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our new food columnist page 8

jews in sports history. really. page 43

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2012

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volume

88,

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news J T
news
J T

the voice of

JEWIS

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WaSHIngton

5773 Wishing you a sweet New Year Joel Magalnick professionalwashington.com /jtnews @jew_ish • @jewishcal connecting our
5773
Wishing you
a sweet
New Year
Joel Magalnick
professionalwashington.com
/jtnews
@jew_ish • @jewishcal
connecting our local Jewish community

2

opinion

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

Your Community • Your Event There’s still time to register! Thank You to Our Community Sponsors
Your Community • Your Event
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Thank You to Our
Community Sponsors
as of September 10th
Join these partners at Kickoff in showcasing
the diversity of our Jewish community.
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For more information, contact Michael Wardlow,
michaelw@jewishinseattle.org, 206.443.5400.

Ahmadinejad’s enhanced legitimacy must be challenged

Lawrence Grossman JTa World news Service

NEW YORK (JTA) — When world leaders converge on New York this month, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadine- jad will again be present. The occasion is the opening of the United Nations Gen- eral Assembly session. This time, though, Ahmadinejad comes with enhanced diplo- matic credentials. He is no longer just head of Iran; he also chairs the 120-member strong Non-Aligned Movement. Countries in the Non-Aligned Move- ment constitute nearly two-thirds of the

U.N. membership. The last time they gath- ered was in Tehran in late August for the movement’s summit. It wasn’t just lower- level diplomats who were present but also 24 presidents, three kings, eight vice presi- dents and 50 foreign ministers. They unan- imously endorsed Iranian policies, many of which are acts of defiance against inter-

national norms. One would have to go back to the 1936 Nazi Olympics to find a more blatant inter- national whitewash

human-rights abuses and threats against

Israel, and urged it to comply with U.N. resolutions. But his was a lone voice and it was ignored. The assembled delegates sat quietly as Iranian speakers reiterated the old charges against the United States and Israel. And the 120-member summit rubber-stamped a 680-point document that seems likely to sow the seeds of further trouble. Three points in the text are particularly menacing. First, Israel was condemned for its nuclear program, whereas Iran’s nuclear program, falsely described as being for peaceful uses only, was pronounced to be Tehran’s “inalienable right.” Thus a healthy majority of U.N. General Assem- bly nations have undermined the sanc- tions regime backed by the U.N. Security Coun-

cil and encouraged the Iranian nuclear gambit, which the International Atomic Energy Agency reports is close to frui- tion.

In our World News section at www.jtnews.net, inves- tigative journalist Edwin Black shows how far Iran has come in its nuclear weapons program.

of a rogue regime. Adolf Hitler by then had ruled Germany for three years. Publicly committed to overturning the results of World War I, making Germany the supreme power in Europe and combating what it deemed the menace of world Jewry, his regime had outlawed dissent; imprisoned, tor-

Second, the summit condemned terrorism but declared that “the legitimate struggle of peoples under colonial or alien domination or foreign occupation” was not terrorism. Thus, two- thirds of the General Assembly approved of the Iranian-supported Hezbollah, since it is ostensibly aimed at the Israeli “occu-

tured and killed thousands of politi -

piers.”

cal opponents; begun a rearmament program; occupied the Rhineland in viola- tion of treaty obligations; and enacted the Nuremberg Laws depriving Jews of citi- zenship. Nevertheless, no nation boycot- ted the Berlin Olympics, and Hitler used the spectacle to cement his international legitimacy. Fast forward to the present. Iran’s leadership, intent on becoming the lead- ing regional power, has denied the Holo- caust and publicly committed itself to wipe Israel off the map. It has outlawed dissent; imprisoned, tortured and killed political opponents, religious minorities and gays; and is developing the capacity to produce nuclear weapons in defiance of the United Nations and in the teeth of economic sanctions leveled by the United States, the European Union and others. This record is crystal clear. Yet, no Non-Aligned Move- ment member boycotted the Tehran summit, which the Iranian leadership used to cement its international legitimacy. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon participated, against the advice of many who felt that his presence would lend undue credibility to a regime that repeat- edly had demonstrated contempt for the world body. To his credit, the secretary- general in his address criticized Iran for

And third, Israeli occupation is iden- tified as the primary cause of the Arab- Israeli conflict and ending it as the proper means to secure peace in the region. For good measure, the document accuses Israel of mass torture and of efforts to eradicate the historic Islamic heritage in Jerusalem. The Palestinian refusal to nego- tiate a two-state solution or to acknowl- edge the profound Jewish connection to Jerusalem is absent. Non-Aligned Movement members pledged support for renewed Palestinian efforts to secure U.N. recognition, a deci- sion that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas immediately cited in announcing his plans to demand upgraded U.N. status when he addresses the General Assembly on Sept. 27. Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei called the Tehran summit a great success for Iran and a “humiliating defeat” for its enemies. He even described the event as a showcase demonstrating the superiority of the Iranian system over Western democracy. That’s eerily similar to what Hitler, Germany’s supreme leader, thought the Nazi Olympics achieved for his regime in 1936. The parallels are fright- ening. Canada, a vibrant democracy and not

friday, september 14 , 201 2 . www.jtnews.net . jtn ews

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the rabbi’s turn

opinion

What Ruth’s marriage can teach us about our own unions

rabbi racheL nussbaum The kavana cooperative

I returned recently from a wonderful summer in Israel, where I had the privilege of serving on the faculty for the Bronfman Youth Fellowships in Israel program. It was a total treat to teach the group of 26 fellows — high school seniors from a wide range of Jewish backgrounds and communities across North America. Each morning, the program began with a shiur, a Torah study session, and faculty members were encouraged to pick a text they loved to teach. I chose to do a close reading of the biblical Book of Ruth with the fellows. The themes that emerged from our conversations — including loss, inti- macy, and loyalty, to name but a few — all felt incredibly relevant and contemporary. Returning to Seattle in this election season, I realized an even clearer applica- tion of this text: Referendum 74, the voter referendum in favor of marriage equal- ity. The Book of Ruth and its interpretive tradition provide one of the clearest illus- trations of how the Jewish tradition has historically been willing to overlook or overturn a scriptural injunction in order to adjust to reflect changing moral expec- tations and world views. I believe that today there is a clear parallel in the move- ment to grant legal recognition to same- sex unions. Ruth herself is the quintessential out- sider-turned-insider. She begins her life as a Moabite in the land of Moab but, fol- lowing the death of her Israelite husband, willingly chooses to align herself with her mother-in-law Naomi, returning with Naomi to her ancestral land in Bethlehem.

friday, september 14 , 201 2 . www.jtnews.net . jtn ews 3 the rabbi’s turn opinion

Throughout the remain - der of the book, Ruth is more or less treated as a member of Naomi’s extended family, yet her status is not 100 per- cent clear. The text seems to assume that the Torah’s com- mandments — including the mitzvot of gleaning, redeem-

ing property, and levirate

marriage (to the extent that they apply at all in this family’s situation) — apply to Ruth as they would to any Israelite. However, throughout the book, Ruth continues to be referred to as “Rut haMoaviyah,” “Ruth the Moabite.” Has Ruth become an insider, or does she forever retain her outsider status? To see the insider-outsider tension even more clearly, it is helpful to read two

texts in juxtaposition with one another. We begin with the coda of the Book of Ruth, chapter 4, verses 18-22:

This is the line of Perez: Perez begot Hezron, Hezron begot Ram, Ram begot Amminadab, Amminadab begot Nahshon, Nahshon begot Salmon, Salmon begot Boaz, Boaz begot Obed, Obed begot Jesse, and Jesse begot David.

Although Ruth’s name doesn’t appear in this all-male genealogy, it is clear from the context of the narrative that “Ruth the Moabite” (the wife of Boaz and the mother of Obed) has really made it: She is the great-grandmother of King David!

But how can this possibly be the case, given Deuteronomy’s attitude toward the Moabites, in chapter 23, verses 4-5?:

No Ammonite or Moabite shall be admitted into the congregation of the Lord; none of their descendants, even

in the tenth generation, shall ever be admitted into the congregation of the Lord, because they did not meet you with food and water on your journey after you left Egypt…

Reading the Deuteronomy text, it seems almost impossible that the Book of Ruth can end on such a positive note, given Ruth’s Moabite origins. However,

the interpretive rabbinic tradition con-

siders Ruth the first convert to Judaism, with numerous midrashim emphasizing her inner qualities such as modesty and loyalty and generally casting her in a very positive light. At the end of the day, Ruth’s Moabite origins never totally disappear from the narrative, and yet she seems to be fully accepted as an Israelite. As I said above, this tension and resolution is one that I believe has a parallel in our own day and age; this fall, in particular, I can’t help but read this text in light of the campaign for LGBTQ inclusion in our American society and, more specifically, for marriage equal- ity in the State of Washington. Many of the opponents to Referen- dum 74 claim to speak in the name of religion, using a verse from Leviticus to demonstrate that the Bible does not accept homosexuality. However, as the Ruth case reminds us, our textual tradi- tion is not monolithic, and the weight of our religious texts and traditions can also be brought to bear to support precisely the opposite conclusion. In the case of mar- riage equality, it is easy to think of numer- ous relevant Jewish values: That all human beings are created b’tzelem elohim (in God’s image), v’ahavta l’re’acha kamocha (the commandment to love your neighbor as yourself), the principle of k’vod ha-bri-

yot (human dignity), and the calls for us to empathize with society’s underdogs based on the principle that we were once strang- ers in the land of Egypt. The Ruth example provides us with a model for how we can approach our own contemporary version of this question of boundaries and inclusion vs. exclusion. Just as the Ruth text and subsequent rab- binic interpretations seem to outweigh the punitive attitude of the Deuteronomy verses, I believe that the weight of our Jewish traditions and values around inter- personal relationships — which empha- size principles like inclusion, humility, dignity, and equality — can and should be heard over a single verse from Leviticus. I am proud that the Seattle Jewish com- munity has largely banded together in support of marriage equality and Refer- endum 74, but there is still a tremendous amount of work to be done between now and Election Day in November. As we head into this High Holiday season, I hope that we will have the opportunity to reflect on and be inspired by our own tradition. The challenges of creating and main- taining a pluralistic and open Jewish com- munity are very real; our Jewish texts have bequeathed to us a complicated and often contradictory set of traditions and guide- lines. It is my hope that we will learn from the way that “Ruth the Moabite” has come to take her place in our canon, in the gene- alogy of King David, and in the line point- ing us toward redemption. In this election season, may Jews from across the widest possible spectrum of our community take the lead in ensuring that our American society can offer the possi- bility for finding sanctity in heterosexual and homosexual unions alike.

a Non-Aligned Movement member, has severed diplomatic ties with Tehran. Its foreign minister described Iran unam- biguously as “the most significant threat to global peace and security in the world today.” As Iran moves closer to a nuclear bomb, suppresses democracy and con- tinues to threaten Israel, much depends on whether the international commu - nity, set to gather this month at the United Nations, remains in thrall to the move- ment’s approach or emulates Canadian courage.

Lawrence Grossman is the American Jewish Committee’s director of publications.

Our High Holiday plea As we begin our new year and reflect on the one drawing
Our High Holiday plea
As we begin our new year and reflect on the one drawing to a close, we often use this as a time to think about how we can
better support our Jewish community. One way to support your community, and at the same time help to sustain the resource
that lets you know what’s happening in your community, is by making a donation to JTNews. Your donation, whether it’s $36,
$100, $500 or $1,000, though not tax deductible, will help us improve upon everything we do, in the name of better informing
and educating you. We will thank all of our donors on our honorary masthead this coming October.
Simply visit the “Subscribe” page at www.jtnews.net or contact Becky at 206-774-2238 to make your gift.
Thank you, and shana tova from all of us at JTNews.
Joel Magalnick, Editor and Acting Publisher

wRIte A LetteR tO tHe eDItOR: we would love to hear from you! Our guide to writing a letter to the editor can be found at www.jtnews.net/index.php?/letters_guidelines.html, but please limit your letters to approximately 350 words. the deadline for the next issue is september 18. Future deadlines may be found online.

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communi T y news

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

Coming up

2013 Community Celebration and Campaign Kickoff

Sunday, September 23, 5–9 p.m. Jewish community members are invited by the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle to a dinner and celebration of the leadership and spirit of the Puget Sound’s Jewish institutions. Enjoy a light kosher buffet and a live performance by Israeli band Moshav. At McCaw Hall, Seattle Center. Cost is $54 per individual, $180 for patrons, and $500 for a row of 10. For more information contact 206-443-5400 or campaignkickoff@jewishinseattle.org. To register or sign up to be a row captain, visit bit.ly/FederationKickoff.

SJCC Teen Rock Band

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:15–5:45 p.m. from October 2 to December 13 Kids, do your rock star dreams have mom and dad and homework standing in the way? Well, here’s your chance at stardom: Shul of Rock! Cover your favorite songs, write origi- nal music, play instruments, and learn how to form a band. You will also learn Jewish songs and camp song-leading skills. It all ends with a rock ’n’ roll concert open to the public. Open to kids ages 10–18. At the Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 Mercer Way, Mercer Island. $400/SJCC members, $500/non-members. For more information contact Katie London at KatieL@sjcc.org. No class November 20.

Create musical bonds through Musikgarten

Thursday mornings starting September 20 Congregation Beth Shalom is offering three 8-week music classes for children ages 0–5 and their caregivers. Learn how to help children develop listening skills and a sense of beat, and how to connect music, language and movement. Establish a foundation for musical thought and singing, and create a deeper bond through music. Taught by Carolyn Fried- kin, licensed certified Musikgarten teacher. Contact Leah Lemchen at leah@bethshalomseattle.org or 206-985-2517 or bethshalomseattle.org/ECC.php for pricing and class times. At Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave. NE, Seattle.

Diller Teen Tikkun Olam awards call for nominations

Know a Jewish teen making a real difference in the world who could put $36,000 to good use? Bay Area philanthropist Helen Diller is committed to empowering the next generation of Jewish leaders. Up to 10 teens spearheading volunteer service projects in their commu- nities and beyond will be selected. For more information and to nominate an exceptional teen, visit www.jewishfed.org/teenawards/process. Deadline is Jan. 6, 2013.

“The help from JFS was a life saver in an ocean of despair.”

