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Wednesday, September 5, 2012
Wednesday, September 5, 2012
Wednesday, September 5, 2012 FOOTBALL PRACTICE NOTEBOOK Tide offensive line not underestimating Western Kentucky, working

FOOTBALL PRACTICE NOTEBOOK

Tide offensive line not underestimating Western Kentucky, working to improve before home opener.

SPORTS PAGE 6

working to improve before home opener. SPORTS PAGE 6 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Serving the University of Alabama since 1894

Vol. 119, Issue 18SPORTS PAGE 6 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 NEWS | PRESIDENT GUY BAILEY Bailey

NEWS | PRESIDENT GUY BAILEY

Bailey answers questions from media on 1st day

New president talks enrollment, growth

By Stephen N. Dethrage Production Editor

Guy Bailey, The University of Alabama’s new president, opened his first press confer- ence at the helm of the cam- pus with six simple words. “It’s great to be back home,” he said. Bailey is returning to cam- pus 40 years after earning his undergraduate and master’s degree from UA in six years, which he called six of the best years of his life. “I can’t tell you how excit- ing it is to come back,” Bailey

said. “It’s exciting not only because it’s home, but also because of what’s happened at the University in the last decade or so.” Bailey called

that ten-year span a gold- en age at the

Capstone, dur- ing which the

U n i v e r s i t y

was under the leadership of now-Chancellor Robert Witt and

Provost Judy Bonner. “We want to continue that golden age,” Bailey said. “They’ve done a terrific job in recruiting students and

making this an institution of choice for students all over the country.” Witt is widely known for his efforts to expand the

U

n i v e r s i t y ’s

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n r o l l m e n t ,

It’s exciting not only because it’s home, but also because of what’s happened at the

University in the last decade or so.

— Guy Bailey

which, under his leadership, rose from about 19,000 students to nearly 32,000. When asked about his ideas about either

continuing or capping that growth, Bailey said there was still room for more students and faculty at the University. Comparing campus to those of larger research-oriented

universities such as Michigan and Indiana, he said the peak population for UA is probably between 36,000 and 37,000 stu- dents, but until the University

runs out of space or sufficient

faculty, he sees no reason to cap enrollment growth. The new president made no pretense of having every- thing figured out on his first day in office. “The first day’s sched- ule is really just becom- ing acquainted with what I’m going to do for the next month,” he said. “I need to figure out where I need to focus my priorities for the first 30 days.”

SEE BAILEY PAGE 5

my priorities for the first 30 days.” SEE BAILEY PAGE 5 CW | Austin Bigoney President
my priorities for the first 30 days.” SEE BAILEY PAGE 5 CW | Austin Bigoney President

CW | Austin Bigoney

President Guy Bailey goes over his plans to continue expanding the University.

NEWS | BAMA DINING

to continue expanding the University. NEWS | BAMA DINING CW | Shannon Auvil Dunkin’ Donuts employees
to continue expanding the University. NEWS | BAMA DINING CW | Shannon Auvil Dunkin’ Donuts employees

CW | Shannon Auvil

Dunkin’ Donuts employees have a busy first day on campus on Sept. 4.

Dunkin’ Donuts opens in Lakeside

Location will operate from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m.

By Alan Alexander Contributing Writer

Bama Dining kicked off the fall semester with numerous additions to on-campus dining hotspots, most notably adding a Dunkin’ Donuts to Lakeside Dining Hall. Students, faculty and staff were invited to come cel- ebrate the grand opening of the first-ever Tuscaloosa Dunkin’ Donuts restaurant on UA’s campus by enjoying free Munchkins beginning at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. Following a rib- bon-cutting ceremony, guests could also participate in a vari- ety of games, such as mini-golf and corn hole, with chances to

win a free donut, small coffee

or T-shirt.

Dunkin’ Donuts will be open daily from 7 a.m. through 2

a.m., yet some students believe the coffee and donut shop will receive the majority of its business during the morning hours. Zack Brasher, a junior major- ing in international business, prefers his coffee and donuts

in the morning.

“I like the idea of a Dunkin’ Donuts on campus, but I’m only going to eat there for breakfast,” Brasher said. “I don’t think many people will go there in the afternoon or at night.” Dunkin’ Donuts isn’t the only new location for those who are craving something sweet.

SEE BAMA DINING PAGE 3

SPORTS | SOCCER

UA soccer’s star striker 5-0

PAGE 3 SPORTS | SOCCER UA soccer’s star striker 5-0 UA Athletics Katie Bourgeois, as a
PAGE 3 SPORTS | SOCCER UA soccer’s star striker 5-0 UA Athletics Katie Bourgeois, as a

UA Athletics

Katie Bourgeois, as a freshman, has scored the third-most number of goals in a single game in Alabama history.

Bourgeois has played since age 4

By Billy Whyte Staff Reporter

Freshman soccer forward Katie Bourgeois is obsessed with Yogurt Mountain and proud of the fact she can wig- gle her ears. Her role model is French soccer player Zinedine Zidane, who is famous for

headbutting an Italian player in the 2006 World Cup final. Bourgeois got into soc- cer when she was 4 years old because she saw her brother playing and wanted to be just like him. But unlike most soc- cer players, her love of soccer grew not through the thrill of scoring or the excitement of a close game, but from the sim- ple joy of kicking a soccer ball around. Whether doing home- work or watching television,

she is always playing around with a soccer ball. Even during our time togeth- er, she was playing around with a soccer ball at her feet. The simplicity of her love for the game is what helps her take everything in stride. “It’s just awesome being a freshman getting to play,” Bourgeois said. “We have had such a good start on the sea- son, 5-0, and don’t plan on quit- ting anytime soon.”

Four games into her fresh- man year, Bourgeois accom- plished something that few Alabama players have ever done by scoring four goals against South Alabama – the third most goals scored in a single game in Alabama his- tory. But when asked about her historic game, Bourgeois remained humble, deflecting all praise to her teammates.

SEE SOCCER PAGE 6

CULTURE | SELLA-GRANATA ART GALLERY

Art student’s work, inspired by movement, transforms an entire room

Artist paints on the walls in Woods Hall

By Abbey Crain Contributing Writer

For one University of Alabama MFA student studying art, a tra- ditional canvas was not enough. Instead, Aynslee Moon tran- formed an entire room into one expressional piece and is pre- senting an installation of that work, “Painted Space,” in the Sella-Granata Art Gallery locat- ed in 109 Woods Hall.

the Sella-Granata Art Gallery locat- ed in 109 Woods Hall. CW | Austin Bigoney Aynslee Moon’s

CW | Austin Bigoney

Aynslee Moon’s installation “Painted Space,” is located in the Sella- Granata Art Gallery.

Originally a journalism student at The University of Mississippi, Moon decided

to return to her first

love of

art and painting by changing her major.

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INSIDE

today’s paper

Briefs

Opinions

Culture

2

4

8

Sports

Puzzles

Classifieds

It’s not a bunch of things hung on a wall. You get to go and be inside an environment. She totally transformed the space into a completely new place.

— Stephen Watson

“I guess, deep down, thats what I’ve always wanted to do,” Moon said. “That’s what I enjoy doing the most.” After graduating from Ole Miss with a BFA in painting, Moon sought to further her career by pursuing higher edu- cation. After applying to six uni-

versities, Moon decided on The University of Alabama because of the faculty, ample studio space and opportunity to teach. Moon said the inspiration for “Painted Space” came from her original plan for the gallery, to make individual pieces by tear- ing and sewing painted pieces of

paper. From there, she decided to expand the idea onto an entire wall and finally, the entire room. “It’s like you’re standing inside a painting,” Moon said. When you walk around, instead of looking at individual pieces, the space is the painting. The painting creates the space.” Moon was also inspired by the actual body movements used in creating the space. She had to use her entire body in order to paint on such an extensive canvas.

