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Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 9
GAINING STRENGTH
NATION PAGE 7
DIP IN IQ LINKED
TO TEEN POT USE
HEALTH PAGE 19
ISAAC THREAT TO GULF COAST WELL BEYOND NEW ORLEANS
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Local parents hoping to open a
new charter school on the east side
of Redwood City next fall have
one last hurdle before really start-
ing to plan a vote by the
Redwood City Elementary School
District Board of Trustees.
Earlier this summer, Connect
Community Charter School submit-
ted a proposal to the district in
hopes of opening a school that fea-
tures shared leadership, social-emo-
tional learning and an inquiry-based
approach. On Wednesday, the board
is scheduled to vote on the proposal.
Both sides have, however, agreed to
extend the deadline to vote. The
board must take action on or before
Sept. 11. If approved, as is recom-
mended, the charter backers can get
to work raising funds, starting
enrollment and looking for a home
to open the new school.
Before the board is a recommen-
dation from Superintendent Jan
Christensen to approve the proposal
contingent on the two sides both
approving a memorandum of under-
standing.
Whitney Wood, one of the 13
founders, was encouraged by the
recommendations but was waiting
for Wednesdays vote before getting
started on the work ahead. She
added that working with the district
thus far has been a thoughtful, col-
laborative experience which those at
Connect hope to continue.
The proposal for Connect
Community Charter School outlines
Charter school awaitingvote
Some financial concerns remain, but Redwood City superintendent recommends approval
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Up until shortly before the dead-
line to le to run for the two open
seats on the Half Moon Bay City
Council Aug. 10, incumbents
Marina Fraser and John Muller
thought they would both be running
uncontested, with no need for the
city to hold an election this
November.
But that changed when Harvey
Rarback walked into the city clerks
ofce and handed in his paperwork
with a little more than three hours
before the 5 p.m. deadline.
An hour later, John Charles Ullom
led his paperwork making the Half
Moon Bay council race a four-per-
Two candidates
join Half Moon
Bay council race
Newcomers want to oust incumbents
By Michelle
Durand
DAILY JOURNAL
STAFF
The wife of a
Japanese vice
consul testified
yesterday that
he stabbed her
hand with a
screwdriver after she searched his
cellphone for evidence of a relation-
ship with a fellow embassy employ-
ee and left her bruised on several
other occasions from kicks and
punches.
She further testied she did not
call police because thats not how
people in her country handle domes-
Japanese government official
begins domestic violence trial
Translator snafus trip up proceedings
Marina Fraser and John Muller
Harvey Rarback and John Ullom
See HMB, Page 18
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Patricia Barnes with San Mateo Convalescent Hospital looks at items the San Mateo Convalescent Hospital must
liquidate as it has gone out of business.
Yoshiaki
Nagaya See NAGAYA, Page 20
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After serving mature adults with
chronic illness for more than 50
years, the San Mateo Convalescent
Hospital has stopped doing business
and is in a rush to liquidate its assets
to pay off its last month of payroll,
administrator Patricia Barnes told
the Daily Journal yesterday.
Its 34 residents, some with
dementia and Alzheimers disease,
have all found homes at other assist-
ed-living or skilled-nursing facili-
ties, mostly in the county, and
Barnes and the rest of the hospitals
Convalescent hospital closes
Liquidation sale under way to make payroll
See HOSPITAL, Page 20
See SCHOOL, Page 20
SHP AND
SAN MATEO
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Jason
Priestley is 43.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1862
The Second Battle of Bull Run (also
known as Second Manassas) began in
Prince William County, Va., during the
Civil War (the result was a Confederate
victory).
Whom the gods would
make bigots, they rst deprive of humor.
The Rev. James M. Gillis, author, editor (1876-1957)
Actor Jack Black is
43.
Country singer
LeAnn Rimes is 30.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A re burned for a third day in two fuel storage tanks at Venezuelas biggest renery on Monday, putting in doubt plans to
quickly restart the facility after one of the worst accidents to hit the global oil industry for decades. The tank at left caught
re today and is now the third fuel storage tank burning at the renery. SEE STORY PAGE 16
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the 60s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the lower
to mid 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. Northwest winds 15 to 20 mph...Becoming around 10
mph after midnight.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower to mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 08 Gor-
geous George in rst place; No. 06 Whirl Win in
second place; and No.03 Hot Shot in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:41.24.
(Answers tomorrow)
DODGE SKUNK REVIVE AFFIRM
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When the does met, they knew instantly they
would become DEER FRIENDS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
VUCER
OLPIT
SCINEK
PLOIWL
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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A:
6 4 0
25 34 45 46 49 34
Mega number
Aug. 24 Mega Millions
5 29 35 37 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 1 0 3
Daily Four
0 1 2
Daily three evening
In 1609, English sea explorer Henry Hudson and his ship, the
Half Moon, reached present-day Delaware Bay.
In 1910, the Kingdom of Montenegro was proclaimed.
In 1922, the rst-ever radio commercial aired on station
WEAF in New York City (the 10-minute advertisement was for
the Queensboro Realty Co., which had paid a fee of $100).
In 1947, legendary bullghter Manolete died after being gored
during a ght in Linares, Spain; he was 30.
In 1955, Emmett Till, a black teen-ager from Chicago, was
abducted from his uncles home in Money, Miss., by two white
men after he had supposedly whistled at a white woman; he
was found brutally slain three days later.
In 1962, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter resigned;
President John F. Kennedy nominated Arthur Goldberg to suc-
ceed him.
In 1963, more than 200,000 people listened as the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. delivered his I Have a Dream speech in front
of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
In 1968, police and anti-war demonstrators clashed in the
streets of Chicago as the Democratic National Convention
nominated Hubert H. Humphrey for president.
In 1972, Mark Spitz of the United States won the rst two of
his seven gold medals at the Munich Olympics, nishing rst
in the 200-meter butterfly and anchoring the 400-meter
freestyle relay. The Soviet women gymnasts won the team all-
around.
In 1987, a re damaged the Arcadia, Fla., home of Ricky,
Robert and Randy Ray, three hemophiliac brothers infected
with AIDS whose court-ordered school attendance had sparked
a local uproar. Academy Award-winning movie director John
Huston died in Middletown, R.I., at age 81.
Actor Sonny Shroyer is 77. Actor Ken Jenkins is 72. Former
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen is 72. Actor David Soul is
69. MLB manager Lou Piniella is 69. Actress Barbara Bach is 66.
Actress Debra Mooney is 65. Singer Wayne Osmond (The
Osmonds) is 61. Actor Daniel Stern is 55. Olympic gold medal
gure skater Scott Hamilton is 54. Actor John Allen Nelson is 53.
Actress Emma Samms is 52. Actress Jennifer Coolidge is 51.
Movie director David Fincher is 50. Actress Amanda Tapping is
47. Country singer Shania Twain is 47. Actor Billy Boyd is 44.
Olympic gold medal swimmer Janet Evans is 41. Actor J. August
Richards is 39. Rock singer-musician Max Collins (Eve 6) is 34.
Rosie ODonnell: Im
married, selling art on eBay
LOS ANGELES Rosie ODonnell
has announced that she married her
fiancee, Michelle
Rounds, in a private
ceremony in June,
just days before
Rounds had surgery
to treat desmoid
tumors.
The 50-year-old
TV personality also
said Monday on her
blog that she is sell-
ing original paintings
on eBay to raise money for the Desmoid
Tumor Research Foundation.
A spokeswoman for ODonnell con-
firmed the nuptials and fundraising
efforts.
Rounds was diagnosed with desmoid
tumors in June. She and ODonnell wed
in New York on June 9, and Rounds
underwent surgery June 14. Desmoid
tumors occur rarely and can affect almost
any area of the body. The tumors can be
fatal.
ODonnell has had health issues of her
own. She said Aug. 20 that she recently
suffered a heart attack.
City fails to break
bikini parade record
OCEAN CITY, Md. A city in China
still holds the bikini parade record after a
failed attempt in Maryland.
Organizers of Saturdays effort in
Ocean City to take the title from Huludao
City in China fell short. Only about 325
woman turned out under rainy skies.
Brad Hoffman, who organized the
parade for the North Ocean City
Business Alliance, blamed the rain for
the poor turnout.
Organizers were trying to attract more
than 1,085 to break the record set in
China earlier this month.
The 25-block parade included women
of all ages.
The $10 registration fee for the event
benefited charities including the
American Cancer Societys Relay for
Life.
New York City fair nixes
pig races and goes to the dogs
NEW YORK Organizers of the
county fair on New Yorks Staten Island
are making a dogged effort to prevent the
spread of swine u.
The Staten Island Advance says this
years Richmond County Fair is forgoing
pig races in response to a new swine u
strain. Instead, the Labor Day weekend
fair will feature dogs running down an
elevated plank and diving into the water.
Former Detroit Tigers pitcher Milt
Wilcox owns Ultimate Air Dogs, which
is hosting the canine caper. Hes encour-
aging fairgoers to bring their dogs if they
like to swim.
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention have said the new swine u
strain is relatively mild. Some cases have
been linked to fairs, so the health organi-
zation has encouraged people not to pet
pigs.
A mountain lion in
a casino? Dont roulette out
RENO, Nev. An underage mountain
lion was caught Friday after trying to slip
into a casino in downtown Reno ahead of
the breakfast rush.
Nevada Department of Wildlife
spokesman Chris Healy says the young
male cats behavior was almost the
equivalent of being a stupid teenager.
Healy says coming-of-age cougars
often end up where they shouldnt after
being chased out of a territory by adults.
It ts the classic denition of a dis-
persal-age male looking for a place to
be, Healy said, adding the drought also
could have prompted the cat to enter the
downtown.
Still, he acknowledged, this wasnt
exactly a typical case.
Ive been here 27 1/2 years and this
one is new to me, Healy said. Weve
seen mountain lions on the fringes of
Reno before, but not in downtown
Reno.
Guests at Harrahs reported seeing the
100-pound cat trying to walk into the
casino around dawn Friday morning.
When the animal couldnt negotiate the
revolving door, it hid under an outdoor
stage in a nearby plaza.
4 7 11 15 38 4
Mega number
Aug. 25 Super Lotto Plus
Rosie
ODonnell
3
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Drug complaint. A person with a medical
marijuana card was legally growing marijuana
on his balcony when his neighbor complained
on the 1700 block of Marco Polo Way before
6:44 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 24.
Vandalism. A person reported a large hole
had been cut into the roof of their van on the
800 block of Airport Boulevard before 9:57
a.m. on Friday, Aug. 24.
Towed vehicle. A vehicle reported as stolen
was determined to have been towed for six
months of expired registration at Bancroft
Road and Peninsula Avenue before 9:36 a.m.
on Friday, Aug. 24.
Drunk in public. A man caught looking at
pornography on a library computer was arrest-
ed for being drunk in public on the 400 block
of Primrose Road before 6:44 p.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 23.
Theft. A woman reported an ex-boyfriend had
stolen $80,000 from her on the 1400 block of
Floribunda Avenue before 3:46 p.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 23.
SAN MATEO
Drunk in public. An intoxicated man holding
three pizza boxes was seen urinating behind a
business on the 2700 block of South El
Camino Real before 4:41 p.m. on Sunday,
Aug. 26.
Theft. A security guard chased a drunk male
after he stole items from the Hillsdale
Shopping Center before 8:15 p.m. on
Saturday, Aug. 25.
Property damage. A woman intentionally
scratched a car after an altercation over a
parking spot at the Hillsdale Shopping Center
before 2:46 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25.
Suspicious person. A man with no shirt was
seen taking of his pants in front of a home on
the 700 block of 10th Avenue before 1:35 p.m.
on Thursday, Aug. 23.
Suspicious person. A man was found taking a
bath in the laundry room of an apartment
complex on the 100 block of Dartmouth Road
before 8:52 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 23.
Fraud. An incident of fraud occurred on the
400 block of North Bayshore Boulevard
before 3:47 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23.
Police reports
Girls just want to have fun
A girl called the police on her father after
he refused to let her go out with her
friends on the 1000 block of East Poplar
Avenue in San Mateo before 8:49 a.m. on
Saturday, Aug. 25.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
While in the care of a Menlo Park veterinar-
ian for a leg injury, Marble the cat escaped last
week and his owner is asking for help in nd-
ing the 2-year-old domestic short-haired
feline.
The Redwood City owner, who prefers not
to be named, took the cat to the vet Monday,
Aug. 20 to treat a leg injury. Its believed that
Marble had been bitten by another cat. Once at
the veterinarian ofce, Marble was taken to
the back for an injection. He was able to get
away from the staff and ran down the street.
Marble was a neighborhood cat who adopt-
ed his Redwood City owner about eight
months ago. Despite efforts searching the area
which is 2.5 miles from the owners
Redwood City home and checking with
local animal agencies, theres been no luck in
nding Marble.
Named for his coloration, the owner is not
sure if Marble is still having problems with his
leg.
Anyone who nds Marble is asked to call
365-1088.
San Francisco
archbishop-elect in DUI arrest
SAN DIEGO The Roman Catholic arch-
bishop-elect of San Francisco apologized
Monday for his arrest on suspicion of drunken
driving, behavior he called an error in judg-
ment and that legal experts said was unlikely to
derail his promotion.
The Rev. Salvatore Cordileone said in a state-
ment issued by his ofce that he was driving
home from a dinner with friends in San Diego
with his mother and a visiting priest friend early
Saturday when he was pulled over at a DUI
checkpoint near San Diego State University.
The statement said a sobriety test showed his
blood-alcohol level to be above the legal limit,
although Cordileone did not reveal by how
much.
I apologize for my error in judgment and feel
shame for the disgrace I have brought upon the
Church and myself, he said.
Cat takes off from vet,
owner asking for help
Anyone who nds Marble is asked to call
365-1088.
Around the Bay
4
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
STATE GOVERNMENT
A bill to protect the rights of driv-
ers by regulating red-light cameras
passed Monday in the state Senate
and is now headed to the governor for
approval.
Senate Bill 1303, authored by state
Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto,
would establish statewide standards
for the installation and operation of trafc enforcement cam-
eras, and make it easier to challenge unjustied tickets.
The idea for the bill originated in Simitians annual
There Oughta Be a Law contest. San Jose resident Vera
Gil suggested the legislation after receiving multiple tickets
from red-light cameras for a car in Southern California that
she does not own and has never driven, according to
Simitians ofce.
Nonprots that manage lands for the purposes of land
and open space conservation and generate limited income are
one step closer to receiving a property tax exemption from
the state. Authored by Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, Assembly Bill 2207 passed in a concurrence
vote Monday in the Assembly and now heads to the gover-
nor.
Specically, the bill allows nonprots to qualify for the
exemption if they participate in revenue generating activities
that are consistent with conservation purposes and are con-
sistent with the management plan for the property, according
to Gordons ofce.
A bill signed by Gov. Jerry Brown Monday authored by
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, requires parents to
be notied about where, and at no cost, that their child pas-
senger restraint system can be inspected and proper installa-
tion instruction can be given.
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death of
children 3 to 14 years of age. Many of these deaths can be
prevented through the proper use of child safety seats.
According to the NHTSA, child safety seats can reduce fatal
injury by 71 percent for infants and by 54 percent for tod-
dlers, 1 to 4 years of age, according to Hills ofce.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The San Mateo Planning Commission will consider an
amendment to city code at its next meeting to allow for uses
other than retail on the ground oor in downtown. The city
adopted a resolution more than 10 years ago to restrict
ground-oor uses to mostly retail during the dot-com boom
when ofce space was at a premium. With the downturn in
the economy, many property owners downtown have asked
the city to reconsider the code. The Planning Commission
meets 7:30 p.m., tonight, City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo.
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO A bill approved
Monday by the state Assembly would
allow judges to declare more than two
legal parents for some California chil-
dren.
Lawmakers approved SB1476 by Sen.
Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, on a party
line vote, with Democrats supporting it.
The legislation would allow judges to
legally recognize multiple parents when
it is in a childs best interest to have
more than two parental relationships.
We live in a world today where courts
are dealing with diverse circumstances
that have reshaped California families,
Leno said in a state-
ment. This legisla-
tion gives courts the
exibility to protect
the best interests of a
child who is being
supported nancially
and emotionally by
those parents.