– Emergency Services Client, Jewish Family Service

JFS services and programs are made possible through generous community support of

4 communi T y news JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T

For more information, please visit www.jfsseattle.org

4 communi T y news JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T
VOICES FOR HUMANITY Hear from exceptional teachers and inspiring students. luncheon tomorrow in action Keynote Speaker
VOICES FOR
HUMANITY
Hear from
exceptional teachers
and inspiring students.
luncheon
tomorrow in action
Keynote
Speaker
Monday, October 15, 2012
Edwin Black
in the Comcast Green Room from 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Luncheon
The Westin Seattle | 1900 Fifth Avenue
Award winning author of New York Times best seller
iBm and the holocaust ties the strategic alliance
between Nazi Germany and IBM to contemporary
corporate ethics, responsibility, and technology.
AlAn SteinmAn & DiAne Sigel-SteinmAn/BADer mArtin | AlphAgrAphicS
coAStAl trAnSportAtion | the commerce BAnk of WAShington
george elBAum & mimi JenSen | nAthAn & mArcie fox | hAl & inge mArcuS
henry & SAnDrA frieDmAn
richmark label/Bill & toby Donner | Barrier motors | federal Army & navy Surplus | Judy & krijn DeJonge | laurie Warshal cohen & michael cohen
the Simon family charitable trust & nova foundation | gene & mindy printz-kopelson | Bob & eileen gilman family foundation | Jay & Dana Azose
george & carolyn cox | magda Shaloum | Davis Wright tremaine | naomi & Jon newman | miriam gela greenbaum | pat gallagher
George Beykovsky | Robert Herschkowitz | AllianceBernstein | Ben Bridge Jewelers | Arlene B. Ehrlich | Josh Isgur & Sarah Lindsley | Steve Pruzan & Janet Abrams | Carl & Joann Bianco
Alhadeff Charitable Foundation | Colehour + Cohen | Dorsey & Whitney | Rachel Nathanson & Kevin Conley | Complete Automotive | KeyBank | Pacific Lutheran University
Rabbi Jim & Julie Mirel | Lucy & Herb Pruzan | Vicki Robbins | Intore Expeditions/Shelly Rosen & Paul Karemera | Sharon Nov & Family
Jewish Club of Washington | The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany

friday, september 14 , 201 2 . www.jtnews.net . jtn ews

5
5

inside

yIDDIsH LessOn

by rita Katz

Host broit un puter, iz der mazl a gutter.

If you have bread and butter, you have good luck.

It’s time to find that first Jewish baby Once again, JTNews is looking for the first
It’s time to find that first Jewish baby
Once again, JTNews is looking for the first Jewish baby of 5773. Do you know the
baby? Is this new baby yours? Introduce the first little boy or girl to the community
by contacting us at editor@jtnews.net.

ReMeMBeR wheN

ReMeMBeR wheN From The Jewish Transcript, September 8, 2000. The 18 athletes who attended the JCC

From The Jewish Transcript, September 8, 2000. The 18 athletes who attended the JCC Maccabi Games in Tucson dealt with 110- degree heat and intense lightning storms, but they said they had a blast competing in sports ranging from basketball to baseball to gymnastics. The elite crew pictured here sport the gold medals they brought home from the games.

JTNews is the Voice of Jewish Washington. Our mission is to meet the interests of our Jewish community through fair and accurate coverage of local, national and international news, opinion and information. We seek to expose our readers to di- verse viewpoints and vibrant debate on many fronts, including the news and events in Israel. We strive to contribute to the continued growth of our local Jewish community as we carry out our mission.

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*Member, JTNews Editorial Board § Ex-Officio Member

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friday, september 14 , 201 2 . www.jtnews.net . jtn ews 5 inside yIDDIsH LessOn by

published by

j e w i s h

transcript media

inside this issue

A sweet New Year

Our coverage this issue leads with our High Holiday coverage. A few highlights are below, but you can find articles and tips through page 23.

22 resolutions

7

When you add together the numbers of the new year, 5773, you get 22. That’s how many resolutions we’ve got as the year begins.

Now that’s a salad!

8

JTNews debuts its new cooking column with a salad recipe that will knock your Rosh Hashanah guests’ socks off.

A postcard a day…

9

A local artist decided to better ground herself by creating and sending a postcard every day for a year.

The rituals that help our kids grow

20

It’s those little variations from the norm that kids notice, and a great way to create New Year traditions.

Our regular news coverage begins on page 34

When the peace camp didn’t preach peace

34

Seattle’s Middle East Peace Camp is supposed to celebrate the commonalities and differences of Arab and Jewish children in Seattle. So why did the camp bring in a speaker that was so one-sided against Israel?

The story of two Beths

35

Two Beth Shaloms in our state — Congregation Beth Shalom in Seattle and Temple Beth Shalom in Spo- kane — were recognized for excellence in their education programs.

The start of something digital

37

A new program between the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle and a local entrepreneur launched aims to bring together Jewish tech professionals in the area.

She liked camp so much she’s taking it to Hebrew School

39

This summer marked the start of a program that brings the best of Jewish camp to a religious school to create a cycle of continuity in Jewish learning.

The Jews who built our sports legacies

43

No question about it: Much of the history of athletics in our state, whether it’s horse racing or basketball, can be attributed to our Jewish community.

Still hungry

45

The recession began four years ago, but still more people come to the food bank every year.

MORE

The Arts

24

 

40

M.O.T.: The health lawyer Israel: To Your Health: Seniors’ online lives

42

 

42

Where to Worship Crossword

45

 

50

Community Calendar The Shouk Classifieds

49

Coming up september 28 jewish wedding Celebrations
Coming up
september 28
jewish wedding Celebrations

welcome, new advertisers!

Space Needle • Freshy’s Seafood • Alan L. Berg

Mirabella • Space Needle • Sandy Piha

Make them feel at home. Give them a call!

6

rosh hashanah gree T ings

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

Happy New Year Peace, Love & Good Health to Everyone Al Sanft Louie Sanft Brina Sanft
Happy New Year
Peace, Love &
Good Health
to Everyone
Al Sanft
Louie Sanft
Brina Sanft
Mark & Nettie Cohodas
Samantha & Ben
Richard & Barrie Galanti
Sam, Oliver & Rachel Ada
SANFT
FAMILY
Raymond & Jeannette Galante Stanley & Valerie Piha Jessica, Vincent & Blaire Averill & Shana Marvin
Raymond & Jeannette Galante
Stanley & Valerie Piha
Jessica, Vincent & Blaire
Averill & Shana
Marvin & Ray
Charlie, Cindy, Rylan & Brady
Happy New Year! Robin, Stephen and Sara Boehler Lindsay, Barry, Elle and Sadie O’Neil Emily and

Happy New Year!

Robin, Stephen and Sara Boehler Lindsay, Barry, Elle and Sadie O’Neil Emily and Elan Shapiro

A Good & Sweet Year!

A Good & Sweet Year! George & Carolyn (Puddin) Cox Natalie Ray Brooke & Breanna Austin

George & Carolyn (Puddin) Cox

Natalie Ray Brooke & Breanna Austin Cox Adam Ray Alexis Cox

In memory of Sara Kaplan David Kaplan & Susan Devan Sydney Kaplan Daniel & Miriam Barnett
In memory of Sara Kaplan
David Kaplan & Susan Devan
Sydney Kaplan
Daniel & Miriam Barnett
Miya & Blake

A Sweet and Healthy New Year

In memory of Suzanne Joy Shultz

The Spektor Family Michael, Wendy,

Jordan and Jeremy

Joe and Alan Shultz

A Sweet and Healthy New Year In memory of Suzanne Joy Shultz T he Spektor Family
May the New Year Bring You Peace, Health & Happiness Klaus & Paula Stern Marion Kitz
May the New Year
Bring You Peace,
Health & Happiness
Klaus & Paula Stern
Marion Kitz
and Leah
Opher & Rebecca Mizrahi
Marvin & Michele Stern
Rafi & Shira
L’Shana Tova To our reLaTiveS and friendS Philip Stratiner Louise Ruben Jan and Steve Lewis Andrew,
L’Shana
Tova
To our
reLaTiveS
and
friendS
Philip Stratiner
Louise Ruben
Jan and Steve Lewis
Andrew, Marcie, Jadyn
and Zachary
Scott, Heather and Vanessa
Gary and Cynthia Stratiner
Matthew, Koltin and Kyle
Sara Blumenzweig and Family L'Shana Tova Wishing our children and grandchildren and all our friends a
Sara Blumenzweig
and Family
L'Shana Tova
Wishing our children and
grandchildren and all our
friends a sweet year!

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

7

Your guide to a sweeter new year in 5773

cindy sher JUF news, chicago

You ready for a clean slate? We Jews are lucky to get a chance to start over every fall as the shofar sounds a wakeup call in each of our lives. With the changing leaves, the crispness in the air, and new Justin Bieber Trapper Keepers in the back-to-school aisle comes a promise for a fresh start in 5773.

Since the sum of 5, 7, 7, and 3 equals 22, I offer you 22 tips for a sweeter new year. L’shana tovah tikatevu!

  • 1. Give thanks. No matter what you’re

doing, take at least a moment every day to stop and say thank you to God, to your par- ents, to the love of your life, to your kids, and to that barista at your local coffee joint who greets you with a smile and a “half-

caff-skim-latte-easy whip” every morning. We get so wrapped up in the chaos of our days that we forget to give thanks for all the blessings, big and small, in our lives.

  • 2. Make Shabbat special. Whether you

keep Shabbat or not, it’s a nice time to be in the present with a good meal, good

people — and a good nap.

  • 3. Get inspired. Go online and click on

one of those TED talks, listen to an uplift- ing sermon by your rabbi, take in a sunset,

watch a Spielberg flick — whatever moves you.

  • 4. Learn about your roots. Ask an older

member of your family to tell you a

story stemming from your family tree. My grandparents just recently told me

how they met. Long story short, I might

not be here if it weren’t for my grand- ma’s Canasta game with my great aunts Faye and Gertie, who put the shidduch together. How’d your grandparents meet?

and the stars, and plant something in the ground.

  • 10. Take up space in the room. Last year,

I attended a Jewish women’s empower- ment seminar, where we talked about this

13.

Give yourself a break. So many people,

especially among us MOTs, are taught to

excel and to make everyone around them happy all the time, whether that means making the honor roll, getting that promo-

Spend time with people you really like

5.

6.

Raise your heart

rate. They say sitting at your desk all day

can shave years off your life. It’s a pity I write these words as I sit at my desk. So whenever you can, get up and move. Walk, don’t drive, the mile to the store. Take the

stairs, not the eleva- tor. Do yoga. Shoot hoops. Just move.

7.

ing is dangerous, too.

8.

9.

and love. And spend less time with people you don’t. Life’s short. ’Nuf said.

Never text and drive — capiche? And

while we’re on the subject, texting and walk-

Laugh more. In the book “The Happi-

ness Project,” author Gretchen Rubin says a small child typically laughs more than 400

times each day, while an adult laughs only 17 times. Raise that average.

Look up at the sky and down at the

earth. Pay attention to the sun, the moon,

concept, but it applies to both men and women: Who you are and what you have

tion, or saying yes to a project you know you don’t have time for. But you know what? Sometimes it’s okay to take a day off from perfection. I give you permission.

Eat broccoli, beans, and blueberries.

Incorporate superfoods like these into

your diet to improve your overall health.

…But eat ice cream, too. I know these

last two tips sound contradictory, but it’s

not like you’re training for the Olympics.

Yes, eat your vegetables, but every once in

a while, go for those two scoops of peanut butter and chocolate ice cream. 16. Visit somewhere you’ve never been. That may be Israel, India, or Indiana, or it could be your local

gym or the top of the Space

Needle. Visit uncharted ter-

ritory next year. 17. Talk about real stuff.

Again, we get bogged down in the details of life, logistics, and work, but take some time to really talk to the people in

your lives about what really matters.

X PAge 16

14. 15. adWriTer/creaTive coMMonS Sometimes you just have to boogie. to say matter. Own it.
14.
15.
adWriTer/creaTive coMMonS
Sometimes you just have to boogie.
to say matter. Own it.
  • 11. Commit gemilut hasa-

dim — deeds of loving

kindness. Mentor a kid who

needs a friend, volunteer at

JeSSica Merz/creaTive coMMonS

A little ice cream’s okay as long as you eat your veggies.

a senior home, or feed the hungry at a local soup kitchen.

  • 12. Devour a book — for fun. Read it on

your Kindle or the real kind made of actual paper.

L’Shanah Tova

L’Shanah Tova Stacy Schill Ryan & Maddy Kubasta

Stacy Schill Ryan & Maddy Kubasta

A Good & Sweet Year! In memory of Frances & Howard Keller Jim & Leatrice Keller
A Good & Sweet Year!
In memory of
Frances & Howard Keller
Jim & Leatrice Keller
Felice & Coleman Becker
Jessica Grace
Ilaine & Scott Slotnick
Keller, Molly & Stephanie Faye
Stuart & Barbara Sulman
Scott & Carin Jacobson
Ryan Nathan & Luke Howard
Scott Sulman
Nick & Michele Keller
Caitlin, Michael & Courtney

L’Shana T o v a

Wishing all good health and peace

ruTh LevinSon david and vicki LevinSon Linda, aLan, jacob and Sarah freyd

L’Shana Tova

L’Shana Tova Jon Lellelid & Linda Burns

Jon Lellelid & Linda Burns

HEALTH • • undErsTAnding • • HAppinEss

• HEALTH • • undErsTAnding • • HAppinEss • Char Ahroni Children And granchildren

Char Ahroni

Children And granchildren

A Good & Sweet Year! Larry and Shelley Seth, Josh and Danielle BenSuSSen
A Good & Sweet
Year!
Larry and Shelley
Seth, Josh and Danielle
BenSuSSen

8

rosh hashanah gree T ings

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

A salad for a sweet new year

michaeL natKin JTnews columnist

Editor’s note: This column debuts our new column by local food writer and chef Michael Natkin. Natkin is the author of the recently released cookbook, “Herbivoracious, A Flavor Revolution with 150 Vibrant and Original Vegetarian Recipes,” based on his food blog, herbivoracious.com. Enjoy his sumptuous treat for the New Year!

