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Students will be able to -define archaeology - Discuss historiography of archaeology,

What is archaeology? The history of

archaeology

lecturing and Cross over group

-Introducing the objective of the lesson -Asking brainstorming question -Allow students to reflect on brainstorm questions -Give lecture -Order students to discuss in pair and then form small group and finally reformulate new group from previous group and finally -Follow up students activity while they discuss -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and questions Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about the definitions and historical developmen t of archaeology

- Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -Give feed back -Give advice

day 1

Written comme nts of student s through piece of paper on the progres s of the lesson

REFLICTION

CONTENTS OR TOPICS

FEEDBACK

MODE OF DELIVERY

OBJECTIVE S

INSTRUCTORS ROLES AND ACTIVITIES

STUDENTS ROLES AND ACTIVITIES

INSTRUCTO RS HELP

MODE OF ASSESME NT

REFERANCE MATERILAS

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions),Univ ersity of

-Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Question for reflection and peer assessment

California, The Lindbriar corporation

Week 1

- Archaeology and other fields of study

Give reading material lecturing

-Introducing the objective of the lesson -Allow students to reflect on the issue based on reading materials already given -Follow up students activity -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and questions Outside the class room: read books written on the reference part and come with clear information about the relationship between archaeology and other sub disciplines

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions), University of California, The Lindbriar corporation

-Out line the relationship between archaeology and other field of study

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Written comments of students through piece of paper on the progress of the lesson

Randomly ask question for reflection

- Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -Give feed back -Give advice

Day 2

- David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

-The goals of archaeology -Types of archaeology

Brainsto rm question and Gap lecturing And spider diagram

day 3

Introducing the objective of the lesson -Asking brainstorming question -Allow students to reflect on brainstorm questions -Give lecture -Order students to discuss in group and finally tell them to write goals of archaeology and types of archaeology on the board in front of them. -Follow up students activity and time -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and questions Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about types and goals of archaeology

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -Give feed back -Give advice

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions), University of California, The Lindbriar corporation - David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

-Out line different types of the field.

-identify the major goals of archaeology

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Quiz 2%)in the afternoon and oral presentation

Oral comments of students on the progress of the lesson

- Archaeological data - Formation processes of archaeological data

Gap lecturing , discussio n and presenta tion

Introducing the objective of the lesson -Asking brainstorming question -Allow students to reflect on brainstorm questions -Give lecture -Order students to discuss in group and then allow group representatives to present discussion points Follow up students activity -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and presentation Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about how archaeologic al data can be formed.

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -visual aids through projectors -Give feed back -Give advice

Homewo rk and oral presenta tion on the way how archaeol ogical data is formed(5 %)

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions), University of California, The Lindbriar corporation David Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Hurst

- examine formation process of archaeological records

- identify different types of archaeological records

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Written comments of students through piece of paper on the progress of the lesson

Day 4

-Methods
archaeological recovery- Site identification Surface survey

of data

and

Buzz group, visual aids and text based informat ion

excavation

Introducing the objective of the lesson -present information for about 10-15 minutes , give text based information and give students to pair or small group to discuss what they have told. -Allow students to reflect on the topic. -lecturing through pictures, maps, diagrams, that relates to the information given to students -Follow up students activity -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and presentation Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about how archaeologic al data can be formed

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -visual aids through projectors -Give feed back -Give advice

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions) ,University of California, The Lindbriar corporation - David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston. - Colin Renfrew
and Paul Bahn. 1991. Archaeology: Theories, Methods Practices. and

- identify different site identification techniques

-distinguish the methods of archaeological data recovery

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Assignments on reporting how the different archaeological sites in Ethiopia identified(15%)

Oral and Written comments of students on the progress of the lesson

day 5

London,

Thames

-Define and discuss the significance of archaeologi cal record. -Distinguish and explain different ways of -Processing and analysis of archaeological records

Brainsto rm question Gap lecture, jigsaw group

analysis of those archaeologi cal evidences day 6

Introducing the objective of the lesson -Asking brainstorming question -Allow students to reflect on brainstorm questions -Give lecture -Order students to form small group and assign specific tasks such as the different ways of processing and analyzing archaeological data and after completed, splitting the previous group in order to form another group. in the new group each of the group members explain their own task. -Follow up students activity -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works. -Students will be asked to write down everything that comes in their mind about what type of information extracted from archaeological records

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions Outside the class room: read and with books come clear

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -visual aids through projectors -Give feed back -Give advice

Written comme nts of student s through piece of paper on the progres s of the lesson

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions), University of California, The Lindbriar corporation - David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston. -Renfrew Paul 1991. Archaeology: Theories, Methods Practices. and Colin and Bahn.