The bill was
inspired by the case
of a young California girl who was put
into the foster care system because her
biological father could not be ruled a
third parent when her two legal parents
were unable to care for her. Supporters
of the legislation say it could keep future
children out of the foster care system by
giving them additional legal parents who
have caretaking and nancial obliga-
tions.
Opponents say the bill erodes tradi-
tional parental roles and could allow
children to have a limitless number of
parents.
This smacks of the state redening
parenthood, said Assemblyman Tim
Donnelly, R-Twin Peaks. Whats next?
Are we going to parent by committee?
Supporters say these scenarios are
unlikely because the bill would not
change existing standards for legal par-
enthood, only the number of parents a
court can recognize.
To qualify as a parent, adults would
have to raise the child as their own.
Stepparents and parents boyfriends or
girlfriends would not qualify.
Senate OKs bill to let
farmworkers sue over heat
SACRAMENTO A bill approved
in the state Senate would let California
farmworkers sue their employers for
failing to comply with laws requiring
them to provide adequate water and
shade.
AB2346 passed on a 21-12 vote
Monday. It would let farmworkers sue if
employers fail to follow Californias
2005 heat protection regulations.
Sen. Juan Vargas, a Democrat from
San Diego, says state regulators cant
keep up with complaints from work-
ers. The bill would let individual
employees take action against repeat
violators.
The legislation returns to the
Assembly for a nal vote.
Bill aims to prevent
drug overdose deaths
SACRAMENTO Recreational drug
users seeking medical help would get a
reprieve from legal repercussions if a bill
heading to the governors desk becomes
law. AB472, by Democratic
Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, stipulates
that it is not a crime to be high or in pos-
session of small amounts of illegal drugs
when seeking medical assistance for a
drug overdose. The bill also carves out a
legal exception for underage drinkers.
The bill passed the state Assembly 50-
20 Monday. Several Republicans who
supported the bill said they condemn
drug use but want people in trouble,
especially teens, to seek help.
Bill would give
cyclists buffer zone
SACRAMENTO California bicy-
clists who navigate busy roads may be
able to ride a little easier if a bill
approved by the Assembly becomes law.
The Assembly approved SB1464
Monday, which would require motor
vehicle drivers to stay three feet from
cyclists in most cases. Drivers would be
allowed to cross double solid yellow
lines to provide bicyclists enough room.
Opponents of the bill by Sen. Alan
Lowenthal, a Long Beach Democrat,
argued that it would give bicyclists a
false sense of security. Gov. Jerry Brown
vetoed a similar bill last year.
The new legislation would allow nes
of at least $35 for drivers who impinge
on bicyclists buffer zones.
Assembly approves bill to allow multiple parents
Mark Leno
Around the state
6
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Sponsored by:
Peninsula Ballet Theatre,
Broadway By The Bay partner
up to preserve youth theater
On Monday, the Peninsula Ballet
Theatre and Broadway By The Bay
announced a new partnership to preserve
The Youth Theatre Conservatory.
Under the arrangement, Peninsula
Ballet will assume responsibility for The
Youth Theatre Conservatory, while
Broadway By The Bay will continue to
recruit talent from the Conservatory for
its annual productions. Further, Fox
Theatre Redwood City owners Eric and
Lori Lochtefeld, who now serve as act-
ing board members for Broadway By
The Bay, have offered up their venue for
all future YTC productions.
Having the Fox Theatre as the home
theater for all future YTC performances
will be a very special treat for our stu-
dents, said PBT President and CEO
Christine Leslie. We could not ask for a
better situation to build and expand an
already great program.
Recently, Eric and Lori Lochtefeld
stepped in to save the nancially strug-
gling Broadway By The Bay.
We were prepared to take on the per-
formance arm of Broadway by the Bay,
but we did not have the studio space for
YTC, he said. We were really happy
when we realized that Peninsula Ballet
Theatre shared not only our concerns,
but had the expertise and the infrastruc-
ture to provide high quality, nurturing
arts education programs. Plus, they had
professional studio space for the class-
es, said Lori Lochetefeld. Classes will
be able to continue as before on the same
schedule; we are very pleased.
Stephanie Maysonave, former educa-
tional and outreach director with
Broadway by the Bay, will become
director of Youth Theatre Conservatory
under Peninsula Ballet Theatre.
Classes will still start Sept. 9 as origi-
nally planned. Registration forms and
information can be obtained from
Peninsula Ballet Theatre, the PBT web-
site and soon on the Youth Theatre
Conservatory website.
Local man drowns
in Lake Berryessa
The body of San Mateo resident
Sitaniselao Tau was recovered Sunday
after he drowned in Lake Berryessa
Saturday afternoon, according to the
Napa County Sheriffs Ofce.
Taus body was found after seven
hours of diving in 40 feet of water with
no visibility, according to the Sheriffs
Ofce.
He had reportedly jumped from a boat
he rented with friends and went swim-
ming for about 10 minutes before he
started to struggle and drown, according
to the Sheriffs Ofce.
Tau, who attended Aragon High
School, would have celebrated his 25th
birthday yesterday.
Hotel death prompts
hazardous material call
Parts of a San Mateo hotel were evacu-
ated Monday afternoon after emergency
responders found evidence of hazardous
materials while investigating a death,
police said.
Police and reghters responded to the
Hilton Garden Inn at 2000 Bridgepointe
Circle at 2 p.m. in response to a reported
death in a hotel room, San Mateo police
said.
Ofcials discovered a female body in
the hotel room and also found evidence of
chemical exposure. A San Mateo County
hazardous materials team was called in.
Police said there is no public danger, but
nearby rooms at the hotel were evacuated.
The cause of death appears to be suicide
and no foul play is suspected, according to
police. The exact details of the death will
be determined by the San Mateo County
Coroners Ofce.
Man accused of
molesting 10-year-old girl
A man convicted of statutory rape in
2011 is in jail again for allegedly molest-
ing his rst victims 10-year-old sister,
according to South San Francisco police.
Jose Maria Perez, 30, had a prior
arrest and conviction for statutory rape
involving a 17-year-old female victim.
After his release, he allegedly continued
an illegal relationship with the 17-year-
old and began molesting her 10-year-old
sister over a 14-month period, according
to police.
Police investigated the claims after the
younger sister told another family mem-
ber of the molestation, according to
police.
He is being charged with 50 counts of
child molestation and one count of con-
tinual sexual abuse of a minor under the
age of 10 years old. Perez reportedly
admitted the crime, according to police.
He is being held without bail and has
a pending immigration hearing as well,
according to police.
Helicopter survey to measure
radiation levels this week
A helicopter may be seen ying at
low-level altitudes over parts of San
Francisco, Pacica and Oakland this
week, but authorities say the public
shouldnt be alarmed.
The helicopter isnt searching for sus-
pects on the loose, but rather is taking
measurements of naturally occurring
radiation, Oakland police said.
The yovers, which will take place
today through Saturday, are a part of a
joint research project by the Department
of Homeland Securitys Domestic
Nuclear Detection Office and the
National Nuclear Security
Administration to assess natural back-
ground radiation levels.
The survey will cover about 69 square
miles, and will be performed by the
NNSAs twin-engine Bell 412 helicop-
ter, which is operated by the Las Vegas-
based Remote Sensing Laboratory
Aerial Measuring System in Las Vegas.
The helicopter will y in a grid pattern
about 300 feet above ground. The ights
will be limited to daylight hours.
Federal ofcials say the data will be
used as background to help local, state
and federal entities measure radiation
levels in the future.
Ex-Oakland police chief
to lead Baltimore police
BALTIMORE The former police
chief of Long Beach and Oakland in
California has been selected as the new
police commissioner in Baltimore, the
mayors ofce said Monday.
Anthony W. Batts was expected to be
introduced as the citys new police com-
missioner Tuesday by Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake.
He replaces former commissioner
Frederick Bealefeld III, who announced
his retirement in May after a ve-year
run as chief that included a drop in the
number of homicides.
Local briefs
S
andpiper Elementary School will welcome a new prin-
cipal, Erica Gilbert, starting Sept. 4. She was appoint-
ed during an Aug. 23 Redwood City Elementary School
District board meeting.
Gilbert has been serving the Los Altos School District since
March 2008 when she was hired to
be principal of Gardner Bullis
Elementary School. She was
instrumental in opening a school
that had previously closed, drawing
the school and local community
together, setting a vision and new
perspective on student learning.
Gilbert held a variety of adminis-
trative positions during her 15 year
tenure in the Sunnyvale School
District including assistant princi-
pal at Sunnyvale Middle School for four years and principal of
Cherry Chase Elementary School. Gilbert holds a masters in
education administration and a bachelors in consumer and fam-
ily studies from San Francisco State University.
***
This weekend, Notre Dame de Namur University
announced the election of two new members to its board of
trustees Redwood City Mayor Alicia C. Aguirre and
Cynthia Vrooman of Sonoma, an NDNU alumna and retired
educator.
Aguirre has served as mayor of Redwood City since 2011.
She was originally appointed to the City Council in Redwood
City in 2005. Aguirre is also a professor at Caada College in
Redwood City, where she teaches in the English Institute and
the Spanish Department.
Vrooman most recently taught at Dominican University of
California in the Communications and Media Studies
Department. Previously, she was the director of religious edu-
cation at St. Leo Catholic Church in Sonoma, the coordinator
of adult education for the Diocese of Santa Rosa and director
of campus ministry at Notre Dame de Namur University (then
College of Notre Dame) and St. Vincent High School in
Petaluma.
***
The Boys and Girls Clubs of North San Mateo County and
Kiwanis Club of South San Francisco are holding a lobster
feed fundraiser with auction and rafe Saturday, Sept. 22 at the
South City Boys and Girls Club, 201 W. Orange Ave., South
San Francisco. The social starts at 4:30 p.m. Dinner will be
served at 6 p.m. Tickets are $55 and include an old fashioned lob-
ster boil with one fresh Maine lobster, prawns, sausage, corn on
the cob, artichokes, potatoes and more. For tickets and more
information visit www.theclubs.org or call (415) 242-5253.
lass notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by edu-
cation reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344-
5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
NATION 7
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, Fla. Republicans
staged a remarkably subdued open-
ing to Mitt Romneys national con-
vention Monday in the midst of a
turbulent election year, wary of
uncorking a glittery political cele-
bration as Tropical Storm Isaac
surged menacingly toward New
Orleans and the northern Gulf Coast.
There was speculation that the
Republican man of the hour would
make an unannounced visit to the
convention hall Tuesday night when
his wife, Ann, was on the speaking
program. The campaign would con-
rm only that he was ying to town
in time to do so.
Virtually every party leader spoke
somberly of the storms potential
damage during the day, including the
candidate. Our thoughts are with
the people that are in the storms
path and hope that theyre spared
any major destruction, said
Romney, the man seeking to defeat
Democratic President Barack
Obama.
Though Republicans are intent on
turning the campaigns focus back to
the nations sluggish economic
growth and high unemployment, a
comment Romney made on abortion
reintroduced a topic that had taken
over campaign discussion last week.
In a CBS interview, he said he
opposes abortions except in the
case of rape and incest, and the
health and life of the mother.
That underscored his difference of
opinion on the subject with his run-
ning mate, Rep. Paul Ryan of
Wisconsin, as well as with his own
convention platform, which opposes
all abortions.
Subdued start for GOP convention
By Kevin McGill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS With its
massive size and ponderous move-
ment, Tropical Storm Isaac was
gaining strength Monday as it head-
ed toward the Gulf Coast. The next
24 hours would determine whether
it brought the usual punishing rains
and winds or something even
more destructive harkening back to
the devastation wrought seven years
ago by Hurricane Katrina.
The focus has been on New
Orleans as Isaac takes dead aim at
the city, but the impact will be felt
well beyond the city limits. The
storms winds could be felt more
than 200 miles from the storms
center.
The Gulf Coast region has been
saturated thanks to a wet summer,
and some officials have worried
more rain could make it easy for
trees and power lines to fall over in
the wet ground. Too much water
also could ood crops, and wind
could topple plants such as corn and
cotton.
A large, slow-moving system is
going to pose a lot of problems:
winds, flooding, storm surge and
even potentially down the road
river flooding, said Richard
Knabb, director of the National
Hurricane Center in Miami. That
could happen for days after the
event.
The storms potential for destruc-
tion was not lost on Alabama farmer
Bert Driskell, who raises peanuts,
cotton, wheat, cattle and sod on sev-
eral thousand acres near Grand Bay,
in Mobile County.
Isaac threat to Gulf Coast
well beyond New Orleans
By Scott Mayerowitz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK When hurri-
canes, blizzards or other severe
weather disrupt ights, some air-
lines are more accommodating
than others in letting passengers
rebook.
Tropical Storm Isaac is sweep-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico and
all the airlines with ights to and
from the region this week are
waiving their normal fees for pas-
sengers to rebook trips. So-called
change fees can be as high as
$150 on a domestic trip.
While its nice that airlines
arent charging you to rebook, the
time you have to take your trip
depends on your carrier.
Some airlines are giving pas-
sengers nearly a year to y while
others are requiring passengers to
be on planes as quickly as Friday.
They are all over the place,
says George Hobica, founder of
travel site AirfareWatchdog. He
says the process should be stan-
dardized and that some of the air-
line requirements are harsh. Its
not the passengers fault that a
hurricane happened.
The government doesnt have
rules for how much time airlines
should give passengers to take
their trip. The only protection pas-
sengers have is this: If their ight
is canceled, the airlines must offer
a refund.
Airlines differ on
rebooking policies
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, Fla. Republican Mitt
Romney says he is in favor of abor-
tion in cases of rape, incest and the
health and life of the mother.
The presidential candidates
addition of the health of the moth-
er is certain to raise questions
about Romneys position among
conservatives. Health can be
broadly dened and, in fact, run-
ning mate Paul Ryan has chal-
lenged the health exception as a
major loophole.
Romney commented in an inter-
view Monday with CBS News.
Romneys position on abortion
rights has evolved. When he ran for
the U.S. Senate
i n
Massachusetts,
he backed abor-
tion rights. As a
p r e s i d e n t i a l
candidate, he
has opposed
abortion rights
and says the
Supreme Court
should reverse the landmark Roe v.
Wade decision that legalized abor-
tion.
In a statement, Romney cam-
paign spokeswoman Andrea Saul
said Romneys position is clear
that he opposes abortion except for
cases of rape, incest and where the
life of the mother is threatened.
Romney says abortion
legal for mothers health
REUTERS
Delegates cheer as an image of Mitt Romney is displayed during the
opening session of the Republican National Convention.
Mitt Romney
NATION/WORLD 8
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Afghan protesters burn a U.S. ag during a protest in Jalalabad province.
By Patrick Quinn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan Insurgents behead-
ed 17 people at a party in a Taliban-controlled
area, and an Afghan soldier killed two U.S.
troops, bringing the two-day death toll Monday
to about 30.
Near-daily attacks by militants and increasing-
ly frequent deadly violence against NATO troops
by their Afghan allies highlight an embarrassing
failure of Western policy: After nearly 12 years
of military intervention, the country is not paci-
ed. Once the United States and other countries
pull out their troops, chaos seems almost certain
to return and Taliban domination in large parts of
the country is hardly implausible.
The beheadings occurred in southern
Helmand, the same province where more than
100 insurgents attacked an Afghan army check-
point and killed 10 soldiers.
Helmand was the centerpiece of President
Barack Obamas surge, when he ordered 33,000
additional U.S troops to Afghanistan to help the
military with a counterinsurgency plan. That
plan hoped to turn the tide in Helmand and
neighboring Kandahar and establish the govern-
mental institutions that would allow the Afghan
government to take control of the Taliban heart-
land.
Two years later, however, Helmand is still so
lawless that Afghan government ofcials could-
nt even go to the Taliban-controlled town where
the beheadings were reported. Many Afghans in
the south, the Talibans birthplace and the home
of the countrys Pashtun speaking population,
are leery of a government that many consider to
be corrupt and ineffective.