On Rosh Hashanah, tradition suggests we eat apples dipped in honey for a sweet new year, and a “new fruit” to celebrate the season — often a pomegranate, which is apocryphally claimed to have 613 seeds, the same as the number of mitzvot. This recipe combines all of these elements into a hearty salad that could easily be a meal in itself. The tofu I call for in this recipe is the pressed type. It is very dense and firm. You can find prepackaged versions of it at nat- ural foods stores, often pre-flavored with soy sauce. If you live in Seattle, it is worth a trip to Northwest Tofu on Jackson Street for a fresher, better-textured version. This tofu has had so much of the mois- ture removed that it browns really quickly and easily. It reminds me of grilled hal- loumi cheese, which I think would also be excellent in this dish. Keep the salad dressing in mind for everyday green salads as well. You can

8 rosh hashanah gree T ings JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep

Michael naTkin

Pan-Seared Pressed Tofu with Apples and Champagne Vinaigrette

make a double batch and it will keep in the refrigerator for a few days.

For the dressing:

2

Tbs. champagne vinegar

1

Tbs. honey

Pan-Seared Pressed Tofu with Apples and

3

tsp. minced shallot

Champagne Vinaigrette

Leaves from 2 sprigs of fresh thyme

Vegetarian and vegan

1

tsp. Kosher salt

Serves two as a light lunch or four as a side dish

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil In a small bowl, stir together the vin-

egar, shallot, thyme and salt. Allow to stand for 10 minutes. Drizzle in the olive oil while whisking to emulsify. Taste and adjust seasoning. Reserve.

To finish:

  • 2 Tbs. vegetable oil

  • 9 oz. pressed tofu (the kind that is completely firm and generally already brown with some soy sauce on the outside) cut into 1-inch cubes Reserved dressing

  • 1 large or 2 medium crisp, sweet apples, cored

and cut into 16 slices each (Braeburns work well)

1/2 cup pomegranate seeds Freshly ground black pepper Flaky sea salt (Maldon is ideal) Place a large skillet over high heat. Add the oil, and when it is shimmer- ing, add the tofu in a single layer. Cook until well browned on one side, then flip and cook the other side. Re- move to a medium bowl with a slotted spoon. Pour the dressing over the tofu and toss. Add the apples and pomegran-

ate seeds and toss again. Taste and

adjust seasoning. Divide among serv-

ing bowls and finish with generous amounts of black pepper and flaky

salt.

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year! Peter Horvitz

Peter Horvitz

L’Shanah Tova U’metuka Only the best for a sweet year! JacquieBayley & Family
L’Shanah Tova U’metuka
Only the best
for a sweet year!
JacquieBayley
& Family
8 rosh hashanah gree T ings JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep

A Good And Sweet YeAr!

From our house to your house, to our family and friends

Bob & Becky Minsky Kevin Minsky, Natasha & Tala Sacouman Caryn Weiss Abbi Evanna & Adina Natali Wendi Neuman Alexandra Rachel & Daniela Talya

H appy N ew y ear to our frie N ds a N d family

H appy N ew y ear to our frie N ds a N d family r

r ita r ose N J udy a N d K ri JN de J o N ge s as K ia a N d a NN e K e s ta N a N d m ic H ele r ose N l eslie a N d J ac K

m imi a N d N ate g oldberg s adie , m atilda a N d H a NN a H

A Good and Sweet Year! The Benardouts Bob & Sue Jessie & Melissa Mandy & Jon

A Good and Sweet Year! The Benardouts Bob & Sue Jessie & Melissa Mandy & Jon Heflin

®
®
L’Shana Tova! Ina WILLner andreW & nancy WILLner Laura & Mike juLIa, chrIS, eveLyn & ISLa
L’Shana Tova!
Ina WILLner
andreW & nancy WILLner
Laura & Mike
juLIa, chrIS, eveLyn & ISLa
STuarT & SonIa WILLner
racheL, DeirDre & Martin
danIeL & Shauna WILLner
Jeffrey & BraDLey
PaTrIcIa WILLner MarTIn
& neIL MarTIn
richeLLe & aLLison

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

9

For one local woman, change is small, simple, doable

emiLy K. aLhadeff associate editor, JTnews

Last December, Wiebke Light was browsing through Third Place Books when she stumbled upon an idea. “There was this art diary,” she says, about artists who had done different art projects each day for a year. Light was especially inspired by “Obsessive Con- sumption: What Did You Buy Today?” Kate Bingaman Burt’s collected drawings of everything she bought for three years. “I was walking home and my mind was spinning,” she says. “I thought ‘maybe I could just do it.’” Light brought the idea home to her husband, Rabbi Stuart Light, who encour- aged her. She only had to decide what to create every day for 365 days. “What are my values? What would I like to document every day?” Light, 42, asked herself. “First, I’d like to develop more art skills and do it in a way that’s somewhat challenging…something small and simple and doable.” She also wanted to connect it to people, who would hold her accountable. And it went from there. “We feel strongly about no media, and a simplistic life,” Light says. So she decided to create one postcard a day to send to friends and family. It was sort of “an anti- act to Facebook and emailing and texting and Twittering, to connect with people the old way,” she says.

Light studied art in her native Germany (her first name is pronounced Vib-keh) before studying Jewish art and material culture at the Jewish Theological Semi - nary in New York, where she met her husband. After work- ing for many years in the museum world, she currently assists in the art room at the Jewish Day School, where her three chil- dren attend and her husband is assistant head of school. Since January 1, Light has been carving out time every day to design a postcard. But the project has evolved from artistic enrich- ment and reconnection to a

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews
friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews
friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews
friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

lesson in gratitude, change and acceptance. Light recalls starting out by opening her address book. “I’ll just go from A to Z and see how far I can get,” she says. But she soon found her address book was outdated. “I realized after two weeks or three

weeks there weren’t any addresses left.” It was her first lesson in accepting change. “Sometimes, when we have a plan, and we want to change something, we think we have to have it all figured out,” she reflects. Light started “looking for things to thank people for that aren’t so obvious.” So she sent one to her kids’ bus driver. “His name is Nestor and he’s awe - some,” she says. “I take him so for granted, and we all do…he never gets a formal thank you.” Light also keeps a blog, located at mazecard.blogspot.com, to track her jour- ney. In January, she worked through struggles with time management and per- fectionism. But since then, Light says the project has made her “think about the pos- itives in life.” On June 10 she wrote, “Find- ing myself now on day 148 of my daily postcard project, I notice that I have gained something that I have always longed for, but never knew how to achieve: I am much happier and more content…by cul- tivating the daily practice of thinking of people in a positive way, I find myself con- stantly concerned with thoughts of grati- tude, love and appreciation.” While many of her cards go to family

X PAge 33

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friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

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rosh hashanah gree T ings

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

www.SeattlePremises.com

www.SeattlePremises.com Commercial Brokers 206 679 7918

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A Good & Sweet Year! Stan & Iantha SIDELL Mark, Leslie, Leah & Hannah Scott, Pam,
A Good & Sweet Year!
Stan & Iantha SIDELL
Mark, Leslie, Leah & Hannah
Scott, Pam, Sydney & Emma
Benjamin, Brooke and
Ella Pariser
L’Shana Tova! Walt Oppenheimer David & Kaden Oppenheimer & Family Linda & Efrem Krisher & Family
L’Shana Tova!
Walt Oppenheimer
David & Kaden Oppenheimer
& Family
Linda & Efrem Krisher
& Family
L’Shana Tova Happy New Year! Aaron & Edith DICHTER Stephen, Gina, Marisa & Lauren DICHTER Robin,
L’Shana Tova
Happy New Year!
Aaron & Edith DICHTER
Stephen, Gina, Marisa &
Lauren DICHTER
Robin, Max &
Denielle Morgan
ZAMbRowSky
Gloria Steinberg
Sharlene & Jack Calvo
Aaron, Tara, Emma & Addison Calvo
Brian, paola & Elisa calvo
Michael & melody calvo
Don Bertoncin
Barry Steinberg

a year of health & happiness to all

a year of health & happiness to all Joann Goldman Dan, Cheryl, Candace & David Becker

Joann Goldman

Dan, Cheryl, Candace & David Becker

arthur, susie, Brandon & Mackenzie Goldman

L’Shana Tova Carole & Alvin Pearl Joy & Craig Pearl Zoe, Jack & Harrison Margaret &
L’Shana Tova
Carole & Alvin Pearl
Joy & Craig Pearl
Zoe, Jack & Harrison
Margaret & Tad Pearl
Jamie & Lauren
Tracey & Shanin Specter
Silvi, Perri, Lilli & Hatti
  Happy and healthy New Year to all Joel, Maureen & Joe Benoliel  
Happy and healthy
New Year to all
Joel, Maureen & Joe
Benoliel

L’Shana Tova

Health & Happiness in the New Year

L’Shana Tova Health & Happiness in the New Year The Feldhammers Lynn, Allan, David, Matthew &

The Feldhammers

Lynn, Allan, David, Matthew & Sarah

L'Shana Tova Linda Jacobs & Associates College Placement Services 206/323-8902
L'Shana Tova
Linda Jacobs & Associates
College Placement Services
206/323-8902
L'Shana Tova In memory of Helen Lott Manny Lott Sandra, Gerald, Joel, Leslie, Torry & Kaya

L'Shana Tova

In memory of Helen Lott

L'Shana Tova In memory of Helen Lott Manny Lott Sandra, Gerald, Joel, Leslie, Torry & Kaya

Manny Lott Sandra, Gerald, Joel, Leslie, Torry & Kaya M. Ostroff Sharon & Martin Lott Jordan & Andrea Lott Jeremy, Elicia, Jossalyn & Micah Lott

Tami, Ed, Yoni, Emma, Tova & Zachary Gelb

To all a peaceful & joyous year L’Shana Tova Tracy Schlesinger Tamar & Raphael Ghelman
To all
a peaceful & joyous year
L’Shana Tova
Tracy Schlesinger
Tamar & Raphael
Ghelman

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

11

For the New Year, renew the commitment to end global hunger

ruth messinGer JTa World news Service

NEW YORK (JTA) — This summer I traveled to Ghana with 17 American rabbis. We spent 12 days constructing the walls of a school compound in partnership with a local Ghanaian community ravaged by hunger, poverty and labor exploitation. More important than our efforts to mix cement and schlep bricks, we built pow- erful relationships with Ghanaian human rights activists. We also engaged in rich discussions about what it means to be faith-based leaders and global citizens. One afternoon, a rabbi was exchanging stories with a young Ghanaian girl. In the middle of their conversation, she suddenly asked the rabbi if he had eaten lunch. When he said that he was planning to eat soon, the girl responded, “I pray to God you will be able to eat tomorrow,” reflecting her own understandable insecurity about food as well as her concern for others. As I prepare for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, the young girl’s words weigh heavily on my mind, especially as I reflect on a familiar refrain from the High Holy Days liturgy: “Who shall live and who shall die?” Most of the blessings we celebrate on Rosh Hashanah are unearned blessings. I often remind myself that I did nothing

to deserve being born in the richest coun- try in the world — I was lucky. I did noth- ing to deserve a roof over my head and hot meals on my kitchen table — I was lucky. Most American Jews who are privileged enough to read the words of the High Holy Days liturgy are among the luckiest people in the world. We have rarely in recent years known the hardship of being “the hungry” or “the naked” — the very people Jewish tradition demands that we feed and clothe. For the vast majority of American Jews, fasting on Yom Kippur is a voluntary act, not a chronic reality. But when nearly a billion people around the world go to bed hungry every night, when drought exacerbates hunger in the United States and around the globe, and when fasting for too many people is not a choice but an endemic condition, we must adopt a food ethic that enables everyone to experience the sweetness of having enough. The links between hunger and the Yom Kippur liturgy — “Share your bread with the hungry” — require that we challenge the injustice of hunger and champion the right for everyone to access healthy food. It is easy to forget that the potential to effect global change is intimately tied to our local lives. What we consume, which

government policies we support, where we work, and how we spend our money and our time have a profound impact on the lives and human rights of people thousands of miles away — earthquake survivors in Haiti, migrant workers in Thailand, young girls in Ghana. As I take stock of all that happened this year, I know that many American Jews already have made a difference in chal- lenging policies that are unintentionally undermining the ability of people in the developing world to feed themselves. Last fall, American Jewish World Service and a coalition of Jewish organizations committed to ending hunger in the United States and around the world launched the Jewish Peti- tion for a Just Farm Bill. Together we gath- ered more than 18,000 signatures in support of a just food and agriculture system. As compassionate, concerned citizens, we must continue to educate our own communities about the urgent need to address hunger. With the New Year upon us, one way to make a difference is by observing the Global Hunger Shabbat on Nov. 2 and 3. Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel described Shabbat as an “island in time” — a por- trait of how the world should be. Global

Hunger Shabbat is an opportunity to use this sacred time to reaffirm our commit- ment to food justice for all. It is a time to ask ourselves: How do we use our power as American Jews to make a difference in the lives of people facing hunger in the devel- oping world? How can we be more effec- tive as advocates and catalysts for change? Certainly, extreme poverty and hunger are colossal problems. No matter the number of Global Hunger Shabbat obser- vances, we cannot eliminate these prob- lems on our own. But we can — and must — expand our collective responsibility to support people who are unable to put food on their own tables. With the Days of Awe upon us — a time when we weigh our lives against our benefit to others — we must hold our- selves and our communities account - able. Join me in assuring the young girl I met in Ghana, and so many others like her around the world, that we will live the values of our tradition: We will work for justice so that people around the world have enough to eat tomorrow and for many years to come.

Ruth Messinger is the president of American Jewish World Service.

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rosh hashanah gree T ings

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

Haute-kosher cookbook offers creative, elegant recipes, and a few opinions

emiLy K. aLhadeff associate editor, JTnews

If you’re going to buy one Jewish cookbook this year, make it Lévana Kirschenbaum’s “The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen: Glorious Meals Pure and Simple” (Lévana Cooks, $39.95). But be warned: Lévana has no patience for fad diets, box mixes, the dearth of extreme television cook-offs, deceptive marketing, can’t-lose-weight pity parties, “bad-bad-bad- for-you additives, preservatives, supplements and whatnot,” and proofreaders. The co-owner of Manhattan’s haute- kosher Lévana Restaurant, which recently

closed after a three-decade run, takes a whole foods approach. (The “whole foods” in the title is not connected to Whole Foods Market). Even in the Northwest, where farm-to-table is becoming household lan- guage, a kosher cookbook focusing on holis- tic dining is refreshing — and necessary. Lévana opens this 400-page hardbound beast of a book with a polite, 18-page tirade about American food culture. She is out- raged by low-carb diets (“I would hate to add myself to the glut of people who feed you a barrage of information on low-carb foods,

which leaves me, for one, confused and not an ounce thinner”), liquid meals and various marketing sleights-of-hand that fool con- sumers into thinking they’re saving a few grams of fat, when in fact they’re eating a higher-calorie product pumped with unpro- nounceable manmade ingredients. Aside from a fresh — literally — approach to Jewish cooking, one that does not require such kosher-aisle offend- ers as MSG-laden powdered soup stock and Passover cake mixes with no ingre- dients found in nature, Lévana’s recipes

are beautiful, easy and inventive. Recipes like “Quick Black Bean Chocolate Soup” and “Mushroom and Feta-Stuffed Tilapia Rolls” make me fall in love with food all over again. Well, since yesterday. This is an excellent go-to book for holi- day recipes, not only for traditional recipes (with an emphasis on Lévana’s Moroccan background) but also because each recipe makes enough to feed a small army. No need to worry about making an elaborate dish, only to find out it serves four super- models or one normal person. And in case

Shana Tova! Wishing you and yours a happy, healthy, and sweet new year! Our clergy team
Shana Tova!
Wishing you and yours a happy, healthy, and sweet new year!
Our clergy team welcomes members and nonmembers to celebrate
the High Holy Days with Temple B’nai Torah,
Rabbi James Mirel
Rabbi Yohanna Kinberg
Cantor David Serkin-Poole
*Please call or visit our website for ticket and schedule information
Building an Inclusive Sacred Community of Reform Jews
Temple B’nai Torah * 15727 NE 4th Street * Bellevue, WA 98008 * (425) 603-9677 * TempleBnaiTorah.org
12 rosh hashanah gree T ings JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep
L’Shanah Tova The Greer Ross Family

L’Shanah Tova

The Greer Ross Family

L’SHANA

TOVAH

5773

Wishing you and your family

a good year and a long, peaceful life

L’SHANA TOVAH 5773 Wishing you and your family a good year and a long, peaceful life

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

13

you overdo it, you can burn off some calo-

immersion blender. Adjust the texture

  • 3 tsp. lemon zest

ries bench-pressing the book.

and seasonings. Makes a dozen am-

1/4 cup rum

One note of caution: Some recipes call

ple servings.

  • 1 cup light agave syrup

for pantry items like preserved lemon,

  • 1 lb. silken tofu

which takes two weeks to make. While

 
  • 1 8-oz. container dairy-free cream cheese

most ingredients are readily available at the supermarket or farmers’ markets, be sure to read through ingredients first. Here are a few recipes that use in-sea- son ingredients and will bring symbolic

Roasted Salmon with Maple Glaze (Gluten Free)

Bluefish will be suitable here, as well as any thick white fish.

1/3 cup maple syrup

  • 1 cup toasted coconut for topping (about 15 minutes in a 325°F oven), optional

Dissolve the gelatin in the water and reserve. Bring the coconut milk and the lemon juice to just below boiling in

meaning to your holiday tables. B’tayavon!

2

Tbs. soy sauce

a small saucepan. Transfer the warm

3

Tbs. Dijon-style mustard

mixture to a food processor with the

Kabocha Sweet Potato Soup

3

Tbs. toasted sesame oil

reserved gelatin mixture and process

Round lentils symbolize the cyclical

1

Tbs. cracked pepper, or less to taste

about 30 seconds. Add all remaining

year, and at Sephardic Rosh Hashanah seders gourds — based on Hebrew word

whole side salmon, about 3 lbs., skin off, bones out, trimmed

1

 

ingredients and process until perfect- ly smooth. Pour into a bowl or small

dozen servings.

play — represent the tearing apart of evil judgments on us, and the announcement of our merits before God.

Preheat the oven to 500º. Mix all but last ingredient in a bowl. Place the salmon skin side up in a baking pan

individual cups and chill. Top with toasted coconut, if desired. Makes a

  • 1 Kabocha squash, about 2 pounds, unpeeled,

just large enough to fit it snugly in

Many of Lévana’s recipes are available

seeded, and cut into large chunks (use a hammer)

one layer (if you have empty spaces, the liquids will burn). Pour the sauce

on her website, levanacooks.com. Here are

  • 2 large sweet potatoes, cut into large chunks

evenly over the fish. Bake 18 minutes,

a few personal recommendations:

  • 1 large red onion, cut into large chunks

or a minute or two longer, until the fish

  • 2 cups red lentils or yellow split peas

is tender but firm to the touch. Trans-

Moroccan Fava Bean Soup

  • 6 ribs celery, peeled

fer to a platter and pour the cooking

Though the reputation of fava beans was

  • 1 large bunch dill, fronds and stems 1∕3 cup olive oil

juices over the fish. Serve hot, or at room temperature. Makes 8 main

permanently altered for the worse by Hanni- bal Lecter, this soup is incredible. The spice

  • 6 bay leaves, or 1 tsp. ground

course servings, or a dozen ample

mix will put some hair on your chest, too.

  • 1 Tbs. turmeric

first course servings.

Sea salt to taste

Moroccan Ratatouille

12 cups water

Lemon Coconut Mousse (Gluten Free)

 

Made with vegetables peaking right

Ground pepper to taste Bring all ingredients to a boil in a wide

1-1/2 envelopes unflavored kosher gelatin 1/4 cup cold water

now, this is a wonderful side dish or veg- etarian main dish. To boost the protein

heavy pot. Reduce to medium, cover,

1

15-oz. can coconut milk

content, throw in a can of chickpeas. Make

and cook 1-1/2 hours. Cream with an

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

 

this a day ahead to enjoy a bolder flavor.

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

Meir PliSkin

Kale, beet and seaweed salad.

Kale, Beet and Seaweed Salad

Give this one a chance! Kale is abun- dant right now, and in the Sephardic seder beets and scallions symbolize the hope that our enemies will retreat and be elimi-

nated by God.

Almond-Stuffed Salmon

Fish and almonds are related to fertility and abundance, good things to hope for in the New Year.

Brisket in Coffee and Brandy Sauce

This is a perfect example of Lévana’s experimentation with “wacky ingredients” and a result “that comes out to die for!” I might just have to come out of vegetarian- ism for this one.

Extending Our Best Wishes to the Jewish Community Rosh Hashanah 5773 The Caroline Kline Galland Home
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14

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Teshuvah and Penn State: The sin of rushing to judgment

david e. ostrich JTa World news Service

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (JTA) — In our busy lives, there are lots of decisions to make. Though we know that quick judg- ments made without all the facts can be faulty, we do not have the time to dwell on each decision, and we learn to live with a kind of necessary impatience. Whether it is a route across town, what we want for lunch, or the selection of a shirt to wear, we need to make our choices quickly and then get on with the day. Thus do we approach many things in life — including stories in the news. Even when the story is important, we want to finish it quickly. We want to know what happened and why it happened, and we want to get some kind of expeditious reso- lution (lesson learned) before we move on. The problem, however, is that some stories do not conform to our impatience. Complex events elude quick and simple conclusions and are not conducive to the few minutes we are willing to give them. Of course, when we are the ones involved in controversy — when our rep- utations are at risk and our feelings are being battered — we want plenty of time

to defend ourselves. Many of us have known the frustration and hurt of being falsely accused, and I suspect that this fear of false accusation is at the heart of our legal system’s many safeguards. “Innocent until proven guilty” is no abstract princi- ple. It is one of our nation’s most impor- tant protections. The problem, however, is that the time delays necessary for our day in court — all those procedures and facts — can get in the way of a good story. Although not every accusation leads to an indictment, and not every indictment leads to a conviction, there is that rush of excitement when evil is exposed and we get to watch the bad guys squirm. In many ways, the truth seems less important than the fun and titillation of lashon hara, the “evil tongue.” This year, I am particularly aware of our human tendency to rush to judgment, and of the injustice it can cause, because I live in a town that has been at the center of an enormous news story. State College, Pa., the home of Penn State University, has been rocked by the indictment and convic- tion of Jerry Sandusky, the former football

14 rosh hashanah gree T ings JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep

kevin dean/creaTive coMMonS

coach who sexually victimized a number of young boys. That this happened is horrible enough, but the revelations were particu- larly shocking to this small town because Sandusky was such an integral part of the community’s social fabric. When a trusted and respected member of the community turned out to be a pedo- phile — a serial pedophile — people were stunned and wondered how their judg-

ment could have been so wrong, their trust so abused. There was grief that the crimes were committed, sympathy for the vic- tims, and anger that no one saw through the criminal’s deception. This anger is overwhelming, and people have furiously sought places to focus it. One would have thought that the rage would have been addressed by the crimi- nal’s arrest, trial, conviction and incarcer- ation, but this has not been the case. The outrage is too great for the criminal alone. From the beginning, allegations and stories of a highly placed conspiracy have become

well known and frequently repeated.

Here’s what this story says: Coach Sandusky’s criminal activities were well known at the highest levels of the univer- sity administration. The men at the top of the Penn State power structure did not care about his crimes, allowed them to continue on campus, and then conspired to conceal them for the sake of the football program. As everyone knows, “Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Therefore, people as powerful as Coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham

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Congregation Ezra Bessaroth wishes its members, friends and the entire Seattle Jewish Community a Happy New
Congregation Ezra Bessaroth
wishes its members, friends and the entire Seattle Jewish Community a
Happy New Year, Rosh Hashanah 5773
Ron-Ami Meyers, Rabbi • Yogev Nuna, Hazzan
Isaac Azose, Hazzan Emeritus • Ilya Gamel, President
Leslie Galanti, Muriel Thompson, Co-Presidents of the Ladies Auxiliary
Tizku Leshanim Rabot!
Wishing the Greater Seattle Community a Healthy, Happy, and Kosher 5773! L’Shana Tova! Va’ad HaRabanim of
Wishing the Greater Seattle Community
a Healthy, Happy, and Kosher 5773!
L’Shana Tova!
Va’ad HaRabanim
of Greater Seattle
Visit us on the Web at www.seattlevaad.org
206-760-0805
Rabbi Simon Benzaquen
Rabbi Ron-Ami Meyers
Rabbi Mordechai Farkash
Rabbi Moshe Kletenik
Rabbi Yechezkel Kornfeld
Rabbi Sholom Ber Levitin
Rabbi Solomon Maimon

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

15

Spanier must have been corrupt. They must have known everything that was transpiring on campus, and their corruption included a criminal conspiracy to cover up child abuse. Of course, we do not actually know any of these things. While this story has been repeated again and again, the charges have never been proven. Indeed, no grand jury or governmental prosecutor has ever even alleged these accusations. What we have is a rush to judgment and a conspiratorial tale that is more entertaining than factual. In the very long and complicated Freeh Report, a team of investigators looked into some of the evidence and concluded that high administrators did not adequately respond to this situation. They based their opinion on some of the evidence, but there is additional evidence and other possi- ble interpretations of it. Inasmuch as the university authorities reported the suspi- cious behavior to the district attorney, and inasmuch as the district attorney’s official investigation did not find enough evidence

for an indictment, one could conclude that the university leaders did their jobs. One could conclude that the criminal was deceiving people — as criminals are wont to do. In other words, rather than imagin- ing a conspiracy that allowed Sandusky to continue his crimes, one could conclude that his deception worked. Therefore, and tragically, he was able to continue his criminal behavior. A careful reading of the Freeh Report would have revealed this possible inter- pretation, but reading the report would have been tedious and taken a long time. Besides, what people wanted was a con- clusion and dramatic punishment. Public anxiety demanded answers and action immediately. So instead of a careful dis- cussion of the Freeh Report’s opinions and some patience as the legal system worked its slow process, we saw the NCAA and its hurried imposition of dramatic sanctions rescue public patience. In lieu of an actual investigation, the

   

Chag Sameach

   
   
admin@kolaminw.org

admin@kolaminw.org

www.kolaminw.org

425-844-1604

16530 Avondale Rd. NE, Woodinville

   
   
friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

Emanuel

EmanuEl

CongrEgation

invitEs you to join us for thE high holy days

sEE our wEbsitE for thE holiday sChEdulE:

www.EmanuElCongrEgation.org

NCAA gave us closure. Much less inter- ested in the truth than in resolution, many people are happy with the penal- ties, regardless of whether they are prop- erly directed. Instead of fact finding and legal dilly-dallying, this crisis was met with a swift and decisive rush to judgment. The important thing is that we see someone punished; now we can then get on with other concerns. In the interest of clear thinking and the possibility of justice, it is important, however, to remind everyone that the oft- repeated and salacious stories have not been proven. In other words, the common knowledge of a high university conspir- acy and the NCAA sanctions are based on nothing more than gossip, and that is a shame and a scandal in and of itself.

As mortified as I am about the terri- ble things Jerry Sandusky is convicted of doing, I am also disappointed in the way that the rest of this story is being told. Rushing to judgment does not make for justice, and we should all know better. Our Jewish tradition teaches that relying on premature conclusions and gossip is not just — that this kind of behavior is unfair and sinful. I believe that many people in the media, in the NCAA and in the public are guilty of these sins this year. For the sin of believing gossip, for the sin of repeating it, and for the sin of rush- ing to judgment, many of us have some teshuvah, repentance, to do.

David E. Ostrich is rabbi of Congregation Brit Shalom in State College, Pa.

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  • W 22 ReSoluTioNS PAge 7

    • 18. Dance more. So you’re not exactly

Mikhail Baryshnikov or J. Lo. Well,

chances are neither is that guy next to you on the dance floor at the club or dancing the hora alongside you.

  • 19. Find joy in every season — even

winter. Yes, we have two seasons: Rain and summer. But revel in each of them — whether you’re seven years old or seven at

heart. In the fall, jump in a pile of leaves. When it’s cold, make a snow angel. Mean- der through the rain without an umbrella in the spring. And, next July, jump into a lake.

  • 20. Be more Zen. I’m a work in progress on

this one. Your friend is 11 minutes late for your coffee date. The forecast calls for storms

on your wedding day. Your daughter just drew a picture of the dog with a Sharpie on

the coffee table — rather than on her plenti- ful construction paper. Don’t freak out about things beyond your control. Okay, maybe freak out a little about the Sharpie stain.

  • 21. Do something a little scary. No, not

necessarily bungee jumping. My mom would kill me — and she’d probably kill you,

too. But get out of your comfort zone and do something new that seems easier not to do.

  • 22. Turn your phone off every once in a

while. Wouldn’t it be nice, every so often — maybe on Shabbat — to not text, not email, not status update, and not tweet — to just be?

This column originally appeared in JUF News, Chicago.