SEE MOON PAGE 8

6

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WEATHER

today

Chance of T-storms 95º/75º
Chance of
T-storms
95º/75º

Thursday

95º/73º

Chance of T-storms

ON THE

Page 2• Wednesday, September 5, 2012

ON THE Page 2• Wednesday, September 5, 2012 P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144

P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036 Advertising: 348-7845 Classifieds: 348-7355

EDITORIAL

Will Tucker

editor-in-chief

editor@cw.ua.edu

Ashley Chaffin

managing editor

Stephen Dethrage

production editor

Mackenzie Brown

visuals editor

Tray Smith

online editor

Melissa Brown news editor newsdesk@cw.ua.edu

Lauren Ferguson

culture editor

Marquavius Burnett sports editor

SoRelle Wyckoff

opinion editor

Ashanka Kumari chief copy editor

Shannon Auvil

photo editor

Whitney Hendrix lead graphic designer

Alex Clark

community manager

Daniel Roth

magazine editor

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348-8042

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osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com

The Crimson White is the community newspaper of The University of Alabama. The Crimson White is an editorially free newspaper produced by students. The University of Alabama cannot influ- ence editorial decisions and editorial opinions are those of the editorial board and do not represent the official opinions of the University. Advertising offices of The Crimson White are on the first floor, Student Publications Building, 923 University Blvd. The adver- tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White (USPS 138020) is published four times weekly when classes are in session during Fall and Spring Semester except for the Monday after Spring Break and the Monday after Thanksgiving, and once a week when school is in session for the summer. Marked calendar provided. The Crimson White is provided for free up to three issues. Any other papers are $1.00. The subscription rate for The Crimson White is $125 per year. Checks should be made payable to The University of Alabama and sent to: The Crimson White Subscription Department, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. The Crimson White is entered as peri- odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389. All material contained herein, except advertising or where indicated oth- erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by The Crimson White and protected under the “Work Made for Hire” and “Periodical Publication” categories of the U.S. copy- right laws. Material herein may not be reprinted without the expressed, written permission of The Crimson White.

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TODAY

What: Women’s Club Soccer Tryouts

Where: SRC Fields Complex, Field #7

When: 6 - 8 p.m.

What: Trivia Night and Dance Party

Where: Egan’s Bar

When: 9 p.m.

What: Dinosaur Robot Vam- pire Comedy Hour

Where: Green’s Bar

When: 7:30 p.m.

ON THE CALENDAR

THURSDAY

What: Deadline for Freshman Forum Applications

Where: fye.ua.edu

When: 4:45 p.m.

What: Homegrown Alabama Farmer’s Market Welcome Back Students Party

Where: Canterbury Episcopal Church

When: 3 - 6 p.m.

What: Ben Joseph and The Lay Lows

Where: Egan’s Bar

When: 11 p.m.

FRIDAY

What: 2012 Crimson Couch to 5K

Where: Rose Administration

When: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

What: International Coffee Hour

Where: 121 B.B. Comer Hall

When: 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

What: Faculty Recital: Dan Sweaney Where: Moody Music Building When: 7:30 - 9 p.m.

Submit your events to calendar@cw.ua.edu

LAKESIDE

LUNCH

DINNER

Steak Chicken Salad Sandwich Fresh Basil & Tomato Penne Broccoli & Cheddar Spud Corn on the Cobb Sautéed Mushrooms Eggplant & Bean Casserole (Vegetarian)

Pork with Caramelized Onion Gravy Crispy Chicken Tenders Chicken Fajita Pizza Fried Okra Cavatappi Marinara with Arugula Garden Taco Burgers (Vegetarian)

ON THE MENU

BURKE

LUNCH

Chicken Parmesan Chicken Salad Grilled Chicken Tenders Hummus with Pita Chips Pumpkin & Coconut Bisque Seasoned Corn Ziti Pasta (Vegetarian)

BRYANT

LUNCH

Chicken and Basil Ciabatta Cheeseburger Pie Grilled Vegetable Quesadilla Grilled Eggplant and Broccoli Pizza Cheddar Beer Soup Season Corn Homestyle Baked Ziti

FRESH FOOD

LUNCH

Seafood Salad Herb Grilled Chicken Sandwich Philly Cheesesteak Pizza Roast Pork Loin Polenta with Broccoli Rabe Red Skin Mashed Potatoes Vegetable Quesadilla (Vegetarian)

ON THE RADAR

Democrats turn left on social issues, widening chasm with GOP

From MCTCampus

Democrats staked out unmistakably liberal posi- tions on some of the nation’s most volatile social issues Tuesday, notably abortion and gay marriage, planting the party as firmly on the politi- cal left as Republicans are on the political right.

The differences are vividly reflected in the two parties’ platforms. For years, plat- forms strived to be lofty and gentle, brushing aside any hint of extremes while couch- ing controversial positions in language carefully crafted not to offend swing voters. Not anymore. The Democratic platform lights a

fire from the start, fans the flames and urges votes to pick sides. “This election is not simply

a choice between two candi-

dates or two political parties,”

it says, “but between two fun-

damentally different paths for our country and our families.” Republicans at least agree on that much.

our families.” Republicans at least agree on that much. The firefight reflects two significant trends: Both

The firefight reflects two significant trends: Both par- ties see 2012 as a “turnout election,” where getting out

the faithful could mean the difference, and both parties’

ideological wings are now firmly in control. “The platform is most important to Democratic Party activists more, and feminists,” said John Green, a senior fel- low with the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. “For the Democratic activists, these issues are a plus. If you look at the Democratic Party voter, there are some constituencies that care about these issues, particularly women.” So, too, with Republicans, whose strong opposition to abortion and gay marriage is a surefire base-motivator. Neither stance is particular- ly new or surprising, but some of the details and tough lan- guage are. Since the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade deci- sion, which permitted abortion in most cases, the Democratic Party has supported the rul- ing. In 1980, as conserva- tives gained control of the Republican Party, its plat- form was quick and pointed:

“While we recognize differing views on this question among Americans in general - and in our own party - we affirm our support of a constitutional amendment to restore pro- tection of the right to life for unborn children.” Democrats also kept the language soft. In 1996, the party wrote in its platform:

“We respect the individual conscience of each American on this difficult issue, and we welcome all our members to participate at every level of the party.” The party’s goal, it wrote, is “to make abortion less neces- sary and more rare, not more difficult and more danger- ous.” This year, such niceties are all but gone. You’re either with us or you’re against us, they seem to say. “The Democratic Party strongly and unequivocally supports Roe v. Wade and a woman’s right to make deci- sions regarding her pregnan- cy, including a safe and legal abortion, regardless of ability to pay. We oppose any and all efforts to weaken or under- mine that right,” the 2012 plat- form says. The Republican view on abortion takes three para- graphs. The platform endors- es a human life amendment to the Constitution, and makes no references to exclu- sions. Republican nominee