The problem is compounded by a rapid reduc-
tion in American and international aid, which
fueled most of the growth in the south in recent
years. Afghanistan, one of the worlds 10 poor-
est countries, has received nearly $60 billion in
civilian aid since 2002. Now it stands to receive
$16 billion, or about $4 billion a year, in the next
four years. By comparison, the U.S. alone spent
that much in 2010.
Analysts also say that a public worn down by
a war that began just a month after the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks no longer cares about Afghanistan,
and that the war has slipped off the radar screens
and is now considered by many to be over.
The problem with this attitude is that
Afghanistan or whatever the crisis may be
has a life of its own. Men and women keep
dying, and U.S. policies keep accelerating the
centrifugal forces that are driving the country
toward civil conict, which may have profound
implications for future regional and internation-
al security, said Sarah Chaynes, a senior associ-
ate with the Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace, in a commentary published
Sunday.
Afghan insurgents kill
17 civilians at a party
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Abu Qais, a Sunni Muslim in
Syrias capital Damascus, says six members of
his extended family have been killed by gun-
men who belong to the minority Alawite sect
of President Bashar Assad.
The gunmen who grabbed one of his distant
cousins called up his family while they were
torturing him so they could hear his
screams, said Abu Qais, an anti-Assad
activist who spoke on condition his full name
not be used for fear of reprisals.
Sectarian slayings between Syrias Sunni
majority and the Alawite minority have been a
brutal reality of Syrias 17-month-old conict,
and they have only accelerated as the country
falls into outright civil war. Sunnis have large-
ly backed the uprising against Assads rule,
while the Alawites members of an offshoot
of Shiism have rmly stood behind the
regime, where they ll the leadership ranks.
And as tit-for-tat killings have swelled, so
has the segregation of the two communities as
they ee each other. In Damascus and other
cities, Sunnis and Alawites avoid venturing
into each others neighborhoods for fear of
being snatched. Some Alawite districts in the
capital are now ringed with checkpoints
manned not only by security forces but also
residents who have taken up arms to protect
their homes.
Those in mixed neighborhoods ee their
homes to move into safer enclaves dominated
by their community whether in the same
city or in another part of the country.
Mutual threats in Damascus have succeed-
ed in triggering migration, said Fateh
Jamous, an Alawite activist from Latakia, the
Mediterranean coastal city where many
Alawites have ed. Latakia itself has so far
represented a sort of tense neutral ground
its population is about half Sunni, half
Alawite. That created a sort of balance of ter-
ror. So far, it has been generally peaceful, he
said by telephone from Latakia.
The ight raises the grim possibility that
Syria could go down the path of neighboring
Iraq. There, violence in 2006 and 2007 effec-
tively turned into a sort of sectarian cleansing,
as Shiite and Sunni militias and insurgents tar-
geted members of the rival community, killing
thousands and sending hundreds of thousands
eeing their homes. To this day, Baghdad
remains largely divided between wholly Shiite
and wholly Sunni districts with few mixed
areas remaining.
Syria has not yet reached that scale. But the
prospect of it breaking up along religious or
ethnic lines is no longer a remote possibility in
a conict that activists estimate has killed
20,000 people as Assads regime tries to crush
rebels determined to topple him. Kurds in the
northeast have begun rumbling with talk of
self-rule.
Prehistoric tiny bugs
found trapped in amber
WASHINGTON Scientists have found
three well preserved ancient insects frozen in
amber and time in what is Earths oldest
bug trap.
The discoveries of amber-encased insects in
Italy may sound like something out of Jurassic
Park but these bugs are even older than that.
They are about 230 million years old, which
puts them in the Triassic time period, and about
100 million years older than what had been the
previously known oldest critters trapped in fos-
silized tree resin, or amber.
Gooey tree resin is like sap but without water
and cant be diluted.
Researchers painstakingly examined 70,000
droplets of amber found in northeastern Italy.
Stuck in them were two microscopic mites and
much of one y. The mites are too small to be
seen with the naked eye and the y is a tad
tinier than a fruit y, researchers say.
Student shot at Maryland
high school; suspect held
PERRY HALL, Md. A 15-year-old stu-
dent opened re on the rst day of classes
Monday at a Baltimore County high school,
getting off two shots and wounding a classmate
before being rushed by teachers, authorities
said.
Investigators do not believe the victim, a 17-
year-old male, was targeted by the shooter, a
15-year-old who is also a student at Perry Hall
High School, Baltimore County Police Chief
James Johnson said. The 15-year-old boy was
taken into custody after the shooting and was
cooperating with investigators, police said.
Police took the weapon, although they did not
say what kind of gun it was.
Johnson said at about 10:45 a.m., a student
walked into the cafeteria and pulled out a gun.
He red one shot before being grabbed by
teachers, and then another shot went off as
teachers grabbed him, Johnson said.
Johnson said the shooter acted alone. He did
not answer numerous questions from reporters
about a motive.
Democrats urge immediate
repair of Capitol Dome
WASHINGTON Democrats controlling
the Senate pressed Monday for an immediate
infusion of money to repair the iconic dome of
the U.S. Capitol, which has fallen into disrepair
and has at least 1,300 cracks in it.
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., says $61 mil-
lion to x the leaky Capitol Dome should be
added to an upcoming stopgap spending bill to
keep the government running into next year.
That measure generally wont contain money
for new initiatives and will instead freeze
spending at current levels for almost every gov-
ernment program.
Schumers statement came in a letter to House
Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Boehner and
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., are
negotiating through staff aides on the stopgap
funding measure, which is needed to avert a par-
tial shutdown of the government when the cur-
rent budget year ends on Sept. 30.
Syria sectarian divide
turns to fear and flight
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Reality check
Editor,
This is regarding the guest perspec-
tive by Sheriff Greg Munks and District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe, Emptying
the jail is not the answer in the Aug.
20 edition of the Daily Journal, in
which they responded to a perspective
by a consultant on our criminal jus-
tice system that we jail too many peo-
ple (Guest perspective by Bob
Cushman Our justice system needs
change in the Aug. 16 edition of the
Daily Journal). Jail is meant to protect
the public and be a punishment. Judges
make their determination on the safety
of our community our schools,
streets and homes.
The author of the original piece sug-
gests virtually doing away with incar-
ceration except in a few cases. He must
be oblivious to what is happening on
our streets, especially in light of these
difcult times. Everyone agrees that we
need better treatment and rehabilitation
programs, but to open up the jails in
the name of economics or concern for
criminals is not a principle of our
democracy. Thankfully, we have law
enforcement in this country that recog-
nizes this principle as well as judges
that live in the real world.
Joseph W. Cotchett
Burlingame
What is President
Obama hiding?
Editor,
Team Obama is claiming Romney is
hiding something in his tax returns. Big
deal. Maybe he used legal tax loop-
holes to legally pay the minimal
amount of taxes. I do the same thing.
Who wants to see $500 million of their
tax dollars go to bankrupt companies
whose CEO bundles money for Obama
himself? Who wants to see their tax
money go to lavish government parties
complete with hotel suites with hot
tubs? Who wants to see $1.2 billion of
their tax dollars go to the Muslim
Brotherhood? And President Obama,
what are you hiding? Why have you
invoked the secrecy of executive privi-
lege to withhold information about
your administration supplying guns to
Mexican drug lords that later killed
American citizens? After all, didnt you
tell us you would be the most transpar-
ent president in history?
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Michelle Durand,
comic and intelligent
Editor,
I disagree with Scott Wardles letter
Michelle Durand, petty and vicious
in the Aug. 23 edition of the Daily
Journal. I did not nd her Aug. 16 col-
umn dismissive of the good efforts
from people like Scott in fact, I
thought it expressed a normal human
reaction and portrayed it in a comic
way. I also believe Michelle made a
good point about our dependency on
petroleum and how we spend a signi-
cant amount of our earnings (and other
societal resources, like tax revenue, to
fund bigger roads, freeways, etc.) to
support the auto industry. I also wish
that like in Europe (or Singapore,
Japan, etc.) our tax dollars supported
public transportation, health care and
education so everyone could make bet-
ter choices for themselves.
Rahul Bahadur
San Mateo
Mr. Romneys taxes
Editor,
Mr. Roussards letter (Leave
Romneys tax returns alone in the
Aug. 27 edition of the Daily Journal)
concerning Mr. Romneys tax returns
makes two very good points. One is
that Mr. Romney has not cheated or
done anything illegal on his tax returns
and the other is doing something the
same way and expecting a different
outcome is irresponsible by both par-
ties.
What Mr. Roussard may be missing
is that although I and many others do
not care what Mr. Romney paid in
taxes, I think they are important
because they speak to Mr. Romneys
integrity. He claims to be a patriotic
American and also that he has had
nothing to do with Bain Capital for
several years. I would like to know if
he has placed vast sums of money in
overseas accounts and if he has been
paid by Bain Capital during the time he
said he has done nothing with them.
As for expecting different results for
the same actions, the current
Republican plan for the economy is the
same plan that has shown to be a fail-
ure in the past. The only exception in
this plan is that it offers even larger tax
cuts and benets for the richest of the
rich.
David Amaral
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Loveland (Colo.)Reporter-Herald
I
n 1858, as the question of slav-
ery, the most contentious issue in
the history of American politics,
was fueling fierce argument in the
countrys ruling class, an Illinois
lawyer and candidate for the U.S.
Senate named Abraham Lincoln chal-
lenged the incumbent, Stephen
Douglas, to a series of debates. The
format allowed for extraordinarily in-
depth discussions of the issues. The
first candidate had one hour to address
the audience, the opposing candidate
then had an hour and a half to speak,
and a closing slot of half an hour went
back to the first speaker. The sub-
stance of the debates and the very
quality of the language made them
suitable for publication in book form
and study by generations of scholars.
Theyre a paragon of American politi-
cal discourse.
How far weve come and how low
weve stooped.
The quality of discourse in the 2012
presidential election is culturally
embarrassing and politically haz-
ardous.
The camps of President Barack
Obama and GOP candidate Mitt
Romney trade lies in a manner that
reveals a brazen calculation that truth
simply does not matter. An Obama-
supporting group has run ads that
imply a woman died of cancer
because she lost her health insurance
after her husbands factory was closed
by Romneys firm Bain Capital. The
ad, as many pointed out, is garbage,
but it has run anyway.
Romney asserts that Obama wants
to remove the work requirement from
former President Bill Clintons wel-
fare reform act. Partisans on both
sides of the aisle agree that pretty
much the opposite is true. But
Romney has continued to say it any-
way.
The candidates obviously arent
interested in concentrating on the
issues. Its up to American voters to
do it themselves.
How low our campaigns have stooped
Age-old question
T
he latest dividing line of aging just disrupted the
Republican convention. In an email joke making
the rounds of the newsroom, a specific actor with
a wide smile and a mustache was superimposed over a
weather map approaching Florida. The character was
Isaac, bartender from
The Love Boat, for
those who cant figure
out the reference with-
out the visual.
I told the sender he
should ask the high
school interns to iden-
tify the image just to
make us all feel a little
more ancient a fun
game that always tends
to clarify the widening
age gaps between ever-
older us and ever-
younger batches of stu-
dents.
With the response
barely in transit, a
voice from one of the younger newsroom staff members
piped up.
No idea who this is.
Sigh. The more senior editorial staff is obviously a lot
older than we think either that or we collectively
watched a lot of soapy re-runs. Maybe a bit of both.
The newsroom is actually always a good reminder of
just how timeworn we have gotten and, sometimes, just
how advanced the newer generations see us.
Several years ago, an intern asked if Id ever been to a
Beatles concert. I think this actually reflects her lack of
music history instead of my wrinkle collection, but still.
Sept. 11 is always a mixed bag. Most vaguely remember
the day but dont have the firsthand images and fear
seared into their memories like those beyond a certain
age. Our history is their history lesson. But back to The
Beatles seriously? Thats worse than when the clerks at
Trader Joes call me maam when waving away my prof-
fered drivers license for wine purchases. Theres no need,
they say.
Oh, you might not need it, I think. But I certainly do.
Recently, one incredibly thoughtful and intelligent
intern got caught into a newsroom chat of records superi-
ority over CDs or MP3s. We finally asked him if he even
knew what a record player was (all part of the previously
mentioned fun Lets age ourselves game).
I understand the mechanics behind it, he said helpful-
ly.
Inside I felt myself becoming my parents and grandpar-
ents, my self-described coolness shriveling and ready to
die. How long until I take a page from my father and
recall my youth when movies involved cavemen running
quickly by cartoon-like images carved in rock? Am I that
far off from telling those younger than me that not only
do I remember a world before email and Skype but that
we sent messages via homing pterodactyl?
Wait a second while I uncreak my joints and try to
remember what I was talking about. The mind aint what
it used to be.
Neither, it seems, is the freshman mindset. Every year,
Beloit College in Beloit, Wis. (go figure), released what it
calls the Mindset List to illustrate how the incoming
freshmen class sees the world around it. For instance, the
class of 2016, has never known a time when Jackie
Kennedy Onassis, Richard Nixon or John Wayne Gacy
were alive. Im not sure if those are really any great loss.
The Beloit list also includes never seeing a hard air-
plane ticket or luggage that doesnt roll. Football has
never been in Los Angeles and The Real World has
always been on MTV. Remember, for those who didnt
want to do the math back from 2016, these kids were born
in 1994.
Bound encyclopedias whats that? And exposed bra
straps fashion statement not misstep. Arianna
Huffington? Always a liberal news aggregator instead of a
conservative political wife. Yearbooks are digital as are
cameras. Gene therapy has always been available and
Pulp Fiction is just some flick that came out the year of
their birth.
Do you feel the gray hairs sprouting yet?
Most likely, future gene technology will wipe out gray
hair. Most likely, too, it will end up on a future Beloit list,
too.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to
the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,124.67 -0.25% 10-Yr Bond 1.649 -1.73%
Nasdaq3,073.19 +0.11% Oil (per barrel) 95.739998
S&P 500 1,410.44 -0.05% Gold 1,666.00
HP, Dell: PC makers in
desperate need of a reboot
SAN FRANCISCO Hewlett-Packard Co. used to be
known as a place where innovative thinkers ocked to
work on great ideas that opened new frontiers in technolo-
gy. These days, HP is looking behind the times.
Coming off a ve-year stretch of miscalculations, HP is
in such desperate need of a reboot that many investors have
written off its chances of a comeback.
Consider this: Since Apple Inc. shifted the direction of
computing with the release of the iPhone in June 2007,
HPs market value has plunged by 60 percent to $35 bil-
lion. During that time, HP has spent more than $40 billion
on dozens of acquisitions that have largely turned out to be
duds so far.
Just think of all the value that they have destroyed, ISI
Group analyst Brian Marshall said. It has been a case of
just horrible management.
Marshall traces the bungling to the reign of Carly
Fiorina, who pushed through an acquisition of Compaq
Computer a decade ago despite staunch resistance from
many shareholders, including the heirs of HPs co-
founders.
IXYS board authorizes buyback of 1M shares
MILPITAS IXYS Corp. said Monday that its board
has approved a plan to buy back up to 1 million shares, or
about 3 percent of the chip makers 31 million shares out-
standing. Its shares rose more than 6 percent in afternoon
trading.
The repurchases will be made from time to time on the
open market, the company said.
IXYS, which makes semiconductors used in controlling
and converting electrical power, noted that a stock repur-
chase plan approved in February 2011 also remains in
effect.
Business briefs
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK The biggest story in
the stock market Monday was Apple,
but that wasnt saying much.
Trading was light, even by the slum-
berous standards of August. Investors
those who werent on vacation killed
time waiting for a speech by Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke later
this week.
In the meantime, there wasnt much
else to guide them. Apple was one of the
only shreds of action in an otherwise
dull market.
The stock shot to an all-time high of
$680.87 and nished at $675.68, up
$12.46, or 1.9 percent. Late Friday, a
jury found that Samsung copied some of
the features of the iPhone and iPad, and
Samsung could be forced to take prod-
ucts off the shelves.
Apples move wasnt the biggest on
the stock market Monday. Best Buy,
Hertz, Dollar Thrifty and other compa-
nies all moved by bigger percentages.
