me some drag
queens!
n n n
Whenever I get sad, I just
stop being sad and start being
awesome instead. True story.
n n n
Baseball is so bloody boring
(English accent)!
n n n
Get these X’s of the back of
my hands!

n n n
I have expensive taste, so it
sucks when I have no money.
n n n
My horoscope dictates that
this is supposed to be my
happy day!
n n n
I am reading a book. It’s
called you.
n n n
I’ve been alive for 7,071
days.
n n n
Do me a favor and don’t ever
look at me again.
n n n
A fridge full of Chipotle and
beer … I’m living the dream.
n n n
I just saw a Dodge Challenger
drift around the Chi Omega
fountain in broad daylight. My
life is complete.
n n n
LeTTer GuideLines
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com.
Write LeTTerTOTHe ediTOr in the
e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the
author’s name, grade and hometown.
Find our full letter to the editor policy
online at kansan.com/letters.
how to submit A LEttER to thE EDitoR
stephen Montemayor, editor in chief
864-4810 or smontemayor@kansan.com
Brianne Pfannenstiel, managing editor
864-4810 or bpfannenstiel@kansan.com
Jennifer Torline, managing editor
864-4810 or jtorline@kansan.com
Lauren Cunningham, kansan.commanaging
editor 864-4810 or lcunningham@kansan.com
Vicky Lu, KUJH-TV managing editor
864-4810 or vlu@kansan.com
emily McCoy, opinion editor
864-4924 or emccoy@kansan.com
Kate Larrabee, editorial editor
864-4924 or klarrabee@kansan.com
Cassie Gerken, business manager
864-4358 or cgerken@kansan.com
Carolyn Battle, sales manager
864-4477 or cbattle@kansan.com
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adviser
864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com
Jon schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
864-7666 or jschlitt@kansan.com
THe ediTOriAL BOArd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are
Stephen Montemayor, Brianne Pfannenstiel,
Jennifer Torline, Lauren Cunningham, Vicky Lu,
Emily McCoy, Kate Larrabee, Stephanie Penn,
James Castle, Michael Holtz, Caitlin Thornbrugh
and Andrew Hammond.
contAct us
OpinionTHE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
monDAY, ApRiL 12, 2010 www.kAnsAn.com pAGE 9A
H
ours before the 2010 Van-
couver Winter Olympics
were set to begin, Geor-
gian Nodar Kumaritashvili lost
control of his luge during a prac-
tice trial and slammed into a pillar,
killing him. NBC, the American
network granted coverage of the
Games, captured the grisly footage
on video, and viewers originally
watched the death of the 21-year-
old on television. Later in the day,
however, NBC edited the footage to
just before Kumaritashvili’s impact,
preventing the worst of the footage
from airing.
Whether or not this video should
have been shown is a debate that
perhaps will never be resolved, but
should certainly be discussed. Te
fact that the video was later taken
down is a refection of the media’s
good intentions of protecting view-
ers’ comfort, but others argue that
the video’s removal was ill-advised
and prevented citizens from seeing
reality.
It’s a basic human response to
distance ourselves from situations
that make us uncomfortable. But
how is a viewer supposed to see
just how dangerous that Olympic
luge track was if the video can’t be
shown?
Te cliché says that a picture is
a worth a thousand words. In the
case of these two examples, I be-
lieve that statement is correct. I re-
member that as I watched Kumar-
itshvili’s impact with a small group
of people, our reaction was gasps
and shock. We shared the moment
of emotion, and could more closely
feel the pain of the event. Tis is
something I believe would have
been hard to replicate if a Bob Cos-
tas summary took over in place of
the video.
For another example, could the
widespread public unity in the im-
mediate afermath of September 11
have occurred if news outlets had
elected to censor the footage of the
planes striking the buildings? Most
everyone can remember where they
were when they frst heard news
of the attacks, even years afer the
events. Tis leads one to wonder
how much of the emotion generat-
ed from that day was a result of the
media’s willingness to publish the
images — albeit disturbing ones.
It’s pretty harmless to debate on
the topic when one is devoid of a
direct connection to any of images
discussed. But, how would you
feel if it was someone close to you
whose moment of vulnerability was
broadcast for millions? Tis is why
it’s difcult to know where to draw
the line in the battle of the rights
to see reality versus the ethics of
showing violent acts.
Te Associated Press ran into
this problem last year when it chose
to publish a photo of a dying U.S.
soldier who had been ambushed
in Afghanistan, against his family’s
wishes. Although the photo wasn’t
nearly as bad as other images of
war on the Internet, it did show the
fnal moments of the soldier’s life.
Even though the Associated
Press received harsh criticism for
its publication of the photo, it did
help remind viewers that, yes, there
are still soldiers dying and that, yes,
the situation on the front can be
deadly.
Removing publication of graph-
ic photos allows the public to be
spared from disturbing images, but
such an action refuses to tell the
complete story. Terefore, NBC
and the Associated Press were just
in their publication of the respec-
tive images — afer all, isn’t the
complete truth what we demand in
our news?
It’s very possible that most of
the criticism directed against the
Associated Press wasn’t about the
soldier’s death. Instead, it may have
been a refection of viewer’s un-
willingness to place Afghanistan
back in the dominant role of pub-
lic discourse, much like Olympic
fans who didn’t want the dangers of
winter sports to interfere with their
eager, but safe roles as viewers. Te
public needs to confront reality.
Boultinghouse is a sopho-
more from Girard in history
and journalism.
A little discomfort can be good
mARIAm SAIfAm
ediTOriAL CArTOOn
‘Doubling down’ may
be ticket to reality TV
S
unday’s inauguration of
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-
Little, the University’s frst
African-American and frst female
chancellor, stands as a momentous
occasion.
Since beginning her tenure as
the 17th chancellor of the Universi-
ty on Aug. 15, 2009, Gray-Little has
proven to be a worthy successor to
Robert Hemenway. Burdened with
$37.3 million in budget cuts and
unfunded mandates, her frst eight
months as chancellor have been far
from easy.
Here we assess how the chancel-
lor has dealt with some big chal-
lenges and has contributed to some
positive new policies.
— Budget Cuts. We support
Gray-Little in her continued eforts
to minimize short- and long-term
efects of the budget shortfalls. In
working closely with Kansas law-
makers, Gray-Little has shown
her commitment to preserving the
University’s high educational stan-
dards.
Her emphasis on maximizing
operating efciency has saved the
University more than $3 million
through changes in purchasing
rules, the consolidation of library
purchases and improvements in
energy efciency.
With the chancellor’s support,
several bills further improving bud-
get efciency are expected to pass
the state legislature in the coming
months.
Te University needs Gray-
Little’s strong leadership and frm
commitment to higher education
more than ever. We agree with her
belief that a strong University can
ensure a prosperous Kansas and
contribute to economic recovery.
— Charting the Future.
Tough managing budget cuts has
dominated the chancellor’s agenda
since August, she has also taken
important strides in three key areas
outlined in her strategic initiative,
“Charting the Future.” Tese areas
include research engagement, stu-
dent recruitment and student re-
tention and success.
In recognizing the need for im-
provements in these key areas, the
chancellor organized three task
forces to develop strategies for each
issue. Proactive steps such as this
illustrate Gray-Little’s dedication to
improving the quality of education
and research at the University.
So far, only the Research En-
gagement Task Force has presented
a formal report to the chancellor
outlining specifc recommenda-
tions. We hope to see the report’s
suggestions implemented soon.
— Semester of Service. Gray-
Little’s inauguration provided stu-
dents, faculty, staf, alumni and the
Lawrence community the perfect
opportunity to show their support
through community service.
Te KU community has con-
tributed more than 91,000 volun-
teer hours through the “Semester
of Service” program. Te program
was organized in honor of Gray-
Little’s inauguration, with the goal
of reaching 100,000 hours by the
end of the semester.
With fve weeks lef in the se-
mester, “Semester of Service” looks
on track to surpass its initial goal.
Tough the program has been ex-
tremely successful, the real test will
be to see if the KU community can
sustain its commitment to commu-
nity service afer this semester.
— Future Goals. We remain
optimistic in Gray-Little’s ability
to lead. Tough she has been chan-
cellor for a mere eight months, we
are impressed by her strong com-
mitment to ensuring the success of
students and the University.
With strong leadership and pro-
active solutions, Gray-Little has
proven herself capable of handling
the difculties at hand.
Yet given the $37.3 million bud-
get cuts, the chancellor has much
lef to do in order to ensure the
long-term success of the University
and its students.
— Michael Holtz for The Kansan
Editorial Board
ediTOriAL BOArd
Chancellor’s progress report
MediA issues
HuMOr
LeTTer TO THe ediTOr
Think before you eat
I was pleased to read the
review of Tenth St. Vegetarian
Bistro in Jayplay. In light of the
cruelty inherent in the livestock
industry, providing students with
information on cruelty-free din-
ing is more important than ever.
Ever wonder why slices of
meat are cheaper than fresh
produce? Well, aside from the
billions of dollars in annual
subsidies that meat producers
receive, factory farmers keep
meat cheap by boxing up animals
in flthy warehouses in extreme
confnement for their entire
lives. Chickens are kept in cages
so small that they can’t stretch
a single wing, and pigs are con-
fned to crates so tiny that they
can’t even turn around and are
forced to stand on slatted foors
in their own excrement.
Ammonia from trapped urine
burns the animals’ lungs, and
they are continually given antibi-
otics in order to keep them alive
in these flthy conditions.
Tis extreme confnement
frequently drives animals insane,
they are mutilated (without be-
ing given any painkillers) so they
don’t kill each other: Chickens
have their beaks cut of with hot
blades and pigs are castrated and
have their tails cut of.
In order to produce the
amount of meat that’s consumed
in America today, factory farm-
ers have to keep animals in ex-
treme confnement and disregard
animal welfare.
Fortunately, thanks to es-
tablishments such as Tenth St.
Vegetarian Bistro (not to men-
tion your local grocery store)
that ofer cruelty-free dining
options, it’s never been easier to
avoid meat, milk and eggs. Please
remember, every time you sit
down to eat, you can choose not
to support companies that abuse
animals.
— Drew Winter is a college campaigns
assistant for peta2.
That Guy
By TrenT BoulTinghouse
tboultinghouse@kansan.com
M
y mother will watch
any TV show involving
obesity or dwarfsm.
If it includes a big person trying
to get smaller or a small person
trying to reach a light switch, she
will fnd herself compelled by the
stories of their real-life struggles.
I would imagine her ideal show
would be a combination of the
two — something along the lines
of, “Te Littlest Biggest Loser.”
Te bounty of dwarfsm pro-
grams can mostly be attributed to
TLC, whose lineup seems to con-
sist exclusively of reality shows
about average-sized families of
little people or extremely large
families of average-sized people.
But shows about obesity are vir-
tually everywhere. Te national
epidemic is refected in TV Guide
— Discovery Channel, NBC and
even VH1 all have shows about
losing weight.
Te latest, “Jamie Oliver’s Food
Revolution” on ABC, is about
getting to the root of the obesity
problem by changing America’s
eating habits. Tat will be pretty
hard to do, especially since KFC
has started a revolution of its own
with the Double Down sand-
wich.
Te Double Down, debuting
nationwide this week, is a gro-
tesque masterpiece. If Michel-
angelo worked in grease, this is
what he would create. Te Double
Down consists of bacon, melted
cheese and something terrifying
called “Colonel’s Sauce.” Where is
the chicken, you ask? Well, forget
everything you ever thought you
knew about buns because they
have been replaced by two hulk-
ing fried chunks of bird.
KFC seems to have abandoned
Kentucky Grilled Chicken, its
weak attempt at following the
healthier fast food trend led by
restaurants such as McDonald’s,
in favor of the only sandwich on
the market that could accurately
be described as Kafaesque. In-
deed, they are moving in the com-
plete opposite direction and into
bizarre, nightmarish realms never
before explored by the American
food industry.
Now, I usually have no qualms
about junk food. I only go to fast
food joints a few times a month,
but when I do partake, I don’t shy
away from the dark depths of the
menu. On more than one occa-
sion, I have ordered six KFC Buf-
falo Snackers to eat in one sitting.
When you eat that much crap, the
meal is divided into stages.
Te frst two snackers go down
fairly easily, but you’re just get-
ting started. Halfway through the
third one, you look at the remain-
ing three and start to panic. On
the fourth one, you feel your body
starting to weaken and promise
yourself never to do this again.
By the ffh one, you’re angry at
yourself, at KFC and at the world.
When you fnally get to the sixth
one, you’re just depressed. You
force it down and then cry your-
self into a food coma.
When somebody who has done
that multiple times is frightened
of your sandwich, you’ve either
failed or accomplished something
magnifcent. Or both.
If the sandwich is successful,
KFC could turn the already-
feared freshman 15 into the fresh-
man 50. And that may just be the
start — if other places follow suit,
we could see salads where the let-
tuce is replaced with beef jerky
or cream cheese bagels where the
bagels are replaced with more
cream cheese. I have seen the fu-
ture, and it is fat.
If you are brave enough to try
the Double Down, please be care-
ful. I don’t want my mother to see
your story on the next episode of
“I Nearly Died of Shame.”
Nichols is a junior from
Stilwell in creative writing.
Under
Observation
By Alex nichols
anichols@kansan.com
BY ALEESE KOPF
akopf@kansan.com
Although Robert Hemenway
is no longer chancellor of the
University, his legacy for service will
still continue. The Dole Institute of
Politics will present the first Robert
Hemenway Public Service Award to
an outstanding student who shows a
commitment to volunteerism within
the community and the University.
The award was created in May
of last year to honor the former
chancellor’s 14 years of dedication
to public service. The $1000 award
will be given annually to a junior
who has demonstrated a commit-
ment to making a difference for
KU students, furthering the idea
of service on campus and in the
community, as well as established
leadership. Barbara Ballard, associ-
ate director of Civic Programming
and Outreach, said the committee
was choosing a junior because that
student had another year to con-
tinue his or her dedication to public
service as an undergraduate.
Chancellor Hemenway was very
instrumental in making sure a pro-
gram existed in which students could
be civically engaged, said Ballard.
She said Hemenway was dedicated
to students, student involvement,
study abroad and encouraging stu-
dents to get more involved not only
as an undergraduate, but also after
graduation.
“It should be something special
about every KU student, not just
about the degree you leave here
with, but a commitment to which-
ever community you end up living,”
Ballard said.
Applications for the award are
due by 5 p.m. today and require a
list of organizations the student is
involved in, leadership positions
and honors/scholarship received, as
well as a 250-word essay on why
the student believes public service
is important. As of the end of the
day Friday, Ballard said they had
received five applications.
Manutell Ford, a junior from
Wilson, said she decided to apply
because she has been involved in
public service throughout her life
and thinks it is nice to be recognized
for service.
“I believe recognition, especially
with a scholarship is important,”
Ford said. “Although volunteering is
a selfless activity, it is more satisfy-
ing to know your time and effort is
appreciated.”
Ford currently volunteers as
a coordinator for the Center for
Community Outreach program,
Lifeline, and participates in sev-
eral other CCO programs and
Alternative Breaks. She said pub-
lic service was important to her
because it could open your eyes to
groups of people you would not
have exposure to on a daily basis.
“Public service can change your
viewpoint on a certain topic or
group of people and the experience
does not have to be extreme,” Ford
said. “Giving back to the commu-
nity is rewarding for both you and
the recipients of your service.”
Once applications are reviewed,
finalists will be contacted on
Wednesday, April 14 and interviews
will be held on that Thursday and
Friday. Responsibilities of the recipi-
ent include attending the 2010 Dole
Lecture, participating in the plan-
ning committee for the 2010 Civic
Engagement Week and serving as
a member on the Dole Institute
Student Advisory Board.
Ford said she thought the Dole
Institute did an excellent job of
encouraging public service through
its civic engagement week and abil-
ity to bring in influential speakers
who have dedicated a large portion
of their lives to service.
She said she appreciated
the opportunity to apply for the
Hemenway Public Service Award
and looked forward to the current
chancellor’s same dedication to ser-
vice as the previous.
— Edited by Becky Howlett
DeaDline
information:
WHen: Today by 5:00 p.m.
WHere:The Dole Institute
of Politics, 2350 Petefsh
Drive, West Campus
application link:
http://doleinstitute.org/
students-hemenway-award.
shtml
DUI ofender drives
to jail intoxicated
SPRINGFIELD, Vt. — Police said
a Massachusetts man headed to
a Vermont prison to serve a two-
day sentence for driving under
the infuence was intoxicated
when he drove himself to prison.
Police said the man was then
processed for a second DUI of-
fense and released back into the
custody of the Department of
Corrections.
Man accidently fres
gun of in Walmart
PHOENIX — Authorities said a
man has been arrested on suspi-
cion of endangerment when the
gun he was carrying discharged
inside a Walmart. El Mirage
police said when the 30-year-old
man went to a counter to pay for
a video game, witnesses said he
removed the gun from the hol-
ster — causing the magazine to
come loose and fall to the foor.
They said he reinserted
the magazine and continued
manipulating the gun when it
fred, sending one bullet into the
ceiling.
— Associated Press
First female justice
to give law lecture
Sandra Day O’Connor will be
speaking at the Dole Institute
of Politics at 7:30 p.m. She is
delivering the University of
Kansas School of Law’s 2010
Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for
Excellence in Advocacy Annual
Lecture.
O’Connor is a retired associate
justice of the Supreme Court of
the United States. She was nomi-
nated by President Reagan and
became the frst female member
of the court. O’Connor took her
seat in Sept. 1981 and served
nearly 25 years as an associate
justice. She
retired in Jan.
2006.
O’Connor
earned a
bachelor’s in
economics
and a law
degree from
Stanford
University. She was appointed to
the Arizona Senate in 1969 and
won re-election twice. She was
then elected judge of the Marico-
pa County Superior Court in 1975
and in 1979 was appointed to
the Arizona Court of Appeals. In
2009, President Obama awarded
O’Connor the highest civilian
honor in the United States, the
Presidential Medal of Freedom.
The lecture is part of
O’Connor’s two-day visit to the
University. On Tuesday, April 13
she will also speak to students
during a constitutional law class
and have lunch with some stu-
dents and faculty.

—Erin Brown
10A / neWS / MONDAy, APRIL 12, 2010 / tHe UniVerSitY DailY kanSan / KANSAN.COM
campUS
Hemenway’s dedication to
service refected in award
GoVernment
pride with pizazz
Tanner Grubbs/KANSAN
Daisy Buckët performs “I AmWhat I Am”for a large crowd in front of the Kansas Union Friday afternoon in homage to Pride Week at KU. This is
Buckët’s fourth time hosting the annual event known as “Brown Bag Drag.”
oDD neWS
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Bochy out for
the season
Junior
pitcher
Brett
Bochy is
out for the
season
after re-
quiring surgery | PaGe 8B
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Sports
MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2010 www.kANsAN.cOM PAGE 1b
By Clark GoBle
cgoble@kansan.com
Jayhawks claim 2-1 victory over Saint Louis. SOCCER| 10B
Soccer wins exhibition
Jayhawks play in fnal regular-season tournament GOLF | 9B
Kansas wants big fnish
coMMentary
I
n 1991, running back Tony
Sands rumbled for a school-
record 396 yards against
Missouri.
Nearly 20 years later, freshman
Deshaun Sands, Tony’s son, wants to
break that record.
Tony was a big factor in Deshaun
deciding to leave Florida — his
home state, which he deemed “way
more fun than Kansas” — and the
weather he still loves, but he’s look-
ing to make his own legacy.
“He was a legend here, so I fig-
ured I could come here and outshine
him, break his records,” Sands said.
“Father-son stuff.”
Sands, just 5-foot-7 with short
dreadlocks, said his father got the
“blazing” speed, but he got the
vision.
“Every time I get in open space, I
see everything,” Sands said.
Sands’ style — he says its about
quickness and vision — is one of
many different styles of running
backs vying for playing time next fall.
Freshman Toben Opurum is a
between-the-tackles runner who
delivers the pain instead of taking it.
Junior Angus Quigley, 6-foot-1,
runs tall like Adrian Peterson, a trait
that he thinks led to his position
switch to linebacker last season.
Sophomore Rell Lewis showed his
quickness on a 42-yard reception in
last year’s Border Showdown.
But Sands might have the most
potential of the group.
“He’s a tough little dude,” Quigley
said. “He’s shifty.”
As it stands, an Opurum-Sands
combination sounds pretty lethal.
Opurum will bowl over defenders;
Sands will juke around them.
Sands is also working with the
return teams in spring ball.
“That’s my thing,” Sands said.
“Something like Devin Hester, you
know?”
Sands needs a lot more time
to grow out his dreadlocks — he
started them at the beginning of
last season — to match Hester’s. He
isn’t worried about the ramifications
of having his hair flare out past his
helmet.
“If they pull them, oh well,” Sands
said.
It won’t be hard for Sands to stay
motivated: his roommate, freshman
quarterback Jordan Webb, is also
looking for playing time. Sands said
they study the playbook whenever
they have free time.
Webb and Sands redshirted and
worked with the scout team’s offense
last year, mimicking opponents’
offenses in the week prior to the
game. They would watch film on the
weekends to prepare. Sands said hav-
ing to learn lots of different offenses
is helping him a lot this year under
new coach Turner Gill.
Sands filled the role well too: he
was named the scout team’s offensive
player of the year at the end of last
season. He wanted to help the team
on game days, but he embraced his
role as a scout team player.
Sands said he learned one big
thing from his redshirt experience.
“Stay humble,” Sands said. “You
have to be patient and your time will
come.”
Don’t be surprised if Sands and
Webb end up manning the Jayhawk
backfield for extended periods next
year.
“We want it bad,” Sands said.
—Editedby DrewAnderson
footBall softBall
Kansas splits series,
gets frst Big 12 victory
Quigley rejuvenated under Gill
KANSAN FILE PHOTO
Junior running back Angus Quigley takes a handof fromquarterback Todd Reesing during a game against SamHouston State in 2008. Quigley
started out his career as a running back before moving to linebacker last season. Quigley will play running back again this season under frst-
year coachTurner Gill.
By ZaCh GetZ
zgetz@kansan.com
twitter.com/zgetz
Freshman outfielder Rosie
Hull popped a ball to third base,
and a rush throw by a Baylor
defender caused Baylor to over-
throw the play at first. Freshman
Alex Jones took the opportunity
to pick up an extra base and score
a run. The team didn’t know it at
the time, but that would be the
difference in the game to give
Kansas its first Big 12 Conference
victory of the season.
On Sunday, Kansas ended
up splitting the two games with
Baylor and moved to 17-22 (1-7)
while Baylor went to 22-14 (3-4).
It was also Kansas’ first series
against a Big 12 unranked oppo-
nent, although Baylor received
votes in the USA Today poll,
while also being ranked No. 23 in
the ESPN.com poll.
St andi ng
in the out-
field before,
f r e s h m a n
Jones said it
felt great to
run off the
field after the
last out.
“That feel-
ing was absolutely amazing,”
Jones said. “We needed that real-
ly badly.”
Kansas has had a tendency
to allow big innings, letting the
opposing team put the game
out of reach for Kansas. Coach
Megan Smith said focus might
be a reason Kansas has allowed
some of these innings.
“We are encouraging them to
go out every day, work hard and
focus on each individual pitch
and not to get too overwhelmed,”
Smith said. “I think sometimes
in those big innings they’re not
quite focusing on all the little
things.”
Junior Allie Clark’s pitching
performance was night and day
in the two games. In the first
game Clark allowed four hits and
five earned runs in two innings.
The second
game Clark
pitched seven
i n n i n g s ,
allowing three
hits and no
earned runs.
Clark said her
pitching per-
formance was
part of a team
effort.
“I knew I needed a good outing
and I was working hard,” Clark
said. “The girls behind me were
working harder, and I appreciate
them a lot.”
The victory will release a little
pressure the team was feeling,
Clark said.
“Everyone just exhaled and are
relaxed now, so now we just got
to get on a roll,” Clark said.
In the first game, Kansas tee-
tered on giving up a big inning,
but its defense managed to
lockdown in times of need. In
By Jayson Jenks
jjenks@kansan.com
When Angus Quigley talks,
there’s a sense that he’s not hiding
anything behind the curtain, that
everything he thinks, he says.
He’s transparent, well-spoken
and willing to publically share
his thoughts.
Yet last season Quigley slipped
a slight of hand when, before
Kansas’ Senior Night against
Nebraska, he told members of
the media that he wasn’t sure if
he’d pursue a sixth year of eli-
gibility.
Turns out, Quigley knew all
along.
“I really wasn’t coming back,”
Quigley said. “I knew when I sat
in that room, my mind was made
up. I wasn’t
coming back.
But things
changed.”
Shortly after
last season,
coach Mark
M a n g i n o
reached a
mutually sat-
isfactory agreement to resign,
triggering a series of events
that ended when Lew Perkins
announced Turner Gill as the
new head coach on Dec 13.
More than anything, the
chance at a fresh start intrigued
Quigley. So he listened to what
Gill had to say, and he thought
about the opportunity to play
under new leadership.
Then he decided to return for
a sixth season — this time as a
running back once more.
“He just talked to me about
how I am as a person,” Gill said.
“He talked about how he wanted
SEE softball ON PAgE 4b
SEE football ON PAgE 4b
Jones
Clark
Quigley
touGh coMPetition
Jayhawks lose three in Austin
Scott Squires/THE DAILY TEXAN
The Jayhawks played in a pitching-dominated game against the Longhorns Sunday. Kansas' pitchers kept up with the Texas pace Friday and Saturday, but lost momentum, falling 10-4.
Kansas' bats
silenced during
3-game series
By Ben Ward
bward@kansan.com
twitter.com/bm_dub
As the old adage goes, good
pitching almost certainly will top
good hitting.
Kansas (19-13-1, 3-5-1) was
shut down by No. 6 Texas’ domi-
nant pitching staf in Austin, get-
ting swept in a three-game series
for the frst time this season.
Afer nearly matching the
Longhorns’ talented starters
pitch-for-pitch in slim defeats on
Friday (3-2) and Saturday (3-1),
Kansas’ staf couldn’t keep pace on
Sunday, falling 10-4.
“Te frst thing I told our guys
right afer the game was, ‘Right
now, Texas is playing better than
anyone in the country,’” coach
Ritch Price said. “Teir pitchers
are as good as advertised.”
Junior T.J. Walz was masterful
on Friday night, overshadowing a
strong efort from Texas’ ace Tay-
lor Jungmann with his best outing
of the season.
Walz easily handled the Long-
horns through the frst eight in-
nings, striking out seven along the
way. He threw frst pitch strikes to
18 batters and retired the leadof
hitter in every inning he pitched.
A sacrifce fy by junior Tony
Tompson and a solo home run
by senior Brett Lisher gave Walz
an early 2-0 cushion.
But a throwing error with two
outs in the seventh by junior
shortstop Brandon Macias al-
lowed Texas to score an unearned
run, which narrowed Kansas’ lead
to 2-1.
Walz rebounded from the er-
ror and settled down to take the
Jayhawks into the ninth with the
lead intact, where he attempted to
fnish his complete game.
But the Longhorns fnally got
to him as he went well over 100
pitches, plating the tying run on
an RBI double with one out in the
ninth.
Walz’ efort went for naught, as
he was sent to the showers shy of
earning his sixth victory. A sac-
rifce fy in the 11th inning de-
livered a crushing 3-2 loss to the
Jayhawks.
“It was a little disappointing
but I thought we put it behind
us pretty quickly,” senior second
baseman Robby Price said.
Like Walz, senior Cameron Se-
lik was equally sharp on Saturday,
tossing an eight inning complete
game and holding the Longhorns
only four hits while striking out
seven.
“I could not have been more
pleased with the performances
that we got from Walz and Selik,”
coach Price said.
Despite Selik’s strong outing,
Cole Green was just a bit better
for Texas. Green held the Jay-
hawks to four hits, with their only
run coming on an RBI single by
Robby Price in the third inning.
Bochy
Freshman
continues
family
legacy
SEE baseball ON PAgE 8b
I
f you have ever sat in Allen
Fieldhouse and watched the
Jayhawks’ pregame video, you’ve had
goosebumps.
Now watch that same video on mute.
It doesn’t have quite the same effect, does
it?
That song used in the pregame video
— a variation of the song “Lux Aeterna”
by Clint Mansell— brings it to life. Music
as a whole, for that matter, makes almost
anything come to life.
We can attest to the same phenom-
enon. When accompanied by song, we
are capable of many feats otherwise unat-
tainable. Case in point: physical fitness.
Music has the power to move us,
inspire us and ignite us. The collection
of instruments and vocals can somehow
trigger a desired emotion, whether we
are aware of it or not. That’s why they
play songs like that at sporting events.
That’s why we have workout playlists.
Generally, people have different
tastes in music, but choosing workout
pump-up songs are a case where every-
one should be in accordance. Those
adrenaline-building playlists should have
the same outline for everyone: Bon Jovi
here, maybe some Kanye there. Even boy
bands from the late 90s have something
worthy for the workout.
Remember: no ballads such as “As
Long as You Love Me” by the Backstreet
Boys allowed and keep the “Jock Jams”
usage to a minimum.
If it’s got a good beat, it’ll juice up
the heart beat. That is the desired out-
come of doing or watching physical
activity, after all.
That’s why it’s saddening when people
hold themselves back. It’s understand-
able that people prefer certain artists, but
there is a line.
Example: Jack Johnson has nothing
in his body of work that falls under the
category of a “pump-up” song. It’s not
a knock, but there is a certain time and
place for that kind of tune, maybe while
chilling on the beach after a workout.
And let’s be honest, pop, rock and
rap can summon one’s untapped ability
better than any style. Country has a few
exceptions, but overall it just makes you
want to socialize instead of pulverize.
I’ve been around the musical block a
few times. I usually exercise only with
the music I have in my head, but I pre-
pare for the experience with my own
pump-up playlist. It makes a difference.
Music is a tool we should learn to use.
Everybody pretty much knows where
to go for the classics — Journey, ABBA,
Metallica. But if you are lost on how to
properly harness today’s melodies out-
side the Top-40, there is help.
For those who like a harmless
approach while still getting their
adrenaline fix: Jason Mraz, The Cab and
anything from “A Goofy Movie.” Even
American Idol runner-up Adam Lambert
has some gems.
If you are a more aggressive rocker
type: Dead by Sunrise, Skillet, Rise
Against and Deepfield can blow some
amplifiers.
And in the rap game: Basically any-
thing featuring Drake or Akon, DJ
Khaled and The new Cypress Hill album
coming out later this year looks prom-
ising. Nothing too surprising in this
department.
Saying I left something out is an
understatement, but it’s up to you to find
out what works for you.
We are just like that pregame video:
better with music.

—Edited by Jesse Rangel
2B / SPORTS / MONDAY, April 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
The pump-up power of music
MORNINg BREw
By corey thiBodeaux
cthibodeaux@kansan.com
twitter.com/c_thibodeaux
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“i am so excited and blessed just
to be here. Not many players can
get hurt and still be in this posi-
tion right now, so i am just really
blessed and so excited to be a
part of the connecticut organiza-
tion.”
— Danielle McCray
FACT OF THE DAY
Danielle Mccray was the ffth
Jayhawk player to be selected in
the WNBA Draft. she was taken
by the connecticut sun with the
seventh pick in the 2010 WNBA
Draft Thursday.
— KU Athletics
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
Q: Who was the last kansas
player drafted into the WNBA?
A: Jaclyn Johnson. she was
selected 42nd overall by the
Orlando Miracle in 2001.
— KU Athletics
THIS wEEK IN
kANsAs ATHlETics
Men’s golf
at UMB Bank Mizzou
intercollegiate,
columbia, Mo., all day
TUESDAY
Baseball
vs. Missouri state,
6:30 p.m.
Men’s golf
at UMB Bank Mizzou
intercollegiate,
columbia, Mo., all day
wEDNESDAY
Softball
vs. Nebraska, 6 p.m.
Track
at kansas relays, all day
THURSDAY
Softball
at creighton,
3 p.m., 5 p.m.
Track
at kansas relays, all day
FRIDAY
women’s tennis
vs. Oklahoma state,
2 p.m.
Baseball
at Nebraska, 6:35 p.m.
Track & Field
at kansas relays, all day
SATURDAY
Soccer
vs. south Dakota state,
2 p.m.
Softball
vs. Oklahoma state,
2 p.m.
Baseball
at Nebraska, 4:05 p.m.
Track & Field
at kansas relays, all day
SUNDAY
Tennis
vs. Oklahoma, 11 a.m.
Softball
vs. Oklahoma state,
12 p.m.
Baseball
at Nebraska, 1:05 p.m.
TODAY
SCORES
MLB Baseball:
Boston 8, kansas city s
chicago 4, cincinnati 3
New York (Al) 10, Tampa Bay 0
san Diego 5, colorado 4
pittsburgh 6, Arizona 3
seattle 4, Texas 3
Oakland 3, los Angeles (Al) 4
st. louis 7, Milwaukee 1
Washington 4, New York (Nl) 3
cleveland 2, Detroit 4
Toronto 3, Baltimore 0
los Angeles (Al) 6, Florida 7
philadelphia 9, Houston 6
Minnesota 2, chicago (Al) 1
Atlanta 7, san Francisco 2
NBA Basketball:
Orlando 98, cleveland 92
portland 91, lA lakers 88
Miami 111, New York 98
chicago 104, Toronto 88
CAMPUS
O
R
N
E
R
KU SwIMMINg
The kU men’s and
women’s club swimming
team will be competing in
Nationals this weekend in
Atlanta, Ga..
The meet will be held
at Emory University
beginning on April 16th
at 4 p.m. and will continue
throughout the weekend.
KU CYCLINg
The kU cycling team will
travel to lincoln, Neb.,
this weekend for the
Nebraska races. The races
will be held on Friday and
saturday.
— Nicolas Roesler
COLLEgE HOCKEY
CLUB SPORTS
Boston College clinches NCAA hockey title
KU Club Softball
defeats Mizzou
kansas club softball re-
turned to play in columbia,
Mo. this past saturday. in
game one against st. louis,
sophomore pitchers Nicole
DeFranco, stilwell, kan., and
kendall knott, Wichita, kan.,
were the victims of felding
errors, which led to a 10-8
loss despite kansas’ eight-
run, 13-hit attack.
in the second game, kan-
sas had14 hits, leading to
13 runs. With solid defense
behind her, lindsey Wiegele,
shawnee graduate student,
pitched a complete game in
route to a 13-5 victory .
The club softball team
will take on Nebraska satur-
day in lawrence.
— Katy Saunders
associated Press
DETROIT — The NCAA hock-
ey championship trophy is head-
ed back down Commonwealth
Avenue.
Led by goalie John Muse,
Boston College won the national
title for the second time in three
years, beating Wisconsin 5-0 in
the final of the Frozen Four on
Saturday night.
Muse made 20 save to improve
to 8-0 in tournament play, includ-
ing the national title run he made
as a freshman in 2008.
When it was over Muse’s team-
mates tossed their sticks and hel-
mets into the air then swarmed the
junior goaltender.
“Johnny Muse was clearly on
the top of his game,” BC coach
Jerry York said.
BC won its fourth title and third
since 2001, best in the nation over
the last decade. The Eagles’ top
rival, Boston University, took
home the championship last year.
In college hockey’s version of the
Duke-North Carolina basketball
rivalry, BU and BC are located just
a few miles away
from each other
on the Green
Line trolley
that runs along
Commonwealth
Avenue.
This champi-
onship for Muse
came almost a
year after hip
surgery, and the
grueling rehabilitation that fol-
lowed.
“There wasn’t much pain, but it
was long and tedious,” he said. “I
did it for these guys. I wanted to
be back.”
Cam Atkinson scored two of
the Eagles’ four third-period goals
to back Muse.
Atkinson’s first and Chris
Krieder’s goal came 2:02 apart
early in the period and turned a
one-goal game into a rout.
“We wanted to attack and be
aggressi ve,”
York said.
“We don’t like
to sit back
and change
our style of
play with the
score.”
That mind-
set has helped
put York in
elite company
with four national titles, including
one with Bowling Green.
Just two coaches have more
championships — Michigan’s Vic
Heyliger won six from 1948-56
and Denver’s Murray Armstrong
had five from 1958-1969 — and
no one has more than York’s 33
wins in the NCAA tournament.
“I’ve been at it a long time, so
that helps,” York said at the end of
his 38th season as a head coach,
and 16th leading the Eagles. “It’s
always good to coach good teams
and good players, and I’ve had a
whole bunch of those.”
Wisconsin beat the Eagles in
the 2006 finals for its sixth title,
but didn’t have much of a shot to
stop BC’s faster forwards, swarm-
ing defensemen and stellar goalie
in the rematch.
Wisconsin forward Blake
Geoffrion, grandson of Hockey
Hall of Famer Bernie “Boom
Boom” Geoffrion, was shut down
a day after winning the Hobey
Baker Award as college hockey’s
top player.
Boston College center Ben
Smith won the most outstanding
player award for the tournament.
“It’s always good to coach
good teams and players,
and I’ve had a bunch of
those.”
JErrY YOrk
Boston college coach
5
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undergraduate students from Johnson, Leavenworth,
Miami and Wyandotte counties in Kansas can attend
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OPEN LATE
Angels narrowly
beat Athletics, 4-3
ANAHEIM, Calif. — Hideki Mat-
sui singled home the winning run
with one out in the ninth inning,
giving the Los Angeles Angels
a 4-3 victory over the Oakland
Athletics on Saturday night.
The three-time defending
AL West champs avoided what
would have been their frst 1-5
start since their inaugural 1961
season. They had given up 10
runs in each of their previous two
games — the frst time that hap-
pened to them since July 2005.
Bobby Abreu started the win-
ning rally with the Angels’ sixth
double of the game — one more
than their combined total in the
previous fve.
Craig Breslow (0-1) intention-
ally walked Torii Hunter, then fell
behind Matsui 2-0 before last
year’s World Series MVP lined the
next pitch just inside the right-
feld line for his frst game-ending
hit with the Angels.
Fernando Rodney (1-0) got
the win with an inning of perfect
relief.
Angels starter Jered Weaver
allowed a run and four hits in six
innings, struck out seven and left
with a 3-1 lead. The right-hander
has yielded just three earned
runs over 23 innings in his last
four starts against Oakland.
— Associated Press
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, APRIL 12, 2010 / SPORTS / 3B
By Kathleen Gier
kgier@kansan.com
The Kansas tennis team lost both
its matches this weekend. The first
was to the University of Missouri
4-3 on Friday and the University of
Colorado 6-1 on Sunday.
The team fell to 9-10 overall and
1-6 in conference with four games
left in the regular season.
Freshman Victoria Khanevskaya
led the Jayhawks with singles victo-
ries in both matches.
Against Missouri, Kansas record-
ed three singles victories from
freshman Khanevskaya, sophomore
Kate Morozova and senior Kuni
Dorn. Khanevskaya and Morozova
both fought through three sets.
Morozova and doubles partner
sophomore Erin Wilbert defeated
the No. 72 ranked Colorado team
of Monica Milewski and Ania
Anuszkiewicz 8-4.
The Jayhawks will return home
for the last four matches of the reg-
ular season and will face Oklahoma
State on Friday at 2 p.m.
— Edited by Kristen Liszewski
TENNIS
Robert Swain/THE MANEATER
Alessandra Dzuba, Kansas sophomore, serves a ball on Friday night at the GreenTennis center in
Columbia, Mo. The Jayhawks lost both matches this weekend against Missouri and Colorado.
Jayhawks struggle to
keep up in conference
aSSOCiateD PreSS
LOS ANGELES _ Steve Lavin’s
introductory news conference at
St. John’s last week was, in one
word, realistic.
Realistic goals for a program
that hasn’t been to the NCAA
To u r n a me n t
since 2002.
Get into
the NCAA
Tournament, be
competitive and
eventually win
some games,
Lavin said. If
the program’s
progress contin-
ues, maybe even
claim a Big East
title. “Incremental” steps is what
Lavin talked about.
That’s definitely a stark contrast
with the expectations for Lavin at
UCLA.
In his seven seasons in Los
Angeles, getting to the Sweet 16,
which Lavin did four times, and
the Elite Eight, which he did in
his first season, just wasn’t good
enough for a high-profile pro-
gram coming off a national title
in 1995.
“It was wins and losses more
than anything else,” retired UCLA
associate athletic director Rick
Purdy said of Lavin’s undoing.
Lavin, who compiled a 145-78
record at
UCLA, hasn’t
c o a c h e d
since he was
fired after the
2003 season,
the school’s
first losing
season in 55
years. Purdy
said Lavin,
just 32 at the
time, may
have been given control of the
storied program too soon.
“I think maybe it was a little too
early for him, age-wise and expe-
rience-wise,” Purdy said. “Getting
into a pressure-cooker like the
UCLA basketball program was . . .
you have to understand how it was
there and the expectations.”
Lavin often was under fire from
his own players and school admin-
istrators.
“If Lavin gets St. John’s to be a
20-game winner and they are in
the NCAA Tournament, he’s going
to be the savior of New York,” said
Jon Crispin, who played for UCLA
in Lavin’s final season. “Winning
20 games (six times) was abso-
lutely not enough at UCLA. He
could never do anything right.
Even though we went to five Sweet
16s, it was still like, ‘What is he
doing?’ Things were happening
behind his back, rumors that they
were going after (Rick) Pitino.”
Kris Johnson, son of former
UCLA star Marques Johnson,
played for both Lavin and Jim
Harrick, whom Lavin replaced.
In Lavin’s first two years, Johnson
saw the discontent in the locker
room.
“There were probably six,
seven, eight disgruntled players
over playing time,” he said. “He
didn’t have the stature that coach
Harrick had. He was looked upon
as the third assistant. He described
himself as the cream-and-sugar
guy _ the guy who got the cream
and sugar for everyone’s coffee.”
Johnson thinks the adminis-
tration never fully backed Lavin.
“There’s a lot of things going on
behind the scenes and different
regimes of athletic directors, and
he kind of ran into some issues
recruiting there,” he said.
Lavin recruited very well at
UCLA, routinely bringing in top
classes. Future NBA players such
as Baron Davis, Trevor Ariza,
Jason Kapono and Earl Watson
played for Lavin.
But some of Lavin’s recruits got
into trouble, according to numer-
ous published reports.
Jelani McCoy was suspended
in 1997 for violating team rules.
He was reinstated for 15 games
before leaving the team in 1998.
Kris Johnson was simultaneously
suspended.
Rico Hines was suspended for
striking Matt Barnes, now with
the Orlando Magic, with a metal
chair in 2000.
Andre Patterson was dismissed
from school for academic reasons
in 2003.
COLLEgE BASKETBALL
Lavin adjusts to new team, St. John’s
“He didn’t have the
stature that coach Harrick
had.”
KRIS JOHNSON
former UCLA player
KICKER
NBA
TORONTO — Derrick Rose
scored 26 points, Joakim Noah had
18 points, 19 rebounds and seven
assists and the Chicago Bulls beat
Toronto 104-88 on Sunday night
to take a one-game lead over the
Raptors for the fnal Eastern Con-
ference playof spot.
Luol Deng scored 14 points, Taj
Gibson had 11 and Ronald Murray
and Hakim Warrick each scored
10 points for the Bulls, who led by
25 points.
Chicago has won eight of 12
since Noah returned from a foot
injury that forced him to miss 10
games. Te Bulls went 0-10 with-
out him.
Sonny Weems and Andrea
Bargnani each scored 18 points
for the injury-riddled Raptors,
who lost their ffh straight.
Hedo Turkoglu had a career-high
19 rebounds and nine assists but
shot 2 for 12 and scored just six
points.
Jarrett Jack had 14 points but
was the only Raptors reserve to
score until Marcus Banks con-
verted a layup with 5:20 lef in the
fourth.
Te Bulls can clinch the eighth
and fnal playof spot in the East
with a win and a Toronto loss, or
by winning their two remaining
games. Te Raptors hold the tie-
breaker over the Bulls afer win-
ning the frst two matchups this
season.
Chicago hosts Boston on Tues-
day and travels to Charlotte on
Wednesday for the season fnale.
Toronto is at Detroit on Mon-
day and fnishes its season at
home against
New York on
Wednesday.
Raptors for-
ward Amir
Johnson made
his second
straight start in
place of Chris
Bosh, who is
expected to
miss the re-
mainder of the
regular season
afer surgery last week to repair
a broken nose. Bosh was released
from hospital Friday and had the
post-surgical packing removed
from his nose Sunday, but has not
rejoined the team.
Turkoglu started
for Antoine Wright,
who lef Friday’s
loss at Atlanta with
a sore lef ankle and
is still walking with
crutches. Turko-
glu also injured his
nose when he was
headbutted by Bos-
ton’s Tony Allen last
Wednesday. Turko-
glu wore a protec-
tive face mask on Friday but did
not wear one Sunday.
Chicago seeks fnal spot in playofs
“The Bulls can clinch
the eighth and fnal
playof spot in the
East with a win and
a Toronto loss, or by
winning their two
remaining games.”
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to come back and have an oppor-
tunity to at least start out as a
running back. I told him I would
give him that opportunity.”
So far this spring, Quigley
has noticed a change in atmo-
sphere and coaching style. He
said there’s more encouragement
floating around these days, and
he describes practices as fun.
Throughout spring drills, when
the topic of Mangino and his staff
arises, Gill deflects the questions
simply: Kansas football is moving
forward.
Quigley shared a similar sen-
timent Friday — “We took off
the rearview mirror” — but he
couldn’t let the topic float away.
Not after everything he has expe-
rienced.
“It’s just differ-
ent,” Quigley said.
“You always want to
play out of respect
for a man, not fear.”
From the start,
Quigley’s career
has been unconven-
tional.
He missed his
first two seasons
with season-ending
injuries. In 2007, he
carried the ball just 17 times as a
reserve.
Then, in 2008, Quigley led the
Jayhawks with 5.2 yards per carry.
During the first four games, he
was arguably Kansas’ most con-
sistent running back on a team
that struggled to run the ball.
But Quigley never cracked the
rotation that year and, before
last season, former coach Mark
Mangino moved him to lineback-
er. Mangino said he didn’t see a
spot for Quigley at running back.
“If there was a doghouse, I was
most definitely in it,” Quigley
said. “I asked about a doghouse
one time, and he said there was
no doghouse. We won’t even talk
about that. There had to be a
doghouse.”
Quigley said that Mangino told
him “there was really no place for
a big running back” in Kansas’
offense. The Jayhawks’ leading
rusher last season was 6-foot-1
freshman Toben Opurum.
“As we all know,” Quigley said,
“that’s not true because Toben is
bigger than I am.”
In turn, Quigley moved to line-
backer but never settled in. He
played sparingly and recorded
just three tackles.
Yet now he’s returned to run-
ning back, competing for carries
against Opurum and a handful of
less-experienced players in Gill’s
more run-oriented offense.
Quigley said Kansas has been
working heavily this spring on
the I-formation — two running
backs with the quarterback under
center, not in shotgun. Kansas
rarely used this formation in the
recent past.
“Downhi l l
r u n n i n g , ”
Quigley said.
“That’s what I
like to do. In
high school,
I never really
ran shotgun.
We’re back to
under center.
I’m loving it.”
Q u i g l e y ,
who is tall for
a running back at 6-foot-1, still
has aspects he needs to improve
upon.
Under Mangino, Quigley
repeatedly heard the words “pad
level,” a reference to his upright
running style instead of keep-
ing his shoulder pads low to the
ground. Under Gill, the phrase
hasn’t gone away.
“Initially, when the spring
started, his pad level was a lit-
tle high,” running backs coach
Reggie Mitchell said. “Now he’s
starting to get that down and get
a feel for being a running back.”
At the end of practice Friday,
Quigley stood outside Memorial
Stadium and interacted with
members of the media. He
answered each question thought-
fully and once again held little
back.
Last season, this scene
appeared highly unlikely. But
Quigley, comfortable at running
back again, is noticing recently
that times do change.
“Things are looking up around
here,” Quigley said.
— Edited by Drew Anderson
SERIES RESULTS
Game 1:
Baylor 8, Kansas 0
Game 2:
Kansas 2, Baylor 1
UP NEXT
Nebraska vs. Kansas
WHEN: 5 p.m. Wednesday
WHERE: Arrocha Ballpark,
Lawrence
4B / SPORTS / mondAy, ApriL 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / KAnsAn.com
the first four innings Baylor only
managed one run on six hits and
stranded nine base runners. In the
bottom of the sixth Baylor finally
broke the game wide open scoring
seven runs on nine hits to run-
rule Kansas 8-0. Baylor also outhit
Kansas 15 to two in the game.
The second game was a com-
pletely different story. Kansas took
a 1-0 lead in the top of the second,
but Baylor quickly tied it up in the
bottom of the second. A throw-
ing error by Baylor in the bottom
of the fifth allowed for Jones to
score a run, putting Kansas up
2-1. Kansas wouldn’t need to score
again as it squeaked by in its first
conference victory of the season.
Jones said the team didn’t want to
dwell on the first loss in the series
and wanted to make a statement to
Baylor in the second game.
“I feel like Baylor wasn’t expect-
ing to bounce back like that,” Jones
said. “We came out and wanted to
win more than them.”
Kansas will play again
Wednesday against Nebraska at
Arrocha Ballpark.
— Edited by Kristen Liszewski
football (continued from 1b)
softball (continued from 1b)
GILL: SEcONDARY POSSESSES DEPTH
At times, Kansas’ secondary seemed to be playing
a game of musical chairs last season. The Jayhawks
struggled and, because of that, cornerbacks and safe-
ties rotated in and out of the lineup.
But so far this spring, coach Turner Gill views Kansas’
secondary as one of the strong points of the defense.
“if i had to say today, i’d say the secondary,” Gill said. “i
think that group there, there’s quite a few guys we think
have some skill, have some talent with both corners
and safeties.”
Kansas returns junior cornerback chris Harris, a
veteran player who started opposite Aqib Talib in the
2008 orange Bowl. Freshman Lubbock smith and junior
phillip strozier also received playing time last season.
Last week, Gill singled out the performance and
physical play of junior safety olaitan oguntodu this
spring.
Gill said he hadn’t established a set depth chart
within the secondary yet.
“As a group,” Gill said, “i think there are a lot of quality
players there.”
SPRINGER DEVELOPS INTO LEADER
According to Gill, junior linebacker Justin springer
has developed into one of the defense’s biggest leaders
so far this spring.
springer recorded 25 tackles and played in all 12
games last season.
“springer has been a guy that has jumped out,” Gill
said. “not from a verbal standpoint, but a little bit of his
body language and his productivity in practice.”
ETc.
nFor the second time this spring, Gill praised the
play of sophomore linebacker steven Johnson. Johnson
recorded nine tackles as a backup linebacker and spe-
cial teams player last season.
non Friday, Gill was asked if his team had Big
12-caliber athletes.
“i think that we have potential to have a competitive
team throughout the Big 12,” Gill said. “But again, it’d be
great to play a whole football season and then see it.”
—Jayson Jenks
"You always want to
play out of respect
for a man, not fear"
AnGus quiGLey
Junior running back
MLB
AssociAted Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Dustin
Pedroia collected four hits, includ-
ing a home run, and the Boston Red
Sox beat the Kansas City Royals 8-6
on Sunday.
Adrian Beltre had three hits and
three RBIs for Boston, but was
part of a ninth-inning collision
that resulted in Red Sox left fielder
Jacoby Ellsbury being helped off
the field.
Jose Guillen homered twice and
drove in four runs for the Royals.
Pedroia connected in the fourth
against right-hander Gil Meche,
who came off the disabled list after
being hampered by a stiff shoulder
at the end of spring training. It was
the second baseman’s 13th career
game with at least four hits.
Guillen led off the second with a
drive to center and hit a three-run
shot off Ramon Ramirez in the
eighth to get Kansas City within
two. Ramirez failed to retire any of
the three hitters he faced.
Jonathan Papelbon worked a
perfect ninth for his second save in
two opportunities.
Boston sent eight men to the
plate during its four-run first.
Victor Martinez singled in Ellsbury
and scored on Beltre’s base hit.
Clay Buchholz (1-0) worked five
innings for the Red Sox, yielding
three runs, and seven hits.
Pedroia collects four
hits in win against Kc
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Ethan Padway
epadway@kansan.com
The Kansas rowing team faced
stiff competition from three east
coast schools this weekend: Old
Dominion, Rhode Island, and
Bucknell.
Despite the tough competition,
the Jayhawks still managed to come
out on top in four of the 12 races.
“There is a lot of high school
rowing out (east),” coach Rob
Catloth said. “They have more kids
who gained experience rowing in
high school. Here we take kids
from other sports and turn them
into rowers.”
The first varsity four-person boat
built on earlier victories against
Texas and Kansas State by winning
head-to-head races against Rhode
Island and Bucknell. The Jayhawks
raced down to the wire, defeating
Rhode Island by less than three
seconds and Bucknell by less than
five.
The second varsity eight-person
boat defeated Old Dominion in the
morning and then the Jayhawks
novice eight boat finished ahead
of Rhode Island for Kansas’ fourth
victory of the day.
The Jayhawks raced a grueling
12 races in slightly more than 24
hours.
“Having all
the races in the
short period of
time was very
b e n e f i c i a l ,”
senior Stacy
Rachow said. “It
gave us a better
feel on how the
boats compete when together.”
The Jayhawks have a two-week
break before returning to the water
competitively against Minnesota in
St. Paul, Minn., on April 24.
“Now we have two weeks to fix
the mistakes we made.” Rachow
said.
Minnesota will be the final tune-
up for Kansas before the Big 12
championship rolls around May 1.
— Edited by Kelly Gibson
Kansas takes 4 wins over weekend
rachow
associatEd PrEss
CLEVELAND — Mickael
Pietrus scored all 12 of his
points in the fourth quarter
and Jameer Nelson hit a big
3-pointer in the closing min-
utes, leading the Orlando Magic
to a 98-92 win Sunday over the
Cleveland Cavaliers, who rested
LeBron James for the playoffs
Pietrus was a matchup night-
mare in the playoffs last season
for Cleveland, averaging 13.9
points in the Eastern Conference
finals when the Magic beat the
Cavs in six games. He made a
pair of 3s to open the fourth and
Nelson hit his with 2:53 left to
put Orlando ahead 96-88.
Dwight Howard scored 22
points with 13 rebounds and six
blocks for Orlando.
Delonte West had 21 points
and Mo
Williams had
19 with nine
assists for the
Cavaliers, who
finished the
regular season
35-6 at home.
J a m e s
watched the
game from the
bench along
with Shaquille
O’Neal, who
has been out
since tearing a thumb ligament
Feb. 25 and hasn’t been cleared
by doctors to play. Cleveland
anticipates having him in the
postseason and will need the
7-foot-1 center to get past
Howard and the Magic.
The Cavs had no answer
inside during last year’s play-
offs against Orlando’s big man,
who muscled his way to the rim
against Zydrunas Ilgauskas, Ben
Wallace and Anderson Varejao.
O’Neal, if he’s healthy, believes
he can neutralize the Magic’s
Superman.
Cleveland coach Mike Brown
sat James for a third straight
game, giving the reigning MVP
— and almost certainly the
next one, too — additional rest
for the playoffs, which begin
next weekend. Dressed in a
beige sports coat and matching
slacks, James sat at the end of
Cleveland’s bench and even took
a turn behind the TV micro-
phone during the first quarter
of ABC’s national broadcast.
During his interview, James
discussed the Cavs’ roster
upgrades and said the team’s
biggest acquisition, O’Neal, has
lost 20 pounds since getting
hurt.
The Cavs have been hoping to
get O’Neal back before the post-
season to shake off some expect-
ed rust, but Brown said team
doctors have not yet cleared the
17-year veteran
to play.
W h i l e
Cleveland used
the home fina-
le to get rest
and address a
recent loss of
defensive inten-
sity, the defend-
ing Eastern
C o n f e r e n c e
c h a m p i o n
Magic played
all their starters
at least 24 minutes and worked
out a few late-season kinks.
Orlando, which has wrapped
up the No. 2 seed in the East,
can still beat out the Los Angeles
Lakers for the second-best over-
all record, which would give the
Magic home-court advantage if
the two teams meet in the finals
for the second straight year.
“We’re not in the same situ-
ation Cleveland is in, that’s the
bottom line,” coach Stan Van
Gundy said.
Cavs can’t close;
Magic overcome
NBA
“We’re not in the
same situation Cleve-
land is in, that’s the
bottom line.”
StAN VAN GuNdy
Orlando Magic coach
NBA
New Orleans snaps 5-game losing
streak with victory against Minn.
associatEd PrEss
NEW ORLEANS — Emeka
Okafor scored 23 points and the
New Orleans Hornets snapped a
five-game skid with a 114-86 vic-
tory over the woeful Minnesota
Timberwolves on Sunday night.
Darren Collison had 17 points
and 11 assists, and fellow rookie
Marcus Thornton scored 22 points
to help the Hornets win for only
the fifth time in 22 games.
Julian Wright added a season-
high 16 points, and David West
had 10 points and 12 rebounds in
the Hornets' final home game of
the season.
Ryan Gomes scored 18 points
for the Timberwolves, who played
without coach Kurt Rambis after he
was ejected for arguing a call early
in the second quarter. The Wolves
have lost five straight and 21 of
their last 22 games.
The Hornets' dominating per-
formance allowed George Shinn to
enjoy a victory in what was likely
his last home game as majority
owner of the club he founded in
1988. Shinn sat in his courtside
seats next to wife Denise and with
his daughter and two sons sitting
nearby.
Shinn, who recently underwent
treatment for prostate cancer, is
negotiating to sell his shares of
the club to minority owner Gary
Chouest, a Louisiana native and
owner of a company that supports
the offshore oil and gas industry.
New Orleans led by as much as
much as 28 in the third quarter
when Okafor's 6-foot hook made
it 74-46, capping a 14-4 run that
began with Okafor's 14-foot jumper
and included a 3-pointer by Morris
Peterson. The game was never in
doubt after that as Minnesota got
no close than 18 points.
New Orleans outshot Minnesota
52 percent to 39 percent and out-
rebounded the Timberwolves
49-30. The Hornets also outscored
the Wolves 70-32 in the paint, 18-8
on second-chance points and 23-6
on fast break points.
Al Jefferson returned to the line-
up after missing two games while
attending to a hospitalized family
member, but had only five points
and three rebounds in 30 minutes.
Ramon Sessions scored 17 points
for Minnesota and Jonny Flynn
had 11.
Okafor, who came in averag-
ing 10.2 points, scored nine points
in the first quarter to help New
Orleans to a 25-21 lead.
New Orleans led 31-25 when
the Wolves started to implode.
Jefferson was called for traveling
while attempting a reverse layup.
Rambis didn't agree and drew two
quick technical fouls, the first from
official Eli Roe and the other from
Ron Garretson, the second trigger-
ing the coach's ejection.
New Orleans then scored the
next six points to take a 37-25
lead.
Minnesota shot only 33 percent
in the quarter (4 of 12), while the
Hornets shot 63 percent (12 of 19).
Flynn, who had nine points in
the first half, cut the Wolves' deficit
to eight with two free throws with
3:28 to go in the second period.
James Posey then hit a 3, igniting
an 11-0 run to close the quarter
and widen the Hornets' lead to 19
at 58-39 at halftime.
NBA
Miami grabs win
over Milwaukee
NEW yOrK — dwyane
Wade scored 32 points and
the Miami Heat pulled into a
tie for ffth place in the Eastern
Conference with a 111-98 vic-
tory over the New york Knicks
on Sunday night
Michael Beasley added 16
points, and udonis Haslem and
former Knicks forward Quentin
richardson had 14 apiece for
the Heat, who won for the 10th
time in 11 games and joined
the Milwaukee Bucks at 45-35.
they hit 26 of 42 shots (62
percent) across the middle two
quarters to build a comfortable
lead after a slow start.
david lee scored 26 points
and danilo Gallinari had 19
for the Knicks, who lost their
third straight and dropped all
three meetings to the Heat this
season.
the Heat's push for ffth
stalled Friday with a home loss
to detroit that snapped their
nine-game winning streak, but
they bounced back with their
seventh straight road victory,
fourth-best in franchise history.
—Associated Press
ROwINg
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2010census.gov
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There are special programs in place to count students on campus. But if you live off
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n d j
[ d g b
6B / SPORTS / monday, april 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kansan.com
GREG BEACHAM
associated press
LOS ANGELES — Martell
Webster hit three free throws
with 3.1 seconds left, and the
Portland Trail Blazers improved
their chances of avoiding the Los
Angeles Lakers in the playoffs with
a 91-88 victory over the defending
NBA champions Sunday.
Kobe Bryant and Derek Fisher
combined to miss three free throws
in the final 6.9 seconds, and Pau
Gasol missed a three-pointer at
the buzzer for the Lakers, who
have lost six of nine.
LaMarcus Aldridge had 24
points and 11 rebounds for the
Blazers, who lost leading scorer
Brandon Roy at
halftime with a
sore right knee.
Webster scored
16 points and
Andre Miller
added 15 for
the Blazers,
while Marcus
Camby had
10 points and
17 rebounds,
including a go-ahead tip-in basket
with 12.7 seconds left.
Portland (49-31) also snapped
a five-game road losing streak
against the Lakers while moving
into a seventh-
place tie with
San Antonio
in the Western
C o n f e r e n c e
s t a n d i n g s .
Given the
Blazers’ two-
month surge,
they probably
don’t care who
they face: They
haven’t lost back-to-back games
since Feb. 19-21.
Gasol had 23 points and 12
rebounds for the Lakers, while
Bryant had 20 points on 8-of-
23 shooting. After clinching the
top seed by beating Minnesota
on Friday, the Lakers simply are
trying to stay
healthy before
the playoffs
begin in a week
— but Bryant
still decided not
to shut himself
down for the
regular season.
Bryant took
the Lakers’ last
two games off to
rest his litany of injuries, most
prominently his swollen right
knee. Bryant also has a broken
bone in a finger on his shooting
hand and a sprained ankle.
After a rocky performance
that didn’t include a free throw
until the final
31 seconds,
Bryant made a
three-pointer
and a three-
point play in
the final min-
ute while Los
Angeles ral-
lied from a
s e ven- poi nt
deficit to take
an 87-86 lead. But after Camby’s
tip-in, Bryant clanged two free
throws.
Gasol rebounded Bryant’s sec-
ond miss and got it to Fisher, who
was fouled by Miller — but the
veteran point guard also missed
his first free throw before tying it
with 4.7 seconds to play.
Fisher then fouled Webster,
reaching in on a desperation
3-point attempt — although
Bryant also could have been called
for contact. The reserve swingman
coolly made three straight free
throws for the second time in the
final 3:34.
Roy, the Blazers’ leading scorer
with 21.8 points per game, played
11 minutes in the first half before
the Blazers ruled him out at half-
time with knee soreness. Roy
had struggled with a sore back in
recent days, missing practice to
rest up for the playoffs.
Bryant picked up his 14th tech-
nical foul of the season after the
first quarter.
NBA
Kobe Bryant and Derek
Fisher both missed free
throws for the Lakers in
the fnal 6.9 seconds and
Pau Gasol missed a three-
pointer at the Buzzer.
The Lakers clinched the
top seed in the Western
Conference on Friday, so
they are simply trying to
stay healthy before the
playofs begin in a week.
White Sox hold of
Twins in play at plate
cHicaGo — J.J. Hardy was
nailed at the plate for the fnal out
when he tried to score on pinch-
hitter Jim Thome’s long drive, and
the chicago White sox held of
the minnesota Twins 5-4 sunday.
Hardy singled with two outs
against Bobby Jenks and took of
when Thome hit a shot into the
left-center feld gap. left felder
Juan pierre retrieved the ball on
the warning track and threw to
third baseman mark Teahen.
Teahen’s relay to catcher a.J.
pierzynski arrived in plenty of
time, and Hardy was beaten by
so much that he didn’t slide or go
barreling home.
pinch-hitter andruw Jones
singled home the go-ahead run
in the eighth. mark Buehrle (2-0)
pitched eight innings and Jenks
held on for his frst save.
paul konerko hit a two-run
home run, and mark kotsay and
Gordon Beckham had solo shots
for the White sox, who snapped a
four-game losing steak.
Joe mauer was 2 for 4 with
two doubles for the Twins, who
fnished a season-opening road
trip 5-2 and are set to open Target
Field against the Boston red sox
on monday.
Buehrle settled down after the
third inning for another strong
start, allowing four runs and eight
hits. He walked two and struck
out one
Twins starter nick Blackburn
pitched 7 2-3 innings, allowing
fve runs, eight hits and one walk.
With two outs in the eighth
inning, Blackburn gave up back-
to-back singles to konerko and
carlos Quentin. after left-hander
Jose mijares replaced Blackburn,
White sox manager ozzie Guil-
len sent Jones to bat for kotsay.
Jones singled to left and Quentin
scored, just beating delmon
young’s throw.
— Associated Press
Portland sinks late free throws to defeat slumping Los Angeles Lakers
Weekend warrior
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN
Jessica McMillan, a senior fromGarden City, forehands the ball Sunday night. McMillan usually plays a couple times a week when she can.
MLB
MLB
Yankees complete
road trip with win
AssoCiAtEd PREss
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — The
New York Yankees are ready for
another celebration.
The World Series champions
wrapped up a successful season-
opening road trip Sunday before
heading back to the Bronx for a
special ceremony that will pre-
cede the team’s home opener on
Tuesday.
“We’re ready to get back,” out-
fielder Nick Swisher said. “We
get our rings and
I’m juiced about
that.”
The Yankees
are also feel-
ing good about
going 4-2 against
AL East rivals
Boston and
Tampa Bay in
the first week of
the season.
A.J. Burnett
pitched seven
strong innings and Jorge Posada
and Alex Rodriguez drove in two
runs apiece to pace Sunday’s 7-3
win over the Rays.
“Playing a team like Boston
to open up the season, and not
only that, come and play the Rays
right after that, these are two
tough series. I think it just shows
where our focus is,” Swisher said.
“We feel good. We feel we have
a great team. We’re getting great
pitching.”
CC Sabathia took a no-hit
bid into the eighth inning of
Saturday’s 10-0 rout. Burnett gave
up singles to Jason Bartlett and
Carl Crawford to start Sunday’s
game, then limited Tampa Bay
to four hits over the next six
innings.
Joba Chamberlain pitched the
eighth, yielding an RBI triple
to Crawford. Mariano Rivera
worked a scoreless ninth in a
non-save situation as the Yankees
won their second straight game
after dropping the opener of
the weekend series at Tropicana
Field.
“This is a tough trip to start
out,” manager Joe Girardi said.
“Two teams in
your division that
are very good and
you’re able to win
both series. It’s a
very good trip for
us.”
Posada’s two-
run homer off
Randy Choate
(0-1) gave the
Yankees a 3-2
lead in the sixth.
Rodriguez dou-
bled off the wall in
left field to drive in two to make it
6-2 in seventh, and Nick Swisher
added a solo homer in the eighth
off Andy Sonnanstine.
Burnett, who walked three and
struck out one, worked out of a
jam in the sixth after the Rays
loaded the bases, helped by Evan
Longoria’s infield pop single that
struck a speaker attached to one
of the catwalks in the domed sta-
dium before falling to the field.
Tampa Bay went 3-3 on its
season-opening homestand, with
its starting pitchers compiling a
3.41 ERA. In contrast, the bull-
pen posted a 7.78 ERA during the
homestand.
“I think it just shows
where our focus is.
We feel good. We
feel we have a great
team.”
nick sWisHEr
yankees outfelder
5
$
all you can eat
buffet ANYTIME
Rock Chalk Cafe located inside Naismith Hall
*valid with KU ID or coupon
THE ONLY
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*some restrictions apply
INDIVIDUAL LEASES
[ ]
GPM
Garber Property Management
5030 Bob Billings Pkwy, Ste. A
785.841.4785
Stone Meadows South
Town homes
Adam Avenue
3 bdrm
2 baths
1700 sq. ft.
Stone Meadows West
Brighton Circle
3 bdrm
2 1/2 baths
1650 sq. ft.
$950
Lakepointe Villas
3-4 bdrm houses


$1000
$1300 - $1500
Now leasing
For Summer
and Fall!
* Pets okay with deposit!
* NO application fee!
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2010 / CLASSIFIEDS / 7B
www.FIRSTMANAGEMENTINC.com
briarstone
1008 Emery Rd • 749-7744
canyon court
700 comet lane • 832-8805
chase court
1942 stewart ave • 843-8220
highpointe
2001 w6th st • 841-8468
MELrose court
1605 tennessee • 843-8220
oread
1201 oread • 841-8468
parkway commons
3601 clinton pkwy • 842-3280
parkway townhomes
3520 w. 22nd st. • 842-3280
saddlebrook
625 folks rd • 832-8200
-leasing for fall-
downtown lofts
10th and massachusetts • 841-8468
I can’t think of a better place to
study come August — Can you?
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Paid Survey Takers Needed in Lawrence.
100% FREE to Join! Click on Surveys.
1326 or 1336 Massachusetts 4bd/1ba
hardwood foors, WD, DW, AC and off
street parking near dwntn. Avail. Aug 1 for
$1520/mo. 760.840.0487
1428 West 19th Terrace
3 BR 1 BA House, DW, Avail Aug 1,
$1050 Call 843-8540 ext. 23
1015-25 Mis.
Remodeled 1&2 BR’s
Next to Memorial Stad.
MPM 841-4935
1712 Ohio
Large 3&4 BR’s
Only $900 & 1080
MPM 841-4935
1BR, 1BA (very spacious!) sublease
avail.for Jun-Jul in 3BR, 2BA. 6th & Iowa.
Friendly roommates (2 girls). Kelsie at
620-491-0047. hawkchalk.com/4471
1BR/1BA sublease in a great summer
house at 1009 Connecticut. W/D,
dishwasher, parking in back, porch,
deck.
$370/mo. hawkchalk.com/4793
1BR/1BA SUBLET Avail. May. $315
OBO. Near 6th & Mich. Parking, Laundry
in apt. (816) 868-5810. hawkchalk.
com/4774
1 roommate needed for a 3 br/3 ba town-
home. Male or Female. Sublease through
July 31st. $292/month + utilities. W/D, 1
cat, so pets are welcome! sgoetz@ku.edu
383-6512 hawkchalk.com/4759
1,2,3,4+ apts, townhomes available
Summer & Fall. Peaceful location,
Pool, pets allowed, pation/balcony,
on KU & Lawrence bus route call 785-
843-0011
1-2-3 or 4 BR, W/D included, , owner man-
aged and maintained, pets possible, June
& Aug avail, 785-842-8473, jwampr@sun-
fower.com
Women’s purple bike for sale w/lock
and new bike seat. Good condition...
only ridden once! $60 OBO. Call
(847)477-0242
hawkchalk.com/4778
LOST CAR KEYS! Black Ford key and 1
other silver key. Last seen in Kansas
Union b/w 5-10 p.m. 4/6/10. Call Tyler at
785-840-5454
BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING
PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT 108.
Camp Counselors, male and female,
needed for great overnight camps in the
mountains of PA. Have a fun summer
while working with children in the out-
doors. Teach/assist with water sports,
ropes course, media, archery, gymnas-
tics, environmental ed, and much more.
Offce, Nanny & Kitchen positions also
avaliable. Apply on-line at
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Earn $1000-$3200/mo to
drive new cars with ads.
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CAMP TAKAJO, Maine, picturesque
lakefront location, exceptional facilities,
experience of a lifetime! From mid-June
to mid-August. Counselor positions
available in land sports, water sports,
fne arts, outdoor education call (800)
250 8252 for info and online application
- takajo.com
HELP WANTED: Student needed to
watch 9 yr old appx 10 days/mo for
the summer. Free room & board in a
nice west side home. Flexable Sched-
ule. Call 785-865-6223 if interested.
No app. fee for 1 & 3 BR apt. and houses.
Avail. Aug 1, most have wood foors,
close to KU, W/D. Some pets ok, $395 -
$810, 785-841-3633 anytime
Paid Internships
with Northwestern Mutual
785-856-2136
Summer Nanny
2 boys ages 10 & 11 - must have
experience with boys, reliable transpor-
tantion & be okay with dogs & cats
20-30 hours per week - call 785-760-
4501
Wanted German Student to converse
with elderly German Woman. $10/hr.
E-mail resume to offce@dgraves-law.
com
2 & 3 BR Town-homes and Houses
Available August. FP, garages, pets ok.
Call 785-842-3280
2 and 3BRs, leasing now and for Aug. For
more info, visit www.lawrencepm.com or
call (785) 832-8728.
3 BR 2 BA. Near downtown & KU.
916 Indiana. $850/mo. Remodeled.
816-522-3333.
3 BR, 1 BA, central air, W/D, off-street
parking, 818 Kentucky, 785-842-6618
rainbowworks1@yahoo.com
2 BR August lease available. Next to
campus. Jayhawk Apts. 1130 W 11th
$600/mo. No pets. 785-556-0713
2 BR, Close to KU, Avail. August, 1 Car
Garage, Fenced, Great Condition.
Call 785-841-3849
4 BR House with hardwood foors, w/d,
central air & heat, next to campus
avail aug, $1700 - 913.683.8198
3 BR, 2 BA. Walk to KU. Avail.
Aug. or June. All Appliances, 2 Car
Garage, Large Yard Call: 785-841-3849
3BR 2BA condo with W/D near campus.
$250/mo. each +1/3 util Will Split Lease
Avail Aug 1. Please call 785-550-4544.
4BR house needs 2 male roommates
next yr. Very nice, clean house w/
appliances/-furniture. 1000 Hilltop. $400/
mo. Tyler@ 913-484-2039. hawkchalk.
com/4772
5 Br, 2 BA, central air, W/D, off-street
parking, 820 Kentucky, 785-842-6618
rainbowworks1@yahoo.com
4BR 3 1/2BA house for rent. Fenced
backyard. W/D. Central heat and air. Very
spacious. Close to campus. $1450/mo.
Please Call Chris 913-205-8774
Attention seniors & grad students!
Real nice, quiet 2 BR house close to KU.
Avail. 8/1. Hard wood foors. Lots of win-
dows. No pets or smoking. 331-5209.
Avail. August 1st. 1 & 2/BR apts close to
GSP/Corbin, between campus and
downtown. No pets. Utilities Paid. $475/
mo for 1BR. $325/ea per mo. for 2BR.
Call 785-550-5012
900 Alabama
4 BR 2 BA, DW, Avail Aug 1 $1640
Call 843-8540 ext. 23
Applecroft Apts.
19th & Iowa
Studio, 1 & 2 Bedrooms
Gas, Water & Trash Pd.
Move-In Specials Avail.
785-843-8220
chasecourt@sunfower.com
Beautiful 2, 3 & 4 BR homes.
Available immediately. We love pets.
Call for details. 816-729-7513
Beautiful 3BR Apartment Avail. Now!
W/D, pool, gym, garages & security sys-
tems avail. Only $795/mo! 785-842-3280
CANYON COURT APTS.
700 Comet Ln.
(785) 832-8805
Now Leasing for Fall!!
3BR $995, 2BR $795, 1BR
$660-$680
FOR RENT! 3BR, 2BA house-
Updated. 5BR, 3-1/2BA house. $525
per room! Close to campus, down-
town and stadium- 700 block of Ilinois.
Avail. JUNE 1! 816-686-8868
Chase Court
19th & Iowa
1 & 2 Bedrooms
1BR Move-in Special
$300 off Aug. thru 4/30/2010
785-843-8220
chasecourt@sunfower.com
Check us out!
Large remodeled
1,2,3 and 4 Br’s
www.southpointeks.com
843-6446
Coolest Apartments in Town! 2BR &
4BR loft apartments in N. Lawrence
located at 642 Locust St. Hardwood
foors and all modern conveniences.
$875 for 2BR and $1575 for 4BR per
month. Available Aug 1st. Call 785-550-
8499.
Duplex for rent! 3 BDR 2.5 BATH. 2 Car
Garage. W/D. $350/ per person plus utili-
ties. Avail Aug 1-785-550-4544.
Female Roommate Needed for Su/
Fall! 3 girls live in 4BD/2BA home at
19th & Naismith. $300/mo + 1/4 utils.
913-940-7448. hawkchalk.com/4789
NICE 1BR/1BA. 500 sqft. $435/mo. W/D.
2 MIN. WALK TO KU. $150 dep. Ready
May 22 to end of lease on July 31, 2010.
mbigbee@ku.edu. hawkchalk.
com/4791
HOUSE FOR RENT Mid May-July 31.
$358/mo + utils. Right by the Rec center!
2BRs avail. Text: 254-702-2560.
hawkchalk.com/4790
Houses and apartments, all sizes and
locations 785-749-6084
www.eresrental.com
Large 3 BR 2 BA Duplex. 1 & 2 car
garages, FP, W/D, 785-832-8728,
www.lawrencepm.com
Need female subletter for Jun-Jul. @ The
Reserve. $389 + elec. Pool, parking,
cable/internet incl. Fully furn. 3BR/3BA
(847)477-0242. hawkchalk.com/4779
One roommate needed to share 1800 sqft
house. $250/mo + utils. jollyjayhawk@g-
mail.com. hawkchalk.com/4777
Studio, 1-3 BR apts., 3-7 BR houses
near KU. Check it out: A2Zenterprises.
info Click on “Residential Rentals.”
841-6254.
Sublease 1BR in 4BR apt. May or
June1-Aug1, lease renewable.
Furnished. A/C, 2BA. $319 inc. utils.
Rent nego. Orchard Corners on bus
route 785-760-7173.
hawkchalk.com/4792
Sublease June and July 1 br Apt. w/ A/C;
across st from campus; DW, pool, W/D.
All Utilities PAID except elec.; On KU bus
route. Pets ok 7857270143/yara86@ku.-
edu hawkchalk.com/4757
Summer lease. June & July, 4BR and
3BR. Close to KU. Great condition.
Call 785-841-3849.
Summer Sublease
Female Roommate needed to share 3BR
2BA condo with W/D near campus.
$290/mo. +1/3 util. Avail May 15
Please call 785-550-4544.
Three Bedroom Townhome Special!
$810 ($270 per person). Avail. in August!
www.lorimartownhomes.com
(785) 841-7849
Urgently need roommates by June!
1028 Tenn. 4BR, 2BA, W/D, close to
campus. 913-306-3424. Zack22@
ku.edu.hawkchalk.com/4788.
1125 Tenn
HUGE 3&4 BR’s
W/D included
MPM 841-4935
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FOR SALE
JOBS
HOUSING HOUSING HOUSING HOUSING
HOUSING
50"Toshiba TV Model#TP50G50-Not
HD.$175 or best offer! Moving & need to
sell.Call/email me if interested 847-571-
7149, xsarah8x@ku.edu.Come take a lot at it
if interested. hawkchalk.com/4801
Loveseat for sale, tan suede, excellent condi-
tion, rarely used. $125 OBO, matches tan
suede couch also listed. Contact 316-288-
9449 if interested. hawkchalk.com/4807
KUMC Diabetes Transition Clinic
Are you 16-29 with Type 1 diabetes or Type
2 diabetes managed with insulin for at least
one year? You may be eligible to participate
in a KUMC research study
designed to give you the tools to navigate and
become a self-advocate in the adult health-
care system. Also, learn to address unique
challenges young adults face and how life
choices affect and are affected by diabetes.
For more information please contact Louise
Voelker at lbales-voelker@kumc.edu or call
(913) 588-1045.
CAMP COUNSELORS wanted for private
Michigan boys/girls summer overnight
camps. Teach swimming, canoeing, lacrosse,
skiing, sailing, sports, computers, tennis,
archery, riding, crafts, drama, climbing,
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jobs too. Salary $1900+, free room/board.
APPLY ONLINE! www.lwcgwc.com, or call
888-459-2492.
Hetrick Air Services is seeking self-
motivated person for part-time receptionist
at Lawrence Municipal Airport. Phones,
unicom, bookkeeping, fight school opera-
tions and cleaning. Must be detail oriented
with knowledge of Microsoft Word and
Excel. 4-8pm evenings plus weekend hours.
1-2 evenings per week and 2-3 weekends per
month for year round. Must be available for
summer hours. Pick up applications 8am-
8pm at Lawrence Municipal Airport, 1930
Airport Road.
PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MON-
EY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors
to teach all land, adventure & water sports.
Great Summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply:
campcedar.com.
1 BR/BA4 sublease @ Legends. May 15-
July 31. MAY RENT PAID! $459/mo, all
utl. inclu., fully furnished, w/d, pets ok, good
parking. (540) 271-2135, jhieber@ku.edu
hawkchalk.com/4818
Melrose Court. 1BR in 2BR Sublease.
May 17th-July 31st. $460/mo. Fully Fur-
nished, Pool, Parking, W/D, Workout Facil-
ity, next to campus & bars. Email swoody3@
ku.edu; hawkchalk.com/4815
Need girl 2 sublease room @ The Reserve
next year! 3 other female roommates.
$329/mo. Own bedroom and bathroom.
Furnished. Great apt! Contact: 817-727-3986.
hawkchalk.com/4819
Sublease Mid May-July 31st. 3 BR/2 BA
house. $350/person; great deal; close to cam-
pus! Located right by the Rec on Missouri St.
hawkchalk.com/4794
Summer Sublease 1 BR in 3BR, 1.5 BA,
2 story townhome behind Meadowbrook.
Cheap rent & fun place for summer! $262/
month. Contact Kassie at kassiea@ku.edu or
832-723-6056; hawkchalk.com/4816
785-842-3040 village@sunflower.com
GREAT LOCATIONS
PET FRIENDLY
STUDIO, 1 BR,
2 BR, 3BR
Available for Summer & Fall
Stonecrest
Village Square
Hanover Place
A P A R T M E N T S
Apartments & Townhomes A a t e t & T h e
by KU Students in 2009
Call Today to Set Up a Tour
Voted “Best Apartments”
Leasing NOW thru
August 2010
www.meadowbrookapartments.net
Floor plans, Photos and
Availability on our website
Studio, 1, 2, & 3 BRs
3 & 4 BRs at Regents Court
(19th & Mass)
785.838.3377 785.841.3339
www.tuckawaymgmt.com
Now Accepting Rental Applications
for Fall 2010
Now Accepting Rental Applications
for Fall 2010
JOBS
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
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for sale
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SALE
Guide.Kansan.Com
It’s 2 a.m. I want food delivered. What’s open?
Junior outfelder Jimmy Waters
Waters had been one of the team’s best hitters
of late, but went 0-for-12 over the weekend and
struck out fve times. As Kansas’ top RBI man,
Waters has excelled all season at hitting with run-
ners on base, but was 0-for-6 in those situations
in Austin.
Price check
With a hit in each game of the series, Robby
Price’s hitting streak is now at 17 games — a new
career high. Price went 4-for-13 during the week-
end with two walks and one RBI.
Left stranded
Despite the success of Texas’ pitching staf,
Kansas did have a number of opportunities to
put up additional runs — none more glaring than
on Friday. The Jayhawks left 13 men on base in the
series opener, including four in extra innings as
they were attempting to retake the lead.
Junior T.J. Walz and senior
Cameron Selik
Kansas’ top two starters were
brilliant on Friday and Saturday,
though the end results didn’t
refect how well they pitched.
After Walz outdueled Texas’
Taylor Jungmann to begin the
series, Selik had his best outing
in nearly a month on Saturday, but sufered the tough-luck loss.
Both needed to have great showings for Kansas to have a chance,
and they rose to the occasion.
From the stat book
10-3
Series to remember
Selik
Waters
BaseBall ReWIND
Kansas vs. TEXas
Series to forget
BaseBall
(continued from 1b)
In perspective
Series notes
Price
8B / SPORTS / monDAy, APRIl 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / KAnSAn.com
Green, like the other Longhorns
pitchers, didn’t allow the Jayhawks
to string together at-bats – which
has been a trademark of their of-
fense this season.
“Teir ability to mix pitches and
throw the frst pitch for a strike ev-
ery time made it pretty difcult,”
Robby Price said.
With Green dealing, the Long-
horns blasted a solo home run in the
sixth to break the 1-1 tie, and added
another run in the eighth to extend
the cushion to 3-1 – which proved
to be enough for the victory.
Texas wasted little time on Sun-
day, taking pressure of its starter,
Brandon Workman, with a six-run
inning in the third of senior Brett
Bollman, which was capped of by a
grand slam by Kevin Lusson.
Kansas fought back with its best
ofensive showing of the weekend,
chipping away for four runs on
eight hits, including a solo home
run by Tony Tompson.
Te Longhorns tacked on two
more runs to extend their lead,
but with the way its pitchers were
throwing, they didn’t need the ad-
ditional runs. Te defcit proved too
much to overcome for Kansas, who
fell to a 10-4 defeat.
Robby Price said the Jayhawks
were dissatisfed to leave Austin
without a victory to show for their
eforts, but that the setback won’t
derail the club.
“We’re fne, no one’s hanging
their heads here,” he said. “Tere’s a
lot of season lef.”
— Edited by Kristen Liszewski
By Ben Ward
bward@kansan.com
Junior Brett Bochy will miss
the rest of the season as he recov-
ers from reconstructive surgery
on his elbow.
Bochy experienced some sore-
ness in his pitching arm afer
picking up a save in last Friday’s
9-5 victory against Texas A&M.
Te team physician gave Bochy
the remainder of the weekend of
to recover.
But afer an MRI revealed a
torn ligament in his elbow, it was
clear that Bochy needed surgery.
Dr. James Andrews, the leading
orthopedic specialist in sports-
related arm and shoulder inju-
ries, performed the surgery dur-
ing the weekend
in Florida. Te
typical recovery
period for the
surgery is 10-12
months.
Te Jayhawks
will defnitely
miss Bochy’s
presence at the
end of games,
but coach Ritch
Price said the injury was crushing
because Bochy is a beloved team-
mate.
“Obviously it’s devastating for
our team, but I feel even worse
for Brett,” he said.
As the team’s
closer, Bochy had
been on an All-
American pace. Te
pitcher was 2-0 with
fve saves and a 0.78
ERA in 12 appear-
ances. He allowed
only two earned
runs in 23 innings
pitched while strik-
ing out 34.
— Edited by Ashley Montgomery
injury ends season for reliever
Entering the series, Kansas had been
10-3 when holding an opponent to
four or fewer runs. So the two losses
after the outstanding starts from Walz and Selik were rarities for a
Jayhawk team that excels when it receives great pitching.
The sweep is a big setback
for the Jayhawks in terms of the
Big 12 standings, but the eforts
turned out by Walz and Selik were
defnite bright spots. Each hurler
threw one of his best outings of
the season, and against a top-10
opponent no less. Though Walz
and Selik fnished with a no
decision and a loss, respectively
– those are the kinds of perfor-
mances Kansas needs out of
them to be successful as confer-
ence play wears on.
Walz
“Obviously, it's
devastating for our
team, but I feel even
worse for Brett.”
RITch PRIcE
coach
Friday:
Texas 3,
Kansas 2
(11 innings)
Saturday:
Texas 3,
Kansas 1
Sunday:
Texas 10,
Kansas 4
Series results
MASTERS
Mickelson takes the spotlight
from Tiger, wins in Augusta
Mcclatchy-triBune
AUGUSTA, Ga. _ This year’s
Masters started out all about
Tiger Woods. But in the end, Phil
Mickelson stole the show from his
rival with back-to-back rounds of
5-under-par 67 and a three-shot
win over Lee Westwood on Sunday
at Augusta National Golf Club to
earn his third Masters champion-
ship in seven years.