Mitt Romney says abortion could be permitted in cases involving rape, incest or a threat to the woman’s life. Gay marriage also has bit- terly divided the two par- ties. Democratic platforms have supported gay rights since 1980, though in 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the Defense of Marriage Act into law, which defines mar- riage as the union of a man and woman. Obama person- ally opposed gay marriage, as well, until recently. This year’s platform rejects that notion. “We support marriage equality and support the move- ment to secure equal treat- ment under law for same-sex couples. We also support the freedom of churches and reli- gious entities to decide how to administer marriage as a reli- gious sacrament without gov- ernment interference,” it says. Republicans differ: “We believe that marriage, the union of one man and one woman, must be upheld as the national standard, a goal to stand for, encourage and pro- mote through laws governing marriage.” The challenge is persuading swing voters they can be com- fortable in political parties that are determined to pro- mote such ideology. The social issues do have some value, as each party can use the oppo- nent’s views to make the other one look too extreme. “Our position is hardly extreme when you have Republicans like Todd Akin talking about legitimate rape,” said Tandy Williams, a dental office manager from Seattle, speaking of the con- gressman from Missouri. Women, Republicans coun- ter, aren’t voting simply on abortion and gay marriage, and the more that Democrats emphasize such issues, the more women might turn away. “We don’t only think about contraception,” South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley said. “I know pro-life women that are in the Democratic Party. I know pro-choice women that are in the Republican Party. But I also know that all women care about their budgets. They care about their jobs. They care about the economy.” Most people aren’t wedded to the extremes: 25 percent said abortion should be “legal under any circumstances,” while 20 percent said it should be “illegal in all circumstanc- es,” according to a Gallup poll. But 52 percent said abortion should be “legal only under certain circumstances.”

NEWS
NEWS

OPINION

CULTURE

SPORTS

N E W S

Page 3

NEWS O PINION C ULTURE S PORTS N E W S Page 3 Editor | Melissa

Editor | Melissa Brown newsdesk@cw.ua.edu Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Al’s Pals mentorship program growing in size, scope

By Ashley Tripp Contributing Writer

Al’s Pals, a UA mentorship program for at-risk youths, has seen great growth since its launch over two years ago. Rachel Guiles, the student director for Al’s Pals, said the group offers a rewarding expe- rience for both the children and the mentors. “The children absolutely love us coming to their school and mentoring them,” Guiles said. “Many of the students we men- tor don’t always have adult fig- ures that they can count on being there for them, so we become that role model that they can look up to and strive to be like.” Al’s Pals mentors are paired one-on-one with students in

grades K-5 at either Tuscaloosa’s McKenzie Court Community Center or Oakdale Elementary on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 2:45 p.m. to 5 p.m. Al’s Pals is an opportunity offered to all UA students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher who are willing to com- mit to mentoring weekly for at least one semester. Mentors help the children with their home- work, reinforce reading and math skills and offer a variety of enrichment and recreational activities. “We are so excited Al’s Pals is returning to McKenzie Court,” Betsy Ervin, the McKenzie Court site manager, said. “This pro- gram has been so well received by our families and gives the children the confidence they need to realize that they, too, can

go to college and be successful in the future.” In addition, Dr. Lucille Prewitt, Oakdale Elementary principal, said she and her staff can’t wait for the mentors to return. “The mentees’ excitement for a fun-filled afternoon transforms into hope for a better spelling grade or accomplishment of their multiplication tables as the semester progresses,” Anne Claire Spradling, the president of Al’s Pals, said. “Mentors, including myself, cannot wait for another day of boosting these children to become the best they can be.” Over 60 majors on campus are represented by Al’s Pals. Billy Bowes, a junior majoring in psy- chology, said he’s learned that there is no certain stereotype

of a mentor – in order to change

a child’s life, they just have to

be there for the child and truly

reach out to them. “One of the best things that

I saw Al’s Pals do was to host

little events that the kids could get involved in, like a mini Mardi Gras parade and a live band performance,” Bowes said. “To have that special environment there for them makes a huge dif- ference as far as how they feel about doing schoolwork and interacting with each other.” Meg Steel, a junior majoring in anthropology, said volunteer- ing for Al’s Pals is a fantastic way to give to the local community because you really feel that your efforts will have a long-term effect. “The greatest part of Al’s Pals

Dunkin’ Donuts Lakeside Dining Hall Topio’s Ferguson Food Court
Dunkin’ Donuts
Lakeside Dining Hall
Topio’s
Ferguson Food Court
The Bistro Bidgood/Alston
The Bistro
Bidgood/Alston

CW | Sarah Grace Moorehead and Whitney Hendrix

Several new dining options open on Alabama’s campus

BAMA DINING FROM PAGE 1

The Bistro, the newly renovated coffee and dessert shop in the Bidgood-Alston business complex, offers Sweet Street Desserts brand items, such as gourmet pastries and dessert bars, with flavors ranging from Chocolate Raspberry Tangos to Oreo Dream bars. Shawn Boone, a sophomore majoring in criminal justice, frequents The Bistro regularly. “I find everything here very delicious, especially the new dessert options,” Boone said. Among other new features and loca- tions coming this fall are two express- order kiosks at the Subway in Alston Hall, as well as an official reopening of Topio’s in the Ferguson Center Food Court, complete with new pasta and gelato menu items. Whether you’re a fan of donuts or pastries, coffee or cappuccinos, Bama Dining now offers a variety of locations for students to satisfy their sweet tooth.

of locations for students to satisfy their sweet tooth. is seeing the reflection of your commitment
of locations for students to satisfy their sweet tooth. is seeing the reflection of your commitment
of locations for students to satisfy their sweet tooth. is seeing the reflection of your commitment
of locations for students to satisfy their sweet tooth. is seeing the reflection of your commitment

is seeing the reflection of your

commitment in the kids – not only in their grades, but in their attitudes and actions,” Steel said. In applying for Al’s Pals, the

group’s coordinator, Star Bloom, said she looks for commitment, compassion and enthusiasm for the program, as well as a belief that every child has untapped potential and deserves an adult role model who wants to help them succeed. “If you feel like you aren’t con- tributing enough here at UA, Al’s

Pals is where you need to be,” Tanya St. Clair, a sophomore majoring in healthcare manage- ment, said. “It is a wonderful program that allows students from UA to become mentors and ensure enrichment in the lives of elementary school children in need.” If you would like more infor- mation about the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a form in Ferguson Center room 355G.

the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a
the group, includ- ing how to apply, visit the Ferguson Center website or pick up a

NEWS

OPINION
OPINION

CULTURE

SPORTS

O PINIONS

Page 4

N EWS OPINION C ULTURE S PORTS O PINIONS Page 4 Editor | SoRelle Wyckoff letters@cw.ua.edu

Editor | SoRelle Wyckoff letters@cw.ua.edu Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Language: accents evoke feelings MCT Campus
Language:
accents evoke
feelings
MCT Campus

By Lucy Cheseldine Staff Columnist

Upon purchase of a post office box, naturally, one expects to receive letters. So, this week has been one of correspondence. From my grandparents, I received what you might call a “vin-

tage” letter, romancing the lost art. It was written on pale blue airmail paper, the paper they had found in a hidden drawer, dating back to 1926.