But the Nasdaq composite index and
Standard & Poors 500 index are
weighted by stock market value, so the
biggest companies are the most impor-
tant. A small change in Apple can inu-
ence the market more than big swings
by smaller companies.
Apple makes up more than 13 percent
of the Nasdaq composite, and helped the
index grasp a slight gain, rising 3.4
points to 3,073.19. It makes up 5 per-
cent of the Standard & Poors 500 index,
which finished down 0.69 point to
1,410.44.
The Dow Jones industrial average,
which does not include Apple, fell 33.30
points to 13,124.67.
Apple is the biggest company by
stock market value in American history,
worth $633 billion as of Monday. Thats
more than 100 times the value of Best
Buy or Hertz, and about 260 times as
much as Dollar Thrifty.
Overall trading was subdued just
2.4 billion shares. The only quieter day
this year was July 3, a Tuesday that fell
before a midweek Fourth of July.
The market is kind of on hold until
Jackson Hole, said Randall Warren,
chief investment officer of Warren
Financial Service in Exton, Pa., refer-
ring to the Wyoming resort town where
Bernanke will speak. Probably Apple
is the only thing thats moving the mar-
ket today. Its stunning how big they
are.
Stocks barely move
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Monday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Best Buy Co. Inc., up 56 cents at $17.87
The electronics chain and Richard Schulze, its
founder, said they reached an agreement that
will allow him to try to buy the company.
Tiffany & Co., up $4.21 at $62.71
The luxury retailer said its second quarter net
income rose 2 percent and revenue at
established stores fell less than expected.
Hertz Global Holdings Inc., up $1.06 at $14.21
The rental car company is buying rival Dollar
Thrifty Automotive Group Inc. for $2.3 billion,
giving it a bigger global presence.
Kenexa Corp., up $13.40 at $45.79
Technology company International Business
Machines Corp. is buying the employee
management software maker for about $1.26
billion.
AOL Inc., up 94 cents at $33.86
The Internet company said that it will buy back
about $600 million in its common stock and
declared a special dividend of $5.15 per share.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., up $12.46 at $675.68
After winning a $1 billion court battle against
rival Samsung, shares of the iPhone and iPad
maker rose to an all-time high.
Deltek Inc., down $1.08 at $12.93
The software maker is being bought by private
equity rm Thoma Bravo at a share price that is
7.2 percent below its Friday close.
Hudson City Bancorp Inc., up $1.01 at $7.45
M&T Bank Corp.is buying Hudson City in a deal
that is worth about $3.7 billion to broaden
M&Ts reach in the eastern U.S.
Big movers
By Samantha Bomkamp
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Hertz is one-step
closer to its long-awaited prize.
More than two years after its original
bid, it agreed Sunday to buy Dollar
Thrifty Automotive Group Inc. for about
$2.3 billion, giving it more ways to
attract travelers and expand its interna-
tional presence. It will also give the
company a leg up against competition
from an increasing number of smaller
competitors.
At $87.50 per share, the deal is worth
far more than any of Hertzs previous
bids and about 8 percent higher than
Dollar Thriftys closing price Friday.
Nothing will change immediately for
consumers. Travelers that rent through
Dollar Thrifty will still visit that counter
for service. In the long run, prices in
many markets will almost certainly rise
as the two companies streamline their
operations.
Both rental companies have grown
stronger and more valuable in the years
since they rst considered teaming up.
Both stocks have almost doubled in
value, and theyve reported robust quar-
terly nancial results as the volume of
car rentals soared. But still-erce com-
petition has prevented the industry from
raising prices, which has dragged on
revenue. Fewer big competitors mean a
better chance of higher rates.
The push-and-pull between two of
the nations largest car rental compa-
nies started in 2010. Avis Budget
Group was also in the mix, pursuing a
bid for Dollar Thrifty for more than a
year.
Avis dropped its bid nearly a year ago
citing market conditions. Then, in
October of last year, Hertz dropped its
bid, too. But Dollar Thrifty didnt trust
that the years of attempts were over. In
February, it extended its shareholder
rights plan known as a poison pill
a maneuver designed to deter any unso-
licited attempts to take over the compa-
ny through May 2013.
More recently, it appeared Dollar
Thrifty was open to another bid. Earlier
this month, it urged for either a com-
pelling offer or an end to the constant
distraction of merger speculation.
Then last week, media reports said
that Hertz Global Holdings Inc. of Park
Ridge, N.J., was considering a new bid
for Tulsa, Okla.-based Dollar Thrifty.
Hertz expects that the acquisition will
save it at least $160 million a year,
while providing the opportunity for
increased sales.
In an interview Monday with the
Associated Press, Hertz Chairman and
CEO Mark P. Frissora said this deal will
help it ght against a growing number of
small regional rental companies popping
up in airports across the country. He said
those competitors, along with European
rivals like Germanys Sixt doing more
U.S. business, will likely cause the rate
wars to continue for now.
Hertz buying Dollar Thrifty
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Apple Inc. on
Monday gave a federal judge a list of
eight Samsung Electronics Co. products
it wants pulled from shelves and banned
from the U.S. market, including popular
Galaxy model smartphones.
U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh asked
for the list after a jury in San Jose last
week slammed Samsung with a $1.05
billion verdict, nding that the South
Korean technology giant had willfully
copied Apples iPhone and iPad in creat-
ing and marketing the products.
Samsung plans an appeal.
The products Apple wants out are all
smartphones: Galaxy S 4G, Galaxy S2
AT&T, Galaxy S2, Galaxy S2 T-Mobile,
Galaxy S2 Epic 4G, Galaxy S Showcase,
Droid Charge and Galaxy Prevail.
Koh on June 26 banned the Galaxy Tab
10.1 from the U.S. market after nding it
likely violated a design patent.
Samsung is now asking for that ban to be
lifted after the jury found the computer
tablet didnt infringe that particular
patent, but it did nd it infringed three
Apples software patents that cover the
popular bounce-back and pinch-to-
zoom features.
The judge has scheduled a Sept. 20
hearing to discuss Apples demands for
the sales bans. She asked Apple on
Friday to submit the list of products its
wants removed from U.S. stores after
Samsung complained that it doesnt have
enough time to prepare for the scheduled
hearing.
The judge is deciding whether to
reschedule the hearing to give Samsung
more time to prepare. Samsung plans to
ask the judge to toss out the jurys verdict
as unsupported by the evidence. Failing
that, the company says it will appeal the
verdict to higher courts, including the
U.S. Supreme Court.
In addition to the sales bans, Apple
also plans to ask the judge to triple the
damages to $3.15 billion because of the
jurys nding that Samsung willfully
copied Apple.
Apple led its lawsuit in April of last
year alleging that 28 Samsung smart-
phones and computer tablets had slav-
ishly copied the iPhones and iPads.
Samsung countered with its own claims
that Apple used its wireless technology
without proper compensation.
A nine-person jury in its verdict Friday
unanimously agreed with Apple. Most of
the damages were tied to Samsungs
smartphones. The jury rejected
Samsungs counterclaims.
Most of the Samsung products found
to have infringed Apples patent were
older devices no longer being sold. The
list Apple presented to the court on
Monday represent devices it believes are
still being sold in U.S. stores, including
several versions of the companys popu-
lar S2 phones introduced last year.
Samsungs newest and hottest selling
smartphone, the Galaxy S3, was not part
of the lawsuit and is unaffected by the
jurys verdict.
Apple lists Samsung products it wants banned
Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012
NINERS AND RAIDERS MAKE CUTS: FORMER ARAGON DON AMONG THOSE AXED ON MONDAY >>> PAGE 12
Gators reloading and rebuilding
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Its a never-ending
question when it
comes to high school
football: is a team
rebuilding or reload-
ing? In the case of
Sacred Heart Prep, its
a little of both.
I think our defense
is reloading. Our
offense is rebuilding,
said SHP coach Peter
Lavorato. If you look
at the kids coming back,
we should be OK on
defense. On offense, well see. We have some
young kids who are pretty good athletes.
Lavorato said he has about 17 players returning
from a team that advanced to the Central Coast
Section Division IV seminals, losing to eventu-
al champion Palma. Nine of those returners are
on the defensive side of the ball. Senior Danny
Thaure and junior Noah Kawasaki will anchor
the back end of the defense from the strong safe-
ty and free safety positions, respectively. The
Gators also return two starting corner backs in
Rex Shannon and Jack Del Santo.
Both Thaure and Kawasaki will be changing
positions this season, but both played as defen-
sive backs last year, so the learning curve to learn
a new position should not be that great.
[Thaure] is such as aggressive player. Well
move him to strong safety. We want him clos-
er to the line of scrimmage so he can have a big-
ger effect, Lavorato said.
Lavorato is especially excited about his line-
backing corps of Michael Covell, Sean Mayle
and Mark Hardy, a group Lavorato believes is his
teams best unit.
Absolutely, Lavorato said. Those three guys
are going to be good. Theyre fast and they want
to get to the ball.
We dont have a lot of big guys and thats OK.
We have guys who are smart and understand the
game and have experience in our system. If
its up to me, Id rather have guys who are a little
more agile and can get to the ball.
The defense may have to shoulder much of the
load early on as the offense which is breaking
in a new starter at quarterback looks to get into
a rhythm.
Right now, Kevin Donahoe, who backed up
Balance will make the Bearcats better
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For San Mateo and its 2012 football team, its
addition by subtraction.
The Bearcats were one of most exciting teams
to watch last year with two of the premiere play-
makers in Michael Latu and Andrew Ho which
was great if youre into explosive play on offense.
But their skill alone did not translate to wins (1-
8-1 overall record) and, while the Bearcats scored
nearly 28 points per game, they gave up a
Peninsula Athletic League Lake Division worst
36 points per.
San Mateo head coach Jeff Scheller believes
that wont happen in 2012.
Sometimes a team comes together a little
stronger because they know they dont cant just
turn around and watch those guys do their thing,
Scheller said. And I think thats what happened
last year ... when they would get the ball, every-
one became a spectator. Knowing we dont have
a couple of those players, now everyone knows
they need to execute. It makes our team even
stronger.
Initial returns look promising for San Mateo.
They kicked off their season with a scrimmage
against Central Coast Section Division II champi-
on Los Gatos.
It was good. Ill be honest, last year we scrim-
maged and it was ugly, Scheller said. They beat
us up. And it affected us against Aragon (in the
season opener a week later). This year, we de-
nitely moved the ball well. I was really pleased
with how we played and how we executed. Were
off to a good start and thats what we wanted.
Weve never been wrong when we played them
(Los Gatos). We know what kind of season were
going to have when we play them, so it looks
good.
First, Schellers excitement is based around a
team that has been thinking as a cohesive unit
since the summer.
See BEARCATS, Page 14
Key Players: Larry Campbell (sr., WR/DB); Taylor Sanft (sr., QB); Kevin Garcia-
Rodela (sr.,RB/CB); David Aranda (sr.,OL/LB); Line Latu (so.,RB/DB); Juan Garcia
(sr.,WR/LB); Jonathan Arguelles (sr.,TE/DL); Kupa Schaumkel (jr., RB/DB); Jason
Gonzalez (jr., QB/LB); Casey Ghilarducci (sr., OL/LB).
2011 record: 1-4 PAL Lake, 1-8-1 overall.
2012 schedule (home games in CAPS): 8/31 GUNN, 3 p.m.; 9/7 @ Aragon, 7
p.m.; 9/14 WOODSIDE, 7 p.m.; 9/28 at The Kings Academy, 7 p.m.; 10/5 CARL-
MONT,7 p.m.;10/12 @ Hillsdale,8 p.m.;10/19 @ Mills,7 p.m.;10/26 @ Capuchino,
7 p.m.; 11/2 @ El Camino, 2:45 p.m.; 11/10 @ Burlingame, 11 a.m.
Key players: Danny Thaure (sr., SS); Noah Kawasaki (jr., FS); Michael Covell (sr.,
LB); Sean Mayle (jr.,LB); Mark Hardy (jr.,LB); Rex Shannon (sr.,CB); Jack Del Santo
(sr., CB); Ryan Gaertner (sr., RB/DB); Kevin Donahoe (sr., DB/QB); Hank Robson
(sr., WR); J.R Hardy (jr., QB); Andrew Segre (jr., RB); Pat Tinsley (sr., RB); Chris Lee
(jr., RB); Joey Ertola (sr., OL); Kyle Schaul (sr., OL)
2011 record: 3-2 PAL Bay, 8-4 overall
2012 schedule (home games in CAPS): @ Branham-SJ, 7 p.m.; 9/8 @ Moun-
tain View,12:15 p.m.;9/15 LOS ALTOS,1 p.m.;9/22 KINGS ACADEMY,1 p.m.;10/5
BURLINGAME,3 p.m.; 10/12 @ Terra Nova,7 p.m.; 10/19 ARAGON,3 p.m.; 10/27
MENLO-ATHERTON,1 p.m.;11/2 @ Half Moon Bay,7 p.m.;11/9 vs.Menlo School
at Woodside, 7 p.m.
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Senior Taylor Sanft is the new San Mateo QB.
See GATORS, Page 15
Debating the Lance Armstrong effect
I
ts a blast from the
past the last two
weeks or so. After
years of the various
sports leagues telling the
public they were clean-
ing up the use of drugs in
their games, doping in
sports is, once again, on
the front pages of news-
papers and is trending
on the Internet.
San Francisco Giants
outelder Melky Cabrera and Oakland As
pitcher Bartolo Colon were given 50-game
suspensions within a week of each other after
failing drug tests for synthetic testosterone.
Then, three Tampa Bay Rays minor leaguers
were suspended for testing positive for
methamphetamine.
But the real bombshell was the U.S. Anti-
Doping Association stripping Lance
Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles
and banning him from sanctioned competition
for life after Armstrong publicly admitted he
was done ghting PED charges. USADA head
Travis Tygart claims to have a mountain of
evidence and testimony from some of
Armstrongs former teammates, indicating he
was heavily involved in blood doping during
his career.
We may never know the full story, however,
because Armstrong gave up the ght to keep
his name clear.
Heres what we do know for certain:
Armstrong never, publicly, failed a drug test.
The rules state a cyclist in the Tour de France
must pass drug tests to compete. Armstrong
was tested and he never failed. Other champi-
ons: Jan Ullrich, Floyd Landis and Alberto
Contador among others did fail tests
and were stripped of titles. Armstrong fol-
lowed the rules put in place and he passed.
Now Im not nave enough to believe
Armstrong didnt dope. No normal human
being can do what Tour de France riders do
every year without some pharmacological
help. I believe he did dope. But he passed the
tests and whatever anyone might think, he
beat the system when others could not.
Bob Hammer, a two-time testicular cancer
See LOUNGE, Page 13
If you look at the kids coming back, we should be OK on defense. On
offense, well see.We have some young kids who are pretty good athletes.
Peter Lavorato, Sacred Heart Prep coach
SPORTS 12
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Sports brief
Former Aragon RB among Raiders
12 waived to get down to limit
ALAMEDA The Oakland Raiders
waived fullback Manase Tonga, the former
Aragon Don running back, and 11 others on
Monday to get down to the 75-player limit.
Quarterback Kyle Newhall-Caballero, line-
backer Korey Bosworth, defensive ends
Mason Brodine and Wayne Dorsey, safety
Aaron Henry, cornerback Terrail Lambert,
wide receivers Thomas Mayo and DeAundre
Muhammad, and safety Chaz Powell were also
among the cuts.
Tonga was the only player on Oaklands ros-
ter in 2011 when he played 11 games, three as
a starter in place of the injured Marcel Reece.
Cubs get Anthony Recker
from Athletics for Blake Lalli
CHICAGO The Chicago Cubs have
acquired catcher Anthony Recker from the
Oakland Athletics in exchange for catcher and
rst baseman Blake Lalli.
Recker was a member of Oaklands opening
day roster but was sent to Triple-A Sacramento
after hitting .129 in 31 at-bats. over 13 games.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Rookie center Jason
Slowey was among the 12 players cut Monday
by the San Francisco 49ers as they trimmed
their roster to 75.