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friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

rosh hashanah gree T ings

17

More High Holiday services

The following congregations were not included in our last issue’s listings of synagogues and organizations holding High Holiday services this year. You can find all of our listings online at www.jtnews.net/holidays5773.

Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County

  • 3437 Libby Rd. NE, Olympia

Erev Yom Kippur: Mincha-Hatarat Nedarim: 3 p.m. Kal

Yom Kippur: Shacharit: 9:30 a.m. Yizkor: 11:30 a.m.

The Kavana Cooperative

19626 76th Ave. W, Suite B, Lynnwood Warm, friendly, traditional, and open to all. Free of charge,

Contact: Lowell Cordas at slcordas@yahoo.com Erev Rosh Hashanah: 7:30 p.m.

Nidre: 6:30 p.m. followed by Arvit. Light candles at 6:41 p.m.

Mincha: 5 p.m. Fast ends: 7:41 p.m.

regardless of background or affiliation. Membership is not

Rosh Hashanah First Day: 9 a.m.

Yom Kippur: Shacharit: 8:30 a.m. Sermon: 12 p.m. Presi-

Queen Anne, Seattle (location details sent upon registration)

required to join and there are no prerequisites. All prayers

Rosh Hashanah Second Day: 9 a.m.

dent’s message: 5 p.m. Neilah: 6:30 p.m. followed by

For complete details, visit kavana.org. Please register

will combine the original Hebrew and translated English. Contact: 425-640-2811 or Rabbi@JewishSnohomish.com or

Erev Yom Kippur: 6:30 p.m. Yom Kippur: 9:30 a.m.

Arvit. Fast ends: 7:43 p.m.

directly through the online registration system.

www.JewishSnohomish.com

Eastside Torah Center

X PAge 21

Erev Rosh Hashanah: 7 p.m.

Congregation Ezra Bessaroth

1837 156th Ave. NE #303, Bellevue

Rosh Hashanah First Day: Morning services: 10 a.m.

  • 5217 S Brandon St., Seattle

Warm and inviting community. Traditional and contempo-

New Year Greetings!

 

Shofar: 11:30 a.m. Community kiddush following the

Rosh Hashanah Second Day: Morning services:

Modern Orthodox services in the tradition of the Jews from

rary services and multi-lingual prayer books. No tickets or

Contact: Rabbi Mordechai Farkash at 425-957-7860

service.

the Island of Rhodes. Contact: 206-722-5500

reservations needed. No charge — everyone is welcome.

 
service. the Island of Rhodes. Contact: 206-722-5500 reservations needed. No charge — everyone is welcome.
 

10 a.m. Shofar: 11:30 a.m. Holiday ends: 8:01 p.m.

Erev Rosh Hashanah: Mincha: 6 p.m. followed by Arvit

Erev Rosh Hashanah: 7 p.m.

college

 

Erev Yom Kippur: Fast begins: 6:42 p.m. Kol Nidre: 6:45

Rosh Hashanah First Day: Shacharit: 8 a.m. Sermon and

Rosh Hashanah First Day: Shacharit: 9:30 a.m. Shofar:

p.m.

shofar: 10:30 a.m. Mincha and Tashlich: 6 p.m. fol-

11:30 a.m. Mincha followed by Tashlich: 6:15 p.m.

placement

Yom Kippur: Morning services: 10 a.m. Yizkor: 11:15 a.m.

lowed by Arvit. Light candles after 7:46 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Second Day: Shacharit: 9:30 a.m. Shofar:

consultants

Mincha and Ne’ilah: 5:45 p.m. Fast ends and shofar

Rosh Hashanah Second Day: Shacharit: 8 a.m. Sermon and

11:30 a.m. Mincha: 7 p.m.

Expert help with

blowing: 7:44 p.m. Break-fast to follow.

shofar: 10:30 a.m. Mincha: 6 p.m. followed by Arvit.

Erev Yom Kippur: Mincha: 3 p.m. Kol Nidre and Arvit:

undergraduate and graduate

Congregation B’nai Torah

Holiday ends at 7:44 p.m.

6:45 p.m.

university selection, applications

 

and essays.

   
 

425-453-1730

 
 

Pauline B. Reiter, Ph.D.

   

preiter@qwest.net

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JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

The High Holidays in Jewish cinema

JoeL rosenberG JnS.org

When cinema was still in its youth, Hollywood built a story around the High Holidays. Its tale was a measure of Jew- ry’s ties to tradition, but also a gentle sign of its loss. In “The Jazz Singer” (1927), Ameri- ca’s first feature-length sound film, Jakie Rabinowitz is a cantor’s son whose father expects him to follow tradition and stand by his side in the synagogue to chant Kol Nidre, the prayer that opens the erev Yom Kippur service. But as the eve of the hol- iday approaches, the father is told that 12-year-old Jakie is singing in a saloon. The cantor angrily fetches him home and gives him a thrashing. Jakie vows to leave home for good. As the father chants Kol Nidre at shul, the son takes to the streets and embarks on a life singing jazz. Years later, his career on the rise, his name now changed to Jack Robin (played here by the great Al Jolson, whose life had inspired the story), he visits his parents on his papa’s 60th birthday, announces he’ll soon be starring on Broadway, and hopes to make peace with his folks. Jack’s mama welcomes him back eagerly, but the father orders him to leave. Soon after, the cantor grows ill and hovers between life and death. Jack’s mother appears at the Broadway rehearsals and begs him to sing Kol Nidre in place of his father. But Yom

Kippur is also the show’s opening night. The film constructs a virtual morality play around this dilemma. I won’t tell you the outcome, except

to say that the film would be incomplete without a Jolson version of Kol Nidre. Or at least it sounds like Kol Nidre — but in Jolson’s han- dling, the Aramaic-language lines are radically abridged and repeated, over and over, in a reverie of improvi - sation. In effect, it’s Kol Nidre as jazz. The film here subtly portrays the passing of tradition into a creatively eroded form, symbolic of what New World Jews have done with the old.

named named Chanan makes his way to Brinitz, Sender’s town, where, as a Sabbath

guest at Sender’s, he instantly falls in love with Sender’s daughter Leah, who loves him in return. The father, unaware that Chanan is the son of his long-departed

friend, is determined to betroth Leah to the richest suitor he can find. Desperate to win Leah’s hand, Chanan immerses himself in kabbal- istic magic so he can conjure up barrels of gold. Intensely ascetic, Chanan grows ever more unbal - anced, and when Leah’s engagement to a rich man’s son is announced, he calls

on Satan for help, then keels

18 rosh hashanah gree T ings JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep

In 1937, Jews in Poland did a film version of S. An- sky’s acclaimed Yiddish

“al JolSon – a BiograPhy,” 1916.

Al Jolson, star of “The Jazz

Singer.”

over and dies. When Leah

is later about to be married,

she becomes possessed by her dead lover’s spirit. Her father then takes her to Miropolye, where he petitions the Rebbe to exorcise the way- ward soul. The film, one of the last great cultural products of Polish Jewry, is a rich portrait of pre-modern Jewish life and custom. Unlike the play, it opens with an impas- sioned table sermon by the Rebbe on the youthful days of the fathers-to-be. The

play, “The Dybbuk.” In the film, two Hassidic Jews, Sender and Nisan, are longtime friends who meet up only infrequently during holiday pilgrimages to the Rebbe of Miropolye. One such time, they pledge their yet-unborn children in marriage. Soon after, Nisan is drowned and Sender, preoccupied with money, for- gets his promise to his friend. Years later, an impoverished scholar

sermon deals with the Yom Kippur minis- trations of the high priest in ancient times — if an impure thought were to enter his mind in the Holy of Holies, “the entire world would be destroyed.” The Rebbe compares this to the precarious journey of some unfortunate souls, who pass through several lifetimes (these Jews believed in reincarnation) in striving toward their source, the Throne of Glory — only to be cast down, just as they reach celes- tial heights. As this point in the Rebbe’s sermon, Sender and Nisan inopportunely try to inform him of their pact. When, a generation later, Chanan fan- tasizes a union with his beloved Leah, he refers to it as “the Holy of Holies.” In ret- rospect, the Rebbe’s sermon becomes a prophecy of Chanan’s disastrous fall. But “The Dybbuk” never ceases to exalt the lovers’ bond, though the Rebbe and his court try their best to undo it. The holiest moment of Yom Kippur, though fraught with catastrophe, remains a symbol for the resistance of these lovers to a world enslaved by money and class. A third film, Barry Levinson’s “Liberty Heights” (1999), is a nostalgic comedy about growing up Jewish in 1950s Balti- more. It both opens and closes on Rosh Hashanah, when the Kurtzman family customarily attends synagogue. Nate

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Caddy for a spiffy new one, which he can afford — not from fading prof - its of the burlesque house he owns but because of his thriv- ing illegal numbers racket. Nate is other- wise a solid citizen, a devoted husband and father, who has raised himself up from humble ori - gins, and had often,

A scene from “The Dybbuk.”

Kurtzman (Joe Mantegna) has his own New Year custom of exiting early from shul to stroll to the nearby Cadillac show- room, where the coming year’s models are on display. Each year, Nate trades in his

in his youth, proven himself a scrappy street fighter against neighborhood anti- Semites. Most of the film deals with the adventures of Nate’s sons, Van and Ben (Adrien Brody and Ben Foster) and their relations with gentile girls — Van’s pur-

suit of a beautiful, old-money debutante named Dubbie, whom he met at a party; and Ben’s friendship with Sylvia, a black classmate. Levinson’s framing the story inside the Jewish New Year and Nate’s Cadil- lac ritual is important. The Kurtzmans are nominally observant Jews — perhaps even Orthodox, but in a laid-back, assimi- lated way. Though Nate’s wife shows rem- nants of clannishness, the Kurtzmans are open to the winds of change. While both the New Year and the “new car year” are equally important to Nate, their overlap seems a portrait of the tradition’s loos- ening grip since the days of “The Jazz Singer.” Even “The Dybbuk,” flawless as its command of pre-modern tradition had been, was the creation of Jewish moderns:

Playwright Ansky had been a secularist and socialist revolutionary, folklorist, and

humanitarian activist. The film’s creators were immersed in avant-garde theater and Expressionist idioms, and director Mihał Waszyński was a gay man who had left behind his Orthodox background and pretended he knew no Yiddish. But what unites these three films is not just their deep awareness (hidden in “The Dybbuk”) of the secular world, but also their willing- ness to invoke tradition as a yardstick. The High Holidays might be a site of fading cultural memory, but the theme still strikes a responsive chord among filmgo- ers, Jewish and gentile alike.

Joel Rosenberg teaches film and Judaic

studies at Tufts University. His articles on the

cinema of Jewish experience have appeared in various journals and collections, and he has recently completed a book, “Crisis in Disguise:

Some Cinema of Jewish Experience from the Era of Catastrophe (1914-47).”

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The sweet rewards of Rosh Hashanah rituals

sharon duKe estroff Special to JTnews

The change was subtle but undeniable. Carrots cut lengthwise rather than sliced; some scattered sprigs of rosemary. Any other day of the year, such a discrete rift in recipe might have gone unnoticed. But this was not any other day of the year — this was Rosh Hashanah. “What’s up with the brisket, Grandma?” my preteen son asked, echoing my suspi- cions that Bubbe’s famous brisket — the eternal pillar of my family’s High Holi- day feasts — had undergone an unprece- dented facelift. “I thought I’d try something a little dif- ferent this year,” answered my mother (who had recently been possessed by Rachael Ray of the Food Network). “But I like the old brisket,” said my younger son. “Me, too!” agreed my daughter. “Oh, no. Not the brisket!” added the eldest of my grumbling foursome. “Shh, I’m sure it’s delicious,” I said, trying to mask my own disappointment in the demise of the dish of honor. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not that my kids and I didn’t appreciate the wonder- ful meal my mother had prepared. (We did.) And it’s not that the updated version of Bubbe’s famous recipe wasn’t a legiti-

mate improvement over the original. (It was.) It’s just that it didn’t matter whether Rachael Ray herself had prepared that brisket — it wasn’t about taste at all. In fact, prior to that particular evening, my children had scarcely given our tra- ditional Rosh Hashanah brisket a second thought. It was not until it went MIA — and was suddenly replaced with a swankier roast — that my kids came to appreciate its significance in their lives. Please, you may be thinking. How can you possibly suggest that a brisket could have a significant impact on someone’s life? But it wasn’t just any old brisket; it was Bubbe’s famous brisket. The same unwaver- ing recipe that had accompanied my family’s Jewish New Year for as long as my children could remember — for as long as I could remember. In the predictable presence of Bubbe’s brisket on our Rosh Hashanah table, my children found steady ground; a sturdy link between their past, present and future; and a safety net woven out of knowing where they have been and where they are going. No, I’m not being melodramatic. Oodles of experts believe that it is in the simple repetitions of life — not in the grand black-tie affairs — that our children find the stability and continuity they need

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rosh hashanah gree T ings

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to thrive in an unpredictable world. That it is ritual and tradition — not kiddie stress management seminars or pintsized yoga classes — that build a vital sense of emo- tional security in our kids. Of course, if you asked Tevye the milk- man, the power of tradition is not breaking news. Yet, in our rocket-paced, technol- ogy-based, achievement-driven, media-rid- den society, the presence of family rituals in our children’s lives may be more integral to their emotional well being than ever before. Fortunately, Jewish life is positively bursting at the seams with ritual oppor- tunity for parents: Lighting the Hanuk- kah candles, welcoming Elijah to our seder table, eating challah on Shabbat — all these experiences fill our children’s lives with spirituality, security and predictability. Yet the defining rituals of the Jewish New Year play an especially vital role in our children’s overall well being, as they also carry mean- ingful symbolism and essential life lessons. What follows are a few of our rich Rosh Hashanah traditions and the ways they strengthen and prepare our children for the coming year — and far beyond. To help ensure your family enjoys all the sweet rewards of the Jewish New Year (while simultaneously taking advantage of the bountiful benefits of family ritu- als), here are some out-of-the-box, ripe- for-the-picking Rosh Hashanah traditions:

1. Visit a paint-it-yourself ceramic shop, and decorate kiddush cups, apple plates or honey bowls together.

  • 2. Put together baskets of apples, honey,

raisins and other sweet treats, and deliver

them as a family to a hospital or nursing home.

  • 3. Give the world a birthday present by

planting a tree. (You’ll have a whole Rosh

Hashanah grove before long!)

  • 4. Let your kids design your Rosh Hasha-

nah tablecloths, placemats and challah

covers using fabric crayons or markers.

