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Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893

Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893 Volume 120, Issue 65 dailytarheel.com Thursday, September

Volume 120, Issue 65

dailytarheel.com

Thursday, September

6, 2012

Issue 65 dailytarheel.com Thursday, September 6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION

Thursday, September 6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by

A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE

6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by alliSon ruSSell
6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by alliSon ruSSell
6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by alliSon ruSSell
6, 2012 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION A WINDOW TO CHARLOTTE dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by alliSon ruSSell

dth/joSh clinard, Skyline Photo by alliSon ruSSell Top left: Lauren Thomas, bartender. Top right: Dennis Walker, hotel bellman. Bottom left: Chanell Ogburn, Starbucks barista. Bottom right: Capt. Samuel Smith of Georgia’s Clayton County Sheriff’s Office. See page 9 to read their stories.

Politics are not on the minds of most of Charlotte’s residents.

By Sarah Glen

Director of Enterprise

CHARLOTTE — Reaching out with an arm span that could dwarf that of anyone in the throng of visitors clustered before him, Dennis Walker grabs a gallon of sweet tea. And another. And another. Stacking the containers of the famously Southern drink onto a trolley alongside doz-

ens of off-brand potato chip bags, Walker then rolls the spread of food through the sliding doors of the Holiday Inn on College Street in uptown Charlotte. To a bystander, these actions might seem like a typical job for a hotel bellman, but work has been anything but typical this past week — the trip Walker made into the hotel is about the tenth of his shift, and he’s only been working for about an hour. Since the Democratic National Convention set up shop in Walker’s home- town over the weekend, he and the 750,000 other Charlotte residents have seen about

35,000 visitors flock into the Queen City. While pundits debate whether the venue change for President Barack Obama’s speech tonight from Bank of America Stadium to the Time Warner Cable Arena will affect how he does in November’s election, the phrases “swing state” and “youth vote” are far from the minds of most Charlotte residents. Instead, they are continuing their daily jobs and figuring out how to accommodate the thousands of tourists the convention has brought to their city.

See CHARLOTTE, Page 9

New speech location excludes thousands

Obama’s acceptance speech will be in a smaller arena due to weather concerns.

By Daniel Wiser

State & National Editor

CHARLOTTE — The Democratic National Convention Committee announced Wednesday that it will move today’s convention proceedings inside to Time Warner Cable Arena — mean- ing hundreds of UNC students will no longer be able to attend President Barack Obama’s acceptance speech. Obama was originally scheduled to accept his nomination for re-election in Bank of America Stadium, the football stadium for the Carolina Panthers. But convention officials cited severe weather forecasts and the safety of attendees in their decision to move the speech indoors to the arena, where the majority of speeches and votes were conducted for the first two days of the convention. A convention official confirmed that about 75,000 people had received com- munity, or public, credentials to attend Obama’s speech. None of those creden- tial holders will be admitted into the arena, which has an estimated capacity of 15,000 people. “The energy and enthusiasm for our convention in Charlotte has been over- whelming, and we share the disappoint- ment of more than 65,000 people who signed up for community credentials to

See OBAMA SPEECH, Page 9

Sexual harassment policy eases burden of proof

The policy also clarifies the definition of consent used in harassment cases.

By Katharine McAnarney

Staff Writer

A lighter burden of proof could lead to a crackdown on sexual harassment cases at UNC. The University’s new policy on harassment and sexual misconduct, implemented Aug. 1, changes the burden of proof students need to prove their case from beyond a rea- sonable doubt to a preponderance of evidence. “Preponderance of evidence is a civil standard used to try civil cases,” said Jonathan Sauls, dean of students. The new standard must prove that the event “more likely than not” occurred, Sauls said.

Amanda Claire Grayson, attorney general of the Honor Court, said the change will encourage more students who have been victims of sexual mis- conduct to come forward and report their cases. “One of the major reasons the burden of proof and the process in the policy changed is because a small minority of cases of sexual misconduct are actually reported,” Grayson said. Grayson said the change in the burden of proof will also make it more likely that students are found guilty of violations, since complainants need less evidence to prove their case. The sexual misconduct policy also clarifies the definition of consent as whether a sober, reasonable person would have known that the com- plainant was incapacitated — another standard used in civil cases. The Student Grievance Committee will employ the standard in its hear-

ings, Saul said. “I believe what the policy does is shift away from a subjective definition to an objective definition,” Sauls said. “It avoids the opportunity for a respondent to show up and say, ‘This is what I thought happened,’” he said. “They can’t play the ‘I was drunk’ card.” Jan Boxill, chairwoman of the faculty executive committee, said the changes will make the process more efficient. “It will require some careful judge- ments,” she said. “It’s difficult for any- one to come to a conclusion because you come down to ‘he said, she said’,” Boxill said. “It what’s best for our students.” Finally, complainants will be work- ing with a new, more formal system. The new policy shifted juris- diction from the Honor Court

See NEW POLICY, Page 9

Student recovering from NY shooting

Chenin Duclos was the only non-New Yorker injured in the shooting.

By Chelsey Dulaney

City Editor

A 31-year-old UNC graduate student injured in a shooting out- side the Empire State Building two weeks ago is still recovering from a gunshot wound to the leg. Chenin Duclos — a Chapel Hill resident and graduate stu- dent in physical therapy — was one of nine victims injured by New York City police during the shooting. Duclos, the only non-New Yorker injured, was visiting when she was shot. On the morning of Aug. 24, Jeffrey Johnson, a laid-off fash- ion designer, allegedly gunned down his former co-worker,

Steven Ercolino, near the Empire State Building. Both were killed during the shooting, according to McClatchy-Tribune. According to a release from her lawyers — Barket, Marion, Epstein & Kearon, a New York- based firm — Duclos was passing through the area when a stray police bullet shattered her femur. Three of the nine people injured suffered bullet wounds, and the others were struck with fragments. Six of the nine were released from area hospitals the same day as the shooting, accord- ing to McClatchy-Tribune. Duclos was being treated at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, a hospital administrator said. Duclos’ lawyers have begun an investigation into the conduct of the New York City police officers

See EMPIRE STATE, Page 9

Inside

PLAYING HOPSCOTCH

Independent Weekly’s Raleigh music festival is in its third year, overflowing downtown with musicians from near and far. Plus, day parties. Page 5.

musicians from near and far. Plus, day parties. Page 5. WEST NILE IN NC A reporter

WEST NILE IN NC

A reporter for The Charlotte

Observer, Elizabeth Leland, con-

tracted the West Nile virus, which

is transferred by mosquitoes. Her

case is the first ever in Mecklen- burg County. Orange County has never seen a case. Page 11.

This day in history

SEPTEMBER 6, 1986

The University retired six former men’s basketball

player’s jerseys — includ- ing Michael Jordan and Phil Ford — and hung rep- licas at the Smith Center.

Today’s weather

probably sunny.and hung rep- licas at the Smith Center. Today’s weather Stormy but H 87, L 72 and hung rep- licas at the Smith Center. Today’s weather Stormy but H 87, L 72

Stormy but

H 87, L 72

Friday’s weather

Who cares?probably sunny. Stormy but H 87, L 72 Friday’s weather It’s Friday. H 89, L 70

It’s Friday.Stormy but H 87, L 72 Friday’s weather Who cares? H 89, L 70 The city

H 89, L 70

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Thursday, September 6, 2012

News

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© 2012 DTH Media Corp. all rights reserved DAILY DOSE This birdseed’s got a little kick

DAILY

DOSE

This birdseed’s got a little kick

From staff and wire reports

A ll he wanted was a patch of sunflowers.

plants growing on his land.

A 74-year-old Bavarian farmer was approached by drug

enforcement agents curious about the mass of cannabis

The man said he usually uses the field to grow potatoes but wanted to plant sunflowers to keep the land healthy. When he didn’t have any sunflower seeds, he decided to scatter birdseed on the ground instead. The birdseed contained hemp, which resulted in 10-foot-tall plants. When told it was marijuana covering his land, the man plowed through and destroyed the plants. He’ll still have to go in front of a judge, even though the crop was too weak to be intoxicating.

NOTED. Lap dances are basically the same as Russian ballets, right? An attorney for an Albany, N.Y., strip club argued in court that the establish- ment should qualify for tax exemptions because it offers dance and musical perfor- mances. The club is trying to avoid paying $400,000 in back taxes.

QUOTED. “The Tooth Fairy may be the canary in the economic coal mine.” — Jason Alderman, senior director of global financial education for Visa, Inc., which determined that the Tooth Fairy is leaving an average of $3 per tooth. That’s 15 percent more than the average $2.60 she meted out in 2011.

COMMUnIty CaLEndar

the average $2.60 she meted out in 2011. COMMUnIty CaLEndar tOday American songbook ii: a trio

tOday

American songbook ii: a trio of unC jazz professors — stephen anderson, jason foureman and Dan Davis — join their collective musical performance skills in a late-night concert. Time: 9:30 p.m. location: Kenan Music Building

‘A season of Japan’ reception:

Celebrate with the ackland. This semester’s, “a season of japan,” features multiple shows of japanese art. Triangle Taiko will drum at the reception, and four new exhibitions will be opened for a first look. Time: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. location: ackland art Museum

‘An iliad’: PlayMakers Reper- tory Company opens its season with this second-stage produc- tion, which, in a sense, picks up where last season’s finale “Penelope” left off. after this modern retelling of Homer’s epic is a discussion between the artist and the audience. Time: 7:30 p.m. location: Kenan Theatre

FrIday

carolina symposia in music and culture: sarah fuller, an early music scholar from stony Brook university in new York talks dissonance theories and practices in 14th century music. she is the first speaker in the newly-created james W. Pruett

lecture in Music and Culture. Time: 4:15 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. location: Person Hall

mister Diplomat: Real people telling real anecdotes getting real laughs. The national show has found a regional home at Dirty south Improv Comedy Theater with the best of n.C. comedians. Time: 10:30 p.m. location: DsI Comedy Theater

To make a calendar submission, email calendar@dailytarheel. com. Please include the date of the event in the subject line, and attach a photo if you wish. Events will be published in the newspaper on either the day or the day before they take place.

COrrECtIOns

the day or the day before they take place. COrrECtIOns Wednesday’s article, “Shifting landscapes of Beijing

Wednesday’s article, “Shifting landscapes of Beijing on display,” misattributed a quote. The quote, “This dramatic change has caused and been caused by a personal shift — the migration from rural to urban, the needs and expectations of new residents, and the loss of home for the prospect of new, modern and efficient,” should have been attributed to Laura griest, who said it in an email.

• The Daily Tar Heel reports any inaccurate information published as soon as the error is discovered.

• Editorial corrections will be printed below. Errors committed on the Opinion Page have corrections printed on that page. Corrections also are noted in the online versions of our stories.

• Contact Managing Editor Elise Young at managing.editor@dailytarheel.com with issues about this policy.

YouNg DEMoCRAT

with issues about this policy. YouNg DEMoCRAT dth/allison russell A rihya, 3, holds a Democratic National

dth/allison russell

A rihya, 3, holds a Democratic National

Convention T-shirt depicting President

Barack Obama while her mother mans

a vending table along Tryon Street in uptown Charlotte, N.C., during the DNC on Wednesday.

POLICE LOG

Charlotte, N.C., during the DNC on Wednesday. POLICE LOG Someone reported a suspicious person at 1710

Someone reported a suspicious person at 1710 E. Franklin St. at 2:30 a.m. Wednesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. People were hanging around a closed business, reports state.

People were hanging around a closed business, reports state. Someone broke and entered a residence at

Someone broke and entered a residence at 107 Pinegate Circle at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. The person turned door knobs and banged the door with their shoulder in an attempt to gain entry, reports state.People were hanging around a closed business, reports state. Someone disturbed the peace at 108 Ephesus

Someone disturbed the peace at 108 Ephesus Church Road at 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. There was an argument between intoxicated persons, reports state.

was an argument between intoxicated persons, reports state. Someone damaged prop- erty at 1201 Raleigh Road
was an argument between intoxicated persons, reports state. Someone damaged prop- erty at 1201 Raleigh Road

Someone damaged prop-

erty at 1201 Raleigh Road at 1:40 p.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. A water line was dam- aged by construction work, reports state. Damage to the water line was valued at $405, according to reports.