Slowey, a sixth-round draft pick out of
Western Oregon, struggled to make an impact
during training camp for the reigning NFC
West champions and was waived. In addition,
San Francisco placed running back Jewel
Hampton on the non-football Injury list and
linebacker Darius Fleming on the physically
unable to perform list. Neither is eligible to
return to practice until at least the Tuesday
after the completion of Week 6 games.
Also cut Monday were fullback Cameron
Bell, outside linebacker Kourtnei Brown,
defensive tackles Patrick Butrym and Matthew
Masilo, wide receivers Ben Hannula, Joe
Hastings and Brian Tyms, cornerbacks Cory
Nelms and Deante Purvis, tight end Joe
Sawyer and kicker Giorgio Tavecchio.
Defensive coordinator Vic Fangio said the
49ers would consider some of the players
released for this years practice squad.
Obviously at this time of the camp you
have to let some guys go, Fangio said.
Sometimes we dont want to, we think theyre
young guys who have some potential. Well
look into some of them potentially as practice
squad players or maybe to bring back next off-
season when you start signing players in
February or guys to keep on in case you have
some injuries.
On Friday, the Niners (No. 4 in the AP
Pro32) must make another round of cuts to
nalize their 53-man roster ahead of the sea-
son opener Sept. 9 at Green Bay. San
Franciscos last preseason game is Thursday
night against the San Diego Chargers at
Candlestick Park.
Everybody is eager to start the season
with high expectations of reaching the Super
Bowl after last seasons near miss.
The guys are ready to go, thats for sure ...
, Fangio said. This is still a great time to
learn, perfect your craft, excel in your tech-
nique. We have to be able to do that, and we
werent perfect on that the other night by any
means.
Cornerback Tramaine Brock is among those
players considered on the bubble to make the
team after he struggled to defend the Broncos
in the Niners 29-24 exhibition win at Denver
on Sunday night. San Francisco has depth in
the secondary, with starting cornerbacks
Carlos Rogers and Tarell Brown and capable
backups in Perrish Cox and Chris Culliver.
Hes got a little hand injury that hes ght-
ing through but nothing that should affect him
a great deal, Fangio said of Brock. Hes
played better.
The 25-year-old Hastings was active for
only the nal regular-season game of 2011, a
34-27 victory at St. Louis. His presence pro-
vided depth after Braylon Edwards was
released and wideouts Ted Ginn Jr. and Kyle
Williams dealt with injuries.
The coaches will make more critical evalua-
tions in the coming days.
Fangio said playing time for Thursday night
for the defense would be more so on an indi-
vidual basis than on a unit basis.
Yet Fangio would like to see some things
cleaned up in the preseason nale after a frus-
trating performance by San Franciscos D
against Denver.
The 49ers fell behind 17-0 in the rst quar-
ter before rallying to win, outscoring the
Broncos backups 19-0 after halftime.
49ers sixth-round pick Jason Slowey among cuts
SPORTS 13
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
survivor and founder of the Have A Ball golf
tournament that raises funds for cancer
research, has a unique perspective most do
not. Hammer has been involved with the
L.A.F. for several years. Hammer gives full
credit to Armstrongs oncologist, Dr. Craig
Nichols, for allowing him and his wife Kim to
naturally conceive their son Josh. As a result,
Hammer has dedicated his time and effort to
help raise money for cancer research and
awareness. Hammer is not surprised
Armstrong gave up the ght to keep his name
clean. Even Hammer is not one to blindly sit
by and think one thing when all the evidence
suggests otherwise.
Where theres smoke, theres usually re,
Hammer said.
But he also knows the Lance Armstrong
Foundation has done more for cancer aware-
ness and research than just about anybody
else.
I kind of knew this was coming, Hammer
said, who has more of a relationship with the
L.A.F. than most people. Im not surprised. I
do have a personal friend who works for the
foundation. He told me a few years ago
[Armstrong] is going to quit (fighting)
because it has been tearing at him. It was
never going to end and he was going to stop
trying to ght it.
There are obviously more personal reasons
Armstrong decided to wash his hands of the
USADA investigation most certainly to
keep any information about his drug history
buried. But whatever you may think of
Armstrongs cycling exploits, it doesnt take
away all the good he has done in the ght
against cancer.
Hammer has donated more money to the
L.A.F. than any other private donor money
that he and his Have a Ball Foundation per-
sonally raised. And despite making the deci-
sion to donate more money to local cancer
charities in recent years, Hammer will never
stop supporting the Lance Armstrong
Foundation.
You cant look away from what hes done
off the bike, Hammer said. Im never going
to not benet his foundation. I have a son
because of him.
I still believe in his foundation and what
they do because he has helped a lot of people.
I whole-heartedly back that foundation. I
would be a perfect example of some good that
has come out of his foundation.
At the same time, Im a realist. At some
point, [the USADA] wanted his ass. Why did
they keep going after him? Because hes the
best.
There is a saying that two things can be
equally true, and in Armstrongs case, three
things. Was he one of the best cyclists of all
time? Without question. Did he dope? More
than likely, but so did a vast majority of elite
riders. Has he been one of the most visible and
supportive people in the ght against cancer?
Absolutely.
I kind of compartmentalize it. You have
him (as an athlete) and you have his founda-
tion, Hammer said. I think he was already
moving away from the bike stuff (anyway).
Like a lot of sports fans, Hammer is just
weary of steroid talk in professional sports. At
the end of the day, Hammer believes its all
about entertainment anyway. If a player/ath-
lete gets caught using PEDs, then thats the
risk they take, knowing that a positive test can
have a severe impact on their ability to contin-
ue playing the game.
At rst, years ago, it was, Wow! I cant
believe someone would do that, Hammer
said. But if you look at the end results, its
entertainment. It didnt affect me. (However) I
dont agree with it. The bottom line is,
[their using PEDs] didnt [have an adverse
effect on my health].
Whether it can ever be publicly proven
Armstrong doped or not, it will not affect the
legacy he has left in the cancer community.
Since the announcement from USADA,
L.A.F. has reported donations are up 25 per-
cent to 30 percent. Millions of people have
beneted from Armstrongs crusade against a
disease that nearly killed him and are grateful
to the L.A.F. for its continued ght against the
disease. To come back from testicular, brain
and lung cancer and become one of the most
dominant cyclists ever is amazing in and of
itself. But it raises the question: did
Armstrong build his cancer research/aware-
ness empire on a platform of lies and deceit?
To a cancer survivor, it doesnt really matter.
About four years ago, we (the Have a Ball
Foundation) started moving some of the dona-
tions we do make away from Lances founda-
tion because it was becoming too commercial,
but not in a bad way, Hammer said. Ive
heard people saying hes only raising money
for PR, to keep his name in the media. Even if
that were the case, if he was using money for
PR, would that be such a bad thing, to raise
(cancer) awareness?
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD Josh Nunes grew up in the
shadows of Southern Californias champi-
onships.
He had family and friends with UCLA
roots, and no hint of football anywhere in his
past.
Just a father who saw
Stanford in his future.
Everything about the
newly selected starting
quarterback can be traced
back to a single moment.
Tim Nunes came home
one day when Josh was 8
years old, sneaked up
from behind and plopped
a red hat on his sons
head. Josh looked at the logo, an S with a
tree in the middle, and smiled.
Hes like, Oh, whats this? his father
said. I said, Thats where you belong. Youre
going to go there one day.
Never mind that they had no connection to
the university.
Something about his sons smarts steered
his father, who has a degree from UCLA, to
push aside the Bruins and Trojans hats that
day at the Chicks Sporting Goods near the
familys home in Upland and reach for the
Cardinal cap.
Josh wore the heck of that hat, he said,
even if it often fueled his friends.
He took French classes in high school
because he read Stanfords admissions accept-
ed more students who spoke that than Spanish
as a secondary language French came in
real handy in Southern California, he joked.
His rst college game was watching Trent
Edwards and Stanford lose 21-0 to UCLA at
the Rose Bowl on Oct. 30, 2004. He graduat-
ed high school with a 4.6 grade-point average,
turning down offers from football powers
Florida, Oklahoma and Tennessee among oth-
ers for the Silicon Valley school.
It just goes to show you, he said, that I
always wanted to be a Stanford man.
Now Nunes is THE Stanford man.
The redshirt junior quarterback will make
his rst collegiate start and begin the post-
Andrew Luck era when No. 21 Stanford hosts
San Jose State on Friday night.
Walking on campus last week, Nunes
already was recognized by students and at
least one elderly woman who promised to
bring her camera and ask for a photo next
time.
Ive had to pinch myself to make sure its
real, said his mother, Debbie.
Nunes grew up playing baseball, soccer and
just about any sport but football. He struck out
all 18 batters in a Little League game when he
was 12 years old, his father said, and threw a
four-seam fastball clocked in the 90s in high
school and an overhand curve.
His dad, a private contractor, avoided Pop
Warner Football like the plague for fear of
injuries and overbearing coaches.
Not until ag football in the eighth grade
did Nunes ever throw a pigskin competitively,
and he doesnt even count freshman football at
Upland High School because I spent the
whole year learning everything.
By the end of his sophomore season, then-
Hawaii coach June Jones offered him a schol-
arship. Soon Urban Meyer at Florida and
coaches from the Southeastern Conference to
the renamed Pac-12 came calling.
It kind of took us back like, Oh, this is
something I might want to look into, Nunes
said.
For Nunes, there really only was one choice.
He took recruiting visits to Stanford and
Southern California for baseball, too, but
committed to Stanford as soon as former foot-
ball coach Jim Harbaugh offered him a schol-
arship and the admissions ofce approved his
transcript.
Nunes is majoring in management science
and engineering, which he describes as an
engineering degree with a business focus,
particularly on entrepreneurship and start-ups.
New QB Josh Nunes a Stanford man
Josh Nunes
SPORTS 14
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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I think just the fact that we are playing as
one and theyre relying on each other know-
ing that we all have to pull in one direction,
Scheller said.
Second, Scheller believes the defense, the
denite Achilles heel of the 2011 team, will
be this years foundation for success.
Im looking at our defense as the strength
of our team, Scheller said. We have some
guys that really like to y around, they like to
pursue the ball and they have a nose for the
ball thats the instinct weve been looking
for.
The core of this defense is their secondary,
where Larry Campbell and Kevin Garcia-
Rodela will play prominent roles. Scheller
said his team doesnt have one dominant guy,
but instead a handful of players that know
their roles on defense and can execute.
On offense, Taylor Sanft takes over the
quarterbacking duties. Sanft was the varsity
No. 2 last season, who according to Scheller,
could have easily been the No. 1. Instead,
Sanft chose to learn and master the San Mateo
offense. The Bearcats are hoping his eld IQ
and his rocket arm make for a productive
combination. His main target will be
Campbell on the outside. Hes a denite
playmaker, Scheller said of Campbell, who
learned from the leagues best last season.
Garcia-Rodela will front the running back
duties with Line Latu, a sophomore up from
the frosh/soph, as his backup. Up front, David
Aranda will anchor the offensive line with key
newcomer Casey Ghilarducci.
The exciting part of the team, Scheller
said, is although we may be thin, but most of
the time when you have 40-50 guys, you only
have a core group of guys that play all the
time. We have that core group of guys. We can
probably even split up our team where we
have a core group on offense, core group on
defense. And so theyre going to be fresh.
The Lake Division will probably be the
most contested in the PAL this season. And
despite the disappointment of a 1-4 mark in
2011, a new approach and dedication has
these Bearcats thinking playoffs.
Its such a toss-up, Scheller said of the
Lake Division. I tell these guys, our goal is to
win the Lake. If you look at our games last
year, out of probably two or three, we were in
every game, we just had some unfortunate
things happen. Were trying to eliminate those
mistakes, we can compete in the league. I
think we can be right up in there.
Continued from page 11
BEARCATS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND Brett Anderson gave up
two hits, one on a questionable call, over
seven innings as the Oakland Athletics beat
the Cleveland Indians 3-0 on Monday night.
Oakland came in one-half game behind
Tampa Bay in the AL wild-card race and
earned its ninth win in 11 games.
The Indians lost starter Roberto Hernandez
(0-3) after 2 1-3 innings with a sprained right
ankle and fell to 5-24 since July 27.
Anderson (2-0), in his second start since
returning from Tommy John surgery in July
2011, retired the rst 13 batters until Michael
Brantley was ruled safe with an ineld hit in
the fifth inning. TV replays showed that
umpire Jerry Meals missed the call.
Grant Balfour worked the ninth for his 15th
save in 17 chances.
Ryan Cook worked a perfect eighth, striking
out two, as Oakland recorded its 13th shutout
of the season. Cleveland was blanked for the
seventh time.
Brent Lillibridge opened the sixth with a
double for Clevelands rst legitimate hit.
Andersons bid for perfection ended with
one out in the fth. Brantley tapped a slow
roller to the right of the mound that was eld-
ed by rst baseman Chris Carter. He ipped to
second baseman Cliff Pennington, whose foot
hit rst base an instant before Brantley got
there, but Meals ruled safe.
Manager Bob Melvin briey argued with
Meals. Anderson then got Shelley Duncan to
hit into a double play.
Until then, the only thing close to a hit for
Cleveland was a line drive into the gap in
right-center by Jason Donald with one out in
the fourth. Right elder Josh Reddick made a
diving, backhanded catch to keep the perfect
game hope alive.
Hernandez, who pitched for six years in
Cleveland as Fausto Carmona, was making his
third start since being reinstated from a three-
week suspension for using the assumed name.
It was his rst start at Progressive Field since
Sept. 25, but he dropped to 0-5 in his last ve
home matchups with Oakland.
The right-hander made 28 pitches in the rst
inning as Yoenis Cespedes ran up the right-
handers pitch count. Cespedes fouled off
eight consecutive pitches and eventually dou-
bled on the 13th offering.
Athletics Anderson beats Indians
SPORTS 15
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Jack Larson last season, and J.R.
Hardy are battling it out for the
starting quarterback job. Donahoe
saw signicant playing time when
Larson went down with an injury
midway through the season, while
Hardy was the starting signal caller
on the junior varsity squad last year
and was called up for the playoffs.
They can both play. [Donahoe]
has a little more experience.
Athletically, theyre not far apart.
[J.R. Hardy] might have a little
stronger arm, Lavorato said. Both
are real good friends. They dont
care who plays as long as were
playing well. If [J.R. Hardy] is able
to handle the offense, that gives us
[Donahoe] as a starter on defense.
Donahoe could be one of our
best defensive players.
While the Gators may be replac-
ing a lot of talent in the offensive
backfield, Lavorato believes they
can get the job done. Ryan Gaertner,
a three-year varsity player, will
move from wingback to tailback this
season. Andrew Segre, Pat Tinsley,
Chris Lee and sophomore Ben Burr
Kirven give the Gators some depth
in the backeld.
Weve got a pretty good group of
running backs, Lavorato said.
The offensive line will be a work
in progress. Seniors Joey Ertola and
Kyle Schaul, while not starters a
year ago, saw significant action.
Jacob Meyers and Jhed Yuzon are
two more seniors expected to con-
tribute, while juniors Patrick
Finnigan and Alex Castro will also
work into the mix.
Were going to be OK. I say that
reservedly, not because I dont have
condence in my kids, but because
our league is so strong, Lavorato
said. The thing is, we have only 32
players. (But) out of those guys,
there is not one kid who cant be on
the eld. They can all play.
Continued from page 11
GATORS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 77 50 .606
Atlanta 73 56 .566 5
Philadelphia 61 67 .477 16 1/2
New York 59 69 .461 18 1/2
Miami 58 71 .450 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 77 52 .597
St. Louis 71 57 .555 5 1/2
Pittsburgh 68 60 .531 8 1/2
Milwaukee 60 67 .472 16
Chicago 49 78 .386 27
Houston 40 88 .313 36 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 71 57 .555
Los Angeles 69 60 .535 2 1/2
Arizona 64 64 .500 7
San Diego 60 70 .462 12
Colorado 52 75 .409 18 1/2
MondaysGames
St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 15, Chicago Cubs 4
Colorado 10, L.A. Dodgers 0
Cincinnati at Arizona, late
San Diego 3, Atlanta 0.