I almost didn’t want to open

the delicate thing for fear of

it flaking into a thousand tiny

pieces. My grandparents embody the much coveted trait of English eccentricity, and their primary advice upon my arrival here was as follows, “The main thing to remem-

ber is, it’s a big country, with

a north and a south and you

are (I hope) in the south. Get a map if you’re not sure.” Always helpful if I fail to recognize my surroundings, which could become a genu- ine problem with the recent bouts of torrential rain. The second and perhaps more practical parcel I received was my Kindle. I have never been a disciple of technology and have, for many years, refused to read from the Android and iPhone hymnbooks, but I have finally been won over by the ease of the e-reader. And now, with news at my fingertips, as they say, I feel much more connected to the world hid- ing behind the leafy suburbia of campus. Ironically, then, the tradition of the postal ser- vice has brought to my atten- tion the benefits of modern technology. Upon this device asking me to choose between

American and UK English, it has turned my eye to the lin-

guistic differences here. Recently, I visited dorms on campus and was greeted with a chorus of girls ask- ing if I was faking my British accent. Not only this, but

I have been stopped in the

street by strangers who have overheard me talking and, lit- erally running up to me, they question, “Are you really from England?” “Yes. I can assure you I did not travel halfway across the world to fake an accent. I am, indeed, English,” I respond. It is this fascination with

language and accent and how it connects which has been made so much clearer

to me since my arrival here.

I used to think of an accent

as purely and simply a way of talking and have never really had much of an inter- est in the meaning behind it, other than the aesthetic qual- ity. Yet, since arriving here and having become a token British kid, I have realized the way we talk embodies a whole culture and personal-

ity, which, to an outsider, is fascinating.

I, too, have felt this and can

now begin to understand why

it

point out to a foreigner that they speak differently from you. The Southern accent has always been one I have imi- tated over the dinner table at home, asking my “Momma”

to “pass the salt, please,” drawing out the last syllables to a dramatic and slightly ridiculous extent. And so, to hear it in the flesh has been endlessly entertaining. But, not only do I hear a Southern accent, I hear an embodiment of football, fried food and farming, among, of course, the less stereotypical aspects

of this culture. An accent is a keyhole into another way of life. Accent and speech don’t just evoke a sound, but a feel- ing and a sense of what your culture entails.

I am aware that shouting

“Roll Tide” in the Queen’s English doesn’t manage to capture the full meaning of this cult phrase. Still, it’s

best said by a Southerner. In reverse, to friends at home, when I say “hipster,” we think of SLR cameras and indie films. I asked my friend here what hipster connotes. “Doctor Who,” she told me. “Yeah, we’re a little differ- ent; no one watches that any more,” I replied. The way we use that pre- cious voice and language of ours can say much more than just where you come from.

is marginally acceptable to

It works as a harmony of culture and difference. And, although I’m glad to have received word from the out- side world, I’m beginning to absorb some of Alabama’s Morse code. Lucy Cheseldine is an English International exchange student studying English literature.

An open letter to President Guy Bailey

By Austin Gaddis Senior Columnist

President Bailey, Let me be among the first of many to formally welcome you home to The University of Alabama. We all share in the excitement and hype of a new chapter for our campus – yet

another fresh start in the long, storied history of Alabama’s flagship university.

A deeper look into our

history tells many stories. Perhaps the most prevalent position in which we find our- selves is that somehow, in the midst of a troubled state, our University has always strived

to be better, to go forward, to spur new ideas and to equip a new generation of leaders with

a sound mind and discerning

judgment. The current student body has been no stranger to UA’s commitment to always want- ing more, both for good and bad. With the largest freshman class in the University’s his- tory and the constant echo of

construction, we are experi- encing phenomenal years of unprecedented campus growth and development. We’ve seen

of unprecedented campus growth and development. We’ve seen our greek system drastically expand, now claiming its

our greek system drastically expand, now claiming its title as the largest in the country. We’ve never been ranked high-

er among public universities, and we proved our athletic dominance with four national championship teams last year. But we’ve also seen tuition increase every year like clock- work, we’ve seen our cam- pus injected with thousands more vehicles each August, and we’ve all experienced

the nightmare of navigating through the hordes of campus

pedestrians, each more clue- less to traffic signals than the one prior. We’ve seen our class sizes grow, and sometimes, we can’t help but feel our CWID number is our only personal identifier. As an alumnus from the 1970s, you are able to come back and see the true scale of our growth in numbers and

in stature. But while our cam-

pus is thriving in enrollment

and expansion, the sad real- ity is that our campus’ culture remains relatively unchanged from the last time you called the University your home. We still face a largely segregated greek system, virtually homog- enous student government leaders and a clear campus divide – as is evident through our football seating – all with no apparent appetite for the relentless tide of progress. Perhaps the most puzzling element of the University’s commitment to perpetual “more” is the administration’s insistence to not aggressively promote change and prog- ress in our campus culture. For decades, we have allowed our campus to be enslaved to the promotion and practice of tyranny, corruption and elit- ism by students, against stu- dents, condoned at the hands

of countless timid administra-

tors. I hope you will challenge your senior administrators to finally stand up against the voices and old barriers that constantly slow our progress. Students want a courageous leader, not more blind apathy

and false hope from adminis-

trators who are desperate to talk about anything else. Through previous admin- istrations, student input has been relatively stifled – over- shadowed by the bottom dollar and mostly ignored if not in sync with the more-more-more mantra. This lack of communi- cation led to a never-ending cycle where concerns were not being voiced and issues were not being addressed. I hope you will be open to concerns and ideas from students and will be the visible president that our campus needs. Over the course of the next few months and years, you will have the ability to shape and define your legacy at the Capstone. Students need an advocate, a friend and a fierce confidant in the President’s Mansion – one who leads by example, while displaying a genuine interest in the cul-

tural – not merely numerical – advancement of our student body. We hope you are that leader, and we hope you will provide that critical guidance. Austin Gaddis is a senior majoring in communication studies and public relations. His column runs weekly on Wednesdays.

Singles content with being ‘betwixt and in between’

By Sophia Fazal Staff Columnist

There we were in our tight

jeans – mine were red and hers were mint – teased hair and, of course, six-inch heels. It was Wednesday at Gallettes, so naturally, I poured myself some wine and looked into the dead, dilated pupils of the nearest boy and died a little myself. Two of my best friends have recently become single, so we’ve been going out a lot. Keeping that particularly in mind, I was shocked it was the sober conversation that caught my attention that night. “Sophia, I know what this sounds like, but trust me. Relationships are in a con- stant state of becoming,” said Boy while pouring himself a glass and getting awfully close. “Essentially, they’re only what you make them out to be,” he carries on, but I’m not listening.

The idea that a relationship is this ever-changing entity really appeals to me because lately, I’ve been seeing them everywhere. It could be the start of the school year and seeing all the new couples, the fact that Katie Holmes has been taking over my Facebook newsfeed, or the realization that I’m roughly five months single and getting a gameday date is not as easy as

it was freshman year. The way I see it, there’s the

relationship world and the sin- gle world on campus, both two separate communities.

In relationship world, you

stay with your boyfriend and his

best friend, who’s also dating your best friend, and you guys can watch movies and choke on popcorn. In single world, you call up all your always-single girlfriends and go to dinner, some pregame the cute Phi Gam in your class invited you to, and then Red Shed. But what if you’re newly

you to, and then Red Shed. But what if you’re newly single? From what I’ve observed,

single? From what I’ve

observed, it’s a witch hunt for

a man, but that doesn’t neces-

sarily seem like the best option. What if I don’t really want a man? What if I do? Does that make me a slut? Totes slut. So, I confided in the only man

I knew I could, Victor Turner.

As a British cultural anthropol- ogist specializing in symbolic and interpretive anthropol- ogy and the author of “A Ritual Process,” Turner has a way of compartmentalizing relation-

ships. To him, this state of ambigu- ity for the newly single could be described as “the realm of the liminal,” or a period of tran- sition. According to Turner, you’re betwixt and between two worlds: the single world and the relationship world. The liminal state is a pro- cess of self-removal. For me,

it was spending the summer

doing an archaeological dig at Moundville for eight hours a day. For my dear friend, it was becoming Facebook unofficial, having one too many glasses of

bad wine, and sucking face for 20 minutes.