Someone obtained property under false pretenses at 101 E. Weaver St. at 12:38 p.m. Tuesday, according to Carrboro police reports. A man grabbed several items off store shelves and tried to return them for cash, reports state.

shelves and tried to return them for cash, reports state. Someone reported barking dogs at 302

Someone reported barking dogs at 302 Hillsborough Road at 1:24 p.m. Tuesday, according to Carrboro police reports.shelves and tried to return them for cash, reports state. Someone stole a bicycle at 104

Someone stole a bicycle at 104 E. Main St. between 9 p.m. Sunday and 11 a.m. Tuesday, according to Carrboro police reports.

stole a bicycle at 104 E. Main St. between 9 p.m. Sunday and 11 a.m. Tuesday,
stole a bicycle at 104 E. Main St. between 9 p.m. Sunday and 11 a.m. Tuesday,

The Daily Tar Heel

News

Thursday, September 6, 2012

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Plagiarism software still up in the air

After a pilot program, no decision has been reached on the future of Turnitin.

By Sam Schaefer

Staff Writer

After a pilot of the Turnitin pla- giarism detection software, students and faculty are still not sure what the future will hold for the program at UNC. After discussing a report on Turnitin on Aug. 27, the faculty exec- utive committee has not reached a decision either on whether to imple- ment the program campuswide.

Members of the committee said they would send their discussion notes to Chancellor Holden Thorp for further consideration. The report, which was prepared by the Center for Faculty Excellence, found that both students and faculty members thought the program was “moderately effective.” “Like any other tool, some fac- ulty might find it useful, some fac- ulty would not find it useful,” said Melinda Manning, a member of the Turnitin pilot oversight committee. The Turnitin pilot oversight com- mittee was charged with executing the study. “It just goes to show, when we’re talking about academic dishonesty,

there’s no one-size-fits-all answer,” Manning said. Eric Muller, director of the Center for Faculty Excellence, said the over- sight committee sought to find pro- fessors with a variety of perspectives. “We sought to obtain a balanced selection of professors, representing as many schools and departments as possible,” Muller wrote in an email. “We also worked to find profes- sors with a range of initial views about the software, from supportive to skeptical.” According to the report, both fac- ulty and students involved were “on the fence” about implementing the program prior to the trial period’s completion.

But after the trial period ended, more faculty members are convinced the program should be implemented. Students’ opinions did not change. Jeff Spinner-Halev, a political sci- ence professor who participated in the study, said he thought the pro- gram should be used. Spinner-Halev said there were no instances of plagiarism when he used the program, and he thought it was an effective deterrent. Sophomore Noam Argov said she thought the program’s implementa- tion should be left up to professors. “I think it depends on the individ- ual professor and their preference on using it in class,” Argov said. Argov, whose high school used the

program, didn’t find it to be incon- venient. Manning said one of the main concerns among students and pro- fessors were false positives, where properly cited quotes could be clas- sified by the program as unoriginal content. Some involved with the study, including Manning, still have con- cerns about its implementation. “Personally, I’m not convinced that it’s worth the money,” she said.

Staff writer Neal Smith contributed reporting.

Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

Poets ‘exercise Voices’

at university@dailytarheel.com. Poets ‘exercise Voices’ dth/ElizabEth mEndoza Jameson, a musician, performs his

dth/ElizabEth mEndoza Jameson, a musician, performs his original song, “FML,” at the Sacrificial Poets’ open mic night at Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill on Wednesday. Sacrificial Poets is a local group that hosts events and teaches workshops to empower people to use their voice to express themselves.

sacrificial Poets draws crowd at first event of semester

By Elizabeth Straub

Staff Writer

Sophomore Ashley Harris said she was excited — but scared — to try out her new material for the Sacrificial Poets’ first open mic night of the school year Wednesday. Harris, a member of the organization, said she loves performing at these open mic nights, which the Sacrificial Poets hold once a month at Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill. “It’s definitely scary but it’s going to help me,” she said. The Sacrificial Poets, an organization directed by UNC graduate Will McInerney, encourages local youth to write and perform poetry. The organization also includes a competi- tive poetry performance team made up of teenagers ages 13 to 19 in the Triangle area. “We help create places for young people to come and empower themselves,” McInerney said. Wednesday’s event included readings from

both a program veteran and a first time poet, as well as original song performances. Topics ranged from the serious — the July 20 shooting in Aurora, Colo., unemployment and racial discrimination — to the light- hearted. One songwriter even performed a piece about ‘FML’ moments. Though McInerney said the open mic nights — which have taken place nearly every month over the past four years — often have crowds of more than 125 people, about 60 people attended Wednesday night’s perfor- mance. McInerney said the open mic nights pro- vide a space for community members — not just the youth involved in the program — to exercise their voices in a welcoming environ- ment. “We live in a university town that a lot of times forgets about the young people who grow up here,” he said. “They do have a lot of power and there’s a lot that we can learn from them.”

Jamie Fiocco, owner of Flyleaf Books, said the bookstore got involved when the Sacrificial Poets were looking for a new per- formance space. “We’re happy to provide space (because) it dovetails nicely with our mission,” she said. Fiocco said she thinks the organization provides an important service to the com- munity. “I’m really proud of what Sacrificial Poets does,” she said. “I think it’s a really good use of time for people to be working on poetry … it’s good for the community.” Jasmine Farmer said her English teacher told her to try performing her poetry at the monthly open mic. Farmer said she quickly fell in love with the Sacrificial Poets and its mission. “I was just addicted, (so) I started com- peting,” she said. “They’re like my second family.”

Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

inBRIEF

Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com. in BRIEF cAMPUS brief UNC to test Alert Carolina emergency

cAMPUS brief

UNC to test Alert Carolina emergency sirens today

The sirens will sound between noon and 1 p.m. today. No action is necessary dur- ing the siren test.

city brief

Orange County director of EMS to retire in January

Frank Montes de Oca, direc- tor of emergency services for Orange County, will retire in January. Montes de Oca has served as director of emergency services since April 2008. As director, he is in charge of all emergency medical and fire services. Orange County manager Frank Clifton said Montes de Oca’s notice will allow the county to facilitate a smooth transition while the depart- ment is looking for his replace- ment. The county did not announce any further plans to replace Montes de Oca at this time.

— From staff and wire reports

Big-name debate announced

College Republicans will host John Stossel and Howard Dean.

By Maggie Conner

Staff Writer

With the presidential election quickly approaching, UNC College Republicans have called in the big- wigs to lay the issues on the table. The College Republicans will sponsor a debate between Fox Business Network host John Stossel and former Vermont governor and 2004 presidential candidate Howard Dean later this month. The debate between will take place Sept. 20 at 6 p.m. in the Great Hall of the Student Union. The event will cost more than $40,000. The organization received $12,500 from Student Congress to cover speaker costs this year, and all of that money will be put toward this event, said Garrett Jacobs, College Republicans chairman. Jacobs said the debate’s theme will be the role of government in a free society. “Anything is fair game,” Jacobs said, adding that potential topics range from drugs to immigration.

that potential topics range from drugs to immigration. John Stossel, host of a weekly television show

John Stossel, host of a weekly television show on Fox business network, will appear in a debate at UnC with howard dean.

“This is a chance for students to hear both sides of very pressing issues that matter to them,” he said. The remaining cost of the event will be covered by the Young America’s Foundation as part of its national Arthur N. Rupe Foundation Great Debate Series, Jacobs said. The series consists of four political debates on college campuses throughout the country. Maggie Howell, state and national affairs committee chairwoman for the College Republicans, said the foundation asked the group if they would like to take part in the series. “(The foundation) told us that if we were on board and helped with funding, they would help us out and get us some big political names,” Howell said. Last semester the group brought former presidential candidate and businessman Herman Cain. Patrick Coyle, vice president of the Young America’s Foundation,

Coyle, vice president of the Young America’s Foundation, Howard Dean, former Vermont governor and 2004 presidential

Howard Dean, former Vermont governor and 2004 presidential candi- date, will debate John Stossel on campus later this month.

said it has a long history of working with conservative speakers at UNC. “What we are trying to do is give students an opportunity to hear these issues firsthand and not filtered through the media or professors on campus,” Coyle said. Frank Hill, director of the Institute for the Public Trust, a non- profit organization in Charlotte, will moderate and ask questions related to the debate theme, Jacobs said. Audience members will also have the opportunity to ask the speakers questions. Ben Smith, secretary of the group, said students are very ener- gized about the upcoming event. “We hope students will be able to come to the debate to see both sides and start a general discussion about the election — and see who they are more likely to support,” he said.

Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

Perdue

rallies

for

obama

Gov. Bev Perdue focused her speech in Charlotte on Obama’s re-election.

By Meredith Burns

Staff Writer

N.C. Gov. Bev Perdue left the stage of the Democratic National Convention Tuesday to chants of “four more years” — but they weren’t for her. As a lame duck governor who recently fielded some of the lowest gubernatorial approval ratings in the country, Perdue focused her speech on President Barack Obama’s re-election. Perdue was one of the first speakers at the convention in Charlotte, which started Tuesday and will continue until Thursday. She spoke at 6 p.m. — hours before primetime — for about five minutes. Her speech touched on education and women’s health issues but kept the focus on Obama and his re-election. Perdue’s approval ratings have been sinking in recent months. According to a poll conducted by Public Policy Polling in June, which is the latest set of data available, Perdue garnered only a 30 percent approval rating. The high level of unemployment in North Carolina — 9.6 percent in July — has fueled her unpopularity. During her speech on Tuesday, Perdue told the audience that the country can either go back to the same failed economic policies that brought upon the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, or it can move forward. “This election that we’re all working so hard to make happen, this election is about the future,” she said. Perdue appeared on MSNBC Monday and said the state’s economy is in recovery mode. But state Republican leaders, including Ricky Diaz, press secretary for Republican gubernatorial candidate Pat McCrory’s campaign, used her remarks as an opportunity to point to the need for new leadership in the state. McCrory, former mayor of Charlotte, will be on the ballot in November’s election along with Democrat candidate Walter Dalton. Diaz said the high unemployment rate in N.C. is “unacceptable” and will be one of the main focuses of McCrory’s campaign. Republicans are painting Dalton as a continuation of Perdue: “Walter Dalton can’t differentiate himself from Perdue, and that is pretty apparent,” Diaz said. Dalton will speak at the convention Thursday. Sam Spencer, president of the Young Democrats of North Carolina and a delegate at the convention, said Perdue has been representing the state on a national level as Dalton does more grassroots organizing. Although Perdue’s appearance was brief, N.C. delegate Vibhav Kollu said the governor did successfully fulfill her role of hosting the convention. “She did a great job of welcoming the world to North Carolina,” Kollu, a UNC freshman, said. Perdue didn’t mention her governorship during the speech. She gathered the most applause when she promised Obama will win North Carolina in the fall. “For me, and for North Carolina, and for people in America, it’s an easy choice,” she said. “Join with me as we take North Carolina. We will win this state. We will return Barack Obama to the White House. And we will keep America moving forward. We will elect Barack Obama president of the United States of America.”

State & National Editor Daniel Wiser contributed reporting.

Contact the desk editor at state@dailytarheel.com.

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Thursday, September 6, 2012

News

The Daily Tar Heel

September 6, 2012 N e w s The Daily Tar Heel dth/silvana Goberdhan-viGle A bus advertisement

dth/silvana Goberdhan-viGle A bus advertisement advocating for the end of United States military aid to Israel is back on Chapel Hill Transit buses.

Community debate sparked by bus ad

By Caroline Hudson

Staff Writer

A bus ad calling for the end of U.S. military aid to Israel returned to Chapel Hill Transit buses this weekend. The ad, purchased by Chapel Hill’s Church of Reconciliation, was temporar- ily removed because no con- tact information was provided for the church — a require- ment for town transit ads. The ad pictures a Palestinian man and an Israeli man, both holding their grandchildren, with a message that reads, “Join with us. Build peace with justice and equality. End U.S. military aid to Israel.” Although the ad now com- plies with town code, debate continues among community members about whether the ad should be allowed to run because of its content. The ad appeared Aug. 13 on 98 of 121 Chapel Hill Transit buses and was originally scheduled to run for one year. Rev. Mark Davidson, pastor of the Church of Reconciliation, said he knew about the town’s policy requiring a disclaimer about who purchased the ad, but he was not aware of the requirement to include spe- cific contact information for the purchaser. “We were glad to comply,” he said. The church added labels with its website to each ad in order to comply with the code. Residents have flooded the Chapel Hill Town Council’s email with complaints about

the content of the ad, ask- ing for it to be completely removed. Mike Ross, chairman of Voice for Israel, a local non- profit that educates the public about issues in Israel, said he doesn’t think buses should display political statements. He said the ad has caused concern among many people in the Jewish community who find it offensive. But Davidson said the ad has sparked important con- versation about the issue. “I think disagreement is part of living in a democ- racy,” he said. “These are public issues of great impor- tance.” Davidson said he under- stands this is a sensitive issue among the Jewish commu- nity, but the ad is not meant to hurt anyone. “This is not just a Jewish issue, it’s an American issue,” he said. Dr. Steve Feldman, a UNC alumnus and Winston-Salem resident who also sent an email to the council, said in an inter- view that the ad is a wake-up call for people to understand both sides of the problem. “I think it’s great this bus issue has raised such aware- ness,” he said. Chapel Hill Town council- woman Penny Rich said the question now is whether the council, which will reconvene Sept. 12, will consider amend- ing the policy.

Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

Stone Center holds film festival

By Caroline Pate

Staff Writer

There will be a lot of firsts for Mariette Monpierre tonight. Monpierre, the first woman to shoot a film on the island Guadeloupe, will take ques- tions after the North Carolina premiere of “Elza” tonight in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. The film will be the first in the Stone Center’s 11th Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film. Monpierre said this will be one of many screenings that have taken place all over the world, from India to New York. “I believe that building an audience happens one screen- ing at a time,” she said.

Monpierre, who was born on the Caribbean island Guadeloupe but raised in Paris, said the movie is inspired by her return to Guadeloupe to search for her father. She said many of the facts and events were changed for the film. “I made the ending the way I would’ve liked it to happen in real life,” Monpierre said. Monpierre said she wants her movie to give hope to people searching for their relatives, as well as spark a discussion of racial and cul- tural issues. After the movie, Caribbean food will be served and Monpierre will discuss issues surrounding the film with a panel of professors from UNC, N.C. State University and Bennett College.

from UNC, N.C. State University and Bennett College. Joseph Jordan, director of the Stone Center, said
from UNC, N.C. State University and Bennett College. Joseph Jordan, director of the Stone Center, said

Joseph Jordan, director of the Stone Center, said the panel will put the issues raised in the film into a Caribbean context. “Screenings are just an entryway into a broader dis- cussion,” he said. Jordan said the festival will also host five other directors for discussions of their films throughout the semester. There will also be a work- in-progress preview of “The Rosenwald Schools Film Project” by Aviva Kempner. Clarissa Goodlett, program and public communications officer for the Stone Center, said 13 films will be screened, and the center is bringing back the “Lunch and a Movie” series. Goodlett said the film festi- val brings independent films to Chapel Hill that would other- wise not be shown in the area. “I want folks to feel like they have access to films and media that they might not normally

FILM FESTIVAL

Time: 7 p.m. today

Location: Sonja Haynes Stone Center

Info: http://sonjahayness- tonectr.unc.edu/event/elza/

have access to,” she said. Jordan said the Stone Center tries to catch inde- pendent filmmakers early on, sometimes even when they’re still filming. “We try to get into their good graces before they’re big and famous,” he said. Monpierre said the festival has given her an opportunity to tell her story and share her culture with others. “There are very few black women who make movies, so it’s very important that we tell our stories because no one else is going to tell them.”

Contact the desk editor at arts@dailytarheel.com.

them.” Contact the desk editor at arts@dailytarheel.com. courtesy of clarissa Goodlett Left: “Elza” is one of

courtesy of clarissa Goodlett

Left: “Elza” is one of the thirteen films in the Diaspora Festival of Black and
Left: “Elza” is one of the thirteen films in the Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film. The
festival will be the film’s North Carolina premiere. Right: Actresses pose from the film “Girls in the
Band,” which will also be featured in the festival.

The Daily Tar Heel

dailytarheel.com

Thursday, September 6, 2012

5

diversions

Visit the Dive blog: dailytarheel.com/dive

The Independent Weekly’s Hopscotch Music Festival returns for round three today, descending on 15 venues
The Independent Weekly’s Hopscotch Music Festival
returns for round three today, descending on 15 venues
spread across downtown Raleigh with about 175 acts. The
festival attracts both locals and out-of-state visitors alike,
offering an expansive palette of musical genres from some
of the best bands from North Carolina and throughout the
nation. Dive staffers caught up with a few of the weekend’s
noteworthy artists to discuss their festival plans.
Gross Ghost
Phil cook & his feat
What do you think it will be like relative to
one of your typical gigs? — Thompson Wall
What artists are you looking forward to see-
ing perform at Hopscotch? — Alex Dixon
Mike Dillon, guitarist/vocalist: Gross Ghost per-
formed at Hopscotch last year. I have been involved
all three years thus far, the first year playing with
another band. We only play shows we are person-
ally excited about — it’s a pretty good general rule
to have.
Phil Cook: I just try and let my wandering dictate
my discoveries. I usually see my friends from the
road regardless of their shows or mine, but it can
be stressful to run around too much at a festival.
Often you catch something you never would’ve if
you just stay put awhile.
*Gross Ghost plays tonight at The Berkeley Cafe (217 W.
Martin St.) at 10 p.m.
*Phil Cook & His Feat plays tonight at the Fletcher Opera
Theater (2 E. South St.) at 8:30 p.m.
charlie Parr
airstriP
How do you think your classic blues-and-folk
style fits in among the other musicians — or
does it set you apart? — Alex Dixon
Do you happen to personally know any of the
acts coming to perform this year since lots of
them are local? — Thompson Wall
Charlie Parr: I don’t think it necessarily sets me
apart. At the very best, I’m a mediocre musician.
I’m just kind of riding along on whatever I’m riding
on, and I’m grateful to be there … I’m still as excit-
ed to play guitar as I ever was, and I’m still excited
to hear music.
Matthew Park, guitarist/vocalist: I do know lots
of bands that are playing. I have a bunch of friends
and acquaintances in North Carolina’s strong music
scene … We all do our thing, whatever that may be.
There are so many wonderful local artists doing
things in so many genres. It’s always impressive.
*Charlie Parr plays tonight at the Fletcher Opera Theater (2
E. South St.) at 10 p.m.
*Airstrip plays tonight at The Berkeley Cafe (217 W. Martin
St.) at 9 p.m.
hoPscotch music festival
6 to Saturday, Sept. 8
Thursday,
Sept. Raleigh
Location:
Downtown
Time: hopscotchmusicfest.com
Info:
TODAY IN DIVE
TODAY IN DIVE

MUSIC.

Before dancing with Dan Deacon at Hopscotch, read Dive assistant Elizabeth Byrum’s review of his musical road trip, America. Page 7

MOVIES.

Celeste and Jesse Forever endearingly follows the journey of former lovers turned best friends but remains a saccharine dud. Page 7

COLUMN.

Didn’t get a Hopscotch wristband? Don’t worry, Dive editor Allison Hussey has the scoop on the festival’s free day parties. Page 7

ONLINE.

Read the extended Hopscotch performer Q&As and follow Diversions this weekend for more Hopscotch Music Festival coverage.

6
6

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Diversions

The Daily Tar Heel

ready to play hopscotch

Photos by Nivi Umasankar

Today, hundreds of music fanatics from around the Triangle and beyond will descend on downtown Raleigh for the first day of the 2012 Hopscotch Music Festival. As a taste of what’s to come, the festival unofficially kicked things off Wednesday night with wristband pickup and the opening reception of POSTERscotch 3, a festival- long exhibition of several distinguished North Carolina poster artists’ work, hosted at Amplified Art.

Carolina poster artists’ work, hosted at Amplified Art. Top: Sophomore Kiever Hunter views POSTERScotch, an
Carolina poster artists’ work, hosted at Amplified Art. Top: Sophomore Kiever Hunter views POSTERScotch, an

Top: Sophomore Kiever Hunter views POSTERScotch, an exhibition of North Carolina poster artists’ work, submissions at Amplified Art on Wednesday night. Left: A Hopscotch Musical Festival poster shows the bands performing at this year’s festival. Middle left: Stickers for the festival were given away at the unofficial opening on Wednesday night. Middle right: Free information about the festival was offered at the wristband pickup area. Bottom: Pub Tir na nOg in Raleigh will be a venue for the festival this year.

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The Daily Tar Heel

Diversions

Thursday, September 6, 2012

7
7

MUSICSHORTS

i o n s Thursday, September 6, 2012 7 MUSIC SHORTS Dan Deacon America Electronic At

Dan Deacon

America

September 6, 2012 7 MUSIC SHORTS Dan Deacon America Electronic At a certain point, the desire

Electronic

At a certain point, the desire to explore these great states we call home from top to bottom, east to west and everything in between is manifested. For Dan Deacon, perhaps it’s his latest album, America, that cements these road tripping dreams. Widespread and ecstatic, America launches off with the instrumental “Guilford Avenue Bridge,” a wonder- fully expansive journey full of building layers of dotting synth that crescendo trium- phantly. These waves seamlessly blend into the soothing intro of lead single “True Thrush,” making way for Deacon’s voice to emerge from the swirling depths. Deacon balances the punchy with the pleasant, making sure to pause once in while. Specifically, the tracks “Prettyboy” and “USA I: Is A Monster” pensively aim to reel the listener back in following some heavier electronica with exquisite soundscapes. But on several of America’s tracks, some songs still make rather abrupt transitions that begin to disrupt the estab- lished groove. There’s the four-part “USA” instrumental that, while robust and creative in technique, can cause an indefinite slip into the mun- dane, fairly characteristic of the Midwest. But then again, maybe this is just another necessary stop on Deacon’s experimental road trip. Even after hundreds of westward miles, the diversity and rich sense of adventure on America that keeps the energy high and the listener pressing forward. The way in which Deacon meshes revitalizing sound waves with decked-out synth makes for an enticing lis- ten. When the sun sets at the end of a long day, this is one cross-country excursion you’ll still definitely want to take part in.

— Elizabeth Byrum

still definitely want to take part in. — Elizabeth Byrum MOVIE SHORTS Celeste and Jesse Forever

MOVIESHORTS

want to take part in. — Elizabeth Byrum MOVIE SHORTS Celeste and Jesse Forever In “(500)

Celeste and Jesse Forever

— Elizabeth Byrum MOVIE SHORTS Celeste and Jesse Forever In “(500) Days of Summer,” 15-year-old Chloë

In “(500) Days of Summer,” 15-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz teaches, “Just because she likes the same bizzaro crap you do, doesn’t mean she’s your soulmate.” Rashida Jones is 36 and still hasn’t gotten the memo. “Celeste & Jesse Forever,” whose script she co-wrote, tugs feebly at viewers’ heart- strings for a failed marriage

built on goofy jokes and indie

karaoke. Spending the rest of its time trying to humanize its holier-than-thou protagonist, the film winds up little more than an exercise in style that never emotionally resonates. Jones plays Celeste, an L.A. author and marketing exec who’s made her living “fore- casting trends” and generally staying ahead of the curve. When her goofball ex-hus- band Jesse (Andy Samberg) reveals that his new girlfriend is pregnant, Celeste faces the inner regrets she’s harbored about their relationship. It would be generous to say that the filmmakers delib- erately made Celeste unlik- able. They shoot her and her high-brow friends with such closeness and delicacy that viewers can’t help but try to love them. For Celeste in par- ticular, all they can feel is pity for the judgmental loner. Jones may not mind, so long as it’s the same amused pity that audiences have for Liz Lemon of “30 Rock.” But only Liz Lemon can admit that she’s wrong without con- gratulating herself for it. As both a merit and flaw, the film’s aesthetics reproduce the polished, faux-minimal- ism of Instagram photos, irrevocably blurring the line between raw emotion and cutesiness. And somewhere in the process, a potentially moving story gets lost with your ticket money.