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Give Homework about different mechanisms used for analysis of archaeological record (5%)

information about analysis of

archaeologic al records

-Identify archaeologi cal evidences and discuss the type of informatio n extracted from those remains

-Reconstruction past

of

the

Thought bubble

-Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about the process of reconstructi on

-identify different models for reconstruct ion

Models or approaches for reconstruction

day 7

Introducing the objective of the lesson -give students related materials and make them think about the topic I going to teach -Allow students to reflect on what they thought -Give lecture -Order students to discuss in group and then allow group representatives to present discussion points Follow up students activity -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions and presentation Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about approaches of reconstructi on

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -visual aids through projectors -Give feed back -Give advice

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the Beginning: An Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions), University of California, The Lindbriar corporation - David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second Edition). Florida (USA), Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

-Stimulus material -gap lecture

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Question for reflection

Written comments of students through piece of paper on the progress of the lesson

- Define and discuss the significance of dating in archaeolog y Distinguish different dating methods that calibrate one another day 8

-Methods of dating in archaeology -Relative chronology

Lecturin g matchin g exercise

-Absolute dating

Introducing the objective of the lesson -Asking brainstorming question -Allow students to reflect on brainstorm questions -Give lecture and matching exercise and allow them to match different type of dating techniques with absolute and relatve dating methods - -Give concluding remarks -Give library and home works

Able to grasp lesson objectives participating actively during discussions Outside the class room: read books and come with clear information about dating methods in archaeology

Make objective and instructions clear -Give clear examples -visual aids through projectors -Give feed back -Give advice

field report on the procedur es of dating archeolo gical records

Oral comme nts of student s (10%)

Brain M.Fagan. 1994. In the An

Instructors comment. -peer comments of students

Beginning:

Introduction to Archaeology (Eight Editions),Univer sity of

California, The Lindbriar corporation - David Hurst Thomas. 1989. Archaeology (second

-Distinguish the advantages of absolute dating method over relative dating method

Edition). Florida (USA), Rinehart Winston. -- Colin Renfrew and Paul Bahn. 1991. Archaeology: Theories, Methods Practices. and Holt, and

Day 9 and 10 prese ntatio n of assign ments alread y given .

Assignments how the

on

reporting different sites in

archaeological

Ethiopia identified (15%)

Assignment on field report

Day 11 and 12

Exam preparation

Day 13

Final exam

ASSESSEMENT METHODS:

1. Class Participation and attendance ..10% 2. Two Assignment. 30% 3. Quiz .. 5%(total) 4. Two Homework ---------------------------------------------------------10% 5. Final Exam 45%

Gondar University Faculty of Social Science and the Humanities Department of Social Anthropology and Gender and Development Studies A Module Guide for introduction to Archaeology
MODULE NAME: Archaeology, Museum, and Heritage Management MODULE CODE: ANTH MODULE NUMBER: 06 STATUS OF THE MODULE: MAJOR AREA COURSE MODULE ECTS: 9 COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY COURSE WEIGHT: YEAR: 2 TARGET GROUPS: Undergraduate Students PREPARED BY: SISAY TIGABU JULY, 2012 COURSE CODE: ANTH 203 COURSE ECTS: SEMESTER: 2

ANTH 203: Introduction to Archaeology Course description


This course is intended to provide a brief introduction to the evolution of archaeology as a scientific field of study, fundamental principles, methods and theory in archaeology. It begins with the goal of archaeology, going on to consider the basic concepts of culture, time, and space, and discusses the findings and excavations of archaeological sites. In addition to these, the course gives some highlights on how archaeologists reconstruct past human culture. This course explores the human past across all inhabited areas of the globe, from the last Ice Age to historic times. Its main focus is the development of human culture and societies from agriculture to technology, and from the earliest civilizations to the spread of populations worldwide. The course fosters a broad knowledge and understanding through a comparative approach to study, introducing methodology and theoretical issues when necessary.

Course Learning Objectives


Upon completion of course, the student will be able to: Understand the development of human cultures worldwide and some of the principles, concepts and techniques used in the study of the archaeology of the world. Describe how to apply knowledge and understanding accurately to a range of issues, questions and problems relating to the contemporary understanding of the global human past, through the critical evaluation and interpretation of archaeological evidence in a variety of case studies. Compare and use different approaches to issues in world archaeology. Youll have the opportunity to deploy your skills to communicate information, arguments and ideas effectively, using the appropriate style and language.

Analyze details of past important cultures worldwide, describing major transitions in prehistory and how this knowledge is important for modern humans and interpreted differently by different interest groups Outline the major trends in human cultural evolution. Describe the cultural adaptations humans have made through time. Possess a general knowledge about the methods archaeologists use to excavate, date, and interpret archaeological sites and data

CONTACT HOURS EFFECTIVE LECTURE HOURS: HOME BASED and EXTRA ACTIVITY: LIBRARY WORK: 30 hours 60 hours 40 hours