Regardless of how you choose to spend your time, the idea is still the same. The

betwixt and between are within

a group that intimidate oth-

ers. Relationship friends don’t understand your need to be sin- gle, your sadness or even your gosh darn excitement; but your single friends don’t trust that you’ll stay single, and that’s a problem. Within the Malay culture of Polynesia, divorced or widowed woman are given the negative

Polynesia, divorced or widowed woman are given the negative MCT Campus Singles tend to frequent the
Polynesia, divorced or widowed woman are given the negative MCT Campus Singles tend to frequent the

MCT Campus

Singles tend to frequent the bars and social outings more than those in relationships.

connotation of being a “J” or

a “Janda.” These women are

not virgins, and yet they aren’t married. The Janda are scru- tinized and have even been considered vampires in Malay folklore. Where do the betwixt and

between belong here? According to Turner, they don’t. The reason is those who are betwixt and between don’t belong within the community

nights and Wine Wednesday at

Gallettes seems like the perfect remedy. It’s okay to feel alone and confused for a while. However, that doesn’t mean we need to jump into the next relationship that comes along to be happy or even deprive ourselves of some- one else’s support and care. As an independent young adult, I find myself completely contented with being a little

betwixt and definitely in-

between. Sophia Fazal is a senior majoring in anthropology. Her column runs biweekly on Wednesday.

in

which they are, and in order

to

join a new one, they must

undergo the experience of lim- inality. So, to me, a pint of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, some lonely

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 | Page 5

Students get hands-on court experience in Mock Trial

By Katherine Owen Staff Reporter

Students interested in get- ting hands-on experience in the courtroom have the opportu- nity to do so, as either attorney or witness, in real courtrooms with real judges through The University of Alabama Mock Trial team. Mock Trial is a national pro- gram that aims to build the legal and public speaking abil- ity of undergraduate students interested in law, debate, theat- rics and argumentation. The Departments of Criminal Justice and Political Science, as well as the Honors College, sponsor the UA team. The cur- rent president of the UA team, Elizabeth Kiernan, a junior

majoring in political science and English, said the students meet with their team, other teams and the coach between two and three hours a week for training. The students then practice further outside of scheduled times to work the case indi- vidually and in small groups. Kiernan said preparation for competition includes basic training concerning civil and criminal law, team practice and scrimmages against other col- leges. The team then competes at the regional competition against other colleges for a chance to compete at nation- als. In the February competition this year, the Crimson team tied for eighth place out of 25 teams, successfully earning a spot in

the national Opening Round Championship in Greeneville, S.C.

“This was our first year earn- ing a bid to the

Opening Round Championship, and I couldn’t be prouder of our team’s tremen- dous accomplish- ment,” Kiernan said.

Being a mem- ber of the team has helped her develop her public speaking ability and challenged her to expect the unexpected, Kiernan said. “I was forced to see all sides of the case and prepare for the unexpected question or unex-

pected objection,” Kiernan said.

“This is why I believe the most beneficial part of Mock Trial for me has been the strengthening

of my abilities to

think on my feet

and stay calm under pressure.” Keith Edwards,

a junior major-

ing in public relations and a member of the team, said he has experienced similar benefits

to Kiernan. “It teaches you to expect unforeseeable obstacles and how to logically and effectively present your case, your team and yourself,” Edwards said. “It’s something that’s not only

It teaches you to expect unforeseeable obstacles and how to logically and ef- fectively present your case, your team and yourself.

— Keith Edwards

beneficial in the court, but in the real world, as well.” Edwards said he wanted to join Mock Trial because of his

introduction to the program in high school. “I chose to join Mock Trial because it was something I did and loved my senior year of high

school,” Edwards said. “I’ve always been fascinated by law and the legal process, and Mock Trial gives you a great hands-on with cases argued before real judges in actual court rooms.” The team’s coach, James Todd, said he looks for the abil- ity to speak before an audience, use of language and strong speaking voices in students interested in being a part of the Mock Trial team. “Students who participate in

Mock Trial as lawyers need to be able to communicate a clear and forceful message to the jury,” Todd said. “Those who

play the role of witness in a case need to be heard, to be convinc- ing in testimony and to make an impression on the jury.” Kiernan said Mock Trial has students from nearly every college within UA, and the pro- gram is open to students of any major. Interested students should attend the informational meet- ing at 6:15 p.m. on Thursday, September 13, in ten Hoor room

108.

Students can also stop by the Mock Trial table at Get On Board Day or visit their website at cj.ua.edu/student_organiza- tions/mock_trial/index.php.

Students work to uncover facts about legendary civil rights trial

By Judah Martin Contributing Writer

A group of UA students are

delving into a legendary trial that helped set the tone for the civil rights movement. New College and graduate students in William Bomar’s Museum Studies class made

their first visit to Scottsboro, Ala., in March 2011. Scottsboro

is the first site of the infamous Scottsboro trials of the 1930s, in which nine young African American males were falsely accused of rape during a train ride to Huntsville after a brawl broke out aboard their train.

It was later uncovered that

the two alleged victims, Victoria Price and Ruby Bates, fabricated the rape story in an effort to avoid charges of vagrancy and prostitution. Shelia Washington, founder and director of the Scottsboro Boys Museum and Cultural Center in Scottsboro, has been working to receive

exonerations for the remaining Scottsboro defendants. Though charges against some of the defendants were dismissed dur- ing the case, and one defendant eventually received a full par- don, the remaining defendants were never legally acknowl-

edged as innocent by the state of Alabama.

“I want the history told, and

I want the history told right,” Washington said in a museum open house. “I call it the train

ride to tragedy – to know that they [the Scottsboro boys] left Tennessee, on their way to

Huntsville to find work, midway stopped, and their lives were changed forever in one day.” After 17 years of attempt- ing to establish the Scottsboro Boys Museum, Washington was finally able to raise donations to purchase Joyce Chapel United Methodist Church in 2010 after its congregation dwindled and the United Methodist Church elected to sell the property. “[The Scottsboro boys] have been forgotten,” Washington said. “There’s so much in the background when you go

researching this case. You real-

ize it still has legs and it’s walk- ing here in the 21st century. This

is a 21st century case.” The students conducted

historical research and, with assistance from UA’s Center for Community-Based Partnerships and UA’s Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility, created

a website, Scottsboro-boys.org,

and a brochure for the museum. Mo Fiorella, a graduate stu- dent in the Book Arts program, participated in the Scottsboro project. Fiorella said her group began to consider the case from a new perspective. “Some of the most interesting things we dealt with were not

necessarily tidbits of research we unearthed, but situations we came across,” Fiorella said. “Our research led us to think

about why the Scottsboro Boys were called that and whether we should go on using that terminol- ogy, as they were not just boys, and they were not connected to Scottsboro in any way outside of the trial.” According to Fiorella, the Scottsboro incident is strongly connected with the modern civil rights movement. “I was excited when the Birmingham Jail came up as a place where the ‘boys’ traveled through,” Fiorella said. “The jail serves as such a monument to the civil rights movement that it really brought me around to thinking about the importance of this case and all involved to the beginnings of that movement in the South.”