Mickelson trailed Westwood
by a shot heading into the final
round. Heher Mickelson becomes
the eighth man to win three or
more Masters tournaments, and
only Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer
and Woods have won more.
Mickelson birdied the 72nd hole
to cap an electric back nine that
included four birdies, allowing him
to outlast Westwood and challenges
from K.J. Choi, Fred Couples and
Anthony Kim. Mickelson finished
at 16 under.
This Masters win was the sweet-
est for Mickelson, who had his
wife and children awaiting him
off the 18th green following the
round. Mickelson shared a long,
emotional embrace with wife Amy,
who was diagnosed with breast
cancer 10 months ago, following
his final putt.
Amy Mickelson hadn’t traveled
to a tournament since May, and
she spent most of this week at a
rented house before going to the
course Sunday. Mickelson didn’t
know his family would be at the
course Sunday.
“We are fortunate long term,
but the meds that
(Amy) has been
taking has been
very difficult,
and she didn’t
feel well, and she’s
not up for a lot
this tournament
can provide,”
Mickelson said.
“And to have her
here and share
the moment and
share the joy of
winning on 18
and to share this with my kids is
something that we’ll look back on
the rest of our lives. This means so
much to us to be able to share this
type of jubilation.”
The 40-year-old fan favorite shot
a torrid back nine for the second
consecutive day and pulled off two
of the most memorable Masters
shots in recent years during the
final two rounds.
Mickelson hit his tee shot right
of the fairway on the par-5 13th.
The ball settled in the pine nee-
dles and between two trees 207
yards away from the green, which
is guarded in front by a creek and
behind by an embankment and
bunkers. The left-hander took aim,
split the trees and landed his sec-
ond shot within 4 feet of the hole.
He missed the short eagle putt but
settled for a birdie and a two-shot
lead at the time.
“Certainly it was critical, and it
was clutch, and it came at a great
time,” he said. “It may have looked
hard, but there was a pretty good-
sized gap between those trees and a
pretty good lie. It was just a 6-iron,
a lot of green left.”
Said Westwood, “His second shot
into 13 was incredible, and then he
just played solid coming in.”
That shot followed a memorable
hole-out on his approach on No.
14 in the third round. Mickelson
got into contention Saturday when
he went eagle-eagle-birdie on Nos.
13-15 to come from five shots
behind.
Mickelson birdied No. 15 on
Sunday, as well, and had a three-
shot lead heading into the final
three holes. Westwood added some
pressure with a birdie on No, 17,
but Mickelson didn’t falter in his
final two holes. He
made a clutch par
putt on No. 17 and
then had the birdie
on the final hole.
“I love Sunday at
Augusta,” Mickelson
said. “Back in the
‘90s, it was the most
nerve-wracking day.
Still is, but I’ve just
come to love and
cherish it, and to play
some of my best golf
this week, as well as
(Sunday), just feels incredible.”
Mickelson has had the rap of
being a player who made costly
mistakes in big moments. He made
plenty of mistakes Sunday, but he
recovered from each one of them,
including errant tee shots on four
holes during a five-hole stretch.
“I made a few loose swings, as I
tend to do,” he said. But Mickelson
made some impressive up-and-
down saves to make par on three
of the holes and had the birdie on
No. 13.
“I let my short game make par,”
he said. Mickelson didn’t say the
par saves energized him, but a
20-foot birdie putt from above the
hole on No. 12 certainly did. It
was the first of his four back-nine
birdies, and it was the one that
broke a tie between him and Choi,
who was attempting to become the
second consecutive Asian to win a
major following Y.E. Yang’s win at
last year’s PGA Championship.
“I love Sunday in
Augusta. Back in the
'90s it was the most
nerve-wracking day.”
PhIl mIcKElSon
2010 masters champion
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U.S. Junior Team
beats world team
PORTLAND, Ore. — North
Carolina-bound Harrison
Barnes scored 27 points and
the U.S. Junior National Select
Team beat a team of young
international players 101-97
at the Nike Hoop Summit on
Saturday night.
Barnes, a 6-foot-8 guard
from Ames (Iowa) High School,
hit a key 3-pointer that put
Team USA up 94-92 with just
over a minute left — after
trailing by 74-62 going into the
fourth quarter.
Although Canadian Cory
Joseph’s layup tied it at 94, the
world team could not pull back
ahead.
Enes Kanter, a 6-foot-10 cen-
ter from Turkey who is commit-
ted to play for Kentucky, had
34 points and 13 rebounds.
Kanter surpassed the Hoop
Summit world team record of
33 points set by Dirk Nowitzki
in 1998.
“I played with my team,” said
Kanter, who is still working on
his English. “I had 34 points
because of my team.”
The U.S. team is part of USA
Basketball’s development
program and coached by Bob
Cimmino of Mount Vernon
High School in New York.
Last year’s team, which
included such players as
Kentucky’s John Wall and
DeMarcus Cousins, fell to the
world team 97-89 in the Hoop
Summit.
Seven former Hoop Summit
players were among the top
20 draft picks in last year’s
NBA draft. Overall, 53 former
Team USA and 15 former world
players were on current NBA
rosters.
On the international side,
the game is a showcase for
future Olympians.
— Associated Press
What to Watch for:
the absence of junior Nate
Barbee — Barbee will not play this
week and is being rested for the
Big 12 Championship. In 10 events
this year, Barbee has fnished in
the top fve in
eight, including
a frst place fnish
at the Kansas
Invitational in
Lawrence back in
September. Bar-
bee will certainly
be missed as he
was just recently
named one of the top 25 college
golfers in the country by Golfstat
Cup Rankings.
“This is a great accomplishment
for Nate and nobody deserves it
more or works harder,” coach Kit
Grove said.
the leadership of senior Bryan
hackenberg — Hackenberg, along
with Barbee led the Jayhawks all
the way from seventh to fourth
place in just one round last week
at the Diet Pepsi Shocker Classic.
Hackenberg
broke out of
his mini-spring
slump to shoot
a 74, 77 and a
72 and secured
a top-10 fnish
individually.
Hackenberg has
a lot of faith in
his team heading into this tourna-
ment.
“If we all pull together I think we
can win this one,” Hackenberg said.

the emergence of freshman
Dan Waite — Playing in his frst
action this spring, Waite has already
solidifed himself
as one of the
top scorers for
the Jayhawks. In
Kansas’ last two
events, Waite fn-
ished in the top
20 individually.
“Dan has re-
ally been playing
well lately and that is defnitely
building his confdence,” Grove said.
KANSAN.COM / thE UNIVErSItY DaILY KaNSaN / MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2010 / SPortS / 9B
mEN’S goLf
Kansas wants strong fnish to regular season
By Andrew
wituszynski
awituszynski@
kansan.com

In five tournaments
this spring season,
Kansas has three top five
finishes including a tie
for first in the Desert
Shootout in Goodyear,
Ariz. On Monday,
Kansas will tee off in its
final tournament of the
season before the Big
12 Championship. The
Jayhawks know they
have to play well this
week and finish strong if
they are to have any shot
at their biggest goal of
the season, making the
NCAA regionals.
— Edited by Drew Anderson

Barbee
Hackenberg
Waite
coLLEgE BaSKEtBaLL
coLLEgE footBaLL
AssOCiAted Press
GAINESVILLE, Fla. _ Here’s
when it sinks in that Tim Tebow is
gone and he isn’t coming back. It’s
when the new backup quarterback
for Florida refers to that bygone
era as “back in the day.”
On Saturday, the Gators held
their first spring scrimmage with-
out Tebow in four years. An esti-
mated crowd of 51,500 showed
up to Ben Hill Griffin Stadium to
welcome in the new starting quar-
terback, John Brantley, and wel-
come back coach Urban Meyer.
Meyer and his wife, Shelley, were
presented honorary degrees at
halftime. Brantley played well in
his debut as a starter.
But a true freshman quarter-
back stole the show. When has
that ever happened here? Try four
years ago.
Tebow-lite made his debut
Saturday. His name is Trey
Burton, a 6-2, 225-pounder from
Venice, Fla. and he had a great
day. Passing: 12 of 18 for 120
yards, one touchdown and one
interception. Rushing: 123 yards
on 10 carries and two touch-
downs.
Burton had a 76-yard run in
the second quarter during a three-
play, 95-yard scoring drive. It was
the highlight of the spring game.
After the game, Burton was asked
if he likes running the ball.
“I wouldn’t want to do anything
else,” said Burton, who runs a
4.5-second 40-yard dash.
And the play that went for 76
yards?
“It’s one of the plays they had
Tebow running back in the day,”
Burton said.
If Tebow is a back-in-the-day
quarterback, then Burton is a
throwback. Get to know him now
and appreciate his performance
Saturday. He likely won’t put
up those kind of numbers until
next spring and, barring injury to
Brantley, won’t be the starter for
two more years.
“Coach has done an awesome
job with me,” Burton said of UF
quarterbacks coach Scot Loeffler.
“They don’t give me too much.
They know exactly how much to
give me, and I’m going to do the
best I can to get this whole play-
book in this summer.”
The first-string offense, which
played against the first-team
defense, won the scrimmage
27-24. Brantley was 15 of 19 for
201 yards and two touchdowns.
Carl Moore, a rising fifth-year
senior, led all receivers with five
receptions for 102 yards and a
score. Receiver Frankie Hammond
Jr., who will be a redshirt sopho-
more this fall, had four receptions
for 20 yards and a touchdown.
Omarius Hines and T.J. Lawrence
_ also redshirt sophomore receiv-
ers _ had one touchdown catch
apiece.
“People have been talking about
our receivers not being as good as
last year’s or our defense not being
as good as last year’s,” Brantley
said. “I think that’s what we want
to prove, we’re not going to miss
anything.”
Summer workouts with strength
coach Mickey Marotti and his staff
begin Monday. The coaching staff
will begin recruiting in earnest for
2011. As for Meyer, his role this
summer is unknown.
Unlike his previous summers as
UF coach, Meyer will not attend
booster club meetings, with assis-
tant head coach Steve Addazio
filling in. Delegating booster club
obligations is the latest step in
an ongoing process of limiting
Meyer’s workload and stress. He
met reporters only three times this
spring and took a medical leave of
absence after the Sugar Bowl in
January.
“I just did some research on
my own, and sports informa-
tion director Steve McClain and
the administration, we did some
research on what other places do
and the focus is on recruiting,
our players, our team and obvi-
ously raising my children and the
coaches raising their children and
doing it the right way,” Meyer
said. “So if that takes away from
other stuff, that’s got to happen.”
Florida starts a new era without Tim Tebow
Ohio State player
makes recovery
LOS ANGELES _ YouTube
ofers the cringe-inducing foot-
age: Ohio State star Evan Turner
takes of for a two-handed
slam and awkwardly lands
fat-backed on the hardwood,
breaking bones in his spine.
“It was horrible,” he said of
his December injury against
Eastern Michigan. “I couldn’t
move. But the worst thing was,
I knew I was going to miss
some games.”
He missed a month’s
worth but came back to lead
the Buckeyes to the Big Ten
regular-season and conference
championships, as well as the
Sweet 16 in the NCAA tourna-
ment.
— McClatchy-Tribune
coLLEgE BaSKEtBaLL
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This year, Ernst & Young
has 24 reasons to celebrate.
Thank you University of Kansas.
���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
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�������������������������������FORTUNE’s “100 Best Places to Work For” list for the 12th year in a row.
Anna Bliss
Kevin Brown
������������
Estefania Bruzzone, intern
�������������, intern
Nathan Daniels, intern
Jonathan. Dorsey
Rebecca Feickert
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�������������, intern
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Katie Kastner, intern
Ashley Kornhaus
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Ryan Mitchell
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Rohit Venkatasubban
Xiaomin Wang, intern
Nicole. Witt
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10B / SPORTS / monday, april 12, 2010 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kansan.com
Kansas wins exhibition game against Saint Louis, 2-1
JUST fOR KIcKS
Jayhawks snag first win in
spring exhibition opener
Photos by Weston White/KANSAN
Freshman midfelder Whitney Berry (center) runs into the arms of teammate Jordyn Perdue. Berry scored the Jayhawks’ frst goal in the 2-1 victory.
This was the third goal of the season for Berry, while freshman Jamie Berry recorded her frst goal of the season.
A Saint Louis player leans over with a bloody nose after
being hit in the face. The Jayhawks held the Billikens
scoreless for the frst 45 minutes of play.
Sophomore forward Kortney Clifton battles for the ball. Kansas played Saint Louis Sat-
urday afternoon at Community America Ballpark in Kansas City in an exhibition game.
Sophomore forward Emily Cressy kicks the ball over her head during the frst half. The Jayhawks
are 1-2 in exhibition play this season.
for more photos of the
game visit kansan.com
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