  • 5. Take a Rosh Hashanah family nature

hike. Sit down in a shady spot and have

everyone share what he or she appreciates about one another.

  • 6. Go apple picking. Use your haul to make

Rosh Hashanah apple cakes, kugels and

other goodies.

  • 7. Have a shofar-blowing showdown.

  • 8. Gather family pictures from the past

year, and work together to create a “year-

in-review” collage.

  • 9. After lighting the Rosh Hashanah can-

dles, join hands and let everyone share hopes and dreams for the coming year. 10. Leave chocolate on your children’s pil- lows before every Rosh Hashanah along with a note wishing them a sweet New Year.

Sharon Duke Estroff is an award-winning

educator and author of “Can I Have a Cell Phone for Hanukkah?” (Random House). Her parenting articles appear in over 100 publications including Parents, Good

Housekeeping, Woman’s Day, Huffington Post

and the Jerusalem Post. Her four children give

her an endless supply of parenting fodder.

  • W HigH HoliDAY SeRViCeS PAge 17

Contact: info@kavana.org

Erev Rosh Hashanah: 5:30 p.m. Rosh Hashanah First Day: Family service led by Rabbi Rachel Nussbaum, followed by theme-based activities: 9 a.m.

Morning services: 10 a.m. Tashlich ceremony and BYO

picnic lunch: 2 p.m. Rosh Hashanah Second Day: 9 a.m. Erev Yom Kippur: Lighting of memorial candles in honor of deceased relatives. Kol Nidre on cello, followed by

prayer services: 6:15 p.m. Yom Kippur: Family service led by Rabbi Rachel Nussbaum followed by theme-based activities: 9 a.m. Yom Kippur

morning services (with Yizkor in the early afternoon):

10 a.m. Book of Jonah study/discussion: 4:15 p.m. Neilah (closing) service: 6 p.m. Final shofar blast: 7:36 p.m. Break-fast meal: 7:40 p.m.

Temple Beth Am

2632 NE 80th St., Seattle For information about tickets, security and special needs, visit www.templebetham.org/worship/ holidays/high_holy_days

Contact: 206-525-0915 Erev Rosh Hashanah: Last names starting A-K: Early (green ticket): 6:30 p.m. Last names starting L-Z: Late (blue ticket): 8 p.m. Rosh Hashanah: Last names starting A-K: Early (green ticket): 8:30 a.m. Last names starting L-Z: Late (blue

ticket): 11:45 a.m. Children’s service (6 and under):

2:45 p.m. (no tickets needed) Tashlich at Matthews

Beach Park: 4 p.m. (no tickets needed) Kol Nidre: Last names starting L-Z: Early (blue ticket): 6:30 p.m. Last names starting A-K: Late (green ticket):

8:30 p.m. Yom Kippur: Last names starting L-Z: Early (blue ticket):

8:30 a.m. Last names starting A-K: Late (green ticket):

11:45 a.m. Beit Midrash I: 10–11:30 a.m. Healing Service: 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Teen Service: 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Beit Midrash II: 12–2 p.m. Discussion:

2:30–3:30 p.m. Children’s service (6 and under): 2:45–

3:30 p.m. Afternoon, memorial, concluding services:

3:45 p.m. Break-the-fast: 7 p.m.

Temple Beth El

5975 S 12th St., Tacoma The fee for an adult pass is $300 and includes seating at services where passes are required. There is a $500 fee for

a family of two adults and dependent children over 6 years

of age to attend those services. Children under 6 years old may be in childcare (register online). If you will only be attending services on one of the High Holy Days, the cost is one-half the amount stated. No one will be turned away because of need. Contact: 253-564-7101 or www.templebethel18.org/high- holy-days/join-us Erev Rosh Hashanah: 8 p.m. Pass required. Family ser- vice: 5 p.m. Rosh Hashanah First Day: 10 a.m. Pass required.

Tashlich: 1 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Second Day: 10 a.m. Kol Nidre: 8 p.m. Pass required. Family service: 5 p.m.

Yom Kippur: 10 a.m. Pass required. Family service: 1 p.m.

Study session: 2 p.m. Afternoon service: 3 p.m. Yizkor/

Neilah: 4:30 p.m. Break-fast hosted by the Sisterhood will follow services.

happy

new

year

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Keeping our word, improving the world

dasee berKowitz JTa World news Service

NEW YORK (JTA) — Children begin- ning to acquire language face some amus- ing obstacles. Confusing basic words is one of them. My son, for example, loved to stretch out his arms and tell me about something that was the biggest or the best “in the whole wide word.” My heart smiled every time. There was something telling in his mis- take. Jewish tradition is no stranger to the link between words and the world. Words have great power. We recite each morn- ing in the liturgy, “Blessed is the One who spoke and the world came into being.” Words are more than signs. They have the ability to create. They are intrinsically holy. As S. Ansky relates in “The Dybbuk,” “every word that a man speaks with sin- cerity is the Name of the Lord.” For children, words describe what is

concrete around them (“book,” “banana,” “car”) and communicate their most basic needs (“water,” “pee”). As adults, our relationship with words grows much more complex. We use words to build relationships (“I love you”) and to break them down (“You’re fired”). We use them to direct people, manage situa- tions, reflect and pray. We also use words to chart our future behavior. We make promises and vows (“neder” in Hebrew). Rabbi Jonathan Sacks comments on the meaning of a neder: “When we bind our- selves by words, we are using language not to describe but to create — to create an orderly future out of the chaos of human instincts and desires.” No one knows this more than someone who is trying to stop some addictive behav- ior and makes a vow (“I will eat less sugar, I will stop smoking”), or who wants to

create reliable work habits (“I will get that report to you on time”) or build a relation- ship with others (“I will marry you”). Our promises to ourselves and to others guide our behavior and can shape our future. Sacks continues, “What is unique to humans is that we use language to bind our own future behavior so that we can form with other human beings bonds of mutuality and trust.” The care with which we choose our words is at the core of building relationships, family lives, communities and a just society. When we speak, our words can be relied upon. When we promise to do something, others know we will follow through. But even with our best intentions, we fall short in many ways. Yom Kippur is our time to reflect on the year that has passed and all the ways we wished we could fulfill the promises

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and nedarim we made. One of the central aspects of the Yom Kippur liturgy is the confessional prayer, or vidui. In a chant audible only to ourselves, we beat our chest and recite a litany of mis- steps that begin, “We sinned before you.” Hardly an exhaustive list, it represents the whole alphabet of sins (it starts with aleph and ends with tav). It is striking how many times sins related to speech appear. “We have sinned against you through idle chatter, the way we talk, foul speech, foolish talk, gossip, speaking ill of others, everyday conversation,” and the list goes on. The sheer number of sins on the list calling us to consider our speech confronts us to recognize that our talk is cheap. Far from holiness, we use our words to fill the silence at best and malign people at worst. Once sensitized to our overall use of speech, we can go a step deeper and con- sider another transgression mentioned in the confessional prayer: “We have sinned against you through empty promises.” Time and again we have said that we will do something and don’t follow through. Slowly, these empty promises erode trust that binds people and commu- nities together. I have a personal practice every High Holidays season. Instead of sinking into the feeling of “where to begin” with the project of self-improvement presented by the High Holidays, I start small by pick- ing one character flaw and focusing on correcting it. One year it was my strug- gle with being late, so being on time was my focus. Another year I felt like my

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rosh hashanah gree T ings

23

friendships were fading into the back - ground of my recent marriage, so I focused on investing more energy into friendships. Last year, aware that there were many things I did not complete, my vow was to “keep my word.” It was an amazing expe- rience. I learned to measure my words. I wasn’t the first to volunteer for projects I knew I couldn’t complete. And the ones to which I did commit, I was devoted to the end. By becoming more conscious about

keeping my word, I worked to make my world a little bit more reliable. Maybe my son, in his innocent confu- sion, was onto something when he mis- took “word” for “world.” By keeping our word, we keep our world together. This Yom Kippur, let us be more con- scious of our words, their intrinsic holi- ness and their powerful potential to create a better world.

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T he ar T s

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

A mystery of biblical proportions

emiLy K. aLhadeff associate editor, JTnews

Occasionally, a book comes out that changes history. One of these books is the Aleppo Codex, the Hebrew Bible manu- script that has survived a millennium and several perilous journeys. Another is “The Aleppo Codex: A True Story of Obses- sion, Faith, and the Pursuit of an Ancient Bible,” by Canadian-Israeli journalist Matti Friedman (Algonquin, $24.95). In or around the 10th century CE, a scribe in Tiberias named Shlomo Ben- Buya’a completed an authoritative ver- sion of the Hebrew Bible — the five books of the Torah, the prophets and writings. Written on folios of animal hide, rather than as a scroll, this Bible was not meant for religious purposes. By the time Ben-Buya’a set his tree-gall, iron-sulfate, black-soot ink to the page, the Jewish people had been dispersed for about 1,000 years and lived in indepen- dent communities, most of which were now under Islamic rule. Like Jewish com- munities across the world today, they read from the Torah throughout the week and relied upon it for religious guidance. But the Torah wasn’t written in stone, and the need arose for an accurate Bible with cod- ified spellings and pronunciations that Jewish communities could refer to with- out differentiation. This version became known as the codex, or the Crown.

The Crown lived intact for 1,000 years, managing to escape, unscathed, attacks by the Seljuk Turks, the Crusaders, the Mongols, and a devastating earthquake. It was ransomed along with human lives and traveled from Tiberius to Jerusalem to Cairo, making its final stop in Aleppo, Syria. The ancient community of Aleppo Jews guarded the Crown in a safe in a grotto in the bowels of the main syna- gogue. They revered it, even believing it harbored protective powers. So, how, after a millennium of survival in death-defying conditions, sometime after 1947, did nearly half of the pages of the Crown of Aleppo get lost? This is the story Friedman is here to tell. It’s a story others have tried to tell, and failed. Friedman, who currently writes for the Times of Israel and has specialized in religion, archaeology and politics in the Middle East, is a master storyteller. He weaves through a millennium of history with the ease of a seasoned time traveler, starting in 1947 Flushing Meadow, N.Y. From there it’s to Aleppo and a zigzag to Crusader-sacked Jerusalem, 1940s Syria, 12th-century Egypt, and 1950s Israel, coming up for air periodically at the pres- ent day, where he holds scraps of history that crumble to dust in his hands.

24 T he ar T s JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep

The popular story goes like this: When news of the vote to establish a Jewish state hit the Arab world, mobs looted and burned down synagogues and Jewish businesses, and in Aleppo they dragged the codex from its safe and burned it. After the dust settled, Jewish com- munity members collected the scraps of parchment and saved what they could; other fragments disappeared with indi- viduals, later to turn up in people’s homes and wallets in New York, where they were cherished as talismans. Rumor had it the codex was lost. In time, however, it resur- faced almost entirely intact. After much pressure and one botched operation, the Aleppo Codex was smuggled into Israel in 1958 and entrusted to the Ben-Zvi Institute in Jerusalem. The book’s story of survival, rescue and return would seem to be no less miraculous than the Jewish people’s itself. Today the codex lives inside a secret vault at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. But the manuscript that reportedly left Syria complete is now missing almost half of its story: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Eccle- siastes, Lamentations, Esther, Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah and most of Deuteron-

omy, Amos and Song of Songs are gone. Friedman stumbled upon the Crown in 2008 while working on an article for the Associated Press. He was intrigued by its virtual ano- nymity. How was it that hardly anything was known about this epic work, which came to dictate the Bible’s pronunciation and cantillation for the future of Judaism, and about the 40 percent of it — includ- ing almost the entire Torah — that disap- peared? But as he started investigating the deeper questions about the book’s missing sections, his leads went cold, and his con- tacts stopped returning his calls. Friedman found himself in the Aleppo Codex Underground, with a cast of char- acters chasing the same elusive goal: The missing pages. “Listen,” Ezra Kassin, amateur Crown sleuth and Aleppo émigré to Israel, says to Friedman in the book’s introduction, “you’re entering a minefield.” “I nodded, pretending I knew what he meant,” writes Friedman. “He shook his head. I had no idea.” The Aleppo Codex, as it turns out,

X PAge 33

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Cordially invites you to attend the

2012 No Place for Hate Luncheon

T he Anti-Defamation League Cordially invites you to attend the 2012 No Place for Hate Luncheon

Monday, October 22, 2012

Monday, October 22, 2012 12:00-1: 30 PM

12:00-1:

Monday, October 22, 2012 12:00-1: 30 PM

30 PM

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Seattle Sheraton What will it take to make our community no place for hate ? Nicholas

What will it take to make our community no place for hate?

Seattle Sheraton What will it take to make our community no place for hate ? Nicholas
Nicholas Metz Keynote Speaker Minimum donation of $150 Kindly RSVP by Oct 12th to: Deputy Chief
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Minimum donation of $150
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Deputy Chief of Police
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or
(206) 448-5349 x 5

friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2 . www. JT news.neT . JT n ews

25

OCTOBER 29TH - ROGERS ARENA, VANCOUVER TICKETS ON SALE NOW Tickets are available at LiveNation.com, all
OCTOBER 29TH - ROGERS ARENA, VANCOUVER
TICKETS ON SALE NOW
Tickets are available at LiveNation.com, all Tickemaster outlets or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000.
PRESENTED BY LIVE NATION GLOBAL TOURING AND S2BN ENTERTAINMENT

26

T he ar T s

JT n ews . www. JT news.neT . friday, sep T ember 14 , 201 2

Mark Bittman, “The Future of Food” Wednesday, September 19 at 7:30 p.m. Lecture Mark Bittman has
Mark Bittman, “The Future of Food”
Wednesday, September 19 at 7:30 p.m.
Lecture
Mark Bittman has been a journalist for over 40 years and
a professional food writer since 1980. In 1987, he became
the senior writer and later editor of “Cooks Illustrated,”
and in 1990 began writing for the New York Times with
his weekly column, “The Minimalist.” He now blogs for the
NYT’s online column “Opinionator” and has authored sev-
eral books, including “How to Cook Everything” (1998),
“The Food Matters Cookbook” (2010), and “How to Cook Everything, The Basics:
All You Need to Make Great Food” (2012). His discussion, titled “The Future of
Food,” will deal with the intersection of food, politics, the environment, and
personal health.
At Benaroya Hall, S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium, 200 University St., Se-
attle. Tickets are $15/$30 for general admission and can be purchased at www.
lectures.org.
 