Ellen Spears, a profes- sor in New College and the Department of American Studies, explained that after the first trip to Scottsboro, the University began a partner- ship with the Scottsboro Boys

Museum with support from the Partnerships-in-Scholarship program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Ford Foundation. “We are pleased that New College and other University of Alabama students have been able to play meaningful roles in community-based historical research that has helped to focus public attention on the need to exonerate these innocent men,” Spears said.

Spectrum celebrating 30th year at UA

By Colby Leopard Contributing Writer

Spectrum, The University of Alabama’s LGBTQA student organization, will celebrate its 30th birthday on campus this month as they continue advocating for LGBTQA rights on campus. Spectrum President Noah Cannon said the group is for stu- dents looking for a safe space to belong, whether they are a les- bian, bisexual, gay, transsexual, queer, questioning or an ally. Cannon, a sophomore majoring in telecommunication and film, said Spectrum has an open door policy and does not turn anyone away. “Spectrum is open for anyone to join as long as you act respect- ful and keep our environment safe,” Cannon said. “Spectrum events are often the only time people feel safe with who they really are on campus and we will never forsake that.” In addition to advocating for increased rights, Spectrum hopes to encourage the campus to think and act more progres- sively, Cannon said. “UA can be a bit stiflingly conservative sometimes, and it leaves the LGBTQA community feeling like it doesn’t belong at the university,” Cannon said. “Not everyone knows it yet, but the LGBTQA community does have a niche on campus and a lot of times it starts with Spectrum. Our organization has proven that for 30 years, and we’re only going to continue moving forward.”

What Spectrum is really about is building a community where people are accepted for who they are no matter what.

— Lauren Jacobs

Lauren Jacobs, a senior major- ing in TCF from Birmingham, said she has seen the political climate shift and the acceptance of the LGBTQA community become more widespread since she arrived on campus three years ago. Jacobs, vice president of Spectrum, attributes much of this to the fact that people can speak more freely about being gay and have more open conver- sations about homosexuality. “Spectrum has been facilitat- ing and fostering conversations across campus about homo- sexuality and gay rights advo- cacy just to get information out there. A lot of times people are opposed to homosexuality even though they don’t know any- thing about it,” Jacobs said. “Spectrum stands for promoting

an open, engaging environment

for discussions that are safe for anyone to attend and speak can- didly and respectfully.” Jacobs explained that Spectrum is more than just

a facilitator for discussions.

Spectrum is a part of the solu- tion that provides everyone in The University of Alabama com- munity with equal rights. “What Spectrum is really about is building a community

where people are accepted for who they are no matter what,”

Jacobs said. “We are working to achieve that by breaking the mold, defying social constructs about the LGBTQA community and proving that we’re real peo- ple and belong just as much as everyone else.” Kaylyn Johnson is the chair of Spectrum’s political com- mittee and fights for LGBTQA rights on campus. Johnson, a junior majoring in English and American Studies, said the com- mittee’s primary goals for the year are providing more gen- der neutral bathrooms across campus, providing more gender neutral housing options on cam- pus and expanding the univer- sity’s nondiscrimination policy to include those individuals not wishing to identify as a specific gender. “Spectrum made a contract with Dr. Witt when he was presi- dent of the university that each dorm would have at least two gender neutral bathrooms avail- able,” Johnson said. “We hope to renew that contract with the

new administration and con- tinue improving the quality of life for the LGBTQA community across campus.” Spectrum will host its first meeting that is open for new members on Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. in the Heritage Room of the Ferguson Center.

Bailey says Shepherd Bend ‘not an issue’

BAILEY FROM PAGE 1

Bailey also fielded a question about the proposed Shepherd Bend Mine near Birmingham, where The University of Alabama system owns both land and mineral rights on the grounds of the proposed mine.

Opponents have asked system administrators to make a pre- emptive pledge to neither sell nor lease land to the company for development of the mine, which, if built, they say would discharge the coal mine’s wastewater almost directly into a drinking water intake for customers of the Birmingham Water Works Board. “Nobody’s approached us about mining at all. We don’t

have any plans to do anything there,” Bailey said. “I think it’s just not an issue at all. I couldn’t make a pledge for future presi- dents. I couldn’t make a pledge for anything down the road, but right now there really is no issue, because there is no movement and no interest as far as we know in mining there, as far as we know.” The mine has been the cen- ter of some controversy since,

in October 2010, the Alabama Surface Mining Commission issued a permit to Shepherd Bend, LLC to mine 286 acres near the Mulberry Fork of the Black Warrior River. For other big-picture issues like financial stewardship and enrollment growth, Bailey said he would look to maintain and build on Witt’s legacy. For day- to-day issues facing students though, he asked for more time

to figure things out. “Those are things that, as I interact with students, I’ll be able to come up with answers for,” Bailey said. “But that’s something I’ll look to student government and student lead- ers for guidance on.” Bailey said that kind of stu- dent interaction and input was something he prided himself on during his last two presiden- cies, and said it was a tradition

he’d maintain at UA. “I like to get to know stu- dents, I want them to feel com- fortable talking to me and get- ting to know me,” Bailey said. “I want to be approachable. I can’t solve their problems, but the person who can solve their problems reports to me usu- ally. I want this to be a student- centered institution. I want stu- dents to feel that it starts with me and extends to all our staff.”

feel that it starts with me and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6
TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM
TONIGHT
beginning at 6 PM
and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM For questions, concerns, or to
and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM For questions, concerns, or to
and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM For questions, concerns, or to
and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM For questions, concerns, or to
and extends to all our staff.” TONIGHT beginning at 6 PM For questions, concerns, or to

For questions, concerns, or to report potential stormwater violations contact the Office of Environmental Health & Safety at 348-5905 and ehs@bama.ua.edu

Office of Environmental Health & Safety at 348-5905 and ehs@bama.ua.edu This is our water. Let’s all

This is our water.

Let’s all protect it.

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Page 6

N EWS O PINION C ULTURE SPORTS S PORTS Page 6 Editor | Marquavius Burnett crimsonwhitesports@gmail.com

Editor | Marquavius Burnett crimsonwhitesports@gmail.com Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Bama women’s rugby season kicks off Friday

By Charlie Potter Contributing Writer

The Crimson Tide wom- en’s rugby team kicks off its season this Friday against Western Kentucky and the team is looking to build off of the momentum it gained from last year. Caitlin Reilly, a junior, is the club president for the 2012 season. She is confident her squad can handle the two- and-a-half month schedule – that includes games against Florida State, Tennessee and Auburn – that lies ahead. “We are at the point now where we are winning consis- tently,” Reilly said. “People want to play us because they know we are going to give them a good game.” However, Reilly and senior flanker Jessica King pointed out some aspects of the game that the women’s team needs to focus on and improve. “What we really need to work on is our team communi- cation, having everyone work together as a team because we have a lot of people who are

individually good,” King said. Team unity comes as a chal- lenge because rugby is a club sport that organizes and coor- dinates with the University Recreation Center. There are no tryouts, so anyone can par- ticipate in the matches, but the Tide looks to use its open practices and matches to its advantage this season. “We really want to build the team,” Reilly said. “We want to get a bunch of new blood in. Our focus is going to be on recruiting.” Getting more recruits is an important key to the team’s success in 2012. There are only 11 players on the active roster, and there must be 15 players on the field at all times. The Tide has been forced to rely on players from Birmingham to fill its roster for Friday’s game. The best way to obtain recruits is by having them watch an actual game. Alabama will face its first foe in a familiar Western Kentucky squad this Friday at 8 p.m. at the Rec. Center fields with the permanent uprights.