TuesdaysGames
N.Y. Mets (C.Young 3-7) at Philadelphia (Worley 6-
9), 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 13-9) at Pittsburgh (Ja.Mc-
Donald 11-6), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 15-5) at Miami (Nolasco 9-
12), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 13-8) at Chicago Cubs
(T.Wood 4-10), 5:05 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 13-5) at Houston (B.Norris
5-11), 5:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 11-9) at Colorado (Chat-
wood 3-3), 5:40 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 74 54 .578
Baltimore 70 57 .551 3 1/2
Tampa Bay 70 58 .547 4
Boston 62 67 .481 12 1/2
Toronto 57 70 .449 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 71 56 .559
Detroit 69 58 .543 2
Kansas City 56 71 .441 15
Cleveland 55 73 .430 16 1/2
Minnesota 52 76 .406 19 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 76 52 .594
Oakland 70 57 .551 5 1/2
Los Angeles 66 62 .516 10
Seattle 62 67 .481 14 1/2
MondaysGames
Boston 5, Kansas City 1
Baltimore 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Oakland 3, Cleveland 0
Toronto 8, N.Y.Yankees 7, 11 innings
Texas 6,Tampa Bay 5
Seattle 1, Minnesota 0
TuesdaysGames
Chicago White Sox (Sale 15-4) at Baltimore (Till-
man 6-2), 4:05 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 10-9) at Cleveland (McAllister 5-
4), 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 8-11) at N.Y.Yankees (P.Hughes
12-11), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 12-7) at Texas (Darvish 12-9),
5:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-7) at Kansas City (Mendoza
7-9), 5:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 4-3) at Minnesota (Diamond 10-
5), 5:10 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 1 2 0 .333 52 63
N.Y. Jets 0 3 0 .000 21 60
Buffalo 0 3 0 .000 27 81
Miami 0 3 0 .000 30 66
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 73 56
Jacksonville 2 1 0 .667 76 103
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 79 61
Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 79 59
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 91 61
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 54 52
Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 64 54
Pittsburgh 2 1 0 .667 87 55
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 3 0 0 1.000 61 43
Denver 1 2 0 .333 65 62
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 58 92
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 58 54
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 0 0 1.000 78 50
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 43 47
Washington 2 1 0 .667 68 56
N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 74 55
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 57 65
Carolina 2 1 0 .667 53 55
New Orleans 2 2 0 .500 81 71
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 59 61
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 1 0 .667 56 79
Detroit 1 2 0 .333 64 62
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 50 69
Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 52 43
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 101 41
San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 55 50
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 53 75
Arizona 1 3 0 .250 85 103
NFL PRESEASON
@Astros
5:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/28
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
vs.Chivas
6p.m.
NBCSN
9/2
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
9/2
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
RedSox
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/1
@Indians
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/28
RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/2
@Astros
5:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/29
@Indians
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/29
Angels
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/3
Dbacks
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/3
@Astros
5:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/30
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
8/31
@Indians
9:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
8/30
@Cubs
10:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
9/1
RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/31
Linebacker Philip Wheeler likes Raiders D
THE ASSCOATED PRESS
ALAMEDA When he hit the free agent mar-
ket in the offseason, Philip Wheeler didnt garner
anywhere near the attention his former quarter-
back with the Indianapolis Colts did.
While the pursuit of Peyton Manning turned
into a national soap opera, Wheeler ew under
the radar and quietly signed with Oakland (tied
for No. 23 in the AP Pro32). So far its been one
of the best moves made by rst-year general
manager Reggie McKenzie.
Wheeler had ve tackles last week against
Detroit and has been the Raiders most productive
linebacker in the preseason in a defense similar to
the one he played in college.
Hes actually provided a little bit more than
what I would have anticipated after studying him
in Indianapolis, Oakland coach Dennis Allen
said. But were asking him to do a lot of things
they didnt ask him to do there.
Allen, the Raiders first defensive-minded
coach since John Madden, and defensive coordi-
nator Jason Tarver scrapped the schemes favored
by late owner Al Davis and replaced them with a
blitz-heavy concept featuring a variety of cover-
ages in the secondary.
Its a dramatic but welcomed change from what
Wheeler did in Indianapolis, where the defenses
main job was to protect leads built by the
Manning-led offense.
There wasnt much need to blitz, so the Colts
kept the concepts basically vanilla.
Im doing more than what I was doing with
the Colts, Wheeler said Monday. We were just
trying to hold the lead with Peyton at quarter-
back. This defense is an attacking, aggressive
defense. Its made for everybody to be able to
hang loose and make plays.
Oakland is trying to improve a unit that was
among the NFLs worst in numerous categories in
2011. The 6-foot-2, 240-pound Wheeler is a key
part of that process.
His showing in the preseason not only solidi-
ed Wheelers status as a starter, its also provid-
ed a bright spot on a unit facing some serious
questions heading into the regular season.
Middle linebacker Rolando McClain is await-
ing a jury trial in Alabama after appealing his
conviction on assault and gun charges. Aaron
Curry, penciled in to be the Raiders other outside
linebacker opposite Wheeler, has been sidelined
all training camp after undergoing stem cell treat-
ment on his knees in the offseason.
16
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/WORLD
Mention this AD for
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Senate approves ban
on open carry of rifles
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO California would bar the public display
of ries and shotguns in most cities and towns, under a bill
approved by the state Senate on Monday.
The measure responds to gun rights advocates who took to
openly carrying unloaded long guns to protest another bill that
became law last year. That measure prohibited the public dis-
play of unloaded handguns.
The ban was sought by the state police chiefs association
and the Peace Ofcers Research Association of California,
which represents local, state and federal law enforcement of-
cers. They said it was causing confusion and alarm for ofcers
and citizens who couldnt tell if the guns were loaded.
By Jorge Rueda
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUNTO FIJO, Venezuela An
intense re at a Venezuelan renery
spread to a third fuel tank on
Monday nearly three days after an
explosion killed at least 41 people
and injured more than 150.
Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez said
the third tank ignited at the Amuay
renery, which has been in ames
since Saturdays blast.
Government ofcials had previ-
ously said they had the blaze con-
tained, and the spread to another
tank was an apparent setback to
their plans to quickly restart the
renery. While a thick column of
smoke blew in the wind, Ramirez
told reporters the re was still con-
tained.
There is no risk of a bigger
event, Ramirez said, without speci-
fying how much longer it might
burn.
Ofcials have said a gas leak led
to the blast, but investigators have
yet to determine the precise causes.
Prosecutor General Luisa Ortega
said at a news conference that 151
people were injured, 33 of whom
remain in hospitals.
A 9-year-old girl was missing in
the area, Health Minister Eugenia
Sader said on television.
Criticisms of the governments
response to the gas leak emerged
from local residents as well as oil
experts. People in neighborhoods
next to the renery said they had no
ofcial warning before the explo-
sion hit at about 1 a.m. on Saturday.
What bothers us is that there was
no sign of an alarm. I would have
liked for an alarm to have gone off
or something, said Luis Suarez, a
bank employee in the neighbor-
hood. Many of us woke up think-
ing it was an earthquake.
The blast knocked down walls,
shattered windows and left streets
littered with rubble.
People who live next to the ren-
ery said they smelled strong fumes
coming from the renery starting
between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. Friday,
hours before the blast, but many
said they werent worried because
they had smelled such odors before.
Then, a cloud of gas ignited in an
area with fuel storage tanks and
exploded.
President Hugo Chavez visited
the renery on Sunday. In a tele-
vised conversation with the presi-
dent, one state oil company ofcial
said workers had made their rounds
after 9 p.m. and hadnt noticed any-
thing unusual. The ofcial said that
at about midnight ofcials detected
the gas leak and went out to the
street to block trafc.
And later something happened
that set (it) off, Chavez said. A
spark somewhere.
Chavez visited some of the
wounded in a hospital on Monday
and said that more than 500 homes
were damaged.
The disaster occurred little more
than a month before Venezuelas
upcoming Oct. 7 presidential elec-
tion. Opposition candidate
Henrique Capriles said the tragedy
shouldnt be politicized, but he also
strongly criticized a remark by
Chavez, who had said the show
should continue, with our pain, with
our sorrow, with our victims.
It seems irresponsible, insensi-
tive... to say the show should con-
tinue, Capriles told reporters in
Caracas. He repeated past criticisms
about the number of accidents at the
state-owned oil company, and called
for a serious, responsible and
transparent investigation.
The state has to give answers.
Venezuelans have a right to know
what happened in Amuay, Capriles
said.
Energy analyst Jorge Pinon said
the accounts of the hours leading up
the explosion raise concerns.
Fire spreads at Venezuela refinery, 41 dead
REUTERS
A burnt car is seen in the affected area after an explosion at Amuay oil renery in Punto Fijo, in the Peninsula of
Paraguana,Venezuela.
HEALTH 17
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FDA approves 4-in-1 HIV combination pill
WASHINGTON The Food and Drug Administration on
Monday approved a new anti-HIV pill that combines four
medicines to combat the virus that causes AIDS.
The agency approved Gilead Sciences Stribild as a once-a-
day treatment to control HIV in adults who have not previous-
ly been treated for infection.
The pill contains two previously approved antiviral drugs,
emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, currently sold
as the combination pill Truvada.
Those drugs are combined with two new drugs: elvitegravir
and cobicistat. Elvitegravir interferes with one of the enzymes
that HIV needs to multiply. Cobicistat helps prolong the effect
of elvitegravir.
Company studies showed that 88 to 90 percent of patients
taking Stribild had an undetectable level of HIV in their blood
after 48 weeks, compared with 87 percent for patients taking
Atripla, another HIV drug that contains Truvada and one other
drug.
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO The nations most
inuential pediatricians group says the
health benets of circumcision in new-
born boys outweigh any risks and insur-
ance companies should pay for it.
In its latest policy statement on cir-
cumcision, a procedure that has been
declining nationwide, the American
Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to
an endorsement but says the decision
should be up to parents.
Its not a verdict from on high, said
policy co-author Dr. Andrew Freedman.
Theres not a one-size-ts-all-answer.
But from a medical standpoint, circum-
cisions benets in reducing risk of dis-
ease outweigh its small risks, said
Freedman, a pediatric urologist in Los
Angeles.
Recent research bolstering evidence
that circumcision reduces chances of
infection with HIV and other sexually
spread diseases, urinary tract infections
and penis cancer inuenced the academy
to update their 13-year-old policy.
Their old stance said potential medical
benets were not sufcient to warrant
recommending routinely circumcising
newborn boys. The new one says, The
benets of newborn male circumcision
justify access to this procedure for those
families who choose it. The academy
also says pain relief stronger than a
sugar-coated pacier is essential, usually
an injection to numb the area.
The federal Centers for Disease
Control and Convention has estimated
circumcision costs range from about
$200 to $600 nationwide. Coverage
varies among insurers and several states
have stopped Medicaid funding for cir-
cumcisions.
The new policy was published online
Monday in Pediatrics. It comes amid
ongoing debate over whether circumci-
sion is medically necessary or a cosmet-
ic procedure that critics say amounts to
genital mutilation. Activists favoring a
circumcision ban made headway in put-
ting it to a vote last year in San
Francisco but a judge later knocked the
measure off the city ballot, ruling that
regulating medical procedures is up to
the state, not city ofcials.
In Germany, Jewish and Muslim lead-
Pediatricians: Circumcision pluses outweigh risks
Health brief
Its not a verdict from on
high. ...Theres not a one-size-ts-all-answer.
Dr. Andrew Freedman
See BENEFIT, Page 18
18
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ers have protested a regional court ruling in
June that said circumcision amounts to bodily
harm.
Meantime, a recent study projected that
declining U.S. circumcision rates could add
more than $4 billion in health care costs in
coming years because of increased illness and
infections.
Circumcision involves removing foreskin at
the tip of the penis. The procedure can reduce
germs that can grow underneath the foreskin,
and complications, including bleeding and
infection, are rare, the academy says.
Despite the U.S. decline, about half of baby
boys nationwide still undergo circumcision,
or roughly 1 million each year. The countrys
overall rate is much higher than in other
developed nations, but U.S. rates vary by
region and are higher in areas where it is a cul-
tural or religious tradition, including among
Jews and Muslims.
Psychologist Ronald Goldman, director of
an anti-circumcision group, the Circumcision
Resource Center, said studies show circumci-
sion causes loss of sexual satisfaction a
claim the academy said is not supported by
the research it reviewed and can be psy-
chologically harming. Goldman contends
medical studies showing benets are awed
and that the academys new position is out of
step with medical groups in other developed
countries.
The American Congress of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists took part in the research
review that led to the new policy and has
endorsed it. Circumcisions in hospitals are
typically performed by obstetricians or pedia-
tricians.
The CDC also participated in the review,
and will consider the academys updated pol-
icy in preparing its own recommendations, a
CDC spokesman said. The agency has a fact
sheet summarizing circumcisions potential
health benets and risks but no formal guide-
lines.
The American Medical Association and
American Academy of Family Physicians
have neutral policies similar to the pediatrics
academys previous position.
Philadelphia social worker Shannon Coyne
examined medical research on circumcision
before her son was born last September and
had a tough time making a decision. She
learned that a relatives boy needed recon-
structive surgery after a botched circumcision,
and that anothers son who wasnt circum-
cised developed urinary infections.
Coyne said she and her husband ultimately
decided against circumcision, because she
didnt want her baby to have what she consid-
ers cosmetic surgery without being able to
consent.
Her advice to other parents is just make an
informed decision. Do your research, be open-
minded.
Some 18 states have eliminated Medicaid
coverage for circumcision, a trend that could
contribute to rising health care costs to treat
infections if circumcision rates continue to
decline, according to a study published Aug.
20 in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent
Medicine.
Dr. Aaron Tobian, a Johns Hopkins
University assistant professor who co-
authored the study, said the academys updat-
ed policy is a very good step.
Continued from page 17
BENEFIT
son contest.
Rarback and Ullom are both first-time can-
didates and are facing two incumbents with
long political histories in town.
Muller, known as Farmer John and
famous for growing giant pumpkins, was
first appointed to the City Council in 2006
and ran unopposed in 2008. He has a 40-year
history on the coast and told the Daily
Journal he wants to continue the citys turn-
around after suffering some financial set-
backs in recent years.
Weve got a good team in place. We need
to keep working as best as possible to reduce
the mistakes weve made in the past, said
Muller, 66.
It is those mistakes, including hefty annual
payments for a botched development and a
nearly $300,000 civil settlement for clearing
the Kehoe ditch, that prompted both Rarback
and Ullom to run for the council seats.
We need to live within our means, Ullom
told the Daily Journal. The council has
made bad decisions that got us sued and
fined and they are spending money we dont
have.
Ullom, 52, is a computer tech who has
lived on the coast for about 20 years and has
never run for elected office.
Incumbent Fraser, 53, has served on the
City Council since 2003 and notes the citys
efforts to curb its costs in recent years by
contracting out police services to the San
Mateo County Sheriffs Office and adminis-
trative services for its parks and recreation
programs.
Weve saved nearly $1 million annually
with those contracts, Fraser said.
The city is currently making annual bond
payments of about $1 million, however,
related to a court-ordered settlement over the
Beachwood property, wetlands that were
slated for development.
Rarback, 66, said those past decisions by
the council have cost the city too much
money.
The council needs to do better with land-
use issues and have more respect for the
Coastal Act, he said.
He also said the council and city staff have
become too familiar with each other.
It is much too cozy over there, said
Rarback, a retired scientist.
He is an officer at the Sandy Cove
Homeowners Association and is also lead-
ing an effort to recall three members of
the Coastside Fire Protection District.
Rarback wants to keep Cal Fire in place
while the three on the board he aims to
oust want to re-establish a standalone fire
department for the coast.
We need more transparency from our
leadership, he said.
Muller looks forward to the campaign
leading up to the Nov. 6 election.
Im not afraid to campaign. Im going to
keep it positive. Ive got proven leadership
for a number of years and weve got our
structural deficit under control, Muller said.
Fraser is also looking forward to a race.
It validates you when you get elected,
she said.