— Rocco Giamatteo

STARS Poor Fair gooD ExcEllEnt classic
STARS
Poor
Fair
gooD
ExcEllEnt
classic

Day parties a triumph of Hopscotch

S tarting today, thou-

sands of people will

descend on downtown

Raleigh for the third incarna- tion of the Hopscotch Music Festival, happening this weekend. The lineups have consis- tently been strong, but there’s one strength to the festival that, to some, isn’t so obvious:

Day parties. Music that runs all day is nothing new on the festival scene, but the way Hopscotch handles it — it’s brilliant. In addition to the ticketed event, the festival offers a bevy of free daytime shows. There are more than 160 bands playing during the day from Thursday to Saturday — sometimes multiple sets — in addition to the 175 or so acts playing the main event. Most of the day party bands aren’t even playing the festival proper, so you get almost a completely new bunch of options for enter- tainment. And after the festi- val officially ends, there’s yet another party on Sunday at Slim’s. The parties are free and open to the public, so not scoring a wristband doesn’t mean you can’t have any Hopscotch fun. And by the time you read this, the day party train is probably already pulling away from the station: The first act plays today at noon. If day parties were a restaurant, it would be an all-you-can-eat buffet — but think swanky cruise ship more than Golden Corral. Like Hopscotch itself, offer- ings include garage rock, hip-hop, indie pop and Americana. There’s even one dedicated to heavy metal karaoke. Day parties bring more to the table than a few extra hours of entertainment. For out-of-town guests, the par- ties give a pretty comprehen- sive look at the musical talent North Carolina has to offer:

Of all the daytime bands, more than half of them hail from North Carolina. Locals, too, can get a look at North Carolina’s great musical offerings that they had no idea about before. Beyond the bands, it’s a chance to explore some of the many other facets of the world of Triangle music. Area labels Churchkey Records, Three Lobed Recordings, Trekky Records, DiggUp Tapes and Grip Tapes are all partaking in the party- ing, as are organizations like

all partaking in the party- ing, as are organizations like Allison Hussey Diversions Editor PineCone, a

Allison Hussey

Diversions Editor

PineCone, a council to pro- mote folk art and music. For the die-hards, the day parties can offer relief to an overpacked nighttime sched- ule. Passing up Hiss Golden Messenger at Fletcher Opera Theater Friday night in favor of one of the 26 other bands playing at the same time? No worries, you’ll have three other opportunities to catch a set over the weekend. The same can be said for acts like Roman Candle, William Tyler and Matthew E. White. At the same time, trying to figure out what you want to see during the day can be another nightmare, and it’s easy to run yourself ragged before the main attraction even begins. Last year, I missed The Dodos’ early evening set at City Plaza because I was lying on the bench seat of my car, trying to recuperate from six hours of hurrying around downtown Raleigh in the afternoon heat. My only complaint about this setup is that there are almost too many daytime options. It’s a terrible prob- lem to have. There’s simply too much worth seeing. I’ve said that having a time turner from the Harry Potter universe — a device that allows one to repeat certain blocks of time — would solve all of my show-going quan- daries. I would love to post up at Mecca on Saturday afternoon to watch Megafaun and pals play. But in that same block of time, Airstrip plays at Kings, and Justin Robinson and the Mary Annettes plays at the Hibernian. So many options, so little time. There really is something for everyone at this year’s round of day parties, and no matter where you end up, you’re almost guaranteed to see something good. The daytime festivities may be a little overwhelming, but the reward of great music far outweighs the effort you’ll put in to get it. Are you ready for it?

Contact the desk editor at diversions@dailytarheel.com.

The album’s songs depict a narrative of newfound confi- dence and emotional control after a hasty breakup with “Avatar” actor Giovanni Ribisi. Sun still feels like her, most- ly because it is her. Marshall played every instrument and mastered every production element herself. Even when the digital drums and computer beeps sometimes feel accidentally unfinished, these can be for- given in light of the album’s overall sheer likability. The record as a whole par- allels fellow female artists such as Lykke Li, Feist and even strong female rocker Alanis Morissette, Still, Marshall dominates her latest style with much greater results than any of her contemporaries. Her love of synthesizers is evident in the dark, experi- mental title track, “Sun,” and the processed alienesque blips of “Real Life.” Sun’s only fault is that it is cleanly dissected into two genres — early ‘90s feminist singer-songwriter and modern psychedelic glo-fi. The resulting dichotomy feels forced and uneven at times, resulting in the occa- sional lack of cohesion from track to track. But although the record lacks some musical direction, a few songs, such as “3, 6, 9” pack a mean lyrical punch with intense, brutal lines like, “You got a right to have that hand on your arm/but the moment you hit it you’re on your own.” It’s this refreshing combina- tion of formidable lyrics and her growth and blossoming in personal confidence that has resulted in Cat Power’s overall innovation as an artist, placing Sun among the best records of 2012 so far.

— Thompson Wall

among the best records of 2012 so far. — Thompson Wall Animal Collective Centipede Hz Experimental

Animal Collective

Centipede Hz

so far. — Thompson Wall Animal Collective Centipede Hz Experimental Rising to iconic status with chaotic

Experimental

Rising to iconic status with chaotic experimentation and stalwart unpredictability, Animal Collective has taught fans to expect the unexpected. On the heels of 2009’s criti- cally adored and highly acces- sible (by Animal Collective standards) Merriweather Post Pavilion, it only seems natural for the collective to get wild again. “Sometimes it won’t come so easy, sometimes you’ve got to go get mad” howls front- man Avey Tare on lead single “Today’s Supernatural.” The lyrical mission statement rides atop an equally bold sonic statement of shredded guitars and crashing drums with a decidedly rock-influenced tone. But Animal Collective rocks out in its own world — and it’s not an accessible one this time around. Arpeggiated synthesizers and stuttering samples catch the listener in a typhoon

of sound that’s more about aggression than exploration. The shift partially stems from the return of guitarist Deakin to the band after a four-year absence. His guitar work recalls the occasional analog grit incor- porated on earlier albums like Strawberry Jam (2007) and Campfire Songs (2003). The aural assault works brilliantly on high-energy tracks like “Moonjock” and “Applesauce,” but becomes overpowering and cumber- some in the latter half of the album, when songwrit- ing quality fizzles out as the noise rages on. Songs like “Mercury Man” and “New Town Burnout” become abra- sive quickly, exceeding what would be comfortable for most listeners. Fans of the band will cham- pion the clutter, but with an hour-long runtime and few lapses in energy, Centipede Hz is likely to leave many listeners with headaches.

— Jay Prevatt

to leave many listeners with headaches. — Jay Prevatt Yeasayer Fragrant World Psychedelic pop The biggest

Yeasayer

Fragrant World

Psychedelic pop
Psychedelic pop

The biggest problem with Yeasayer’s newest album is the fact that it followed its first two. But those unfamiliar with the Brooklyn trio will find a solid introduction to its idiosyncratic style in Fragrant World. While the band’s sound is distinctively pop, Fragrant World also flaunts a trendy R&B flavor that was absent from the previous releases. Undoubtedly, this new groove is compatible with the group’s heavy synth use and combined with lead singer Chris Keating’s soul- ful croons, the band explores some new boundaries. But it’s no replacement for the global rhythms of All Hour Cymbals (2007) or euphoric ‘80s-tinged dance jams on Odd Blood (2010) that have made Yeasayer so addictive to date. Instead, Fragrant World in itself is a good album — objectively. It has a few sexy moments and plenty of interesting arrangements, especially on “Longevity” and the lead single “Henrietta.” The latter begins with a dark synth line and then trans- forms into a repetitive, swirl- ing mantra that comprises the best two minutes of the entire album. Even so, the magic of songs like “Wait for the Summer,” “Ambling Alp” and “O.N.E.” that enamored Yeasayer fans over the last several years is noticeably absent on Fragrant World. The album could stand alone and survive but in the context of the band’s career, it’s more stagnant and lack- luster than progressive and exciting.

DIVESTAFF Cat Power Sun allison Hussey, editor Elizabeth Byrum, assistant editor diversions@dailytarheel.com
DIVESTAFF
Cat Power
Sun
allison Hussey, editor
Elizabeth Byrum, assistant
editor
diversions@dailytarheel.com
alternative
Indie megastar Chan
Marshall, better known as Cat
Power, has a new philosophy
that goes something like this:
Jeremy Wile, rocco
giamatteo, thompson Wall,
Jay Prevatt, lam chau, alex
Dixon, staff writers
Kevin Uhrmacher, Design &
graphics editor
When life gives you lemons,
you kick life’s ass and make
a damn good album about
it. Sun is Cat Power’s ninth
release, her first album in
four years and her first studio
album composed of entirely
original works since 2006’s
The Greatest.
Unlike her previous efforts,
in which she comfortably rests
on the laurels of her gloomy
songsmith identity, Marshall
commands both the listener’s
attention and respect with
Sun.
— Thea Ryan
cover Design: Melissa Borden
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Thursday, September 6, 2012

News

The Daily Tar Heel

Employee Forum talks technology

ple to do more work. Blair also mentioned cases of bullying, especially toward supervisors who feel that their subordinates gang up on them. Salary equity is another problem because many University workers look up their colleagues’ salaries, which are public record, and find out their colleagues are being paid more, he said. Charles Streeter, a member of the forum, presented three ways technology is moving the Employee Forum forward. Streeter hopes to have an online voting system in place for its next election, Streeter said, and has decided on using Qualtrics, an online survey system. He said the idea came from an employee who had con- cerns with the confidentiality of the current ballots, which are delivered through campus mail. Members are moving the website to WordPress, which offers new features such as photo galleries, he added. Streeter also presented SharePoint, a software for storing and sharing docu-

SharePoint, a software for storing and sharing docu- On the wire: national and world news read

On the wire: national and world news

read today’s news cheat sheet: dailytarheel.com/blog/in-the-know

Bill Clinton says Obama can turn around economy

CHARLOTTE (MCT) — Bill Clinton was set to take center stage Wednesday at the Democratic National Convention in hopes of per- suading middle-class voters that Barack Obama could turn a troubled economy around the same way the former president did two decades ago. Delegates continue to be enthralled with the 42nd president, and his speech had been expected to be one of the highlights of the three- day convention. “He could sneeze and I would applaud,” said Barb Hammon, 60, a nurse and convention delegate from Michigan. “His support of Obama means a lot to me.” Clinton, who served from 1993 to 2001, came into office at the end of a recession and is credited by some for help- ing the nation achieve a bud- get surplus. With millions still out of work and trillion-dollar defi- cits sending the national debt soaring, Obama is looking for Clinton to vouch for his approach. On Wednesday, Clinton framed the election as a choice between an Obama second term that he said would boost the middle class and a Romney administration

would boost the middle class and a Romney administration mct/G.J. mccarthy Musician will.i.am (left) shakes hands

mct/G.J. mccarthy Musician will.i.am (left) shakes hands with San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro (right) at a DNC panel discussion on Wednesday.

that would not. “The most important ques- tion is, what kind of country do you want to live in?” Clinton said in the prepared remarks. “If you want a you’re-on- your-own, winner-take-all society, you should support the Republican ticket. If you want a country of shared prosperity and shared respon- sibility — a we’re-all-in-this- together society — you should vote for Barack Obama and Joe Biden.”

Costa Rica slammed by 7.6 magnitude quake

U.S, officials said Wednesday. The U.S. Geological Survey later downgraded the strength of the earthquake to 7.6 magnitude from an earlier estimate of 7.9. The quake occurred at 8:42 a.m. local time about 5 miles northeast of Samara and 93 miles west of the capital of San Jose. No one was immediately reported injured, the Red Cross said, and damage caused by the quake in Costa Rica was believed to be rela- tively minor. In the town of Nicoya, near the quake’s epicenter, some homes were damaged, as was a court building. Some roads suffered destruction, and peo- ple in San Jose poured onto the streets in panic.

By Paula Seligson

Senior Writer

Members of the Employee Forum learned about ways technology adds conflict to the workplace at their first meeting of the school year. But they also explored tech- nologies that will make their jobs easier. During the first meeting Wednesday, Ombudsperson Wayne Blair presented trends his office has come across. Many issues centered around using technology to solve interpersonal problems. “Alright, we love technol- ogy. Technology is really effi- cient, but you cannot manage conflict via email, or text mes- sages or Twitter,” he said. “You cannot tell the world how you feel about your col- leagues and your supervisor and put it on Facebook.” The line was met with laughter and applause from forum members. Other trends he noted reflected the toll of budget cuts. Blair said people are stressed and exhausted, both physically and emotionally, because there are fewer peo-

“You cannot man- age conflict via email, or text mes- sages or Twitter.”

Wayne Blair,

University ombudsperson

ments, which would help members collaborate. “Everything is free, but it’s also supported by other peo- ple in the University,” Streeter said, adding that when mem- bers phase out, others at UNC will be able to maintain the new technology. Brenda Malone, vice chan- cellor for human resources, also spoke, and gave an update on the University- wide transition to PeopleSoft software, which will replace the current finance and HR and payroll systems. The software was to be implemented in two separate segments in 2013, but will now be implemented all at once in January of 2014, she said.

Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

SAN JOSE, Calif. (MCT) — A strong earthquake off the west coast of Costa Rica
SAN JOSE, Calif. (MCT)
— A strong earthquake off the
west coast of Costa Rica has
prompted a tsunami warning,
Honor codes put in spotlight
By Andrew Edwards
Staff Writer
Major cheating allegations
at one of the nation’s top
universities have sparked a
national conversation about
the necessity of honor codes.
Harvard University
announced last week that
about 125 undergraduate stu-
dents might have inappropri-
ately collaborated on a take-
home final exam in a large
lecture class last semester.
And at the forefront of this
scandal is Harvard’s lack of a
formal honor system or code.
The allegations have
prompted the university to
consider implementing an
honor code, according to a
statement in the Harvard
Gazette, the university’s offi-
cial newspaper.
“These allegations, if prov-
en, represent totally unac-
ceptable behavior that betrays
the trust upon which intel-
lectual inquiry at Harvard
depends,” Harvard President
Drew Faust said in the state-
ment.
Faust said the university
will deal with the incident in
a “deliberative process” and
educate Harvard students
about the school’s values.
At UNC, the Honor Code is
prominent both in and out of
the classroom.
Amanda Claire Grayson,
UNC student attorney gen-
eral, said an honor code
brings a strong set of ben-
efits to any university and
student body.
“The purpose of any honor
code is to provide a set of
community standards,” she
said. “We expect members of
that community to be aware
of what those rules are.”
Grayson said the honor
system handles an estimated
200 cases per year. About half
of those cases are academic-
related.
“The largest number of
offenses we see are related
to plagiarism and cheating,”
Grayson said.
She said the Honor Court
has a strict system in place to
hear violations.
Donald McCabe, a profes-
sor at Rutgers University
who has researched issues of
cheating and student integ-
rity, said he expects Harvard
to implement an honor code.
But he said in order to
establish a rigorous honor
code — like that of UNC — it
would require commitment
and sustained effort.
“To establish and get an
honor code working takes
a lot of resources,” McCabe
said.
“It also requires mainte-
nance to keep it going — in
times of budget crunches and
cuts, this is not always a high
priority.”
But McCabe said the
advantages of an honor code
are worth the effort.
“Instilling principles of
integrity, as well as knowl-
edge of the judicial process,
are invaluable advantages,”
he said.
Contact the desk editor at
state@dailytarheel.com.
SATURDAY, SEPT 8 WHO’S BAD 919-967-9053 300 E. Main Street • Carrboro SEPTEMBER OCTOBER (cont)
SATURDAY, SEPT 8
WHO’S BAD
919-967-9053
300 E. Main Street • Carrboro
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER (cont)
7 PERPETUAL GROOVE**($12/$15)
FR
7
SU
THE DISMEMBERMENT PLAN**($22/$24)
8 WHO’S BAD? (The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band)**$15
SA
9
TU
TENNIS w/Wild Belle**($12/$14)
9
SU
YEASAYER**($22/$25) w/ Daedelus
10
WE
MELVINS LITE**($15/$17) w/ Tweak Bird
10 STREET DOGS w/ Downtown Struts, Roll The Tanks, Koffin Kats**
MO
11/12/13 (Th/Fr/Sa) YR15
15 Year celebration for Yep Roc Records!
($13/$15)
15
MO JENS LEKMAN w/ Taken By Trees**($18/$20)
11 ARIEL PINK’S HAUNTED GRAFFITI w/ BODYGUARD and Moon
TU
16
TU
THE TEMPER TRAP w/ The Neighbourhood**($20/$22)
Diagrams**($15)
19
FR
Father John Misty w/ La Sera and Jeffertitti’s Nile**($12/$14)
12 SUPERSUCKERS**($12/$15) w/ Michael Rank & Stag, Pussy
Mountain
WE
20
SA
LANGHORNE SLIM & THE LAW**($13/$15) w/ The Last Bison and
WylieHunter &TheCazadores
THURSDAY, SEPT 13
BIG KRIT
WEDNESDAY SEPT 19
TYCHO
13 BIG KRIT**($16/$18) w/ SLIM THUG, Big Sant & more
TH
21
SU
AFGHAN WHIGS**($35) w/ Wussy
14 AMANDA PALMER & THE GRAND THEFT ORCHESTRA**($22/$25)
FR
23
TU
STATE RADIO**($16;on sale 9/8)
15 SA
THE FEELIES**($18/$20)
24
WE LAGWAGON W/ Dead To Me, Flatliners, Useless ID**($18/$20)
18 TU
THE ADICTS**($17/$20) w/ The Bastages
25 TH
THE SEA AND CAKE**($15)
19 WE
TYCHO w/The Album Leaf**($16)
26 FR
SHARON VAN ETTEN**($15/$17)
20 JO GORE AND THE ALTERNATIVE Album Release show w/ Lizzy Ross
TH
27 OLD 97s “Too Far To Care” Tour w/Salim Nourallah and Rhett Miller
SA
Band**($10/$12)
Acoustic**($20/$22)
21 THE OLD CEREMONY “Fairytales and Other Forms Of Suicide” Yep
Roc Record Release Party w/ special guest MEGAFAUN (acoustic
FR
28 SU
STEPHEN KELLOGG & THE SIXERS w/ Miggs**($18/$20)
30 TU
NOUVELLE VAGUE**($18/$20)
set)**$10/$12)
NOVEMBER
22 BETH ORTON**($25) w/ Sam Amidon
Sa
23 TWIN SHADOW**($15/$18) w/Niki and the Dove
SU
1
TH
ELECTRIC SIX**($12/$14) w/Little Hurricane
SATURDAY, SEPT 22
24 MO [The Margaret Cho show has been postponed to January 24, 2013.]
3
SA
MIPSO**($10)
BETH ORTON
TUESDAY, SEPT 25
BROTHER ALI
25 BROTHER ALI w/ Blank Tape
TU
Beloved & more**($14/$16)
9
FR
MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS ‘THE HEIST’ World Tour w/ Dee-1**
26 STARS**($22/$24; includes download of new Stars’ album, THE
NORTH) w/ Diamond Rings and California Wives
WE
($18/$20)
10
SA DIRTY GUV’NAHS w/Dark Water Rising**($12/$14)
27 ANTIBALAS**($15/$17) w/ The Brand New Life
TH
14
WE ALL TIME LOW w/ The Summer Set, The Downtown Fiction, Hit The
28 FR
BEN SOLLEE**($15/$17) w/ Luke Reynods
Lights**($21/$24)
29 SA
CYNAMATIK Freak Circus!
17
SA
INFAMOUS STRINGDUSTERS**($15)
30 Carrboro Music Festival (free show/ 3 PM -midnight)
SU
18
SU
David Bazan Band plays Pedro The Lion’s Control**($13/$15)
25
SU
OM w/ Daniel HIggs**($12/$14)
OCTOBER
30
FR STEEP CANYON RANGERS**($15)
1 MO POLICA**($12/$14) w/ Gardens and Villa
DECEMBER
3 THE GREEN w/ Stick Figure and Matt Irie**($13/$15)
WE
4 GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR w/Airstrip (Sold Out)
TH
1 SA
PENTATONIX**($20)
5 THE WHIGS w/ Ponderosa**($12)
FR
15 SA OF MONTREAL**($17)
6 Easy Star All-Stars w/Aggrolites**($15/$17)
SA
THURSDAY, SEPT 27
ANTIBALAS
WE ARE ALSO PRESENTING
SHOWS @ Kings (Raleigh)
SHOWS @ Casbah (Durham)
SHOW@ Disco Rodeo (Raleigh)
Sept 26 NICKI BLUHM &THE GRAMBLERS w/Sean
Rowe**($10)
13 TH
Oct 18
PASSION PIT**($24/$27)
Oct
16
Oct 18
TILLY AND THE WALL**($12/$14) w/ Nicki
PASSION PIT after Party!
Da B
SHOWS @HawRiver Ballroom(Saxapahaw)
Sept 22 BOWERBIRDS**($12)
Nov 10 BEN GIBBARD w/ Advance Base**($32) / Seated show
Sept 22
Sept 30
MILK CARTON KIDS**($13/$15)
MICHELLE SHOCKED**($20/$25)
Neil Halstead**($10/$12)
SHOWS @ Local 506 (Chapel Hill)
SHOW@ Ziggys (Winston Salem)
Sept 21 TODD SNIDER AND THE BURNOUTS**($20/$25)
Oct 31
Noah Gundersen & David Ramirez**($8/$10)
SHOW@The Artscenter (Carrboro)
Sept 18
Nov 17 KAKI KING**($17/$20)
Oct 13
PERFUME GENIUS w/Dusted**($13/$15) FREE!
Sept 29
SHOW@ Longbranch (Raleigh)
Sept 20 GIRL TALK w/ G-Side**($20/$22)
Oct 2
SHOWS @ Motorco (Durham)
SHOW@ CarrboroTown Commons (Carrboro)
Sept 21 TIFT MERRITT MEGAFAUN MANDOLIN ORANGE -
Attendance Vouchers available online at cats http://
cradle.com/
Oct 19
HANDSOME FAMILY w/Phatlynx ($12)
FRONTIER RUCKUS**($10) w/ Magnolia Collective
The Soft Pack w/ Heavy Hawaii**($10)
MILO GREENE w/ Lucius**($10/$12)
GENERATIONALS w/ Maus Haus**($10)
RACHAEL YAMAGATA**($12)
Sept 15
Oct 21
Sept 26
WHY w/ Doseone and Serengeti, DJ Thanksgiving Brown**($15)
TOROY MOI w/The Choir Quit, Can’t Kids, Organos**($15/$17)
AC NEWMAN **($15) w/ The Mynabirds
SHOWS @ Lincoln Theatre
Oct 1
MINUSTHEBEARw/CursiveandCaspian**($22.50/$27)
Oct 10
Oct 27
Oct 28
Nov 14 PINBACK**($15/$17)
Nov 2
DIVINE FITS**($16/$18; on sale 9/7)
FUTURE ISLANDS w/ Talk Normal**($14/$16; on sale 9/7)
Serving CAROLINA BREWERY Beers on Tap!
**Advance ticket sales at SchoolKids Records (Raleigh), CD Alley (CH). Buy tickets on-line www.etix.com | For phone orders CALL 919-967-9053
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The BEST live music ~ 18 & over admitted
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John P. Kee &
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CommuniTy Choir
friDay
september 14
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september 15
Hayti Heritage center
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plus dozens more shows
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for unc-cH stuDents.
every sHow. all season.
GeT TiCKeTs:
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10%off

The Daily Tar Heel

From Page One

Thursday, September 6, 2012

9
9

OBAMA SPEECH

from page 1

be there with the president in person,” said Steve Kerrigan, CEO of the committee, in an email statement. Convention officials encour- aged those with credentials to remain in Charlotte and view the speech at one of several watch parties. Obama will hold a confer- ence call with community credential holders today. But staying in the city is not an option for students, said Austin Gilmore, president of UNC Young Democrats. Gilmore said the group was forced to cancel its plans to bus 150 students to Obama’s speech today, and other stu- dents who came to the con- vention early traveled back to Chapel Hill Wednesday. “We’re definitely disap- pointed that we’re not going to see Obama speak,” Gilmore said. “But there’s nothing you can do about rain.” Ashley Stearns, a UNC junior studying economics and public policy and a mem- ber of Young Democrats, said she has friends all across the country who were planning on coming to the speech with community credentials. Stearns obtained a ticket via the Obama campaign’s 931 program, through which

volunteers could work three nine-hour shifts to help regis- ter voters in return for admit- tance to the speech. After devoting all those hours to the campaign, Stearns said she was disap- pointed to learn about the shift in locations and subse- quent denial of public entry. “I thought the decision to put it in the stadium in the first place was a little strange,” she said. Democratic officials had said a stadium full of thousands of cheering spectators would bolster Obama’s image and case for re-election in the wake of campaign rallies earlier this year that drew smaller crowds than 2008. The change in venue could throw a monkey- wrench into that strategy. But Gilmore said the more exclusive locale won’t neces- sarily project the appearance of less enthusiasm. He com- pared it to the UNC men’s basketball team playing a game in Carmichael Arena rather than the Smith Center. And students can still watch the speech — just not in person. The Young Democrats are co-sponsoring a watch party with the Black Student Movement at the Stone Center, Gilmore said.

Contact the desk editor at state@dailytarheel.com.

NEW POLICY

from page 1

to the University’s Equal Opportunity Office to process complaints. Changes were made to the policy in response to the “Dear Colleague” let- ter published by the U.S. Department of Education in April 2011, which mandated reforms for federally funded campuses. “The initial investigation is done by the equal opportuni- ties office,” Sauls said. After the investigation, students can choose to either meet with Sauls or request a formal hearing with the Student Grievance Committee. Sauls said if either party does not agree with the sanction, they can appeal to Chancellor Holden Thorp, the Board of Trustees and, finally,

POLICY CHANgES

File complaint with Student Complaint Coordinator

Investigation by Equal Opportunity/ADA officeCHANgES File complaint with Student Complaint Coordinator Seek informal resolu- tion with dean of students or

Seek informal resolu- tion with dean of students or formal resolution with Student Grievance Committee

If decision is unsatisfac- tory, appeal to Chancellor Thorp, Board of Trustees and Board of Governors

Chancellor Thorp, Board of Trustees and Board of Governors the Board of Governors. “We are empowering
Chancellor Thorp, Board of Trustees and Board of Governors the Board of Governors. “We are empowering
Chancellor Thorp, Board of Trustees and Board of Governors the Board of Governors. “We are empowering

the Board of Governors. “We are empowering the complainant to be in control of how the case will move for- ward,” he said.

Contact the desk editor at university@dailytarheel.com.

CHARLOTTE from page 1

DENNIS WALKER, hotel bellman

With the additional travel needs of delegates, media personnel and con- vention attendees, Walker — who has worked as a bellman and van driver at the Holiday Inn for six years — said the downtown area is more clogged than he’s ever seen it. “Traffic is busy on normal days … But this has really shut the city down as far as the downtown area,” he said, explaining that the hotel suspended its van services during the week. “It’s just too hard to get from point A to point B and get the guests where they need to be.” Even Walker had some difficulty getting into the city for his Wednesday afternoon shift: The Secret Service

stopped his car for a security check as he neared the Time Warner Cable Arena. “Wow, it has been really crazy,” he said. “You know, it’s a little out of the ordi- nary to have guard dogs running around your car, but the president’s here with his wife and a lot of very important people, and we want to make sure that everybody’s safe.” Despite the presence of more than 100 Occupy protesters near his post at the entrance of the hotel, Walker said he feels that safety has been maintained. “This sort of thing comes with the DNC — everybody has an opinion, and this is just the way they express themselves.”

CHANELL OgBuRN, barista and student

From the moment Chanell Ogburn clocked into her 10 a.m. shift to the time she finally walked out of work, a constant line of caffeine-starved conven- tion-goers stood before her. With her hair tied up and her green Starbucks apron flapping behind her, Ogburn served more than 100 customers per hour at her store’s downtown location. “It was like, ‘Oh my gosh,

we’re selling this, we’re sell- ing that, do we have any more of that?’” she said. “It’s been really busy — we ran out of quarters, pennies, dollars and everything.” The N.C. Department of Commerce has antici- pated that the Democratic National Convention could

bring in as much as $200 million. In addition to serving more mochas, lattes and Frappuccinos than she ever has, the junior at Central Piedmont Community College also spent more time commuting to work. Ogburn’s 30-minute bus ride to work took more than an hour Monday, a slowdown she said has become common because of street closures. “Working during the con- vention has been fun, but I just can’t wait until it’s over,” she said. “At least now when we go back to our regular business it will be like, ‘This is nothing compared to what we had to deal with during the DNC.’”

SAMuEL SMITH, police captain

The corner of Fifth and Tryon Streets isn’t known for its performances. But that was before Capt. Samuel Smith of Georgia’s Clayton County Sheriff ’s Office and three of his coworkers took over the intersection. Whistling along to beats from their favorite songs and intermittently per- forming Michael Jackson and Elvis Presley dance moves, the four men took directing downtown traffic as an opportunity to enjoy their North Carolina visit. “We’ve never worked a convention before, so every- thing is new to us,” Smith said. “We’ve just loved hang- ing out and watching the citizens respond to the little

show that’s going on.” An experienced member of his county’s SWAT team, Smith jumped at the chance to volunteer in Charlotte when the city reached out to other agencies for help with the convention. The city employs more than 1,600 police officers but did not return calls for comment on the number of outside volunteers. Pedestrians passed Smith with amused looks. “It’s just been such a great time. The crowds seem to like my signature move called ‘the boot,’” he said as he stuck his left foot in the air. “When the car’s going by, you’ve just got to kick it a little ‘cause it’s moving kind of slow.”

LAuREN THOMAS, bartender

As a bartender in uptown Charlotte, Lauren Thomas knows how much people like to drink. But even with $4 spe- cials on just about every drink in the bar, Thomas said Wednesday afternoons at the Town Tavern tend to be one of the slowest peri- ods of the week. That was before the con- vention brought in thou- sands of visitors ready to try out Charlotte’s bars and restaurants. Wednesday afternoon alone, Thomas said at least 20 people per hour stopped in for a drink and a break from the humidity. Thomas said she has also seen a shift in orders, includ- ing a significant spike in the

sale of Samuel Adams. “People have been very nice, and everybody’s been talking about what’s going on here,” she said. “Everybody’s been showing me pictures of movie stars that they’ve seen and some even had pictures with Obama from when he just landed here.” While she hasn’t seen any celebrities, Thomas expects more business today, when speeches end. “It’s been an experience,” Smith said as she poured a mixed drink for a customer. “I personally haven’t seen anybody, but who knows? People just come in at the most random times, just being like, ‘You know, I want a beer.’”

EMPIRE STATE

from page 1

involved in the shooting, the press release states. Two other bystanders injured by police gunfire — Robert Asika, 24, and Mark Logossou, 35 — have indicated they might pursue lawsuits against the city by

filing preliminary notices of claim with the city comp- troller, McClatchy-Tribune reported. Duclos is now recovering from surgery to repair the leg wound. Her injuries are serious but not life threaten- ing, according to her lawyers’ release. Duclos, who moved

to Asheville, N.C., from Washington in 2004, taught yoga at the Asheville Yoga Center, according to the cen- ter’s website. She graduated from the center’s teacher training program and the Asheville School of Massage and Yoga. Duclos could not be

reached for comment. Rick Segal, director of the UNC School of Medicine’s physical therapy division, said he could not discuss the case, citing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

citing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com. BUY ONE,
BUY ONE, GET ONE
BUY ONE, GET ONE
10
10

Thursday, September 6, 2012

The Daily Tar Heel

10 Thursday, September 6, 2012 The Daily Tar Heel   DTH office is open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
 

DTH office is open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm

 

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NOTICE TO ALL DTH CUSTOMERS

Deadlines are NOON one business day prior to publication for classified ads. We publish Mon- day thru Friday when classes are in session. A university holiday is a DTH holiday too (i.e. this affects deadlines). We reserve the right to re- ject, edit, or reclassify any ad. Acceptance of ad copy or prepayment does not imply agreement to publish an ad. You may stop your ad at any time, but NO REFUNDS or credits for stopped ads will be provided. No advertising for hous- ing or employment, in accordance with federal law, can state a preference based on sex, race, creed, color, religion, national origin, handicap, marital status.

UNiTARiAN UNivERSAliSTS meet Thurs-

days 5-6pm in Union room 2510. Many beliefs. One faith.

Child Care Wanted

BABYSiTTER: looking for babysitter for 2 kids,

7 and 10, 2nd Monday evening each month

(start 9/10), teacher workdays, delayed open- ings, minor holidays. Must have car. Katherine. double@gmail.com. $11/hr. 919-240-2376.

EXPERiENCED, REliABlE, lOviNG and fun babysitter wanted for 3 and 9 year-old in Carrboro on occasional weekend nights and Sunday mornings. Excellent references and non-smoking required. Email resume to:

babysitls2010@gmail.com.

CHilD CARE WANTED: Reliable student

as sitter for our 5 year-old twins. Avail- able Wednesdays and Fridays 3-8pm. Able to engage with and keep 5 year- olds occupied. Near Chapel Hill Country Club. $12/hr. Please provide references.

919-949-1014.

AFTERSCHOOl CHilD CARE: Seeking caring, responsible, non-smoker for child care, trans- portation of 7 year-old to gymnastics Tuesdays and/or Thursdays 3-5:30pm. Child care, babysit- ting experience, your own car and clean driving record a must. Email alison-andre@nc.rr.com.

AFTERSCHOOl CARE: looking for athletic, safe driver to pick up 11 year-old boy afterschool and play until 5:30pm. $15/hr. Prefer M/W/F, but can be flexible. Email dgill@email.unc.edu or call 919-418-1967.

MOTHER’S HElPER, BABYSiTTER: Family with

2 girls (9 months-old, 4 years-old) looking for

a fun, energetic helper. 10-20 hrs/wk (flexible).

For more info email: chlov99@gmail.com.

BABYSiTTER, DRivER NEEDED for busy Chapel Hill family with 3 children. Clean driving record/ references required. Afternoons from 2pm until 7pm, daily. Will hire more than 1 person. $10/ hr initially. The children have afternoon ac- tivities, so time available to read, study. Start immediately. beron@mindspring.com.

AFTERSCHOOl CHilD CARE: Babysitter needed for 2 children, daughter (6) son (8). Any of the following 2 days/wk: Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Thursdays, 3-5:30pm. Car needed. Child care experience required. Seeking someone energet- ic, caring and reliable. adlevine1@gmail.com.

FAMilY HElPER wanted for a few hours per week to help with food prep, laundry, errands, etc. Must have car and like dogs. Send a note telling me about yourself! No child care in- volved. tbarron105@aol.com.

BABYSiTTER NEEDED: looking for a UNC stu- dent to babysit my 3 girls (ages 7, 9, 11) after- school from 3:30-6:30pm. Need reliable car to take girls to afterschool activities. $10/hr. +mile- age. Please contact me at Solveigkanderson@ gmail.com or 919-593-7744.

CHilD CARE AND DRivER for 3 kids (15, 13 and 9). if you can get to our house 2 miles from campus with reliable transport, we have van to drive kids and will supply gas. Job duties are driving, homework help and occasional errands. 3-4 afternoons/wk 2:30- 6pm. $12/hr. Call 919-818-4988 or email shaheen@med.unc.edu.

Child Care Wanted

ENERGETiC AND FUN PERSON NEEDED! UNC prof’s family is looking for a UNC student to be a family helper. Primary responsibility will be to drive a 10th grader home afterschool and help with homework especially chemistry. Need would be 2-4 hrs/day, 2-4 days/wk beginning when school finishes (usually 3:15pm but as late as 5pm on some days). The other children are 17, 14 and 12. Your own transportation, a good driving record and good references are es- sential. $15/hr. stouffer@pol.net.

For Rent

FAIR HOUSINg

All REAl ESTATE AND RENTAl advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or dis- crimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspa- per will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. Our readers

are hereby informed that all dwellings adver- tised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis in accordance with the law. To complain of discrimination, call the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development housing discrimination hotline:

1-800-669-9777.

FURNiSHED APARTMENT, private home. wooded lot. 10 miles west of Chapel Hill. 1BR/1BA. Full kitchen. Private entrance. No smoking, pets. Utilities included. References. 919-967-6377, 856-745-6226.

FOR RENT: 375-B UMSTEAD DRivE. 2BR/1.5BA condo townhome. Near busline, parks, ex- change pool. laminate, hard wood floors and marble floor kitchen and bath room. $850/mo Jeff Jeannerret, 919-490-9050.

gIMgHOUL ROAD

Peace and quietude in this secluded, little, stone cottage. Only 1/2 block from campus and buslines. $500/mo. 919-929-7618.

SPACiOUS FURNiSHED APARTMENT near town park and ride. $850/mo. includes utilities, cable, WiFi. 919-942-1522.

4BR, WAlK TO CAMPUS. Walk to campus. Newly updated 4BR/2BA house, W/D, AC, great backyard, tenant parking, year lease. $1,700/ mo. 919-360-2935.

Help Wanted

NURSiNG STUDENTS: Provide part-time person- al care and dinner meal preparation for senior woman in Chapel Hill. 4-7pm everyday. Hours negotiable. $10/hr. Call Nancy 919-251-9085.

PROGRAMMER WANTED: Ever dream you could use your skills to change the world for the better? Faculty in sociology wants to col- laborate with a computer programmer (to be frank you will help many hundreds of people). We will discuss a quote, send me a note at judith_blau@unc.edu.

PART-TiME OFFiCE ASSiSTANT $15/hr. +travel. 1-2 evenings/mo. Word processing and light office duties for retiree. prefer a business or accounting major with at least a 3.0 GPA. Call Walt at 919-967-1411.

UNC SORORiTY HOUSE seeking part-time waitstaff for immediate hire. Please call 919- 967-1286 for more information.

BUSY RETiNOvASCUlAR PRACTiCE seeks

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FAiR TRADE COMPANY looking for social media marketing intern. Possible academic credit. www.pocketdisc.com. Send resume to rachel@pocketdisc.com.

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lOST: CAMERA. Black Nikon “Coolpix” F220. lost at UNC football game around student gate on 9/1. Reward offered. Call 336-625-3976.

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ENJOY HElPiNG CHilDREN lEARN? Regis- ter to vOlUNTEER for a variety of roles, all grades with Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools:

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TUTOR WANTED: looking for a tutor to help our son with high school courses: English, physics, history and especially precalculus. Need consis- tent help M-Th late afternoon, early evening, 10-15 hrs/wk. $20/hr. Please send resume, note to driftwood.resources@aol.com.

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HOROSCOPES

 
     
If September 6th is Your Birthday
If September 6th is Your Birthday
If September 6th is Your Birthday
If September 6th is Your Birthday

If September 6th is Your Birthday

If September 6th is Your Birthday
This year is great for your career. Get clear about what you want and ask

This year is great for your career. Get clear about what you want and ask for it. let go of stuff you don’t need. Family and friends keep you grounded.

Get clear about what you want and ask for it. let go of stuff you don’t
  An autumn discovery tempts you to a course of study.  
  An autumn discovery tempts you to a course of study.  
 

An autumn discovery tempts you to a course of study.

 

To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

 

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

 

Today is a 5 -- For about five weeks, you’re even luckier than usual, and your artistic creativity increases. Keep concen- trating on your studies. Make a romantic promise that you’ll enjoy fulfilling.

Today is a 5 -- You’re very popular, but your social life could cause a problem at home. Your career could benefit from the new contacts you make. Balance.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

 

Today is a 6 -- New opportunities arise over the next three weeks. Take a few days to store away provisions, as many

Today is a 7 -- You should be able to

 

see clearly what needs to be done

no

need to be overwhelmed. Now is a good time for making money, so brainstorm ideas. Maintain objectivity, if possible.

 

as

you can. Then go rejuvenate an old

bond.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

 

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

 

Today is a 5 -- For the next month, it’s easier to get away. All is not as it appears, however. Negotiate a trade. New pos- sibilities develop while this lasts.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is a 5 -- Conditions are excellent for expansion now in a loving context. For about four weeks, your curiosity will be more insatiable than usual. Trust your heart to lead you.

 

Today is a 7 -- Take on more work, and

Cancer (June 21-July 22)

 

make no expensive promises. it’s easier

Today is a 6 -- Gather up the harvest as quickly as possible, with some help. it’ll be easier to make money for the next few weeks, but don’t buy toys yet. it’s not a good time to travel.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is a 6 -- Romance awaits, and you’re especially good-looking during this period. Answer the call of the wild. You have willing helpers nearby; rely on them. listen for feedback.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

 

to

save now. Get family to help. You have

more together than you do apart.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

 

Today is a 7 -- For the next five weeks,

delegate as much as possible. investigate long-term partnerships. Don’t fall for

trick; look beyond attractive results. instead, seek balance. Compassion increases.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

a

Today is a 6 -- Work is more fun and gets easier for the next few weeks.You’re very attractive now. You don’t have to know everything yet. Your past work speaks well for you.

Today is a 6 -- You’ll have sweeter dreams for the next few weeks. Fantasies abound and are achievable. Don’t reveal your secrets all at once. There’s beauty in anticipation. Get into action.

 

(c) 2012 TRiBUNE MEDiA SERviCES, iNC.

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110 Henderson St., Chapel Hill
United Church of Chapel Hill:
Reli g ious
Welcoming & Affirming
Open to EVERYONE
• Thursdays Fellowship dinner
& program 5:30-8 PM
Social Justice • EQUALITY
• Weekly small groups
Multi-cultural • Mutli-racial
MAS
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• Sunday Worship at our six local Partner Churches.
Uniting - Just Peace Church.
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Sunday: 9am, 11am & Student Mass at 7pm
• Trips to the NC mountains & coast as well
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-College Students Welcome-
Coffee Hour & Classes at 10:00 a.m.
Worship at 8:45am & 11:00am
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Pastor: Isaac Villegas
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www.mennonit.es/chmf
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Come worship with a peace church.

The Daily Tar Heel

News

Thursday, September 6, 2012

11
11

Tar Heels take top spot despite loss

Syracuse follows UNC in rankings despite its weekend win.

By Brooke Pryor

Assistant Sports Editor

Under normal circum- stances, the No. 1 spot in the polls is earned by the team with the best performance from the past week. But last week in NCAA Division I field hockey, the top three teams suffered losses, prompting a shake up in the rankings that left North Carolina in the top spot despite a weekend over- time loss. “There’s not a great explana- tion for it other than there’s a lot of parity in Division I field hockey this year,” coach Karen Shelton said. “And if you’ve fol- lowed the other top teams and their records, they’ve all suf- fered a loss early.” Previous No. 1 and ACC foe Maryland lost its Friday match against then-No. 3 Old Dominion, creating an oppor- tunity for a new team to take the reigns in the polls. ODU then lost to previous No. 8 Virginia on Sunday. The Tar Heels split their

weekend games in New York, losing 1-0 to last week’s No.7 Syracuse on Saturday but beating Cornell 6-1 on Sunday. The upsets left the top teams unsure of their rank- ings going into the next week. And when the polls were released, UNC only received 697 points and eight first place votes, more than 100 points less than the total that landed UNC second place in the preseason poll. But the significantly lower point total was good enough to dethrone the Terrapins and earn the No. 1 spot. “It was a huge surprise,” junior forward Rachel Magerman said. “After we lost, we were kind of saying that this is motivation for us to work harder because we won’t be ranked No. 1, so we’ll be kind of an underdog when we’re ranked two or three. “Then when the rankings came out and we were No. 1, we were all really shocked.” Maryland dropped two spots to No. 3, coming in right below Syracuse. “We always have a rivalry with (Maryland), so it’s nice when we’re ranked over them,” Magerman said. “But it doesn’t really mean anything

NFHCA COACHeS pOll

NCAA Division I coaches vote on the top 25 teams each week. This week was the first regular season poll.

1. North Carolina (2)

2. Syracuse (7)

3. Maryland (1)

4. Princeton (4)

5. Old Dominion (3)

6. Virginia (8)

7. Connecticut (6)

8. Penn State (9)

9. Duke (5)

10. Iowa (12)

(#) denotes previous ranking

because when we play them it’s a dogfight.”

Though the Tar Heels weren’t expecting to be the top team, they must now embrace the position and prove the selection wasn’t a fluke. “I think this weekend we need to come out and make

a statement,” senior back

Caitlin Van Sickle said. “Not so much about being No.

1, but about ourselves and

wanting to play better and

No. 1, but about ourselves and wanting to play better and dth fIle photo Senior midfielder

dth fIle photo Senior midfielder Kelsey Kolojejchick reaches out to recieve a pass. Kolojejchick scored a goal and assisted on another in last weekend’s 6-1 win against Cornell. She has had two goals this season.

playing Carolina field hockey.” Van Sickle acknowledged that UNC is still a top team despite the loss, but the team

isn’t playing at the level of a No. 1 team. “I definitely think that we’re

one of the top teams in the country,” Van Sickle said. “But

after losing to Syracuse, I don’t think we’re quite there yet, but we have to potential to be.” The Tar Heels may have snuck past other top teams to the top of the polls in this round, but the rankings won’t matter until later in the season. “I don’t think we (deserve

the No. 1 ranking) — I don’t think any of us do,” Magerman said. “We still need to work harder. When it counts to be No. 1 is in the postseason.”

Contact the desk editor at sports@dailytarheel.com.

West Nile cases spike in NC, nationwide

By Kathryn Trogdon

Staff Writer

Charlotte resident Elizabeth Leland never expected an afternoon of gar- dening to keep her from work for almost a month. On Aug. 23, Leland, a reporter for The Charlotte Observer, was diagnosed with West Nile virus — one of five cases reported in North Carolina in the last month. “She started having flu-like symptoms — nausea, head- ache and fever,” said Karen Garloch, Leland’s coworker at The Observer. More than 30,000 people

in the United States have got- ten sick with West Nile since 1999. The virus originated in Africa. According to data from the Center for Disease Control, North Carolina has only reported five cases of the virus in 2012 so far, two resulting in death. Texas has reported 1,013 cases — and 40 deaths. N.C. Department of Health Spokeswoman Julie Henry said the department is keep- ing a close watch on the cases. “The experts don’t really have a good answer as to why West Nile is occurring more frequently this year,” Henry said.

The state reported no cases in 2009 and 2010 and only two cases in 2011, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Orange County has not had

a confirmed West Nile case

to date. But Stacy Shelp, spokes- woman for the Orange County Health Department, said the department is taking steps to educate residents on how to protect against the virus. “We’re focusing on educa- tion and prevention methods associated with that,” she said. Shelp said the best way for residents to protect against West Nile is to drain any

standing water near their home, wear protective cloth- ing and use insect repellent. Henry said standing water can be a breeding ground for

mosquitoes. “Mosquitoes can breed in something as small as a bottle cap,” she said. Though some counties spray outdoor areas to keep down mosquitoes that spread the virus, Shelp said Orange County does not. “At this time, Orange County does not have any plans — to the best of our knowledge — to do any kind of spraying or pesticide treat- ments,” she said.

“Mosquitoes can breed in something as small as a bottle cap.”

Julie Henry,

spokeswoman for the N.C. department of health

And not all people who contract West Nile show as many symptoms as Leland. About 80 percent of cases involve no symptoms at all, Henry said. She said a small group will develop flu-like symptoms — and an even smaller group will develop more severe symptoms that lead to hospi- talization. Garloch said Leland devel-

oped more severe symptoms, including sore throat, vomit- ing and meningitis. She said Leland was tem- porarily hospitalized and is now at home recovering. Garloch said she didn’t know when Leland could return to work: “She will be out for some weeks.”

Contact the desk editor at city@dailytarheel.com.

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Level:

1 2 3 4
1
2
3
4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9.

Solution to

Wednesday’s puzzle

every digit 1 to 9. Solution to Wednesday’s puzzle Portrait of the Queen N.C.’s largest city
every digit 1 to 9. Solution to Wednesday’s puzzle Portrait of the Queen N.C.’s largest city

Portrait of the Queen

N.C.’s largest city is buzz- ing as host of the DNC in a growing battleground atmo- sphere. See pg. 1 for story.

Unpopular Perdue

Gov. Bev Purdue is play- ing a supporting role at the DNC due to her unpopular- ity. See pg. 3 for story.

Diaspora at Stone

The Stone Center kicks off its Diaspora Film Festival with the Caribbean story “Elza.” See pg. 4 for story.

Political speakers

The UNC College Republicans are bringing John Stossel and Howard Dean. See pg. 3 for story.

bringing John Stossel and Howard Dean. See pg. 3 for story. Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

(C)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All rights reserved.

ACross Cask stopper Conquest for Caesar Serbs, e.g. School that expelled James Bond Gustav Mahler’s wife Hilarious person Grandmotherly nickname Protective trench Miguel’s gal Prickly undergrowth

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

22 Pine secretion

23 More than te-hee, online

24

26

29

31

32

34

37

40

59

60

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

73

Ness and others Verbally overwhelm Dim Small pie Time for action 2-Down, for one Mother of Don Juan Kerry’s home Much of the RMS Queen Mary, now Bank (on) “Seasons of Love” musical

Down

1 Not in good shape?

2 Natural Bridges locale

3 Second helping, to a

dieter

4 Twist

5 Long shot, say

6 Baseball’s Moises

7 It has a campus near the

JFK Library

8 Turning tool

9 Ancient Athens rival

1

5

9

Prop for a safety briefing

Brewer’s vessel

Implore

Wheels

Mideast language

Finish a gymnastics routine, perhaps

Toward the stern

They lead you astray and what the starts of 20-, 24-, 52- and 60-Across are?

Brian of Roxy Music

“Yeah, sure”

Surpass

Washed-out

Bob Marley genre

Place in considerable disarray

It’s often a tough cut

Fighting Tigers’ sch.

44

45

46

47

49

51

often a tough cut Fighting Tigers’ sch. 44 45 46 47 49 51 52 57 10

52

57

10

Nitwit

11

Ouzo flavoring

12

Watch

13

Barely sufficient

21

Slangy “Don’t worry

about it”

25

“High Voltage” rockers

26

Ex-GIs’ org.

27

Bern’s river

28

1982 sci-fi film

30

Superficially fluent

33

Grumpy friend?

35

Exist

36

Mosquito protection

38

Unfriendly types

39

Fastener named for its shape

41

Have supper

42

Wedding reception

highlight

43

Catch sight of

48

Heineken brand

50

All thumbs

52

Winter puddle cause

53

Scout master?

54

Elaborate display

55

Up and at ’em

56

Scottish feudal lord

58

Milker’s handful

61

Hurler Hershiser

62

Large-tongued comics

dog

63

Wave a red flag at

64

Nikita’s no

61 Hurler Hershiser 62 Large-tongued comics dog 63 Wave a red flag at 64 Nikita’s no
12
12

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Opinion

The Daily Tar Heel

6, 2012 O p i n i o n The Daily Tar Heel Established 1893, 119

Established 1893, 119 years of editorial freedom

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“What we are trying to do is give students an opportunity to hear these issues first- hand and not filtered through the media …”

Patrick Coyle, on bringing Howard Dean and John Stossel to UNC

FEATUrED OnlinE rEADEr cOmmEnT

“If members of this ‘union’ are truly con- cerned with restoring legitimacy to the major, they should encourage reviews and inquiries.”

Hugo, on the new AFAM students’union

lETTErS TO

THE EDiTOr

The problem of inequality in America

TO THE EDITOR:

Here are the facts:

Currently the bottom 40 percent of Americans own 0.3 percent of the wealth, while the top 20 percent owns about 84 percent of the wealth. Looking even higher, the top 1 percent gets around 20 percent of the nation’s income — twice what it did two decades ago. So, what does this mean? Inequality is bad for all stratospheres of society and is not sustainable for a healthy society. For example, the American economy grew faster in the decades after World War II with the bottom of society account- ing for the majority of the growth than in the 1980s when the growth from the bottom and the middle dropped off. Inequality has historical- ly come before the collapse of civilizations, but America has withstood a similar problem, rebounding from the gilded age. The problem is this won’t happen on its own. Inequality by nature is self- propagating. Marriages often stay within economic classes, children tend to be educated to the level of their parents, and capitalism naturally facilitates making money from money. Equally frustrating, there is no easy cure for inequality. However, a country with its eye on the problem is much more likely to find a solution than one without. As college students, we represent the future upper- class in America, where influence is also top heavy. Whether economic policy is your passion or not, it is our responsibility to understand this issue and move forwards mindful of the changes that need to happen.

Ty Fenton ’14 Environmental Sciences

Loaded words cloud immigration debate

TO THE EDITOR:

I read your article on in-state tuition for undocu- mented youth. I think it should be noted that while many use the term “illegal immigrants,” this is often shortened simply to “ille- gals” in order to provide some emotional distance from these “illegals” in an attempt to dehumanize them in order to lessen remorse of the blind dislike or even hatred for them.

Also interesting is that the DREAM Act had bipar- tisan support for some time and that many undocu- mented people do pay taxes, albeit working with a false Social Security num- ber, and those who don’t typically do so because they struggle to find a job that does not require or check social security numbers. Without that, I feel the

article falls a bit short, and

it feels as though the author

has a somewhat narrow understanding of many of the implications of this new party platform. I by no means intend to criticize the

article, but I do feel it was missing important aspects. Also, I know someone who was accepted into Cornell University but couldn’t go because she was “international” (a term many colleges use for undocumented youth) and received no financial aid aside from small outside scholarships, despite being qualified to attend a school that is generally generous with its financial aid. So there are a lot of sides to the issue of undocumented youth attempting to receive

a higher education.

Jenny Hernandez ’15 University of Rochester Psychology

Bus ad’s message on israel was wrong

TO THE EDITOR:

I am glad the Coalition for Peace and the Church of Reconciliation had the chance to post their erroneous political ad on the Chapel Hill bus, for it only served to expose their naivete on foreign affairs and their blatant hatred of Israel. This church group has joined a conspiracy of fools in an attempt to render Israel defenseless. We have Iran threatening to wipe out Israel as they enrich uranium at levels never before seen. Israel, that tough little nation, is a western bul- wark against the aggressive intents of Iran and other bellicose nations. Compared to the $2 bil- lion in military aid to Israel, the U.S. contributes more than $130 billion yearly, to the defense of Europe. While Israel and Egypt are the two largest recipi- ents of U.S. aid, for its “participation” in the Gulf War, Egypt was forgiven its indebtedness of $9 bil- lion, while Israel pays its bills. Our investment in Israel is rewarded many times over.

Rene’ Paul de La Varre Massage therapist Chapel Hill

JOin US: The Daily Tar Heel is hiring for the fall semester.

Apply for Fall 2012 to be a member of the DTH Editorial Board to write unsigned editorials on behalf of the DTH. Members must attend a one-hour meeting on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday at 5:30 p.m. each week to brainstorm and pitch ideas. Each board member can expect to write a couple editori- als a week. We are especially seeking freshmen!

Email Chelsea Phipps at chelsphipps@gmail.com for an application and more information. Deadline is Sept. 9 at 9 p.m.

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of seven board members, the opinion editor and the editor. Andy ThomAson EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM

Andy ThomAson EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM ChelseA PhiPPs OpInIOn EDITOR, OpInIOn@DAILYTARHEEL.COM nAThAn d’Ambrosio DEpuTY OpInIOn EDITOR

ediToriAl boArd members

SAnEM KAbACA

TIM LOnGEST

KAREEM RAMADAn

nAYAb KHAn

TREY MAnGuM

EvAn ROSS

KAREEM RAMADAn nAYAb KHAn TREY MAnGuM EvAn ROSS Stewart Boss Old north State politics Senior public

Stewart Boss

Old north State politics

Senior public relations and public policy major from bethesda, Md. Email: sboss91@live.unc.edu

More than 15 electoral votes

O n Thursday night,

President Barack

Obama will be

officially renominated at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. While the convention might

be a three-day exercise in parti- san political rhetoric, the choice to host it in North Carolina represents a bold decision to symbolically plant a flag for Democrats in the South. The convention’s location signals that Obama is not just fighting to capture our 15 electoral votes again in 2012. Picking Charlotte is just as much about cementing the state as a contested presidential bat- tleground in future elections. Veteran Democratic strate- gist Gary Pearce said this week

is ripe with historical and polit-

ical significance because firstly,

a Democratic president is hold-

ing his convention in the South. Secondly, he picked North Carolina. Thirdly, he’s black. “This would have been inconceivable 20 or 30 years ago,” Pearce said. “We have come a long way.” But key liberal constituen- cies were not thrilled about the state’s anti-union history or the landslide vote supporting Amendment One. Although Obama’s razor- thin margin of victory in 2008 and the state’s sharp turn to the right in the 2010 election made another Democratic win at the presidential level look unlikely in 2012, the polls tell a different story. While Republican opponent Mitt Romney has held a small advantage in North Carolina over Obama in most recent polls, his lead has almost always been stuck within the margin of error. The latest survey from Public Policy Polling shows the two candidates tied at 48 percent. CNN moved North Carolina from “lean Romney” to “toss up” in its electoral map last week. The state’s unique demo- graphics — and its unusually strong contingency of youth

and minority voters — deliv- ered the state for Obama in 2008 and explain why Obama’s support is holding steady. Obama has lost ground among working-class white voters since 2008, but that vot- ing bloc is much less important in North Carolina compared to other Republican-leaning states, such as Indiana, which Obama also won four years ago. Only 27 percent of the president’s North Carolina supporters in 2008 were white voters without a college degree, compared to 51 per- cent in Indiana. That disparity illustrates why Obama is conceding Indiana while betting that support from young people, African Americans and women can put him over the top again in North Carolina. As Pearce has pointed out, Obama can hold the upper hand by forcing Romney to fight in what has traditionally been GOP territory. For exam- ple, no Republican has gone to the White House without win- ning North Carolina since 1956. Obama changed the game in North Carolina four years ago with aggressive field orga- nizing and a barrage of TV ads to win the state with less than 15,000 votes. And Democrats aren’t willing to write 2008 off as a fluke.

NEXT
NEXT

9/7: AVERAGE MUSINGS Memet Walker shares unusual insights from the DNC.

EDiTOriAl cArTOOn

by Connor Sullivan, cpsully@live.unc.edu

EDiTOriAl cArTOOn by Connor Sullivan, cpsully@live.unc.edu EDiTOriAl More Tar Heel voices Students should have a say

EDiTOriAl

More Tar Heel voices

Students should have a say on the Board of Governors.

T he Board of

Governors con-

trols many of the

most important decisions affecting UNC students. However, a number of bureaucratic hurdles exist that make it very difficult for system students to

speak directly to the mem- bers of the board.

The board should change its bylaws in order to make student access easier. Currently, the only stu- dent with regular speak- ing privileges at meetings of the board is the presi-

dent of the Association of Student Governments. That more student perspectives, or those of others impacted by BOG regulations on the uni- versity system, aren’t con- sulted directly by the BOG results in a disconnect between the board mem- bers and those they make decisions about. Should an outside group wish to present information to the board, the group would have to obtain a two-thirds board vote for approval or give the information to a standing committee for investigation and report. This creates significant barriers to interaction between the BOG and

those their decisions end up affecting the most. Next Thursday, the Board of Governors will meet to determine wheth- er to change the system- wide rule that dictates that a minimum of 25 percent of all tuition increases must go to financial aid. Removing this rule and replacing it with a policy that allows universities to determine individu- ally what portion of these increases should go to aid would have far-reaching ramifications for every student in the UNC sys- tem. In that light, it is unfor- tunate that there is so little student input on the Board of Governors.

EDiTOriAl

What’s in a name?

AFAM changes must be transparent and substantive.

L ate last week, it was announced that the Department

of African and Afro- American Studies would be renamed the Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies to reflect new reforms to the depart- ment after its place in the recent academic scandal. The name change will help the department move past the turmoil and scan- dal and could facilitate further reforms. However, it must be coupled with substantive departmental

changes. One new policy requires students taking indepen- dent study courses to be a junior or senior major in the subject with a mini- mum GPA of 3.0. Students must also sign a contract to partake in an indepen- dent study course. But many other depart- ments have also changed their standards in a simi- lar way. The newly renamed department has also announced new policies for course syllabi content, retention, exams and grading. But the progress in the implementation process of these new poli- cies could be more trans- parent.

If the department would like a fresh start, its leaders must do more than change the name; they must continue review and enact substantive reforms in a transparent manner. Although the name of the department is being altered, this still does not mean that the past issues have been completely addressed yet. It is unlikely that a scandal reaching back several years will be solved in such a short time, so review must continue. The department’s first steps need to be just the first of many to ensure that the department’s integrity and founding principles are restored.

integrity and founding principles are restored. rain at the dnC Fearing inclement weather, the muckety mucks

rain at the dnC

Fearing inclement weather, the muckety mucks of the Democratic party decided to Fearing inclement weather, the muckety mucks of the move Obama’s acceptance speech from Bank of America move Obama’s acceptance speech from Bank of America Stadium to the Charlotte Bobcats’ Time Warner Cable Arena. Because holding your con- vention in the arena of the losingest team in basketball history is good luck, right?

Clint & the chair

At the RNC, Clint Eastwood gave a speech to a chair. A lot of people have been At the RNC, Clint Eastwood gave a speech to a chair. making fun of Ol’Clint for making fun of Ol’Clint for this boondoggle, but we think it really got the job done for the Republi- cans. Independent voters are now polling at 45% for Romney, 30% for the chair, and 25% for Dear God What is This Country Coming To?

Quick Hits

Beat elon!

On Saturday, the football team put the hurt on Elon, as unC rolled to a 62-0 victory. Some people have questioned the sports- manship of continuing to pour points on to a clearly inferior team. These people are manship of continuing to pour points on to a clearly inferior team. These people are sissypants Communists who have no business watching football. U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!

return of the nFL

Last night, the National Football League kicked off its season as Last night, the National Football League kicked off the Cowboys played the Giants. While college football the Cowboys played the Giants. While college football is great, it’ll definitely be nice being able to watch football without worrying about scandals and eligibil- ity. Unless you’re a Browns fan. It always sucks being a Browns fan.

you’re a Browns fan. It always sucks being a Browns fan. see no evil… On Friday,

see no evil…

On Friday, UNC announced that the NCAA would not be pursuing sanctions based on present in- formation about the ongoing academic scandal. Yet again, the NCAA sanctions based on present in- formation about the ongoing academic scandal. Yet again, the NCAA proves just how inconsistent it can be when meting out punishments. Why do some schools receive far more thorough examinations than others?

The Pitcam

A webcam attached to Stu- dent Stores watches the Pit 24/7 and broad- attached to Stu - dent Stores watches the Pit 24/7 and broad casts everything it sees casts everything it sees online in real time for your viewing pleasure. There’s definitely something creepy and voy- euristic about the camera, but on the upside at least it will make avoiding shriek- ing Dance Marathoners that much easier.