Controlling the game at their desired pace, playing at an up-tempo level and keeping the ball out of the Hilltoppers’ hands is what the Tide players need to do in order to win the match. “We want to control the time,” King said. “Whether we control it by making our tack- les or doing quick picks off of the ball, we want to keep the game at our pace. We don’t want them to even touch the ball.” The Tide players are filled with excitement for the upcoming match and the start to the program’s fourth sea- son. They want to show the University’s student body and the Tuscaloosa community what rugby is all about. “I cannot wait to get start- ed,” King said. “I want to hit people. I have not hit some- body in a while. What other sport do girls get to hit peo- ple?” Practice times: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 6-8 p.m. Rec. fields with the per- manent uprights. Everyone who wants to play is welcome.

per- manent uprights. Everyone who wants to play is welcome. Submitted The Crimson Tide women’s rugby
per- manent uprights. Everyone who wants to play is welcome. Submitted The Crimson Tide women’s rugby

Submitted

The Crimson Tide women’s rugby team will play a two-and-a-half-month schedule, which includes games against Florida State, Tennessee and Auburn. More than 11 players make up the active roster but 15 players must be on the field at all times.

Tide practices I-formation

By Alexis Paine Staff Reporter

The University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team is working to improve the offensive line’s performance on the field during practice this week. Offensive lineman Anthony Steen said that while the offensive line showed more maturity during Saturday’s game than it did at this time last year, the players continue to eliminate imperfections they experienced in Dallas, Texas. The offensive line is also improving their performance in the I-formation the team used many times against the University of Michigan. The Tide’s five linemen are not intimidated that the formation invites eight defensive players into the box. Steen said prac- tice with this type of play has allowed the offensive line to

become comfortable with this formation and the threat from opposing defenses. “We do so many reps dur- ing the week, we’re prepared for anything right now,” the offensive lineman said. “It’s a little unfair, but we’re going to make do.” The offensive line is also working this week to sell pass plays as rushing plays. Steen said they are doing a better job of allowing quarterback AJ McCarron time to find receiv- ers downfield. Defensive back Dee Milliner said the defense is practicing techniques of handling these plays from the other side during practice. He said the defense is begin- ning to distinguish fakes by both the quarterback and receivers. The defensive back said the team is also work- ing to eliminate long passes, like the two they rendered to the Wolverines, by focusing

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on what the opposing team’s wide receivers are doing and watching film of the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers. Milliner wore a brace for practice Tuesday to prevent further harm to a minor injury he received during Saturday’s game. The defensive back said he fell on his hand, bending it back in a play against the Wolverines, but the injury was nothing serious. Milliner said he was proud of the way he performed in Dallas last weekend, but said that he and his teammates would not let the win influence the way they played in the upcoming game against the Hilltoppers. The junior said the team is focus- ing on each opponent week by week in order to win each game this season. Milliner said the team has been poised in practice, despite playing a smaller school. “We never treat any team like they’re lower than anoth- er team we play,” Milliner said. “We treat every team like they’re highly ranked.” Milliner said he is looking to have another performance like the one he had in Dallas, in which he recorded five tack- les, an interception and broke up four passes. He credits his interception to making what he called a “great jam” against the Wolverine receiver Roy Roundtree. Milliner said he did not know Roundtree stepped out of bounds during the play until he had caught the ball and started running with no one trailing him. Milliner said he has received flak from his teammates for being tackled by Wolverine quarterback Denard Robinson.

Freshman forward helps team to 5-0

SOCCER FROM PAGE 1

“It feels great, but I mean anyone on our team could have finished those balls,” she said. “The service to and the pass- es were really what made the plays. The goals were just the final touch.” On an offense featuring 2011 Southeastern Conference All-Tournament Team mid- fielder Molly Atherton and

COLUMN

As a whole, Alabama dominated during their 41-14 win over Michigan Wolverines

By Zac Al-Khateeb

Another opening week- end of football has come and gone and offered Alabama fans a brief glimpse of what the future may hold for the football team. If you hap- pened to miss that hyped- up match against Michigan - it was more of a beat down, really, then here are some of the things I think are worth mentioning.

Alabama’s offensive line is good – really, really good. No surprise here. Every single player on that line has playing time from last year. And, unlike last year, Saban doesn’t appear like he’s trying to rotate the linemen to see how they gel best. They hit the ground running, which is some- thing that backs Eddie Lacy and T.J. Yeldon will be able to appreciate. But more on that later… Anyway, Barrett Jones was incred- ible, as always, and Cyrus Kouandjio performed admi- rably at the left tackle posi- tion.

You know who else is good? T.J. Yeldon. Easily the biggest sto- ryline to come out of the Michigan game was how well Yeldon played in his first game for Alabama. If you haven’t heard, he became the first true

2011 National Soccer Coaches Association of America All- South region forward Pia Rijsdijk, Bourgeois is not only making a name for herself but has managed to become a breakout player. She has led the team with six goals through five games. To put that in perspective, only sopho- more Theresa Diederich had more than six goals all last sea- son for the Tide, and she had seven. But it’s not just her scoring ability that is turning heads. She also leads the team in

You know who else is good? T.J. Yeldon. Easily the biggest storyline to come out of the Michigan game was how well Yeldon played in his first game for Alabama.

freshman to run for 100 or more yards in his debut game at the Capstone. He proved not only to be a pow- erful runner, but versatile as well, catching the ball out of the backfield. Now, granted, part of that came from an increased number of carries due to a Lacy injury, run- ning behind one of the best offensive lines in the nation, and running against a weak- sauce Michigan defense. Still, the feat was impressive and, Bama fans hope, a sign of things to come.

The defense wasn’t half-bad, either. But that’s old news, right? I mean, no one expected the Wolverines to run against Alabama anyway. Even Denard Robinson, easily the Wolverines’ most potent rushing threat, was held in check by Alabama’s disci- plined front seven. Robinson sometimes had a little too much time in the pocket, but other- wise, it was a great perfor- mance from the first line of defense. But what really jumped out was how well the defensive secondary

shooting efficiency and accura- cy with a 46.2 percent shooting percentage and 61.5 percent shots on goal. Bourgeois’ all- around game has impressed the coaching staff and her teammates. “She obviously has scored some goals, but we ask her to do a lot of other things for us:

to hold the ball for us while we are in possession and to make good runs off the ball,” Bramble said. “Defensively, she has responsibilities to put pressure on the other team’s center backs, and she does it

played. Before I begin, I do acknowledge that it got beat at times (especially on those throws of 44 and 71 yards, respectively). Still, the sec- ondary held its own, and for a relatively young group, that’s impressive. Robert Lester looked good, as always, and Dee Milliner looked impass- able for a majority of the game. This unit still has a long way to go under Saban, but if it can keep up its domi- nant performance, look for this to be another typical Saban/Kirby Smart defense.

While we’re at it, special teams looked pretty special, too. Something a little atypi- cal of Alabama but exciting nonetheless. Alabama punter Cody Mandell had four punts, averaging 47 yards per punt, and had a few key punts that were downed inside Michigan’s five. Alabama also had four punt returns, aver- aging 14 yards per return. It was also good seeing Saban put faith in Cade Foster, who went one-for-two on the eve- ning, but added a 51-yarder to his resume. Overall, it was a very solid performance all around from this group.

all so well.” Along with soccer, the Texas native said she wants to get the entire college experience and live as a regular student. Her main focus is trying to fig- ure out what engineering and chemistry clubs to join. Her goal is to get an internship that will one day allow her to get a job in her home state. “After college, I would love to work for an oil company in the Texas area, whether Houston or Dallas,” she said. “That’s kind of where I’m heading. Texas is awesome.”

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16

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30

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Close, as a windbreaker

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Denmark’s Islands

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Erin of “Happy Days”

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Tummy soother

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Cassette half

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Composer Satie

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once in a while

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Gazpacho, e.g.

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Easy run

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Hint of things to come

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N EWS O PINION CULTURE S PORTS C ULTURE Page 8 Editor | Lauren Ferguson culture@cw.ua.edu

Editor | Lauren Ferguson culture@cw.ua.edu Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Art exhibit features historical political memorabilia

By Becky Robinson Staff Reporter

Politics often bring out the worst in a lot of people, but UA Libraries has found a way to bring conflicting sides together with their new exhibit. “Red, White & Blue: Political Campaigns and Presidential Memorabilia” is an exhibit spon- sored by UA Libraries, the A.S. Williams Americana Collection and the H.S. Hoole Special Collections Library. The exhibit will feature historical pieces of campaigns and party collectables dating as far back as Abraham Lincoln. The idea for this exhibit came from Donna Adcock, director of public relations for UA Libraries. “The subject is timely, with the current presidential, state and

I think we always need to remember, wherever we are, it’s not happen- ing for the first time; we’ve had campaigns before. Even if the technol- ogy changes a lot of things, the campaign won’t change.

— Nancy DuPree

local elections being held this fall,” Adcock said. Some of the items featured will include a Franklin D. Roosevelt campaign poster, a textbook issued by the Democratic National Convention in 1916 and a textbook issued by the Republican National Convention in 1928. Visitors can also see a songbook used in Abraham Lincoln’s 1860 cam- paign. While memorabilia from American presidents will be on display, the collection will also fea-

ture two prominent Alabama poli- ticians who both ran unsuccessful presidential campaigns: Oscar W. Underwood, who ran in 1924, and George Wallace, who ran four times between 1964 and 1972. Jessica Lacher-Feldman, the curator of Rare Books and Special Collections for Hoole Library, said while producing her part of the exhibit, she chose to focus on a few main points, such as Underwood and Wallace. She thought these would be the “most interesting” for audiences.

Lacher-Feldman has been working with Hoole Libraries for more than 12 years and has participated in the production of many exhibits. “I love everything about [producing exhibits],” Lacher- Feldman said. “I think the thing that excites me the most is work- ing through the whole process of the exhibit. I love coming up with an idea and seeing it to fruition.” Lacher-Feldman said she also enjoys the spontaneous learning brought on by exhibits. Nancy DuPree, interim cura- tor of the A.S. Williams Third Collection, was part of the team that selected the items to be dis- played. She said there are two cri- teria that go into selecting a work:

historical importance and appear- ance. DuPree said that color is often a determining factor for a

collection piece, and cases filled with all-white pieces are gener- ally turn-offs to the public. “A case with nothing but that kind of thing is not eye-catching,” DuPree said. “It doesn’t have the interest, so you try to bring in some things that are colorful and attractive to look at.” DuPree also said students should visit the exhibit regardless of what political party they agree with. “I think we always need to remember, wherever we are, it’s not happening for the first time; we’ve had campaigns before,” DuPree said. “Even if the technol- ogy changes a lot of things, the campaign won’t change.” Robert Christl, a junior major- ing in political science and history, believes that in this time of cam- paign season, an exhibit like “Red,

White & Blue” is relevant. “I think it is important for this type of exhibit because politi- cal campaigns are at the heart of our democracy,” Christl said. “Therefore, it is vital that we appreciate the long history of the electoral process at work.” Cody Jones, a senior major- ing in political science, thinks students should go and visit the exhibit to become more educated in politics and leadership. “I encourage students who are politically minded and want to be future leaders to consider getting involved in parties and campaigns,” Jones said, “Political knowledge is a sign of a healthy electorate.” “Red, White & Blue” will run on the 2nd floor lobby of Gorgas Library until shortly after the November election.

COLUMN | MUSIC

Canadian alternative group deserves recognition

By Noelle Brake

Recently, alternative music has gained popularity, with bands such as Florence + The Machine becoming regular pur- chases on iTunes and Amazon. Two performers in particular that haven’t gotten the clout that most bands have are Tegan and Sara, a singing set of twins with hits such as “Body Work” (with Morgan Page), “The Con” and “Back in Your Head.” Born in Canada in 1980, Tegan and Sara Quin have been play- ing and writing songs since age 15. Their 1999 independently released album, “Under Feet Like Ours,” lead to their sign- ing with Vapor Records. They’ve released a few albums since then

including “The Business of Art,” “If It Was You,” “So Jealous,” “The Con” and “Sainthood.” Recently they released “Get Along,” a CD/DVD set featuring 15 live tracks including “Call It Off,” “Alligator” and “I Won’t Be Left” as well as featuring three films: “States” by Danny O’Malley, “India” by Elinor Svoboda and “For the Most Part” by Salazar. Along with producing albums, Tegan and Sara per- form at festivals around the U.S., including Bonaroo, Cochella and Lollapaloza, and have toured with The Killers, The Pretenders, Cindy Lauper, Weezer, Paramore and many other well-known bands and singers. They’ve headlined tours

in North America, Europe, Asia and Australia, selling out all of their shows. Along with touring, they’ve collaborated with dif- ferent kinds of artists, from hip hop, rock and pop. Their song “Walking with a Ghost” was covered by The White Stripes, paying them a high honor. To add to their growing popu- larity, they’ve had music fea- tured on many popular television shows such as “Parenthood,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “The Vampire Diaries” and “One Tree Hill.” They’ve also been featured on many talk shows such as Letterman, Leno and Conan. One of their most recent ventures documents their jour- ney making “Get Along” in a video series called “Carpool

Confessionals” which shows the sisters with a video camera in their car as they drove to dif- ferent studios soliciting their music. They’re not just great singers and performers. They’re very politically and socially minded, being proud advocates for LGBT equality groups by not only coming out as gay themselves but also doing a photo shoot for Under the Radar magazine. The photos feature the twins wear- ing equality shirts and holding a sign stating, “The rights of the minority should never be sub- ject to the whim of the majority.” Their activism and music have helped them develop a huge fan base, which follows them wher- ever they go.

Student focused on full movement in art

MOON FROM PAGE 1

“The show took a lot of move- ment and it was such a large scale,” Moon said. “I used to dance and play music and, like that, painting used my whole body. Movement inspired me.” The large scale at which Moon worked proved daunt- ing, but she said it encouraged her to have faith in her own skill as well as the medium with which she was working. “It’s not like you can take it down and put a new one up. I had to have faith it was going to work out,” Moon said. “It felt a little risky, and it made me feel excited and adventur- ous.” Stephen Watson, a third- year graduate student in the painting program, was

impressed by Moon’s ambition and the risk she took when creating the space. “I like that she created some- thing not to go and be seen, but go and experience,” Watson said. “It’s not a bunch of things hung on a wall. You get to go and be inside an environment. She totally transformed the space into a completely new place.” In the future, Moon plans to write proposals to other galleries around the country so that she can continue her “Painted Space” series. She is willing to travel anywhere her art takes her. She also hopes to continue to teach, for she feels other students’ work inspires her own creativity. “I want to travel a lot,” Moon said. “Each time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on display until Sept. 21.

time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on
time I would paint it differently.” Moon’s exhibition opened Aug. 24 and and will remain on