She is looking to continue to find more
opportunities for shared services to reduce
the citys operating costs and wants to make
the city more friendly for pedestrians and
bicyclists.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
HMB
HEALTH 19
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Malcolm Ritter
and Nick Perry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Teens who rou-
tinely smoke marijuana risk a long-
term drop in their IQ, a new study
suggests.
The researchers didnt nd the
same IQ dip for people who
became frequent users of pot after
18. Although experts said the new
ndings are not denitive, they do
t in with earlier signs that the drug
is especially harmful to the devel-
oping brain.
Parents should understand that
their adolescents are particularly
vulnerable, said lead researcher
Madeline Meier of Duke
University.
Study participants from New
Zealand were tested for IQ at age
13, likely before any significant
marijuana use, and again at age 38.
The mental decline between those
two ages was seen only in those
who started regularly smoking pot
before age 18.
Richie Poulton, a study co-author
and professor at the University of
Otago in New Zealand, said the
message of the research is to stay
away from marijuana until adult-
hood if possible. For some its a
legal issue, he said, but for me its
a health issue.
Pot is the most popular illegal
drug in the world, with some-
where between 119 million and
224 million users between the
ages of 15 and 64 as of 2010, the
United Nations reported. Within
the United States, 23 percent of
high school students said theyd
recently smoked marijuana, mak-
ing it more popular than ciga-
rettes, the federal government
reported in June.
Young people dont think its
risky, said Staci Gruber, a
researcher at the Harvard-afliated
MacLean Hospital in Belmont,
Mass. Gruber, who didnt partici-
pate in the new work, said the idea
that marijuana harms the adoles-
cent brain is something we believe
is very likely, and the new nding
of IQ declines warrants further
investigation.
Experts said the new research is
an advance because its methods
avoid criticisms of some earlier
work, which generally did not
measure mental performance
before marijuana use began.
I think this is the cleanest study
Ive ever read that looks for long-
term harm from marijuana use, said
Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the
National Institute on Drug Abuse,
which helped fund the research.
Teen pot use linked to later declines in IQ
REUTERS
Among participants whod been dependent on marijuana at age 18 and
in at least one later survey, IQ declines showed up even if theyd largely or
entirely quit using pot at age 38, analysis showed.
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tic disputes.
The wife of Yoshiaki Nagaya, 33, ultimate-
ly did contact police and the vice consul is
now charged with 16 counts of domestic vio-
lence and assault. A preliminary hearing on
the evidence began yesterday but did not con-
clude, in large part due to a morning session in
which two interpreters providing separate
service to Nagaya and his wife differed
numerous times over the accuracy of transla-
tion and one abruptly resigned.
The hearing, which drew Japanese media
largely from Los Angeles, continues Tuesday
afternoon. Before the court recessed, however,
Nagayas wife of 18 months told the court the
couples ghting escalated over his female
friendship with a foreign ministry employee
and, in March 2011, he stabbed her hand with
a screwdriver while they struggled over his
cellphone which contained a picture of the
woman. Other incidents described by her
included kicks to her thigh, punches to her
arm, milk poured over her head and once
being dragged by the neck of her pajamas
down a hallway. Prosecutors have said other
times Nagaya knocked out a tooth and threw
her from a car.
Dating back to January 2011, the approxi-
mately 80-pound woman photographed her
injuries after every assault and much of
Tuesday afternoons testimony was of her
explaining the circumstances of each pictured
bruise or scratch. After the alleged screwdriv-
er incident, the woman said Nagaya also hit
her square on the head with a laptop comput-
er but it was not that severe.
On May 3, 2011, the woman said she con-
fronted Nagaya about the large amount of
cash in his briefcase, wondering why he need-
ed to avoid receipts, and said he gave a punch
onto my shoulder.
The couples arguments escalated with
more confrontations about his parents
upcoming visit to San Francisco, and his rela-
tionship with a woman who worked in the for-
eign ministry and embassy. In March 2012,
after Nagaya allegedly threw her from their
car in the San Bruno apartment parking
garage which left her face and knees scraped,
the woman went to San Bruno police which
led to Nagayas April 1 arrest.
Nagaya has pleaded not guilty and remains
free on $350,000 cash bail. Prosecutors say he
faces 15 to 20 years if convicted.
Nagaya is a vice consul at the Japanese
embassy in San Francisco and moved there
with his new wife in June 2010. He does not
qualify for diplomatic immunity because that
only extends to those accused of acts in the
performance of their duty. Since Nagayas
April 1 arrest, the embassy has declined much
comment and he remains an employee.
While yesterday afternoon focused on
Nagayas wife, the morning was sidetracked
by questions of mistaken translation.
Attorney Gerrick Lew objected, saying his
clients case would be prejudiced without a
proper translation. Lew also pointed out that
the interpreter, who is certied as a simultane-
ous translator, was not even translating for his
client as attorneys spoke.
I think we have a problem, Lew said.
The translator then resigned from the job,
saying he had driven for Los Angeles to par-
ticipate and was too tired to continue.
Continued from page 1
NAGAYA
TUESDAY, AUG. 28
Rhumba with Arthur Murray. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. 200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Free.
Art on the Square featuring:
Edgardo and Candela Salsa. 5
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Courthouse Square
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Pop/Soul band. Free. For more
information call 780-7340.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29
Stress-Free Dementia Care: Free
Preview. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Twin Pines
Senior and Community Center, 20
Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. For more
information call 637-2976.
Weight Loss Challenge. Noon to 1
p.m. 1730 S. Amphett Blvd., San Mateo.
Eight weeks and $35 to learn how to
safely achieve the weight loss you
have always wanted. In this powerful
eight-week course you get your own
personal coach, group support, free
fitness evaluation, proven tips for
weight loss and a chance to win cash.
For more information contact Rick at
rckerri@hotmail.com.
Teen Movie: The Hunger Games.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
ages 13 to 19. Popcorn will be served.
The movie is rated PG-13. Free. For
more information visit smcl.org.
Peninsula Stroke Associations
Open House. 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. 1600
Trousedale Ave., Burlingame.There will
be speakers and refreshments. For
more information visit
events@psastroke.org.
Ted Atlas presents MOAH lecture
series: AHistoryof Candlestick Park.
7 p.m. Museum of American Heritage
Lecture Series, 351 Homer Ave., Palo
Alto. As the 49ers prepare to vacate
this historic sports stadium, join Ted
Atlas for an encore performance as he
explores how Candlestick Park has
shaped Bay Area sports and
entertainment. Free for MOAH
members. $10 for non-members. For
more information call 321-1004.
Sinister Blue performs at Club Fox
Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
information call 369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Argentine Tango Class. 7:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. for beginners. 8:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. for intermediates. 9:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. practice. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Free. For more
information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
THURSDAY, AUG. 30
Burlingame Lions Club Membership
Drive. Noon. 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Join us for free lunch and
see what the club is about. Free. For
more information call 245-2993.
Middle School IceCream Social. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Middle school
students only. Students will be able to
meet the Teen Center staff and get
freebies. For middle school students
only. Those who attend must show
student identication. Free. For more
information visit smcl.org.
Dancin Off the Avenue. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. Adjacent to Fresh Market on Park
Road off Burlingame Avenue. Live
music and dancing. Free.
Cooking Class: Healthy Lunches. 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Preregistration required.
Free. For more information visit
newleaf.com.
Group Series Dance Classes. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
International Standard, Level II Class
Learning Waltz 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. All Level
Bachata Class 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
International Standard, Level I Class
Learning Waltz 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. All Level
Salsa Class 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Annual Labor Day Festival of
Theatre and Dance. 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. The
program will include short plays,
dance performances, films and
presentations. Some plays contain
adult situations and language. Tickets
available at the door. $10. For more
information visit ndnu.edu.
MauriceTani and 77 El Deora. 8 p.m.
Angelicas Bell Theatre and Bistro, 864
Main St., Redwood City. $10-$14. For
more information call 365-3226.
Movies on the Square: Citizen
Kane. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. This
movie is rated PG. Free. For more
information call 780-7340 or visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.
html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 31
Relay For Life. Leo Ryan Park, Foster
City.To sign get involved call (925) 337-
7268. To sign up visit
RelayForLife.org/FosterCityCA.
Free Wine and Beer Tastings Friday
Happy Hours. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. New
Leaf Community Markets, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. A different
selection will be offered each week.
We will feature local wines and brews,
wines that offer exceptional value and
limited-quantity, hand-crafted wines.
Meet knowledgeable vendors and
educate your pallet. Must be 21 years
of age or older. No registration
required. Free. For more information
email www.newleaf.com.
Free Concert. 6 p.m., Rotary Pavilion,
San Bruno City Park, corner of Crystal
Springs and Oak Avenue, San Bruno.
Enjoy classic rock by Just for Kicks.
Wine and snacks available for
purchase. Free. For more information
call 616-7180.
Music on the Square. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Foreverland, the
Michael Jackson tribute band, will
perform. Free. For more information
visit redwoodcity.org/events.
For Beginners Only Ballroom Dance
Classes. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Suite G, Foster City.
Own the Night 2012. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
800 Alma St., Menlo Park. For more
information visit
www.menloparklibrary.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
crew are busy now clearing out decades of
history as it rst opened in 1961 on its San
Mateo Drive location near the Burlingame
border.
A sale is pending on the building with an
asking price of $2.5 million but it is not
known yet whether the prospective buyer will
continue to operate it as a convalescent facili-
ty.
Barnes has worked at the for-prot hospital
since it was opened by her mother Betty Frint
in the early 1960s.
At its peak, the hospital employed 55 peo-
ple, Barnes said.
Many of the former residents of the facility
have moved to Nazareth Vista in Belmont
where Barnes has accepted a new job.
In the meantime, the building was supposed
to be cleared of all belongings by this past
Friday but, with so much inventory, Barnes
and a few other faithful staff members and
family have stuck around to liquidate all of the
facilitys belongings, including wheelchairs,
furniture, craftware and many other items.
The hospital was given a 30-day notice to
vacate, Barnes said, and will have to pay a
daily ne as it continues to occupy the space.
We are in a big bind over here, Barnes
said about having to clear the building.
The hospital will likely have to le for
Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection, she said.
Barnes had attempted to sell her business as
part of the buildings sale and had a prospec-
tive buyer but the deal fell apart, she said.
Neighbors of the facility, located at 453 N.
San Mateo Drive, have been helpful in the
transition, she said.
The neighbors have been buying things
just to help us out, said Barnes, one of the
owners of the hospital.
The hope was to have all of the facilitys
belongings sold by yesterday, she said.
However, the liquidation sale could continue
through the week depending on what gets
sold.
Continued from page 1
HOSPITAL
a plan to operate on the east side of town with
a focus on social-emotional learning and
inquiry-based learning that would, at capacity,
serve 300 students in kindergarten through
eighth grade. First heard by the board in June,
district staff and charter backers worked
together over the summer to clarify details.
Also, the district had the nancial aspects of
the charter proposal analyzed by School
Services of California, Inc.
Ultimately, Christensen wrote, the district
staff believes all items have been addressed or
resolved. There are some concerns, however,
about the schools nancial viability during a
time of continuous budget cuts from the state.
District staff believes that petitioners have
a nancial plan in place to pursue options to
secure financial operations of the charter
school as necessary, Christensen wrote.
District staff also believes that the proposed
charter school program presents a unique and
benecial opportunity to provide an addition-
al school to residents of the district.
The 118-page petition took more than a
year for the 13 founders most of whom live
in the district and are parents to put togeth-
er. Four of the founders presented an overview
of the principles for the program.
Connects program calls for integrating
social and emotional learning. The program
would allow children to build a relationship
with teachers by having students work with
the same teacher for two consecutive years.
Daily curriculum would include visual arts
and physical education. Opportunities for
hands-on service learning with the communi-
ty would be offered. Connect would partici-
pate in mandated state tests and include a
teacher-led professional learning community
through a shared governance model.
As proposed, Connect Community Charter
School founders aims to open in the 2013-14
school year with 25 students in kindergarten,
rst and second grades and 50 students in
sixth grade. In the years to come, one grade
would be added to the elementary and middle
school section until the fourth school year,
2016-17, when the campus would be at capac-
ity with 300 students.
If the petition is approved, Connect would
most likely make a Proposition 39 request to
access facilities. Since the school isnt starting
at full capacity, it would most likely use a
number of classrooms at an existing district
site to start.
Currently, the district does not have any
charter schools.
Previously, Gareld School was a charter
school sponsored by the Redwood City
Elementary School District. It was the states
49th charter school in 1994. In February 2009,
the Gareld Charter Board voted unanimous-
ly not to renew the schools charter and return
to the district.
The board meets 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29
at the District Office, 750 Bradford St.
Redwood City. To read the full charter peti-
tion visit the districts website
www.rcsd.k12.ca.us or the schools website
www.connectrwc.org.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
TUESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2012
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Dont allow any outside
infuences to cause you to be unduly rushed regard-
ing tasks that are detailed and intricate. Haste
will most assuredly perpetrate serious errors or
complications.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you try to juggle ac-
counts around in order to rob Peter to pay Paul, all
youll do is create even more havoc in your fnancial
affairs. Live within your means.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your loved ones will
follow the example you set when you deal with them.
If you are cranky, short-tempered or impatient, it isnt
likely that your family life will be pleasant.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you have to deal
with a diffcult person, it might be hard to keep your
anger in check. It would be best to smolder in silence
rather than respond in kind.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Financial arrange-
ments with friends could cause problems. Should a
disagreement arise over something material, suffer
the loss rather than jeopardize the relationship.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Sometimes there is a
fne line between being assertive and being just plain
aggressive. If youre not considerate, you might have
trouble distinguishing between the two.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Its never a good idea
to butt into a testy situation that doesnt directly con-
cern you. You wont derive any benefts from getting
in the middle of someone elses mess.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If you encounter some-
one who is as strong-willed and infexible about his
or her opinions as you are, any trivial disagreement
can quickly be blown out of proportion. Be careful.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Make sure that some-
one whose cooperation is essential to you is handled
with the utmost diplomacy so that he or she doesnt
become an adversary instead of an ally.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Dont take something
that you need repaired back to an establishment that
gave you problems in the past. Youd be wise to look
for a place that is more reliable.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You should try not to
be overly possessive of a person with whom you are
emotionally involved. Unfortunately, the tighter you
try to hold on to him or her, the faster she or he is
apt to run.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- An outsider should not
be allowed to try to help resolve a disagreement
between you and your special someone. If you think
things are heated now, outside intervention would
only pour more gasoline on the fre.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
8-28-12
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PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
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kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


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2
ACROSS
1 Petroleum
4 Iffy attempt
8 Padded glove
12 Lemon drink
13 Divas tune
14 Very pale
15 Thugs
17 Hoofbeat
18 Arm bones
19 Midwest airport
20 Seance sound
22 Winter malady
23 Toledos lake
26 Secondhand
28 No.
31 Swerves
32 Okra morsel
33 Way of the East
34 Narrow inlet
35 NFL player
36 Swindle
37 Newspaper execs
38 Forest grazer
39 Fencers blade
40 Little kid
41 Check fg.
43 Injured at Pamplona
46 Boy Scout rank
50 Oops! (hyph.)
51 Apollo 11, for one
54 Trig function
55 Mardi --
56 Environmental prefx
57 Stockings
58 Oater backdrop
59 Untold centuries
DOwN
1 Waikikis island
2 Rock star, maybe
3 Spinks of the ring
4 Chip dip
5 Play about Capote
6 Focus
7 Univ. degrees
8 -- Picchu
9 La -- Bonita
10 Thunder god
11 Hunt-and-peck
16 Has the nerve
19 Antique
21 Marionette
22 Soft hat
23 Rochesters Jane
24 Plunder
25 -- -- a Teenage
Werewolf
27 Holding a grudge
28 Ear cleaner (hyph.)
29 Yarn
30 Two oxen
36 Early VCRs
38 Pentagon grp.
40 Snicker (hyph.)
42 Brainy club
43 Erupt
44 Columbus locale
45 Howard and Reagan
47 Clarifed butter
48 Crazy
49 Jacket type
51 Paramount rival
52 Source of metal
53 New World alliance
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE ShOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
APPLY NOW
F/T WORK
Up to $900/wk
PAID TRAINING
INCENTIVE
IMMEDIATE START
No experience needed
Full Training provided
650-238-5399
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY CALVARY
PRESCHOOL PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
( 6 5 0 ) 5 8 8 - 8 0 3 0 ( 6 5 0 ) 5 8 8 - 8 0 3 0
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CLEANING SERVICE needs workers to
clean houses and apartments. Experi-
enced, $11.00 per hour, viknat@sbcglo-
bal.net
COMPUTERS -
Tidemark Systems, Inc., Redwood City,
seeks Principal User Interface Develop-
ers. Design User Interface (UI); Devise
novel ways to visualize data for analytics
products; Produce functional specs. us-
ing Adobe Creative Suite; Dvlp. product
using UI technologies & frameworks
(Javascript, HTML5, CSS3, iOS, Sen-
cha); Produce robust code through test-
ing or optimization. Resumes to HR,
2200 Bridge Pkwy, #102, Redwood City,
CA 94065. Complete job details:
www.tidemark.net
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSEKEEPER
NEEDED
Two full days per week in Palo Alto.