AJC SEATTLE REGIONAL OFFICE

2012 Advocacy & Impact

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2—SAVE THE DATE

AJC Annual Advocacy In Action Community Reception and Campaign Event Energy Security and Independence 6:00pm – 8:00pm Reception & Panel Discussion Learn How We Can Collectively Make An Impact

 

David Harris, AJC Executive Director

Michael Granoff, Founder of Maniv Energy Capital / Head of Oil Independence Policies for Better Place

For more information contact: chandlerb@ajc.org or 206.622.6315 or www.ajcseattle.org

AJC SEATTLE REGIONAL OFFICE 2012 Advocacy & Impact SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2—SAVE THE DATE AJC Annual Advocacy
AJC SEATTLE REGIONAL OFFICE 2012 Advocacy & Impact SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2—SAVE THE DATE AJC Annual Advocacy
AJC SEATTLE REGIONAL OFFICE 2012 Advocacy & Impact SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2—SAVE THE DATE AJC Annual Advocacy
 

Seattle

ISSAQUAH Nov 7- Dec 30, 2012 Jan 4-27, 2013 I ssaquah verett : (425) 257-8600 www.VillageTheatre.org
ISSAQUAH
Nov 7- Dec 30, 2012
Jan 4-27, 2013
I ssaquah verett : (425) 257-8600
www.VillageTheatre.org
Monday, September 24 at 6 p.m. Ira Shapiro: “The Last Great Senate” Lecture Many argue that
Monday, September 24 at 6 p.m.
Ira Shapiro: “The Last Great Senate”
Lecture
Many argue that the U.S. Senate has lost its way. “It’s a far
cry from the Senate of the 1960s and ’70s,” says politi-
cal insider Ira Shapiro, of a time when representatives
reached across the aisle to pass “Great Society” legisla-
tion and the Civil Rights Act, debate the Vietnam War, and
hold President Nixon accountable for Watergate. Shapiro,
author of “The Last Great Senate,” documents those years,
offering inspiration for a return to these so-called glory days. Presented as part
of the Town Hall Civic series, with Elliott Bay Book Company.
At Town Hall, 1119 8th Ave., Seattle (enter on Seneca Street). Tickets are $5 at
townhallseattle.org or 888-377-4510 or at the door beginning at 5:30 p.m., and
also gain entry to David Domke and Christopher Parker discussing “President
Obama, the Tea Party, and Racism,” at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, September 28 at 8 p.m. Michael Chabon: “Telegraph Avenue” Author reading Literature lovers, it’s time
Friday, September 28 at 8 p.m.
Michael Chabon: “Telegraph Avenue”
Author reading
Literature lovers, it’s time to salivate. Michael Chabon’s got
a new book out. As part of The Stranger’s “Verse Chapter
Verse” series, the popular author will speak about his new
novel, “Telegraph Avenue.” Reviews are coming fast and
furious, and for good reason: This buddy story about two
longtime friends and co-proprietors of a failing record store
shows off Chabon’s mastery of language not in the dank,
dusty offices of mid-century Manhattan or the imagined Jewish homeland of
Sitka, Alaska, but in the context of his own neighborhood, the quickly gentrifying
subduction zone between Oakland and Berkeley. We’ve waited five years for this.
It’s about time. At Fred Wildlife Refuge, 127 Boylston Ave., Seattle. Free.
15th Season • Mina Miller, Artistic Director LOVE LOVE Klezmer? Klezmer? ADORE ADORE Klezmer & Chocolate
15th Season • Mina Miller, Artistic Director
LOVE
LOVE Klezmer?
Klezmer?
ADORE
ADORE
Klezmer & Chocolate
Chocolate?
Chocolate?
“played heroically by Seattle
“played heroically by Seattle
clarinet clarinet goddess goddess Laura Laura DeLuca” DeLuca”
–(John –(John Sutherland, Sutherland, Seattle Seattle Times) Times)
a fundraiser for Music
of Remembrance
Make plans for a night unlike any
6:30 p.m., Sunday,
October 7
other, at Theo Chocolate Factory. This
fundraiser for Music of Remembrance
Theo Chocolate Factory
features performances by Seattle’s
“clarinet goddess” Laura DeLuca and
her klezmer band, with chocolate
3400 Phinney Ave N.
Seattle
tastings (orange, cherry and almond,
spicy chili, mint) courtesy of Theo.
Enjoy complimentary wine as well.
Space limited to just 75 klezmer-and-
chocolate lovers, so get your tickets
today!
Tickets: $50 in advance / $60 at the door • To order, call
(206) 365-7770 • Online: www.musicofremembrance.org
night
night
One only!
One only!
L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •
L’Shana Tova 5773
U-Metukah Tikateivu
May you be inscribed
for a good and
sweet year
• Mitzvot in the Community: During the
school’s Mitzvah Days, JDS students did
hands-on volunteer work for more than
a dozen local non-profit organizations;
the student-led Mitzvah Fair raised
money for organizations researched by
student teams and pitched to their peers;
and throughout the year, each grade
selected their own class mitzvah projects
and launched programs to support them
including craft and bake sales.
a special thanks to the
Jewish Federation of
Greater seattle
and the samis Foundation
for their ongoing support.
2012 JDs annual RepoRt Rosh hashanah is a time for personal introspection and prayer as well
2012 JDs annual RepoRt
Rosh hashanah is a time for personal introspection and prayer as well as celebration. At JDS, as we
review the past year, we are so grateful to the many people who have supported us in so many ways. This
support has enabled us to offer our unparalleled education to families from more than 30 zip codes, from
non-affiliated families to those from every branch of Judaism, helping JDS students learn to respect each
other’s differences and value our shared heritage, a true mark of a community school.
And community is what it is all about! We continue to receive calls from all over the country asking
how we were able to score such high marks from our parents on the value of the JDS community in a recent
national Jewish day school survey. If you live here, you feel it and breathe it each and every day. “Where study
leads to action” is experienced through our curriculum, through our mitzvah days sprinkled throughout the
year reminding all of us that we are responsible for one another, and through our amazing parent body that
sponsors: two Family Camps, Moms & Dads Night Out, Dads Pancake Breakfast, STEM Fair and grade level
Shabbat Dinners. JDS is a family experience open to all!
Most importantly, our children are immersed in our ever evolving, exceptional 21st century education
steeped in Jewish values which teaches that each child can make a difference. We are the only area school
providing an inquiry-based curriculum for children from Preschool through eighth grade; a program rich with
off-campus learning experiences; a global program of daily second language study with Israel and Jewish
learning woven throughout; academically rich in attending to each child’s unique gifts.
Such a school can only thrive with the support of this community. From parents to grandparents to
community donors; from our local support from family foundations and Samis and the Jewish Federation to
our national support from grants made by PEJE and others; we grow and build community because you believe
in us. We are grateful that as we approach the new year, we know that with your help we can go from strength

to strength. May we all be inscribed for a year of peace and prosperity and continuity of our great heritage.

With great appreciation for your support.

L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •
Maria Erlitz Head of School
Maria Erlitz
Head of School
L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •

Richard Galanti

President, Board of Trustees

L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •

JDS iS where StuDy leaDS to action.

L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •

2011 was an extraordinary year for action projects initiated by JDs students. at JDs, children

learn from an early age that tikkun olam and environmental responsibility are an essential part of

their Jewish worldview and as they grow, it is beautiful to see them marry their secular knowledge

— Rabbi stuart light, JDs assistant head of school

with the fulfillment of these Jewish ideals.

energy conservation, waste reduction program which recognizes excellence King County Green school • in Level 2
energy conservation, waste reduction
program which recognizes excellence
King County Green school
in
Level 2 status
level 2: JDS
Green School
and recycling.
in the King County
is proud to have earned
• eco-Friendly Cleaner: A grant from the King County Solid Waste Division helped JDS 6th graders

eco-Friendly Cleaner: A grant from the King County Solid Waste Division helped JDS 6th graders work in the science lab to develop, market and distribute their own non-toxic household spray cleaner.

JDs and the JFs Foodbank: JDS is pleased to be the site of JFS’ Eastside Foodbank for which students sort and distribute groceries to local Foodbank clients each month.

the JDS Middle School Mitzvah • Mitzvah in a Bag: Thanks to a grant families with
the JDS Middle School Mitzvah
• Mitzvah in a Bag: Thanks to a grant
families with snack bags to keep in the
to those in need.
Team launched
car and distribute
an initiative to provide
Jewish Federation of Greater
from the Seattle,
from the
Seattle,
L’Shana Tova 5773 U-Metukah Tikateivu May you be inscribed for a good and sweet year •
The Cape Family
The
Cape Family

Michele & Adam Kohorn linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Chris & dr. Marty lazoritz Cindy & Sandy levy Wiebke & rabbi Stuart* light roberta* & Ken lyon Barb & Chuck Maduell Patty Willner-Martin & neil Martin Angela & Jan Miksovsky Susan* & Tom Miller laurie Minsk & Jerry dunietz lisa & Ian Morris drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz Joshua & Erica nash Judy & nissim neuman Tina* & Michael novick Bill Powell & Eric Candell Judy lynn & ron rice Mimi rosen & nathan Goldberg Margaret & david rudin nina Saponova & daniel Ellis Amy Schottenstein & Justin Magaram ronnie & dr. ronald Spiegel Charlene & Greg Steinhauer Jodi & ryan Sternoff Stokes Auction Group, Inc. Alayne & Bobby Sulkin Masako Tamura & Eric Yap deb & Martin Wahl Toni & ronald Waldbaum lynn & The Hon. Anthony Wartnik devorah & ronald Weinstein Ina Willner Stacey Winston levitan & dan levitan Ilana Wodlinger

The Cape Family Michele & Adam Kohorn linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Chris & dr. Marty

JdS SPrinG 2012 auCtion triBute JournaL donorS

Anonymous david Ackert nance & Steve Adler Emily & Aaron Alhadeff Joe & Karen Barer Jill & Craig Beilinson Jennifer & Jeff Benoliel Maureen & Joel Benoliel ruth & dr. Aaron Bernstein Joann & Carl Bianco Beth Billington Warren Blatt Herb Bridge Celie & dr. Zane Brown dr. Keely Brown & david Berkman Melissa and Zane Brown, Jr. Janice & Marshall Brumer Jennie Burns rochelle romano & robert Bush Cindy and Earl Caditz Bonnie & robbie Cape Maureen & Michael Cape Marilyn & Chuck Caplan Pearl & Michael Caplan robin & Ben Castrogiovanni Isabella & norm Chapman laurie Minsk & Jerry dunietz Eastside Pediatric dental Group Susan & dr. lonnie Edelheit laura & Alexander Endel Carol Epstein

TrIBuTE FundS

2012 AnnuAl dInnEr And AuCTIon

Thank you to the crowd of more than 350 people who joined us at our 2012 Annual Gala and Auction

honoring Bonnie and Robbie Cape & Family. Together we raised over $450,000. JDS is grateful and

humbled by the wonderful outpouring of support at this event. The work at our school is inspired by

your contributions; your generosity is appreciated each and every day at JDS. Many thanks to our

auction co-chairs, Tamar Boden and Judy Lynn Rice and all of the amazing volunteers.

Andrea Selig & Joel Erlitz Sharon & dr. Chris Farac lela & Harley Franco Gail & Jackie Frank Marcia & Al Friedman Candace & daniel Friedman Jill & Chuck Friedman Michael Friend Barrie & richard Galanti Mindy & Adam Geisser deanna & Sydney Godel Joanne Godel & Warren Blatt Gina & dr. Marc Gonchar Suzanne & Barry Goren Judy & Jeff Greenstein Anne & Ed Harris dena & drew Herbolich Herzl-ner Tamid Conservative Congregation Kim & Shai Herzog Joanna & Gary Hill deb & Marc Kadish Martha Baker & Malcolm Katz Sandra & Alan Kipust Michele & Adam Kohorn linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Heather & Andrew lader Chris & dr. Marty lazoritz roberta & Ken lyon Edythe Misel Bea & Bruce nahon northwest Yeshiva High School nosh Away, Inc. Carol & Steve Paige Panera Bread-Bellevue Panera Bread-Issaquah Pioneer Venture Partners lucy & Herb Pruzan rdl Catering Emma Bartholomew & George reilly

Judy lynn & ron rice deborah & doug rosen Judith & norman rosenbloom Al Sanft Amy Schottenstein & Justin Magaram Cynthia Shumate & John Warnick Sue & Bob Solomon ronnie & dr. ronald Spiegel Kathleen & rob Spitzer Charlene & Gregory Steinhauer Stellar Women’s Fund, llC Stephanie Solomon Events Cindy & Bob Strauss Alayne and Bobby Sulkin david Tarica The lott Foundation diane & Stuart Triester ulTA deborah levinger & david Vaillancourt Priscilla Wayne devorah & ron Weinstein riva Zeff & Yaakov Medrash

JdS 2012 SPrinG auCtion Lead donorS

Callie & Andrew Abrahamowicz nance* & Steve Adler Anonymous (2) Karyn & Joe Barer lucy & Shai Bassli Jill & Craig Beilinson ruth & dr. Aaron Bernstein Joann & Carl Bianco Shoshana Bilavsky lauren & Harry Brown Celie & Zane Brown Melissa & Zane Brown, Jr. Janice & Marshall Brumer Bonnie & robbie Cape Sarah Castoriano & Jeff Sullivan

robin & Ben Castrogiovanni Isabella & norm Chapman Margaret* & derrick Chasan Julie* & david Chivo Susie & Steve Cohen risa* & Adam Coleman Myrna darland diane deFuria Susan & dr. lonnie Edelheit rene & dr. Antony Egnal Julie & larry Engel Maria* & dr. Marc Erlitz Sharon & dr. Chris Farac linda* & dr. Gary Feldman lela & Harley Franco Jill & Chuck Friedman richard Fruchter Karen & dave Fulmer Barrie & richard Galanti Mindy & Adam Geisser Peggy & Bruce Gladner Cindy & Hugh Gladner Kristina & Mike Gladstein Joanne & larry Glosser Elizabeth & Mario Goertzel Elinor & Jack Goldberg Marla & Martin Goldberg Meredith & Jay Goldstein Gina & dr. Marc Gonchar Bette Greenstein Judy & Jeff Greenstein Giselle & Harvey Greisman Pamela* Grossman & Scott Gerlach lori & Claudio Guincher dena & drew Herbolich Erica & dr. Eric Herman Harriet Katz z”l Mindy & russell Katz Sharon & Isaac Kellerman Pamela love-Koepf & Werner Keopf

herB & rita roSen

other

SChoLarShiP fund

In Appreciation of:

In memory of Paul Eisenberg

Mike Gardner’s work

Gail Eisenberg & Jacalyn Eisenberg

The JDS Finance Committee

The Cape Family Michele & Adam Kohorn linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Chris & dr. Marty

JDS is grateful to receive support from families and community

members who wish to recognize a life cycle event or send their

condolences through our Special Occasion Tribute Program.

Donations provide funding for various school programs and

professional development opportunities for our faculty and staff.

The Cape Family Michele & Adam Kohorn linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Chris & dr. Marty

eduCation fund

In memory of Samuel J Cowan

Helen Cowan

In honor of the 60th wedding anniversary

of ruth and dr. Aaron Bernstein

Bette Greenstein

In honor of Judy and norm

rosenbloom’s 50th Wedding anniversary

Susan & Ira Kadish

In honor of Ariana Auerbach’s high school graduation

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In memory of dale Behar

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In honor of Marc Erlitz’s speedy recovery

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In honor of rachael okrent’s high school graduation

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In memory of Harriet Katz

The Krisher Family

In memory of Stanley Erlitz

Renee & Eric Radman, Josh and Leora

endowment fund

In memory of Saul Shapiro

Steven Kahn’s support of the JdS auction

JoeL Starin teaCher

Heike & Edward Malakoff

deveLoPment fund

Michelle Younker

In memory of Melissa Fagin

Reba & Robert Bachrach

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In appreciation of rabbi light, Susan

in honor of

Miller & Holly Greenspoon’s generous spirit during 6th grade camping trip

The birth of Meital, Amy and Josh Adler’s daughter

Linda & Efrem Krisher

Chris & Dr. Marty Lazoritz

Janice & Marshall Brumer

Erica nash’s birthday

In honor of Mr. & Mrs. Mark &

In memory of Frances Altman, mother of

dr. richard Brodsky

Drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz

Sheryl Steifel’s 30th anniversary

Cindy levy & nancy Etsekson

Rivka & Jeffrey Klaff

Mrs. Erica nash, JdS PA Volunteer of

and their daughters’ graduations

Tina & Michael Novick

Mr. Benjamin Cape

the year

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In memory of Zane Brown’s mother,

Drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz

Jill & Chuck Friedman

Sonia Brown

Penny Cook’s birthday

Peggy & Bruce Gladner

faCuLty triBute fund

Tina & Michael Novick

Drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz

Shirly niemi’s daughter’s Wedding

In honor of Micha Vardy’s Wedding

Maria Erlitz

The JDS Sunshine Committee

The JDS Sunshine Committee

ronaLd & devorah weinStein

Joel Erlitz & Andrea Selig

dr. Cyrus rubin’s 90th birthday

fund for CuLturaL artS

Ben Friedman on his Bar Mitzvah

Alayne & Bobby Sulkin

PeGGy & BruCe GLadner hot

In honor of ronald and devorah

Lucas Schenck & Carla Bauman

Ms. Amy Schottenstein, President’s

LunCh fund

Weinstein’s 50th anniversary

danny Gladner on his Bar Mitzvah

Service Award

In memory of Peggy Gladner’s father,

Denise & Neil Weinstein

Priscilla & Steven Leytus

Jill & Chuck Friedman

Wayne dean

Jen & Craig Weinstein

Mrs. dena Herbolich, President’s Service

Tina & Michael Novick

Lee & Stuart Weinstein

Award

Peggy & Bruce Gladner Alayne and Bobby Sulkin

In honor of Sy danish’s birthday

Jill & Chuck Friedman

Jackie Kallay’s Birthday

Mrs. Michelle Younker’s complete

LiBrary fund

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Peggy & Bruce Gladner

recovery

In honor of Pattie Holt’s daughter’s wedding

In honor of Carolyn & Gary Weinstein’s 55th Wedding Anniversary

Alayne & Bobby Sulkin

Drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz in memory of Sarah Boden’s father, dave Goldberg Tamar & Alan
Drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz
in memory of
Sarah Boden’s father, dave Goldberg
Tamar & Alan Boden
Sonia Brown, grandmother of
Zane Brown, Jr.
Robin & Ben Castrogiovanni
Stanley Erlitz
Robin & Ben Castrogiovanni
Vicki Gillman, Jeff Gillman’s mother
JDS Sunshine Committee
Roberta & Ken Lyon
Joseph renna, david Auerbach’s stepfather JDS Sunshine Committee Joel Starin Joan Alexander
Joseph renna, david Auerbach’s
stepfather
JDS Sunshine Committee
Joel Starin
Joan Alexander

The JDS Sunshine Committee

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Julie Johnston

In honor of Mr. & Mrs. Stuart & lee

Mrs. linda Krisher

LuCy & herB Pruzan iSraeL

Weinstein

Peggy & Bruce Gladner

miSSion fund

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Ana and Ephraim light working at the

In honor of Tahlia Edgar-Chalker on her

In memory of Mr. Jack Benaroya

West Hollywood Food Coalition

Bat Mitzvah

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Wendy & Ivan Light

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In memory of leonard donin

rabbi Stuart light

In honor of richard Goldman on his

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Wendy & Ivan Light

Bar Mitzvah

In memory of Arva & Bernard Gray

rabbi Stuart light’s fantastic & creative

Linda & Efrem Krisher

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

programming

In honor of Ariel Simpson on her Bat Mitzvah

Linda & Efrem Krisher

In honor of rebecca Brown on her Bat

Mitzvah

Tina & Michael Novick

In honor of Ariel Simpson on her Bat Mitzvah Linda & Efrem Krisher In honor of

In memory of Joseph Stroum

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

In memory of dr. George Winston

Devorah & Ronald Weinstein

Lynn & Steve Katz

Mrs. Pamela love-Koepf, JdS PA Volunteer of the year

Jill & Chuck Friedman Peggy & Bruce Gladner

Suzanne Messinger earning the Maria

Erlitz Award in Education

Alayne & Bobby Sulkin

tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99

dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott Azose* Ann & Marc Bachrach Beverly & dr. Peter Blum Heather Boydell* lauren & Harry Brown dilia & Martin Cartagena* la Verne* and Jack Chen Penny & Tim Cook Cantor ray Edgar linda & lloyd Grossman Berthe & Stanley Habib Allie Hauser* Pattie Holt* Shannon* & J. Michael Jay rakhilya Khanatayeva & roman Khanatayev Arlen* & Ted levy Priscilla* & Steven leytus Henry Melgar* Suzanne Messinger* rebecca & robert Minsky linda* & Zlatko nalis Shirly niemi* The Quijada Family* Karen & david rosenzweig Shannon* & Gary rubin Jane* & Jason Shay Jodi & ryan Sternoff dr. doris Stiefel lisette Trombley* Kari Tondera* Helene Voron Priscilla Wayne* Farah & Jim Wiesen* Yaakov Medrash & riva Zeff Christy Zinn & Sean Krulewich diane Zipperman* & Carl Bloom rita* & Pinchas Zohav

AnnuAl Fund donor Honor roll

The Jewish Day School of Metropolitan Seattle excels because of the tremendous support our children receive

from JDS parents, faculty, staff and our community. Together we raised over $350,000 which included over

$17,000 in new and incremental gifts raised from the JDS Board of Trustees Matching Challenge. Thank you for

your generous contributions to the JDS Annual Fund which enriches the education our students receive at JDS.

The contributors listed below support academic programming that:

• Embraces 21st century learning that prepares students for today’s global interactive society

• Supports diversity and a commitment to Tikkun Olam

• Practices environmental stewardship on campus and beyond the classroom walls.

Shomrim L’Chaim/GuardianS of Life—PLatinum $10,000+

nevet Basker & Gabriel Scherzer Joann & Carl Bianco § Janice & Marshall Brumer § lela & Harley Franco § Barrie & richard Galanti § Gina & dr. Marc Gonchar § david Greenspoon Judy & Jeff Greenstein § Chris & dr. Marty lazoritz § Microsoft Corporation laurie Minsk & Jerry dunietz § Gretchen & robert rabinowitz The rita & Herbert rosen Family & Mimi rosen & nathan Goldberg Amy Schottenstein & Justin Magaram § Alayne & Bobby Sulkin §

Shomrim L’Chaim/GuardianS of Life —GoLd $5,000–$9,999

Boeing Company Melissa & Zane Brown, Jr. Isabella & norm Chapman § linda* & dr. Gary Feldman Jill & Chuck Friedman § Elizabeth & Mario Goertzel Sandra & Alan Kipust § Charlene & Gregory Steinhauer § Stacey Winston levitan & dan levitan

tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott
tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott
tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott

Shomrim L’Chaim/GuardianS of Life—SiLver $1,000–$4,999

Anonymous Pam* & david Auerbach Jacquie Bayley Bonnie & robbie Cape § robin & Ben Castrogiovanni § risa* & Adam Coleman Maria* & dr. Marc Erlitz Jacqueline & ron Estrin Marcia & Alfred Friedman lori & Claudio Guincher Holly Greenspoon Marilyn & Mike Grossman Foundation luminita & Mircea Gruia Martha Baker & Malcolm Katz Pamela love-Koepf & Werner Koepf Tova & lior Kohavi Yael & ron Kohavi Adam & Michele Kohorn § Wiebke & rabbi Stuart* light drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz lucy & Herbert Pruzan Judy lynn & ron rice Fran & Stan Schill Seattle Sephardic Brotherhood Seattle Foundation Andrea Selig & Joel Erlitz debbie & Andy Seres ronnie & dr. ronald Spiegel lisa & Andy Woods rabbi Elana Zaiman and Seth rosenbloom

Shomrim L’Chaim/GuardianS of Life—Bronze $500–$999

Amy* & Joshua Adler rene & dr. Antony Egnal Sharon & larry Finegold Anne & Ed Harris deb & Marc Kadish § linda* & Efrem Krisher Erica & Joshua nash deborah & Yuval Peres Holly & Craig reines Bernice Mossifer rind Ida & Chad Wicklund

madriChim/LeaderS— $100–$499

nance* & Steve Adler Irina & Yuriy Babadzhanov lucy & Shai Bassli ruth & dr. Aaron Bernstein Jennifer & Jeff Benoliel rebecca & Barry Bockow Margaret* & derrick Chasan Julie* & david Chivo rabbi Jody & rabbi Alan Cook Gail & Kevin l. Coskey Florence Katz Burstein & Paul Burstein Gail & Jackie Frank Jennifer & Mike Gardner* Mindy & Adam Geisser § Cindy & Hugh Gladner Carol & dr. Allen Gown Marguerite & Eddie Hasson Erica & dr. Eric Herman Kim & Shai Herzog Tracy Immel Martha & dan Javnozon

CAPITAl CAMPAIGn

tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott

Heather & dr. Kevin Joseph Sharon & Isaac Kellerman Kathy & Braden Kelley Jo Ann Kobuke* Iris* & Harel Kodesh Wanda & Jeffrey* Kralman linda & dr. ronald Krivosha Heather & Andrew lader dahlia & Jeremy levin Tatyana & Igal lis roberta* & Ken lyon Emily & david Marks rachel & Manor Mendel Susan* & Tom Miller Bea & Bruce nahon Tina* & Michael novick Carol & dr. Steven Paige dikla & Ziv rafalovich liat & ron rogozinski Judith & norman rosenbloom Al Sanft Kathleen & robert Spitzer Sheryl & Mark Stiefel Anonymous united Way Patricia Willner-Martin & neil Martin

tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott

§ = Husband or wife 2011–2012 JdS Board Member * = 2011–2012 JdS Staff Member

tomChim/SuPPorterS—$1–$99 dihlara Abramova & Mehman Abramov nancy & Jeff Adelson Anderson damon Worldwide Svetlana Avanesyana Scott

Many thanks to the more than 250 Jewish Day School Capital Campaign supporters for their

generosity and foresight as new generations of children are maximizing the use of the wonderful

classrooms, playgrounds, and athletic facilities. Over $14 million was raised to support the facility

renovation, building of a new athletic center and establishment of an endowment. Today, our

preschoolers giggle and laugh their way through their day in the renovated preschool wing and all of

our children are benefiting from the efforts of you, our Capital Campaign supporters. Please contact

Sharon & donald Mossman Bea & Bruce nahon Sandra & Gerald ostroff The Pearl Family Carole
Sharon & donald Mossman
Bea & Bruce nahon
Sandra & Gerald ostroff
The Pearl Family
Carole & dr. Alvin Pearl
Joy & Craig Pearl
Margaret & Tad Pearl
Gwenn & dean Polik
Amy Schottenstein & Justin Magaram
Ellen & Brad Spear
drs. Wendy & Michael Spektor
Kathleen & robert Spitzer
Alayne & Bobby Sulkin
Gillian & david Witus
income
other income
4.2%
Fundraising
19%
Jewish
Tuition & Fees
Federation: 2.8%
60.4%
SAmiS
Foundation: 13.7%
expenSeS
Facilities
Development &
6.9%
marketing: 8.8%
Administration &
Support: 14.6%
Educational Programming
69.8%

us to tour our beautiful campus and experience first-hand the vision that is now our students’ reality.

rebecca & Eli Almo Janice & Marshall Brumer Cindy & Earl Caditz Bonnie & robert Cape Beryl & Gary Cohen rae & Stan Cohen Julie & david Ellenhorn deanne & donald Etsekson nancy & Paul Etsekson Pam & Gary Farber linda* & dr. Gary Feldman Sophie & dr. Jeff Frankel Marcia & Alfred Friedman Barrie & richard Galanti

Karen Gamoran Merrill Gerstel z”l Peggy & Bruce Gladner The Gonchar Family Charitable Fund Suzanne & Barry Goren Carol & dr. Allen Gown Judy & Jeff Greenstein deb & Marc Kadish Jodi & dr. Jerry Kent Chris & dr. Marty lazoritz debra levin Barb & Chuck Maduell lisa & Ian Morris drs. Kara & Kerry Moscovitz

THE l’dor V’dor SoCIETY

From generation to generation, our grandparents are investing in the future that

The Jewish Day School helps provide. We are proud to have the generous support of

grandparents who exemplify the spirit of tzedekah for our children.

GoLd

SuStaininG

linda & lloyd Grossman

Maureen & Michael Cape

Bronze

Pearl & Michael Caplan