Must have 3+ yrs private home
experience, drive and love dogs.
415-567-0956
www.tandcr.com
IRISH HELP AT HOME
Caregivers wanted.
High Quality Home Care.
Qualified, Experienced
Caregivers for Hourly and Live in
placements in San Mateo.
Inquire at: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
110 Employment
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line cook, Night / Week-
ends. Apply in person,1201 San Carlos
Ave., San Carlos.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TEACHER AIDE
Special Education
Daily and long-term assignments
available working with pre-school
through high school age special
needs students in schools throughout
San Mateo County. 6.5 hr. work days
M-F. $16.17/hr. To apply call The Per-
sonnel Department at San Mateo
County Office of Education at 650-
802-5309.
TRUCK DRIVER wanted, P/T, On Call.
Reg. License. $16. (650)327-5200.
UPHOLSTERER NEEDED - 10 years
experience, pay negotiable, FT/PT,
(650)583-6286
WAREHOUSE/DRIVER - P/T Distributor
in San Carlos seeks employed person
with Van, SUV or covered Truck. Ware-
house work and delivery. (650)595-1768
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251694
The following person is doing business
as: Zoetic Wines, 320 S. Humboldt St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kim Ann
Vance, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kim Ann Vance /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/12, 08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251743
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Nicks Honda/Acura Service,
775 California, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Nick & Cathy Susan Ther-
oux, 2090 Sullivan St., San Mateo, CA
94403. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/27/12.
/s/ Nick Theroux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515619
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vanda Suzana Reksua Morizaki
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Vanda Suzana Reksua Mori-
zaki filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Vanda Suzana Reksua
Morizaki
Proposed name: Suzana Reksua Guil-
hem
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
19, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/01/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/30/2012
(Published, 08/07/12, 08/14/12,
08/21/12, 08/28/12)
CASE# CIV 515888
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Lee Ceccarelli
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Lee Ceccarelli filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: David Lee Ceccarelli aka
David L. Ceccarelli
Proposed name: David Ceccarelli Lee
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
26, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/16/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/15/2012
(Published, 08/21/12, 08/28/12,
09/04/12, 09/11/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251566
The following person is doing business
as: DW Designs, 1072 S. Mayfair Ave.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Danny
Wong, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/01/12.
/s/ Danny Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/12, 08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251804
The following person is doing business
as: San Francisco Billiard Academy,
1170 Helen Dr., MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Joseph Mejia, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on Jan. 1992.
/s/ Joseph Mejia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251279
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: C/A Investment Properties, 285
Old County Road, Suite 9, SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Christopher Gay,
same address & Annette Toscanelli, 20
Doris Ct., Redwood City, CA 94061. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
12/01/2011.
/s/ Christopher Gay /
/s/ Annette Toscanelli /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/12, 08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12).
110 Employment
110 Employment 110 Employment
23 Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251721
The following person is doing business
as: Burlingame Laguna Florist & Gift,
1202 Broadway, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Ruth Dul, 792 Brahma St.,
Paso Robles, CA 93446. The business
is conducted by a General Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Ruth Dul /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/07/12, 08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251768
The following person is doing business
as: Papoki, 3401 Kettering Court, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Scott Angel,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Scott Angel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251811
The following person is doing business
as: Goko, 1048 El Camino Real, Suite A,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Fun-
sockets, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/16/2012.
/s/ Ted Griggs /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251757
The following person is doing business
as: Westborough Pet Hospital, 45 Chest-
nut Avenue, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Grewalz Animal Hospi-
tal, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
12/20/2004.
/s/ Sararteft Grewal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251805
The following person is doing business
as: Palmers Enterprises, 950 Redwood
Shores Pkw. #H203, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94065 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Frank Palmer, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Frank Palmer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251868
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: SkyPark, 1000 San Mateo Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: SkyPark
Associates, A Limited Partnership, CA
and Airport Parking Services, Inc., A Cal-
ifornia Corporation - General Partner,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 1997.
/s/ Nicolle Judge /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251852
The following person is doing business
as: Dimitris Painting Service, 1400 Hop-
kins Ave., Apt. 203, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94062 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Dimitri Zlatev, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Dimitri Zlatev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251793
The following person is doing business
as: Sierra Leadership, 1760 Pierce
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Si-
erra Leadership, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liabiltiy Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Eric Nitzberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251922
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Star Seafood Supply Company,
513 Mayfair Avenue, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Star Group
International LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liabiltiy Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Louis Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/12, 08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251309
The following person is doing business
as: Raymond Travel, 57 Elm St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Junsheng Cao,
III, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 0709/2012
/s/ Junsheng Cao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/12, 07/26/12, 08/2/12, 08/9/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251739
The following person is doing business
as: Bayby Boot Camp-Redwood City,
San Carlos, Belmont, 1246 North Rd.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tracee
Gonzalez, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/01/2012
/s/ STracee Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251670
The following person is doing business
as: Alta Off the Avenue, 415 Floribunda
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Windy Hill PV Seven, CA. The business
is conducted by Limited Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/19/2012
/s/ J. Blosshard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251951
The following person is doing business
as: Startup-CFO.com, 126 Second Ave
#200, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Maureen Hurley, 15 Garcia, San Francis-
co, CA 94127. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Maureen Hurley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252009
The following person is doing business
as: Daly City Auto Body Center, 250 San
Pedro Road, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Shum & Ma Corporation, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/08/2012.
/s/ Chi Yin Shum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251779
The following person is doing business
as: Hire Me 101, 956 Mission Road,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Milan L. Truong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/01/2012.
/s/ Milan Truong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251974
The following person is doing business
as: Dorians Electrical Co., 417 West-
moor Avenue, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dorian C. Yeung, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Dorian C. Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251693
The following person is doing business
as: Biomed Esthetics, 303 Twin Dolphin
Dr., 6th floor, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Dermeso, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251990
The following person is doing business
as: Skin Technologies, 40 Eddystone Ct.,
Redwood City, CA 94065 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Dermeso,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/12, 09/04/12, 09/11/12, 09/18/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Aug. 22, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
R & L FOOD, INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1699 BAYSHORE HWY
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 28, 2012
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Elizabeth Ann Murphy
Case Number 122627
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Elizabeth Ann Murphy,
aka Betty Ann Murphy. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Robert W. Bra-
dy in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Robert W. Brady
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This
athourity will allow the personal repre-
sentative to take many actions without
obtaining court approval. Before taking
certain very important actions, however,
the personal representative will be re-
quired to give notice to interested per-
sons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The
independent administration authority will
be granted unless an interested person
files an objection to the petition and
shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: September 24,
2012 at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood
City, CA 94063. If you object to the
granting of the petition, you should ap-
pear at the hearing and state your objec-
tions or file written objections with the
court before the hearing. Your appear-
ance may be in person or by your attor-
ney. If you are a creditor or a contingent
creditor of the decedent, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy
to the personal representative appointed
by the court within four months from the
date of first issuance of letters as provid-
ed in Probate Code section 9100. The
time for filing claims will not expire before
four months from the hearing date no-
ticed above. You may examine the file
kept by the court. If you are a person in-
terested in the estate, you may file with
the court a Request for Special Notice
(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory
and appraisal of estate assets or of any
petition or account as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 1250. A Request for
Special Notice form is available from the
court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Walter S. Ferenz, SBN25868
3555 Higgins Canyon Road
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019
(650)726-4455
Dated: 08/17/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on August 21, 28, September 4, 2012.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-248897
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Bur-
lingame Laguna Florist & Gift, 1202
Broadway, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 02/14/12.
The business was conducted by: Lucy
Loeurth Dul,760 Frederick Road, San
Leandro, CA 94577.
/s/ Lucy Dul /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 08/06/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 08/07/12,
08/14/12, 08/21/12, 08/28/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, Has HONDA
CAR KEY. San Mateo. Reward. 650-
274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
FOUND!
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY BJORN potty $10 (650)595-3933
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
DEX SAFE Sleeper Ultra bed rail $10
(650)595-3933
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
SOLD!
1968 SILVER MEXICAN OLYMPIC
COIN - 25 pesos, $50., SOLD!
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
296 Appliances
298 Collectibles
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. SOLD!
SPORTS CARDS 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)341-3288
TIME LIFE Art books collection. 28 Vols.
$75 all (650)701-0276
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD 2,000 some rare 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
AMERICAN FLYER train set $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45., (650)341-
7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
STICKLEY STYLE solid oak Mission
Chair needs to be refinished $99
(650)365-1797
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $30.00 SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
SOLD!
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
QUEEN SIZE white cast iron front head-
board and footboard, $40., SOLD!
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
24
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 6-Across, for one
6 Friday portrayer
10 Flag down __
14 Totally lose it
15 Modest reply to a
compliment
16 Sported
17 Zimbalist Jr. of
77 Sunset Strip
18 Playwright Akins
and Tony winner
Caldwell
19 Et __: and others
20 Repeatedly, in
poems
21 The first Mrs.
Trump
23 Reaction to a
pun, perhaps
24 Driver with a
permit
26 *Monopoly cards
28 Snickered at
29 Start of a
confession to a
priest
32 Ed.s workload
33 *Warty leaper
34 Youve got mail
Internet giant
35 Recedes to the
sea
38 Oedipus __
39 Beggars request
40 Spanish aunt
41 *Robins egg
color
43 Cookie container
45 Concur about
47 Marys little
follower
51 *Scrub
52 Latvia neighbor
53 Sonic bursts
55 Make joyful
57 Cold War initials
58 Prefix with
Chinese
59 Silly smile, maybe
60 Inline roller
62 Sly glance
63 __ platter:
Chinese menu
choice
64 Tuckers (out)
65 Use intense light
on
66 Laundry
challenge
67 Begin
DOWN
1 From long ago
2 *With 13-Down,
roasted aromatic
seed
3 Fish-and-chips
sauce
4 Reveal, in verse
5 Helps remember
6 *Oz ruler
7 School for English
princes
8 Place for
pumpernickel
9 Fly-__: air
passes
10 Military medals,
e.g.
11 Really huge
12 Carmen
highlight
13 *See 2-Down
22 Victory signs
23 Turned right
25 Canyon
perimeters
27 Portuguese she
30 *Pops partner
31 2012 British Open
winner Ernie
33 Peg on the links
35 Terminal
expectation:
Abbr.
36 *Tom Hanks film
37 Lines on labels
38 Second-place
finisher
39 Folk singer
Guthrie
41 Swarming
stingers
42 Mauna __
43 Kid around
44 Swears to
46 Get Shorty
author Leonard
47 *Piece of packing
material
48 Michael who
played Cochise
49 Title associated
with the 11
starred answers
50 Most meager
53 *Birds beak
54 Fit for military duty
56 Fat removal,
briefly
59 Navig. aid
61 Christopher
Carson, famously
By Ed Sessa
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
08/28/12
08/28/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
3 ALUMINUM ladders 8', 16', & 28' good
condition all for $90 SOLD!
49 TOOLS Varity of tools all for $98,
SOLD!
AIR COMPRESSOR, 220 Volt 2hp
20gal Tank $60, SOLD!
CEMENT MIXER, Never used 3.5 Cu. Ft.
SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN GASLESS Wire feed
welder New in the box , SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN RADIO ARM SAW -
needs a switch, $20., SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT COMBO 14.4v - Drill, saw,
charger, 2 batteries. $40.00 cash, firm.
SOLD through the Daily Journal!
ENGINE HOIST PROFESSIONAL - no
leaks, American made, $90., SOLD!
FLOOR JACK, American Made, no
leaks, $60 SOLD!
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MICRO METER Set, 0 to 12. 12 mikes
Total, $75, SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TABLE SAW, Upright, craftsman 10
Blade, $20., SOLD!
TABLE SAW- Craftsman 10" saw. brand
new, never used $85. (650)591-6283
WOOD JOINTER, Craftsman Model
#113206931, 6 Blade 36 Table 36 tall,
$50., (650)697-1594
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, SOLD!
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. SOLD!
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COSTUME JEWELRY, 200 Pieces,
Necklaces Bracelets and earnings,
SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $45. SOLD
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $10. (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., SOLD!
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual $10
obo (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; SOLD!
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2 L x 27 W x 30 Tall, bolted type,
very clean, like new, $95. firm, SSF,
(650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping trim, 2 pock-
ets. Medium. $10., (650)341-3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Black - superb
condition $40 (650)595-3933
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Silver.gray
good condition $30 (650)595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner: navy
fleece, $15. (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
WESTERN/COWBOY SHIRTS
7 pearl snap front, snap pockets XL and
XXL, $12 - $15 (650)595-3933
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, size 12,
$10., (650)341-3288
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2, SOLD!
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
12' ALUMINUM boat with a car top rack,
oars, cushions, electric motor $100
(650)574-4586
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, $50, San Mateo
(650)341-5347
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, (650)355-0236
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels. $50
San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., SOLD!
ORBITREK LEG & arm workout ma-
chine - SOLD!
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TREK TRANSPORT BICYCLE CARRI-
ER - brand new, SOLD!
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
310 Misc. For Sale 316 Clothes 308 Tools
25 Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, excellent
condition, extra new grasscatcher, $85.,
(650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800. per month, near shop-
ping center, (650)697-4758
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
96 JAGUAR XJ6 - Needs work, $3,500
or best offer, (650)678-3988
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA 92 Celica GT, black. Pristine
in and out. New tires, brakes, battery
within last year. $3,450., revised price
$2995. obo. SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
WANTED - Honda 90 to restore for stu-
dent, (831)462-9836
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
94 COACHMAN Motor home 95k Miles,
$18,500 SOLD
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC. MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
( 650) 349- 2744 ( 650) 349- 2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
650 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, SOLD!
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CAR COVER / CAMRY, not used, in
box. $12. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
670 Auto Service
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Contractors
HUSHER CONSTRUCTION
Full Service General Contractor
Remodels and Additions
Residential, Commercial
Lic #789107
www.husherconstruction.com
(650)873-4743
Cleaning
GALA MAIDS
Residential & Commercial
14 Years Experience
Excellent References
(650)773-4516
www.galamaids.com
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
26
Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
COMPLETE TREE
SERVICE
Stamp Concrete
Brick Work
BEST PRICES!
Licensed & Insured
(650)222-4733
LEAKPROFESSIONALS
LEAKS? SAME DAY SERVICE!
Valves Sprinklers
Wiring Broken Pipes
Retrofits
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Painting
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE
HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New August Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(Ira Harris)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Business Services
BUSINESS
TRANSACTIONS
Robert Preskill, Esq.
Tech & Media Contracts
Franchise and Licensing
Call (415) 377-3919
robert@preskilllaw.net
CBN# 221315
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
FIND OUT! FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
( 650) 589- 1641 ( 650) 589- 1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050 (650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
Food
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
27 Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
STAND UP &
TRAIN!
Train at Home & Reach your
Fitness Goals
Group Classes or
One On One
using TRX Suspension &
Kettlebell training ,
Custom Designed fitness
program
Call Chris Nash
(650)799-0608
alternativewayfitness@gmail.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007 (650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
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Tuesday Aug. 28, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL