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WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 $1.

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The Times Leader
EUROPE HANGS
AROUND RYDER CUP
Europe isnt ready to
concede the Ryder Cup,
winning the last two
matches and bringing the
American juggernaut to a
screeching halt.
The Americans still have a
10-6 lead, and need 14
1
2
points to regain the Ryder
Cup. The largest comeback
in Ryder Cup history was at
Brookline in 1999, when the
U.S. erased a 10-6 deficit
on the final day.
PAGE1C
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
NCAA FOOTBALL
W. VIRGINIA 70
BAYLOR 63
OHIO ST. 17
MICH. ST. 16
S. CAROLINA 38
KENTUCKY17
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ORIOLES 4
RED SOX 3
BLUE JAYS 3
YANKEES 2
6 09815 10077
As officials continue tosearch
for clues towhat ledfour teenag-
ers tokill themselves over an
eight-day span, mental health
experts say the answers likely lie
ina complexseries of life events
rather thana single emotional
trauma.
The public has a tendency to
lookfor quick-hit answers, suchas
bullying, a poor report cardor
breakingupwitha boyfriendor
girlfriend, the experts said.
That may make for a good
news bite, but the reality is far
more complex, saidTony Salva-
tore, a suicide crisis counselor
withMontgomery County and
author of the pamphlet, Suicide
Loss: What Schools Should
Know.
Suicide is the third-leading
cause of deathfor people age15 to
24, accordingtothe National
Institute of Mental Health. Ap-
proximately 4,000 teenagers kill
Suicides complex, experts say
Female : 21%
(7,820)
Male: 79%
(29,089)
15-24: 12%
(4,371)
25-64: 72%
(26,680)
65+: 16%
(5,858)
BY GENDER:
BY AGE:
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
U.S. SUICIDES
There were 36,909 suicides in the United
States in 2009, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention.
Likely no easy answers exist
for why teens took own lives
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See EXPERTS, Page 7A
INSIDE: Advice from someone who
knows what its like to have been a
deeply troubled teenager, Page 7A
Local mental health profes-
sionals are working to re-estab-
lish a psychological autopsy
committee that would investi-
gate suicides in hopes of gain-
ing insight that will aid preven-
tion efforts.
The committee, which will
include representatives from
multiple disciplines, is looking
to carry on work done by a
team10 years ago.
That committee studied
hundreds of coroners reports
dating back to 1992 and con-
ducted interviews with families
in an effort to identify the most
common factors that led per-
sons to kill themselves.
While work was already
under way to restart the com-
mittee, the deaths of five teen-
agers from suicide this year,
including four that occurred
within a recent eight-day span,
have provided an additional
impetus, said Rich Burns,
acting director of the
Committee would
investigate suicides
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
See SUICIDES, Page 7A
WASHINGTON Barack
Obama is cruising into the presi-
dential debates with momentum
on his side, yet hes still strug-
glingtorevivethepassionandex-
citement that propelled him to
the White House. Mitt Romney is
grasping for his
last, best
chance to re-
boot his cam-
paign after a di-
sastrous Sep-
tember.
The fierce
and deter-
mined compet-
itors in the
tight race have
a specific mis-
sion for the
three debates,
the first of
which is
Wednesday
night in Den-
ver.
Obama, no
longer the fresh
face of 2008,
must convince
skeptical Amer-
icans that he
can accomplish in a second term
what he couldnt in his first, res-
toringthe economy tofull health.
Romney, anxious to keep the
race fromslipping away, needs to
instill confidence that he is a
credible and trusted alternative
to the president, with a better
plan for strengthening the econo-
my.
The burden in many ways is
heavier on Romney, says Wayne
Fields, a professor at Washington
University in St. Louis who spe-
cializes in political rhetoric.
What we see right now is an un-
certainty about whether hes
ready for the job.
For all the hundreds of cam-
Obama
leads into
first TV
debate
Romney looking to reboot
campaign in Wednesdays
showdown in Denver.
See DEBATE, Page 12A
By NANCY BENAC
Associated Press
The Times
Leader and
Wilkes Uni-
versity will host
forums for the
U.S. congres-
sional candi-
dates running
for election in
November to
serve the peo-
ple of North-
eastern Penn-
sylvania.
PAGE 3A
L O C A L
D E B AT E S
20 1 2
ELECTION
INSIDE
A NEWS
Obituaries 2A, 8A
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 9B
C SPORTS:
Outdoors 10C
D BUSINESS
Stocks 3D
E VIEWS
Editorials 3E
F. ETC.
Crossword/Horoscope 2F
Books 5F
G CLASSIFIED: 1G
WEATHER
Jeffrey Terpak
Mostly cloudy with light
showers. High 64. Low 47.
Details, Page 12C
In the five years hes
worked building wind tur-
bines, Mike Kelly has faced
plenty of obstacles, but hes
never dealt with challenges
like those presented by his
neighbors near the Me-
hoopany Wind Farm project
in Noxen Township.
Virtually every day they
infiltrate the construction
site, blocking roads and
preventing crews and equip-
ment from passing by.
Theyve also forced the
relocation of several of the
giant wind-producing tur-
bines and the re-routing of
miles of roadways built into
the mountainside to reach
the sites.
Theyve created lots of
headaches, and they arent
even human.
Kelly and fellow employ-
ees are being rattled by
hundreds of rattlesnakes
that inhabit the section of
the mountain where theyre
working.
The issue isnt so much
the threat the venomous
reptiles pose to the work-
ers, but the threat the work-
ers pose to the snakes,
particularly the timber
rattlesnake.
The snake, which is close
to becoming endangered, is
considered a special candi-
date species, which affords
it special protection under
the Pennsylvania Fish and
Boat Commission.
Noxen Twp. wind
farm project
workers face snakes
at construction site
Not really rattled
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
The timber rattlesnake is the largest venom-
ous snake in Pennsylvania.
Size: These rattlesnakes range in length from
3 to 4
1
2 feet and may weigh up to 2 pounds.
Life Span: The lifespan of the timber rattle-
snake is 22 to 30 years.
Color: This snake varies in coloration, with
bands of color that are different on snakes
found in different regions.
Habitat: The timber rattlesnake is found in
the forested rocky hills of many states
throughout the eastern United States, and
also in swamps.
Food: This rattlesnake eats small mammals,
especially mice, rats, squirrels, and rabbits.
Sometimes it will even kill birds.
Reproduction: Every three or four years in
the early spring, these rattlesnakes mate.
About 10 young are born in late summer or
early fall with the average length of 11-13
inches.
Fun Facts: Although they rarely attack
humans, these rattlesnakes are venomous
and very dangerous.
T I M B E R R AT T L E S N A K E FA C T S
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kathy and TomMichell work to place a transmitter on a timber rattlesnake they are
releasing into the wild after nursing it back to health.
See SNAKES, Page 12A

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


Callahan, Grace
Chipego, Lottie
Cigarski, Joan
Erickson, Mary
Fiume, Ann
Flaherty, Sean
Kennedy, Warren
McQuown, Marqueen
Mengak, Peter
Pickett, Marjorie
Prichard, John
Roos, Charles
Swerdon, Dora
Zoeller, Harold
Zukosky, Barbara
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 8A
PRASHANT SHITUT
President & CEO
(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOE BUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor
(570) 829-7249
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
MICHAEL PRAZMA
VP/Circulation
(570) 970-7202
mprazma@timesleader.com
LISA DARIS
VP/HR and Administration
(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
An company
DETAILS
timesleader.com
Grace D.
Callahan, a for-
mer resident of
Murray Street,
Forty Fort,
passed away
Friday morn-
ing at St.
Therese Resi-
dence, S.
Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre.
Born August 22, 1920, in
Swoyersville, she was a daughter
of the late Thomas J. and Edith
Boyle Callahan. Grace was a mem-
ber of the 1937 graduating class at
the former Swoyersville High
School. In 1941, she received her
degree in home economics from
Marywood University. Grace fur-
thered her education at the Jeffer-
son Hospital in Philadelphia and
had been employed there as a diet-
itian.
When her mother became ill in
1949, Grace returned to Swoyers-
ville to become the primary care-
giver for both her family and ex-
tended family. She had resided on
Murray Street for many years prior
to her move to St. Therese Resi-
dence.
Grace had been a faithful mem-
ber of the former Holy Name
Church, Swoyersville, prior to its
closing.
She was preceded in death by
brothers, Thomas, Anthony, Leo-
nard Callahan; sisters, Agnes Kel-
ley, Margaret Campbell, Marie
Buckley, Edith Callahan and Julie
Kennedy.
Surviving are her sister, Louise
Callahan, St. Therese Residence,
Wilkes-Barre; numerous nieces
and nephews; great-nieces and
great-nephews; great-great-nieces
and great-great nephews; and her
cousins.
The family would like to thank
the staff of St. Therese Residence
for the compassion and care that
they provided to Grace and the
hospitality and support extended
to her family.
Afuneral Masswill be celebrat-
edMondayat1:30p.m. inthechap-
el at Little Flower Manor, 200 S.
Meade St., Wilkes-Barre. Inter-
ment will be in St. Marys Ceme-
tery, Hanover Township. Friends
may call Monday from 12:30 p.m.
until time of service at Little Flow-
er Manor.
The family requests that those
who desire make memorial dona-
tions to St. Josephs Center 2010
Adams Ave., Scranton, PA 18509.
Funeral arrangements are under
the care of McLaughlins- The
Family Funeral Home. Permanent
messages and memories may be
shared with the family at www.ce-
lebrateherlife.com.
Grace D. Callahan
September 28, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 8A
L
ottie B. (Gowisnok) Chipego, of
Swoyersville, passed away Fri-
day, September 28, 2012, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital,
with her loving family at her side.
Born March10, 1926, in Swoyers-
ville, she was a daughter of the late
Peter and Louise Phillips Gowis-
nok.
She met her husbandDaniel after
he returned home fromthe war and
they married soon after. Lottie and
her husband Daniel recently cele-
brated their 65th Wedding Anniver-
sary on June 21, 2012. A surprise
family celebration was held in their
honor at their son and daughter-in-
laws home, Tom and Brenda.
It was the perfect party for our
mom. It was a full house withfamily
and friends and plenty of food, fun
and laughter.
Lotties husband, Dan, their chil-
dren, and grandchildren, were her
everything. Baking, cooking and
conversation also gave her so much
joy. She was very religious and
prayed daily. Prior to its consolida-
tion, she was a lifelong member of
St. Marys of Czestochowa Church,
Swoyersville.
Preceding her in death were her
brothers, JosephGowisnok, Stanley
Gowisnok; sisters, Ann Norkus,
Stella Hosa, Mary Cegelka and Jo-
sephine Burakiewicz.
Surviving, in addition to her hus-
band, Dan, are her children, Diane
Zupko, Swoyersville, Daniel Chipe-
go and his wife, Linda, Shavertown,
Robert Chipego and his wife, Janet,
Swoyersville, Mary Jo Pieczynski
andher husband, Benjamin, Doyles-
town, Thomas Chipego and his
wife, Brenda, Dallas, Jill Marie Der-
win and her husband, Robert J.,
Mountain Top; grandchildren, San-
di Ragukas and her husband, Rob-
ert, Jeffery Zupko, Douglas Zupko
and his wife, Amanda, Carolyn Ger-
gen and her husband, Nick, Chris-
tine Zavala and her husband, Leo,
Danielle Fleck and her husband,
Douglas, Nicole Chipego, Carrie
Singer and her husband, Russell,
Kimberly Chipego and her fiance,
Roy Calvey, Robert Chipego and his
wife, Lorri, Lori Chipego, Jennifer
Brown and her husband, Christoph-
er, Benjamin Pieczynski, Michelle
Pieczynski, Thomas Chipego, Lot-
tie Chipego (her namesake), twin
granddaughters Venessa and Kay-
leigh Derwin; great-grandchildren,
Sarah Jasterzinski, Beth Ann and
Robert Ragukas, Douglas and John
Zupko, RoyceZavala, Alexis andDy-
len Fleck, Abbey and Meghan Sing-
er, Chloe and Robert Chipego, Ma-
rielle Brown; a great-great-grand-
child, Kaleb Albert; sister, Louise
Krall, Laflin; several nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral services will be held at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday from Bednarski
Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Parish, 116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville. Friends may call Mon-
day 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Interment will be held in St. Marys
Cemetery, Swoyersville.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the Cath-
erine McAuley House, 121 Church
Street, Plymouth, PA18651.
The family would like to extend a
special thank you to Dr. Joseph Ri-
dilla and Dr. James Galasso and his
staff for their kindness to Lottie and
Dan throughout the years.
Lottie B. Chipego
September 28, 2012
ing costs associated with the
numerous changes in technol-
ogy and even the costs of old-
fashioned books, Rash said.
We went from card catalogs
to computers, she said. Now
we have to work to provide e-
books, she added.
However, Rash stresses
most children go to the library
to read books.
The event included Tuckers
Tales Puppet Theatres pre-
sentation of The Book-
aneers and Aesops Fables,
Pat Wards Magic Show and
Balloon Animals, storyteller
Mary Baker, and awards pro-
grams and refreshments.
Hanna Chocallo, a 10-year-
old from Wilkes-Barre, won
first prize for her essay on
what she likes most about the
library. She described in her
essay how she really enjoys
the large variety of books and
other media, such as digital
discs.
Jocelyn Chocallo, Hannas
mother, said they attend the
library on a regular basis.
We like the library because
it encourages reading, she
said. If you can read, you can
do anything, she added.
Samantha Ashford won first
prize for her poster drawing.
She created a colorful portrait
of library activities highlight-
ing the reading dogs.
Richard Miller, executive di-
rector of the library, said the
childrens wing has been a
huge success.
The Osterhout was one of
the first libraries in the state
WILKES-BARRE Thirty
years ago the Osterhout Free
Library opened the Ken L. Pol-
lock Childrens Wing to better
facilitate reading and learning
for local kids. On Saturday,
the library celebrated the
wings 30th anniversary with
its Wing Fling.
Local children were treated
to storytelling, games, magi-
cians and other treats, all as a
way to continue the message
of the importance of reading
and learning during the early
years.
Elaine Rash, youth services
coordinator for the library,
was working there when the
wing opened. Since then, she
said, it has provided many val-
uable services to the commu-
nity. Offering a variety of pro-
grams all year, the library tries
to keep learning fresh, fun and
interesting for local children.
One of the biggest challeng-
es since it opened has been
keeping up with the increas-
to have a childrens wing, he
said. Its a very innovative
idea, he added.
Miller lauded the staff at the
library and how they have
strived at the childrens wing
to make reading fun. They en-
courage children to enjoy it as
opposed to taking it on as a
responsibility. He added that
research shows children who
begin reading at an early age
are more likely to succeed in
their future educational pur-
suits.
The staff here is very cre-
ative and they do a lot of ou-
treach, he said.
Fling celebrates library wing
Fun event marks 30th
anniversary of Osterhouts
childrens addition.
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Isaac Bolan laughs at something his brother Mathew shows himin a book they got at the Osterhout
Library Wing Fling. For Click photos, see Page 11A.
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 6-0-7
Monday: 1-4-9
Tuesday: 8-5-3
Wednesday: 0-5-7
Thursday: 2-5-0
Friday: 9-4-2
Saturday: 0-7-0
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 8-4-5-0
Monday: 6-4-2-0
Tuesday: 8-9-3-4
Wednesday: 8-7-1-0
Thursday: 0-2-8-8
Friday: 9-8-6-9
Saturday: 0-2-4-3
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 1-8-4-3-4
Monday: 5-6-9-6-1
Tuesday: 7-3-3-5-1
Wednesday: 2-7-6-6-0
Thursday: 8-8-7-4-8
Friday: 4-1-8-2-5
Saturday: 3-9-5-1-8
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-04-15-23-27
Monday: 14-20-21-22-25
Tuesday: 04-05-10-15-22
Wednesday: 02-20-24-26-30
Thursday: 01-02-14-15-17
Friday: 08-12-15-27-30
Saturday: 03-05-06-09-29
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-4-0
Monday: 7-7-3
Tuesday: 4-8-9
Wednesday: 6-2-9
Thursday: 7-3-6
Friday: 3-6-0
Saturday: 0-5-7
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 6-0-1-3
Monday: 5-4-3-7
Tuesday: 2-8-8-6
Wednesday: 3-0-4-2
Thursday: 6-3-5-6
Friday: 8-2-8-6
Saturday: 4-4-3-1
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-8-6-1-0
Monday: 8-9-3-1-4
Tuesday: 8-7-3-1-8
Wednesday: 8-4-3-4-1
Thursday: 7-7-4-9-0
Friday: 6-1-8-0-3
Saturday: 5-9-9-8-1
Cash 5
Sunday: 05-12-18-22-38
Monday: 02-13-20-41-42
Tuesday: 18-28-31-35-37
Wednesday: 01-05-14-15-36
Thursday: 07-19-21-32-42
Friday: 09-10-14-22-33
Saturday: 06-19-22-35-36
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 10-14-18-38-39-42
Thursday: 03-15-17-39-42-44
Powerball
Wednesday: 13-26-39-41-42
powerball: 10
Saturday: 14-18-28-29-57
powerball: 08
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 07-08-23-50-51
Megaball: 26
Megaplier: 03
Friday: 06-08-14-43-56
Megaball: 28
Megaplier: 04
WEEKLY LOTTERY
SUMMARY
scene before emergency respon-
ders arrived.
Investigators interviewed nu-
merous people inNesbitt Parkand
around the Market Street Bridge
but could not find additional wit-
nesses. After firefighters searched
beneath the pillars and along both
sides of the bridge by boat and
found nothing, Snarski declared
the report unfounded at 2:45 p.m.
Greg Dovish of Luzerne was fish-
ing in a boat near the bridge and
Mark Wanko of Kingston was kay-
aking north of the Pierce Street
Bridge when emergency respon-
ders arrived.
Bothmenassistedfirefighters in
the search, but neither sawanyone
jump fromthe bridge or found any
evidence of a person in the water,
they said.
The Susquehanna River level
was 1.3 feet in Wilkes-Barre Satur-
day afternoon, according to Na-
WILKES-BARRE Firefight-
ers declared a report of a man
jumpingfromthe Market Street
Bridge unfounded after search-
ing the area below the bridge
from the bridge, the riverbank
andbyboat Saturdayafternoon.
Wilkes-Barre firefighters and
police responded at approxi-
mately 2:15p.m. toa report that
amantiedcinder blocks toboth
his legs and leaped from the
bridge, according to Wilkes-
Barre Assistant Fire Chief Ed-
ward Snarski. Snarski said the
report was called in by a man
riding a bicycle who left the
tional Weather Service data. Snar-
ski saidthe water was clear andin-
vestigators couldseethebottomin
most places.
Saturday was the fourth time
emergency responders were called
to the Susquehanna River in
Wilkes-Barre this year, according
to Snarski.
Bridge jumper reports unfounded
Wilkes-Barre crews respond
to Market Street Bridge,
but cannot find anyone.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
WESTPITTSTONSportinga
navy blue plaid kilt, 79-year-old
Warren Pollard hunched over and
held his back while taking a break
during Saturdays Apple Festival
and Flea Market at the First Unit-
ed Church of West Pittston.
Pollard, of West Pittston, said
he and a group of church volun-
teers made 65 apple pies and 100
apple dumplings over the course
of two days for the annual event.
The festival featured a silent auc-
tion, book andbake sale anda flea
market.
Somebodys always peeling,
somebodys rolling the dough and
somebodys filling, he said.
Pollard said hes been making
the pies and dumplings for his
churchs various events for thelast
30 years.
We all have fun, he said. I en-
joy coming down here to do it.
In the lower level of the church,
referred to by parishioners as the
cake room, Esther Shoback, 59,
of Duryea and her sister, Donna
Turner, 49, of Moosic were loaded
down with a variety of household
items they snagged at half price.
This is our day out, said Sho-
back, adding that she and her sis-
ter hit the yard sales every Satur-
day.
Jugglingan8-poundfreeweight
and a plastic water pitcher in one
hand and a stuffed moose door
hanger in the other, Turner said
she was happy with her finds.
This is our first time here, and
we got a lot of great stuff, she
said. You cant beat it.
The turnout was good, said
event organizer Kelly Dushok,
who added shes been sorting do-
nations since July.
Believeme, its alot of work. At
the end of the week, Im exhaust-
ed.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Warren Pollard cuts apple pies at the First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston Apple Festival.
Church apple festival
is an appeeling event
West Pittston featured a
silent auction, book and bake
sale and a flea market.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
WACO, Texas Several busi-
nesses in the Central Texas town
of Waco are dealing with a smelly
problem that wont go away: de-
caying cricket carcasses.
A bank, a drugstore and other
businesses have been inundated
with the odorous onslaught of
dead crickets that have been
trappedinside walls andhave col-
lected on sidewalks.
Jani Rodriguez, the branch
manager at Synergy Bank, tells
the Waco Tribune-Herald that
scented products have been un-
able to get rid of the smell. Using
air-scrubbing machines hasnt
worked either.
Fred Huffman, an entomolo-
gist who runs a local pest control
business, says the cricket prob-
lem has been worse this year be-
cause mild winter conditions re-
sulted in the insects appearing
earlier than normal.
Crickets cause stink in Texas
The Associated Press
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL
timesleader.com
CLARKS SUMMIT
Tons of food donated
W
ith food banks and nonprofits
facing record requests for ser-
vices, sourcing and providing pro-
tein is often a challenge. To help
meet the high demands, Smithfield
donated a combined 30,000 pounds
of protein-rich food
to the CEO/Wein-
berg Northeast
Regional Food
Bank.
The donation
took place Friday
at Weis Markets in
Clarks Summit, a
retail partner of
Smithfield and longtime supporter
of the food bank. Smithfield has
primary lines of business including
fresh pork, smoked meats, bacon,
cooked hams and hot dogs.
The Food Bank serves nearly
10,000 different people every week.
A donation of this size makes a
tremendous impact and goes a long
way toward feeding the hungry in
our region, said Gene Brady, exec-
utive director of CEO and the food
bank.
Smithfield is in its third year of
the Helping Hungry Homes tour,
having made more than 100 stops
across the country, said Dennis
Pittman, public affairs director for
Smithfield. In January 2008, Smith-
field established their Helping Hun-
gry Homes initiatives to help
ensure that American families in
need do not go hungry.
The food bank assists community
organizations obtain food for needy
families, in particular children and
the elderly, by collecting donations
of wholesome but unmarketable
food from the food industry and
distributing it to these organiza-
tions. It works to reduce hunger and
promote proper nutrition in addi-
tion to preventing food waste. It
serves Luzerne, Lackawanna, Sus-
quehanna and Wyoming counties.
WILKES-BARRE
Wilkes homecoming near
Wilkes University will welcome
more than 1,000 alumni and friends
back to campus when it holds its
2012 Homecoming weekend Friday
through Sunday, Oct. 5-7.
This years theme is Looking
Back with Pride, Looking Forward
with Confidence.
Alumni of the Sidhu School of
Business & Leadership; the A-List;
the ladies of Barre Hall; the ladies
of Delaware Hall; Manuscript Socie-
ty; communication studies, philoso-
phy, political science, and psycholo-
gy majors, and the classes of 1962,
1967, 1972, 1977, 1982, 1992, 1997,
2002, and 2007 are encouraged to
come back to campus for reunion
celebrations. Alumni attending
homecoming will have their first
opportunity to meet the universitys
new president, Patrick F. Leahy, at
many of the events.
For more information about
homecoming events, go to
www.wilkes.edu/homecomingor
contact Bridget Giunta Husted at
1-800-WILKES-U, Ext. 4134 orbrid-
get.giunta@wilkes.edu.
KINGSTON
Closed for Columbus Day
The municipalitys administrative
offices will be closed on Monday,
Oct. 8, for the Columbus Day holi-
day. The offices will reopen on Oct.
9 at 8:30 a.m.
WILKES-BARRE
Register your marrow
Wilkes University is holding a
bone marrow donor registration on
Friday in conjunction with its home-
coming weekend. The event is spon-
sored by DKMS Americas, a nation-
al bone marrow donor center. Vol-
unteer registration will be held in
the Henry Student Center from 10
a.m. to 7 p.m. There is no fee to
register.
DKMS Americas organizes donor
drives to raise awareness and
recruit potential bone marrow do-
nors to be placed on a donor regis-
try. Registration involves a simple
cheek swab and filling out a ques-
tionnaire.
Donor registrations are the best
means of generating a large pool
and eventually identifying matches.
For more information, visit
www.dkmsamericas.org.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Brady
WILKES-BARRE The Times Leader
and Wilkes University will host forums
for the U.S. congressional candidates
running for election in November to
serve the people of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania.
Incumbent U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-
Hazleton, and Gene Stilp, candidates in
the11thCongressional District, will take
part in a forum at 7 p.m. on Oct. 8.
Aforumfor Matt Cartwright and Lau-
reen Cummings, candidates in the 17th
Congressional District, will be held at 7
p.m. on Oct. 10.
The forums will be open to the public
and will be held at Wilkes University in
Room101of the Stark Learning Center,
150-180 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. Seat-
ing in the auditorium-style roomwill be
on a first-come, first-served basis. Free
parking will be available in the Wilkes
lot behind the Henry Student Center,
located at 84 W. South St.
Both forums can be viewed live on
WYLN-TV Channel 7. Rebroadcast
times and dates will be announced.
Times Leader Editorial Page Editor
Mark Jones will moderate the forums.
Barletta is a former three-term mayor
of Hazleton rounding out his first two-
year term in Congress after ousting 13-
term incumbent Democrat Paul Kanjor-
ski in 2010. As mayor, he garnered na-
tional attention for his attempted crack-
down on illegal immigrants living and
working in his city.
AWilkes-Barre native living inMiddle
Paxton Township, Dauphin County,
Democrat Stilp is an attorney well
known for his activist role in state mat-
ters and for using huge inflatable pigs
and a pig-themed bus to draw attention
to fraud, waste and corruption in state
government.
Both candidates in the 17th District
have considerably less name recogni-
tion.
Cartwright, an attorney from Moosic,
defeated 20-year Democrat incumbent
Tim Holden in the May primary. He
backs President Barack Obama on many
issues, including the Affordable Care
Act, althoughhedoesnt thinkit went far
enough and said he will work to streng-
then it.
One of the founders of the Scranton
Tea Party, Cummings, of Old Forge, be-
lieves ObamaCare should be repealed
andthe taxcode reformed. The owner of
a private duty nursing and staffing agen-
cy, shes also running on a platform
against high taxes and for creating more
jobs.
The public is invited to attend the fo-
rums tohear the candidates address spe-
cific issues affecting the people of North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
Congressional forums scheduled
Candidates in both districts that
represent the local area will meet in
early October at Wilkes University.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
What: Candidate forums.
When: 7 p.m. Oct. 8 to hear
11th Congressional District
candidates Lou Barletta
and Gene Stilp; 7 p.m. Oct.
10 to hear 17th Congression-
al District candidates Matt
Cartwright and Laureen Cummings.
Where: Room101 of the Stark Learning
Center at Wilkes University, 150-180 S.
River St., Wilkes-Barre.
I F YO U G O
20 1 2
ELECTION
No character in the Sherlock
Holmes canon is too minor to escape
the attention and praise of the Sher-
lock Holmes Societys local chapter.
For 30 years, members of Boss
McGintys Bird Watchers, as the local
chapter of the Holmes Society calls
itself, have lauded all of Holmes cre-
ator Sir Arthur Conan Doyles charac-
ters. On Friday, the toasts rang out
again:
To Mrs. Hudson, that long-suf-
fering landlady who had the worst
tenant in London.
To Mycroft, Holmes older broth-
er and if you can believe it in-
tellectual superior.
To the canines of the canon, espe-
cially Toby, Holmes lop-eared half-
spaniel, half-lurcher.
The Holmes fan club a very
tongue-in-cheek affair has grown
considerably since founders Fred
Sauls, professor of chemistry at Kings
College, and Frank Vacante, a now-
retired accounting professor fromthe
same school, first imagined the club
over dinner at Hottles in Wilkes-Barre
30 years ago.
Close to 40 turned out for Fridays
anniversary celebration, including
many of the original 18 members.
You get together, you have a good
meal, you have a good time, and you
talk a little about Sherlock Holmes
and Victorian times and all that,
Sauls said, adding, none of it is taken
seriously.
AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Robert Gaiteri toasts to Sherlock Holmes older brother Mycroft Holmes on Friday night at the 30th anniver-
sary dinner of the local chapter of The Sherlock Holmes Society, named Boss McGintys Bird Watchers.
Case of faithful fans
Holmes group toasts 30 years
See HOLMES, Page 6A
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Jessica Jones be-
lievedthe boy standingbefore her onthe
youthaidpanel was a goodkid.
HewasanAstudent withdreamsof be-
coming a police officer, but a careless
mistake threatened to deter those
dreams before they couldtake flight.
The boy had come to school with a
multi-tool clipped to his belt. He didnt
thinkof it asaweapon, but theschool did,
and expelled himunder a zero-tolerance
policy for bringing weapons to school.
Sent to an alternative learning center
following his expulsion, the boy told the
panel he only wanted to return to his for-
mer school and graduate with his class-
mates. Hehas sincecompletedtheyouth
aid panels intervention program, and
through the advocacy of Jones and the
rest of his panel was allowed to return to
his former class. He is doing well in his
classes and works part-time at a local li-
brary, Jones said.
The boy is one of nearly 100 juveniles
who have successfully completed Lu-
zerne Countys youth aid panel program
over the past year and a half. The volun-
teer panels offer juveniles age10 to17 ar-
rested for minor offenses the chance to
avoid being charged in court while still
being heldaccountable for their actions.
Each juvenile appearing before the
panel must complete a restitution pro-
gram custom-tailored to their case and
outlined in a contract they must sign.
The juveniles must also keep in regular
contact withapanel member assignedas
their mentor during the 90-day restitu-
tion period. Juveniles who successfully
complete the program will have the re-
cordof their case expunged.
ThesystemgavetheboyinJones story
a chance to make restitution for his of-
fense while avoiding the permanent
damage an arrest record or alternative
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
District Attorney Stefanie Salavantis
speaks at the Youth Aid Panel appre-
ciation breakfast on Saturday.
Youth aid
panel work
celebrated
Youths who finish program will have
record of minor offense expunged.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See AID PANELS, Page 6A
KINGSTON TWP. Its a
sad and painful chore to clean
out a loved ones home after
death, having to make deci-
sions as to what to donate,
keepor disposeof. But whenit
comestopurgingthemedicine
chest, whattodowithall of the
prescription and over-the-
counter drugs has gotten a lit-
tleeasier. DuringNational Pre-
scriptionDrugTake-BackDay
on Saturday, people had the
chance to dispose of their un-
usedorexpiredmedicationsat
various sites inLuzerne Coun-
ty.
Dumping the contents of a
large bag into a barrel at the
KingstonTownshipPolice De-
partment, Yvonne Eckman of
Shavertown, saidshe was hap-
py to find a place where she
couldtakeher deceasedmoth-
er-in-laws medications.
My daughter is a pharma-
cist and she said, Mom, dont
keepanything, saidEckman.
When we saw on the news
they were having a collection,
we were thrilled, she said.
Im sure people throw
A safe way to dispose of old medicine
Sites in the county
collected unused or
expired medication.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Buddy Novak brought medication to Duryea while Lois
Hanczyc, left, Nick Lohman and Connie Anderson of the
Wyoming Valley Alcohol and Drug Services wait to help. See DRUGS, Page 6A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
BARCELONA, SPAIN
Tornado hits fair, kills 10
A
tornado swept through a fair-
ground in a Spanish town, knock-
ing down a Ferris wheel and injuring
35 people, while the death toll from
flooding in the same southern region
of the country rose to 10, authorities
said Saturday.
Fridays tornado damaged several
rides and cut electricity in the tempo-
rary fair set up in the main square of
Gandia, according to its town hall
website. It said 15 of the injured were
seriously hurt, all of whom were treat-
ed on site.
Local media reported the fair in
Valencia province was closed to the
public at the time of a thunderstorm
and that all the injured were fair work-
ers.
NEW YORK
Ex-NY Times publisher dies
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, the fourth
publisher of the New York Times, who
made history with his decision to
publish the Pentagon Papers and re-
vived the "Good Gray
Lady" of print jour-
nalism with a radical
redesign that set a
new standard for
newspapers in the
last quarter of the
20th century, has
died. He was 86.
Sulzberger died
Saturday at his home
in Southampton, N.Y., after a long
illness, according to the New York
Times.
Widely known by the nickname
Punch, Sulzberger was publisher of
the Times from1963 to 1992 and
chairman and chief executive of the
parent company from1973 to 1997. He
passed his titles on to his son, Arthur
Ochs Sulzberger Jr., the fourth gener-
ation of his family to head the paper.
LOS ANGELES
Carmageddon II begins
Traffic was light around Los Angeles
hours after the start of Carmageddon
II, and transportation officials were
hoping it stays that way until a bridge
is demolished before the Monday
morning rush hour.
Construction crews began work
early Saturday morning taking down a
portion of the Mulholland Drive
bridge along Interstate 405, one of the
nations busiest freeways. The bridge
and its pillars will eventually be re-
placed so that the freeway can be
widened to include a new carpool
lane.
For weeks Angelenos have been
warned to avoid the 10-mile stretch of
the 405 that will be shuttered through
the Sepulveda Pass on LAs west side
for the entire weekend.
BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND
Protestants march in peace
Thousands of Protestants marched
peacefully through the heart of North-
ern Irelands capital Saturday amid a
heavy security presence.
It was one of Belfasts biggest pa-
rades in years, and police were de-
ployed in large numbers to prevent
street clashes between marchers and
Northern Irelands Catholic minority.
Members of the various Protestant
loyal orders, so-called because
theyre loyal to Great Britain, trooped
down Belfasts streets festooned with
buttons, tassels and other ceremonial
gear.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Storm hits ship in Spain
People look at a cargo ship which ran
aground after a heavy storm at Saler
beach near Valencia Saturday. At least
eight people, including a young girl
and an elderly woman, have died in
Spain as a result of floods brought on
by downpours, regional officials said
Sulzberger
VATICAN CITY The
popes once-trusted butler
went on trial Saturday for al-
legedly stealing papal docu-
ments and passing themoff to
a journalist in the worst secu-
rity breach of the Vaticans re-
cent history a case that em-
barrassedthe Vaticanandmay
shed further light on the dis-
creet, internal workings of the
papal household.
In its first hearing in the
case, the three-judge Vatican
tribunal threw out some evi-
dence gathered during the in-
vestigationof butler Paolo Ga-
briele, who is charged with ag-
gravated theft. It also decided
to separate Gabrieles trial
from that of his co-defendant,
a computer expert charged
with aiding and abetting the
crime.
Gabriele is accused of tak-
ing the popes correspondenc-
es, photocopying the docu-
ments and handing them to
Italian journalist Gianluigi
Nuzzi, whose book His Holi-
ness: The secret papers of
Pope Benedict XVI, was pub-
lished to great fanfare in May.
Prosecutors have said Ga-
briele confessed to taking the
documents because he want-
ed to expose the evil and cor-
ruption in the church. They
quoted him as saying during
aninterrogationthat he felt in-
spired by the Holy Spirit to in-
form the pope about the
churchs problems and that a
shock, even a media one,
would have been healthy to
bring the church back on the
right track.
Nuzzi on Saturday wished
Gabriele well, tweetingGood
Luck, courageous Paoletto,
werewithyou. Hereferredto
Gabriele by the diminutive
nickname used by the pope
and other members of the pa-
pal household.
The trial inside the intim-
ate, austere courtroom was
the highest-profile case to
come before the Vatican judi-
ciary since the 1929 founding
of the Vatican city state, the
worlds smallest sovereign
state. Media from around the
world converged on St. Peters
Square to cover the case,
which has attracted attention
not so much because of the
content of the documents but
because they were stolenfrom
the popes desk and leaked, al-
legedly by one of Benedicts
closest assistants.
Papal butlers trial begins
Accused of leaking copies
of popes correspondences
to journalist for book.
By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
In this photo released by the Vatican paper LOsservatore
Romano, popes butler Paolo Gabriele, right, sits in the
wood-trimmed courtroom of the Vatican tribunal, Saturday. WASHINGTON When last
we saw the chief justice of the
United States on the bench, John
Roberts was joining with the Su-
preme Courts liberals in an un-
likely lineup that upheld Presi-
dent Barack Obamas health care
overhaul.
Progressives applauded Ro-
berts statesmanship. Conserva-
tives uttered
cries of be-
trayal.
Now, the Su-
preme Court is
embarking on a
newtermbegin-
ning Monday
that could be as
consequential
as the last one, with the prospect
for major rulings about affirma-
tive action, gay marriage and vot-
ing rights.
Many people on both the left
andright expect Roberts toreturn
to the fold and side with the con-
servative justices in the new
terms big cases. If theyre right,
the spotlight will be back on Jus-
tice Anthony Kennedy, whose
vote typically is decisive in cases
that otherwise split the courts lib-
erals and conservatives.
But Roberts will be watched
closely, following his health care
vote, for fresh signs that hes be-
coming less ideologically predict-
able.
It may be that the dramatic
health care decision presages
some shift in his tenure as chief
justice, said Steve Shapiro, the
American Civil Liberties Unions
national legal director. Or does it
give himcover to continue to pur-
sue a conservative agenda?
The first piece of evidence
could be in the courts considera-
tion of the University of Texas al-
ready limited use of race to help
fill its incoming freshman classes,
whichcomesbeforethecourt Oct.
10. The outcome could further
limit or even end the use of racial
preferencesincollegeadmissions.
Roberts has expressed con-
tempt for the use of race in draw-
ing legislative districts, calling it
a sordid business, this divvying
us up by race, and in assigning
students to public schools, saying
that the way to stop discrimina-
tion on the basis of race is to stop
discriminating on the basis of
race.
The written arguments submit-
tedbybothsides intheTexas case
leave little doubt that Kennedy,
not Roberts, holdstheprizedvote.
The challengers of the Texas pro-
gramand the university itself cite
Kennedys prior writings on af-
firmative action a combined 50
times.
The court also is expected to
confront gay marriage in some
form. Several cases seek to guar-
antee federal benefits for legally
married same-sex couples.
Supreme
Court to
kick off
new term
Judges may rule on
affirmative action, gay
marriage and voting rights.
By MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
Roberts
BEIRUTAfire sparked by
battles between Syrian Presi-
dent Bashar Assads troops and
rebel fighters tore through
Aleppos centuries-old covered
market Saturday, burning
wooden doors and scorching
stone stalls and vaulted pas-
sageways. The souk is one of a
half-dozen renowned cultural
sites in the country that have
become collateral damage in
the civil war.
The damage to one of the
best-preserved old souks in the
Middle East was the worst yet
to a UNESCO World Heritage
site in Syria. Across the coun-
try, looters have broken into a
historic castle, stolen artifacts
from museums and damaged
ruins in the ancient city of
Palmyra, antiquities officials
and Syrian experts say.
The Aleppo market, a major
tourist attraction with its nar-
rowstone alleys and stores sell-
ingperfume, fabrics andspices,
had been the site of occasional
gun battles and shelling for
weeks. But amateur video post-
ed Saturday showed wall-to-
wall flames engulfing wooden
doors as burning debris fell
away from the storefronts. Ac-
tivists said hundreds of shops
were affected.
Its a big loss and a tragedy
that the old city has now been
affected, Kishore Rao, direc-
tor of UNESCOs World Heri-
tage Center, said by telephone
from Paris.
Most of the other sites recog-
nized as heritage sites by UN-
ESCO, the global cultural agen-
cy, are also believedto have suf-
fered damage during the 18-
month battle to oust Assad,
Rao said. The ancient center of
AleppoSyrias largest city
has been hit the hardest, he
said.
The fire in the souk erupted
late Friday and was still burn-
ing Saturday, following fierce
fighting between regime
troops and rebels trying to
drive pro-Assad fighters out of
the city of 3 million.
Syrian fighting badly damages centuries-old market
Hundreds of shops affected
in the Aleppo market, a
major tourist attraction.
By KARIN LAUB
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
A Free Syrian Army fighter, left, helps traders as they remove
their stock from their shops in this photo from Monday.
WEST BRANCH, Mich. A mid-
Michigan community cheered on a
16-year-old sophomore the victim of
an apparent prank by classmates as
she took her place with other members
of her high schools homecoming court.
Whitney Kropp was escorted by her
father and grandfather onto the Oge-
maw Heights High School football field
Friday night in West Branch, about 140
miles northwest of Detroit.
Kropp was named to the homecom-
ing court of the 800-student school
earlier this month, but said she felt
betrayed after some students suggested
her selection was a joke. She said she
had been picked on in the past, but it
intensified afterward.
Her story has sparked national in-
terest and on Friday, residents and
business owners in the West Branch
area turned out to the game to show
their support and help take a stand
against bullying.
Orange T-shirts Kropps favorite
color have been sold with the slogan
Its not cool to be cruel.
Its just so much right now for me,
Kropp said Friday night. I had
thoughts about not coming but I actual-
ly changed my mind and came out. I
just thought maybe I wont have fun.
But Im having a lot of fun right now.
Her gown, jewelry, shoes, hair styling
and makeup were donated.
The kids that are bullying, do not let
them bring you down, Kropp told
reporters. Stand up for what you be-
lieve in, and go with your heart and go
with your gut. Thats what I did, and
look at me now. Im just as happy as can
be.
Many in the stands, even students
from visiting Cadillac, wore orange.
It wasnt right what they did to her,
said Alexis Dahlstrom, a 16-year-old
Cadillac junior. We wanted her to
know that there are people out there
who support her.
Dahlstrom and her friends learned
about Kropps story on Facebook.
Whitney is strong. I dont know that
I would have had the courage to go,
15-year-old Ogemaw Heights sopho-
more Heather Oyster said.
Community shows support for Michigan high school sophomore
selected by classmates for homecoming court as a possible joke
AP PHOTO
Sophomore homecoming representatives Whitney Kropp, left, and Josh Awrey stand together during the homecoming ceremo-
ny at the OgemawHeights High Schools homecoming football game against the Cadillac Vikings in West Branch, Mich., Friday.
Homecoming hoax?
The Associated Press
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
ANNOUNCEMENT
Dr. Jerey P. DAndrea
is pleased to announce the opening of his
newcardiology practice.
Dr. DAndrea will continue to see current and newpatients in
temporary locations until the upcoming grand opening of his
newoce.
Patients may call Dr. DAndrea at
570-602-7865
and leave a message with the answering service.
Your call will be promptly returned
to schedule an appointment,
to have prescriptions relled
have questions answered,
and howto make arrangements for the transition to the
newlocation.
Dr. DAndrea is committed to ensuring continuity of care for
all patients.
Dental Specialists of Northeast PA
ROOT CANAL & IMPLANT DENTISTRY, PC
NEW ENDODONTIST IN TOWN
Dr. Julee Plastow
Dr. Paul Mancia is pleased to welcome Dr. Julee Plastow to his endodon-
tic and implant practices in Kingston and Hazleton. An honors graduate
of the University of Scranton, she maintained a 4.0 GPA and ranked num-
ber one in her class at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental
Medicine. Dr. Plastow has received awards of excellence in Implants,
Prosthodontics and Pathology, and is a member of the National Boards
Honors list, the Matthew Cryer Honor Society and the Omicron Kappa
Upsilon Honor Society. She completed a two-year residency in endo-
dontics at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine where she trained
in microscopic endodontics and modern microsurgical techniques. She
received additional training in dental implantology and will be provid-
ing these services in both Kingston and Hazleton. To see Dr. Plastow in
Kingston, call 331-0824; and in Hazleton, call 459-2100.
7
8
0
7
1
9
schooling could have on his fu-
ture. Jones said it was a second
chance he might not have re-
ceivedinthe juvenile courts prior
to the inception of the youth aid
panels.
He didnt mean to do this, and
the consequences shouldnt have
been so severe, but I feel like if he
didnt cometotheyouthaidpanel
he would have slipped through
the cracks, she said. He would
have stayed in the ALC and ulti-
mately wouldnt have gotten to
his full potential.
County judges and other lead-
ers gathered Saturday to reflect
onthosesuccess stories, andhon-
or the 85 county residents who
have volunteered their time to sit
onyouthaidpanels.
Some of those volunteers said
the opportunity to make positive
change in the lives of young peo-
ple has beenits ownreward.
Kids are just so much more
able to be influenced, so its good
to see adults helping to prevent
them from getting involved with
something that can really affect
their lives, said Stephanie Durk,
a panel volunteer and drug-and-
alcohol counselor who works
withadults inher profession.
Adults maykeeprepeatingthe
same mistakes, but theyre pre-
pared to deal with the conse-
quences, she said. Kids dont
know what theyre getting in-
volvedwith.
Panel volunteer Shannon
Doyne said panel mentors some-
times become the first positive
adult mentors inchildrens lives.
We believe in the child,
Doyne said. We dont focus on
theoffense. Itsanegligiblepart of
what we talkabout onour panels.
We dont talk about it on the
phone, andI thinkwe really, truly
can be that person (who believes
in the child). Until theres some-
one else who believes, and more
people that believe, its the youth
aid panels and Im honored to do
it.
Youth aid panel coordinator
Bob Stevens said the panels have
proven to be successful alterna-
tive to adjudication, and have
grown as more local law enforce-
ment agencies, school districts
and judges have recognized their
effectiveness.
Theres no question that its
working, Stevens said. There
are innumerable instances where
the young person we see the first
night andthepersonweseeat the
end of our panel is a completely
different person.
Stevens said its impossible to
comparetheprograms long-term
success rate to that of traditional
court intervention, but that 85
percent of juveniles entering the
program have successfully com-
pleted it, slightly above the aver-
age of other youth panels across
the state of 82 percent.
The number of panels has
grown from six to 12 to meet the
demand fromincreased referrals,
and the group recently inducted
20 new volunteers to serve on
three newpanels in the Hazleton
area.
AID PANELS
Continued from Page 3A
Volunteers are interviewed and
selected to serve on youth aid
panels on an as-needed basis.
Panel Coordinator Bob Stevens
said the most important qual-
ification for the job is a desire and
motivation to help children. Volun-
teers should also be prepared to
serve for at least one year and to
complete a training program. To
apply, download an application
from the district attorneys page
at www.luzernecounty.org and
mail it to the Luzerne County
District Attorneys Office, C/O Bob
Stevens, or email Bob Stevens at
Bob.Stevens@luzernecounty.org.
WA N T T O V O L U N T E E R ?
medicine away all the time.
More than 30 pounds of drugs
were collected in roughly two
hours said Kingston Township
police officer Frank Ziegler, as he
guarded the barrel. Theres con-
trolled substances in here, he
said. Youcant leave this thing.
The free programis sponsored
bytheDrugEnforcement Admin-
istration, which incinerates the
medications brought in during
the drop off.
Ziegler said the drop-off proce-
dureishighlyconfidential, andhe
offeredablackpermanentmarker
to anyone wishing to cross out
personal information on the la-
bels. Were not allowed to count
(the medicine containers) or
look.
Janine Olshefski, of the Wyom-
ingValleyAlcohol &DrugServic-
es, was alsoonhandat topass out
informationonprescriptionmed-
icine anddrug abuse.
This was the fourth year the
township partnered with the
DEA for the drop off program,
said Ziegler, adding the most re-
cent drop-off was held last April,
during which 100 pounds were
collected. For more information
on howto safely dispose of medi-
cations, contact your pharmacy
or visit the FDAs website:
www.fda.gov.
DRUGS
Continued from Page 3A
The group takes its peculiar
name from Conan Doyles final
SherlockHolmes novel TheValley
of Fear, a story inspired by local
history.
In the novel, Holmes investiga-
tion of a murder in Southeastern
England leads him to the tale of a
secret society called the Scowrers
in the fictional coal and iron ore
mining region of Vermissa Valley
in America. Conan Doyle wrote
the novel after learning the real-
life story of the Molly Maguires
and their clashes with mine own-
ers and authorities in Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania.
Boss McGinty, the leader or
bodymaster of the Scowrers, is
arrested along with other group
ringleaders while waiting to am-
bush Birdie Edwards, a Pinkerton
detective sent to investigate the
group.
ItsBossMcGintysBirdWatch-
ers because were watchingout for
Birdie Edwards, said Larry Wil-
liams of New Cumberland, Cum-
berland County. Youll find that
Sherlockians really like puns.
Williams relates the story
dressed as Boss McGinty himself.
A towering bearded figure in a
black Victorian three-piece suit
and stovepipe hat, he looks the
part of the menacing gang leader.
So what keeps Williams andthe
others coming back? What mys-
tery lies behind the pipe and deer-
stalker capthat cancaptivate a fan
for a lifetime?
For Sauls, the groups founder,
its the scientific and logical rigor
withwhichDoyle orchestratedhis
plots.
Holmes was the first one that
showed you could attack crime
logically, and it was not long after
Holmes came along that they did
start to attack crime logically and
apply science to solving crimes,
Sauls said. So in a lot of ways you
could say Holmes anticipated fo-
rensic science and many of the
shows that you see on TVtoday.
But Sauls also finds the forensic
sciencedramas of todaytobepoor
imitations. He cant watch them
without yelling at the television.
Theyjust dothings that arenot
technically possible, he said.
For Rob Gaiteri, an original
member who claims to have read
each Sherlock Holmes story at
least five times, Sherlock Holmes
isacomfort food;afamiliarplace
filled with familiar characters
where he can always return.
I guessitsthesamereasonwhy
a child likes to be read to, Gaiteri
said. You know the ending and
youknowitsgoingtobegood, and
Sherlock always triumphs in the
end.
There is something in Conan
Doyles formula that has held en-
during appeal, here and else-
where. The Holmes stories and
their protagonist have beenadapt-
ed and re-imagined countless
times over thelast century, includ-
ing in the recent film series star-
ring Robert Downey Jr. and in the
new CBS drama Elementary,
which recently premiered.
I thinkit proves that the appeal
of this mystery appeals to any
age, said Alethea Bowman, a re-
tired English teacher and original
groupmember. It speakstothein-
tricacy of the stories and the con-
struction of the characters It
proves its timeless in its enchant-
ment.
HOLMES
Continued from Page 3A
1. Holmes resides at which Lon-
don address?
A: 50 Wimpole Street
B: 10 Downing Street
C: 221B Baker Street
D: 6 Masons Yard
2. Where does Sherlock Holmes
final, fatal encounter with arch-
nemesis Professor Moriarty take
place?
A: Reichenbach Falls
B: Notre Dame Cathedral
C: Stonehenge
D: Gobblers Knob
3. Which Scotland Yard detective
frequently calls on Holmes to
assist on cases?
A: John H. Watson
B: G. Lestrade
C: Henry Baskerville
D: Langdale Pike
4. How did Sherlock Holmes
describe his profession?
A: Private Investigator
B: Forensic Scientist
C: Consulting Detective
D: Sleuth for Hire
5. Sherlock Holmes is one of the
most frequently-appearing char-
acters in film and television
history. Which of the following
actors never portrayed the
sleuth on film?
A: Robert Downey Jr.
B: Basil Rathbone
C: Charlton Heston
D: Bela Lugosi
6. Which musical instrument did
Holmes play?
A: Violin
B: Accordion
C: Acoustic Guitar
D: French Horn
The answers can be deduced by
searching for clues below .
TA K E O U R S H E R L O C K H O L M E S Q U I Z
Sherlock Holmes Quiz Answers: 1:C,
2:A, 3:B, 4:C, 5:D, 6:A
DALLAS TWP. -- About 250
administrators, supporters and
athletes of Misericordia Univer-
sity gathered on Saturday morn-
ing for the dedication of the new
John and Mary Metz Field
House.
Touted as a state-of-the-art
facility, the $4 million 21,750-
square-foot center includes ath-
letic training rooms, expanded
locker facilities for mens and
womens fieldsports, teammeet-
ing rooms, a weight room, show-
er rooms and public restrooms.
Located between the Man-
gelsdorf Fieldandanewbaseball
diamond, the Metz Field House
is the latest part of a $7 million
university expansion.
University President Michael
MacDowell said the university
dedicated the facility to John
and Mary Metz because of how
they have driven the universi-
tys growth over the last few
years. Metz serves as chairman
of the universitys board of trust-
ees as well as thechairmanof the
Metz Culinary Management and
Northeast Restaurant Group,
Inc., both based in Dallas.
John Metz was the driver be-
hindour attaininguniversity sta-
tus and growing in enrollment
from 1,050 to over 1,900 stu-
dents, MacDowell said.
MacDowell said a greater em-
phasis onfieldsports, particular-
ly mens football, will bring in
high quality students.
There are 130 student-ath-
letes here that have grade-point
averages higher than 3.4, Mac-
Dowell said. They are coming
here because they love to play
the games as well as earn great
degrees.
Jeff Metz, president of Metz
Culinary, said the dedication
was a real special day for the en-
tire Metz family. He added sup-
porting the university gives
them a way to show their grat-
itude.
He said Misericordia, as a lo-
cal university, offers value for
employers inNortheast Pennsyl-
vania by providing good educa-
tion and training for the future
workforce.
Its right here in our back-
yard, Metz said. Supporting
the university is a great way to
help the local community.
The dedication took place just
prior to Misericordias inaugural
homecoming football game.
Franco Harris, a Hall-of-Famer
for the Pittsburgh Steelers who
also played for Penn State Uni-
versity, talked to the group
about the benefits of a strong
football program at the school.
Harris said a football program
offers many benefits to all stu-
dents as well as the university.
Paul Krzywicki, assistant di-
rector for university marketing
and communications, said John
and Mary Metz have been long-
time supporters of the school.
Misericordia dedicated the field
house to acknowledge the sig-
nificant leadership and philan-
thropy of the couple and their
family, he said.
Misericordia dedicates field house
Athletic facility named after
John and Mary Metz, longtime
supporters of the school.
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Chip Siegel, a Misericordia trustee, left on the podium, introduc-
es John and Mary Metz, for whom the field house is named.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 7A
N E W S
NEWS OF
FOUR teen
suicides in two
weeks affected
me profoundly.
I do not pre-
tend to under-
stand each
students unique pain, but I can
relate to their feelings of hope-
lessness. I attempted suicide
several times during my teen
years.
My family was not the Brady
Bunch, with solutions to prob-
lems guaranteed within 30 min-
utes. I had loving and caring
parents who did the best they
could a normal, dysfunctional
family. I went to Catholic high
school in another state for three
years, transferring to public
school for my senior year. I felt as
comfortable as I could in school
until ninth grade.
There was something different
about being13 or 14. My world
spun into a whole newgalaxy,
and I was being swallowed into a
black hole of puberty, angst and
an identity crisis. At that time my
mother began battling severe
depression. I was in eighth grade.
I too had struggles with depres-
sion.
I played freshman basketball,
but I was not a jock. I was into
movies and video games, and
joined the audio/visual depart-
ment. I did many normal activ-
ities, yet never felt like I fit in.
In Catholic high school, I was
asked why I sat with the geeky
or gay kids at lunch and was
made to feel embarrassed by my
choice. I should have gotten to
knowthose lunch peers better.
They were always kind, let me
eat in peace, and laughed at my
stupid jokes. But I let what oth-
ers said affect me. I was not
strong enough, mentally, to stand
up to the ridicule. I became a
loner. I transferred to another
school and never sawthe kids
who made me feel good about
myself again. I did not think
there was anyone who truly liked
me for who I was or cared about
me.
In public school I wanted to be
part of something outside myself,
but felt no girl could love me and
no one would accept me. I loved
and accepted myself, but I did
not think that I was normal and
always felt out of place. I received
plenty of love and concern from
my parents, but I was afraid to
talk to them; I felt ashamed and
different. My best friend was a
sophomore I only sawafter
school. I was silent, sad and
terrified.
I was never beaten or picked
on, but there were little moments
that piled into a mountain of
despair. Moments I couldnt
share because they embarrassed
me. When my father asked if
anything was wrong, I stuffed my
emotions and let the problems
build to an unstable peak.
That peak became an ava-
lanche of suicidal thoughts. I
wanted to die; I continued to
trudge on.
One day I sat alone outside the
auditoriumand ate the sandwich
packed by my father. I wanted to
read my magazine and hide.
Three girls who I never saw
before sat across fromme, chat-
ting and laughing.
I was minutes into my meal
when one of the girls sandwiches
was hurled in my direction, land-
ing on my magazine. I trembled
with fear; I brushed the sandwich
aside and continued with my
lunch. The laughs got louder.
One girl shouted: Hey, thats my
sandwich! I had no way to deal
with this. I did not want to re-
treat to the principal. I wouldnt
retaliate against the girls. I just
ran frommy problems.
It was just a little moment for a
student who had no girlfriend,
average grades and hard tests
ahead. It felt like the end of my
world.
A day later in English class,
everyone seemed somber. I asked
the teacher what happened. She
had just received word a student
had killed himself. I looked at his
empty seat and slouched. That
very student had previously
attempted to befriend me. When
I heard howhe did it, I thought
that perhaps it would not be
too hard to end my pain like that.
I tried to take my life a few
days later. I failed. I tried a few
months after that. I failed. One
more time at the end of high
school failed. My second year
at college I tried once again and
failed.
I nowlook at those failures as
successes that afforded the op-
portunity to a good life. And to
nowshare what I learned.
Life after high school and
college wasnt smooth, but I
eventually found contentment. I
love my wife and my daughter.
My friends today accept me for
who I am. I love themand they
love me. I amhappy with my life.
To have made it so far makes
me all the sadder for the lives
lost these past weeks.
I do not have an answer. But I
share what happened to me in
the hopes that parents do what
my father tried to do for me. He
cut out articles about things that
he thought might help me. Some-
times I would read them, some-
times I would not. If I had read
something like this, maybe, just
maybe, I would have felt that I
was not alone.
Sometimes a kid will talk to
his or her parents and feel com-
fortable. Sometimes professional
help will work. I share my story
hoping others will do the same.
No one is alone.
We just feel like it sometimes.
.
Advice from someone happy and lucky to have survived teen years
JOHN GORDON
O P I N I O N
with anyone regarding the com-
mittee. He said he supports the
effort, but noted he expects it
may find, as the 2002 committee
did, that surviving family mem-
bers of suicide victims might be
reluctant to participate.
We were the go-between be-
tween the group and the surviv-
ing family members. The vast
majority did not want to partici-
pate, Lisman said.
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
Mental Health and Develop-
mental Services program.
We cant undo this tragedy,
Burns said. The whole purpose
is to see if there are any com-
mon factors so we can learn
what we can do to prevent future
tragedies.
A psychological autopsy in-
volves a detailed examination of
all aspects of the suicide victims
life to determine if there are any
common patterns among indi-
viduals who kill themselves.
It helps us understand who
the person was and what was
happening prior to the suicide
so we can focus our efforts on
the most preventive measures,
said Tara Gallagher, the chil-
drens services coordinator for
the county mental healthagency
who is helping restart the com-
mittee.
Gallagher noted officials in
Schuylkill County utilized psy-
chological autopsies to discover
that a large number of suicide
victims there had been at a tav-
ern prior to their deaths.
They used that information
to place posters in bars telling
people who to call for help, she
said.
The 2002 Luzerne County
committee helped uncover dif-
ferences in the manner in which
youths and adults manifest
signs of suicides.
The panel concluded that trig-
gers for youths include loss of a
loved one and romantic break-
ups, and warning signs included
self abusive cutting, risk taking
and withdrawal from society.
Adults might have experienced
financial troubles, depression,
illness or substance abuse.
Gallagher said formation of a
newcommittee is still in the pre-
liminary phases. Its not clear
when it might begin work.
Acting Coroner William Lis-
man said he has not yet spoken
SUICIDES
Continued from Page 1A
themselves nationwideeachyear.
Research has shown suicide
doesnt just happen, Salvatore
says in the pamphlet. Its the out-
come of a complex intermingling
of psychological, social, cultural
and interpersonal factors over a
period of time. Often persons
who kill themselves suffer from
depression or some other type of
mental illness.
Classmates of a16-year-old boy
and 15-year-old girl from the Pitt-
ston Area School District who
killed themselves days apart last
week said the teens did not ap-
pear troubled, although experts
warn the signs may not be obvi-
ous.
Days before their deaths, a 13-
year-old boy from Nanticoke fa-
tally shot himself. A fourth teen
from Hazleton took his life on
Tuesday.
Their deaths, coupled with the
suicide of a 17-year-old boy in Au-
gust, bring the total number of
teen suicides in Luzerne County
this year tofive. That compares to
three teensuicides in2011, two in
2010 and none in 2009, according
to the Luzerne County Coroners
Office.
The District Attorneys Office
has joined with school officials
fromthe three districts to investi-
gate the circumstances that ledto
the latest deaths, including alle-
gations by peers that some of the
teens were bullied.
So far, officials say theres no
concrete evidence of bullying.
Evenif its shownthe youths were
targeted, mental health experts
cautionits overly simplistic to tie
a suicide to a single event.
What seems to happen is
stressors accumulate (leading)
to isolation, hopelessness, anger
and negative self-image, said Dr.
Philip Rutter, an associate profes-
sor of psychologyat Widener Uni-
versity in Chester.
Is bullying directly related to
suicide? Its not totally legitimate
to say that. It is fair to say some
young people who are bullied be-
come depressed and feel help-
less.
A key difference between
youths and adults who commit
suicide is that youths tend to act
more impulsively to life stressors
than adults, Rutter said.
One of the things with young
people is they are extremely pre-
sent centered. They dont have
much of a future concept, Rutter
said.
That makes it difficult for them
to wait out the rough patches in
their lives, he said
Adults say, giveit ayear, it gets
better. But a sixth- or seventh-
grader isnt able to give it a week-
end, Rutter said.
Thats partlyattributable tothe
biology andphysiology of teenag-
ers, said Dr. David Rudd, a psy-
chologist at the University of
Utah who studies suicide.
The frontal cortex of the brain,
which controls inhibition, is not
fully developed until a person is
in their mid 20s, Rudd said.
It controls theabilitytoinhibit
impulses. When its not fully de-
veloped you get more impulsive
behavior, he said.
Theres no evidence that any of
the four local suicides were link-
ed in any way. Some have ex-
pressed concern that media cov-
erage of the latest teen suicides
could spawn copycat action.
Oftentimes if there is a great
deal of coverage, people who are
struggling perceive its a way to
achieve significance, Rudd said.
If theyarenot abletoachievesig-
nificance in life, they can achieve
it in death.
That means families and class-
mates need to be extra vigilant in
watchingfor signs apersonis hav-
ing suicidal thoughts.
Sometimes those signs are ob-
vious a person talks about sui-
cide or starts giving away prized
possessions. Other times theyre
far moresubtleanddifficult tode-
tect.
People go into another zone
when they are truly suicidal and
dont necessarily communicate
everything, Salvatore said.
Theyfeel noone cares about me.
When they feel that way they
dont think anyone will under-
stand, so they dont say any-
thing.
In those cases, actions speak
louder than words.
Friends and families need to be
on the lookout for mood changes
someone who was very social
suddenly begins staying home all
the time; a normally calm person
becomes angry or aggressive.
If something goes off you
thinkis not right, dont ignore it,
Salvatore said. We think it cant
happen to us, it only happens to
them. Guess what, it can happen
to anyone.
Salvatore said friends and
classmates are the front line de-
fense to suicide. They may see
signs that parents, teachers and
other adults might miss, particu-
larly messages posted on the so-
cial networking site Facebook.
But youths are often reluctant
to come forward out of fear they
will alienate their friends, Salva-
tore said. Its crucial they speak
up if they sense the slightest hint
of suicidal thoughts.
Kids need to be taught, dont
keep a secret. Its better to lose a
friend for a month than to lose
them forever, he said.
Salvatore said he also stresses
the need for the Luzerne County
community to ensure suicide pre-
vention remains a priority after
this crisis subsides.
The typical response is to
have an assembly for the kids and
a town meeting where you bring
in experts. Then the school year
ends and things return to nor-
mal, Salvatore said. Suicide
prevention should be like fire pre-
vention: You just dont worry
about it after a fire. Its got to be
somethingwe worry about all the
time.
EXPERTS
Continued from Page 1A
People go into another zone when
they are truly suicidal and dont nec-
essarily communicate everything.
They feel no one cares about me.
When they feel that way they dont
think anyone will understand ...
Tony Salvatore
Suicide crisis counselor with Montgomery County
One of the things with young people is
they are extremely present centered.
They dont have much of a future con-
cept. Adults say, give it a year, it gets
better. But a sixth- or seventh-grader
isnt able to give it a weekend.
Dr. Philip Rutter
Associate professor of psychology at Widener University
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
William Tucker of Avoca hugs his daughter Rhiannon, 11, while waiting his turn to comment during Wednesday nights public forum on
teen suicide and bullying held at Pittston Area High School.
If you or someone you know is
having thoughts of suicide, there
are numerous organizations that
can help.
National Suicide Prevention Hot-
line a 24 hour crisis line that
provides counseling services
800-273-TALK (8255).
H E L P I S AVA I L A B L E
Numerous websites provide in-
formation on suicide and preven-
tion. They include:
American Association of Suicid-
ology: www.suicidology.org
American Foundation for Sui-
cide Prevention: www.afsp.org
Society for the Prevention of
Teen Suicide: www.sptsusa.org
National Center for the Prevention
of Youth Suicide: www.suicid-
ology.org/ncpys
M O R E S U I C I D E
I N F O R M AT I O N
Often-
times if
there is a
great deal
of cover-
age, people
who are struggling per-
ceive its a way to
achieve significance. If
they are not able to
achieve significance in
life, they can achieve it
in death.
Dr. David Rudd
Psychologist at the University of
Utah who studies suicide
RISK FACTORS AND WARNING SIGNS OF SUICIDE
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
Talking or writing about suicide
Feelings of hopelessness, helplessness
Dramatic mood changes, including strong anger and rage
Changes in personality
Losing interest in most activities
Changes in sleeping or eating habits
Giving away prized possessions
Mental illness and/or substance abuse
Previous suicide attempts
Firearms in the household
Non-suicidal self-injury (cutting self or other high risk behavior)
Exposure to suicide of friend or family member
Low self-esteem
Warning signs include:
Risk factors include:
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Two Pittston Area students light candles at the teen suicide vigil
Wednesday night.
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
ST.M ARYS
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N S CREEK
NOTICE
TOALL
VETERANS
and ex-service personnel who have loyally
served their country in peace and in war.
If you were honorably discharged and
live anywhere in the State of
Pennsylvania, you are now entitled to a
burial space at no cost in the veterans
memorial section at
Chapel Lawn Memorial Park
RD 5 Box 108, Dallas, PA 18612
This offer is available for a limited time
only. Special protection features are
available for your spouse and minor
children with National Transfer
Protection. This limited time offer is
also extended to members of the
National Guard and Reserve.
Space is limited.
Conditions - Burial spaces cannot be for
investment purposes. You must register
for your free burial space.
1-800-578-9547 Ext. 6001
Happy Birthday In Heaven
Oct. 1, 1939 ~ Oct. 2, 2008
Mickey Coffee
On your birthday and on the 4th
anniversary of losing you, it is
certainly no easier to accept your
absence than it was the rst year,
due in fact, to an irresponsible
19 year old DUI driver.
However, we know for sure that
you are in Heaven because of
your acceptance of the Lords
promise of John 3:16. We all look
forward to once again reuniting
with you on the other side &
maybe even jet-skiing with you
on the River Jordan.
Happy 73rd Birthday
Love, Your Wife Barbara &
Children: Michaelene, Kim,
Mike & Nicole
MARY E. ERICKSON, 89, for-
merly of Bear Creek Township,
passedawayonThursday, Septem-
ber 27, 2012, in Smith Health Care
Center, Mountain Top. Born in
Orion, Ala., she was a daughter of
the late Todd and Eleanor
(Bryant) Qualls. She was preceded
indeath, inadditiontoher parents,
by her husband, Herbert. Surviv-
ing are her daughter, Dena Sztu-
kowski and husband, Kenneth,
Bluffton, S.C.; her son, Keith and
wife, Angela, Berlin, N.J.; her
granddaughter, Kristen.
Graveside services will be
held on Wednesday in the Indian-
town Gap National Cemetery at
10:30 a.m. McCune Funeral Ser-
vice Inc. is handling the arrange-
ments.
SEANFLAHERTY, 28, of Yates-
ville, passed away Thursday, Sep-
tember 27, 2012, at home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and will be announced
from Kiesinger Funeral Services
Inc., 255 McAlpine St., Duryea.
DORA E. (WALTON) BELLES
SWERDON, 89, of White Haven
and Freeland, died September 28,
2012. She was born in White
Haven, November 13, 1922. She
was preceded in death by parents;
first husband, Joseph A. Belles;
second husband, Peter Swerdon;
sons, Robert Swerdon, John Swer-
don, Joseph W. Belles; siblings,
James Walton, Irene Walton Car-
ter, Malhon Walton Sr., Ruth, Viola
Walton Belles, Irvin Walton, Ceci-
lia Walton Belles-Kolasensky, Wil-
liam Walton Jr., and Harry Walton
in1989. Survivedare sons, Donald,
Peter, Michael; nine grandchil-
dren; eight great-grandchildren;
siblings, Eleanor Walton- (Keper-
Schade), Leroy Walton, and Lois
Walton Hall.
Private services will be held at
the convenience of the family. Ar-
rangements are by Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., White Haven.
Condolences may be sent at
www.lehmanfuneralhome.com.
A
nn S. (Latona) Fiume, 90, of
Pittston, passed away on Sep-
tember 29, 2012, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Hospital.
Ann was a daughter of the late
Vincent and Marie Estelle (Terra-
no) Latona.
In addition to her parents, Ann
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, AnthonyFiume; twosons, Mi-
chael, Jimmy; six brothers, Jimmy,
Louie, Marty, Sam, Peter, Carmen;
four sisters, Grace, Mary, Brigette
and Fran.
Surviving are numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services have been en-
trusted to Graziano Funeral Home
Inc., Pittston Township.
Funeral services will begin at
the funeral home on Tuesday at
12:30 p.m. AMass of Christian Buri-
al will be held from St. Joseph Ma-
rello Parish (Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church), Pittston, on Tues-
day at 1 p.m. Interment will follow
in St. Roccos R.C. Cemetery, Pitt-
ston Township. Friends and family
may call from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. on Tuesday at the funeral
home.
For directions to our funeral
home or to submit online condo-
lences, please visit www.graziano-
funeralhome.com.
Ann S. Fiume
September 29, 2012
M
arjorie Pickett, 81, formerly of
Nuangola and Mountain Top,
passed away peacefully surrounded
by her loving family on September
26, 2012, at Mountain Top Senior
Care and Rehabilitation, Mountain
Top.
She was born July 22, 1931, in
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter of the late
Williamand Marjorie Miles Bender.
She was formerly employed by
the Smith Nursing Home in the die-
tary department and also as an aide.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Thomas (Roy) Pickett;
brothers, Stewart Bender, William
Bender Jr.; sister, Joan Shanahan.
The family would like to thank
the staff of Compassionate Care
Hospice and Mountain Top Senior
Care and Rehabilitation for the ex-
cellent care that they provided.
Surviving are her son, Thomas
Pickett and his wife, Annette, Hob-
bie; daughter, Marjorie (Becky)
Pawlowski and her husband, Ber-
nard, Dorrance Township; grand-
children, Thomas Pickett, Nuango-
la, Megan Slivinski, Mountain Top,
Jason Pawlowski, Saint Louis, Mo.;
great-grandchildren, Thomas, An-
thony, and Sara Anne Slivinski all of
Mountain Top; sisters Doris Mor-
ren, Wilkes-Barre, Peggy Myers,
Dorrance Township; brother, Do-
nald Bender, Archbald; several niec-
es and nephews.
Amemorial andcommittal ser-
vice will be held Friday at 1 p.m. at
Maple Hill Cemetery, 68 E. Saint
Marys Road, Hanover Township.
Services will be conducted by the
Rev. George Kropp, Pastor of Laurel
Run Primitive Methodist Church.
Condolences can be sent to the
family at www.eblakecollins.com.
Marjorie Pickett
September 26, 2012
C
harles F. Roos, 89, of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away on Friday,
September, 28, 2012, at his home
two days before his 90th birthday,
which he will celebrate today, Sun-
day, September 30, in Heaven with
his beloved wife, Louise.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre on
September 30, 1922, a sonof the late
Carl and Mary Zoeller Roos. Char-
les was a graduate of Coughlin High
School andhe was a U.S. Navyveter-
an, serving during World War II and
the Korean War. Prior to his retire-
ment he had been employed as a
pipe fitter. In 2003 Mr. Roos was
awarded a Certificate for 55 years of
service as a member of the Pipefit-
ters Union, Local 524.
Charles was a member of St.
Andre Bessette Parish at Holy Sa-
viour Church in Wilkes-Barre. He
was active for many years with the
Boy Scouts of America, was a recip-
ient of the Silver Beaver Award and
a vigil member of the Order of the
Arrow.
He was preceded in death by his
wife of 56 years, Louise Reilly Roos
in 2002. He was preceded in death
also by his brother, Edmund Roos.
Surviving are sons, Donald Roos,
Wilkes-Barre, Richard Roos and his
wife, Mary Lou, Wilkes-Barre;
grandchildren, Heather, Donald,
Colleen, Eric, Alison, Sarah Roos;
sister, Mary Coughlin, Hanover
Township; nieces and nephews.
The Roos family would like to
thank the nurses andstaff fromHos-
pice of the Sacred Heart for their
compassionate and loving care.
Funeral services will be held
on Tuesday at 9 a.m. from the
Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a
Mass of ChristianBurial to followat
9:30 a.m. in St. Andre Bessette Par-
ish at Holy Saviour Church, 54 Hill-
ard St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment
will be in St. Marys Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township. Friends may call
on Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to the Parish of
St. Andre Bessette, 666 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705, or to Hos-
pice of the Sacred Heart, 600 Balti-
more Drive Wilkes-Barre, PA18702.
Online condolences may be sent by
visiting Charles obituary at
www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Charles F. Roos
September 28, 2012
B
arbara A. Zukosky, 71, of Center
Street, Upper Askam section of
Hanover Township, passed away
Friday at Celtic Health Care, Geis-
inger South Wilkes-Barre.
Barbara was born in Wilkes-Barre
on November 27, 1940. She was a
daughter of thelateStephenandLo-
retta (Moran) Sisko.
Barbara was a graduate of Hanov-
er Area High School, class of 1959.
She enjoyedcooking andhada deep
love for her family. She loved her
grandchildren so very much. She
will be sadly missed by all who
knew and loved her.
Barbara was precededindeathby
her son, Michael Zukosky; and
brother, Pete Sisko.
Surviving are her husband of 48
years of marriage, Ted Zukosky, Up-
per Askam; daughters, Debbie Zu-
kosky, Upper Askam; Tracy McFad-
den and her husband, Robert, Sugar
Notch; grandchildren, Robert Ankn-
er, Kala Ankner, Scott McFadden,
Todd McFadden, Paige Zukosky;
sister, Dorothy Zochowski, Wilkes-
Barre; brother, Stephen Sisko,
Mountain Top; several nieces and
nephews.
Private funeral services will be
held from the George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105N. MainSt., Ash-
ley.
Barbara A. Zukosky
September 28, 2012
JOAN SHEA CIGARSKI, 79, of
Shavertown, passed away Septem-
ber 29, 2012, at River Street Ma-
nor, Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Memo-
rial Highway, Dallas.
COOLBAUGH Thomas, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. Monday in
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc.,
255 McAlpine St., Duryea. Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
215 Lackawanna Ave., Dupont.
Friends may call 4 to 8 p.m. today
in the funeral home.
GOODALL Richard, funeral 8:45
a.m. Monday in Miller Bean Funer-
al Home Inc., 436 Cedar Ave.,
Scranton. Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Saint Eulalia Church, 214 Blue
Shutters Rd., Roaring Brook
Township. Friends may call 4 to 8
p.m. today in the funeral home.
HAZENSKI Bernard, funeral 9
a.m. Monday in Bernard J. Pion-
tek Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main
St., Duryea. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Duryea.
Friends may call today from 6 to
8 p.m.
JONES Henry, funeral service 11
a.m. Monday in Williams-Hagen
Funeral Home Inc., 114 W. Main St.,
Plymouth. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today.
KOSIEROWSKI Anthony, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. Mon-
day in Ss. Peter and Paul Church,
Pittston. Friends may call at the
church from 8:30 a.m. until time
of the service.
MARCINIAK Antoni, blessing
service 2 p.m. today in Lehman-
Gregory Funeral Home Inc., 281
Chapel St., Swoyersville. Friends
may call at the funeral home
noon until time of service.
MISCAVAGE Donna, memorial
Mass at 11:15 a.m. today in St.
Benedict Parish, 155 Austin Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre.
PUPA Letitia, funeral services 9
a.m. Monday in Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston. Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph Marello
Parish, 237 William St., Pittston.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m. today
in the funeral home.
PURCELL Joseph, funeral ser-
vices 9:45 a.m. Monday in Curtis
L. Swanson Funeral Home Inc.,
corners of Routes 29 and 118,
Pikes Creek. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in Our Lady of
Victory Church, Harveys Lake.
Friends may call 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. today.
SHELLHAMER Dorcas, memorial
service Sunday, October 14, at 2
p.m. in First Reformed Church,
Willow Street, Plymouth.
FUNERALS
P
eter Mengak, 85, of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away on Saturday,
September 29, 2012, at the Golden
Living Center - East Mountain,
Plains Township.
He was born December 10, 1926,
in Wilkes-Barre, a son of the late Pe-
ter and Emma Martin Mengak.
He was a graduate of G.A.R. Me-
morial High School and attended
the Penn State, Wilkes-Barre cam-
pus. ANavy veteranof WorldWar II,
he served as a gunner on a de-
stroyer. Mr. Mengak was employed
as a general manger of Sterling En-
gineering, which was a division of
Sordoni Enterprises. He retired af-
ter 40 years of service and later was
affiliated with Professional Photo-
graphic Services, Wilkes-Barre. A
former Boy Scout leader, he was an
active member of the former St.
Pauls Church, South Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre. Mr. Mengak was a
member of Good Shepherd Luthe-
ran Church, Wilkes-Barre. He en-
joyed the outdoors and was an avid
hunter and fisherman.
In addition to his parents he was
preceded in death by his brother,
Michael Mengak; and sister, Mary
Mengak.
Surviving are his wife, the former
Jean Hill, with whom he celebrated
their 65th wedding anniversary on
March 8, 2012; son, Edwin Mengak
and his wife, Maryann, Mountain
Top; granddaughter, Marie Men-
gak; sisters, Mildred Andreas and
Eleanor Blaker, both of Wilkes-
Barre; brother, Edward Mengak,
Kingston; nieces and nephews.
The funeral will be held Tues-
day at 10 a.m. from E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159 George
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Services will be
conducted by the Rev. Peter Kuritz,
Pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Interment will be inMemo-
rial Shrine Park, Carverton. Friends
may call Monday from5 until 8 p.m.
Memorial donations may be
made to Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 190 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18701. Condolences can
be sent to the family at www.eblake-
collins.com.
Peter Mengak
September 29, 2012
H
arold L. Zoeller, 98, of Hatfield,
Pa., formerly of Seneca Street,
Wilkes-Barre, passedaway onSatur-
day, September 29, 2012, at the Ma-
nor Care Nursing Center, Montgo-
meryville, Pa.
He was born in Scranton on Au-
gust 20, 1914, a son of the late Louis
and Anna Ward Zoeller. Harold was
an Army veteran, serving during
World War II. He was later employ-
edas a supervisor at Natona Mills in
Dallas.
Harold was a member of St. Ni-
cholas Church in Wilkes-Barre,
where he served as an acolyte and
was a member of the Holy Name So-
ciety. Harold was an avid bowler
and was elected to the PSBAHall of
Fame.
He was preceded in death by his
wife of 52 years, Helen M. Kuczyn-
ski Zoeller in1995. He was also pre-
ceded in death by his sister, Marie
Hoedl and by his brothers, Louis
and Bernard Zoeller.
Surviving are, daughter, Gail
Dukes and her husband, John, Hat-
field; grandchildren, John and Sara
Dukes; nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Wednesday at 9 a.m. from
the Nat &Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a
Mass of ChristianBurial to followat
9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church,
226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be in St. Ma-
rys Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call on Tuesday from5
to 7 p.m. at the funeral home.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to the North
Penn VNA and Hospice, 51 Medical
Campus Drive, Lansdale, PA19446.
Online condolences may be sent by
visiting Harolds obituary at
www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Harold L. Zoeller
September 29, 2012
W
arren E. Kennedy, of St.
Therese Residence, South
Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre, died
Friday, September 28, 2012, at the
inpatient unit of Hospice Commu-
nity Care, Dunmore.
Born June 8, 1921, in Brooklyn,
N.Y., he was a son of the late John
and Rose Cummings Kennedy.
Warren had served with the
United States Navy during World
War II inthePacific Theater of war.
After the war he had been employ-
edas a foremaninthe construction
industry in New York City.
In 1999, Warren relocated to
Wilkes-Barre to be near to his fam-
ily. He has resided at St. Therese
Residence for the last 13 years. He
was a member at Churchof St. Ma-
ry of the Immaculate Conception,
Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre
A celebration of Warrens
life will be held Tuesday at
9:45 a.m. from McLaughlins- The
Family Funeral Home, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with a funeral Mass at 10 a.m. in
Church of St. Mary of the Immac-
ulate Conception, South Washing-
ton Street, Wilkes-Barre. Entomb-
ment will be in Mary Mother of
God Mausoleum in St. Marys
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call Tuesday from
8:45 a.m. until time of service.
Permanent messages and me-
mories may be shared with the
family at www.celebratehislife-
.com.
Warren E.
Kennedy
September 28, 2012
M
arqueen K. McQuown, 91, for-
merly of Shickshinny, died
Friday evening, September 28,
2012, in the emergency room at
Berwick Hospital Center.
She had been staying at the Ber-
wick Retirement Village for the
past 2 years.
BornAugust 19, 1921inJamison
City, she was a daughter of the late
John and Edna (Hess) Getz.
She was a graduate of Benton
High School and was employed for
37 years at Wise Foods until her re-
tirement. She was a member of
First Presbyterian Church, Shick-
shinny, and a past elder of the
church. She served for 34 years on
the Shickshinny Volunteer Ambu-
lance. She was a life member of the
Shick Shawnee Chapter, Order of
the Eastern Star. She was also a
member of the Womens Auxiliary
of the Shickshinny American Le-
gion Post 495.
She was preceded in death by
her brother, Jack Getz; and sister,
Norma Bennett.
Surviving are her husband, Ge-
orge McQuown, whom she mar-
ried January 22, 1966; a son, Ge-
orge Jr., at home; a daughter,
Cathy Sirak, Hunlock Creek;
grandchildren Ryan Sirak and
wife, Angela, Brandon Sirak, Kelly
Sirak; and a great-grandchild, Cy
Sirak.
Funeral services will be held
Monday at 8 p.m. at the Mayo Fu-
neral Home Inc., 77 N. Main St.,
Shickshinny, with the Rev. James
Parks officiating. Burial will be at
the convenience of the family. Vis-
itation will be Monday from 5 to 8
p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the Shickshinny Volun-
teer Ambulance Association, 7
Main St., Mocanaqua PA 18655.
For additional information or to
send condolences, please visit
www.mayofh.com.
Marqueen K.
McQuown
September 28, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
Dr. John El-
mer (Jack) Pri-
chard died
Wednesday,
September 19,
2012, after an
illness of pan-
creatic cancer.
Jack was
born Novem-
ber 19, 1923 in Washington, D.C.,
into a family with Pennsylvania
roots dating to before the Civil
War. His family settled in Hunlock
Creek.
Jack grew up in Washington,
graduating from Catholic Univer-
sity and George Washington Uni-
versity Medical School. He later
served in the U.S. Navy, obtaining
credentials in surgery at the Veter-
ans Administration Hospital (affil-
iated with Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity), Perry Point, Md., and the
University of Oklahoma Medical
School, Oklahoma City, Okla. He
was a board-certified surgeon and
a Fellow of the American College
of Surgeons.
He married Esther, nee Esther
Bell Beatty, his wife of 67 years, on
January 4, 1946. They settled in
Corona, Calif., where Jack had a
practice insurgery for 30 years and
was very active in the community.
He was a Renaissance Man with
many interests, including reading,
writing, philosophy, math, astron-
omy, education, history, traveling,
bicycling, tennis, ice skating, bil-
liards and playing the violin.
Surviving are his wife, Esther;
children, Sophia Jane Szabo, An-
chorage, Alaska; John Stanley Pri-
chard, Ventura, Calif.; Suzanne
Ruth Prichard, Corona, Calif.;
daughter-in-law, Michelle Broneau
Prichard; son-in-law, Dezso Szabo;
grandchildren, John (Jake) Pri-
chard, Anne Prichard, Alicia Aule-
ta, Michael Auleta, Steven Auleta,
Joseph Prichard Szabo and Rose
Szabo.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, John and Ruth Prichard;
sister and brother-in-law, Gladys
and Bill Eggert.
Donations, in Dr. Prichards
name, may be made to Pan-
creatic Cancer Action Network
(PANCAN), www.pancan.org, 1-
877-272-6226.
Dr. John E. Prichard
September 19, 2012
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 9A
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PHILADELPHIA Thou-
sands of conservative Christians
gathered Saturday on Independ-
ence Mall in Philadelphia to pray
for the future of the UnitedStates
in the weeks before the presiden-
tial election.
Religious broadcaster Pat Ro-
bertson and Family Research
Council president Tony Perkins
topped a full day of speakers at
The America for Jesus 2012
prayer rally.
Robertson, a former Republi-
can candidate for president,
calledthe electionimportant, but
didnt mentioneither major polit-
ical party or candidate by name.
I dont care what the ACLU
says or any atheists say. This na-
tion belongs to Jesus, and were
here today to reclaim his sover-
eignty, said Robertson, 82, who
founded the Christian Coalition
and Christian Broadcasting Net-
work, and ran for president in
1988.
Organizers plananother prayer
rally Oct. 20 inWashington, D.C.,
two weeks before President Ba-
rack Obama faces Republican
Mitt Romney in the presidential
election.
Perkins asked the crowd to
pray for elected officials includ-
ing Obama.
We pray that his eyes will be
open to the truth, Perkins said.
A number of event organizers,
though, have been vocal critics of
the Democratic president.
Steve Strang, the influential
Pentecostal publisher of Charis-
ma magazine, which was distrib-
utedat the rally, recently wrote in
a blog post that America is under
threat from a radical homosex-
ual agenda. He also said Obama
seems to be moving toward
some form of European social-
ism.
And speaker Cindy Jacobs has
blamed a mysterious Arkansas
bird-kill last year on Obamas re-
peal of the policy knownas dont
ask, dont tell, whichallows gays
and lesbians to serve openly in
the military.
Speakers throughout the day
condemned abortion, gay mar-
riage and population control as
practiced by Planned Parent-
hood. Christian rock music filled
the historic mall as speakers chal-
lenged the crowd to overcome
the seven deadly sins: pride,
greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath
and slothfulness.
The rally was held outside of
Independence Hall, where the
Declarationof Independence was
signed. Pennsylvania is also
where evangelist George White-
field preached during the first
Great Awakening, the 18th-cen-
tury religious revival that spread
through the American colonies.
Thousands pray for future of U.S.
Christians gathered in
Philadelphia at The America
for Jesus 2012 prayer rally.
By MARYCLAIRE DALE
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Dharma Bohall, 13, extends her arms in prayer during the America
for Jesus prayer rally, Friday, on Independence Mall in Philadelphia.
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
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PHOENIXAman who stole
a car at gunpoint, shot at Phoe-
nix police officers and then led
themon a chase that ended with
his suicide broadcast on national
television was identified Satur-
day as a wanted felon with a long
criminal history.
Jodon F. Romero, 33, was
wanted for violating his parole
for a weapons conviction and
had numerous other violent
crimes in his background, police
spokesman Sgt. Tommy Thomp-
son said.
At the end of an hour-long pur-
suit on an interstate west of
Phoenix on Friday, Romero
pulledinto the desert andanoffi-
cer shot at him, although it ap-
pears he missed, Thompson
said. Romero then walked off the
dirt road, put a gun to his head
and killed himself.
Fox News was covering the
chase that began about midday
Friday using a live helicopter
shot from Phoenix affiliate
KSAZ-TV. Anchor Shepard
Smith told viewers that the vid-
eo was supposed to be on a delay
so it couldbe cut off if something
went awry.
We really messed up, and
were all very sorry, Smith said
minutes after the suicide aired.
Fox apologized for showing the
violence on air. KSAZ itself was
not airing the chase.
On Saturday, Thompson said
police did everything in their
power to de-escalate the situa-
tion, but Romero seemed intent
on continuing a crime spree that
began with a minor incident
where he apparently hit a pass-
ing car with his hand, leading to
a call to police.
An autopsy will determine if
Romero was actually shot by an
officer before shooting himself.
Thompson said it was clear to of-
ficers they had to stop Romero
fromgetting back to a populated
area.
Anybody who will shoot at
police officers, that shows a total
disregard for them, will shoot at
anybody else, he said. Even af-
ter we backed out all the marked
units he still continued to go.
Arizona Department of Cor-
rections records show Romero
was imprisoned from April 2010
to June 2012 for a felony weap-
ons charge.
Man who killed himself
on TV after chase IDd
Jodon F. Romero stole car at
gunpoint, shot at Phoenix
cops, led them on chase.
By BOB CHRISTIE
Associated Press
The Social Security numbers
of Army recipients of the Medal
of Honor and Distinguished Ser-
vice Cross were inadvertently
postedonline by a Pentagoncon-
tractor and were available to the
public until they were discov-
ered by a Vietnam veteran who
researches military medal
awards.
The Social Security numbers
of 31winners of the militarys top
two awards for valor in combat
were posted by a contractor con-
ducting medals research for the
Pentagon. The information was
removed Friday after the Penta-
gon learned of the breach
through the efforts of Doug Ster-
ner of Alexandria, Va., a Bronze
Star winner who has spent 14
years researching medals.
The 31 Social Security num-
bers were posted on a link that
contains details of the 518 recip-
ients awarded the Medal of Hon-
or, Distinguished Service Cross
and Silver Star since Sept. 11,
2001.
I was stunned Imvery up-
set this information got out
there, said Sterner, 62.
Sterner said Google searches
of several medal winners names
ledhimto the link, where the So-
cial Security numbers were in-
cluded along with names, ranks,
units and brief narratives of bat-
tlefield heroics in Iraq and Af-
ghanistan.
Erik Muendel, chief executive
officer of Brightline Interactive,
an Alexandria, Va., company
that has compiled information
on medal recipients for the Pen-
tagon, said he didnt know how
the Social Security numbers
ended up online. He said the
company was supposed to re-
ceive only unclassified informa-
tion.
A Pentagon spokesman, Maj.
S. Justin Platt, said some Social
Security numbers were included
when Brightline Interactive
posted a link to an html-coded
file used to create content for an
interactive Gallery of Heroes
kiosk at the October 2011confer-
ence of the Association of the
United States Army, a nonprofit
educational group.
Sterner said the Social Securi-
ty numbers appeared to have
been available for some time.
Social Security numbers wrongly posted
Social Security numbers of 31
military award winners posted
by contractor doing research.
By DAVID ZUCCHINO
Los Angeles Times
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 11A
CLICK
timesleader.com
7
7
8
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1
7
GANG AWARENESS
FORUM IN HAZLETON
OSTERHOUT FREE LIBRARY
WING FLING
KINGSTON SENIOR
CENTER VARIETY SHOW
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
A gang awareness information session was held Thurs-
day at Arthur Street Elementary School in Hazleton.
Among those attending were Rosemary and Walter
Bringslid.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Osterhout Free Library in Wilkes-Barre hosted a Wing Fling
Saturday to celebrate the 30th anniversary of its Ken L. Pollock Chil-
drens Wing. Isaac, left, and MathewBolan took part in the event.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Comedy skits and belly dancing were some acts at the
Kingston Senior Center variety show on Wednesday.
Betty Lee Frusciante, left, Mary Ann Prince, Sarah Der-
hammer and Esther Paratore were there.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Nicholas Triano, left, Craig and Matthew Budde
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Henry, left, and Devin Hughes
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Gen Wenger, left, and Gene and Diane English
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Mike Shay and Kelly Hastings of Congressman Lou Bar-
lettas office
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Alyssa and C.J. Kruszka
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Arlene Finley, left, Dolly Yunkunis and Darlene and Paul
Wheeler
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Gene and Jeanne Cannon
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Alyssa Pugh, left, Sadie Fuller and Elene Gober
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Frank Warunek and Carolyn Tavella
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Michaelene Brown, left, Marge Matisko and Lauren Pote
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Anthony Sak and Delores McCrea
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Frank Elick, left, and Hugh Rolf

PAGE 12A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
paign appearances, thousands of
political ads and billions of dol-
lars invested in the race, this is a
singular moment in the contest.
Upward of 50 million people are
expected to watch each of the de-
bates, drawing the largest politi-
cal audience of the year.
Forty-one percent of Ameri-
cans reported watching all of the
2008debates, and80percent said
they saw at least a bit, according
to a Pew Research Center poll.
That intense interest tends to
crowd out everything else for a
time, adding to the debates im-
portance. With polls indicating
that Obama has been gaining
ground steadily in the most com-
petitive states, the pressure is on
Romneytoturnina breakout per-
formance.
The Denver debate, 90 min-
utes devoted to domestic policy,
airs live at 9 p.m. EDT, with the
two men seated side by side in
elevated directors chairs. Rom-
neyandObama debate againOct.
16 in Hempstead, N.Y., and Oct.
22 in Boca Raton, Fla. Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden and Republican
Paul Ryan have their lone debate
Oct. 11 in Danville, Ky.
With early or absentee voting
already under way in more than
half the states, any first impres-
sions created in the debates
could well be last impressions.
What the candidates say is sure
to matter immensely, but how
they say it may count for even
more.
We remember visual impres-
sions fromdebates more than we
remember specific words, says
Alan Schroeder, a Northeastern
University professor whos writ-
ten a history of presidential de-
bates.
Whether the candidates smile
or grimace, strike a confident or
defensive pose, speakwitha reso-
nant or strained tone of voice, it
all matters. That may be particu-
larlytruefor theall-important un-
decided voters and those still
open to changing their minds.
Staunch Democrats and Re-
publicans may well be firm in
their choices, says Patti Wood, an
Atlanta-basedexpert onbodylan-
guage, but if less partisan voters
are frightened in general about
their lives, if theyre insecure,
theyre going to pick the most
charismatic person.
Bothcandidates have challeng-
es to overcome on that score, ac-
cording to Wood.
Obama, 51, has been sounding
very tired and very strained
lately, she says, and Romney, 65,
has a problem with appearing
superior and cold.
Overall, she says, Romney is
looking a little bit younger than
Obamaright now, interms of en-
ergy if not wrinkles.
Both candidates are experi-
enced and competent debaters.
But each, setting the judgment
bar high for his opponent, is
working overtime to puff up the
skills of the other guy and play
downhis owndebate credentials.
Romneyrecentlydescribedthe
president as eloquent indescrib-
ing his vision during the 2008
debates. But the GOP nominee
added that Obama cant win by
his words, because his record
speaks so loudly in our ears.
Obama campaign spokeswo-
man Jen Psaki stresses that Rom-
neyhas beenpreparingfor thede-
bates with more focus than any
presidential candidate inmodern
history. Sketching sky-high
stakes, Psaki says the Republi-
cans fully expect the debates to
be their turning point in the
campaign.
The president himself mocked
the idea that Romney still can al-
ter the campaign dynamic.
Every few days he keeps on
saying hes going to reboot this
campaign and theyre going to
start explaining very specifically
howthis plan is going to work
and then they dont, he said last
week while campaigning in Vir-
ginia.
For all their positioning, both
candidates will usethedebates to
try to surmount the same chal-
lenges that they long have con-
fronted.
Romney, frequently criticized
for shifting his positions to sync
up with the politics of the mo-
ment, needs to project a kind of
character, a kind of maturity that
allows him to be presidential,
says Fields.
Obama, an incumbent whos
shown himself to be comfortable
in the media glare, doesnt have
to prove that part, says Fields.
He has to prove that he has real
answers to problems that have
not been solved in his first term
andfor whichthere is a great deal
of unrest.
Romney is sure to be ques-
tioned anewabout his caught-on-
video comment dismissing the
47 percent of Americans who
dont pay federal income tax as
victims who wont take respon-
sibility for their lives.
How can Gov. Romney have
such a profound misunderstand-
ingof the people of this country?
Biden asked during an appear-
ance SaturdayinFort Myers, Fla.,
When I hear this talk, not just
fromRomney and Ryan, but from
this new Republican Party ... I
dont recognize the country
theyre talking about.
Former President Bill Clinton,
offering a bit of unsolicited ad-
vice to the opposition, says Rom-
ney would be wise not to double
downonthat 47percent remark.
AP FILE PHOTO
Then-Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama speaks
during a presidential debate on Oct. 15, 2008.
AP FILE PHOTO
Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney during a Republican
presidential debate Oct. 18, 2011, in Las Vegas.
DEBATE
Continued from Page 1A
Precautions required
The status means BP and its
wind farm partner, Sempra U.S.
Gas &Power, must take extraor-
dinary precautions toprotect the
health, safety and welfare of the
reptiles.
Asnake crossing or sunning it-
self in the road brings produc-
tionto a screeching halt as crews
must stop the trucks and call in
snake monitors specially
trained environmentalists who
capture the rattlers and move
them to the side.
It would be a lot easier to just
run the reptile over, Kelly ac-
knowledges, but regulations
strictly prohibit the intentional
killing of the timber rattlesnake.
Its beenreal educationfor Kel-
lyas hes come torealize: BPmay
one of the biggest petroleum
companies in the world, but in
this part of the country, rattlers
rule.
Once completed, the $250mil-
lionMehoopany project will con-
sist of 88 wind turbines located
across a 9,000-acre site inNoxen,
Forkston, EatonandMehoopany
townships. Construction began
last October and is scheduled to
end on Dec. 31.
The site is a rattlesnake mec-
ca, home to an estimated 800 to
1,000 rattlesnakes, said Eric
Heppenof Shoener Environmen-
tal in Dickson City, the company
BP and Sempra retained to help
ensure the project complies with
regulations.
Those efforts go far beyond
avoiding crushing the reptiles as
they cross the road. Before con-
struction began, extensive stud-
ies were conducted to pinpoint
the location of snake dens, Hep-
pen said.
Younot onlyhavetoavoidthe
snake, you have to buffer to the
point you dont affect a single
rattlesnake den, Heppen said.
Critters get costly
The efforts have added signif-
icant cost and created some ma-
jor challenges, Kelly and Heppn-
er said. The companies hadtore-
locate roughly eight of the wind
turbines and re-route about 10
miles of roadways after snake
dens were discoveredinthe orig-
inally planned locations.
There were also some unex-
pected costs like the special
matting thats placed on the
mountainside to reduce erosion
of soil once trees are cut. It could
not be used because BP and
Sempra learnedthesnakes could
not pass throughthe type of mat-
ting that had been purchased.
Kelly, safety manager for the
project, said protecting the
snakes also tests the patience of
workers.
With 33 miles of roads, it can
take 10 to 15 minutes before a
snake monitor makes it to the lo-
cation to move the snake.
You have to stop traffic and
wait for the snake tocross, or call
in a snake monitor, Kelly said.
Snakes are coldblooded and
love to sun themselves on rocks
and the dirt roadways. During
the peak season of snake activity
in June and July, snake monitors
were called out as many as 15
times a day, he said.
Some of the workers many of
whom are not fond of snakes
would prefer to take care of the
problem in a whole nother
way, Kelly said.
But we wont let that hap-
pen, he said. Its immediate
dismissal if you intentionally
harm a snake.
The efforts have made a differ-
ence. Only about 20 rattlesnakes
out of the hundreds that pop-
ulate the site have been killed,
said Kathy Michell, one of five
snake monitors employed at the
site.
Samson is one of the success
stories. The timber rattlesnake
was discovered on the side of the
road about a month ago. It had
apparently been run over by an
all-terrain vehicle not connected
to the project, Michell said.
Saving a snake
At first, Samson named in
honor of the biblical figure
known for his strength ap-
pearedtobe dead. Incompliance
with regulations, Michells son,
Tom, who is also a snake moni-
tor, picked the snake up to pho-
tograph it and record its death.
When he dropped it to the
ground, he saw a slight move-
ment.
The snake, which suffered a
spinal injury, could not crawl or
hold its head up.
Kathy Michell took the reptile
home and nursed it back to
health. She released it back into
the wild last week.
Michell and Heppen credited
BP and Sempra for their cooper-
ation in protecting the snakes,
noting the companies have gone
beyond what theyre required to
do.
For instance, the companies
have voluntarily avoided build-
ing on gestation areas for the
snakes, even though those areas
are not officially off limits.
It was critical we leave as
much habitat as we could, Hep-
pen said. It ensures their long-
time survival.
The bucket Kathy Michell uses to transport rattlesnakes. The tail is all that can be seen of Samson, a timber rattlesnake,
as he slithers into the woods following his release.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Tom Michell, one of the snake monitors at the Mehoopany Wind Farm project, releases a female rattlesnake on the rock where it was
found.
SNAKES
Continued from Page 1A
Tom Michell releases the rattlesnake near where it was found near the Mehoopany Wind Farm
project in Noxen Township.
Kathy Michell attaches a transmitter to a timber rattlesnake so
she can track the snakes movements in the wild.
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
G
reat heroes ruled the airwaves
in 1940s and 1950s radio.
Whether bringing bad guys to
justice in the Old West or exploring
outer space, these fearless and re-
sourceful men always kept their wits
about them as they made life safe for
everyday folk like ourselves.
Yes, many a box of cereal I downed
and many a plastic artifact I sent
away for to show my solidarity with
these titans of manliness whose ex-
ploits rang out from our Silvertone
and Zenith weekly.
But, at this distance of more than
half a century, and fully aware that I
run the risk of shocking my fellow
hero worshippers, I have a confession
to make.
I thought some of the sidekicks
were more interesting figures than
the larger-than-life men whom my
favorite shows were built around.
Dont get me wrong, now. I was as
devoted as anyone else to Wild Bill
Hickok when with blazing guns or
flying fists he would smoke the bad
guys. Of course I ate my share of
Kelloggs Sugar Corn Pops in tribute
to his heroism.
But, I have to admit, the rather
bland voice of Guy Madison as Hick-
ok never really burrowed into my
youthful brain as much as the cackly
laugh of that wonderful actor Andy
Devine as his sidekick Jingles. In fact,
its Jingles voice I remember today.
I felt for Jingles when, in the open-
ing of the show he would call to Hick-
ok on a dash across the plains Hey,
Wild Bill, wait for me. Even then I
sensed that Jingles was far closer to
real life and to what I would likely
be than the intrepid and just-too-
perfect U.S. Marshal who could tame
the whole west with a steely gaze.
I liked the way Jingles, though slow
on the draw and out-of-shape, never
got excited and always radiated confi-
dence that right would win out in the
end if only you showed up and did
your share, small though it might be.
Thats probably why I had a sneak-
ing admiration for the other radio
sidekicks of the time, even though I
genuinely respected their bosses.
Hey, heres a mini-quiz (answers
below). No, Im not including the
Lone Ranger and Tonto. Theyre too
famous.
But does anybody remember the
name of Straight Arrows sidekick?
Straight Arrow was a Native Amer-
ican frontier crime fighter who used
the wisdom of two worlds to keep
good people safe. There was a totally
unprepossessing older guy who
helped him along.
How about Commander Buzz
Corry of the Space Patrol, that Sat-
urday morning staple? A young fellow
on loan from the space academy ac-
companied him as he rocketed count-
less parsecs across the universe.
I never missed the exploits of the
Silver Eagle, an intrepid Northwest
Mountie who carried the crowns
justice to the frozen wilds. His side-
kick was sort of a Jingles with a
French Canadian accent.
The Cisco Kid? Who was his
loyal buddy in the old Southwest?
Ah, sidekicks. I liked them one and
all, and because they were so much
more real than their bosses, they have
remained in my memory to this day.
Heres what Ive learned: Never
scorn a sidekick. In their own ways,
these guys were heroes too.
Got em all? OK, here they are.
Packy (Straight Arrow); Cadet Happy
(Buzz Corry); Joe Bideaux (the Silver
Eagle); Pancho (the Cisco Kid).
I could think of more but, please
excuse me; I suddenly have this crav-
ing for a big bowl of cereal.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
A salute to all
the heroes of
classic TV
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
C
indy Maillouxis the chairpersonof the NursingDepartment
at Misericordia University. Mailloux, 55, attended Meyers
High School and received her bachelors degree in nursing at
Wilkes College and her masters degree in nursing at Misericor-
dia University. She attended Penn State University and received
her Ph.D. in nursing. Cindy lives in Mountain Top with her hus-
band, Peter. The couple has sons: Bradley and Cliff.
What got you interested in nurs-
ing? When I was in high school I was
part of theFutureNurses Organization
andthat really got meinterested. I was
alsoacandystriper duringhighschool
and that got me even more interest-
ed.
When you graduated from Wilkes
what did you do next? I became a
staff nurse in Detroit and Cleveland.
After a while I became interested in
nursing education so I moved back to
Northeastern, Pa. to pursue my mas-
ters degree. Once I did that I started
teaching at NPW Hospital, which is
now Geisinger. I then taught at Penn
StateWorthingtonfor14years. I decid-
ed to go for my Ph.D. after that and
ended up at Misericordia. I wanted to
advance my position and this was the
next step.
So you became the chairperson of
the Nursing Department there. How
has it been working there with the
staff and students? I have loved
working there. Everyone at Misericor-
dia does service for the communities
and I have been proud to be a part of
that.
What have been some of the
events or causes you have partici-
pated in? I currently serve as a
board member with the Northeast
Regional Cancer Institute and volun-
teer my time to evaluate nursing
programs for accreditation. I once
took a group of students to Guyana on
a service trip. It was a highly profound
thing to see underdeveloped health
care there. It was incredible seeing the
M
INNEAPOLIS A bustling city can be a difficult
place to hold on to ones identity. Then theres Jessi-
ca Mooney, who has given up even trying.
Imlooking for this kind of look, says Mooney as she sur-
veys Google bad-boy1980s images of tennis star John McEn-
roe, That kind of angry, argumentative look.
Within seconds Mooney is dressing up an old white tennis
shirt with strips of blue tape, reaching for a curly wig and
cutting up a red bath towel she will fashion into a headband.
A few angry scowls into a webcam, a couple clicks on her
computer and Mooneys latest picture is posted. In a classic
McEnroe Youcannot be serious pose, Mooney is nowupon
Facebook. Thats the theme for the week, she says. Angry
week.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AP PHOTOS
Jessica Mooney poses as a tennis player for a Facebook photo of herself.
See JESSIE, Page 3B
MEET CINDY MAILLOUX
F
R
E
D
A
D
A
M
S
/
F
O
R
T
H
E
T
I
M
E
S
L
E
A
D
E
R
See MEET, Page 2B
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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students responses and how
grateful they are for what they
have in their lives here in the
states.
You have been very success-
ful with your career. How do
you try to translate to or share
that success with students? I
believe in trying to provide edu-
cational opportunities for every-
one, whether it be high school,
college or technical trade
schools. I always want toencour-
age students to move forward at
all levels.
Was there anyone in your life
who afforded those chances by
way of their actions? My par-
ents were instrumental in my
success becausetheysupported
me the whole way and allowed
me to do what I wanted to do.
You mentioned going to
Guyana, is there any place you
wouldliketovisit inthefuture?
I amactually going to Ireland in
November. That should be great.
I would like to mention that I
went to China and that was truly
fascinating. The history there is
amazing. The temples and impe-
rial gardens were amazing. I am
writing a paper on the Terracota
soldiers or warriors. It was just a
great trip.
What do youlike to do here in
Pennsylvania? We love to
drive in the mountains and visit
the Skytop Lodge (in the Poco-
nos). We also are into skiing
heavilyasbothof mysonsarein-
structors at Jack Frost and my
husband is with the Ski Patrol.
What is your all-time favor-
ite food? Pizza with extra
cheese.
Do you have favorite TV
shows or movies that you
watch? Love reality shows like
Survivor. I really enjoyed the
film The Notebook.
Do you have a favorite quote
or saying? Dont blow out
someone elses candle to make
yours shine brighter.
Who do you like in the music
world? Country music is a fa-
voriteandI reallylikeBlakeShel-
ton who was on The Voice.
What do you think North-
eastern Pennsylvania has to
improve upon the most? The
area really needs to be promot-
edbetter sincewearesocloseto
major cities like New York and
Philadelphia.
What would you consider as
the proudest moments in your
life? I would have to say that
having my children and family is
most important to me personal-
ly. In the professional world it
would be the completion of my
Ph.D.
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
John Gordon writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7229.
Everyone at
Misericordia does ser-
vice for the communities
and I have been proud to
be a part of that.
Solomon/Plains Junior High School recently held a program on cyberbullying by Janene Holter
from the Pennsylvania Attorney Generals Office. Students were educated on the negative effects of
cyberbullying and its legal consequences. Participants, from left, first row: Belinda Tabron, assistant
principal; Deputy Erin Joyce, Luzerne County Sheriffs Department; Richard Werhun; Alexis Baker;
Brooke Iverson; and Heather Crawford, project facilitator, Wilkes-Barre Area School District. Second
row: Brian Fischer, activities director; Kathy Kownacki, guidance counselor; Officer Paul Myers, Wilkes-
Barre Police Department; Holter; Officer Tim Minnick, Plains Police Department; officer Barry Jacob,
resource officer, Wilkes-Barre School District; and officer Brian Lavan, director of security, Wilkes-
Barre Area School District.
Solomon students learn consequences of cyberbullying
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3B
P E O P L E
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She laughs, anticipating the
feedback, Its exciting.
And thus begins a typical
morning for Mooney. Every
weekday for the past three years
she has added a picture of herself
toher Facebookpage, made-upin
some costume to fit a weekly
theme of her choosing, KARE-TV
reports (http://kare11.tv/Ulh-
DEE).
For Annie week, she posed as
Annie Oakley, Annie Lennox, An-
nie Hall and Resusi-anne the
last of which, she admitted, was
totally creepy.
Among her posts for Hot
Mess Week were a bearded Joa-
quin Phoenix and a bald and bug-
eyed Britney Spears. I love to
dress up. I love to entertain.
And since the marketing man-
ager in the University of Minne-
sotas College of Education and
Human Development was sur-
rendering her identity, she in-
vented a new one: Dressy Jes-
sie is the name she chose for her
Facebook page.
It all started innocently when,
in the midst of job change within
the university, Jessie decided to
show her friends the contents of
her closet one day at a time. I
think I was lonely, she laughs.
The postings started with dif-
ferent color blouses, evolving in-
toaccessories till one blingled
to another.
These I wear for Harry Ca-
ray, she laughs, pulling an over-
sizedpair of glasses out of a draw-
er filled with eyewear.
Theres the drawer of wigs,
she says, pulling out a gray mop.
Captain Kangaroo. That was
animal week.
She grabs another. Veruca
Salt fromWilly Wonka, she says,
turning on her best snotty voice.
Daddy I want a goose that lays a
golden egg, now!
Nearby stands a closet filled
with blouses and gowns. She
pulls out a red blouse. I bought
this especially because I needed
to be Nancy Reagan.
Now 800 photos posted and
counting, one might think Moo-
ney would be running out of
ideas. I would think Id be run-
ningout of ideas too, she laughs.
Yet the inspiration just seems
to keep coming, to the delight of
nearly 800 followers whove dis-
covered Dressy Jessie on Face-
book.
One of my favorites was the
dogs of Westminster week, says
Jerry Smith, who found himself
hooked after being steered to
Mooneys Facebook page by a
friend. Its crazy because every
picture she looks like the same
woman, yet she morphs into ev-
erybody, everything.
Blessed with a face as mallea-
ble as clay, Mooney is a master of
human expressions.
Smithconsiders her posts tobe
a form of art, and Mooney isnt
disagreeing. The fact that Ive
got an audience, you know peo-
ple waiting to see what Imgoing
to do everyday its kind of like
anentrance. SoI thinkof it as per-
formance art.
JESSIE
Continued from Page 1B
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
T
anya Marie Bernacki and Bran-
don Kyle Polak, together with
their families, announce their engage-
ment and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Stan and Pat Bernacki, Jessup.
Tanya is a 2006 graduate of Valley
View High School and earned a bach-
elors degree in medical imaging from
Misericordia University in 2010. She
is an MRI technologist at Advanced
Imaging Specialists.
The prospective groom is the son
of Roseann Polak and the late Eugene
Polak.
Brandon is a 2004 graduate of
Hanover Area High School. He
earned a bachelors degree in medical
imaging from Misericordia University
in 2009. He is a cardiovascular tech-
nologist at Berwick Hospital Center.
The couple will exchange vows
Nov. 10, 2012, at St. Leos Church,
Ashley.
Polak, Bernacki
C
andice Caroline Chilek and Ste-
phen Yale Marr are pleased to
announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
Candice is the daughter of the late
Elizabeth and Joseph Chilek.
Candice is a graduate of Wilkes
University holding a Bachelor of Fine
Arts degree with post graduate stud-
ies in education, art therapy and
special education. The bride-to-be is
the owner of Thomas Properties
LLC/Thomas Barbecue, Moosic, Pa.
Mr. Marr is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Yale Marr, Cobble Hill, Brit-
ish Columbia, Canada.
Stephen is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada,
as a licensed professional chemical
engineer. The prospective groom is a
process engineer for Worley Parsons
Engineering, Reading, Pa.
The wedding is planned for Oct. 5,
2012.
Marr, Chilek
L
isa Nevanpera and John Appel Jr.,
together with their families, an-
nounce their engagement and up-
coming marriage.
Lisa is the daughter of Paul and
Josephine Nevanpera, Manor Park,
N.Y. She is the granddaughter of the
late Joseph and Concetta Buono and
the late Raymond and Ruth Nevan-
pera.
John Jr. is the son of John and
Mary Pat Appel, West Wyoming. He
is the grandson of Catherine and
Robert Thornton, West Pittston;
Constance Appel, Duryea; and the
late Donald Appel.
The bride-to-be is a 2000 graduate
of Westhampton Beach High School,
New York. She earned a bachelors
degree in finance and business ad-
ministration from Sacred Heart Uni-
versity, Connecticut, in 2004, and a
masters degree in business education
from Hofstra University, New York, in
2010.
The prospective groom is a 2001
graduate of Wyoming Area High
School, Exeter. He earned a bache-
lors degree in chemistry in 2005 and
a Master of Business Administration
degree in 2012 from Lehigh Uni-
versity, Pennsylvania. He is employed
by Syngenta as an R&D strategy
manager.
The couple resides in Basel, Swit-
zerland, and plans to wed on Dec. 22,
2012, in St. Francis Church, Hoboken,
N.J.
Nevanpera, Appel
L
aura Rose Kelly, daughter of Tim-
othy and Mary Kelly, Drums, and
Ryan Matthew Janov, son of Helen
Davis and Richard Janov, were united
in marriage on July 14, 2012, in a
double-ring ceremony performed by
the Rev. Connell McHugh at Good
Shepherd Catholic Church, Drums.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose her sister, Kristin
Boyle, Drums, as the matron of hon-
or. Bridesmaids were Morgan and
Meghan Kelly, cousins of the bride,
and Sherry Bereznak and Allison
Dennison, friends of the bride. Isabel-
la Rose Boyle, niece and goddaughter
of the bride, served as the flower girl.
Richard Janov, brother of the
groom, performed the duties of best
man. Groomsmen were Tyler Davis,
brother of the groom, and Christoph-
er Brown, Elvis Lefkoski, and Daniel
Hyzenski, friends of the groom.
A reception following the ceremo-
ny was held at the Waterfront Ban-
quet Facility, Plains Township. A
shower was given in honor of the
bride by her mother at the Brass
Buckle Mexican Restaurant, Conyng-
ham. The rehearsal dinner was host-
ed by the mother of the groom at
Best Western Genetti Inn and Suites,
Hazleton.
The bride is a 2002 graduate of
Hazleton Area High School. She
earned her Bachelor of Science de-
gree in psychology and her Master of
Social Work degree from Marywood
University. The bride is employed as
a licensed social worker at Friendship
House, Scranton.
The groom is a 2003 graduate of
Coughlin High School. He has
worked in a lead shift position at
Mission Food, Inc., Mountain Top,
since 2007.
The couple enjoyed a honeymoon
in Montego Bay, Jamaica. They re-
side in Wilkes-Barre.
Kelly, Janov
P
eter S. Scarantino and Carla A.
Saporito exchanged wedding
vows on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012, with
the Rev. Alan Rupert officiating.
The ceremony was held at the
Gramercy Ballroom, Pittston, fol-
lowed by a cocktail hour and dinner
reception. Music was provided by
Millennium.
The bride was given in marriage by
her two daughters, Mrs. Adrian Vilar-
do, Pittston, and Mrs. Dana Rivera,
Wilkes-Barre. Her matron of honor
was Mrs. Tina Marie Dolgash, Old
Forge. Mr. Frank Borzell, Inkerman,
was the best man. The ring bearer
was Joshua E. Rivera, grandson of the
bride.
Carla is an employee of Mondelez
Industries in Hanover Township and
Peter is employed by the Topps Com-
pany in Duryea.
The couple resides in Pittston.
Scarantino, Saporito
J
anyne Marie Swircek and Eugene
Anthony Gurnari were united in
marriage on May 19, 2012, by the
Rev. John Chmil at Holy Trinity
Church, Swoyersville.
The bride is the daughter of John
Swircek and the late Paulette Swir-
cek, Swoyersville. She is the grand-
daughter of the late John and Helen
Swircek and the late Joseph and
Elizabeth Kochis.
The groom is the son of Anthony
and Bernadette Gurnari, Hanover
Township. He is the grandson of Rita
Tarnalicki and the late Frank Tarnal-
icki, Wilkes-Barre Township, and the
late Dominick and Lillian Gurnari.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle and given in marriage by her
father. Honorary mothers of the
bride were Cathy Mericle and Mau-
reen Szalkowski. The bride chose
her sister, Christa Scott, as her ma-
tron of honor. Bridesmaids were
Jennifer Burry, sister of the bride;
Karen Glova and Amy Freeman,
close friends of the bride; and Deena
Gurnari, sister of the groom. Junior
bridesmaid was Debra Scott, niece of
the bride. The flower girl was Katie
Tarnalicki, goddaughter of the
groom.
The groom chose his best friend,
Robert Lloyd, as best man. Groom-
smen were Joseph Gurnari, brother
of the groom, and Ryne Salsavage,
Jeremy Schlegel and Craig Scott,
close friends of the groom. Junior
groomsman was Ethan Scott, neph-
ew of the bride. The ring bearer was
Tyler Swircek, nephew and godson
of the bride. He was escorted down
the aisle by his parents John and
Gina Swircek.
Scriptural readings were given by
John Swircek, brother of the bride;
Anthony Orlando, close friend of the
couple; and Antoinette Smith, aunt
and godmother of the groom.
A rehearsal dinner was hosted by
the grooms parents at Andy Perugi-
nos Restaurant, Luzerne. The recep-
tion, hosted by the brides father,
was held at the Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center, Wilkes-Barre. To
honor their late mother, the bride
and her brother danced to Like My
Mother Does. Dear family friend,
Bill Lynch, sang a special song for
the couple at the reception. The
bride was honored at a bridal shower
by the honorary mothers of the
bride, bridal party and mother of the
groom at the Genetti Hotel and
Conference Center.
The couple honeymooned in Sa-
lem, Mass. They reside in Swoyers-
ville.
Swircek, Gurnari
D
r. Sara Dorman and Nicholas
Lauri were united in the sacra-
ment of marriage on May 12, 2012, at
Holy Trinity Church, Swoyersville, by
the Rev. Richard Hockman.
The bride is the daughter of John
and Nancy Dorman, Larksville. She is
the granddaughter of Fred and Mar-
tha Dorman, Swoyersville, and the
late Raymond and Elizabeth Vanyo.
The groom is the son of Francis
and Kathleen Lauri, Larksville. He is
the grandson of Delphine Bienick and
the late Bernard Bienick, Lynwood,
and the late Francis and Theresa
Lauri.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose her best friend, Jill
Gurgal, as matron of honor. Brides-
maids were Katy Meade, Maura Neh-
er, Alexis Holroyde, Amelia Khan and
Katie Sweet, friends of the bride.
Taylour Lauri, brother of the
groom, served as best man. Groom-
smen were Elliott Lauri, brother of
the groom; Neil Dorman and Joel
Dorman, brothers of the bride; David
Caruso, cousin of the groom; and
Sam Cohen, friend of the groom.
An evening cocktail hour and din-
ner reception were held at The High-
lands at Newberry Estates. The bride
was honored at a shower given by her
mother and attendants at the Irem
Country Club, Dallas. A rehearsal
dinner was hosted by the parents of
the groom at Vanderlyns Restaurant,
Kingston.
The bride is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School and
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in biology from Kings College in
2006 and a Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine degree from the University
of Pennsylvania in 2010. She is em-
ployed as an associate veterinarian at
Plains Animal Hospital, Plains Town-
ship.
The groom is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School and
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in business administration, with a
minor in marketing, from Miser-
icordia University in 2012. He is em-
ployed as a therapeutic support staff
member with Community Counsel-
ing Services, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple honeymooned in San
Francisco, Calif., and Oahu and Maui,
Hawaii. They happily reside in King-
ston with their two cats, Jack and
Jinx.
Lauri, Dorman
C
rista Giordano and Christopher
Gerald Reedy were united in
marriage on Sept. 9, 2011, in St.
Anthonys Church of St. Barbaras
Parish, Exeter. The ceremony was
officiated by the Rev. Joseph Sib-
liano O.S.J.
The bride is the daughter of
Ross and Margaret Giordano, Exe-
ter. She is the granddaughter of
the late Doris and Michael Vacula
and the late Samuel and Mary
Giordano, all of Exeter.
The groom is the son of Gerald
and Pauline Reedy, Duryea. He is
the grandson of Leola Bartush and
the late Anthony Bartush, Avoca,
and the late Edward and Leneita
Reedy, Harding.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father. She chose her cou-
sin, Kimberly Pasko, as her ma-
tron of honor. Bridesmaids were
Maryann Giordano, sister-in-law of
the bride; Jennifer Vacula and
Heather Gallo, cousins of the
bride; and Amy Croughn, friend of
the bride. Junior bridesmaid was
Eisela Pasko, cousin of the bride.
Flower girls were Ava Vacula, Mia
Gallo and Elizabeth Hannon, cou-
sins of the bride.
The groom chose his friend,
Edward Cherundolo, as his best
man. Groomsmen were Anthony
Giordano and David Giordano,
brothers of the bride, and Jeffery
Hoover and James Demich, friends
of the groom. Jayden Reedy, son
of the groom, was ring bearer.
Offertory gifts were presented
by Jessica, Isabella and Gianna
Cavalari, cousins of the groom.
Organist/soloist was Ann Manga-
niello, soloist was William Bal-
dauff and flutist was Linda Pineno.
An evening reception was host-
ed by the parents of the bride and
groom at Colarussos LaPalazzo,
Moosic, and a rehearsal dinner
was held at Marianaccis Restau-
rant, West Wyoming. The bride
was honored at a bridal shower
hosted by mothers of the bride
and groom and bridesmaids at Fox
Hill Country Club, Exeter.
Mrs. Reedy is a graduate of
Wyoming Area High School. She is
employed by Social Security Ad-
ministration, Wilkes-Barre.
Mr. Reedy is a graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School. He is em-
ployed by Pride Mobility, Duryea.
The couple honeymooned on a
cruise to the Bahamas. They re-
side in Exeter with their son, Jay-
den.
Giordano, Reedy
G
ennifer Pauley and Timothy
Oefelein were united in mar-
riage on Sept. 1, 2012, at Long
Point Winery, Aurora, N.Y. The
Rev. Douglas Taylor officiated the
ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Jeffrey and Cathie Pauley, Noxen.
She is the granddaughter of the
late Hubert and Dorothy Pauley
and the late Edgar and Catherine
Engelman.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father. She chose Rebecca
Burdett, Edwardsville, as her ma-
tron of honor. The flower girl was
Julia Macey, Dallas.
The groom chose Scott Poulton,
Apalachin, N.Y., as his best man
and Scott Geiger, Binghamton,
N.Y., as his groomsman. John
Macey, Dallas, provided piano and
trumpet music for the ceremony.
An evening cocktail hour and
reception were held at Long Point
Winery.
Genn is a 1999 graduate of
Lake-Lehman High School. She
earned a bachelor degree in ele-
mentary education from Miser-
icordia University, Dallas, and is
pursuing a masters degree in
early childhood literacy from
Wilkes University. She is employ-
ed as a second-grade teacher for
the Lake-Lehman School District.
Tim is a 1999 graduate of Duke
University Talent Identification
Program. He is employed by Still-
water RTF, Greene, N.Y.
The couple plans to honeymoon
in the Virgin Islands. They reside
in Noxen.
Pauley, Oefelein
M
r. and Mrs. John Trombetta
celebrated their 55th wedding
anniversary on Feb. 14, 2012.
They were married at St. Roccos
Church, Pittston, by the late Julio
Serra.
The couple has two sons, Domin-
ick, Mountain Top, and Anthony,
Plains Township.
A special dinner was held in honor
of the occasion.
The Trombettas
M
r. and Mrs. Thomas R. McGeer
Sr., Hanover Township, are cele-
brating their 70th wedding anni-
versary on Oct. 1, 2012.
Mrs. Dorothy McGeer will cele-
brate her 91st birthday on Oct. 7.
The couple met while they were
employed at the family movie theater
in Nanticoke. Mrs. McGeer was the
ticket seller and Mr. McGeer was the
usher.
They were married in St. Johns
Lutheran Church, Nanticoke. Maid of
honor was the late Bernice Lubinski
Bonner, sister of the bride. Best man
was the late Jack McGeer, brother of
the groom.
Mrs. McGeer is the former Do-
rothy Lubinski. She is the daughter of
the late Adam and Edith Lubinski.
She worked for many years in the
garment industry at Mac Gregorys,
Pittston Apparel, J and L, Vals
Sportswear and Page Boy Dress. She
was a member of the ILGWU and
Amalgamated Union. She also
worked as a clerk at Koronkiewicz
Pharmacy, Nanticoke.
Mr. McGeer is the son of late Law-
rence and Anna McGeer.
He served in the Armed Forces
during World War II as a member of
the 98th division. He was also em-
ployed by Schimmel Construction
Company and K&S Canning. He is
well known for his great skill at darts
as part of many area teams.
Mr. and Mrs. McGeer were former
owners and operators of McGeers
Pub, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple has two children, Judi-
th Ann McGeer Krapf, St. Petersburg,
Fla., and Thomas R. McGeer Jr.,
Wilkes-Barre. They are the proud
grandparents of 15 grandchildren and
13 great-grandchildren with another
on his way.
The McGeers
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5B
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sundays People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then weddings
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a color proof in advance
of other album photographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
O C C A S I O N S
J
ohn and Bertha Pytell, Shaver-
town, celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary on Sept. 29, 2012.
Mrs. Pytell is the daughter of the
late Louise and Edward Blaine. Mr.
Pytell is the son of the late Caroline
and John Pytell.
They are the proud parents of a
son, Jack Pytell, and two daughters,
Debbie Dante and Beth Ann Morio.
They are also the proud grandparents
of seven grandchildren, Jack and
Jacob Pytell, Tessie Buttner, R.J. and
Hope Dante and Bryan and Cole
Morio.
They celebrated their anniversary
with a party at A Touch of Class
Catering with their family and
friends.
The Pytells
M
r. and Mrs. Thomas P. Supey,
West Pittston, are celebrating
their 40th wedding anniversary to-
day, Sept. 30. They were married on
Sept. 30, 1972, at Our Lady of Sor-
rows Church, West Wyoming, by the
Rev. Theodore Obaza.
Tom is the son of the late Thomas
P. and Margaret Supey. He is the
mine foreman at the Lackawanna
Coal Mine Tour in Scranton.
Mary is the daughter of Genevieve
Labaty and the late Francis D. Labaty.
She is employed as the administrator
at Maxim Healthcare in Plains Town-
ship.
The couple has been blessed with
three sons, Thomas and his wife,
Doriann, Bordentown, N.J.; Samuel
and his wife, Kristine, West Wyom-
ing; and Michael, Exeter. They have
five grandchildren, Tommy, Luke,
Jake, Sammy and Samara Rose.
The Supeys celebrated with family
and close friends at an evening din-
ner party given by their family and a
Mass of Celebration at Corpus Chris-
ti Parish (Immaculate Conception).
The Supeys
R
onald J. and Rosalie J. Serafin
celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary on Sept. 15, 2012. They
were married by the Rev. Ostrowski
in SS. Peter and Paul Church, Plains
Township.
Their attendants were Margaret
Kubic-Giovagnoli, sister of the bride,
and Marianne Wojcik-Kress and Ma-
rie Knutelski-Bryski, friends of the
bride. Groomsmen were Dell Smith,
Daniel Bryski and John (Jackie)
Kozik.
Mr. Serafin is retired from Toby-
hanna Army Depot and Mrs. Serafin
is retired from Techneglas, Inc.
The couple has two children and
one grandchild. Their son Todd and
his wife, Kathleen, along with their
daughter, Erika, reside in Wilkes-
Barre. Their daughter Kimberly and
her husband, Keith Scott, reside in
Exeter.
The couple celebrated the occasion
with a family dinner.
The Serafins
M
r. and Mrs. Stanley Shinko are
celebrating their 35th wedding
anniversary on Oct. 1. They were
married in St. Jude Church, Moun-
tain Top, by the Rev. James Jacobs.
Patti is the daughter of Tony and
Maureen Muskas, Mountain Top.
Stan is the son of the late Helen and
Stanley Shinko Sr.
They are the parents of two sons,
Stanley III and his wife, Heather, and
Jason and his fiance, Amanda Eck-
lund.
Stan is employed as a firefighter for
the City of Wilkes-Barre. Patti is
employed as a van driver for Williams
Bus Company and a teacher associate
at Dan Flood Elementary School.
Their marriage will be blessed
today, Sept. 30, at Our Lady of Hope
Parish by the Rev. John Terry. A
family dinner will follow.
The couple celebrated with a Dis-
ney vacation in August.
The Shinkos
Four generations
of the Cannon fam-
ily recently gathered
in Wilkes-Barre to
celebrate the 90th
birthday of William
Cannon.
Family members and friends trav-
eled from Michigan, New York, Vir-
ginia and throughout Pennsylvania to
honor Mr. Cannon at a party at St.
Lukes Villa, where he resides.
Born in Pringle on Sept. 22, 1924,
he grew up in Kingston and has resid-
ed in Wilkes-Barre for more than 62
years.
Mr. Cannon was a World War II
veteran and was married to the late
Lillian Edwards Cannon for more
than 58 years.
He has four children and six grand-
children.
William Cannon
celebrates 90th
birthday
S
usan Bawn, a
patient at Gold-
en Living East
Mountain Manor, is
celebrating her
100th birthday to-
day, Sept. 30.
Bawn enjoys playing bingo and
making food for bazaars.
She was recognized on Sept. 28 at
the end of the Walk with Aegis Ther-
apies, a week-long event with mind,
emotional, physical and spiritual
therapies with healthy snacks. A
celebration in her honor will also
take place today.
Susan Bawn
celebrating 100th
birthday
Nesbitt Womens & Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital
Dominick, Nina and James Ceb-
ula, Hughestown, a daughter,
Sept. 17.
Purcell, Kelly and Patrick, King-
ston, a daughter, Sept. 17.
Luton, Tanya and Nick Keller,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 17.
Shamaski, Kristen and Keith,
Nanticoke, a son, Sept. 17.
Moore, Jennifer and Daniel,
Drums, a son, Sept. 17.
Supinski, LeAnne and Paul, La-
flin, a son, Sept. 17.
Garrity, Angela, Harveys Lake, a
son, Sept. 18.
Nesbitt, Penny and Gary Steid-
inger, Glen Lyon, a son, Sept. 18.
Griffin, Melida and Fred Toole,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 18.
Staley, Nicole and Joseph Piccil-
lo, Pringle, a son, Sept. 19.
Sullivan, Stefania and Chad, West Pitt-
ston, a son, Sept. 19.
Badman, Heather and Kevin, Hunlock
Creek, a son, Sept. 19.
Roberts, Josita and Wayne Castner,
Plymouth, a daughter, Sept. 19.
Keifer, Kristen and Richard, Dallas, a
daughter, Sept. 19.
Ciocco, Melissa and Joseph, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, Sept. 20.
Matriccino, Melissa and Ryan Scarcella,
Hazleton, a daughter, Sept. 20.
Perry, Amanda Munno and Edwin David
Torres, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept. 20.
Kennedy, Kathleen and Warren Little,
Larksville, a son, Sept. 20.
Foersch, Heather and James Gavin,
Plains Township, a son, Sept. 21.
Shea, Sarah and Brandon, Nanticoke, a
daughter, Sept. 21.
Seree, Dodi and John Albert Geisler,
Mountain Top, a daughter, Sept. 21.
Bagley, Jennifer and Bradley Sr., Noxen,
a daughter, Sept. 21.
Williams, Sue and Nick, Back Mountain, a
daughter, Sept. 22.
BIRTHS
The Little Sisters of the Poor at Holy Family Residence are sponsoring their
annual homemade roast beef dinner from noon-4 p.m. on Oct. 21 at Holy Family
Residence, 2500 Adams Ave., Scranton. The dinner will be catered courtesy of
Stirnas Restaurant, Scranton. Take-out dinners will be available all day. Tickets
are $10 for adults and $6 for children 10 and younger. The menu includes roast
beef, mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots, applesauce, rolls and butter, pie and
assorted beverages. There will also be easy-listening entertainment, a bake sale
and raffles for gift baskets, gift certificates and a $5,000 Mount Airy Casino
Resort weekend getaway prize package. There are sponsorship packages avail-
able. For advance ticket purchases and sponsorship information, contact Jackie
Galvin, director of development and communications, at 343-4065, or visit
www.littlesistersofthepoorscranton.org. Tickets will also be available at the door.
All proceeds will benefit the Little Sisters in their mission of caring for the elder-
ly. Some committee members, from left, first row, are Faith Foley, Judy Cosgrove
and Joyce Tressler. Second row: Sister Marie Therese, MaryCarol Kanton and
Janet Skibinski. Third row: Galvin and Pete Kanton. Also on the committee are
Charlie Butler; Theresa Durkin; Cathy Gavin; Ann Kwak; Alice Micone; Carole
Paswinski; Sister Gilmary Speirs; Sandy Yantorn; Mother Maureen; Sister Gerard
Marie; and Lisa Blaker, director of activities.
Little Sisters of the Poor holding roast beef dinner
Emma Makayla Long, 9, and her sister,
Mia Taylor Long, 6, of Limerick, recently
donated their hair to the Locks of Love
organization. The sisters each donated
10 inches of hair which was cut by Ann
Marie Skudalski of Be Unique Beauty
Boutique in Forty Fort. The girls are the
daughters of Sarah Long and Gary Long.
They are the granddaughters of Michael
Zaleskas, Irene and Ralph Daddario,
Susan and Peter Horoschak and Gary
Long Sr. They are the great-grand-
daughters of Tom and Sylvia Casey and
the great-great-granddaughters of Jo-
seph and Evelyn Casey. For more in-
formation on Locks of Love visit
www.locksoflove.org. With their dona-
tions, from left are Emma Long and Mia
Long.
Emma and Mia Long donate
hair to Locks of Love
Marymount High School Class of 1960
recently held a 70th birthday party at the
Catholic War Veterans Grove in Hanover
Township. Several out of town classmates
were in attendance. The committee will
meet at 6 p.m. on Oct. 10 at Norms Pizza
and Eatery, North Sherman Street, Wilkes-
Barre. Plans for a Christmas get together
will be discussed. All classmates are invited.
For more information call Ray at 639-1390;
Chris at 823-4341; or Ann at 825-5711. At
the party, from left, first row, are Ann Kor-
doski Wielgopolski, Michaelene Peck Can-
non, Annamae Borum Coveleski, Mary Ann
Kulmaczewski Belchunes, Henry Trochi-
mowicz and Ben Jurewicz. Second row: Joe
Boris, Marianne Wilpiszewski Strong, Jeri
Zalewski Basarab, Jeanne Heck Triani,
Henrietta Tomczak Wisdo and Alice Iwa-
nowski Kwiatkowski. Third row: Henry Os-
trowski, Christine Poris Wilk, John Zarenski,
Charlotte Kitler, Mooneen Lavan Bielecki,
Ray Iwanowski, Frank Kowalski, Tom Mendr-
zycki and Walt Grodzki.
Marymount High School Class
of 60 holds birthday party
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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MOUNTAIN TOP: The 54th
Jeckell family reunion was held
on Aug. 11at Camp St. George in
Mountain Top. There were 89
family members and guests pre-
sent. Attendees enjoyed an after-
noon of fun, food and family ac-
tivities.
Attending from Connecticut
were Mary Catalina, Paul and
Nancy Ciminera, Matt Ciminera,
Melissa Ciminera, Peter and Hei-
di Lipieka, Ally Lipieka, Chelsea
Lipieka, Jason Doyon, Jack
McGrath, Michael McGrath,
Shannon Lafferty, Marley
McGrath, Kingston McGrath
and Joyce Perugini.
From New Jersey were Carol
Bright, Joanne Farkas, Barry and
Jill Jeckell, Vivian Jeckell, Char-
lie Jeckell, Bernie and Barbara
Jeckell, Ken and Doreen Pavese,
Randi Born, Lexie Born, Kristen
Pavese, Ruth Ruzanski, Sande
Salowey, Joyce and Rory Shot-
well and Brandi Mahedy.
From Pennsylvania were War-
ren and Betsy Williamson,
Brockway; Bernie and Linda
Thoma, Dallas; Matt andJeanine
Jeckell, Madison Jeckell, Sophia
Jeckell, Milly Jeckell, Jeanne
Jeckell, Bill and Tina Jeckell,
Irene Sabol and Frank Gombeda,
Mountain Top; Tammy Miller,
Hailey Miller and Abygail Miller,
Shickshinny; Donnie and Aimee
Fetterman, Donnie Fetterman
Jr., Ron and Cheryl Jeckell, Matt
and Judi Kotarsky, Alia Kotarsky
and Noah Kotarsky, Wapwallo-
pen; Ed and Beverly Bath, John
and Barbara Bath, William Bath,
Rhonda Davis, Georgia Daniels,
Beth Jablonski, Justin Jablonski,
Eric Eppler, Arline Jeckell, Cindy
Jeckell, Britnee Jeckell, Shirley
Larnerd, Effie Ann Metcalf, Bill
and Donna Sabol, Emily Sabol,
Billy Sabol, Danielle Angle and
Debbie Shannon, Greater Wyom-
ing Valley; and Eleanor Swilp
Ford, Rose Vallee, JohnandIrena
Swilp, Matt and Yana Swilp,
Leah Swilp and Elizabeth Swilp,
Schuylkill County.
Jeckell family holds 54th reunion in Mountain Top
The ninth Edwardsville all-schools reunion was held on Sept. 15 at the
Harveys Lake American Legion. Members of classes from1943 to 1966,
along with former Russell, Meyers and Jackson Street students, en-
joyed swapping Edwardsville stories, along with an excellent buffet,
catered by Northeast Catering. Attending this years reunion were
members of the Edwardsville High Class of 1952, who celebrated their
60th anniversary and five members of the Class of 1962, who cele-
brated their 50th anniversary. Members of the Class of 1952 (above),
fromleft, first row, are Rita Minkewicz Doonan, Annette Wartella Rus-
sett and Betty Kushner Stockla. Second row: Mike Matson, John Delin-
sky, JimLaity and Mike Narkoff. Members of the Class of 1962 (below),
fromleft, are Donald Buck Roberts, Alice Youngblood Majeski, Rowland
Rollie Roberts, Doris Harabin Gliddon and Leonard Mino.
Edwardsville holds all-schools reunion
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 7B
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 9B
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-generated.
Include your name and your
relationship to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal guardians
only, please), your childs name,
age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grand-
parents names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages. Dont forget to in-
clude a daytime contact phone
number. Without one, we may
be unable to publish a birthday
announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return
of birthday or occasions photos
and do not return community-
news or publicity photos. Please
do not submit precious or origi-
nal professional photographs
that require return because
such photos can become dam-
aged, or occasionally lost, in the
production process.
Email your birthday announ-
cement to people@timeslead-
er.com or send it to: Times Lead-
er Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. You
also may use the form under the
People tab on www.timesleader-
.com.
GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY DENTISTRY
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Take care of your familys dental health today.
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ilkes-Barre
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355 Market St.
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at
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Mallory Ann and Mason Colby Myers, twin daughter and son of David and
Carla Myers, Mountain Top, are celebrating their seventh birthdays today,
Sept. 30. Mallory and Mason are the grandchildren of Clare Myers and
the late Ellis Myers, Mountain Top, and Rosanne and Martin Desiderio
and Gary and Emma Guesto, all of Wilkes-Barre. They are the great-
grandchildren of Marita Freeman and Libby Desiderio, Wilkes-Barre.
Mallory and Mason have a sister, Marley, 9.
Mallory A. and Mason C. Myers
Samantha Lynn Graboske,
daughter of Christina Wildoner,
Hunlock Creek, and Richard
Graboske, Ashley, is celebrating
her fourth birthday today, Sept.
30. Samantha is a granddaught-
er of Lloyd and Sue Wildoner,
Hunlock Creek; Linda Graboske,
Ashley; and the late Richard
Graboske.
Samantha L. Graboske
Zoe Lorraine Morrissey, daugh-
ter of Mark and Staci Morrissey,
Whitehall, is celebrating her
second birthday today, Sept. 30.
Zoe is a granddaughter of Eileen
Morrissey and the late Thomas
Morrissey, Wilkes-Barre, and
Robert Smith and the late Lor-
raine Smith, Allentown.
Zoe L. Morrissey
Jeffrey Thomas Mencken, son of
Tom and Lauri Mencken, Ply-
mouth Meeting, is celebrating
his eighth birthday today, Sept.
30. Jeffrey is a grandson of
Joseph and Kathy Grabiec,
Wilkes-Barre, and Jeffrey and
Pat Mencken, Warminster. He is
a great-grandson of Robert
Porter, Cape Cod, Mass.; the late
Helen Porter; the late Dr. John J.
Caffrey and Kathleen Caffrey;
the late Joseph and Elizabeth
Grabiec; the late Raymond
Mencken; and the late Muriel
Gefeller. Jeffrey has two sisters,
Gillian Kathleen, 15; and Miranda
Elizabeth, 13.
Jeffrey T. Mencken
Cayden Mark Masakowski, son of
Mark and Jennifer Masakowski,
Shickshinny, is celebrating his
fourth birthday today, Sept. 30.
Cayden is a grandson of Walter
Bezdecki, Hanover Township,
and Michael and Maryann Masa-
kowski, West Nanticoke. He has a
brother, Chayse Matthew, 6.
Cayden M. Masakowski
Jessie Rae Wienckoski, daughter
of Mia and Ray Wienckoski,
Franklin Township, is celebrating
her sixth birthday today, Sept.
30. Jessie is a granddaughter of
Eleanor Wienckoski, and Bob and
Gerry Hovan, Swoyersville. She
has a brother, Jake, 10.
Jessie R. Wienckoski
GAR Memorial High School recently announced its 2012 Homecoming Court. The homecoming game
versus Lake-Lehman is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Saturday at Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium. Home-
coming King and Queen will be crowned prior to kickoff. Members of the Homecoming Court, from left,
first row, are Paige Thomas, Jenny Chi, Venessa Vasquez, Edoukou Aka-Ezoua, Candice Hartman and
Natasia Alexander. Second row: Lucas Benton, Christian Skrepenak and Vincent Phan. Third row: Luke
Height, Brian Klapat and Shakir Soto.
GAR Homecoming Court named
The Friends of the Back Mountain Memorial Library are sponsoring the annual citrus fruit and
cheesecake sale from Oct. 15 to Nov. 9. Order forms have been mailed to regular customers and new
customers can pick up forms at the front desk at the library. Fruit orders and cheesecakes may be
picked up from 3-5:30 p.m. on Dec. 7 and 9:30 a.m.-noon on Dec. 8 at the library, 96 Huntsville Road,
Dallas. All checks for pre-paid orders should be made payable to the Back Mountain Memorial Library.
All proceeds benefit the library. Some of the Friends distributing fruit last year, from left, are Jane Kish-
baugh; Anne Davies; Mary Lou Grant, co-chair; John Simons; Joanne Runner; Claudia Stevens; Pam
Allardyce, co-chair; and Jill Kryston.
Fruit and cheesecake sale will benefit Back Mountain library
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
TRI-VETS
COMMUNITY
ACTION TEAM
Honor
&
Respect:
What I Most
Learned from My
Family Member
Who Served in
the Military.

Essay Contest
Wha Wha W aa hha ha
Lear Lea earr

In 500 words or less, write an essay on what you learned


most from your family member who is currently serving
in the military or has served in the past. A panel of judg-
es from all participating sponsors will select rst, second
and third place prize winners from EACH category.
Award Categories Awards
Elementary School:
Grades 4 through 6
Middle School:
Grades 7 and 8
High School:
Grades 9 through 12
College: any age student
actively enrolled
Adult: Any non-student
age 18 to 100
Awarded in
each category.
FIRST PLACE:
$250.00
SECOND PLACE:
$150.00
THIRD PLACE:
$100.00
PLUS $100 will be donated
to the library of each school
represented by the rst
place winners in the
elementary, middle and
high school categories.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 SUNDAY OCTOBER 14 2012
Deadline to Enter
Please mail all entries to:
The Times Leader Essay Contest,
15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
In
m
in
es
an
DEADLINE
JUST
2
W
EEKS
AW
AY!
946 Wyoming Ave Forty Fort 287-0441
www.kapmoore.com
Serving the Area for Over 20 Years
Auto Home Life
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BIRCHWOOD
REHABILITATION AND NURSING CENTER
PUBLIC WELCOME!!!!
Childrens Games Craft & Flea Market Vendors Face Painting
Arts & Crafts Basket Raffles Food & Baked Goods
Musical Entertainment provided by George Rittenhouse
395 Middle Road, Nanticoke, PA 18634
Invites You To Join Us
At Our Annual Fall Festival
Saturday, October 6, 2012
10am - 2pm **Rain date October 13th**
PUBLIC OOOME!!! ! WELCOM WEEE PU III OOME LLLLC !! U CCOOOOM C L OO !!!!!!! C W C WW LI EELL
Limited Vendor space is available FREE OF CHARGE
For More Information on Vendor space please call (570) 735-2973
BIRCHWOOD
NURSING &REHABILITATION CENTER
WILKES-BARRE: James
Deice, president of the Italian
American Association of Lu-
zerne County, recently an-
nounced that Leo J. Sperraz-
za, Pittston, will serve as
toastmaster and attorney Jo-
seph P. Giovannini Jr., King-
ston, will be the guest speaker
at the Italian American Asso-
ciations 35th annual Colum-
bus Day Banquet on Oct. 7 at
the Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center.
Attorney Girard J. Mecadon,
Pittston, will be honored with
the Person of the Year award
and Charles A. Adonizio III,
Wilkes-Barre, will receive the
Lifetime Achievement Award.
Cocktails and a cash bar will
available from 5-6 p.m. Dinner
will be served at 6 p.m. Music
for dancing will be provided
by Danny Argo and Friends
until 10:15 p.m. The public is
invited. Cost is $35 per per-
son. Tickets must be pur-
chased in advance. No tickets
will be sold at the door. Co-
chairmen of the banquet are
Herman Castellani and James
Deice.
For reservations contact
Louise Castellani at 654-6454
or Judy Deice at 654-7600.
Toastmaster, speaker announced for banquet
Sperrazza Giovannini
Monday
PLAINS TWP.: The Plains Parks
and Recreation Board, 6:30 p.m.,
at the Birchwood Hills Park
Office.
MEETINGS
Penn State Harrisburg,
Middletown
Kaitlin Rando, Dallas, and Ryan
Urzen, Swoyersville.
OUT-OF-TOWN
DEANS LIST
Four employees of Blue
Cross of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania recently spent the
day at Childrens Service Cen-
ter (CSC), South Franklin
Street campus, helping with
childrens art projects. Blue
Cross has a group of employ-
ees who volunteer throughout
the year at various non-profit
organizations throughout the
community. They have also
volunteered for years at CSC
as part of the United Ways
Day of Caring. Participants,
from left, are Norma Silva,
Michele Warke, Jackie Jacobs
and Karen Samuels.
Blue Cross workers help
CSC children with art
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 11B
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Its smart to get serious about your health.
Join us for events in October.
To find out more information or to register for any event, visit
www.geisinger.org/events or call 800.275.6401 and ask for CareLink.
Geisinger Health System
Follow us: @geisingerhealth
Special Events
The Multiple Sclerosis
Education Series
The East Mountain Inn
600 Wildflower Dr., Wilkes-Barre
Wed., October 3 6 pm
Join Geisinger neurologist Douglas
Nathanson, M.D., as he discusses
spasticity and MS. All those
diagnosed with MS, their caretakers
and family members are
encouraged to attend.To RSVP,
contact Christie Edwards at 570-
808-7330 or
cledwards@geisinger.edu.
Health Care Reform:Where
are we going?
Wilkes University
Dorothy Dickson Darte Center
84 West South St., Wilkes-Barre
Thurs., October 11 7 pm
Geisinger Health System will host a
panel discussion titled Health Care
Reform: Where are we going? Free
and open to the public, topics of
conversation will include impacts of
health care changes at the local,
regional and national levels;
examples of current health care
reform efforts; maternal and fetal
risk factors in obese pregnant women
and several others.
Volunteer Information Night
Geisinger WyomingValley
Kistler Learning Center
1000 East Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Thurs., October 18 5:30 pm
Join staff from Geisingers volunteer
services department for a discussion
about the rewarding work of Geisinger
volunteers. Attendees will be able to
sign up for open opportunities.
No One Dies AloneVolunteer
Training
Geisinger WyomingValley
Administrative Conference Room
1000 East Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Tues., October 23 8:30 - 10:30 am
No One Dies Alone is a volunteer
program that provides the reassuring
presence of a companion to dying
patients that would otherwise be
alone. No nursing skill is required.
Registration recommended.To register
or for more information contact
gwv_volunteer_services@geisinger.edu.
Free Cancer Screenings
GeisingerTunkhannock
110Treible Rd., Suite 1,Tunkhannock
Tues., October 23 5:30 - 8 p.m.
Geisinger doctors and nurses are
offering several cancer screenings at
the GeisingerTunkhannock location,
including skin checks, breast exams
and prostate exams. Space is limited.
Call 1-800-275-6401 and say
"CareLink" or go online to
www.geisinger.org/events to make
your free appointment.
Classes & Lectures
Heart Failure Education Class
Geisinger WyomingValley
Richard and Marion Pearsall|
Heart Hospital
Second floor conference room
Wed., October 3 10 am - 12 pm
Prepared Childbirth Class
Geisinger WyomingValley
Kistler Learning Center
Sat., October 6 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Sibling Class
Geisinger WyomingValley
4th Floor OB Education Room
Wed., October 10 6 - 8 pm
Basic Skills for New Parents
Geisinger WyomingValley
4th Floor OB Education Room
Wed., October 17 6 - 8 pm
Support Groups
BrainTumor Support Group
Candys Place
190 Welles Street, Suite 120,
Forty Fort, PA 18704
Tues., October 2 5:30 - 7 p.m.
Call 808-6407 for information.
Bariatric Support Group
Geisinger Specialty Services
675 Baltimore Drive, Entrance A
GI Nutrition Conference Room
Wed., October 3 3 - 4 pm
Thurs., October 4 3:30 - 4:30 pm
Parents of Children with
ADD/ADHD Support Group
Geisinger WyomingValley
Spiritual Center East Entrance
Tues., October 9 6:30 - 8 pm
Call 592-0058 for more information.
Ostomy Support Group
Geisinger WyomingValley
Scarano Conference Room
Wed., October 10 6 - 7 pm
Cancer Support Group
Geisinger WyomingValley
Henry Cancer Center
Conference Room
Wed., October 17 3:30 - 5 pm
Call 808-6186 for more information.
DALLAS: Misericordia
University is hosting two
open houses for high school
students and their parents
on Oct. 27 and Nov. 10.
Registration will begin at
9 a.m. in the Anderson
Sports and Health Center,
located at the North Gate of
the campus. A special Meet
the Coaches session will be
held each day from 9-10 a.m.
The open house programs
will run from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m.
The schedule includes
refreshments, campus tours,
a faculty session over lunch
and meetings with repre-
sentatives of student ser-
vices, athletics and financial
aid. For those interested, a
session will also be held on
the universitys Alternative
Learners Project for stu-
dents with learning dis-
abilities.
For more information, or
to register, contact the Ad-
missions Office at 675-4449,
1-866-262-6363 or email ad-
miss@misericordia.edu. Stu-
dents can also visit the uni-
versity online at www.admis-
sions.misericorida.edu.
NANTICOKE: The Lu-
zerne County Community
College Diversity Council is
holding two film screenings
in October at the colleges
Educational Conference Cen-
ter.
If These Halls Could
Talk features students shar-
ing their stories and differ-
ent life experiences. Direc-
tor Lee Mun Wah brought
together 11 college students
from around the country to
answer some of the ques-
tions students most ask
about diversity issues on
college campuses and in the
classroom. The film will be
shown from 11 a.m. to noon
on Tuesday.
The Price of Sugar rais-
es key questions about
where the products that are
consumed originate and at
what cost they are pro-
duced. Narrated by Paul
Newman, The film follows
Father Christopher Hartley,
a charismatic Spanish priest
as he organizes some of the
hemispheres poorest people
to fight for their basic hu-
man rights. The film screen-
ing will be held from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 8.
For more information, call
the college at 740-0753 or
800-377-LCCC ext. 7753.
IN BRIEF
Melissa Jabore Futch, vice presi-
dent of investments, Stifel Nico-
laus, recently received a certif-
icate of appre-
ciation from
the Luzerne
County Com-
munity Col-
lege Alumni
Office for her
outstanding
financial
support of the
colleges
Alumni Association. The award
was presented by Bonnie Bren-
nan Lauer, director, alumni rela-
tions; Thomas P. Leary, presi-
dent, LCCC; and Francis Curry,
director, admissions.
Meredith Falchek, a science teach-
er at Solomon Plains Junior
High School, was one of 20
teachers to participate in the
Pennsylvania
Department
of Education
Literacy
Design Collab-
orative held at
Luzerne
County Inter-
mediate Unit
18. The Bill
and Melinda
Gates Foundation awarded Penn-
sylvania with a grant to improve
students literacy skills at the
middle and high school levels
through a planned professional
development initiative. The
teachers developed common
task-based formative assess-
ments using the Literacy Design
Collaborative framework, merg-
ing the Common Core State
Standards for Literacy in differ-
ent subject areas to develop
high-level reading, writing and
thinking skills. Falcheks work, in
collaboration with Wyanita
Edwards, Northwest Area
School District, and Robin Frask,
Hazleton Area School District,
has been selected by the Penn-
sylvania Department of Educa-
tion to be included in a collection
of task-based assessments and
exemplars that will be accessible
across the state for use by edu-
cators working to implement the
Common Core State Standards.
NAMES AND FACES
Futch
Falchek
Topp Business Solutions, Scranton, recently donated $2,500
to the Education Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program at MMI
Preparatory School in Freeland. The program helps fund need-
based scholarships. At the check presentation, from left, are
Thomas G. Hood, Head of School, MMI, and John Foster, field
manager, Topp Business Solutions.
Topp makes donation to tax credit program at MMI
St. Jude School recently welcomed two new faculty members.
Nicole Flaherty will teach the computer curriculum to pre-kindergar-
ten through eighth grade students. Madelyn Camasso will have a
fourth-grade homeroom and teach fourth- and fifth-grade science,
religion and English and fourth-grade spelling and vocabulary. From
left: Flaherty; Jeanne Rossi, principal; and Camasso.
Two teachers join St. Jude faculty
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
8
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9
4
3
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
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V
Girls playing soccer during the fall sea-
son on a boys team is nothing new.
There have been numerous females to
suit up with the males because they were
involved in other sports when the game
was played during the spring season.
But four girls on the same boys team
during this season -- when girls soccer
moved to the fall -- wasnt supposed to
happen. Especially on a team that was on
the verge of being very successful.
GARs girls team folded in August
when only five players attended practic-
es. So, since the girls were conditioning
with the boys anyway during the offsea-
son, they decided to join the boys team.
Even though they were on a team, it
was still disheartening because in the
2012 spring, the Grenadiers finished as
one of the most promising squads in the
Wyoming Valley Conference with eight
wins for a young team coming after just a
three-win season in 2011.
It was disappointing because we still
had a good team coming back, but a lot of
them we lost to other sports, junior Bre
Mosier said. We got really used to having
our coach (Stephanie Franks) and we miss
her. She still comes to games, but that was
the worst part, losing our coach.
Mosier is joined on the Grenadiers team
by female teammates Katelyn Oldziejew-
ski, a sophomore; Paige Elmy, a sopho-
more, and Madisen Nichol, a junior.
Not only are they on the field with the
GAR boys, they have contributed. Elmy,
Mosier and Nichol each have two goals
this season, and Oldziejewski has one to
H I G H S C H O O L S O C C E R
There
is a
little more
satisfac-
tion
knowing
I beat
a boy.
Bre Mosier
GAR junior
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
See FOURSOME, Page 11C
MEDINAH, Ill. Phil
Mickelson and Keegan Bra-
dley helped stake the Ameri-
cans to their biggest lead in
the Ryder Cup in more than 30
years. Ian Poulter, eyes bulg-
ing and fists shaking with ev-
ery clutch putt, at least gave
Europe a lot of momentum
over the final frantic hour Sat-
urday at Medinah.
Right when it looked as if
the Americans were a lock to
win back the cup, Poulter
birdied his last five holes to
win a crucial point and keep
everyone guessing. Steady
chants of USA! USA! gave
way to snappy serenades of
Ole, Ole as both sides
trudged to the team rooms in
darkness to prepare for 12 sin-
gles matches on Sunday.
The Americans still had a
big lead, 10-6. Europe at least
had hope.
The last two putts were
massive, European captain
Jose Maria Olazabal said after
watching Poulter stay unde-
feated in this Ryder Cup by
rolling in one last birdie putt
R Y D E R C U P
U.S. has
command
heading
to singles
American lead is the largest
in more than 30 years of
competition against Euros.
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
See COMMAND, Page 11C
For the first time in years, Dan
Bylsmas time at training camp
isnt spent focusing on drills and
systems.
With the NHL
mired in a lock-
out, the Pitts-
burgh Penguins
head coach is
spending the
weekend with Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton, getting a firsthand
look at the organizations future
and depth.
While Bylsma cannot work
with his NHL players to get
them up to speed for the season,
the lockout has given him an op-
portunity to see whats coming
up in the system.
This is the first time Im go-
ing to see a lot of these players,
and Im on the ice specifically
looking at what theyre doing in-
dividually and what theyre
bringing to the table, Bylsma
said after Saturdays practice at
W B S P E N G U I N S
Bylsma
doing some
farm work
Pittsburgh coach attends
camp with his minor league
affiliate during NHL lockout.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
See BYLSMA, Page 11C
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- So this is how leg-
ends get started. In another few years,
Penn State players will talk about Michael
Mauti as though he ripped down Illinois
goalposts with his bare hands.
Teammates spoke in awe of the senior
linebacker following the Nittany Lions
much-relished 35-7 road win over the
Fighting Illini.
And maybe
there was a little
bit of embellish-
ment involved.
Man, before
the game he was
jacked, senior
cornerback Ste-
phon Morris said.
He was on some-
thing. Whatever
he was on, I need
a taste.
He was, like,
banging his head
against the locker.
I never seen no
crazy person like
that in my life. I
loved it. I loved
every minute of it.
And for him to be
able to back it up
(on the field) like
that, it was just
awesome.
Mauti, quite
mellow and re-
laxed after the
game, denied go-
ing as far as
smashing his head into things -- let alone
thick metal -- before taking the field Sat-
urday.
No matter. Mautis play spoke for itself.
He had six tackles and split a sack. He
came up with two interceptions, with the
first going back a school-record 99 yards --
but 1 short of a jaw-dropping touchdown.
He even spooked an Illinois return man in-
to dropping a punt by bearing down on
him at full speed.
Its hardly a coincidence that the per-
formance came against Illinois. Back inJu-
ly, Mauti tore into coaches who spent the
summer recruiting Penn State players,
with TimBeckman and the Illini being the
worst offenders.
So, yes, this one meant a little more to
him than just the teams first Big Ten win.
Having it come against these guys... It
was sweet, Mauti said after initially giv-
PENN STATE 35, I L L I NOI S 7
PAYBACK IS SWEET
Mauti backs up words with actions in win
AP PHOTO
Penn State running back Zach Zwinak (28) celebrates with Penn State tight end Jesse James (18) during the first
half Saturday in Champaign, Ill. Penn State defeated Illinois 35-7.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
See PAYBACK, Page 6C
FOOTBALL
INSIDE
OBrien doesnt
have much to say
about Illinois
coach. 6C
West Virginia
wins wild shootout
over Baylor. 5C
Ohio State holds
off Spartans. 5C
Georgia survives
scare from Ten-
nessee. 5C
Franco Harris
makes stop at
Misericordia. 6C
Wilkes Sheptock
wins No. 100. 7C
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Kaitlyn Oldziejewski (3) and Bre Mosier now play on the
GAR boys soccer team this season because the girls
team folded in August due to a lack of players.
GARs fearless female foursome
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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REFRESHMENTS AND DINNER
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Prizes In Each Flight
format is captain and crew with a
cost of $80 per person which
includes 18 holes of golf, cart,
lunch, dinner and prizes. To regis-
ter to play, to sponsor a hole or to
donate prizes contact Bev Ather-
holt at 675 7295 or Bill Runner at
675 5055 or the church office 675
3616.
Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster
Club will be holding its annual
Nite at the Races on Saturday,
October 27th at the Mountain Top
Hose Company Fire Hall. Doors
open at 6:00 p.m., admission is $10
which buys a horse and includes
food and beverages.
Dallas High School Boys Soccer
Booster Club will be holding its
30th Annual Fall Craft show. It will
be held on October 14th from
10am-4pm at the Dallas Middle
School, Dallas PA. Admission is
free and there will be parking
available.
Help the Warriors 5K Race will be
held today at 9 a.m. at Kirby Park.
Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. All
proceeds benefit the Wounded
Warrior Project and the Gold Bar
Club, which funds supplemental
training for Cadets aspiring to
become Air Force officers. Partici-
pants can register online at ac-
tive.com/running/Kingston-pa/
help-our-warriors-2012. Regis-
tration costs $15 online or $20 the
day of the race.
Kings College Softballs Third
Annual Golf Tournament will be
held today at Four Seasons Golf
Club. The cost of registration is
$70 per golfer and the tournament
is a captain-and-crew format.
There will be a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
The registration fee includes
greens, cart, refreshments and
cookout. For more information, call
208-5855 or send an e-mail to
softball_@kings.edu.
Lackawanna Lightning Softball will
host a 14U girls fastpitch softball
tournament on Oct. 26 and 27 in
Dunmore. Tournament will be a
four game guarantee and will be
open rosters. Proof of insurance is
required with 3 pool-play games
on Saturday, single elimination on
Sunday. MVP awards for pool-play
games. Individual medals awarded
for first and second place finishers.
Cost is $350 per team. For entry
form or more info, call Dino Dar-
benzio at 650-5159 or email:
ddarbenz@yahoo.com.
Lehman Golf Club will host its Fall
Finish tournament today. The
format will be a Par 3 Challenge.
Tee times are available by calling
the pro shop at 675-1686.
Stephs Fall 5K will be held Saturday,
Oct. 27 at 10:30 a.m. through the
grounds of the Luzerne County
Complex. Registration can be done
online at https://stephsfall5k.web-
connex.com/registeronline or at
Stephs Fall 5k.Cost is $20
(through October 17th) includes
t-shirt Register at Pre-Register Via
Mail with $20 (post-marked by
October 15th) includes t-shirt and
make check/money order payable
to Stephanie Godri-Johnston
Memorial Scholarship and mail to:
Mary Godri | 127 Crest St | Harding,
PA18643. Race Day Registration is
$25 cash or check (limited t-shirt
quantities & sizes). Registration
Tables open from 8:30 a.m. until
10:10 a.m. at the Main Pavilion. For
more info contact Stephen Godri
at 438-4698, Mary Godri at 388-
2433or email stephs-
fall5k@gmail.com.
Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth
Center is currently accepting
registrations for its pee-wee bas-
ketball clinic for boys and girls
ages 4-7. It is an eight-session
clinic, which meets twice weekly.
The sessions will take place Mon-
day and Wednesday evenings in
the CYC gymnasium. The choice of
times for the two evening sessions
are 5-5:45 p.m. or 5:45-6:30 p.m.
beginning Oct. 1. The cost of the
clinic is $40 per player, and include
a CYC T-shirt. For more informa-
tion, call 823-6121 or go to 36
South Washington Street, Wilkes-
Barre.
Wyoming Valley Goju Ryu Karate
Academy offers classes at the
Kingston Recreational Center. For
more information, call 888-328-
3218 or visit www.valleygojuk-
arate.com.
LEAGUES
Adult B/C Ice Hockey League will
begin play the week of October 1st
at the Ice Rink on Coal Street.
Games will be played Tuesday and
Thursday nights at 10:00 p.m. The
Cost is $199 per player. Please
contact Rich at rmihelic@wbspen-
guins for more information.
Crestwood Football Booster Club
will meet Monday at Cavanaughs
at 7 p.m.
Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster
Club will meet at on Tuesday at 7
p.m. at Cavanaughs Grille.
Nanticoke Area Little League will
have its monthly meeting on
Wednesday at High School Cafete-
ria for 7:30. Board Members are to
meet at 7:00.
Pittston Boys Basketball Booster
Club will meet Thursday at 6:30
p.m. at the Red Mill, 340 South
Main Street, Pittston. An election
of officers will be held and fun-
draising ideas will be discussed
Plains Yankees Football & Cheer-
leading Organization will hold its
next monthly meeting Tuesday at
8 p.m. at the PAV in Hudson. All
are welcome to attend.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Kingston Recreational Center is
accepting registrations for the
Tommy Federici Sunday and
Wednesday Adult Mens Basketball
Leagues. The leagues begin Sun-
day, Nov. 11 and Wednesday, Nov. 14,
respectively. All participants must
be 17 years old or over. Cost to
register for the Sunday league is
$200, the Wednesday league $125
or $300 if you register for both.
Call 407-0189 for further informa-
tion.
Kingston Recreational Center is
accepting registrations for the
Willie Obremski Youth Baskeball
League. The league begins Dec. 10
with games on Mondays and
Tuesdays. Team drafts will be
helod on Nov. 16 for the 5-7 and
8-10 age groups and Nov. 19 for the
11-13 and 14-18 age groups. Parents
are asked to attend drafts.
Wyoming Valley CYC Sea Lions swim
team will be accepting regis-
trations and starting a two week
free trial starting Monday. Practice
for new and returning swimmers
ages 5 to 14 will be Mondays
through Fridays, 5pm to 7pm,
starting Monday. For more in-
formation call Jeni at 823-6121 ext.
292.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
6th Annual Shavertown United
Methodist Golf Tournament will
take place on Saturday Oct. 20 at
the Mill Race Golf Club, Benton.
Registration begins at 9 a.m. with
a shotgun start at 10 a.m. The
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Ramapo at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
Catholic at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at Bloomsburg Tournament, All Day
MONDAY, OCT. 1
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Elk Lake at Berwick
GAR at Hanover Area
Lackawanna Trail at Holy Redeemer
Meyers at Montrose
Pittston Area at Northwest
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Meyers
Berwick at Wyoming Area
Coughlin at Crestwood, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Valley West
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Meyers
Coughlin at MMI Prep
Wyoming Valley West at Hanover Area
Berwick at Hazleton Area
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area, 7 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Crestwood at Dallas
Delaware Valley at Lake-Lehman
Hanover Area at Hazleton Area
GAR at Wyoming Area
Holy Redeemer at Meyers
TUESDAY, OCT. 2
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Crestwood at Wyoming Seminary
Dallas at Lackawanna Trail
Delaware Valley at Honesdale
Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area
Lake-Lehman at Coughlin
Nanticoke at Wallenpaupack
Wyoming Area at Abington Heights
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Nanticoke at GAR
Tunkhannock at Wyoming Seminary
Hazleton Area at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Crestwood at Nanticoke
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
North Pocono at Wyoming Valley West
Nanticoke at Coughlin
Berwick at Pittston Area
Tunkhannock at MMI Prep
MEN'S COLLEGE GOLF
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU Hazleton Invitational, 11
a.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
Kings at Ursinus, 7 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
Ithaca at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
Misericordia at Kings, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at DeSales, 7 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at Penn, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3
H.S. CROSS COUNTRY
(All games 4:15 p.m. unless noted)
Pittston Area/Hazleton Area/Nanticoke/GAR/
Wyoming Area at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock/Coughlin/Wyoming Seminary/Lake-
Lehman/Meyers at Holy Redeemer
Crestwood/Northwest/Dallas/Wyoming Valley
West/MMI Prep at Berwick
H.S. CROSS Field Hockey
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Elk Lake
Northwest at Meyers
Tunkhannock at Montrose
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Berwick
Meyers at Dallas
Pittston Area at Hanover Area
MMI Prep at Wyoming Area, 6 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Valley West, 6:30 p.m.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
MMI Prep at Meyers
Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area
Berwick at Coughlin
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Dallas at Delaware Valley
Crestwood at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at GAR
Hazleton Area at Holy Redeemer
Pittston Area at North Pocono
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
William Paterson at Misericordia, 5 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
Wilkes at Stevens Institute of Technology, 5 p.m.
Misericordia at Dickinson, 6 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
New Jersey City at Kings, 4 p.m.
Wilkes at Rowan, 7 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPNNASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA 400, at Dover,
Del.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Midwest Nationals, at Madison,
Ill. (same-day tape)
GOLF
Noon
NBC Ryder Cup, final day matches, at Medinah,
Ill.
3 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, final
round, at Weddington, N.C.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
WQMY Philadelphia at Miami
YES N.Y. Yankees at Toronto
1:30 p.m.
ROOT Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
SNY N.Y. Mets at Atlanta
2 p.m.
TBS Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox
4 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Arizona
MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
3:30 p.m.
BTN Northwestern at Michigan State
6 p.m.
BTN Ohio State at Michigan
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World Championship, at Alca-
niz, Spain
5 p.m.
SPEEDMotoGPMoto2, at Alcaniz, Spain(same-
day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
CBS New England at Buffalo
FOX San Francisco at N.Y. Jets
4:25 p.m.
FOX New Orleans at Green Bay
8:20 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia
WNBA BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
ESPN2Playoffs, conferencesemifinals, game2,
Indiana at Atlanta
9 p.m.
ESPN Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 2,
Minnesota at Seattle
BASEBALL
Not Available
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
Sunday
Patriots 4 BILLS
LIONS 5 Vikings
FALCONS 7 Panthers
49ers 4 JETS
Chargers 1 CHIEFS
TEXANS 12 Titans
Seahawks 2.5 RAMS
CARDS 6 Dolphins
BRONCOS 7 Raiders
Bengals 1.5 JAGUARS
PACKERS 7.5 Saints
BUCS 3 Redskins
EAGLES 2 Giants
Monday
COWBOYS 3.5 Bears
Bye week: Colts, Steelers.
AME RI C A S
L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLESClaimed OF Steve
Pearce off waivers from the New York Yankees.
Recalled RHP Oliver Drake from Bowie (EL) and
placed him on the 60-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIESSigned F Michael Duni-
gan, F Ronald Dupree, F Jarrid Famous, C Jerome
Jordan and G-F D.J. Kennedy.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DENVER BRONCOSPlaced S Quinton Carter
on injured reserve. Promoted S Duke Ihenacho
from the practice squad and LB Mike Mohamed to
the active roster.
MINNESOTA VIKINGSSigned TE Allen Reisner
to the practice squad. Waived GTyler Holmes from
the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSSigned OL Matt
Tennant.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
SPRINGFIELD FALCONSSigned G Daren Ma-
chesney to a professional tryout agreement.
S O C C E R
High School Boys Soccer
Wyoming Valley Conference
Boys Standings
(Through Sept.28)
Division I W L T
Coughlin (2A) .................................... 7 0 1
Dallas (2A) ......................................... 7 1 1
Lake-Lehman (2A) ............................ 7 2 1
Crestwood (2A) ................................. 6 3 0
Valley West (3A) ............................... 3 5 0
Hazleton Area (3A) ........................... 2 8 0
Division II W L T
Wyoming Seminary (A) .................... 9 2 0
Tunkhannock (2A) ............................ 9 4 0
Holy Redeemer (2A)......................... 6 4 1
Meyers (A) ......................................... 3 6 0
Pittston Area (3A) ............................. 2 5 1
Division III W L T
Berwick (2A) ...................................... 6 2 1
Nanticoke (2A)................................... 6 4 0
Wyoming Area (2A) .......................... 4 6 1
GAR (2A)............................................ 1 8 0
MMI (A)............................................... 1 9 0
Hanover Area (2A) ............................ 0 8 1
WVC Scoring Leaders
(through Sept. 28)
Minimum 4 points
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
DIVISION I G A Pt.
Danny Saba, Dallas 17 3 37
Alex Machalick, Crestwood 13 5 31
Pat Malone, Coughlin 12 4 28
A.J. Nardone, Dallas 10 7 27
Travis Keil, Coughlin 7 4 18
Justin Okun, Coughlin 6 6 18
Chris Edkins, Lake-Lehman 6 6 18
Nick Singer, WVW 7 2 16
Austin Harry, Lake-Lehman 6 4 16
Matt Saba, Dallas 6 3 15
Dane DeAngelo, Dallas 4 7 15
John Andrews, Crestwood 6 1 13
Nate Wood, Dallas 3 7 13
Tristan Williams, Hazleton Area 5 2 12
Brandon Scharff, Dallas 3 6 12
Alex Buchholz, Crestwood 2 7 11
Kris Konycki, Lake-Lehman 4 0 8
Travis Keil, Coughlin 3 2 8
John Murray, Dallas 3 2 8
Tyler Bicking, Hazleton Area 3 1 7
Eric Whited, WVW 3 1 7
Ryan Wisniewski, WVW 2 3 7
Zach Goodwin, Dallas 3 0 6
Casey Ritsick, Crestwood 2 2 6
Marty Ryman, Crestwood 2 2 6
Matt Wimpfheimer, Crestwood 2 2 6
Blake Pertl, Dallas 1 4 6
Eddie Thomas, WVW 1 4 6
Vince Hornak, Hazleton Area 2 1 5
Derek Distasio, Crestwood 2 0 4
Eric Pincofski, Dallas 2 0 4
Mike Bazadana, WVW 2 0 4
Paul Owens, WVW 2 0 4
Brian Goyne, Dallas 1 2 4
Robert Caffray, Hazleton Area 1 2 4
Mike Symeon, Lake-Lehman 1 2 4
DIVISION II G A Pt.
Henry Cornell, Wyoming Seminary 21 2 44
Brendan Leahigh, Holy Redeemer 13 6 32
Jacob Hughes, Tunkhannock 11 8 30
Dean Mirabelli, Tunkhannock 10 3 23
Jordan Consagra, Pittston Area 9 2 20
Kenny Rexer, Holy Redeemer 9 1 19
Colton Brown, Tunkhannock 8 3 19
Cal Lisman, Meyers 7 1 15
Chris Pawlenok, Holy Redeemer 4 7 15
Aidan Cronin, Tunkhannock 3 6 12
Amdiry Molchanov, Wyo. Seminary 4 3 11
Brian Ly, Tunkhannock 4 2 10
Eduardo Laguna, Wyo. Seminary 3 4 10
Denedikt Buerk, Wyo. Seminary 2 6 10
Malcolm Lumia, Wyo. Seminary 4 1 9
Kenny Rexer, Holy Redeemer 4 0 8
Jarek Hernandez, Meyers 3 2 8
Ian Tracy, Pittston Area 3 1 7
Matt Tavaglione, Pittston Area 3 0 6
Rob Dougherty, Holy Redeemer 1 4 6
Tyler Kukosky, Holy Redeemer 1 4 6
Jesse Macko, Meyers 2 1 5
Joel Tlatenchi, Meyers 1 3 5
Benedikt Buerk, Wyoming Seminary 0 5 5
Jacob Cole, Tunkhannock 2 0 4
Ander Gonzalez, Wyo. Seminary 2 0 4
Pat Casey, Tunkhannock 1 2 4
Robbie Mericle, Wyo. Seminary 1 2 4
DIVISION III G A Pt.
Richard Umana, Berwick 21 9 51
Anthony Ramos, Berwick 11 4 26
Ed Lukowski, Nanticoke 9 4 22
Zack Sypniewski, Wyoming Area 6 2 14
Tyler Robaczewski, Nanticoke 5 2 12
Arlinson Reyes, Berwick 1 10 12
Noah Beltrami, MMI 5 1 11
Mike Mihneski, Nanticoke 4 2 10
Josh Moran, Berwick 3 4 10
Wiston Godoy, Nanticoke 3 4 10
James Lukachinsky, Hanover Area 3 2 8
Junior Ramos, Berwick 3 1 7
Rees Roberts, Nanticoke 3 1 7
Luke Henger, Berwick 3 0 6
Luke Height, GAR 2 2 6
Brian Wisowaty, Wyoming Area 2 2 6
Andrew Woznock, Berwick 2 1 5
Eli Dove, MMI 2 1 5
Charlie Johnson, Wyoming Area 2 1 5
Paige Elmy, GAR 2 0 4
Bre Mosier, GAR 2 0 4
Tristan Gibbons, MMI 2 0 4
Madisen Nichol, GAR 1 2 4
Brian Buckman, Wyoming Area 1 2 4
TEAM SCORING
DIVISION I G GF GA
Coughlin................................................ 8 26 4
Crestwood ............................................ 9 33 18
Dallas .................................................... 9 54 7
Hazleton Area...................................... 10 11 44
Lake-Lehman ....................................... 10 19 10
Wyoming Valley West......................... 9 17 29
DIVISION II G GF GA
Holy Redeemer.................................... 11 33 24
Meyers .................................................. 9 17 25
Pittston Area......................................... 8 16 31
Tunkhannock........................................ 12 41 16
Wyoming Seminary............................. 11 41 13
DIVISION III G GF GA
Berwick ................................................. 9 46 19
GAR....................................................... 8 15 41
Hanover Area....................................... 8 5 33
MMI........................................................ 10 13 66
Nanticoke.............................................. 10 29 20
Wyoming Area ..................................... 10 16 28
L O C A L
R E S U L T S
Bowling
Modern Lanes
Sept. 29
9 a.m. league
Men's Scratch Games: Gage Connolly 87, Aidan
Pavlinchak 85. Men's Scratch Series: Gage Con-
nolly 87, Aidan Pavlinchak 85
Women's Scratch Games: Abby Davis 70, Piper
Pesotini 57. Women'sScratchSeries: Abby Davis
70, Piper Pesotini 57
1. Strykers 15-3; 2. Crazy Kids 11-7; 3. Camo Girls
9-9; 4. 3 Ladies & A Little Man 9-9; 5. The Strikers
8-10.
Men's ScratchGame: Brian Gill 139, Dylan Petruc-
ci 125. Men's Scratch Series: Dylan Petrucci 246,
Brian Gill 229.
Women's Scratch Game: Erica Gilligan 75, Lily
Loughney 50. Women's Scratch Series: Erica Gil-
ligan 124, Lily Loughney 94
10 a.m. league
Men's Scratch Game: Joey Burridge 201, JJ Hood
158. Men's Scratch Series: Joey Burridge 496,
Branden Baldrica 409
Women'sScratchGame: KaitlynSlusser 140, Ste-
phanie Nowak135. Women's ScratchSeries: Ste-
phanie Nowak 358, Kaitlyn Slusser 342.
1 p.m. league
Men's Scratch Games: Alex Hawk 216, Kyle Chro-
mey 199. Men's Scratch Series: Alex Hawk 545.
Austin Amos 538.
Women's ScratchGame: Emily Cherkauskas154,
Emily Cheskiewicz148. Women's ScratchSeries:
Emily Cheskiewicz 386, Emily Cherkauskas 357.
Men's Scratch Games: Conrad Chapple 259,
Jame McEvoy 257. Men's Scratch Series: James
McEvoy 717, Conrad Chapple 653.
Women's Scratch Game: Brianna Eipper 199, Sa-
mantha Amos 199. Women's Scratch Series:
Brianna Eipper 555, Brianna Shinko 503
F O O T B A L L
National Football League
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets .................................... 2 1 0 .667 81 75
Buffalo........................................ 2 1 0 .667 87 79
New England............................. 1 2 0 .333 82 64
Miami .......................................... 1 2 0 .333 65 66
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston.................................. 3 0 0 1.000 88 42
Jacksonville ........................... 1 2 0 .333 52 70
Tennessee............................. 1 2 0 .333 67 113
Indianapolis............................ 1 2 0 .333 61 83
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore................................. 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati ................................ 2 1 0 .667 85 102
Pittsburgh................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland................................ 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego .................................. 2 1 0 .667 63 51
Denver........................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 77
Kansas City................................ 1 2 0 .333 68 99
Oakland...................................... 1 2 0 .333 61 88
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas........................................ 2 1 0 .667 47 54
Philadelphia ............................. 2 1 0 .667 47 66
N.Y. Giants............................... 2 1 0 .667 94 65
Washington.............................. 1 2 0 .333 99 101
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta..................................... 3 0 0 1.000 94 48
Tampa Bay ............................. 1 2 0 .333 60 67
Carolina.................................. 1 2 0 .333 52 79
New Orleans .......................... 0 3 0 .000 83 102
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota.................................. 2 1 0 .667 70 59
Chicago...................................... 2 1 0 .667 74 50
Green Bay .................................. 1 2 0 .333 57 54
Detroit......................................... 1 2 0 .333 87 94
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona..................................... 3 0 0 1.000 67 40
San Francisco ......................... 2 1 0 .667 70 65
Seattle ...................................... 2 1 0 .667 57 39
St. Louis................................... 1 2 0 .333 60 78
Thursday's Game
Baltimore 23, Cleveland 16
Today's Games
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Miami at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh
Monday's Game
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4
Arizona at St. Louis, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 7
Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.
San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday, Oct. 8
Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.
College Football Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 55, Monmouth (NJ) 24
Bloomsburg 43, Gannon 24
Brown 37, Georgetown 10
Clemson 45, Boston College 31
Colgate 47, Yale 24
College of NJ 55, W. Connecticut 27
Cornell 15, Bucknell 10
Cortland St. 20, Montclair St. 0
Delaware Valley 42, Albright 21
Denison 30, Wooster 22
Duquesne 24, St. Francis (Pa.) 21
Gettysburg 35, McDaniel 3
Ithaca 40, Utica 22
Lehigh 34, Fordham 31
Merchant Marine 34, RPI 31
Merrimack 63, Pace 14
New Hampshire 34, Delaware 14
Ohio 37, UMass 34
Penn 28, Dartmouth 21
Princeton 33, Columbia 6
Robert Morris 31, Lafayette 28
Rochester 30, St. Lawrence 20
Rowan 17, Brockport 3
Sacred Heart 34, CCSU 21
San Jose St. 12, Navy 0
Shippensburg 49, Lock Haven 6
Stony Brook 23, Army 3
Susquehanna 17, Muhlenberg 0
UConn 24, Buffalo 17
Ursinus 24, Moravian 7
Villanova 35, Maine 14
Wagner 31, Bryant 21
Waynesburg 20, Thiel 19
West Chester 37, California (Pa.) 34
West Virginia 70, Baylor 63
Wilkes 37, FDU-Florham 27
Stevenson 35, Misericordia 7
William Paterson 21, SUNY Maritime 14
B A S K E T B A L L
Women's National Basketball
Association Playoff Glance
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-3)
Eastern Conference
Connecticut 1, New York 0
Thursday, Sept. 27: Connecticut 65, New York 60
Saturday, Sept. 29: Connecticut at NewYork, 7p.m.
x-Monday, Oct. 1: New York at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Atlanta 1, Indiana 0
Friday Sept. 28: Atlanta 75, Indiana 66
Sunday, Sept. 30: Indiana at Atlanta, 4 p.m.
x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Atlanta at Indiana, 7 or 8 p.m.
Western Conference
Minnesota 1, Seattle 0
Friday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 78, Seattle 70
Sunday, Sept. 30: Minnesota at Seattle, 9 p.m.
x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Seattle at Minnesota, 8 or 9 p.m.
Los Angeles 2, San Antonio 0
Thursday, Sept. 27: Los Angeles 93, San Antonio
86
Saturday, Sept. 29: Los Angeles 101, San Antonio
94
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
..................................... W L T Pts GF GA
x-Sporting Kansas
City..............................17 7 7 58 39 25
New York....................15 8 8 53 54 44
Chicago ......................16 9 5 53 42 36
D.C. .............................15 10 5 50 47 39
Houston......................12 8 10 46 42 37
Columbus...................13 11 6 45 36 37
Montreal .....................12 15 4 40 44 49
Philadelphia............... 8 14 6 30 29 33
New England ............. 7 15 8 29 37 41
Toronto FC................. 5 19 7 22 35 59
WESTERN CONFERENCE
....................................... W L T Pts GF GA
x-San Jose ...................18 6 6 60 62 36
x-Los Angeles..............15 11 4 49 54 42
x-Real Salt Lake..........15 11 4 49 40 34
Seattle...........................13 7 9 48 45 31
Vancouver ....................10 12 8 38 31 40
FC Dallas ..................... 9 12 9 36 35 38
Colorado....................... 9 18 3 30 38 45
Portland ........................ 7 15 8 29 31 51
Chivas USA ................. 7 15 7 28 21 45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth
Friday's Games
Sporting Kansas City 2, Chicago 0
Saturday's Games
New York 4, Toronto FC1
Philadelphia at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
FC Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m.
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Colorado, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Chivas USA at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 6
D.C. United at Toronto FC, 1 p.m.
Chicago at New York, 3:30 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 7
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4 p.m.
FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 7 p.m.
Portland at Seattle FC, 9 p.m.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
Oct. 6
At Kiev, Ukraine, Zaurbek Baysangurov vs. Lukas
Konecny, 12, for Baysangurovs WBOjunior middle-
weight title.
At Bayamon, Puerto Rico, Moises Fuentes vs. Ivan
Calderon, 12, for Fuentes WBOminimumweight ti-
tle; Rafael Marquez vs. WilfredoVazquez Jr., 12, for
the vacant WBO International super bantamweight
title; Eudy Bernardo vs. Jose Gonzalez, 10, for the
WBC Latino lightweight title.
At Toluca, Mexico, Kompayak Porpramook vs.
Adrian Hernandez, 12, for Porpramooks WBC ju-
nior flyweight title.
At Memorial Auditorium, Sacramento, Calif. (FOX),
Yoshihiro Kamegai vs. Cosme Rivera, 10, welter-
weights; Jorge Linares vs. Hector Velazquez, 10,
lightweights.
Oct. 13
At Liverpool, England, David Price vs. Audley Harri-
son, 12, heavyweights.
At Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO), Non-
ito Donaire vs. Toshiaki Nishioka, 12, for Donaires
WBO and IBF super bantamweight titles; Brandon
Rios vs. Mike Alvarado, 10, junior welterweights.
Oct. 20
At Barclays Center, NewYork (SHO), Danny Garcia
vs. Erik Morales, 12, for Garcias WBCand WBA ju-
nior welterweight titles; Paulie Malignaggi vs. Pablo
Cesar Cano, 12, for Malignaggis WBAwelterweight
title; Peter Quillin vs. Hassan NDam, 12, for
NDams WBOmiddleweight title; Devon Alexander
vs. Randall Bailey, 12, for Baileys IBF welterweight
title.
Oct. 27
At Tokyo, Takahiro Ao vs. Gamaliel Diaz, 12, for
Aos WBC super featherweight title.
At Moscow, Denis Lebedev, vs. Guillermo Jones
vs. 12, for Lebedevs WBAWorldcruiserweight title.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3C

M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
TORONTO Adeiny He-
chavarria doubled home the
tiebreaking run in the sixth
inning and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat the Yankees 3-2 on
Saturday, trimming New Yorks
lead atop the AL East to half a
game.
New York could fall into a
first-place tie with four games
to go if Baltimore beats Boston
at home later Saturday.
Torontos Rajai Davis home-
red and had three hits as the
Blue Jays increased the pres-
sure on the Yankees, who wast-
ed several opportunities early.
Shawn Hill (1-0) pitched
three innings of scoreless relief
for the win and Casey Janssen
closed it out for his 21st save in
24 chances.
Athletics 7, Mariners 4
OAKLAND, Calif. Josh
Donaldson hit a tying two-run
home run in the ninth inning
and Brandon Moss hit a game-
ending three-run homer in the
10th, and the Oakland Athlet-
ics gained ground on the first-
place Texas Rangers with a
stunning win over the Seattle
Mariners.
Coco Crisp singled off Oliver
Perez (1-3) leading off the final
inning for his fourth hit. Ste-
phen Pryor entered with one
out and walked Yoenis Ces-
pedes on four pitches.
Moss hammered the first
pitch against Pryor well over
the wall in right for his 21st
home run, sending Oakland
streaming out of the dugout to
celebrate its major-league lead-
ing 14th walk-off win.
Tigers 6, Twins 4
MINNEAPOLIS Miguel
Cabrera hit a three-run homer
to move into at least a tie for
the lead in all three triple
crown categories and Justin
Verlander struck out eight in
seven innings to help the De-
troit Tigers stay in front in the
AL Central with a victory over
the Minnesota Twins.
Rays 10, White Sox 4
CHICAGO Matt Moore
pitched one-hit ball into the
sixth, Matt Joyce homered
twice and the Tampa Bay Rays
stayed three games behind in
the chase for the second AL
wild card by beating the sliding
Chicago White Sox.
Tampa Bay, with nine wins
in 10 games, remained three
games out of the second wild
card behind Oakland, which
beat Seattle 7-4 Saturday.
Orioles 4, Red Sox 3
BALTIMORE Chris Davis
hit his 30th home run, rookie
Manny Machado lined a go-
ahead shot in the seventh in-
ning and the Baltimore Orioles
climbed into a tie atop the AL
East by defeating the Boston
Red Sox.
After finishing in the divi-
sion cellar in each of the previ-
ous four seasons, Baltimore
(91-67) is now in first place
with the New York Yankees.
Both teams have four games
left.
X X X X X L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Toronto Blue Jays Adeiny Hechavarria, left, and Rajai Davis
celebrate their teams 3-2 win over the New York Yankees in a
game in Toronto on Saturday.
Hechavarrias hit
lifts Jays past Yanks
The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS Michael
Morse circled the bases for a
grand slam after taking an
imaginary swing, and the
Washington Nationals cut their
magic number for winning the
NL East to one Saturday night,
beating St. Louis 6-4 on Kurt
Suzukis two-run double in the
10th inning.
The Nationals were forced to
wait at least another day when
second-place Atlanta won.
St. Louis magic number for
clinching the second NL wild-
card spot remained at three.
The Nationals opened the
game with a blast, and a bit of
comedy.
Morses drive with the bases
loaded cleared the wall but
caromed back onto the field,
sending runners and fielders
scurrying. The umpires re-
viewed the ball on replay and
confirmed it was indeed a
grand slam.
The umps ordered all run-
ners to retrace their steps and
Morse back to the plate. He
mimicked his swing minus a
bat, then made his trip around
the bases.
Braves 2, Mets 0
ATLANTA Mike Minor
pitched 6
1
3 sharp innings to
win his fifth straight decision,
Martin Prado and Jason Hey-
ward each had an RBI and the
Atlanta Braves beat the New
York Mets.
Chipper Jones, who played
his next-to-last regular-season
game at Turner Field, was
hitless in four at-bats.
Brewers 9, Astros 5
MILWAUKEE Marco
Estrada struck out 11 in eight
shutout innings, Corey Hart
homered twice and the Mil-
waukee Brewers beat the Hous-
ton Astros.
Pirates 2, Reds 1
PITTSBURGH Andrew
McCutchen hit a solo home
run off Jonathan Broxton with
one out in the ninth inning,
lifting the Pittsburgh Pirates
over the Cincinnati Reds.
A day after getting no-hit by
Cincinnatis Homer Bailey, the
Pirates won with eight hits.
Phillies 9, Marlins 5
MIAMI Roy Halladay
survived a shaky opening in-
ning, Jimmy Rollins had three
hits and scored three times,
and the Philadelphia Phillies
beat the Miami Marlins.
Chase Utley drove in three
runs and Carlos Ruiz added a
two-run double for the Phillies,
who evened their record at
79-79 with four games left.
Diamondbacks 8, Cubs 2
PHOENIX Trevor Cahill
threw a four-hitter in his third
career complete game, Justin
Upton drove in three runs and
the Arizona Diamondbacks
added to Chicagos futility in
the NL West with a victory
over the Cubs.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Nats magic number
at one after victory
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Baltimore........................................ 91 67 .576 7-3 W-3 46-34 45-33
New York ....................................... 91 67 .576 6-4 L-1 48-30 43-37
Tampa Bay..................................... 87 71 .551 4 3 9-1 W-1 44-34 43-37
Toronto........................................... 70 88 .443 21 20 4-6 W-1 38-39 32-49
Boston............................................ 69 89 .437 22 21 2-8 L-4 34-47 35-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit ........................................... 85 73 .538 6-4 W-1 50-31 35-42
Chicago ........................................ 83 75 .525 2 7 2-8 L-1 45-35 38-40
Kansas City.................................. 70 87 .446 14
1
2 19
1
2 4-6 L-6 36-42 34-45
Cleveland ..................................... 66 91 .420 18
1
2 23
1
2 5-5 W-3 35-41 31-50
Minnesota .................................... 66 92 .418 19 24 5-5 L-1 31-49 35-43
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas............................................ 92 65 .586 5-5 L-1 49-30 43-35
Oakland ........................................ 90 68 .570 2
1
2 6-4 W-2 46-31 44-37
Los Angeles................................. 87 70 .554 5 2
1
2 7-3 W-1 46-35 41-35
Seattle........................................... 73 85 .462 19
1
2 17 3-7 L-2 38-40 35-45
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
z-Washington................................ 96 62 .608 6-4 W-1 48-30 48-32
z-Atlanta......................................... 92 66 .582 4 7-3 W-1 47-33 45-33
Philadelphia................................... 79 79 .500 17 6 5-5 W-1 40-41 39-38
New York ....................................... 73 85 .462 23 12 7-3 L-1 36-45 37-40
Miami .............................................. 67 91 .424 29 18 2-8 L-1 36-41 31-50
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Cincinnati.................................. 95 63 .601 6-4 L-1 50-31 45-32
St. Louis....................................... 85 73 .538 10 7-3 L-1 47-30 38-43
Milwaukee ................................... 81 77 .513 14 4 5-5 W-1 47-30 34-47
Pittsburgh.................................... 77 81 .487 18 8 3-7 W-1 43-34 34-47
Chicago ....................................... 59 99 .373 36 26 1-9 L-7 37-41 22-58
Houston ....................................... 52 106 .329 43 33 4-6 L-1 35-46 17-60
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-San Francisco........................... 92 65 .586 8-2 W-3 48-33 44-32
Los Angeles................................. 82 75 .522 10 2
1
2 6-4 W-3 41-35 41-40
Arizona ......................................... 80 78 .506 12
1
2 5 6-4 W-2 40-37 40-41
San Diego..................................... 74 83 .471 18 10
1
2 3-7 L-3 41-38 33-45
Colorado....................................... 62 95 .395 30 22
1
2 4-6 L-1 35-46 27-49
z-clinched playoff berth; x-clinched division
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 9, Boston 1
Cleveland 8, Kansas City 5
N.Y. Yankees 11, Toronto 4
L.A. Angels 7, Texas 4
Minnesota 4, Detroit 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Tampa Bay 1
Oakland 8, Seattle 2
Saturday's Games
Toronto 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Detroit 6, Minnesota 4
Oakland 7, Seattle 4, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 10, Chicago White Sox 4
L.A. Angels at Texas, ppd., rain
Baltimore 4, Boston 3
Kansas City at Cleveland, (n)
Sunday's Games
Kansas City (Hochevar 8-15) at Cleveland (McAllis-
ter 5-8), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Greinke 6-2) at Texas (Darvish 16-9),
1:05 p.m., 1st game
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes16-13) at Toronto (H.Alva-
rez 9-14), 1:07 p.m.
Boston (Z.Stewart 1-3) at Baltimore (J.Saunders
2-3), 1:35 p.m.
Detroit (A.Sanchez 4-6) at Minnesota (Hendriks
1-8), 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 19-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Quintana 6-5), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Er.Ramirez 1-3) at Oakland (Milone 13-10),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 9-12) at Texas (D.Holland
11-6), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Monday's Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 0
Miami 2, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 1
Houston 7, Milwaukee 6
St. Louis 12, Washington 2
Arizona 8, Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 3, San Diego 1
L.A. Dodgers 8, Colorado 0
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Cincinnati 1
Milwaukee 9, Houston 5
Atlanta 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Philadelphia 9, Miami 5
Washington 6, St. Louis 4, 10 innings
Arizona 8, Chicago Cubs 2
San Francisco at San Diego, (n)
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia (Hamels16-6) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-12),
1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 19-9) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez
12-13), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Mejia 1-1) at Atlanta (Medlen 9-1), 1:35
p.m.
Houston (Lyles 4-12) at Milwaukee (Fiers 9-9), 2:10
p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 10-7) at St. Louis (Lynn17-7),
2:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum10-15) at San Diego (Vol-
quez 11-11), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Rusin 1-3) at Arizona (Collmenter
5-3), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado(J.DeLaRosa0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Beck-
ett 1-3), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
A L B O X E S
Blue Jays 3, Yankees 2
New York Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter dh-ss 5 1 1 0 Lawrie 3b 3 0 0 0
ISuzuki lf-rf 5 1 3 0 RDavis lf 4 1 3 2
AlRdrg 3b 3 0 0 0 Encrnc dh 4 0 0 0
Cano 2b 3 0 2 1 YEscor ss 3 1 1 0
Swisher 1b 3 0 2 0 YGoms 1b 2 0 1 0
Grndrs cf 3 0 0 1 Lind ph-1b 0 0 0 0
AnJons rf 2 0 0 0 Sierra rf 4 0 0 0
Ibanez ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Mathis c 3 1 1 0
Gardnr pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Hchvrr 2b 3 0 1 1
ENunez ss 3 0 1 0 Gose cf 3 0 0 0
Pettitte p 0 0 0 0
Chmrln p 0 0 0 0
ErChvz ph 1 0 0 0
Eppley p 0 0 0 0
Logan p 0 0 0 0
DRrtsn p 0 0 0 0
CStwrt c 2 0 0 0
RMartn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 9 2 Totals 29 3 7 3
New York ........................... 200 000 000 2
Toronto............................... 100 011 00x 3
ESh.Hill (1), Y.Gomes (1). DPNew York 1, To-
ronto1. LOBNewYork10, Toronto 6. 2BMathis
(12), Hechavarria (7). HRR.Davis (8). CSI.Su-
zuki (7), Gardner (1). SFCano, Granderson.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Pettitte L,5-4............ 5
2
3 5 3 3 3 4
Chamberlain............ 1
1
3 1 0 0 0 3
Eppley ......................
1
3 1 0 0 0 0
Logan........................ 0 0 0 0 1 0
D.Robertson............
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto
R.Romero ................ 3 6 2 2 2 3
Sh.Hill W,1-0 ........... 3 0 0 0 2 0
Lincoln H,4...............
1
3 1 0 0 0 1
Loup H,5 ..................
2
3 1 0 0 0 0
Delabar H,10 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Janssen S,21-24..... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WPR.Romero.
UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt;First, Laz Diaz;Sec-
ond, Tim Welke;Third, Paul Schrieber.
T2:54. A36,139 (49,260).
Athletics 7, Mariners 4
Seattle Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 Crisp cf 5 2 4 0
Gutirrz cf 5 0 0 0 Drew ss 4 0 0 0
Seager 3b 5 1 1 1 Cespds lf 4 2 2 0
Jaso dh 3 1 1 0 Moss 1b 5 1 3 5
Smoak 1b 3 1 0 0 JGoms dh 3 0 0 0
MSndrs lf 3 1 1 2
S.Smith
ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Olivo c 4 0 1 0 Reddck rf 3 1 0 0
C.Wells rf 4 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 1 1 2
Triunfl ss 3 0 1 0 DNorrs c 4 0 0 0
JMontr ph 1 0 0 0 Rosales 2b 2 0 0 0
Ryan ss 0 0 0 0
Pnngtn
ph-2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 5 3 Totals 37 710 7
Seattle........................... 010 300 000 0 4
Oakland ........................ 000 100 012 3 7
One out when winning run scored.
EMoss (9), Cespedes (3). LOBSeattle 5, Oak-
land 5. 2BOlivo (13), Crisp (23), Cespedes (25),
Moss (16). HRSeager (19), M.Saunders (19),
Moss (21), Donaldson (9). SBJaso (5), M.Saun-
ders (21), Crisp (37).
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Vargas...................... 7 5 1 1 0 7
C.Capps H,2............
1
3 1 1 1 1 1
Wilhelmsen
BS,5-34.................... 1
2
3 2 2 2 1 3
O.Perez L,1-3..........
1
3 1 1 1 0 0
Pryor ......................... 0 1 2 2 1 0
Oakland
Straily ....................... 4
1
3 3 4 3 4 3
Figueroa................... 1
2
3 0 0 0 0 3
Neshek..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Scribner.................... 1
1
3 2 0 0 0 0
R.Cook .....................
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Balfour W,3-2........... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pryor pitched to 2 batters in the 10th.
UmpiresHome, Marty Foster;First, Jeff Kellogg-
;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Eric Cooper.
T3:09. A21,517 (35,067).
Tigers 6, Twins 4
Detroit Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 5 1 1 0 Span cf 4 1 0 0
Berry lf 4 1 1 0 Revere lf 5 0 2 0
MiCarr 3b 4 1 1 3 Mauer dh 3 1 0 0
Fielder 1b 4 1 1 1 Mornea 1b 4 1 0 0
DYong dh 4 0 0 0 Doumit c 4 1 1 4
Dirks rf 4 2 2 1 Parmel rf 4 0 1 0
JhPerlt ss 4 0 1 1 Plouffe 3b 4 0 2 0
Avila c 4 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 3 0 0 0
Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 Flormn ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 36 6 8 6 Totals 34 4 6 4
Detroit................................. 020 000 040 6
Minnesota.......................... 000 000 040 4
EJh.Peralta (7), Plouffe (18). LOBDetroit 5,
Minnesota 9. 2BJh.Peralta (32), Plouffe (17).
HRMi.Cabrera (43), Fielder (29), Dirks (8), Dou-
mit (18). SBA.Jackson (12), Berry (21), Infante
(5), Revere (39).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Verlander W,17-8.... 7 4 1 0 2 8
Benoit .......................
1
3 1 3 3 2 0
Alburquerque H,1 ...
2
3 1 0 0 1 2
Valverde S,33-38.... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Minnesota
Walters L,2-5........... 5 4 2 2 1 5
Duensing.................. 1
2
3 0 0 0 0 2
Al.Burnett .................
1
3 1 2 2 1 0
Fien........................... 1 2 2 2 0 1
Perdomo .................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Al.Burnett pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Verlander pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
BalkAlburquerque.
UmpiresHome, Wally Bell;First, Jim Wolf;Sec-
ond, Ted Barrett;Third, Ron Kulpa.
Rays 10, White Sox 4
Tampa Bay Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DJnngs lf 5 0 1 0 Wise cf 3 0 0 0
BUpton cf 4 1 1 1
JrDnks
ph-cf 0 1 0 0
EJhnsn ss 1 0 0 0 Youkils 3b 3 0 0 0
Zobrist ss 4 2 2 1
Olmedo
ph-ss 1 1 1 0
Thmps cf 0 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 3 0 0 0
Longori 3b 4 1 1 1
DJhnsn
ph-1b 0 1 0 0
Brignc 3b 0 0 0 0 Konerk dh 3 0 0 0
Kppngr 1b 4 1 1 2
OHudsn
ph-dh 1 1 1 4
C.Pena 1b 1 0 0 0 Rios rf 3 0 2 0
BFrncs rf 2 0 1 0
HGmnz
ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Joyce ph-rf 2 2 2 4 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0
RRorts 2b 4 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 3 0 0 0
SRdrgz dh 2 1 0 0 JoLopz 3b 1 0 0 0
Scott ph-dh 2 0 1 0 Flowrs c 4 0 0 0
CGmnz c 3 2 2 1 Bckhm 2b 2 0 0 0
Vogt ph-c 1 0 0 0
Totals 39101310 Totals 31 4 4 4
Tampa Bay....................... 003 201 130 10
Chicago............................ 000 000 040 4
EBeckham(7). LOBTampa Bay 10, Chicago 4.
2BZobrist (39). HRKeppinger (9), Joyce 2 (17),
C.Gimenez (1), O.Hudson (2). SBDe.Jennings 2
(31), B.Upton (31). CSJoyce (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore W,11-11... 5
1
3 1 0 0 2 4
Farnsworth...............
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Archer....................... 2 3 4 4 2 2
B.Gomes.................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Sale L,17-8 .............. 3
1
3 7 5 5 3 7
Omogrosso.............. 1
2
3 2 0 0 1 3
Heath ........................
1
3 1 1 1 1 0
Axelrod..................... 1
2
3 2 3 2 3 3
Septimo.................... 1 1 1 1 0 2
Marinez .................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Axelrod pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
UmpiresHome, Alfonso Marquez;First, TomHal-
lion;Second, Brian ONora;Third, Chad Fairchild.
T3:19. A26,559 (40,615).
Orioles 4, Red Sox 3
Boston Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Ellsury cf 4 1 1 0 McLoth lf 4 0 1 0
Pdsdnk lf 2 0 0 0 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0
Nava ph-lf 1 0 0 0 AdJons cf 4 1 0 0
Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 Wieters c 4 0 0 0
C.Ross rf 3 0 1 1 C.Davis rf 3 2 2 2
MGomz 1b 3 1 0 0 EnChvz rf 0 0 0 0
Sltlmch c 3 1 1 2 MrRynl 1b 4 0 1 0
Lvrnwy dh 3 0 0 0 Machd 3b 3 1 2 2
Ciriaco 3b 3 0 1 0 Ford dh 2 0 1 0
Aviles ss 3 0 0 0 Andino 2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 29 3 5 3 Totals 30 4 7 4
Boston................................ 000 021 000 3
Baltimore............................ 010 200 10x 4
EAviles (15), C.Davis (6). DPBaltimore 2.
LOBBoston 3, Baltimore 5. 2BMcLouth (12).
HRSaltalamacchia (25), C.Davis (30), Machado
(7). SBC.Davis (2). CSC.Ross (2). SAndino.
SFC.Ross.
IP H R ER BB SO
Boston
Doubront L,11-10.... 7 7 4 3 1 10
Tazawa..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
S.Johnson................ 5 4 3 3 3 3
Tom.Hunter W,7-8
BS,1-1 ...................... 2 1 0 0 0 0
Matusz H,4...............
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
ODay H,13 ..............
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson S,49-52 1 0 0 0 0 1
S.Johnson pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBPby Doubront (C.Davis).
UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson;First, Phil Cuzzi-
;Second, Gerry Davis;Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T2:37. A46,311 (45,971).
N L B O X E S
Braves 2, Mets 0
New York Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 Constnz cf 4 0 1 0
AnTrrs cf 3 0 1 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0
DnMrp ph 1 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
DWrght 3b 3 0 1 0 Prado lf 4 1 2 1
Hairstn rf 3 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 0 1
I.Davis ph 1 0 0 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0
Duda 1b 4 0 0 0 FFrmn 1b 4 0 0 0
Bay lf 3 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 2 0
RCeden 2b 3 0 0 0 McCnn c 2 0 1 0
Nickes c 2 0 0 0 Smmns ss 3 1 2 0
Shppch ph-c 1 0 1 0 Minor p 1 0 0 0
CYoung p 2 0 0 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0
ElRmr p 0 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0
JuTrnr ph 1 0 0 0 Hinske ph 1 0 0 0
RRmrz p 0 0 0 0 RJhnsn cf 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 0 5 0 Totals 30 2 8 2
New York ........................... 000 000 000 0
Atlanta ................................ 100 010 00x 2
EUggla (12). DPAtlanta 2. LOBNew York 5,
Atlanta 6. 2BD.Wright (41), Prado 2 (42). CS
Constanza (2). SMinor.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
C.Young L,4-9......... 6 7 2 2 1 6
El.Ramirez ............... 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Ramirez................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Minor W,11-10 ........ 6
1
3 3 0 0 0 4
Durbin H,15 .............
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Avilan H,5.................
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Venters H,20 ........... 1 2 0 0 0 0
Kimbrel S,41-44...... 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBPby Kimbrel (D.Wright). WPC.Young 2,
Kimbrel. BalkAvilan.
UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert;First, Dana DeMuth-
;Second, Doug Eddings;Third, Kerwin Danley.
T2:33. A48,310 (49,586).
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
L E A D E R S
BATTING
MiCabrera, Detroit, .327; Trout, Los Angeles, .321;
Mauer, Minnesota, .320; Beltre, Texas, .319; Jeter,
New York, .316; Butler, Kansas City, .315; Fielder,
Detroit, .309.
RUNS
Trout, Los Angeles, 125; MiCabrera, Detroit, 108;
Kinsler, Texas, 103; AJackson, Detroit, 102; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 102; Hamilton, Texas, 101; Cano,
New York, 98.
RBI
MiCabrera, Detroit, 136; Hamilton, Texas, 125; En-
carnacion, Toronto, 110; Willingham, Minnesota,
110; Butler, Kansas City, 106; Fielder, Detroit, 106;
Pujols, Los Angeles, 102.
HITS
Jeter, NewYork, 210; MiCabrera, Detroit, 199; But-
ler, Kansas City, 188; Beltre, Texas, 187; Cano,
New York, 184; AGordon, Kansas City, 184; Ad-
Jones, Baltimore, 183.
DOUBLES
AGordon, Kansas City, 51; Pujols, Los Angeles, 48;
Cano, NewYork, 44; NCruz, Texas, 43; Choo, Cle-
veland, 42; Kinsler, Texas, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit,
40.
TRIPLES
AJackson, Detroit, 10; Andrus, Texas, 9; Rios, Chi-
cago, 8; JWeeks, Oakland, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7;
AEscobar, Kansas City, 7; Trout, Los Angeles, 7;
Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 7.
HOME RUNS
MiCabrera, Detroit, 43; Hamilton, Texas, 43; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 42; ADunn, Chicago, 41; Grander-
son, New York, 40; Beltre, Texas, 36; Willingham,
Minnesota, 35.
STOLEN BASES
Trout, Los Angeles, 47; RDavis, Toronto, 45; Rev-
ere, Minnesota, 39; Crisp, Oakland, 37; AEscobar,
Kansas City, 32; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 31; Kip-
nis, Cleveland, 31; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 31.
PITCHING
Weaver, Los Angeles, 20-4; Price, Tampa Bay,
19-5; MHarrison, Texas, 18-10; Sale, Chicago,
17-8; Verlander, Detroit, 17-8; Scherzer, Detroit,
16-7; Darvish, Texas, 16-9; PHughes, New York,
16-13.
STRIKEOUTS
Verlander, Detroit, 239; Scherzer, Detroit, 228;
FHernandez, Seattle, 216; Darvish, Texas, 214;
Shields, Tampa Bay, 208; Price, Tampa Bay, 201;
Sale, Chicago, 192.
SAVES
JiJohnson, Baltimore, 49; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 46;
RSoriano, New York, 42; CPerez, Cleveland, 39;
Nathan, Texas, 36; Valverde, Detroit, 33; Reed,
Chicago, 29; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 29.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
L E A D E R S
BATTING
MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346; Posey, San Fran-
cisco, .334; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .330; YMoli-
na, St. Louis, .320; Braun, Milwaukee, .319; Craig,
St. Louis, .313; DWright, NewYork, .306; Pacheco,
Colorado, .306.
RUNS
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 106; Braun, Milwaukee,
104; JUpton, Arizona, 103; Rollins, Philadelphia,
98; Harper, Washington, 95; Holliday, St. Louis, 94;
Bourn, Atlanta, 93; Pagan, San Francisco, 93.
RBI
Braun, Milwaukee, 112; Headley, San Diego, 109;
ASoriano, Chicago, 106; Holliday, St. Louis, 101; Ar-
Ramirez, Milwaukee, 101; Posey, San Francisco,
100; LaRoche, Washington, 99; Pence, San Fran-
cisco, 99.
HITS
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 190; Prado, Atlanta, 186;
Braun, Milwaukee, 185; Scutaro, San Francisco,
185; SCastro, Chicago, 179; Reyes, Miami, 177;
AHill, Arizona, 176.
DOUBLES
ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 50; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
43; AHill, Arizona, 42; Prado, Atlanta, 42; Votto,
Cincinnati, 42; DWright, NewYork, 41; DanMurphy,
New York, 39.
TRIPLES
Pagan, San Francisco, 15; SCastro, Chicago, 12;
Fowler, Colorado, 11; Reyes, Miami, 11; Bourn, At-
lanta, 10; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 10; Colvin,
Colorado, 10.
HOME RUNS
Braun, Milwaukee, 41; Stanton, Miami, 35; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 34; LaRoche, Washington, 32; IDavis,
New York, 31; ASoriano, Chicago, 31; PAlvarez,
Pittsburgh, 30; Beltran, St. Louis, 30; Kubel, Arizo-
na, 30; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 30.
STOLEN BASES
Bourn, Atlanta, 39; Victorino, Los Angeles, 38; Ev-
Cabrera, San Diego, 37; CGomez, Milwaukee, 36;
Reyes, Miami, 36; Pierre, Philadelphia, 35; Altuve,
Houston, 33.
PITCHING
GGonzalez, Washington, 21-8; Dickey, New York,
20-6; Cueto, Cincinnati, 19-9; Lynn, St. Louis, 17-7;
8 tied at 16.
STRIKEOUTS
Dickey, New York, 222; Kershaw, Los Angeles,
221; Hamels, Philadelphia, 208; GGonzalez,
Washington, 207; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 204;
ClLee, Philadelphia, 200; Strasburg, Washington,
197.
SAVES
Kimbrel, Atlanta, 41; Motte, St. Louis, 40; Papelbon,
Philadelphia, 37; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 36; AChap-
man, Cincinnati, 36; Axford, Milwaukee, 33; Clip-
pard, Washington, 32; Putz, Arizona, 32.
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
Sept. 30
1927
BabeRuthhit his 60thhomerunof theseasoninthe
eighth inning off TomZachary to lead the NewYork
Yankees to a 4-2 victory over the Washington Sen-
ators.
1934
Dizzy Dean beat the Cincinnati Reds, 9-0, for his
30th victory of the year as the St. Louis Cardinals
clinched the NL pennant.
1947
In the first televised World Series, the New York
Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 5-3, in the
opening game.
1951
Jackie Robinson homered in the14th inning to give
the Brooklyn Dodgers a 9-8 victory over the Phila-
delphia Phillies, tying the New York Giants for first
place in the National League and forcing a playoff.
1962
Willie Mays homered to give the San Francisco Gi-
ants a 2-1 victory over the Houston Colt 45s in the
seasons final day. That, coupled with the Los An-
geles Dodgers 1-0 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals,
forced a playoff for the NL pennant. The Giants won
in three games.
1972
Roberto Clemente doubled off Jon Matlack during
Pittsburghs 5-0 victory over the New York Mets.
The hit was the 3,000th and last for the Pirates star,
who was killed in a plane crash during the offsea-
son.
1984
Californias Mike Witt tossed 97 pitches in a perfect
game against the Texas Rangers, winning 1-0.
1988
Orel Hershiser of the Los Angeles Dodgers broke
Don Drysdales record of 58 consecutive scoreless
innings by shutting out San Diego for 10 innings.
The Padres won in the 16th inning, 2-1. Hershiser,
whoextendedhis streak to59innings, hadfivecon-
secutive shutout victories in September.
1988
Dave Stieb of the Toronto Blue Jays lost a no-hit bid
withtwoouts intheninthfor thesecondconsecutive
start andfinishedwitha4-0one-hitter over theBalti-
more Orioles. Stieb faced the minimum 26 batters
until Jim Trabor lined a single down the right-field
line about 3 feet from the glove of first baseman
Fred McGriff.
1992
George Brett became the 18th player to get 3,000
hits intheKansas City Royals 4-0winover theCali-
fornia Angels.
1995
Albert Belle of the Cleveland Indians hit his 50th
home run of the season and became the only player
in history to hit 50 homers and 50 doubles in the
same season.
1997
Tim Raines, Derek Jeter and Paul ONeill hit con-
secutive homers in the sixth inning against Cleve-
land, makingtheNewYork Yankees thefirst teamto
hit three straight homers in a postseason game.
ONeills homer made it 8-6, the final score of the
Yankees Game 1 victory in the AL division series.
1998
JohnSmoltz becamethewinningest pitcher inpost-
season history, allowing five hits in 7 2-3 innings as
the Atlanta Braves cruised to a 7-1 victory over the
Chicago Cubs in Game1of their NL Divisional Play-
off series.
2004
Cincinnati Reds slugger Adam Dunn set the major
league record for strikeouts in one season with190
when he fanned in his first two at-bats against the
Chicago Cubs. Dunn struck out against Chicago
starter Mark Prior in the second and fourth innings,
breaking the previous mark for whiffs of 189 set by
Bobby Bonds in 1970.
2005
Ichiro Suzuki became the sixth player in major
league history to collect 200 hits in five straight sea-
sons in Seattles 4-1 win over Oakland.
2007
The NewYork Mets missed the playoffs when Tom
Glavine was tagged for seven runs during the first
inning of a season-ending 8-1 loss to Florida. No
major league team had owned a lead of seven
games or more with 17 to play and failed to finish in
first place. New York, which had that margin on
Sept. 12, matchedthelargest leadblowninSeptem-
ber. The1938 Pittsburgh Pirates (Sept. 1) and1934
NewYork Giants (Sept. 6) also led by seven games
in the final month only to tailspin. New Yorks loss
coupled with Philadelphias 6-1 win over Washing-
ton gave the division title to the Phillies.
Brewers 9, Astros 5
Houston Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 Aoki rf 5 2 3 2
SMoore rf 4 1 2 0 Bianchi 3b 0 0 0 0
Wallac 1b 4 0 1 0 RWeks 2b 4 0 0 0
FMrtnz lf 3 1 1 2 Farris ph-2b 1 0 1 0
JCastro c 4 1 1 0 Braun lf 3 1 2 0
Dmngz 3b 3 0 1 0
Morgan
ph-lf 1 0 0 0
DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 4 2 3 2
Bogsvc ph 1 1 1 2 LSchfr ph-rf 0 0 0 1
Greene ss 4 1 1 1 Hart 1b 3 2 2 4
BBarns cf 4 0 1 0
Ishikaw
ph-1b 1 0 0 0
Keuchl p 0 0 0 0 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0
Fick p 0 0 0 0 Torreal c 0 0 0 0
Pareds ph 1 0 0 0 CGomz cf 4 0 2 0
Storey p 0 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 1 1 0
B.Laird 3b 1 0 0 0 Estrad p 3 0 0 0
LHrndz p 0 0 0 0
Veras p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 5 9 5 Totals 36 915 9
Houston.............................. 000 000 005 5
Milwaukee.......................... 043 100 01x 9
EDel Rosario (2). DPHouston 1, Milwaukee 1.
LOBHouston 3, Milwaukee 8. 2BAoki (37),
C.Gomez (19), Segura (4). HRF.Martinez (4),
Bogusevic (7), Greene (11), Ar.Ramirez (27), Hart 2
(30). SKeuchel, Estrada. SFL.Schafer.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Keuchel L,3-8.......... 2
1
3 8 7 7 1 2
Fick ........................... 1
2
3 2 1 1 1 0
Storey....................... 2 3 0 0 1 1
Del Rosario.............. 2 2 1 0 0 1
Milwaukee
Estrada W,5-7......... 8 4 0 0 1 11
Li.Hernandez...........
2
3 5 5 5 0 0
Veras ........................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
WPFick.
UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher;First, Joe West-
;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Rob Drake.
T3:05. A34,294 (41,900).
Pirates 2, Reds 1
Cincinnati Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
WValdz 2b 4 0 1 0 Presley lf 4 0 1 1
Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 SMarte lf 1 0 0 0
Votto 1b 2 0 1 0 JHrrsn 2b 4 0 1 0
Gregrs pr 0 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 5 1 1 1
Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 GJones rf 4 0 1 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
Rolen 3b 4 0 1 1 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 4 0 0 0
Heisey lf 3 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 4 0 2 0
DNavrr c 3 0 1 0 McKnr c 2 0 0 0
Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 Barmes ss 2 0 1 0
Leake p 2 0 1 0 dArnad pr 0 1 0 0
Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0 Tabata rf 1 0 1 0
Ludwck ph 1 0 1 0 McPhrs p 1 0 0 0
Phipps pr 0 1 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0
Frazier 1b 0 0 0 0 Holt ph 0 0 0 0
Mercer ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 7 1 Totals 32 2 8 2
Cincinnati ........................... 000 000 010 1
Pittsburgh .......................... 000 000 101 2
One out when winning run scored.
EArredondo (1), Cozart (14). DPPittsburgh 1.
LOBCincinnati 9, Pittsburgh 12. 2BLeake (3),
Ludwick (26), Presley (12), P.Alvarez (24). HR
A.McCutchen (31). SW.Valdez, D.Navarro, Holt.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Leake........................ 6 4 0 0 3 3
Arredondo................ 1 2 1 1 1 1
Ondrusek ................. 1 1 0 0 2 0
Broxton L,3-2...........
1
3 1 1 1 0 0
Pittsburgh
McPherson .............. 6 4 0 0 1 5
J.Hughes.................. 1 1 0 0 0 2
Grilli BS,3-5 ............. 1 2 1 1 1 2
Hanrahan W,5-1...... 1 0 0 0 2 0
WPOndrusek.
UmpiresHome, Chris Conroy;First, Mark Carl-
son;Second, Angel Hernandez;Third, Ed Hickox.
T3:11. A38,623 (38,362).
Nationals 6, Cardinals 4
Washington St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Werth rf 6 0 1 0 Jay cf 4 0 2 2
Harper cf 5 1 3 0 MCrpnt 3b 5 0 0 0
Zmrmn 3b 5 1 2 0 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 0
LaRoch 1b 3 2 2 0 Craig 1b 5 0 1 0
Morse lf 4 1 1 4 YMolin c 4 0 1 0
Berndn lf 0 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 1 1 0
Dsmnd ss 5 0 0 0 Schmkr 2b 4 1 1 0
Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0 SFrmn p 0 0 0 0
KSuzuk c 5 0 2 2 Salas p 0 0 0 0
Zmrmn p 2 0 0 0 Kozma ss 4 2 3 2
SBurntt p 0 0 0 0 Lohse p 2 0 0 0
Matths p 0 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Freese ph 0 0 0 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Chamrs pr 0 0 0 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0
Lmrdzz ph 1 0 1 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0
Descals
ph-2b 1 0 1 0
Totals 41 613 6 Totals 37 411 4
Washington.................. 400 000 000 2 6
St. Louis ....................... 000 000 301 0 4
DPWashington 3. LOBWashington 10, St.
Louis 7. 2BHarper (25), Zimmerman (36), K.Su-
zuki (5), Kozma (4). HRMorse (17). SBernadi-
na, Zimmermann. SFJay.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Zimmermann ........... 6
1
3 7 3 3 2 5
S.Burnett H,30 ........
1
3 1 0 0 0 0
Mattheus H,17.........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Clippard H,12 .......... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Storen W,3-1
BS,1-4 ...................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
Stammen S,1-2....... 1 1 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Lohse........................ 6 8 4 4 1 9
Mujica....................... 1 2 0 0 0 2
Boggs ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Motte......................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
S.Freeman L,0-2.....
1
3 0 1 1 1 0
Salas.........................
2
3 2 1 1 1 0
PBY.Molina.
UmpiresHome, Cory Blaser;First, Chris Guccio-
ne;Second, Jeff Nelson;Third, Bill Welke.
T3:38. A42,264 (43,975).
Phillies 9, Marlins 5
Philadelphia Miami
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Rollins ss 4 3 3 0 Petersn cf 5 1 1 0
Pierre lf 2 0 0 0 DSolan 2b 5 1 3 0
Aumont p 0 0 0 0 Reyes ss 3 1 1 0
Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 2 3 3
Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0
Utley 2b 4 2 2 3 Dobbs lf 4 0 0 0
Ruiz c 5 0 2 2 Brantly c 4 0 1 1
DBrwn rf 4 1 1 1 Velazqz 3b 4 0 1 1
Ruf 1b 5 1 1 0 Nolasco p 2 0 0 0
Schrhlt cf 2 1 2 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0
Mayrry ph-cf 3 0 0 0 DMrph ph 1 0 0 0
Orr 3b 2 0 1 2 MDunn p 0 0 0 0
Frndsn ph-3b 3 0 2 1 Koehler p 0 0 0 0
Hallady p 2 1 1 0 ARams p 0 0 0 0
Wggntn ph 1 0 0 0 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0
Horst p 0 0 0 0 Kearns ph 1 0 0 0
DeFrts p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0
Mrtnz ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 39 915 9 Totals 37 510 5
Philadelphia....................... 020 030 211 9
Miami .................................. 301 000 010 5
ERuiz (6), Reyes (18). DPPhiladelphia 1, Mia-
mi 2. LOBPhiladelphia 9, Miami 10. 2BRuiz
(30), Ruf (2), Orr (5). 3BD.Brown (2). HRStan-
ton (36). SBPierre 2 (37), Utley (11), Reyes (37).
CSFrandsen (1). SPierre 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
Halladay W,11-8 ..... 5 6 4 4 3 7
Horst H,5.................. 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
De Fratus H,4 ..........
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Aumont ..................... 0 0 1 1 1 1
Bastardo H,25 ......... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Papelbon.................. 1 3 0 0 0 2
Miami
Nolasco L,12-13...... 5 9 5 5 0 4
Da.Jennings ............ 1 0 0 0 0 0
M.Dunn.....................
1
3 1 2 2 1 0
Koehler.....................
2
3 1 0 0 1 1
A.Ramos ..................
2
3 2 1 1 2 1
Gaudin......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Hatcher ..................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Aumont pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WPAumont, Bastardo.
UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons;First, Dale Scott-
;Second, Mark Wegner;Third, Brian Knight.
T4:03. A30,202 (37,442).
Diamondbacks 8, Cubs 2
Chicago Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJess rf 4 0 1 0 Eaton cf 4 2 2 0
Valuen 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 Grahm cf 0 0 0 0
Rizzo 1b 3 1 0 0 GParra lf 4 0 2 0
ASorin lf 4 1 1 2 A.Hill 2b 4 2 3 2
SCastro ss 4 0 0 0
Elmore
ph-2b 1 0 0 0
WCastll c 3 0 0 0 J.Upton rf 4 2 2 3
Dolis p 0 0 0 0 Pollock rf 1 0 1 0
LaHair ph 1 0 0 0 MMntr c 3 1 0 0
BJcksn cf 3 0 1 0 RWhelr 3b 5 0 2 0
Vitters 3b 1 0 0 0 Jacobs 1b 4 1 2 1
LCastill p 0 0 0 0 JMcDnl ss 4 0 0 0
Belivea p 0 0 0 0 Cahill p 3 0 1 2
Clevngr c 1 0 0 0
Germn p 0 0 0 0
Cardns 2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 29 2 4 2 Totals 37 815 8
Chicago.............................. 000 000 002 2
Arizona............................... 310 030 10x 8
DPChicago1, Arizona1. LOBChicago4, Arizo-
na11. 2BA.Hill (43), Pollock (4), Jacobs (1). HR
A.Soriano (32), J.Upton (17). SGermano, G.Par-
ra.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Germano L,2-10...... 4
1
3 10 7 7 1 5
L.Castillo.................. 1
2
3 1 0 0 1 1
Beliveau ...................
2
3 2 1 1 0 2
Dolis.......................... 1
1
3 2 0 0 1 1
Arizona
Cahill W,13-12 ........ 9 4 2 2 3 9
HBPby Germano (M.Montero), by Beliveau (Eat-
on).
UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover;First, Dan Bellino-
;Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Mike Estabrook.
T2:57. A29,084 (48,633).
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5C
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
No. 9West VirginiaandtheBig12,
perfect together.
Geno Smith and the fast-mov-
ing, high-scoring Mountaineers
proved they fit right in with their
newconference, outracingNo. 25
Baylor 70-63 on Saturday in the
Big 12s highest-scoring game ev-
er.
Smith tied a conference mark
witheight touchdownpasses and
narrowly missed another one
with 656 yards passing.
It didfeel likeoneof thoseclas-
sic Texas shootouts, said Smith,
whose school moved over from
the Big East this season. Thats
kind of what the Big12 is about.
Smith outdueled Baylors Nick
Florence, who broke Heisman
Trophy-winning predecessor
Robert Griffin IIIs school record
with581yards. Florencethrewfor
five TDs.
School, conference and FBS
marks all got rewritten in this
one.
The game alsoset a newrecord
for the most points scored in a
game involving a team ranked in
The Associated Press poll. The
previous mark of 124 was set in
No. 12Oklahomas 82-42winover
Colorado in1980.
How wild was it? Smith, the
early Heisman front-runner, had
more TD passes than incomple-
tions (six). He finished 45 of 51
and still doesnt have an intercep-
tion this season.
Can you please tell me how
you can improve on that? West
Virginia coach Dana Holgorsen
said.
Maybe not on offense, but both
defenses have plenty of work to
do.
West Virginia amassed a
school-record 807 yards and the
teamscombinedfor1,507yardsof
offense and 67 first downs. Six re-
ceivers had at least 100 yards re-
ceiving.
The Bears Terrance Williams
set a Big12 record with 314 yards
receiving. The old mark was set
minutes earlier by West Virginias
Stedman Bailey, who had 303
yards and a school-record five
TDs.
Williams 8-yard scoring catch
brought Baylor (3-1) within70-63
with 3:08 left.
But Dustin Garrison ran for 17
yards on third down and the
Mountaineersranout theclockto
snap Baylors nine-game winning
streak, the second-longest in the
nation.
We expect to score that many
points a game, Florence said.
But thegoal istoscoremorethan
our opponent and we came up a
little short today.
The combined 19 touchdowns
tied an FBS mark, last reached
when Navy beat North Texas 74-
62 in 2007. That matchup set the
FBS record for most points in a
regulation game at 136.
Baylor, meanwhile, tiedanFBS
mark for the most points scored
by a losing team.
Among the other records,
Smith set school single-game
marks for completions, yards and
touchdown passes.
Bailey and Tavon Austin be-
came the first FBS teammates
with 200 yards receiving since
2007.
Going back to the Orange
Bowl, West Virginia has scored10
touchdowns threetimes inits last
five games.
AP PHOTO
West Virginia quarterback Geno Smith (12) throws a pass Sat-
urday against Baylor in Morgantown, W.Va. Smith threw for eight
touchdowns and 656 yards in the 70-63 West Virginia victory.
Mountaineers win a shooutout
No. 9 West Virginia scores 70
in schools first Big 12 game
to overcome No. 25 Baylor.
By JOHN RABY
AP Sports Writer
EAST LANSING, Mich.
Braxton Miller threw for 179
yards and ran for 130, and No.
14 Ohio State held off No. 20
Michigan State 17-16 on Sat-
urday, giving Urban Meyer a
win in his first Big Ten game as
Buckeyes coach.
Miller put Ohio State (5-0,
1-0) ahead 17-13 with a 63-yard
touchdown pass to Devin
Smith in the third quarter, and
the Buckeyes maligned de-
fense held LeVeon Bell and the
Michigan State running game
in check. Meyer becomes the
third coach to start 5-0 in his
first season at Ohio State.
Carol Widdoes and Earle Bruce
also did it in 1944 and 1979.
Michigan State (3-2, 0-1) has
lost four home games in a row
against Ohio State.
Iowa 31, Minnesota 13
IOWA CITY, Iowa Mark
Weisman ran for 177 yards, 155
in the first half, to lead Iowa to
a 31-13 win over Minnesota on
Saturday and give the Haw-
keyes possession of the Floyd
of Rosedale bronze pig trophy.
Christian Kirkseys 68-yard
interception return for a touch-
down in the fourth quarter
sealed the win for Iowa (3-2),
which bounced back from last
weeks disappointing 32-31 loss
to Central Michigan to win the
Big Ten opener for both
schools.
Minnesota (4-1) was off to its
best start since 2008, but
couldnt get anything going on
offense Saturday. Max Shortell
threw three interceptions and
the Gophers managed only 75
yards in the first half. The
Hawkeyes scored three touch-
downs during a six-minute
span of the second quarter to
jump out to a 24-0 halftime
lead.
Purdue 51, Marshall 41
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.
Purdues Caleb TerBush threw
four touchdown passes and the
Boilermakers ran two intercep-
tions back for scores as they
held off Marshall.
TerBush finished 27 of 37 for
294 yards on a day both offens-
es had big numbers.
Marshall (2-3) lived up to its
billing as the nations No. 1
passing offense.
After forging a 14-14 tie early
in the second quarter, Purdues
defense flipped the game by
turning three quick intercep-
tions into touchdowns. Corner-
backs Ricardo Allen and Josh
Johnson each scored on their
interceptions, marking the first
time in Purdue history that
two interceptions were return-
ed for TDs in the same game.
When the flurry ended, Purdue
(3-1) led 42-14.
Marshall charged back in the
second half, closing the gap to
10 with 3:46 to play but
couldnt get any closer.
Tommy Shuler set Marshalls
single-game record with 19
receptions and finished with
200 yards.
Northwestern 44,
Indiana 29
EVANSTON, Ill. Kain
Colter ran for 161 yards and
four touchdowns, and North-
western set a school record
with 704 yards of total offense
in a victory over Indiana in
both teams Big Ten Confer-
ence opener.
Colter also finished with 131
yards receiving. Trevor Sie-
mian threw for 308 yards, and
Venric Mark ran for 138 and a
touchdown on a day when the
Wildcats (5-0) had to hang on
after they appeared to be on
their way to an easy win.
They led 27-0 lead early in
the third quarter before things
got interesting.
Indiana (2-2) got with 37-29
when DAngelo Roberts scored
on a 2-yard run and Kofi
Hughes ran it in on a reverse
for the two-point conversion.
Colter helped to ice the game
when he scored on a 22-yard
run to make it 44-29 with just
over 5 minutes left.
Miller, Buckeyes
hold off Spartans
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Ohio State quar-
terback Braxton
Miller avoids a
tackle attempt
by Michigan
State safety
Isaiah Lewis (9)
during the first
quarter Sat-
urday in East
Lansing, Mich.
Braxton Miller
threw for 179
yards and ran
for 130 more as
the Buckeyes
defeated the
Spartans, 17-16,
in the Big Ten
opener for both
teams.
B I G T E N
R O U N D U P
ATHENS, Ga. Todd Gurley
ran for three touchdowns and
Keith Marshall added two as No.
5 Georgia recovered after blow-
ing a 17-point lead to beat Ten-
nessee 51-44 on Saturday in the
highest-scoring game ever be-
tween the SEC rivals.
Georgia (5-0, 3-0 SEC), which
had never scored more points
against the Volunteers, locked it
up with three takeaways in the
final six minutes. Twice Sanders
Commings intercepted Tyler
Brays passes and in between the
Tennessee quarterback was
stripped frombehind and the
fumble was recovered by Ge-
orgias John Jenkins.
Aaron Murray threwtwo
third-quarter touchdown passes
to Michael Bennett for the Bull-
dogs.
Georgia led 27-10 early in the
second quarter before Tennessee
took the lead with 20 unanswer-
ed points.
Tennessee (3-2, 0-2 SEC) took
its third straight loss in the
series under coach Derek Doo-
ley, the son of Georgias former
longtime coach Vince Dooley.
Texas 41, Oklahoma St. 36
STILLWATER, Okla. David
Ash threwthree touchdown
passes to Jaxon Shipley and Joe
Bergeron scored on a 2-yard run
with 29 seconds left to lift No. 12
Texas to a win against Oklaho-
ma State on Saturday night.
Ash directed the Longhorns
(4-0, 1-0 Big 12) on a 75-yard
scoring drive after the Cowboys
(2-2, 0-1) had taken the lead on
Quinn Sharps 23-yard field goal
with 2:34 to play.
LSU38, Towson 22
BATONROUGE, La. Zach
Mettenberger connected with
Odell BeckhamJr. five times for
128 yards and two touchdowns,
and No. 3 LSUovercame nag-
ging offensive sloppiness in a
victory over overmatched but
feisty Towson.
Mettenbergers scoring strikes
to Beckhamwent for 53 and 27
yards, and LSUs quarterback
finished with 238 yards passing.
Still, Mettenberger missed some
open receivers and his fumble
one of three LSUturnovers
led to the first of two touchdown
runs by Towsons Terrance West.
Wests first TDrun gave Tow-
son, an FCS team, a stunning 9-7
lead in the second quarter before
LSUresponded with 24 straight
points. J.C. Copeland, LSUs
272-pound fullback, scored his
third touchdown of the season
on a 1-yard plunge, but was hurt
in the fourth quarter and did not
put any weight on his left leg as
he was helped off the field.
Florida State 30,
South Florida17
TAMPA, Fla. EJ Manuel
threwfor 242 yards and a touch-
down, helping No. 4 Florida
State remain unbeaten with a
victory over South Florida.
Receiver Rashad Greene got
the Seminoles going with a
10-yard touchdown run, Chris-
tian Jones scored on a 12-yard
fumble return and Penn State
transfer Kevin Haplea had a
1-yard TDreception as the Semi-
noles (5-0) survived their first
road test of the season by pull-
ing away froma three-point lead
with two TDs and a field goal in
the final 5:09 of the third quar-
ter.
Three years after returning to
his hometown of Tallahassee to
lead USF (2-3) to a 10-point
upset of Florida State in his first
college start, B.J. Daniels threw
for 143 yards and ran for 72 more
and two touchdowns for the
Bulls.
South Carolina 38,
Kentucky17
LEXINGTON, Ky. Marcus
Lattimore ran for two touch-
downs and Connor Shawpassed
for another in the second half as
No. 6 South Carolina scored 31
straight points for a victory
against Kentucky.
Shawwas 15 of 18 for 148
yards as the Gamecocks (5-0, 3-0
Southeastern Conference)
moved into a tie with Florida
and Georgia atop the East divi-
sion, with the Bulldogs coming
to Columbia, S.C., next week.
Lattimore rushed for 120
yards on 23 carries and Kenny
Miles added a 17-yard score for
South Carolina, which trailed
Kentucky (1-4, 0-2) 17-7 after a
ragged first half.
The Gamecocks returned to
score on five of six possessions
thanks to Shaw, who hit Da-
miere Byrd with a 30-yard touch-
down before Miles TDput them
ahead to stay.
Kentucky freshman Jalen
Whitlowwas 12 of 23 for 114
yards in relief of Maxwell Smith,
who was knocked out on the
first series with an ankle injury.
Boise State 32,
NewMexico 29
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
Joe Southwick passed for 311
yards and three touchdowns and
Timmy Smith knocked down a
fourth-down pass with two min-
utes to go Saturday to help No.
24 Boise State beat NewMex-
ico.
Boise State (3-1, 1-0) led by 25
points at half time after turning
three Lobos fumbles into 18
points.
Clemson 45,
Boston College 31
BOSTONTajh Boyd threw
for 367 yards and three touch-
downs and ran in another him-
self as No. 17 Clemson beat
Boston College.
Boyd completed 28 of 38
passes and ran11 times for 42
yards and a TDfor Clemson (4-1,
1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference).
DeAndre Hopkins caught 11
passes for 197 yards for the Ti-
gers, who bounced back after
blowing a two-touchdown lead
and losing 49-37 to No. 4 Florida
State last week.
Cincinnati 27,
Virginia Tech 24
LANDOVER, Md. Munchie
Legaux hit Damon Julian for a
39-yard touchdown pass with13
seconds to play, and Cincinnati
beat Virginia Tech.
Trailing by four after a Hokies
touchdown, the Bearcats (3-0)
took over at their own15 with
1:43 to play and moved down-
field in nine plays for the score.
North Carolina 66, Idaho 0
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Gio
Bernard scored twice, Bryn
Renner threwthree touchdown
passes and North Carolina set a
school scoring record in a win
against Idaho.
San Jose State 12, Navy 0
ANNAPOLIS, Md. Austin
Lopez kicked four field goals to
complement a strong defensive
effort as San Jose State blanked,
marking the first time in six
years that the Midshipmen have
been shut out.
Miami 44, N.C. State 37
MIAMI Stephen Morris
threwfor a school- and Atlantic
Coast Conference-record 566
yards and five touchdowns, the
last of those a 62-yard strike to
Phillip Dorsett with19 seconds
left, and Miami beat North Car-
olina State for the Hurricanes
first three-game winning streak
since 2009.
Stony Brook 23, Army 3
WEST POINT, N.Y. Senior
Miguel Maysonet rushed for a
career-high 220 yards and two
touchdowns, and Stony Brook
dominated Army to notch its
first victory against a Football
Bowl Subdivision team.
Duke 34, Wake Forest 27
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
Backup quarterback Anthony
Boone scored on a 4-yard touch-
down run with11:35 left, and
Duke beat Wake Forest for its
first win in the series since 1999.
Missouri 21, Central Florida16
ORLANDO, Fla. Marcus
Murphy returned a punt 66
yards for a touchdown and
James Franklin added an 80-yard
touchdown pass as Missouri
ground out a win over Central
Florida.
Louisiana Tech 44,
Virginia 38
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
Colby Cameron threwfor one
touchdown and ran for another,
and Louisiana Tech scored 34
unanswered points to rally from
an early deficit and beat penalty-
riddled Virginia.
Middle Tennessee 49,
Georgia Tech 28
ATLANTA Benny Cun-
ninghamrushed for 217 yards
and five touchdowns Saturday to
lead Middle Tennessee State to
a win at Georgia Tech.
TCU24, SMU16
DALLAS Casey Pachall
threwtwo touchdown passes,
Jason Verrett had two intercep-
tions and No. 15 TCUextended
its FBS-best winning streak to 12
games by beating SMU.
TCU(4-0) has won11 of 13
over SMUand regained the Iron
Skillet trophy, which goes to the
winner of the Dallas-Fort Worth
rivalry. The Horned Frogs previ-
ous loss came last season at
home to the Mustangs (1-3).
Louisville 21,
Southern Miss 17
HATTIESBURG, Miss.
Senorise Perry rushed for 118
yards and two touchdowns,
Jeremy Wright added 84 rushing
yards and No. 19 Louisville ral-
lied to beat Southern Miss in a
downpour.
Louisville (5-0) trailed17-6
midway through the second
quarter, but scored15 unanswer-
ed points for the win, even
though star quarterback Teddy
Bridgewater was rendered near-
ly useless because of a driving
stormthat soaked the Roberts
Stadiumturf.
AP PHOTO
Georgia wide receiver Tavarres King and coach Mark Richt watch
a replay of Kings apparent touchdown as officials review it during
the first half Saturday against Tennessee in Athens, Ga. The rul-
ing on the field of a touchdown was reversed. Georgia scored on
the next play, however.
Georgia almost lets
a victory slip away
The Associated Press
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
PENN STATE 35, I L L I NOI S 7
DALLAS The cardboard cut-
out was his.
But Franco Harris insists the
replica of the late and lately-
scorned former Penn State coach
Joe Paterno propped up in the
Harris suite during Penn States
home opener this month stood
for much more than great college
football memories.
He wanted to make a state-
ment.
Theres a lot of misinforma-
tion out there, said Harris, a for-
mer Penn State great and Pitts-
burgh Steelers Hall of Fame run-
ning back who lambasted Pater-
nos firing from Penn State
following the Jerry Sandusky
scandal last season.
The reason I got involved,
Harris continued, I really felt
our boardof trustees reactedvery
quickly, without any due process.
(So) we had a cardboard cutout
of Joe (and a sign) telling howwe
want due process for Penn State
and Joe Paterno.
Misericordia University foot-
ball fans may have had trouble
processing why an NFL legend
was walking around their cam-
pus Saturday morning.
It turns out Harris was a guest
of his long-time friend John
Metz, the chairman of Misericor-
dias board of trustees and owner
of TGI Fridays franchises
throughout Northeastern Penn-
sylvania. Metz and his wife Mary
were honored with the dedica-
tion of the programs football
field house in their names before
Misericordias home game with
Stevenson on Saturday.
I just got to know them
through the years, said Harris,
who first met the Metzs through
the food business. I really like
them and really enjoy them.
Weve beenvery goodfriends. Ev-
ery year we spend some time to-
gether.
It seemed the perfect time for
Misericordias football team.
The first-year program is off to
an 0-5 start, and Cougars coach
Mark Ross spent some time talk-
ing with Harris following the
field house dedication ceremony.
Harris certainly could have of-
fered some strong advice.
The Steelers were struggling
after three straight losing sea-
sons before Harris arrived in the
1972 NFL Draft including a 6-8
finish in 1971. But the guy who
performedmainlyas ablocker for
Lydell Mitchell at Penn State
blossomed into one of the NFLs
all-time great rushers, performed
inninestraight ProBowls andled
the way to Pittsburghs four Su-
per Bowl titles insix years during
the 1970s.
So he knows what it takes to
build the frame for long-time suc-
cess.
This is the first year (for Mi-
sericordia football), Harris said.
You have coach Mark Ross, so
hes got to lay the foundation of
what the program stands for.
From what I understand, people
here at Misericordia are big be-
lievers in the student-athlete to
not only do great on the field, but
try to do great off the field.
Thats the culture that you try
to build.
Its a culture Harris credits Pa-
terno for building at Penn State --
a passion for education and a
model for true teamwork that
shouldnt be easily dismissed.
There are certain moments in
your life that change your life,
Harris said, and point you in a
new direction and give you op-
portunity. At Penn State, Joe Pa-
terno provided me that.
Its why Harris has remained
loyal to defending Paternos lega-
cy, despite growingbelief that Pa-
terno was part of a university-
wide cover-up surrounding for-
mer defensive coordinator Jerry
Sanduskys scandalous crimes
against young boys around Penn
States campus.
Harris said hes mostly both-
ered by the decision of Penn
States board of trustees to fire
Paterno within days of Sandus-
kys arrest last November.
How do you make a decision
in two or three days for someone
whos been there 61 years? Har-
ris asked incredulously. How do
you not give someone the time
(to defend himself) and the bene-
fit of the doubt? It was very dis-
turbing.
It was careless, Harris implied,
for someone who cared so much
about kids to be dismissed in
such a callous fashion and for the
university he served to coldly
turn its back on its past.
And it was even more alarm-
ing, Harris said, for Penn State to
readily agree to NCAA sanctions
that include loss of scholarships
and a four-year bowl ban mainly
because of the perception the
football programbecameall-pow-
erful at Penn State.
In 2011, Penn State was
rankedthe number one academic
teamin the country, Harris said.
That tells youwhat its all about.
Having that type of culture at
Penn State, where education and
sports is something you know is
very important, is what Joe val-
ued. I just hope that type of cul-
ture that has defined Penn State
for so long continues.
An image thats not hard for Franco to recognize
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
NFL Hall of Fame running back Franco Harris, left, applauds the
Misericordia football team as it takes the field against Stevenson
in Dallas Township on Saturday afternoon.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
ing the same kind of diplomatic,
cookie-cutter response that Penn
State players had rattled off all
week. We never forgot about
what happened in the summer.
So yeah, to be honest with you,
we had that in the back of our
minds, and that kept us going.
It was just sweet.
Out of everyone who contrib-
uted to the four-touchdown win
for the Lions (3-2, 1-0 Big Ten),
Mauti was the one most entitled
to tell the truth.
The All-America candidate
had something of a target on his
back coming into the game be-
cause of his comments fromJuly.
Any time you have things to
say, its very important to go out
there and back it up, said Lions
coach Bill OBrien, who earned
his first career road win and con-
ference win. Thats kind of what
life is all about ina way. Hes a guy
who doesnt have a lot of prob-
lems backing things up.
Hes an instinctive player. He
plays extremely hard. Hes a
member of a really strong senior
class. We only have seven games
left withthem, andthats goingto
be tough at the end because they
mean a lot to me and the football
program.
Mauti got plenty of support on
offense, which posted its highest
scoring output of the season.
Penn State scored four 1-yard
touchdowns on the ground with
Zach Zwinak (19 carries, 100
yards) andMatt McGloinpicking
up two apiece.
McGloin (18-of-30, 211 yards)
also threw a 21-yard touchdown
to tight end Matt Lehman in the
second quarter. The Lions led
21-0 when Illinois (2-3, 0-1) elect-
ed to go for it on fourth-and-goal
from the Penn State 4-yard line
with 19 seconds left before half-
time.
Mauti read the eyes of quarter-
back Nathan Scheelhaase all the
way, snagging the pass with his
feet just inside his own end zone
and racing down the field in front
of the Illinois sideline.
What was nearly a 21-7 Penn
State lead looked instead to be a
28-0 advantage. But Mauti was
run down at the last possible mo-
ment by the Illinis Miles Osei.
Officially, it went down as a 99-
yard interception return, break-
ing a Penn State record that had
stood since 1958.
Yeah, 99 yards, Mauti said
with a smile, shaking his head.
Ninety-nine yards without a
touchdown. That ones gonna
hurt. Thats gonna haunt my
dreams.
Replay review confirmed that
Mautis right knee hit the ground
with the ball at the 1. But it also
showed that one second was left
on the clock.
OBrien elected to send out the
field goal team, but the Lions got
nothing out of it when Sam Fick-
ens 18-yard try was blocked.
Mauti had starred on defense
and even forced a turnover on
special teams. Would he have
been up for taking a handoff on
that play to try and add a touch-
down on offense?
If there was more time, Mau-
ti joked, I would have petitioned
for it.
That part of the legend will
have to wait for another day.
Penn State.............................. 14 7 7 7 -- 35
Illinois....................................... 0 0 7 0 7
FIRST QUARTER
PSU -- Zach Zwinak 1-yard run (Sam Ficken
kick), 10:41. Drive: 8 plays, 26 yards, 2:56. Analysis:
Fittingly, its Michael Mauti to open things up with a
big play. After an outspoken summer in which he
ripped into opposing coaches like Illinois TimBeck-
man for recruiting Penn State players in the wake of
NCAA sanctions, Mauti forces an early turnover to
set up a score. The senior linebacker puts a scare
into punt returner Tommy Davis, who muffs a punt
just before Mauti lays into him. Long snapper Mi-
chael Fuhrman is on the spot for the recovery, falling
on the loose ball at the Illinois 26. Zwinak polishes off
the drive with his first career score. But that comes
onlyafter anIllinoispenaltyfor runningintoFickenon
a successful field goal gives the Lions a fresh set of
downs.
PENN STATE 7, ILLINOIS 0.PSU -- Matt
McGloin 1-yard run (Ficken kick), 6:29. Drive: 8
plays, 60 yards, 2:35. Analysis: After going the first
three games without scoring a rushing touchdown,
Penn State picks up two in the first nine minutes
against Illinois. McGloin, whocameintotheyear with
two rushing scores, gets his third of the season on a
QB sneak at the goal line that is upheld after a video
review. Illinois continues to shoot itself in the foot,
getting flagged for holding to stall its first offensive
series. After punting back to Penn State, the Illini
tacked 15 yards onto the Lions scoring drive with a
personal foul penalty. PSU 14, UIUC 0.
SECOND QUARTER
PSU-- Matt Lehman 21-yard pass fromMcGloin
(Ficken kick), 3:11. Drive: 8 plays, 72 yards, 2:52.
Analysis: Tempers heat up as Penn State jumps out
to a three-touchdown lead. On second-and-8,
McGloin delivers a strike to Lehman who hauls it in
over themiddlefor atouchdown. Thenthings started
to get ugly. A few steps after the catch in the end
zone, Illinois safety Earnest Thomas doesnt slow
down and leads with his helmet to deliver a shot to
Lehmans chin, briefly knocking out the 6-foot-6 tight
end. Four separate officials throw a flag on the hit.
Thomas, a former high school teammate of Allen
Robinson and Rob Bolden, is ejected. The touch-
down pass is McGloins 10th of the season and the
second one to Lehman, who walks off under his own
power. Its also the 32nd career scoring strike by
McGloin, moving him past Anthony Morelli into sev-
enth place in school history. PSU 21, UIUC 0.
THIRD QUARTER
UIUC -- Spencer Harris 22-yard pass from Josh
Ferguson (Taylor Zalewski kick), 10:22. Drive: 3
plays, 42 yards, 1:15. Analysis: Illinois gets some life
by reaching into the bag of tricks, catching Penn
Stateoff guardwithahalfback pass for atouchdown.
The Illini first flip field position with a perfect 57-yard
punt downed on the Penn State 1. Illinois then forces
athree-and-out andgrabs somemomentum. Nathan
Scheelhaase takes a snap and pitches it back to the
tailback, Ferguson, who runs to the right sideline. Its
a pass all the way. Harris is wide open down the field
andhas plenty of timetocampout at thegoal lineand
wait for the lob to reach him for the score. PSU 21,
UIUC 7.PSU -- McGloin 1-yard run (Ficken kick),
3:15. Drive: 8 plays, 57 yards, 2:31. Analysis:
McGloin shakes off a rocky start to the second half
by deliveringtwoof his best passes of theday before
picking up yet another score on a QB sneak. An un-
characteristically poor punt by Illinois sets Penn
State up at midfield and McGloin completes three
straight passes, with two impressive throws to Bran-
don Moseby-Felder (18 yards) and Kyle Carter (16).
After three Zwinak carries gets it to the 1, McGloin is
again successful in getting low and driving over the
goal line for the score, his fourth rushing TD of the
season. PSU 28, UIUC 7.
FOURTH QUARTER
PSU -- Zwinak 1-yard run (Ficken kick), 14:03.
Drive: 7 plays, 50 yards, 2:03. Analysis: Penn State
finishes off a physical overpowering of the Illini by
having Zwinak finish things off. The emerging soph-
omore gets four straight carries to open the fourth
quarter, andtheres noneedtosneak it this time. The
score puts Zwinak at exactly 100 yards for the game,
the most by a Penn State player on the ground this
season. And it was set up by -- guess who -- Mauti,
anglingfor national defensiveplayer of theweekhon-
ors after his second interception of the day. PSU35,
UIUC 7.
PSU Ill
First downs ............................. 23 17
Rushes-yards......................... 52-173 22-74
Passing.................................... 211 292
Comp-Att-Int ........................... 18-30-0 29-47-2
Return Yards .......................... 135 7
Punts-Avg................................ 3-43.3 6-38.7
Fumbles-Lost.......................... 2-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards ..................... 2-17 8-69
Time of Possession............... 32:55 27:05
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGPenn St., Zwinak 19-100, Belton
16-65, Dukes 5-21, Day 4-14, Zordich 1-2, McGloin
7-(minus 29). Illinois, Young 6-63, Scheelhaase
11-7, Ferguson 5-4.
PASSINGPenn St., McGloin 18-30-0-211. Illi-
nois, Scheelhaase 28-46-2-270, Ferguson 1-1-0-
22.
RECEIVINGPenn St., Lehman 5-70, Kenney
4-24, Carter 3-45, Moseby-Felder 3-37, Robinson3-
35. Illinois, Lankford7-104, Young6-14, Harris 3-41,
Knight 3-30, Ferguson 3-27, Hardee 2-22, LaCosse
2-20, J.Davis 1-19, Viliunas 1-11, Wilson 1-4.
PAYBACK
Continued from Page 1C
Any time you have
things to say, its very
important to go out
there and back it up.
Thats kind of what life
is all about in a way.
Hes a guy who doesnt
have a lot of problems
backing things up.
PSU coach Bill OBrien
On linebacker Michael Mauti
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- ESPN
cameras lingered at midfield,
looking for the typical pregame
pleasantries between two head
coaches.
They left disappointed.
For three hours on Saturday,
Penn States Bill OBrien and
Illinois TimBeckman barely
acknowledged each other. And
that general disgust by the
coaches carried over to the
players, creating a tense and
heated atmosphere throughout
the game.
Only at the end of the Nittany
Lions 35-7 win did the two step
within 20 yards of each other,
giving a handshake so brief, Bill
Belichick would be impressed.
The Big Ten mandates -- or at
least strongly encourages -- that
its coaches shake hands after
games.
The story is known well
enough. In July, OBrien was
furious that coaches fromIlli-
nois flewto State College 48
hours after NCAAsanctions
came down, looking to recruit
away Penn State players.
Our players are in our build-
ing right nowand they dont
want to leave the building,
OBrien said at the time. Be-
cause there are coaches from
other schools in the parking lot
waiting to see them.
But that was the last time
OBrien said anything publicly
about the situation.
That didnt change Saturday.
Ive said my peace on that in
the summertime, OBrien said
after the win. The sanctions
are what they are. The people
who recruited our kids played
within the rules. But at the end
of the day we came here and
played a good football game
against a tough team.
You guys can figure the rest
out.
Pretty much.
Beckman said this week that
he did not regret sending his
staff to Penn State but that he
did regret the stir that it caused.
Both teams responded on the
field with a physical and chippy
game. Lions safety Stephen
Obeng-Agyapong laid a hard hit
on tailback Donovonn Young
right in front of the Illinois
sideline in the early going and
was quickly escorted away by a
teammate after the junior start-
ed jawing at Illini players.
Things ratched up late in the
second quarter when Illinois
safety Earnest Thomas deliver-
ed a particularly vicious shot to
Penn State tight end Matt Leh-
man.
Lehman hauled in a touch-
down pass over the middle and
took a step into the end zone
before Thomas launched and
caught himon the chin with the
crown of his helmet.
I blacked out a little bit. My
vision was a little messed up,
said Lehman, who was dazed
enough to not hear that Thomas
was ejected for the hit. They
took my helmet fromme when I
was on the sideline and I was
done for the rest of the half.
That half ended with players
fromboth teams coming togeth-
er on the way to their locker
rooms. The entire officiating
crewformed a barrier in be-
tween themand what had the
potential for a brawl was dif-
fused after 45 seconds.
I was trying to play peace-
maker, Lions linebacker Mi-
chael Mauti said. Imnot sure
exactly what happened. People
just got tangled up in the pile.
Infirmary report
Lehman was evaluated at
halftime and cleared to return
by Penn States medical staff.
After snagging the touchdown
in the first half, he added four
more catches after returning
and led the Lions in catches
(five) and receiving yards (70).
Obeng-Agyapong also left the
game at the start of the second
half with apparent cramps in his
left knee. He was carted off and
did not return.
Defensive end Pete Massaro
(shoulder, knee) did not make
the trip.
One Cougar for another
True freshman linebacker
NyeemWartman also stayed
back in State College while
recovering froma knee injury.
But Valley ViewHigh school
was still represented in Cham-
paign as junior fullback J.R.
Refice made the trip for the
Lions. It was the former Cou-
gars first road trip in four years
with the Lions.
OBrien said this week that he
wanted to reward the top scout
teamplayers for the week with a
spot on the 70-man travel roster.
(Refice) had a great week of
practice and he deserves to be
out there with us, OBrien said
Thursday on his radio show.
Rules refresher
Out of all the debates over
Illinois summer recruiting
tactics, only reserve offensive
lineman Ryan Nowicki actually
defected to the Illini.
Nowicki did not play against
his old team.
Hes being redshirted this
year, so I didnt speak to him
(Saturday), Beckman said.
Reminded that Nowicki had
already used his redshirt season
in 2011while at Penn State,
Beckman simply shrugged and
replied, Hes just not ready
yet.
AP PHOTOS
Penn State quarterback Matthew McGloin (11) passes during the first half Saturday against Illinois in Champaign, Ill. Penn State
defeated Illinois 35-7 in the Big Ten opener for both teams.
Sporting gesture hollow after summer
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Illinois head coach Tim Beckman looks on from the sidelines
during the second half Saturday against Penn State in Cham-
paign, Ill.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 7C
L O C A L C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
EDWARDSVILLE It was
almost two years ago to the
day that quarterback Alex
George began his collegiate
career at Wilkes with a tremen-
dous come-from-behind victory
to help coach Frank Sheptock
become the schools all-time
winningest coach.
On Saturday, George was at
it again to help his coach reach
a milestone.
With the Colonels trailing by
10 points in the fourth quarter,
George orchestrated three
touchdown drives in the
games final 11 minutes, the
Wilkes defense stiffened and
the Colonels pulled out a 37-27
win over FDU-Florham as
Sheptock earned career win
No. 100.
The Wilkes (2-2, 1-2 MAC)
offense also set a high, piling
up a school-record 667 yards.
The win came after the Colo-
nels gave up 90 points in a loss
to Widener last week.
Sheptock was humbled by
the victory and said that what
made the win satisfying is all
the support he got from former
players and coaches, current
coaches of other programs and
others that he has met
throughout the years who
reached out to him after the
bad loss a week ago.
The 100 thing Im very
proud of but Im more proud of
the support I received leading
up to this, Sheptock said.
Anyone can call and say con-
gratulations on your 100th
win. But when youre coming
off the toughest day that
youve ever had as a coach, and
people are reaching out to you
then, thats when you know
you got something special.
Unlike the game in 2010
when George had a hand in the
last four touchdowns to over-
come a 22-point deficit in the
final 15 minutes, he had plenty
of support this time around in
the fourth quarter. With the
Devils (1-3, 1-2 MAC) holding
a 27-17 advantage and time
running out in the fourth, all
the junior QB had to do was
hand the ball off to Calvin
Garvin or Andrew Regan or
just keep it himself. Garvin
pulled the score to within
27-24 with a 14-yard dash to
the end zone and 11:09 left on
the clock.
The Devils offense contin-
ued to put pressure on Wilkes,
driving 49 yards on their next
possession, but Wilkes de-
fense started to make a stand.
Linebacker Tate Moore-Jacobs
forced and recovered a fumble
to get the ball back in Georges
hands.
When the Colonels regained
possession, Garvin had two big
runs and Regan capped the
seven-play, 78-yard drive with
a 2-yard TD to put the Colo-
nels in front 31-27.
Again, Wilkes defense made
a stand as Paul Gaffney picked
off a pass to get the ball back.
This time on offense, George
completed a short pass to
Justin Pellowski and let the
sophomore playmaker do all
the work, as he dragged a
defender nearly 20 yards into
the end zone on the 46-yard
scoring strike to give the Colo-
nels a 10-point lead.
This junior and senior
class, weve come back before.
We knew we could do it, Ge-
orge said. When I look back
at my college career and see
things I did for coach Sheptock
for our junior and senior
class, to be able to be there for
Coach Shep during those great
moments is something.
FDU tried one more time to
get moving, but quarterback
Mike Santos, who was pres-
sured the entire game fresh-
man linebacker Jason Ugwu,
was brought down by Ugwu
for the second time in the
game to secure the victory.
After allowing 90 points the
week before, the Colonels did
allow 440 total yards, but the
players stepped up when need-
ed. Moore-Jacobs tallied a
team-high 10 tackles, Ty Cun-
ningham added an intercep-
tion, and Ugwu and Michael
Paskas each had three tackles
for loss.
We showed the ability to
stop a team in the fourth quar-
ter and that really gave us
great momentum, Sheptock
added. I think if we limit the
big plays were giving up, we
can be pretty good on defense.
But we have to stop those long
ones.
Garvin, a 5-foot-6, 154-pound
junior that has seen limited
playing time, racked up a
game-high 162 yards on the
ground on just 16 touches and
a pair of TDs. George finished
the game completing 12 of 23
passes for 232 yards and ran
for 89.
Widener 40,
Lebanon Valley 37, OT
The Pride rallied from a
37-21 deficit with 5:44 left in
the fourth quarter, scoring the
games final 19 points to pull
out the victory.
Quarterback Chris Haupt
was picked off three times and
passed for 257 yards and one
touchdown, but the score
started the comeback.
Lebanon Valley signal-caller
Leo Kyte had a big game,
throwing for 395 yards and
two touchdowns.
Wilkes 37, FDU-Florham 27
FDU-Florham.............. 0 13 14 0 27
Wilkes .......................... 7 10 0 20 37
First Quarter
WILKES Jonathon Conklin 66 pass from Alex
George (Frank Bobo kick), 13:15
Second Quarter
WILKES Calvin Garvin 14 run (Bobo kick),
14:03
FDU Craig Kimbrough 12 pass from Mike
Santos (Travis Mullen kick), 9:30
WILKES Jordan Fredo 32 field goal, 4:46
FDU Jon Bennett 20 pass from Santos (kick
blocked), 2:45
Third Quarter
FDU Bennett 2 run (Mullen kick), 9:31
FDU Bennett 62 pass from Santos (Mullen
kick), 7:17
Fourth Quarter
WILKES Garvin 14 run (Fredo kick), 11:09
WILKES Andrew Regan 2 run (Fredo kick),
5:55
WILKES Justin Pellowski 46 pass from George
(run failed), 4:26
Team Statistics FDU Wilkes
First downs.......................... 21 29
Rushes-yards ..................... 27-103 64-435
Passing................................ 337 232
Total Yards.......................... 440 667
Comp-Att-Int ....................... 24-36-2 12-24-0
Sacks by-Yards Lost.......... 1-12 2-15
Punts-Avg............................ 5-33.0 2-41.0
Fumbles-Lost ...................... 2-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards.................. 7-50 9-70
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING FDU, Craig Kimbrough 9-61, Antho-
ny Fruncillo 6-32, Jon Bennett 7-15, Mike Santos
5-(minus-5). WILKES, Calvin Garvin 16-162, Alex
George 14-89, Auxence Wogou 20-84, Justin Pel-
lowski 3-54, Andrew Regan 8-40, Patrick Inguilli
1-10, TEAM 2-(minus-4).
PASSING FDU, Mike Santos 24-36-2-337.
WILKES, Alex George 12-23-0-232, TEAM 0-1-
0-0.
RECEIVING FDU, Jon Bennett 10-135, Anthony
Fruncillo 6-129, Craig Kimbrough 3-23, James
Ognibene 2-24, Bryan Soletto 2-18, Dan Hamilton
1-8. WILKES, Jonathan Conklin 5-114, Tim Bous-
son 2-30, Payton Bachman 2-6, Justin Pellowski
1-46, Dan Curry 1-31, Auxence Wogou 1-5.
INTERCEPTIONS WILKES, Ty Cunningham,
Paul Gaffney
MISSED FIELD GOALS WILKES, Bobo (32
WL), Fredo (35, blk)
Wilkes all-time winningest coach reaches elite level
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes football coach Frank Sheptock gets a water bath from members of his team as he gets his 100th coaching win Saturday
against FDU-Florham.
SHEPTOCK WINS 100TH
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes football coach Frank Sheptock directs his players Sat-
urday against FDU-Florham.
Wilkes lineman
Anthony Swain
lifts running
back Clavin
Garvin over his
head after he
scored in the
second quarter
against FDU-
Florham.
Wilkes receiver Justin Pellowski races to the goal line for the
final Wilkes score as FDU-Florham linebacker Dan Hicks chases
him late in the fourth quarter.
WILLIAMSPORT For three
of out of its first four games,
Kings has had success running
the ball.
On Saturday, the Monarchs
couldnt get the ball moving on
the ground, rushing for 36 yards
as they fell to Lycoming 33-10.
Lycoming (4-1, 4-0 MAC) got
off to a great start as quarterback
Tyler Jenny hooked up with Jar-
rin Campman for a 78-yard scor-
ing strike on the first play from
scrimmage to take a 7-0 lead. The
Warriors got a pair of scoring
runs from Craig Needhammer in
the first half to open a 20-0 lead.
The first score was from 5 yards
out with 6:42 left in the first quar-
ter. Needhammers second TD
came with12:42 remaining in the
second quarter.
Then Kings (1-4, 1-3) started
to get things going. Kyle
McGrath capped a 10-play, 79-
yarddrivewitha7-yardTDrunto
trim the lead to 20-7. Jenny was
intercepted on the next Lycom-
ing drive by Billy Beinke with
1:37left inthe first half. The Mon-
archs responded by driving 42
yards for a 20-yard field goal by
Kevin Mulvihill and a 20-10 def-
icit heading into the half.
But thats all the Kings offense
wouldbe able tomuster onthe af-
ternoon.
The Warriors meanwhile got
twomore scores inthe thirdquar-
ter to seal the victory.
Beinke also added a sack, a
pass breakup and a tackle for a
loss to go with his two tackles on
the afternoon.
Quarterback Tyler Hartranft
had a solid game for the Mon-
archs completing 19 of 34 passes
for 268 yards and one intercep-
tion. His favorite target was
Adam Kudlacik, who hauled in
five passes for 67 yards.
Lycoming 33, King's 10
Kings .................................. 0 10 0 0 10
Lycoming............................ 13 7 13 0 33
First Quarter
LYCO Jarrin Campman 78 pass from Tyler
Jenny (Zack Czap kick), 14:43
LYCO Craig Needhammer 5 run (kick failed),
6:42
Second Quarter
LYCO Needhammer 1 run (Czap kick), 12:42
KINGS Kyle McGrath 7 run (Kevin Mulvihill
kick), 1:48
KINGS Mulvihill 20 field goal, :02
Third Quarter
LYCO John Sibel 9 pass from Jenny (Czap
kick), 4:33
LYCO Parker Showers 3 run (kick failed),
2:10
TeamStatistics King's Lycoming
First downs ........................ 14 16
Rushes-yards.................... 30-36 37-150
Passing............................... 268 173
Total Yards ........................ 304 323
Comp-Att-Int ...................... 19-35-1 12-19-1
Sacks by-Yards Lost ........ 1-3 6-30
Punts-Avg. ......................... 8-31.5 4-36.8
Fumbles-Lost .................... 1-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards ................ 6-29 5-49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING KINGS, Kyle McGrath 14-36, Ju-
dens Goimbert 4-10, Steve Duncan 1-0, Tyler Har-
tranft 11-(minus-10). LYCOMING, Parker Showers
18-83, Craig Needhammer 15-66, Chris Nemits 1-2,
Tyler Jenny 2-1, TEAM 1-(minus-2).
PASSING KINGS, Tyler Hartranft 19-34-1-
268, Kyle McGrath 0-1-0-0. LYCOMING, Tyler Jen-
ny 12-19-1-173.
RECEIVING KINGS, Adam Kudlacik 5-67,
Steve Duncan 5-58, Dan Kempa 4-59, Matt Henry
2-67, Slade Eigenmann 1-13, Josh Sanders 1-3,
Kyle McGrath 1-1. LYCOMING, John Sibel 4-35,
Ryan Umpleby 3-20, Jarrin Campman 2-84, Nick
Mongiello 1-20, Cam Kriner 1-8, Parker Showers
1-6,
INTERCEPTIONS KINGS, Billy Beinke; LY-
COMING, Kabongo Bukasa
MISSED FIELD GOALS None
Monarchs sluggish in loss
The Times Leader staff
DALLAS Quiet and soft-spo-
ken, K.K. Smith took some con-
gratulatory pats fromteammates
as theStevensonUniversitysoph-
omore talked with members of
the media.
Never once did he take credit
for his play at Mangelsdorf Field,
deflecting the attention to the
meninthe trenches.
Theyaretheones whoopened
theholes,hesaid. Ijustfollowed
my blocks, and hit the big holes.
They dida great job.
Smithwas being modest.
The sophomore ran for 234
yards and three touchdowns as
Stevenson jumped out to a 13-0
lead after one quarter and added
15 fourth-quarter points in a 35-7
victory Saturday afternoon in a
battle of two fledgling programs.
Stevenson, in only its second
season, picked up its first win of
theyear. Misericordia, initsopen-
ing year on the gridiron, contin-
ues to make positives strides.
It means a lot to get the first
win,Smithsaid. I wishwecould
have gotten it a few games ago,
though.
Its a simple equation, really.
The Mustangs had one too many
playmakers.
StevensonhadSmith, anexplo-
sive athlete who poseda threat to
scoreanytimehis hands wrapped
aroundthe pigskin.
That was clearly evident when
head coach Ed Hottle chose to go
for a fourth-and-1 on the Mus-
tangs opening drive in the first
quarter. Smith broke through the
line, andwent untouchedstraight
down the middle of the field for a
45-yardscore.
On the Mustangs next drive,
Anthony Smith made an out-
standing one-handed, over-the-
shouldercatchwhilemanagingto
keep one foot inbounds for a 33-
yardcompletion.
I dont think we out-athleted
them, Hottle said. I think we
just out-experiencedthem.
Hottle understands what Mark
Ross is going through. Probably
better thananyother coachinthe
conference.
It was last season where Ste-
vensonwas startinga lineupof al-
most all freshmen in the Mus-
tangs opening campaign of foot-
ball.
The headcoachwill admit its a
work inprogress eachday.
I dont think people under-
stand how hard this is, Hottle
said. Hes coach. Hes dad. Hes
guidance counselor. Hes cheer-
leader. Hes psychologist. Hes ev-
erything wrapped in one with
these guys. Its hard, and we still
gothroughit. Igethomeat10p.m.
or11p.m. andI amjust emotional-
ly and physically exhausted. Its
trying and tough, but it pays off.
You can see his team is working
hard. The day is going to come
where youwill see it pay off.
Right now, its about the little
mistakes.
Ones that kill drives or start
them on the wrong side of the
sticks.
Misericordias biggest issue
was penalties, starting off almost
everydriveof thefirst half withan
illegal motionor false start call.
I told our kids that it cant be
first-and-15 every time, Cougars
coachMarkRoss said. We hadto
eliminate those penalties, and if
we did, I felt that we hada chance
to do some things offensively. In
thesecondhalf, wedidabetterjob
of doing those things, and we
moved the football. I thought we
played hard for 60 minutes, and
thats all we canask of them.
Stevenson........................... 13 0 7 15 35
Misericordia........................ 0 0 7 0 7
First Quarter
S K.KSmith 45 run (Charlie Cornell kick), 7:57
S Jae DeShields 10 pass fromJosh Gasparovic
(kick failed), 1:37
ThirdQuarter
S Smith 27 run (Cornell kick), 10:33
M Jeff Puckett 4 run (Steve Clemson kick), 2:44
FourthQuarter
S Marcus Holley 1 run (Smith run), 14:30
S Smith 1 run (Cornell kick), 7:16
TeamStatistics Stevenson Misericordia
First downs ............. 23 16
Rushes-yards ........ 42-354 47-229
Passing................... 77 18
Total Yards ............. 431 247
Comp-Att-Int........... 10-18-1 4-6-1
Sacks-Yards Lost .. 0-0 0-0
Punts-Avg. .............. 3-33.3 5-34.4
Fumbles-Lost ......... 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards..... 4-55 9-113
INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS
RUSHINGS: K.K. Smith20-234, MarcusHolley15-
116, Alpha Jalloh 1-13, Team 1-0, Anthony Reid 2-
(-1), William Hill 3-(-8); M: Cody Lamoreaux 19-79,
Jeff Puckett 10-64, Robin Custodio 13-58, Benny
Delgado3-22, JuwanPettie-Jacks1-4, FrankSantar-
siero 1-2
PASSING S: John Gasparovic 9-15-1 69 yards,
Reid 1-3-0 8 yards; M: Puckett 4-6-1 18 yards
RECEIVINGS: JaeDeShields3-22, JeromieMiller
3-6, Anthony Smith 2-37, Jalloh 1-8, Smith 1-4; M:
Paul Brace 1-15, Santarseiro 1-10, Dean Lucchesi
1-0, Petties-Jacks 1-(-7)
MISSEDFGS NONE
INTERCEPTIONS -- S: Tyren Pinkett; M: William
Roach
Miseri gets glimpse
into future in defeat
By TOMFOX
For The Times Leader
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Misericordias
Paul Brace (3)
looks for a hole
in the Stevenson
defense in col-
lege football
action Saturday
afternoon in
Dallas Township.
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
LEHMAN TWP. Lake-Leh-
man saw how quickly a close
game could sour just after half-
time in its season opener. It saw
just the opposite Saturday after-
noon during its homecoming
game against Meyers.
The Black Knights scored 30
third-quarter points, erasing a
halftime deficit and any hopes of
a Meyers upset in their 50-29
victory.
Lehman improved to 4-1 over-
all, maintaining its spots atop
the Wyoming Valley Conference
Division 2A-A and District 2
Class 2A standings. Meyers fell
to 2-3.
Back on Aug. 30, Lehman
trailedOldForge bythree at half-
time. The Black Knights lost 50-
14 by allowing 29 third-quarter
points.
Saturdays game followed a
similar patternbut withLehman
as the beneficiary.
OldForge is a hell of a team
we knew that, Lehman coach
Jerry Gilsky said. To come out
in the second half like we did
against Old Forge, thats a team
you cant make the mistakes we
did.
Meyers led 14-13 going into
halftime as Nate Mahalak re-
turned an interception 37 yards
for a score and Matt DeMarco
added a 20-yard TD reception
with1:12 left in the second quar-
ter.
The team wasnt like Here
we go again with that intercep-
tions for the score, Gilsky said.
We kept our kids positive.
Lehman running back Dustin
Jones was certainly a good way
to create optimism. The 240-
pound junior, who finished with
228 yards, scored on a 23-yard
runat 8:00 of the thirdfor a 21-14
lead. Josh Sayre returned an in-
terception 38 yards for a touch-
down three plays later, boosting
the advantage to 28-14.
Meyers Zahir Dunell then
capped a wild 69-second span of
the quarter by returning the en-
suing kickoff 81 yards for a
touchdown. But it was the last
time the Mohawks would score
until early in the fourth quarter.
That gap gave Lehman suffi-
cient time to pull away. Or more
precisely, smash away. Jones
continued to bowl through the
line for scores of 17 and 5 yards.
Neither run, though, was as im-
pressive as his 12-yard score in
the second that left three Mo-
hawks sprawled on the field.
Hes not the fastest kid in the
world, but hes bruiser, Gilsky
said. He keeps his feet going.
Every week, we still have to
coach him up. You got to keep
himlow(when) hestarts getting
tired. But hes a luxury to have
him in the backfield, dont get
me wrong.
Prior tothose twoscores, Tom
Donovan picked his way for a12-
yard TDrun. The final toll of the
thirdledto a 43-21advantage en-
tering the fourth.
Meanwhile, Meyers time on
the field was spent moving for-
ward just a touch more than
moving backward. The Mo-
hawks totaled 126 yards of of-
fense and 120 yards in penalties.
They were flagged 16 times
now 27 times in their last two
games.
Penalties and turnovers, I
dont knowhowmany we had in
the third quarter, Meyers coach
Corry Hanson said, but that
first drive we had two penalties
that put us in a first-and-20. Its
tough, especially with a young
team. But Imnot making excus-
es. Lake-Lehman played a great
game. But with penalties and
turnovers, its tough to win
games.
Lake-Lehman 50, Meyers 29
Meyers .................................. 7 7 7 8 29
Lake-Lehman....................... 7 6 30 7 50
First Quarter
LL Dustin Jones 4 run (Mike Symion kick),
7:58
MEY Nate Mahalak 37 interception return
(Cal Lisman kick), 0:29
Second Quarter
LL Jones 12 run (kick blocked), 4:08
MEY Matt DeMarco 20 pass from Teaguen
Labatch (Lisman kick), 1:12
Third Quarter
LL Jones 23 run (Jones run), 8:00
LL Josh Sayre 38 interception return
(Symion kick), 7:10
MEY Zahir Dunell 81 kick return (Lisman
kick), 6:51
LL Tom Donovan 12 run (John Van Scoy
run), 3:26
LL Jones 17 run (Symion kick), 1:25
Fourth Quarter
LL Jones 5 run (Symion kick), 10:22
MEY DeMarco 4 pass from Labatch
(DeMarco from Labatch), 10:01
TeamStatistics Meyers Lehman
First downs.......................... 7 25
Rushes-yards ..................... 17-53 62-360
Passing................................ 73 19
Total Yards.......................... 126 379
Comp-Att-Int ....................... 8-21-3 1-5-1
Sacked-Yards Lost ............ 0-0 0-0
Punts-Avg............................ 29.8 3-17.0
Fumbles-Lost...................... 1-1 5-0
Penalties-Yards.................. 16-120 11-99
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Meyers, Parrish Bennett 8-19, La-
batch 3-12, DeMarco 3-17, Mahalak 1-0, Rudy
Goodwn 2-5. Lehman, Jones 29-228, Bill Hillman
4-(minus-7), Donovan 7-57, Sayre 2-13, Van Scoy
9-13, Brady Butler 8-52, Zach Jayne 2-5, team 1-
(minus-1).
PASSING Meyers, Labatch 8-21-3-73. Leh-
man, Hillman 1-5-1-19.
RECEIVING Meyers, DeMarco 3-30, Jacob
Brominski 2-18, Bennett 3-25. Lehman, Donovan
1-19.
INTS Meyers, Mahalak. Lehman, Josh Win-
ters, Sayre, Derek Dragon.
MISSED FGS none.
H . S . F O O T B A L L
Knights
roll over
Meyers
A 30-point third quarter for
Lake-Lehman breaks open a
close game against Mohawks.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Meyers Zahir Dunell, left, explodes up the middle past Lake-
Lehmans Josh Winters on a kickoff return in a WVC Division
2A-A matchup in Lehman Township on Saturday afternoon.
BLOOMSBURG -- The Wilkes
University womens tennis team
saw four singles players and
three doubles squads reach the
semifinals on Day 1 of the
Bloomsburg Tournament on
Saturday afternoon.
Ally Kristofco claimed a 6-1,
6-2 win in the first round before
a 7-6 (3), 6-4 victory in the
quarterfinals moved her to the
semifinals today. Katie Lynn
and Amanda Holyk will also
advance after Lynn posted two
straight-set wins -- 6-1, 6-2 and
6-1, 6-4 -- and Holyk posted
scores of 6-0, 6-0 and 6-4, 7-6
(3).
Anna Podrasky grabbed the
lone semifinal place in the D
singles bracket with straight-set
wins of 6-0, 6-0 and 6-4, 7-5 in
her two matches.
In A doubles, an all-Wilkes
final will see the team of Ana
English/Kristofco battle Melan-
ie Nolt/Lynn for the title Sun-
day. At B doubles, the duo of
Podrasky/Olivia Hewison took
both of their matches by scores
of 8-6 and 8-5 respectively to
reach the finals.
COLLEGE MENS TENNIS
Alvernia 6, Misericordia 3
Misericordia lost to Alvernia
in Dallas.
Tony Goodall and Christian
Pugliese both recorded their
first collegiate wins at fifth at
sixth singles, respectively.
COLLEGE MENS CROSS
COUNTRY
Kings places 13th
Kings split its squad for the
Dickinson Long-Short Invita-
tional at Dickinson College.
The Monarchs runners fin-
ished 13th of 26 teams in the
long run and eighth of 16 in the
short run.
COLLEGE WOMENS CROSS
COUNTRY
Kings tied for 21st
Kings finished tied for 21st at
the Dickinson Long-Short In-
vitational.
Jill OMalley turned in the
Monarchs top time of 28:13,
good for a 142nd-place finish.
Kelsie Dougherty finished 166th
overall in a time of 29:38.
Deirdre Cooney turned in a
time of 31:34 and Kaylan Thibo-
deau ran a time of 32.11 for a
195th-place finish.
Amanda Keegan finished the
scored times with a 197th-place
finish in a time of 32:25.
COLLEGE WOMENS
SOCCER
Wilkes 3,
Delaware Valley 0
Wilkes broke open a scoreless
game at the half, using three
second-half goals to power over
Delaware Valley at Schmidt
Stadium.
Katy Fissel, Megan Binder
and Alicia Roberts each scored a
goal.
Manhattanville 2,
Kings 1
Kings fell to Manhattanville
in its Freedom Conference open-
er Saturday.
Erin Laird got the Monarchs
off to a fast start, netting her
third goal of the year when she
finished a Taylor Sweeney
through ball in the fourth min-
ute.
Misericordia 3,
FDU-Florham 0
Laura Roney and Erin
McGreal scored within 30 sec-
onds of each other, and Sam
Helmstetter tied the Miser-
icordia all-time assists record as
the Cougars defeated FDU-
Florham in the Freedom Confer-
ence opener for both teams.
Megan Lannigan also added a
goal for the Cougars, who im-
proved to 8-1-1 on the season.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
Wilkes 1,
Delaware Valley 0
Michael Turners goal at the
85:58 mark was all Wilkes need-
ed to win its Freedom Confer-
ence opener against the Aggies
at Schmidt Stadium.
Dave Marr recorded seven
saves for the Colonels.
Mahattanville 1, Kings 0
Kings dropped a game to
host Manhattanville in the Free-
dom Conference opener for
both teams.
Chris Nygren led Kings with
four shots, two of them on goal.
Niall Croke, Brian Alifano, Erik
Foster and Kevin Buchanan
each had two shots.
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Manhattanville 4,
Misericordia 3, OT
Misericordia dropped a heart-
breaker to Manhattanville at
McGeehan Field.
Emily Hegner had a goal and
an assist, and Terra Hall and
Hannah Harvey each added
goals in the losing effort.
Kings 2, Eastern 1
Calli Berryman netted the
game-winning goal late in the
second half and assisted on the
game-tying goal to lift Kings to
a victory over three-time de-
fending Freedom Conference
champion Eastern at McCarthy
Stadium.
Megan Withrow picked up the
win in the cage, making seven
saves, including five in the first
half to keep the Monarchs close.
Jones made nine saves for the
Eagles in the loss.
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
Kings swept in doubleheader
Kings fell to Mount Saint
Mary 25-4, 25-14, 25-11 in the
first match of a doubleheader.
Kings offense was led by
Kelsie Kramer with five kills.
Molly Dahl and Elen ODonnell
each tallied three kills, and
Mary Loughran had 10 assists.
Kings dropped the second
match to Mount Saint Mary
25-18, 26-24, 25-21.
Molly Dahl notched five kills
and had one solo block and four
block assists for a total of five
blocks. Kelsie Kramer, Alexa
Nelson and Aubrey Gryskiewicz
each tallied three kills, and
Jillian Foster picked up 19 digs.
Mary Loughran dished out 15
assists.
Misericordia second
at Lycoming Tourney
Misericordia finished second
at the Lycoming Tournament,
beating Penn 25-21, 14-25, 25-18,
25-21.
Shelby Brochetti had 14 kills
and 11 digs against Penn, and
Katherine LaBrie had 13 kills.
Misericordia also lost to host
Lycoming 25-19, 25-23, 23-25,
18-25, 14-16 in the final.
Cailin McCullion had 14 kills
and 24 digs in the final, while
LaBrie had 12 kills. Brochetti
added eight kills and 22 digs.
L O C A L C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
Wilkes strong at BU tournament
The Times Leader staff
WILKES-BARRE On the
slimchance Holy Redeemer was
hoping for a miraculous come-
back, Corey Moore came back in
the game.
And when he did, all doubts
about the outcome endedonone
play.
Moore went deep downfield
with his fourth touchdown pass
of the night early in the fourth
quarter Saturday, putting an end
to Redeemers second-half upris-
ing and pretty much securing
GARs 65-28 victory at Wilkes-
Barre Memorial Stadium.
Our speed killed them,
Moore said.
So did Moores arm.
The GAR quarterback threw
for 264 yards, scored on a 1-yard
touchdownrunandfiredscoring
strikes of 29, 14, 14 and 51 yards
while leading GARs scoring
rampage.
His last one was the most curi-
ous, though.
With GAR holding a 50-20
lead and its subs inserted for a
good portion of the second half,
Moore and the first-teamers re-
entered for one play.
Thats all it took for Moore to
find Lucas Benton in the end
zone for a second time, rifling a
51-yard bomb to the end zone.
Rich Sickler followed that with a
conversion run, boosting GARs
advantage to 58-20.
We were playing our game,
not to snub anybody, GAR
coach Paul Wiedlich said. They
(the Royals) showed theyre not
going to quit. That (Moore-to-
Benton) is a staple of our of-
fense. We feel (if) they still want
to play, were going to play.
The Grenadiers made more
than enough big plays all night.
Benton, who caught 157 yards
worth of passes, grabbed the
first two scoring strikes and add-
ed a 28-yard touchdown run as
GAR built a 44-6 halftime lead.
Luke Height hit a 24-yard field
goal as time expired in the first
half, and GAR opened the sec-
ond half with a 1-yard touch-
down pass by Rashaun Mathis.
But Redeemer roared back, as
Jimmy Strickland gunned a 79-
yard touchdown bomb and
whipped a 13-yard touchdown
toss to get the Royals relatively
close.
Thats when Moore and GAR
put the hammer down on all
comeback hopes.
They have a lot of heart,
Moore said of the Royals. They
dont give up. You just have to
keep fighting.
GAR................................. 14 30 6 15 65
Holy Redeemer ............. 6 0 8 14 28
First Quarter
GAR Lucas Benton 29 pass from Corey Moore
(Luke Height kick), 9:29
GAR Benton 14 pass from Moore (Height kick),
7:50
HR Eric Kerr 12 pass from Jimmy Strickland
(kick failed), 1:40
Second Quarter
GAR Moore 1 run (Height kick), 10:51
GAR Sickler 23 run (kick failed), 7:55
GAR Benton 28 run (Sickler conversion run),
4:55
GAR - Sickler 14 pass from Moore (kick failed),
0:43
GAR Height 24 FG, 0:00
Third Quarter
Joe Sipsky 1 pass from Rashaun Mathis (kick
failed), 5:49
HR Kerr 79 pass from Strickland (Kerr con-
version pass from Strickland), 3:35
Fourth Quarter
HR Erik Shorts 13 pass from Strickland (pass
failed), 11:09
GAR Benton 51 pass from Moore (Sickler
conversion run), 10:35
HR Vincent Villani 37 pass from Strickland
(Jason Hoggarth conversion pass from Strick-
land), 7:58
GAR A.J. Mouzone 16 run (Height kick), 2:30
TeamStatistics GAR Redeemer
First downs.................. 15 10
Rushes-yards ............. 26-184 15- (minus 7)
Passing........................ 270 302
Total Yards.................. 454 295
Comp-Att-Int ............... 18-22-0 22-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .... 1-9 2-28
Punts-Avg.................... 0-0 3-32.3
Fumbles-Lost.............. 0-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards.......... 6-40 2-10
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING GAR, A.J. Mouzone 11-68, Rich Sick-
ler 6-48, Lucas Benton 2-46, Rashaun Mathis 4-34,
GlennSoto1- (minus 3), Corey Moore2- (minus 9);
HR, JustinRenfer 3-11, EricKerr 1-0, CharlesRoss
4- (minus 1), Pat Villani 2- (minus 6), Jimmy Strick-
land 5- (minus 11).
PASSING GAR, Moore 16-20-0, 264, Mathis 2-
2-0, 6; HR, Strickland 22-27-0, 314.
RECEIVING GAR, Benton 9-157, Sickler 3-43,
Jammar Taylor 2-29, Joe Sipsky 2-19, Mathis 1-17,
Elmer Strollis 1-5; HR, Eric Shorts 6-51, Erik Kerr
5-129, Vincent Villani 4-45, Pat Villani 2-28, Justin
Renfer 2-28, Jason Hoggarth 2-14, Mike Faux 1-7.
GAR uses speed to blast Royals
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
GAR running
back Rich Sick-
ler, with ball,
evades the tack-
le of Holy Re-
deemer defender
Jason Hoggarth
(20) during a
game Saturday
at Wilkes-Barre
Memorial Stadi-
um.
FREELAND Jesus Tlatenchi
scored the game-winning goal in
overtime to give GAR the 2-1
victory over host MMI Prep in
boys soccer action Saturday.
Tony Tlatenchi recorded 10
saves in the net for GAR while
Edwin Neives scored a goal as
well.
MMI Preps effort was led by a
score from Tristan Gibbons.
GAR............................................................ 0 1 1 2
MMI Prep.................................................... 0 1 0 0
Second half: 1. GAR, Edwin Neives, 4:23; 2.
MMI, Tristan Gibbons, 27:00; Overtime: GAR, Je-
sus Tlatenchi (Luke Height), 4:01.
Shots: GAR20, MMI 16; Saves: GAR10 (Tony
Tlatenchi), MMI 9 (Terrance Jankouskas); Corners:
GAR 9, MMI 12.
H.S. GIRLS SOCCER
Nanticoke 6, Hazleton Area 5
Brittany Sugalski scored four
goals, including the game-win-
ner with less than a minute to
go, to give Nanticoke the victo-
ry.
Hazleton Area was led by two
goals from Josie Zapotosky.
Hazleton Area.............................................. 4 1 5
Nanticoke...................................................... 1 5 6
First half: 1. NAN, Brittany Sugalski (Lindsay
Lane), 27:06; 2. HAZ, Alyssa Sitch (Madison Palum-
bo), 15:36; 3. HAZ, Josie Zapotosky, 11:28; 4. HAZ,
Franchesca Matriccino, 8:24; 5. HAZ, Zapotosky,
2:47; Second half: 6. NAN, Jordan Norton (Alyssa
Gurzynski), 39:30; 7. NAN, Sugalski, 32:40; 8. NAN,
Lane (Jessica McMahon), 27:20; 9. NAN, Sugalski,
26:08; 10. HAZ, Zapotosky, 5:19; 11. NAN, Sugalski
(penalty kick), :42.
Shots: HAZ 20, NAN 17; Saves: HAZ 11 (Haley
Wilkinson), NAN 15 (Shelby Divers); Corners: HAZ
5, NAN 6.
Wyoming Area 5, Crestwood 2
Valerie Bott scored three
goals with one assist to lead
Wyoming Area to a win on Fri-
day evening.
Jocelyn Rasmus and Emily
Oorson each had one goal in the
effort for Crestwood.
Crestwood.................................................... 0 2 2
Wyoming Area............................................. 3 2 5
First half: 1. WA, Crestwood own goal, 15:00; 2.
WA, Valerie Bott, 28:00; 3. WA, Valerie Bott, 29:00;
Secondhalf: 4. CRE, Jocelyn Rasmus (Tatiana Ko-
goy), 40:00; 5. WA, Sam Acacio, 43:00; 6. CRE,
Emily Oorson, 50:00; 7. WA, Danielle Vigueras
(Bott), 70:00
Shots: CRE 11, WA 15; Saves: CRE 10
(McKenna Mera), WA 9 (Jordan Chiavacci); Cor-
ners: CRE 2, WA 3.
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
Meyers 0, Tunkhannock 0, OT
Meyers and Tunkhannock
ended in a scoreless tie in their
battle atop Division 2. The tie
left both teams at 6-1-1, a half-
game behind Northwest.
Rianna Daughtry-Smith post-
ed her third shutout of the sea-
son for the Mohawks. Mary
Sickler made 11 saves to extend
the Tigers unbeaten streak to
five games.
Meyers ........................................................ 0 0 0 0
Tunkhannock............................................. 0 0 0 0
No scoring
Shots: MEY15, TUNK16; Saves: MEY6 (Rian-
na Daughtry-Smith), TUNK 11 (Mary Sickler); Cor-
ners: MEY 6, TUNK 16.
Northwest 5, Hanover Area 0
Glenn Carr led Northwest
with two goals and one assist in
the victory. The Rangers (7-1)
opened a half-game lead in WVC
Division 2.
Tiffany McCary recorded 11
saves in the net for Hanover
Area.
Northwest ..................................................... 4 1 5
Hanover Area............................................... 0 0 0
First half: 1. NW, Aleesha Hildebrand (Glenn
Carr), 26:57; 2. NW, Morgan Price (Carr), 20:49; 3.
NW, Michaela Weber (Kirsten Walsh), 3:53; 4. NW,
Price, 2:56; Second half: 5. NW, Carr, 5:02.
Shots: NW16, HAN5; Saves: NW5 (Alivia Wo-
melsdorf), HAN 11 (Tiffany McCary); Corners: NW
12, HAN 3.
H I G H S C H O O L R O U N D U P
OT tally powers Grenadiers past MMI
The Times Leader staff
NEW YORK Flat Out made
his first win of the year a big one,
edging Stay Thirsty in the final
strides to take the $1 million
Jockey Club Gold Cup on Satur-
day at Belmont Park.
Flat Out won the Gold Cup last
year, but was 0for 6until overtak-
ing Stay Thirsty two jumps from
the finishto give trainer Bill Mott
his second Grade 1 victory on a
day that featured six graded
stakes races.
Earlier, Motts 4-5 favorite Roy-
al Delta beat rival Its Tricky by
9
1
2 lengths in the Beldame Invita-
tional.
Ridden by Joel Rosario, the 6-
year-old Flat Out challenged
pace-setter Stay Thirsty when
the 10-horse field turned for
home, and closed the margin
with every stride before putting
his head in front at the wire.
Whitney Invitational winner
and 5-2 favorite Fort Larned was
third, followed by Atigun, Fast
Falcon, Ron the Greek, Game
Ball, Hymn Book, San Pablo and
Ruler On Ice.
The winning time for the 1
1
4
miles was 2:01.44.
In other stakes races, The
Lumber Guy won the Vosburgh,
Nahraintook the Flower Bowl In-
vitational, 4-5 favorite Point of
Entry won the Joe Hirsch Turf
Classic, and Jersey Town was an
upset winner in the Grade 2 Kel-
so Handicap.
Hall of Fame jockeyJohnVelaz-
quez was aboard three Grade 1
winners The Lumber Guy,
Nahrain and Point of Entry.
The winning horses in each of
the six stakes races earned auto-
matic berths inthe Breeders Cup
at Santa Anita on Nov. 2-3.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Flat Out edges Stay Thirsty in Jockey Club Gold Cup
The Associated Press
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 9C
NFL SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
(EDITORS NOTE:
Because of an ongoing
labor issue with the
league office, the usual
writer of this column has
been locked out. We have
procured a replacement
writer to take his place
until the dispute is set-
tled. He is semi-certified in English and also
happens to be a grizzled old prospector.)
Me beans have been a jumpin ornery in
recent days over this Vick feller what plays
for them no-good flyin buzzards from Philly.
What good are ya? Yer team pays ya a hefty
sum in company script and vittles, and you
gets yer tail feathers tarred by a bunch of
desert pigeons. And without even the de-
cency to throw one of
them high falutin
touchdown passes.
Dagnabbit, tarnata-
tion and monkey
fritters! What in the
name of Yosemite
Sams britches did I
draft yer sorry bee-
hind for? By gum!
(EDITORS
NOTE: We have
resolved the issue at
great expense. Thank
God.)
Ahhh, the beauty
of replacements.
Sometimes they work
out -- Kurt Warner
replacing Trent
Green for the 99
Rams. And some-
times they dont -- did
someone mention the
Packers-Seahawks
game?
In fantasy football,
with the first week of
byes upon us, and the injuries piling up,
replacements are invaluable. They become
your lifeboat to get your team through the
lean times. These three replacements may
not even see the field today, but the starters
in front of them have been banged up and
have durability issues. Eventually, they will
prove valuable for your team.
Tashard Choice, RB, Bills. With Fred
Jackson and C.J. Spiller hurting, Choice may
be the Bills choice at RB. He had some
success in spot starts as a Cowboy and filled
in nicely last week. If there comes a time
when Jackson or Spiller cant go, you may
have a Choice matchup down the road.
Shaun Hill, QB, Lions. If Matthew Stafford
ever misses any time, Shaun Hill can really
help out. Hill filled in for Stafford in 2010
and did a fine job -- and it certainly helps if
he has Calvin Johnson to throw to.
Daniel Thomas, RB, Dolphins. Recom-
mending anyone on the Dolphins not named
Reggie Bush is risky the offense is a work
in progress. But it is a RUN-oriented work in
progress. And that means Thomas will
be the man as long as Bush is sidelined.
QUICK PICK-ME-UPS
Mikel Leshoure, RB, Lions. Chances
are someones scooped him up by now,
but if they havent .. GO GET HIM IM-
MEDIATELY! Barring injury, he will be a
top-10 fantasy back by years end.
Jerome Simpson, WR, Vikings. Earned
himself a three-game suspension when
police found lots and lots of marijuana in his
house. Hes back now and he could earn
himself fantasy stardom as an athletic com-
plement to Percy Harvin.
T.Y. Hilton, WR, Colts. Some nice presea-
son moments put him on the map. His Week
3 effort put him on the radar. Now, with
Austin Collie out for the year, Hilton has the
makings of a fantasy gem.
START THESE GUYS
Arizona defense. The Cardinals have been
taking nasty lessons from the 49ers de-
fense. Theyre quickly turning into an every
week start, but this week they have an espe-
cially tasty matchup with Miami.
Christian Ponder, QB, Vikings. Jake Lock-
er threw for a thousand yards against the
Lions, so theres no reason Ponder cant as
well.
Vincent Jackson, WR, Buccaneers. If you
look up streaky in the dictionary youll see
this: streak-y, adjective \stree-kee\ 1: What
Vincent Jackson is. ... The good news,
against the Redskins, this will be one of
Jacksons good streak weeks.
NOT THESE
Chris Johnson, RB, Titans. For some
reason, the coaching staff just doesnt want
him to get the ball. He had all of ONE carry
in the second quarter Sunday 14 for the
game. And that was against a bad defense
when his team had a lead. This week will be
a debacle from the start.
Anyone on St. Louis. Lost in the chaos of
how Monday nights game ended is the fact
that Seattles defense is downright vicious.
They pretty much shut down Green Bays
big boy offense. And the Rams are nowhere
as good as the Packers.
Mark Sanchez, QB, Jets. Sanchez will
have his good weeks. And his bad. This will
be one of the bad.
FANTASY SPORTS
R I C H S H E P O S H
Time to find
some injury
replacements
Did you pick Vick?
Dont worry, its not
as bad as it seems.
But it will be.
Let me explain.
Hes too talented to
stink it up every
week, and he WILL
have a great game
soon. When he
does, do your best
to move him. Hes
also taking a
pounding out there
and wont be
healthy down the
stretch.
ONE FACT
TO KNOW
>> VIKINGS VS. LIONS: The Lions were
supposed to be the up-and-coming team in
the NFC North. Instead, theyre 1-2 with a
banged up QB and a defense that makes
the French army in WWII look stout. The
Vikings were supposed to be cannon fodder
for the Packers, Bears and Lions, but
theyre 2-1 with a pleasant surprise at QB
and a quality win over the 49ers. Vegas
says Detroit is favored by 6. Confucius say:
Ahhh. Predictability is quite unpredictable
in todays NFL. Take the points.
>> OAKLAND VS. DENVER: Winter arrives
quicker in the Mile-High City than it does in
most places. The average date for the first
snow in Denver is Oct. 19. The earliest snow
game in Bronco history happened on Oct.
15, 1984, when the Packers and Broncos
slogged through a foot of the white stuff on
Monday Night Football. In local lore, the
game would be called, appropriately
enough, The Bronco Blizzard. So, with the
earliest snowfall in Denver recorded on
Sept. 3, 1961, the possibility exists for a
memorable game today, right? Ehhh. No.
The forecast calls for sunny skies with a
high of 72. Sorry.
>> SAINTS VS. PACKERS: The experts
always take the easy route when looking
for ways to analyze an NFL game -- QB
matchups, coaching strategies, etc. Anyone
can do that. It takes courage to break down
a game using things like beer and grub.
New Orleans brings a spicy crustacean-
based menu to the table with dishes like
the pompous sounding crawfish touffe.
And to wash down all those French letters,
the city offers local microbrews such as
Hopitoulas and 7th St. Wheat. In Green Bay,
they have cheddar-stuffed bratwurst and
beer with names like Dark Hel-
met Schwartzbier and
Rye the Helles. Now
THOSE are beer names!
Advantage: Packers.
>>
N.Y. GIANTS VS.
EAGLES: When
two teams have
as heated a
rivalry as
these guys,
theres bound
to be some
mind-searing
memories created
over the years. But of all the head-scratch-
ing and jaw-dropping plays theyve inflicted
on each other, were going to focus on ... a
PUNT? It was Dec. 3, 1989, and the Eagles
were backed up near their goal line. QB
Randall Cunningham dropped back and ...
punted. The ball hit about the Giants 40-
yard line and rolled ... rolled ... rolled ... and
when it was done rolling, rolled some more.
When it stopped, Cunningham had a 91-yard
punt to his credit the fourth longest in
NFL history. The change in field position
helped the Eagles win, 24-17.
>> BEARS VS. COWBOYS: Are you are a
fan of the Chicago Bears? Then you can
thank the makers of fine food starch prod-
ucts for their existence. Da Bears, you see,
were originally called Da Staleys the
Decatur Staleys as a matter of fact. In 1919,
the team was named after its founder,
the A. E. Staley food starch compa-
ny of Decatur, Ill. (See how that
works.) The Staleys moved to
Chicago in 1921 and found a
more menacing name the next
year. Although, if you want
menacing, the Bears
logo from1954 to 1973
was anything but. It
looks like the Bear
was looking for a good
place to take a nap.
-- Rich Sheposh
THINGS
YOU
NEED TO
KNOW
WEEK 4
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets .................................... 2 1 0 .667 81 75
Buffalo........................................ 2 1 0 .667 87 79
New England............................. 1 2 0 .333 82 64
Miami .......................................... 1 2 0 .333 65 66
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston.................................. 3 0 0 1.000 88 42
Jacksonville ........................... 1 2 0 .333 52 70
Tennessee............................. 1 2 0 .333 67 113
Indianapolis............................ 1 2 0 .333 61 83
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore................................. 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati ................................ 2 1 0 .667 85 102
Pittsburgh................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland................................ 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego .................................. 2 1 0 .667 63 51
Denver........................................ 1 2 0 .333 77 77
Kansas City................................ 1 2 0 .333 68 99
Oakland...................................... 1 2 0 .333 61 88
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas........................................ 2 1 0 .667 47 54
Philadelphia ............................. 2 1 0 .667 47 66
N.Y. Giants............................... 2 1 0 .667 94 65
Washington.............................. 1 2 0 .333 99 101
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta..................................... 3 0 0 1.000 94 48
Tampa Bay ............................. 1 2 0 .333 60 67
Carolina.................................. 1 2 0 .333 52 79
New Orleans .......................... 0 3 0 .000 83 102
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota.................................. 2 1 0 .667 70 59
Chicago...................................... 2 1 0 .667 74 50
Green Bay .................................. 1 2 0 .333 57 54
Detroit......................................... 1 2 0 .333 87 94
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona..................................... 3 0 0 1.000 67 40
San Francisco ......................... 2 1 0 .667 70 65
Seattle ...................................... 2 1 0 .667 57 39
St. Louis................................... 1 2 0 .333 60 78
Thursday's Game
Baltimore 23, Cleveland 16
Sunday's Games
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Miami at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh
Monday's Game
Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4
Arizona at St. Louis, 8:20 p.m.
A F C L E A D E R S
Week 3
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Roethlisberger, PIT... 120 82 904 8 1
Dalton, CIN................. 95 65 867 6 3
Schaub, HOU............. 96 63 751 5 1
Flacco, BAL ................ 110 71 913 6 2
Brady, NWE................ 118 79 887 4 1
Fitzpatrick, BUF.......... 86 50 581 8 3
Locker, TEN................ 104 67 781 4 2
C. Palmer, OAK ......... 128 80 879 5 2
P. Rivers, SND........... 103 69 688 4 3
Gabbert, JAC............. 79 40 468 4 0
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN........... 55 323 5.87 91t 1
Jones-Drew, JAC........ 59 314 5.32 59t 1
Spiller, BUF.................. 33 308 9.33 56t 3
Re. Bush, MIA.............. 50 302 6.04 65t 2
A. Foster, HOU............ 79 294 3.72 22 3
R. Rice, BAL................. 46 268 5.83 43 3
Ridley, NWE................. 52 233 4.48 20 1
McGahee, DEN........... 50 213 4.26 31 2
Green-Ellis, CIN .......... 56 204 3.64 19 2
T. Richardson, CLE .... 50 175 3.50 32t 2
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Wayne, IND.................. 23 294 12.8 30t 1
Lloyd, NWE .................. 22 237 10.8 27 0
A.. Green, CIN ............. 21 311 14.8 73t 2
Ant. Brown, PIT............ 18 240 13.3 27 1
Bowe, KAN................... 18 234 13.0 33t 2
Pitta, BAL...................... 18 188 10.4 25 2
Decker, DEN................ 17 243 14.3 35 0
M. Wallace, PIT ........... 17 234 13.8 37t 3
McFadden, OAK.......... 17 107 6.3 17 0
Welker, NWE................ 16 251 15.7 59 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU........ 4 3 1 0 24
H. Miller, PIT............. 4 0 4 0 24
Spiller, BUF .............. 4 3 1 0 24
Stevi. Johnson, BUF 3 0 3 0 18
Kerley, NYJ .............. 3 0 2 1 18
R. Rice, BAL............. 3 3 0 0 18
T. Richardson, CLE. 3 2 1 0 18
Rosario, SND........... 3 0 3 0 18
M. Wallace, PIT ....... 3 0 3 0 18
McGahee, DEN........ 2 2 0 0 14
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE............ 7-7 9-10 53 34
Tucker, BAL ...................... 11-11 7-7 56 32
Succop, KAN..................... 6-6 8-9 45 30
S. Graham, HOU.............. 10-10 6-7 41 28
Folk, NYJ........................... 9-9 6-6 39 27
Kaeding, SND................... 6-6 7-7 45 27
Bironas, TEN .................... 7-7 6-8 38 25
Nugent, CIN...................... 10-10 5-5 47 25
Janikowski, OAK .............. 5-5 6-6 51 23
N F C L E A D E R S
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
M. Ryan, ATL............ 107 77 793 8 1
Kolb, ARI ................... 59 38 428 4 0
Ponder, MIN.............. 97 68 713 4 0
Griffin III, WAS.......... 89 60 747 4 1
Ale. Smith, SNF........ 92 64 641 5 1
E. Manning, NYG ..... 118 79 1011 5 3
Romo, DAL................ 108 70 841 4 3
A. Rodgers, GBY...... 115 78 745 3 2
R. Wilson, SEA......... 75 43 434 4 1
Bradford, STL ........... 95 61 660 4 3
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
M. Lynch, SEA............. 72 305 4.24 36 1
Gore, SNF.................... 45 264 5.87 23t 2
Morris, WAS................. 61 263 4.31 29 3
L. McCoy, PHL ............ 58 261 4.50 22 1
A. Peterson, MIN......... 58 230 3.97 20 2
D. Martin, TAM............. 63 214 3.40 17 1
Murray, DAL................. 50 213 4.26 48 1
Griffin III, WAS............. 32 209 6.53 19 3
And. Brown, NYG........ 33 184 5.58 31 3
M. Turner, ATL ............ 42 154 3.67 25 2
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Harvin, MIN .................. 27 277 10.3 24 0
Amendola, STL ............ 25 296 11.8 56 1
Ca. Johnson, DET....... 24 369 15.4 51 1
Cruz, NYG.................... 23 279 12.1 80t 1
Gonzalez, ATL............. 21 214 10.2 25 3
R. White, ATL............... 19 244 12.8 26 1
M. Crabtree, SNF ........ 19 183 9.6 20 0
Sproles, NOR............... 18 163 9.1 25 1
J. Graham, NOR.......... 17 172 10.1 23 3
Burleson, DET ............. 17 149 8.8 21 1
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Ve. Davis, SNF ........ 4 0 4 0 24
And. Brown, NYG.... 3 3 0 0 20
Ma. Bennett, NYG... 3 0 3 0 18
M. Bush, CHI ............ 3 3 0 0 18
Gonzalez, ATL......... 3 0 3 0 18
J. Graham, NOR...... 3 0 3 0 18
Griffin III, WAS......... 3 3 0 0 18
Ju. Jones, ATL......... 3 0 3 0 18
Morris, WAS............. 3 3 0 0 18
Rudolph, MIN........... 3 0 3 0 18
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Tynes, NYG.................... 8-8 10-10 49 38
Ja. Hanson, DET............ 7-7 10-11 53 37
Akers, SNF ..................... 7-7 7-8 63 28
M. Bryant, ATL................ 10-10 6-6 42 28
Walsh, MIN..................... 7-7 7-7 55 28
Zuerlein, STL.................. 4-4 8-8 56 28
Cundiff, WAS.................. 12-12 5-6 45 27
Gould, CHI ...................... 8-8 6-6 54 26
Feely, ARI ....................... 7-7 6-6 47 25
WHATS ON TELEVISION
PATRIOTS at BILLS
1 p.m., CBS, WYOU-22
49ERS at JETS
1 p.m., FOX, WOLF-56
SAINTS at PACKERS
4:25 p.m., FOX, WOLF-56
GIANTS at EAGLES
8:20 p.m., NBC, WBRE-28
NEWENGLAND at
BUFFALO
OPENING LINE: Patriots by 3
SERIES RECORD: Patriots lead
62-41-1
LAST MEETING: Patriots beat
Bills 49-21, Jan. 1, 2012
LAST WEEK: Patriots lost to
Ravens 31-30; Bills beat Browns
24-14
DID YOU KNOW? Last years
meeting at Orchard Park had
Bills rallying from 21-0 second-
quarter deficit for 34-31 win that
ended Patriots 15-game win
streak vs. Buffalo. New England
has still owned Bills during Bill
Belichick-Tom Brady era, having
won 21 of past 23 meetings
dating to 2000. Patriots lost
two straight for only fourth
time since 2003, and theyre
below .500 for first time since
opening 2003 season with 31-0
loss at Buffalo. ... With 40,866
yards passing, Brady 57 shy of
moving into 11th on NFL list
ahead of Kerry Collins. ...
Bills attempting to get off to
second straight 3-1 start after
opening last season with three
wins. ... Questions remain at
running back with Fred Jackson
(sprained right knee) attempt-
ing to return after missing two
games and after C.J. Spiller
hurt left shoulder at Cleveland.
... Nine sacks in first three
games are most for Buffalo
since having 11 to open 2006
season. Bills managed four
sacks through first six games
last season.
SAN FRANCISCO at
N.Y. JETS
OPENING LINE: 49ers by 3
1
2
SERIES RECORD: 49ers lead
9-2
LAST MEETING: 49ers beat
Jets 24-14, Dec. 7, 2008
LAST WEEK: 49ers lost to
Vikings 24-13; Jets beat Dol-
phins 23-20 OT
DID YOU KNOW?: 49ers 5-1
all-time on road against Jets:
but playing at MetLife Stadium
for first time. ... San Francisco
practiced all week at Young-
stown State in eastern Ohio to
avoid return trip to West Coast
after playing at Minnesota last
Sunday. 49ers did same thing
last season after win in Cincin-
nati and then rallied from 20-0
deficit to stun Eagles 24-23 in
Philadelphia. ... QB Alex Smith
ranks third in NFL with 69.6
completion percentage. Vernon
Davis, called best TE in NFL by
Jets coach Rex Ryan, tied with
Pittsburgh TE Heath Miller for
most TD catches in league this
season with four.
Game marks Ryans first against
an NFC West team since becom-
ing Jets coach in 2009. ... Jets
playing first game since CB
Darrelle Revis was lost for
season with torn ligament in
left knee, suffered at Miami.
2010 first-round pick Kyle Wil-
son will replace him. ... To help
compensate for loss of Revis,
Jets moving RB Joe McKnight
to CB: position he hasnt played
regularly since high school. ...
Last Sundays OT win marked
11th time in QB Mark Sanchezs
career that he has led Jets to
fourth-quarter comeback or OT
victories: seven coming on road.
NEWORLEANS at
GREEN BAY
OPENING LINE: Packers by 7
SERIES RECORD: Packers lead
15-7
LAST MEETING: Packers beat
Saints 42-34, Sept. 8, 2011
DID YOU KNOW? Saints have
won three of past five meetings.
... QB Drew Brees has touch-
down pass in 46 consecutive
games and can tie longest
streak in NFL history, held by
Hall of Famer Johnny Unitas
with 47. ... In four starts vs.
Green Bay, Brees has 1,458
yards passing (364.5 per game),
11 TDs and two INTs. Has 300-
plus yards and two-plus TDs in
all four games. ... In
last meeting, Dar-
ren Sproles had
250 yards combined
with a 72-yard punt
return for a TD. Since 2011,
Sproles leads NFL RBs with104
receptions. ... TE Jimmy Graham
had a TD in last meeting with
Packers and is aiming for TD in
seventh game in row. ... Saints
offense ranks first in NFC with a
70 percent TD rate in red zone.
RB Cedric Benson rushed for
two TDs in last game vs. New
Orleans, Dec. 5 2010 with Cin-
cinnati. ... WR Greg Jennings
aims for fourth game in row vs.
New Orleans with TD. ... ... Pack-
ers pass defense leads NFL
allowing 125.3 yards per game.
Total defense is second in NFC
and third in NFL, allowing 261
yards per game. OLB Clay
Matthews leads NFL with six
sacks. ... Rookie OLB Nick Perry
had first career sack last week.
N.Y. GIANTS at
PHILADELPHIA
OPENING LINE: Eagles by 2
1
2
SERIES RECORD: Giants lead
82-74-2
LAST MEETING: Eagles beat
Giants 17-10, Nov. 20, 2011
LAST WEEK: Giants beat Pan-
thers 36-7; Eagles lost to Cardi-
nals 27-6
DID YOU KNOW? Eagles RB
LeSean McCoy renewed rivalry
with Giants DE Osi Umenyiora
this week, calling him ballerina
in a Giants uniform. ... Eagles
have won seven of last eight
meetings. ... Giants coach Tom
Coughlin 9-11 vs. Eagles, in-
cluding two playoff losses. ...
Giants have forced at least one
turnover in 34 of last 36 games.
... K Lawrence Tynes has made
franchise-record 166 consec-
utive extra points since missing
one vs. San Francisco on Oct. 21,
2007. ... RB Andre Brown
rushed for 113 yards and scored
two TDs last week in first NFL
start. QB Eli Manning will make
123rd consecutive regular-
season start.
Eagles LB Brian Rolle and Gi-
ants S Antrel Rolle are cousins.
... QB Michael Vick 3-2 vs. Gi-
ants. Hes twice rushed for
more than 100 yards against
them. ... TE Brent Celek has 67
receptions for 996 yards and
five TDs in last 14 games. ...
Eagles defense has not allowed
a TD in the second half, and has
held opponents to 2 for 7 in red
zone ... P Chas Henry was re-
leased despite three 60-plus
yard punts in three games. ...
Eagles 42-22-1 after loss under
coach Andy Reid.
-- The Associated Press
AN EAST COAST VIBE
AP FILE PHOTO
The New York Giants Antrel Rolle, left, and the Philadelphia
Eagles Brent Celek argue in the first half of a game last
year in Philadelphia.
The real referees are
back, and to celebrate,
theyre doing a happy
dance.
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
THE PENNSYLVANIA
GAME COMMISSION
will host a tour of
State Game Lands 57
on Sunday, Oct. 7.
Registration to be
held from 7:30 a.m.
until 12:30 p.m. at
the headquarters
building complex on
SGL 57, Ricketts
Station, Forkston
Township, Wyoming
County. Game Com-
mission personnel will
be on hand to ex-
plain various points
of interest, including
wildlife habitat im-
provement projects.
Four-wheel-drive
vehicles with high
clearance are strong-
ly recommended for
this 14-mile, self-
guided driving tour.
Directions: Take
Route 487 north at
the intersection of
Route 118 and pro-
ceed 7.5 miles and
turn onto a dirt road
near SGL sign on
right. Travel on dirt
road one-tenth of a
mile to a Y in-
tersection and pro-
ceed left three-tenths
of a mile to the
headquarters com-
plex. Each vehicle will
be provided a map
and brief explanation
of wildlife manage-
ment programs being
carried out on this
magnificent tract of
public hunting land.
THE U.S. ARMY
CORPS ENGINEERS
PHILADELPHIA
DISTRICT will host a
meeting to review the
2012 Francis E. Walter
Dam recreation plan
and solicit feedback
for next years plan.
The meeting will be
held at 6:30 p.m.,
Oct. 16, at the Holi-
day Inn Express in
White Haven (in-
tersection of Rt. 940
and Northeast Exten-
sion of the Pa. Turn-
pike). In 2012, the
Army Corps of Engi-
neers held 22 of 24
scheduled whitewater
events and numerous
releases for fisheries
throughout the recre-
ation season.
Organizational lead-
ership is encouraged
to attend and provide
recommendations and
feedback.
NESCOPECK STATE
PARK will be hosting
a weekend of pro-
grams to highlight
new natural history
exhibits installed in
the parks visitor
center. The exhibits
highlight the wonder-
ful biodiversity found
within the parks
forest, fields and
wetlands. Visitors can
look through field
guides to discover
what lives in the
park, crawl through
an underground tun-
nel and view inside a
wetland, as well as
capture a photo of
yourself looking out a
tree stump. Other
exhibits include in-
formation on the
Nescopeck Creek
Watershed, the im-
portance of wetlands
and the parks rich
history.
On Saturday, Oct. 20,
from 9 a.m. to 7
p.m., events including
bird mist netting,
nature hikes, live
music and storytelling
will be held. On Sun-
day, Oct. 21, from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m., events
will include paddling
on Lake Frances,
introductions to geo-
caching and wilder-
ness survival, a green
building tour, nature
crafts, kids story time
and live bats.
All events are free of
charge. The first 50
families will receive a
complimentary Pock-
et Naturalist Nature
Guide to Nescopeck
State Park. A detailed
schedule will be
available soon. For
more information,
contact the park
office at 403-2006.
Outdoors Notes items will
not be accepted over the
telephone. Items may be
faxed to 831-7319, dropped
off at the Times Leader or
mailed to Times Leader, c/o
Sports, 15 N, Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-
0250.
OUT DOORS
NOT ES
T
he concept is the same as one of
those drive-thrus safaris at an
amusement park.
But thats where the similarities end.
The Pennsyvania Game Commission
tour of State Game Lands 57, whichwill
be heldonOct. 7, gives the public the
opportunity to drive throughthe heart
of the 49,500 wilderness inLuzerne and
Wyoming counties.
But insteadof feeding peanuts
throughyour windowto giraffes, this
safari encourages participants to hop
out of the car, put your feet onthe
groundandget a firsthandlook at one of
the largest wilderness areas inthe re-
gion.
For decades, the agency has been
opening up its game lands andgiving
the public a chance to what a true wild
area has to offer. Between500 and600
people turnout annually for the SGL57
tour.
Andwhenit comes to diversity, SGL
57 tops the list.
The14-mile driving tour, whichtakes
about two hours to complete, will guide
visitors througha variety of wildlife
habitats andhistorical sites.
Youll see beaver ponds, a post that
has beenclawedby a black bear, one of
the largest redspruce stands inthe
state, waterfowl ponds anddeer exclo-
sures.
The exclosure fence was constructed
aroundanarea recently timberedto
prevent deer andother wildlife from
browsing onthe regenerating trees.
While speaking withPGCinformation
andeducationsupervisor Bill Williams
about the tour, I was surprisedto learn
that hunting is allowedinside the exclo-
sures. Various gates along the fence
allowaccess, andthey close automat-
ically after someone enters. Because
trees oftenfall onto the fence, allowing
deer to enter, the exclosures may offer
some surprisingly goodhunting oppor-
tunities.
Also important along the tour are the
habitat projects andfoodplots conduct-
edby the NorthMountainBranchof
Quality Deer Management Association,
Wyoming Valley Chapter of Ducks Un-
limited, the RedRock Chapter of the
National WildTurkey Federationand
PGCpersonnel. Members of eachorga-
nizationwill be onhandto showoff
their work, whichincludes foodplots
plantedwithclover, brassica andsoy-
beans plantedby QDMA. The lower
beanimpoundment features a water
control device paidfor by Ducks Un-
limited, usedto raise andlower water
levels to aidwaterfowl nesting and
provide access to foodsources.
The crabapple trees comprising an
orchardfive miles into the tour were
purchasedby the RedRock Chapter and
plantedin2007. The trees provide a
valuable late fall foodsource for deer,
turkey andbear all of whichmay be
seenduring the tour.
Other wildlife that call SGL57 home
include baldeagle, osprey, fisher, bobcat
andotter.
But what makes the SGL57 tour truly
unique, inadditionto the size of the area
andthe habitat work, is the history it
contains. The tour starts andends at the
oldtownof Ricketts. Williams saidthe
lumber townwas built in1890s anddied
in1913 whenthe timber was gone.
Its a ghost townnow, but youcan
walk aroundandexplore the area,
Williams said.
If youdo, look for the foundations of
the oldhotel, lumber mill andblack-
smithshop. What is nowmounds of
concrete andstone amidthe trees and
brushwas once the site of a thriving
industrial towna century ago.
This game lands has a lot to offer
wetlands, deep woods andhistory,
Williams said.
Andtheres no better way to see than
trekking into the heart of this wilder-
ness.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
SGL 57 driving
tour more than
a safari ride
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com.
Mike Webb grew tired of
technology.
After hunting with a com-
pound bow for years, Webb
was fed up with spending
valuable hunting time repair-
ing any of the numerous
gadgets that were prone to
breaking.
He also grew bored with
the compound as improving
technology made it easier to
place arrows in the bullseye
one after another.
The challenge was gone.
With all the technology
that comes with a compound,
I just felt like I was missing
something, the Susquehanna
County resident said. It was
getting way too easy.
Thats when Webb took a
step back in time.
Four years ago, he had an
opportunity to target shoot
with a friends recurve bow.
Webb always had an interest
in traditional archery but
never had a chance to try it
out.
When he did, the results
convinced him to give up the
technology-laden compound.
Webbs switch to traditional
archery didnt happen over-
night, however. He compared
the switch to buying a car
tons of research is needed
and dont jump at the first
bow you find.
In fact, getting off to the
wrong start has created the
misbelief that traditional
archery is extremely difficult
and time-consuming, which leads
some to not even bother with the
sport.
They get discouraged, Webb said.
As long as you get the right start, it
will be a wonderful experience.
The right start includes finding a
bow with a suitable draw weight,
matching arrow weight to the bow
and learning proper shooting tech-
nique.
If you think youre going to go to
a store and buy a recurve and arrows,
and youll be shooting bullseyes right
away, youll have a real rough go of
it, Webb said.
With a traditional bow such as a
recurve, Webb advised dropping down
to a draw weight that is 15 to 20
pounds less than what youre comfort-
able shooting with a compound.
With traditional, now youre shoot-
ing a bow zero let-off and you have
to hold it, he said. Its not difficult
if you drop down 15 or 20 pounds.
Because arrows and broadheads
used for traditional archery are heavi-
er, Webb said its crucial to match
them to the draw weight of your
bow.
The heavier arrows and broadheads,
he said, allow for a truer flight and
also quiet the bow down when shoot-
ing.
There are also adjustments that
need to be made when it comes time
to actually shoot the bow. With tradi-
tional archery, there are no sights,
whisker biscuits or stabilizers to help
improve accuracy. Instead, traditional
archery is all about instinctive shoot-
ing and hand-eye coordination, Webb
said.
Distance doesnt come into play
unless the shot is too far, he said.
Twenty-five yards is the furthest I
would even think about. You only
take the high-percentage shots, and
thats something every archer, regard-
less of the bow that they use, should
do.
And then comes the focus. When
its time to shoot, Webb said all focus
and attention must be placed onto a
small spot such as the single hair
of a deer.
The technology is gone and its
back to you and the deer. Everything
you have has to be focused on that
little spot where you want your arrow
to go, he said.
Now in his fourth year of hunting
with a recurve, Webb said he isnt
going back to the compound and its
technology. With the recurve, Webb
said hes gotten back to the origins of
archery and thats where hed like to
stay.
Theres a peacefulness when you
go out with a recurve, he said. Its
totally different than a compound,
and with the right start it can be just
as much, if not more, rewarding.
Youre getting back to what archery is
supposed to be.
A different aim
Ed Krystofosky, owner of The Archery Zone in Larksville, shoots a recurve bow at the indoor
range in his shop. Krystofosky said more young people are getting into traditional archery after it
was featured in the movie The Hunger Games.
About archery
The fall archery season runs from Sept.
20 to Nov. 12. Archery hunters may choose
to use a long, recurve or compound bow,
or a crossbow. Bows must have a draw
weight of at least 35 pounds; crossbows
must have a minimum drawn weight of at
least 125 pounds. Broadheads on either an
arrow or a bolt must have an outside
diameter or width of at least seven-eighths
inches with at least two cutting edges on
the same plane throughout the length of
the cutting surface, and shall not exceed
three inches in length.
Hunters may use illuminated nocks for
arrows and bolts; they aid in tracking or
locating the arrow or bolt after being
launched. However, transmitter-tracking
arrows still are illegal. It also remains
illegal to use dogs to track wounded deer.
Archery on the rise
Ed Krystofosky, owner of The Archery
Zone in Larksville, said he sees traditional
archery growing in popularity among
young adults. He attributes the increase to
the recent movie The Hunger Games,
which features traditional archery.
When it comes to those who hunt with a
recurve or longbow, he said there arent
many but the numbers can be deceiving.
The traditional archery hunters are
kind of reclusive and stick to their own
thing, Krystofosky said. They dont
announce to the world what they do.
Krystofosky teaches traditional archery
at his shop and also hunts deer with a
recurve. Getting started with a traditional
bow is less expensive than a compound, he
said, but getting off on the right foot is
imperative.
Traditional archery is an art,
Krystofosky said.
Most important is getting the right
poundage first, and then you need to
match the arrows to the bow.
After that, you need to practice every
day. You cant just start shooting and
expect to be good. It takes dedication.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
After years of hunting, Mike
Webb went to a traditional bow
and he hasnt looked back.
The technology is gone and its back to you and the deer.
Everything you have has to be focused
on that little spot where you want your arrow to go.
Mike Webb, a hunter who uses a recurve bow
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
The Pennsylvania Game Commission
board held its quarterly meeting last week
in Franklin County. Below is a summary of
board actions taken during the meeting:
Gave preliminary approval to a regu-
latory change to expand antlerless deer
hunting opportunities under the Mentored
Youth Hunting Program for the 2013-14
license year. The change permits the trans-
fer of no more than one Deer Management
Assistance Program (DMAP) permit to a
mentored youth hunter per license year.
If the change is given final approval at a
subsequent board meeting, beginning in
the 2013-14 license year, adult mentors
would be authorized to transfer one DMAP
harvest permit issued to them to an eligi-
ble mentored youth.
Gave final approval to a regulatory
change that amends the list of state en-
dangered and threatened species to reflect
the current status of breeding bird pop-
ulations in the state. The upland sandpiper
was added to the states endangered spe-
cies list, while the northern harrier and
long-eared owl were placed on the states
list of threatened birds.
Gave final approval to a regulatory
change to address violations of possessing,
maintaining, operating, occupying or trav-
eling on an all-terrain vehicle or snow-
mobile in violation of the states Vehicle
Code (Title 75), giving wildlife conserva-
tion officers the authority to enforce sum-
mary offenses of the title, including lack of
registration and insurance.
Gave approval to increase deputy
wildlife conservation officer compensation
from $65 per diem to $80 per diem, effec-
tive Oct. 1.
Recommitted its support for legisla-
tion that would legalize the use of blood
tracking dogs for hunters to recover
wounded deer and bear.
OUTDOOR NEWS
DOVER, Del. Could it real-
ly be true love between Denny
Hamlin and Dover?
So far, its at least a crush.
His performance Sunday will
really determine the fate of this
relationship.
Trying his
best to adjust
his approach
toward his
least favorite
track, Hamlins
reignited court-
ship produced
fantastic re-
sults Saturday
when he turned a lap of 159.299
mph to win the pole at Dover
International Speedway.
Hamlin has been open in his
disdain for the 1-mile concrete
oval and knew hed have to con-
quer his Dover demons to keep
his driven bid for his first career
Cup championship rolling along.
Hamlin, third in the points
standings, turned to a sports
psychologist for advice. The
message for Hamlin was this,
Let your challenge for the week
be to fall in love with this track.
Hamlin says the good karma,
and a great No. 11 Toyota, all
played a part in the turnaround.
I think that right now we
have everything rolling, Hamlin
said. That part of it is giving
me a ton of confidence.
Hamlin is six points behind
Brad Keselowski and seven
points behind leader Jimmie
Johnson.
Johnson starts 11th as he chas-
es history at Dover. He raced his
way into the tracks history
books in June with his seventh
win on the concrete, matching
the mark held by Hall of Fame
drivers Richard Petty and Bobby
Allison.
No active driver owns the
track like the five-time Sprint
Cup champion. Johnson led 289
of the 400 laps and looked every
bit like the driver who swept the
two Cup races at Dover in 2002
and 2009. Johnson also won at
Dover on Sept. 26, 2010 and he
won the September 2005 race.
Dover has traditionally given
Hamlin fits. He has an average
finish of 20.5 in 13 career starts
at Dover. He finished 36th or
worse during a four-race stretch
from 2007 to 2009. Hes said he
just doesnt like the track known
as the Monster Mile.
Hamlin won his 12th career
pole, third this season, and, no
surprise here, his first pole at
Dover. He had never started bet-
ter than third.
Nine other Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship driv-
ers filled the top 13. Clint Bo-
wyer starts second and Martin
Truex Jr. is third. Greg Biffle
and Jeff Gordon start sixth and
seventh. Kasey Kahne, Keselow-
ski, Johnson, Matt Kenseth and
Kevin Harvick are ninth through
13th. Stewart starts 24th and
Dale Earnhardt Jr. is 25th for
Sundays 400-mile race.
N A S C A R
Monster Mile pole
claimed by Hamlin
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 11C
S P O R T S
NEW YORK The best that
can be said about back-to-back
days of negotiations between the
NHL and the locked out players
association is that the sides are
still talking and making more
plans to meet yet again.
While core economic issues
still werent on the agenda Satur-
day when the opposing groups
got together again at the NHL of-
fice, dialogue continued on sec-
ondary topics that will ultimately
go toward forming a new collec-
tive bargaining agreement.
NHLPlayers Association head
Donald Fehr and NHL Commis-
sioner Gary Bettman held a sec-
ond round of private talks Satur-
day in an effort to move closer to
an agreement that would end the
ongoing lockout.
While negotiating teams from
the union and the league dis-
cussed definitions of what makes
up hockey-related revenue the
pool of money the sides are try-
ing to figure out how to split up
Fehr and Bettman talked
about the differences that are
keeping the sides apart.
I spent a fewminutes withGa-
ry talking about the overall situa-
tion, and we agreed to keep in
touch, Fehr said Saturday. I am
sure we will talk again (Sunday).
I dont know whether will meet
again (Sunday). That remains to
be seen.
I am not going to talk about
the specifics, but in general were
tryingtodiscuss howdowefinda
way to make an agreement. How
dowebridgethegaponthemajor
issues that are between us.
The sides met for about four
hours before finishing Saturday,
and they agreed to meet again on
Sunday. The agenda likely will in-
clude discussions on health and
safety issues a topic that made
up a chunk of Fridays talks
and miscellaneous legal things,
such as grievances, game tickets
and other topics.
Clarifications as to what will
fall under the umbrella of hockey-
related revenue going forward in
the next agreement dominated
discussions Saturday. No con-
crete resolutions were made, and
the topic could be revisited on
Sunday.
I amnot sure if we have identi-
fied discrepancies, NHL Deputy
Commissioner Bill Daly said. I
think the nature of what we were
trying to do today was to create
certainty on interpretations
weve had over seven years of this
CBA operation.
The sides talked for a second
straight day on matters separate
from the core economic issues
that ultimately will have to be
hammered out. In the recently
expired collective bargaining
agreement between the league
and the union, the players re-
ceived a 57 percent share of hock-
ey-related revenue.
The NHL wants to cut the
number down to under 50 per-
cent in the new deal. The league
imposed a lockout on Sept. 16,
whenthe previous agreement ran
out, and the sides didnt meet
again until Friday.
Their position on the big stuff
has been that a major move con-
sists of changing the players
share from a reduction of 24 per-
cent to 17
1
2 percent, Fehr said.
Our initial proposal made a
move in their direction. We have
amplified that by giving them
several different ideas to consid-
er about how to lengthen the
agreement to how to be more in
line with what they wanted.
Fehr said discussing what ex-
actly makes up hockey-related
revenue is significant, because
that will determine how much
money is there to be divided.
Today was mainly on HRR is-
sues: definitions, clarifications
and so forth, NHLPlayers Asso-
ciation special counsel Steve
Fehr said. Saturdays talks came
two days after the league can-
celed the remaining preseason
games. The regular season is
scheduled to start on Oct. 11.
N H L L O C K O U T
Little gets accomplished, but sides are still talking
By IRA PODELL
AP Sports Writer
Coal Street.
Its attention I would not be
able to give them in Pittsburgh
running a camp.
And it could prove crucial af-
ter the lockout ends.
Last season, Bylsma said,
players with Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton connections played in
almost 200 games for Pitts-
burgh. The link between the
AHL and NHL club is vital, and
Bylsma is paying close atten-
tion to the players who no
doubt will come to Pittsburgh
and be asked to contribute at
some point.
For me to see these guys on
the ice and get to know them a
little better is really important
for me as a coach, he said.
Its also important to the
players, who dont have the
added bonus of showcasing
their talents at an NHL camp
this year.
In fact, the lockout may pro-
vide the AHL Penguins with
more opportunity in the long
run since Byslma and other
Pittsburgh management will
be giving them their undivided
attention.
The reality of it is this is
one of the best environments
they can be in, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton head coach John
Hynes said. Its probably the
longest and most intense look
most of these guys will get.
The opportunity to skate
with the players in Wilkes-
Barre is also a benefit for By-
lsma personally. Unlike the
players, there isnt the option
to go overseas and coach. Still,
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton train-
ing camp is a way to get on the
ice and stay involved with
hockey.
I felt like a kid getting on
the ice and being able to work
with these players, he said. I
felt excited and rejuvenated.
Bylsma will stay with the
team until Sunday before head-
ing back to Pittsburgh. Pitts-
burgh assistant coach Todd
Reirden will come to town next
week to work with the team, as
will other coaches in the orga-
nization.
For all of them, the AHL of-
fers a brief escape from the
lockout that has left coaches
somewhat caught in the mid-
dle.
Theres no side for me, By-
lsma said. You spend a month-
and-a-half preparing for train-
ing camp, and Im still waiting
for that opportunity.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
While the NHL lockout has wiped out the preseason, Pittsburgh head coach Dan Bylsma, center,
is in town to help out with Wilkes-Barre/Scrantons training camp.
BYLSMA
Continued from Page 1C
CAMP NOTES
With some of his players spending the lockout playing hockey
in other parts of the world, Pittsburgh coach Dan Bylsma said it
doesnt make him nervous. I dont think of life that way, he said,
referencing his NHL playing days with Anaheim. Teemu Selanne
drove cars fast in the summertime and wrecked in Finland, but we
didnt spend the summertime worried about Teemu Selanne
driving cars.
While the lockout continues, Bylsma and his team will have to
continue their wait to redeem themselves after last seasons
disappointing first round playoff exit to the Philadelphia Flyers.
The way the series went and how it started, its not something
that would sit well with either coach, Bylsma said. Having lost
to Philly with the expectations we had, certainly made for some
soul-searching over the summer. Redeeming that situation
thats not going to come until the playoffs come around.
WBS Penguins coach John Hynes said enforcer Steve
MacIntyre could join training camp soon. Were just working out
some things contractually. Its still in the plans.
A A A 4 0 0
L I N E U P
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 159.299.
2. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 159.264.
3. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 159.2.
4. (22) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 158.758.
5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 158.667.
6. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 158.541.
7. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 158.444.
8. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 158.297.
9. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 158.256.
10. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 158.151.
11. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 158.089.
12. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 157.992.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 157.971.
14. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 157.971.
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 157.95.
16. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 157.819.
17. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 157.784.
18. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 157.653.
19. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 157.604.
20. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 156.958.
21. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 156.924.
22. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 156.829.
23. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 156.631.
24. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 156.597.
25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 156.542.
26. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 156.488.
27. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 156.297.
28. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 156.23.
29. (91) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 156.223.
30. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 156.182.
31. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 156.02.
32. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 155.885.
33. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 155.709.
34. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 155.44.
35. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 155.38.
36. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 155.253.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 155.059.
38. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 155.025.
39. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 154.646.
40. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (37) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 155.025.
Failed to Qualify
44. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 154.759.
45. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 154.639.
46. (49) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 154.467.
47. (33) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 153.741.
48. (79) Kelly Bires, Ford, 153.682.
The Sprint Cup contender
is currently in third place
in the Chase for the Cup.
By DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
Hamlin
DOVER, Del. Joey Logano
dominated on the concrete to
winthe Nationwide Series race at
Dover International Speedway.
Logano raced to his series-
leading seventh victory of the
season Saturday, winning for the
16th time in Nationwide.
Paul Menard was second, fol-
lowed by Michael Annett, points
leader Elliott Sadler and Kyle
Busch.
Logano swept the Dover races
this season. He powered his way
to the leadwithsix laps left inthe
June race.
This win was easier. He led184
of the 200 laps in the No. 18 Toyo-
ta. Logano moved into a tie for
16th on the on
career victory
list in the sec-
ond-tier circuit.
My monster
trophy from
last time was
lonely and
needed a
friend, Logano said. Im glad I
was able to get one for him.
Darrell Wallace Jr. finished
12th after winning the pole earli-
er Saturday. He is the first black
driver to win a NASCAR pole in
the Nationwide Series.
Sadler has nine-point lead over
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. in the points
race. Stenhouse was ninth in the
race.
Joey Logano dominates
Nationwide race at Dover
The Associated Press
Logano
account for nearly half of the
teams goals entering Fridays
game.
Its an accomplishment to
score against the boys because
a lot of them are doubting the
girls playing up front, Mosier
added. There is a little more
satisfaction knowing I beat a
boy.
They all have started at
some point this season and
have helped the team in other
ways as well.
I think they got some of
the guys to actually step it up
a little bit, GAR coach Len
Witczek said. Theyre a lot
tougher than most teams
think they are and they do
step it up a lot. Its been in-
teresting if nothing else be-
cause they are better with
their touches and guys are a
lot crisper with their passes,
so its been a good thing.
One would think that girls
playing with so many boys on
the field cant be a good thing
because the boys sport is
much more physical. And
theyre not getting any differ-
ent treatment from opponents,
either.
Ive got 12 freshmen on this
team and I was afraid they
would be a little more timid
and back off them, so I re-
minded them theyre on a
boys team and theyre going to
play just like they would any
other boy, said Meyers coach
Jack Nolan after a recent
match against the Grenadiers.
Theyre going to be as phys-
ical as they need to be be-
cause I know the girls are go-
ing to be physical with us. I
basically told them if they
knock you down, theyre going
to step on you. I told them
that they cant back off be-
cause theyre a girl.
The four girls also played on
teams with boys when they
were younger, so they were
ready for the challenge. And
although the physicality is
more daunting when there are
11 boys on the field for the
other team, they can handle it.
Theyre really pushy, unlike
the girls. But its nothing seri-
ous. Nothing to worry about,
Mosier noted. The girls can
handle themselves out there.
They have not only handled
themselves, they have impact-
ed their entire team and their
opponents.
FOURSOME
Continued from Page 1C
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Paige Elmy is a member of the
GAR boys soccer team this
season.
from 12 feet. That gives us a
chance. Its been done before
in the past. Tomorrow is a big
day.
Only one team has ever ral-
lied from four points behind
on the final day the United
States in that famous come-
back at Brookline in 1999. Ola-
zabal remembers it well. He
was in the decisive match
when Justin Leonard rolled in
a 45-foot birdie putt on the
17th hole.
Is the Spaniard a big believ-
er in fate?
I believe momentum will
come our way, Olazabal said.
Why not tomorrow?
The final two matches Sat-
urday were a showcase of what
the Ryder Cup is all about
one brilliant shot after anoth-
er, birdies on every hole, sus-
pense at every turn.
Luke Donald and Sergio
Garcia were on the verge of
blowing a 4-up lead to hard-
charging Tiger Woods and
Steve Stricker, hanging on
when Donald matched two
birdies with Woods, including
a tee shot into the 17th that
plopped down 2 feet from the
cup.
Their 1-up win kept Woods
winless for the first time in a
Ryder Cup going into Sunday.
Woods and Stricker lost all
three of their matches, even
though Woods made five bird-
ies on the back nine for the
second straight day.
Woods was thinking more of
the big picture.
Being up four is nice, he
said. We are in a great spot
right now to win the cup.
Poulter and Rory McIlroy
were 2 down with six holes to
play against Jason Dufner and
Zach Johnson when McIlroy
made a 15-foot birdie putt on
the 13th, and Poulter took it
from there.
We had to make birdies,
and wow! Five in a row. It was
awesome, Poulter said. Ive
got the world No. 1 at my side,
backing me up. It allowed me
to hit some golf shots.
The crowd was still buzzing
as it filed out of Medinah, and
Poulter grinned.
Its pretty fun, this Ryder
Cup, said Poulter, who raised
his career record to 11-3-0.
Its been plenty fun for the
Americans, who have not lost
any of the four sessions since
the Ryder Cup switched to the
current format in 1979. Mick-
elson and Bradley were flaw-
less in foursomes, matching a
Ryder Cup record for largest
margin with a 7-and-6 win
over Donald and Lee West-
wood.
Mickelson and Bradley have
been so dominant that they
have yet to play the 18th hole
in any of their three matches.
They didnt play in the after-
noon, part of the master plan
by U.S. captain Davis Love III
to make sure his players were
fresh for Sunday. Love became
the first U.S. captain since
1979 to make sure each of his
players sat out at least one
match before the final day.
Now, he finds out if it will
work.
Were not disappointed,
Love said of the late rally by
Europe. We havent lost a seg-
ment yet, and were just going
to try to keep that string go-
ing.
COMMAND
Continued from Page 1C
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 62/53
Average 67/47
Record High 85 in 1921
Record Low 29 in 2000
Yesterday 7
Month to date 102
Year to date 104
Last year to date 81
Normal year to date 141
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date 5.02
Normal month to date 3.93
Year to date 27.34
Normal year to date 28.96
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 0.95 0.30 22.0
Towanda 0.78 0.31 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.81 1.05 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 58-66. Lows: 45-48. Expect show-
ers and isolated thunderstorms today.
Tonight will be mostly cloudy.
The Poconos
Highs: 68-73. Lows: 54-58. Mostly cloudy
to partly sunny with isolated showers
today. Partly cloudy overnight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 58-59. Lows: 42-49. Expect show-
ers and thunderstorms today, with a few
showers lingering into tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 70-73. Lows: 53-55. Skies will be
partly to mostly cloudy today. Look for
decreasing clouds overnight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 72-74. Lows: 52-60. Skies will be
partly sunny today and partly cloudy
overnight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 42/34/.10 45/30/pc 45/28/pc
Atlanta 84/68/.00 74/65/r 75/63/t
Baltimore 69/55/.00 74/53/pc 74/59/pc
Boston 57/54/.02 63/53/sh 71/56/s
Buffalo 64/45/.00 59/49/sh 66/54/pc
Charlotte 73/63/.07 76/63/pc 73/66/sh
Chicago 78/48/.00 64/50/pc 71/54/pc
Cleveland 67/42/.00 61/49/sh 63/52/pc
Dallas 73/69/.73 81/62/pc 84/60/pc
Denver 75/50/.00 76/48/t 78/50/s
Detroit 72/47/.00 62/48/pc 67/53/pc
Honolulu 84/74/.00 85/70/s 84/70/pc
Houston 79/73/.34 81/64/t 83/62/pc
Indianapolis 72/51/.00 68/48/pc 69/49/pc
Las Vegas 93/70/.00 98/72/s 98/73/s
Los Angeles 75/65/.00 84/67/s 93/67/s
Miami 89/75/.00 90/78/t 89/79/t
Milwaukee 74/51/.00 61/48/s 67/53/pc
Minneapolis 81/51/.00 79/54/s 71/50/pc
Myrtle Beach 82/70/.00 79/66/c 82/71/t
Nashville 76/62/.00 74/57/pc 70/55/sh
New Orleans 77/73/.36 79/68/t 79/67/pc
Norfolk 70/61/.03 76/59/pc 76/67/sh
Oklahoma City 72/68/.14 79/56/pc 82/59/s
Omaha 78/42/.00 83/50/s 74/51/pc
Orlando 90/72/.00 91/74/t 92/74/t
Phoenix 94/75/.00 101/76/s 103/77/s
Pittsburgh 64/41/.00 62/45/t 64/50/pc
Portland, Ore. 71/61/.00 78/51/s 82/55/s
St. Louis 74/52/.00 75/55/pc 71/52/pc
Salt Lake City 81/54/.00 81/55/s 81/57/s
San Antonio 83/71/.63 80/62/pc 81/61/pc
San Diego 82/67/.00 84/69/s 88/69/s
San Francisco 66/55/.00 87/61/s 86/62/s
Seattle 66/58/.00 69/51/s 72/51/pc
Tampa 89/75/.00 90/76/t 89/76/t
Tucson 91/66/.00 95/66/s 96/69/s
Washington, DC 71/59/.00 75/55/pc 73/59/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 59/52/.00 59/52/pc 62/53/sh
Baghdad 102/70/.00 104/69/pc 106/72/s
Beijing 77/46/.00 78/56/s 76/55/pc
Berlin 66/46/.00 61/41/pc 63/44/c
Buenos Aires 70/59/.00 74/58/c 72/54/sh
Dublin 57/43/.00 61/46/sh 56/41/sh
Frankfurt 66/43/.00 62/44/s 63/42/c
Hong Kong 88/79/.00 85/72/pc 84/77/pc
Jerusalem 98/72/.00 88/66/pc 86/65/pc
London 61/48/.00 60/58/c 63/49/c
Mexico City 77/61/.00 73/55/t 68/55/t
Montreal 55/50/.00 53/50/sh 61/50/sh
Moscow 57/48/.00 55/46/sh 51/46/c
Paris 64/46/.00 61/44/s 62/53/c
Rio de Janeiro 75/64/.00 76/59/pc 83/66/s
Riyadh 99/70/.00 100/72/s 98/70/s
Rome 90/63/.00 76/63/r 76/63/pc
San Juan 92/79/.00 89/79/t 88/79/t
Tokyo 79/72/.00 81/68/sh 82/68/pc
Warsaw 70/43/.00 62/42/s 61/47/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
72/56
Reading
70/49
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
63/48
64/48
Harrisburg
69/49
Atlantic City
73/57
New York City
70/56
Syracuse
58/49
Pottsville
66/45
Albany
63/48
Binghamton
Towanda
59/47
62/45
State College
64/42
Poughkeepsie
67/47
81/62
64/50
76/48
85/61
79/54
84/67
83/61
80/54
77/46
69/51
70/56
62/48
74/65
90/78
81/64
85/70
47/37
45/30
75/55
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:00a 6:46p
Tomorrow 7:01a 6:45p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 6:48p 7:30a
Tomorrow 7:19p 8:30a
Last New First Full
Oct. 8 Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 29
As we head into
October, it looks
like we could see
a bit of a warm
up with a few
rain showers
mixed in. Mostly
cloudy condi-
tions will stay
with us for
today, with light
scattered show-
ers throughout
the day. The rst
of October looks
like it will be
mostly sunny
with a high of 67.
We will have rain
showers on
Tuesday and
Wednesday with
cloudy skies.
Partly cloudy
skies will return
on Thursday, but
fade away come
Friday afternoon.
Rain showers are
in the forecast
for Friday after-
noon and
evening. After
the front passes
through,
Saturday will be
partly sunny but
much cooler
with a high of
only 60.
-Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: Heavy rain and thunderstorms will accompany a low pressure system slowly
making its way east through the Gulf states today. Showers should reach the Southeast later in the
afternoon. Expect showers and a few thunderstorms over parts of the Northeast and across the
Rockies and High Plains, as well. The West Coast will see sunny and very warm conditions.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Mostly cloudy with
light showers
MONDAY
Partly
cloudy
67
47
WEDNESDAY
Clouds,
rain
possible
76
59
THURSDAY
Partly
cloudy
75
60
FRIDAY
Clouds,
p.m. rain
70
55
SATURDAY
Partly
cloudy
60
50
TUESDAY
Cloudy
with rain
showers
67
53
64

47

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
timesleader.com
W
hether or not you think the
Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs casino has been good
for the region, theres no question the
man who nursed it to life and nurtured
its expansion has been an asset and his
contributions to the community will be
missed.
Bobby Soper has been tapped for an
even bigger challenge in taking the
reins of the struggling Mohegan Sun
tribal casino in Connecticut. Battered
by reluctant consumers, massive debt
and ballooning competition, the once-
mighty flagship of the Mohegan Tribal
Gaming Authority needs new lead-
ership and a new vision the colloquial
term focused like a laser could not be
more appropriate.
Those whove come to know Soper
since he arrived here in 2005 with the
mandate to turn a down-at-the-heels
harness track into a gleaming palace of
gambling and entertainment have seen
that in practice. The local Mohegan
Sun operation has grown steadily,
reaching each milestone on or under
deadline. All along the way, Sopers
insistence on putting the patron experi-
ence above other considerations has
been clear and thats surely one thing
that caught the eye of the management
in Connecticut.
We had some things in common
when my wife and I sought out Bobby
and his wife Jackies company when
they first arrived. In those early con-
versations, when I expressed reserva-
tions about gamblings social and eco-
nomic effects, he made the case that if
done properly it was a legitimate form
of entertainment for many people. I
remained skeptical, but had to admit
the gamblers I interviewed were not
the wild-eyed dupes I had imagined.
Meanwhile, Bobby seemed to devote
as much time and effort to the commu-
nity as he did to the casino, serving on
boards, hosting events and helping to
promote worthwhile causes. A lot of
businesspersons do this, and not just
for altruistic reasons. Relationships
built rubbing shoulders with the mov-
ers and shakers can come in handy
when trying to attract new business or
take out a loan. Except Soper didnt
need either; his clientele was diverse
and growing and the casino operated
like a prosperous island in a sea of
mediocrity.
Soper was more than just a fig-
urehead or a name, said Charles Bar-
ber, CEO of the Luzerne Foundation,
impressed by the commitments Soper
made at a time he had more than
enough on his plate in building a huge
business and raising a family.
Not that Bobby isnt a hard-nosed
businessman when necessary. One
example came when he led a fight
against the supposedly onerous 55
percent state tax rate on casino slot
machine revenue, going so far as to
threaten the Mohegans might pull out
if the rate wasnt lowered. It wasnt,
they stayed and both sides have done
well.
Im still not convinced gambling will
be a long-term net gain for the area;
while Soper was generous with his
time and talent and made an effort to
partner with local businesses, in the
end a casinos goal is to keep all the
money within its walls. So far there has
been little development around the
Downs property, as the casino caters to
gamblers needs with restaurants, bars
and shops that line the gaming floor.
My relationship with Soper has been
mutually beneficial, and we both know
it. I got information and access to bet-
ter tell the casinos story to readers and
he was a constant presence in the
news, carefully making the case for the
business to a skeptical public.
Community relations can work the
same way, and I hope Bobbys depar-
ture does not diminish the casinos
commitments. It is a huge economic
engine, but to be a respected member
of the community it must continue to
share its good fortune.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
Downs CEO
moved beyond
core business
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
THE WILKES-BARRE
Family YMCA, in
conjunction with the
Greater Scranton,
Pittston and Carbon-
dale YMCAs and the
Shoppes at Montage,
has partnered with new lifestyle blog
Eventful Moms to help NEPA fam-
ilies save big this Halloween.
Visit your local Y through Oct. 10
and drop off a gently used Halloween
costume for kids, adults or petsand
youll receive an Eventful Moms token
good for another gently used Hallo-
ween costume to be redeemed on Oct.
13. If you have multiple costumes to
donate, youll receive a token for each
costume you swap.
On Oct. 13, stop by the former Fa-
mous Footwear store at the Shoppes
at Montage from10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to
select your costume of choice. You
can also donate costumes without
swapping. Leftover costumes will be
donated to charity or saved for next
year.
For more information call Jenna
Urban at 499-7690 or email event-
fulmoms@gmail.com.
I told you a few weeks ago that JC
Penney was reviving its free kids hair-
cuts promotion in November, but
altered it so its only kids from K-6
grades and only on Sundays. Well
theyve announced another free hair-
cut promotion, this time for breast
cancer survivors during the month of
October. Call your local salon to verify
participation and make an appoint-
ment.
Ive had some nice feedback from
parents who have learned about
Lowes free kids workshops through
this column and have fallen in love
with the fun, hands-on projects their
wee ones have built for free. Ive also
heard from a Home Depot employee
letting me know that home improve-
ment store does something similar.
So Ill make both chains and plenty
of parents and children happy with
these two items:
You can take your kids to Home
Depot this Saturday for a free kids
workshop to make a Fire Truck from 9
a.m. to noon. Supplies are free. All
kids get to keep their craft and receive
a free Kids Workshop apron, com-
memorative pin and certificate of
achievement. Workshops are designed
for children ages 5-12. Call your local
Home Depot to verify participation.
Register now to enjoy the free
Lowes Build & Grow Kids Clinic at 10
a.m. on Oct. 27. Kids will have fun
building a Creepy Keeper and get a
free apron, project patch and project
kit. Register early as each clinic has
only between 50 and 100 spots and
they fill up fast. Recommended ages
are 5 to 12 but you can bring younger
children if you can provide them the
help and supervision they need. Go
to: https://www.lowesbuildand-
grow.com/pages/default.aspx to
register.
Check out the front of todays
Times Leader for a $5 off $50 pur-
chase coupon for all Schiels Family
Markets. Its good all week.
Theres also a nice glossy pullout
from our friends at Wendys with over
$20 worth of money saving coupons
including one for a free small chili or
sour cream and chives baked potato
with any purchase.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269.
Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrewSeder
Halloween costume swap helps make holiday a little sweeter
A
USTIN, Texas If good help is hard to find, just how
expendable is expertise?
Ina year of strife betweenworker andmanager, NFLreferees
found themselves with a bargaining chip that Chicago teach-
ers, striking bulldozer builders and locked-out sugar makers
lacked: a staggering blunder by overmatched replacements,
resultingina worst-case, told-ya-sofiascolaidbare for millions
to watch in disbelief on na-
tional television.
On Thursday, the NFL and the ref-
erees union ended a three-month
stalemate, three days after the Green
Bay Packers lost a game they would
havewonif not for a less adept crewof
replacement officials.
The whole mess and pretty
much everyone involved agrees it is
precisely that puts the spotlight on
a nebulous notion that is often over-
looked when it works as its supposed
to: the question of expertise.
Workers leverage theirs bygoingon
strike, while lockouts are a bet by
management that they can make do
without it. Its animpasse that usually
plays out on picket lines and private
bargaining tables, and the fight has
trended in recent years toward man-
agement.
But few unions have benefited as
much as the NFLs striped shirts from
such a high-profile validation of the
value of expertise. From the Atlantic
to the Pacific, from rank-and-file la-
borers tothe most senior of American
managers, this one has hit home.
The big difference is that 100 mil-
lion people can see football on TV, so
the mistakes are glaring, said Mark
Froemeke, whos been locked out of
his job as a loader-operator at an
American Crystal Sugar Co. plant in
East Grand Forks, Minn., for 14
months.
Froemeke saidhe knows the people
hired as replacements for the 1,300
locked-out union workers inside the
plants are bumbling with beet slicers
and unable to dry pulp in techniques
passed down through generations. If
the farmers and the management
AP PHOTO
Members of the Utility Workers Union of America Local 1-2 participate in a march and rally in support of locked
out Consolidated Edison workers at Union Square in New York. Consolidated Edison locked out 8,000 workers in
July and brought in replacements from other states to work power lines and operate the grid. It ended just as
severe storms hit and threatened power outages.
QUESTIONING QUALITY
In NFL ref woes, key role of expertise spotlighted
Its just so obvious that people couldnt be replaced and get the same result.
Ken Margolies
Senior associate at the Worker Institute at Cornell University referring to the NFL replacement referee debacle
By PAUL J. WEBER Associated Press
See EXPERTISE, Page 2D
JARONU, Cuba Cubas signature
industry is showing signs of life two
years after the worst harvest in more
than a century.
With world market prices rebound-
ing, sugar is suddenly more profitable,
and a radical reorganization of the sec-
tor couldoffer a blueprint for howtolift
the rest of the islands inefficient com-
mand economy.
The Cuban sugar industry is tied to
the culture, history and identity of this
country, said Liobel Perez, spokesman
for Azcuba, the largely autonomous
state-run company that replaced the
Sugar Ministry in late 2011. Sugarcane
will not define Cubas future, but it will
have to be a part of it.
Just two years ago, the sugar indus-
try was on its knees.
The sugar minister had been sacked.
State-run newspapers lambasted ram-
pant inefficiency and thousands of
workers were moved to other sectors.
Eventually, the powerful Sugar Minis-
try itself was eliminated.
Even with the current reorganiza-
tion, sugar revenues arefar outpacedby
sectors such as tourism and nickel
mining.
Last year, sugar earnings were $333
million, while nickel brought in $1.25
billion, according to a study compiled
by Rafael Romeu, a U.S.-based econo-
mist and former president of the Asso-
ciation for the Study of the Cuban
Economy. Tourism brought in $2.5 bil-
lion in revenue in 2011, according to
government figures.
President Raul Castro created Azcu-
ba as part of his effort to stimulate the
farm sector and streamline a fossilized
Marxist economy that even he says
doesnt work anymore.
Unlike virtually every other part of
the state-dominated economy, Azcuba
gets to keep 65 percent of its revenues
and make decisions about reinvesting
without having to ask permission from
the central government.
At the Brasil refinery, the mammoth
rust-covered sheds installed by Amer-
Cuban sugar looks to rebound after bitter decline
By ANDREA RODRIGUEZ
Associated Press
See SUGAR, Page 2D
NEWYORKStarting a business
in a tough economy taught entrepre-
neurs Chuck Tanowitz and Todd Van
Hoosear the value of time.
The duo started Fresh Ground, a
public relations firm, in Boston in
early 2010. The recession was techni-
cally over, but many companies were
still feeling its effects. That translated
to some prospective clients trying to
get something for, well, very little.
Theyquicklylearnedtostructurecon-
versations with prospective clients so
they would knowearly on howmuch
money a client was willing or able to
spend rather than discovering at
the endof a long meeting that a client
had just $1,000 for a project.
We learned how to figure out
where to find the right (clients) pro-
spects versus the ones who are just
tire-kicking, Tanowitz says.
Conventional wisdom says dont
start a business during an economic
downturn. Based on government fig-
ures many people agree. In 2007,
there were 844,000 new startups in
theU.S. By2009, that numberhadfall-
en to just 700,000, according the Bu-
reau of Labor Statistics.
But a starting a company during
badeconomic times canbe goodbusi-
ness. It often teaches entrepreneurs
lessons that make them better busi-
ness owners and it can reap benefits
suchas savings onrents, products and
services and access to a better talent
pool.
In a downturn, entrepreneurs learn
how to be better business owners be-
SMALL TALK
Startups
find benefits
in bad times
AP PHOTO
Jeanine Hamilton, right, was
previously laid off from her job in
June 2008 and then started her
own business, Hire Partnership,
despite the poor economic times.
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
See STARTUPS, Page 2D
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
Q: My manager recently
gave me a performance warn-
ing for coming to work late.
She has started monitoring me
very closely, which makes me
feel like some sort of criminal.
I dont think I deserve to be
treated this way just because I
have poor time management
skills.
I used to have a friendly rela-
tionship with my boss, but now
I hardly speak to her at all. I
have applied for a position in
another department, but Im
afraid her feedback may keep
me from getting it. Is there
anything I can do to improve
this situation?
A: The most obvious thing
you can do is get to work on
time. Given that your manager
has issued a formal warning,
she must have been irritated
about your tardiness for quite
awhile. If you want her to rec-
ommend you for other jobs in
the company, then this is a
problem you have to fix.
Fortunately, tardiness is a
behavior that can be easily
modified. Even someone with
poor time management skills
has the ability to calculate the
travel time from home to office
and prepare accordingly. This
will undoubtedly require alter-
ing some long-established hab-
its, but if your career matters,
you must make the effort.
At the same time, you should
also reconsider your attitude,
because childishly snubbing
your boss is both self-defeating
and unjustified. By refusing to
tolerate tardiness, she is ac-
tually being a good manager.
Since all employees are expect-
ed to arrive on time, making an
exception for you would con-
stitute blatant favoritism.
If you can be both prompt
and pleasant for a sustained
period, your manager will un-
doubtedly decrease her moni-
toring. And if the rest of your
performance remains satisfac-
tory, she may eventually give
you a favorable recommenda-
tion.
OFFICE COACH
Dont rebel against
performance warning
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics. Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
Travelocity and Benco Dental
have been included on the list
representing 100 Best Places
to Work in PA by the part-
nership of Team Pennsylvania
Foundation, the PA Depart-
ment of Community and
Economic Development and
the Central Penn Business
Journal. Final rankings will be
awarded on Nov. 29.
Dan Hoppel, freight claims
adjustor for Golden Tech-
nologies, has been designated
the Employ-
ee of the
Month for
September.
Hoppel was
selected for
this honor
due to his
excellent
attendance
record, his cooperative atti-
tude, and his attention to
detail.
WVIA Public Media has won two
Mid-Atlantic Emmy Awards.
The WVIA programs honored
were the 2011 Little League
Challenger Exhibition Game
and Remembering the Scran-
ton Sirens.
Sordoni Construction Services
Inc. has been named 2012
Business Partner of the
Year by The University of
Scranton. Sordoni was select-
ed in recognition of outstand-
ing service and value provided
to the university. Recent
construction projects include
Pilarz and Montrone Halls, a
400-bed student housing and
fitness complex, and Mulberry
streetscape improvements.
Leonard Basara, electronics
mechanic for Tobyhanna
Army Depot, was recognized
for 40 years of service. Stan-
ley Sova, electronics worker,
and Robert Young, electron-
ics engineer, were recognized
for 30 years of service.
HONORS AND
AWARDS
Hoppel
BORTON-LAWSON
Thomas Kolesa, P.L.S., has been
selected to fill the health and
safety supervisor role. Kolesas
qualifications for this position
include completion of the 30-
hour OSHA construction training
program and 10 years of health
and safety experience.
CAN DO COMMUNITY
FOUNDATION
Dr. Anthony C. Falvello, Jennifer
A. Hopkins, John F. Patton, and
Krista L. Schneider, were re-
cently welcomed to the board of
directors.
KINGS COLLEGE
Mary OConnor, Michelle Oliva,
and Noemi Tlatenchi have been
named admission counselors.
Oliva is a 2006 graduate of
Kings College, OConnor earned
a bachelors degree from the
College of Holy Cross, and Tla-
tenchi graduated from Kings
College with a double major in
Spanish and elementary educa-
tion.
QUANDEL ENTERPRISES, INC.
Rosalie Gagliano has joined this
construction firm as payroll
accountant. Gagliano has been a
member of American Payroll
Association since 1992 and a
Certified Payroll Professional.
UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON
Full-time faculty members have
been appointed for the 2012-2013
academic year. Jessica M. Bar-
ber, lecturer of psychology.
James Boyle, faculty specialist in
the department of accounting in
The University of Scrantons
Kania School of Management.
Jeremy R. Brees, assistant
professor of management and
marketing. Scott P. Breloff,
assistant professor of exercise
science and sport. Ann E. Nan-
cy Cummings, lecturer in the
operations and information
management department. Mi-
chael W. Fennie, assistant pro-
fessor of chemistry. Jason M.
Graham, instructor of mathe-
matics. Clancy Harrison, lectur-
er in the exercise science and
sport department. Nicholas P.
Truncale, faculty specialist
within the physics and electrical
engineering department. Mary
A. Justis, lecturer in community
health education in the exercise
science and sport department.
Michael D. Ross, assistant pro-
fessor of physical therapy. Patri-
cia Wisniewski, lecturer in the
department of occupational
therapy.
CORPORATE LADDER
OConnor Oliva
Tlatenchi Gagliano
The Times Leader publishes announcements of business promotions, hirings
and other noteworthy events on Sundays. Photographs may be included as
space allows. Submit an announcement by email to tlbusiness@timeslead-
er.com, by mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711; or by fax to 829-5537.
Photos in jpeg format may be attached to emails.
MEMBERSHIP MEETING AND
HEALTHY WORKPLACE
AWARDS: Oct. 4, 7:30 a.m.,
Best Western East Mountain
Inn, Route 115, Plains Township.
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
membership meeting and
presentation of Healthy Work-
place Awards. $25 for mem-
bers; nonmembers $40. For
reservations or information,
email dsedor@wilkes-
barre.org or call 570-823-2101,
ext. 125.
COMMUNICATION EXCEL-
LENCE TRAINING: Oct. 10, 9
a.m.-4 p.m., Top of the 80s,
Sugarloaf Township. Topics
include communication chal-
lenges in todays workplace,
characteristics of effective
business messages, practicing
ethical communications,
designing and delivering oral
presentations, negotiation
skills and having the hard to
have discussions. Course
completion will earn six Gen-
eral HRCI recertification cred-
its. The cost is $145 for North-
east Pennsylvania Manu-
facturers and Employers
Association members and
$290 for nonmembers. For
information or to register, call
570-622-0992 or email crob-
bins@maea.biz.
HOLIDAY SALES OPPORTUNI-
TIES: Oct. 10, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Stone Hedge Golf Course in
Tunkhannock. Executives from
Condron and Company ad-
vertising agency will address
holiday sales opportunities. To
reserve seats, call 570-875-
8325 or by email Debo-
rah@wyccc.com. Seating
limited to one representative
per business.
DRESS FOR SUCCESS FUN-
DRAISER: Oct. 11, 5:30 p.m.,
Rodanos on Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre. Wine and appe-
tizer reception jewelry and
prizes donated by local mer-
chants. Continues with a
clothing sale through Sunday.
For more information, call
570-270-4949.
DISCOVERY BREAKFAST: Oct.
18, 8-9 a.m., Top of the 80s,
Sugarloaf Township. Participa-
nts will receive an overview of
the services available to
Northeast Pennsylvania Man-
ufacturers and Employers
Association member compa-
nies. Free, but registration
required; call 570-622-0992
or email gwhalen@maea.biz.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Send announcements of upcoming
events by email to tlbusi-
ness@timesleader.com; by mail to
Business Agenda, Times Leader, 15
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1
or by fax to 829-5537. Include a
contact phone number and email
address. The submission deadline
is Wednesday for publication on
Sunday.
want to be like the NFL owners
and deny it, thats what theyre
going to do. But nevertheless,
its the reality.
Ken Margolies, a senior asso-
ciate at the Worker Institute at
Cornell University, said the in-
stant upper hand that NFL refer-
ees commandeered this week is
increasingly rare for uniquely
skilled workers in labor dis-
putes. One major culprit is tech-
nology: tool-and-die workers in
the auto industry couldnt be re-
placed easily before automation,
and management can now out-
source jobs like customer ser-
vice to overseas.
The NFL referee lockout, he
said, is most recently compara-
ble to the 2007 writers strike in
Hollywood in terms of profile.
But Margolies said he couldnt
recall such a blatant example
where a labor standoff turned on
this kind of debacle.
Its just so obvious that peo-
ple couldnt be replaced and get
the same result, he said.
Attitudes about expertise can
also make it a risky hand to play
in a negotiation, depending on
whos on the other side of the ta-
ble. The idea that no one is irre-
placeable and theres always a
guy next in line willing to do the
job runs deep in America. Pro-
fessing expertise can also bring
on suspicions of elitism and
scratch an itch to knock some-
one down a peg.
Other work stoppages around
the U.S. this year also illustrate
the role of expertise, albeit in
varying ways:
In Houston, Adrianna Vas-
quez makes $8.60 an hour doing
what she knows people think is
the worlds most replaceable job:
Shes a janitor. When the 37-
year-old returned in August to
resume cleaning the 100 toilets
on 10 floors in a downtown
Chase Bank tower after a city-
wide janitor strike that won a 12
percent raise, Vasquez said the
bathrooms cleaned by replace-
ment crews lookedlike stalls ina
seedy bar. I just wanted to cry
when I saw it, she said.
In NewYork, Consolidated
Edison locked out 8,000 workers
in July and brought in replace-
ments from other states to work
power lines andoperatethegrid.
It endedjust as severe storms hit
and threatened power outages.
Not enough people that knew
what they were doing, said
John Melia, a spokesman for the
Local 1-2 of the Utility Workers
Union of America.
For American Crystal Sugar,
which locked out employees in
five factories in three states, vice
president Brian Ingulsrud ac-
knowledged the union workers
are very skilled and said it was
a big challenge to bring in re-
placements. He said the compa-
ny worked hard at training the
new workers in the months
when the plants were not proc-
essing beets.
It was a learning curve, there
was no doubt, Ingulsrud said.
Last year we did have some
bumps in terms of working
through that. We feel were on
the right side of the curve right
now.
EXPERTISE
Continued from Page 1D
cause they have to work harder to
get and keep customers, says Car-
oline Daniels, an Entrepreneur-
ship lecturer at Babson College in
Wellesley, Mass. In the days
when the economy is booming
and a lot of resources are around,
we get sloppy. We take customers
for granted, Daniels says. Inare-
cessionary period ... we need to
get to know our customers bet-
ter.
Fresh Grounds founders, who
decided to start their firm after
they were laid off from their jobs
in 2009, took lessons from some
disappointingclient meetings and
flippedthemintoastrategythat is
helpingthembuildtheir business.
The firms revenue has doubledin
the past year, according to Tano-
witz.
When Jeanine Hamilton start-
ed Hire Partnership, a staffing
company, inBostoninmid-2008it
lookedliketheworst possibletim-
ing. Companies were laying peo-
pleoff andtherewasverylittlehir-
ing going on. Like Tanowitz and
Van Hoosear, Hamilton also had
been laid off.
I didnt realize howbad the re-
cession was going to be I dont
think anyone knew right then,
Hamilton says.
Business was tough at first, but
Hamilton found that there were
benefits to launching in an eco-
nomic downturn. Because so
many people were unemployed,
she was able to get highly quali-
fied candidates that she could
sendout ontemporaryjobs andto
interviews. Because she was able
to pull together a large group of
strongtemporary workers andjob
candidates she developed a good
reputation that is serving her well
nowthat the economy is showing
signs of life. Since the middle of
her first year in business she says
revenue has climbed 4,000 per-
cent.
The recession not only helped
Hamiltonfindgoodpeoplefor her
clients, but gave her more time to
workonmakingher ownstaff bet-
ter. Since business was slow, she
spent more time on training with
her staff such as doing role-play-
ing exercises and listening to her
employees as they worked with
clients, andthengivingthemfeed-
back.
When you have crazy times,
you dont have time to do that,
she says.
STARTUPS
Continued from Page 1D
ican Sugar Refining Co., which launched
the plant in1921, still stand. Although sur-
rounded by the twisted carcasses of ma-
chinery ripped out of the structures, the
Brasil is expected to be ready for the up-
coming annual harvest and start milling
cane by February.
That would have seemed an unlikely
prospect during most of the last decade.
The plant mostly sat idle or was intermit-
tently used as a grain depot, with only 50
employees remaining from a workforce
that once numbered 500.
The refinery came back online briefly in
2008, only to be shuttered after two years
because it was so inefficient.
The Brasils near-demise mirrors sugars
decline from the times when it accounted
for 80 percent of Cubas export income,
principally from the nearby U.S. market
before relations between the two coun-
tries soured in the 1960s.
The crop fueled Cubas rum industry
and permeated popular culture. Iconic
singer Celia Cruz was famed for interject-
ing cries of Azucar! (sugar) in her
songs.
Over the decades since Cubas 1959 rev-
olution, bureaucratic mismanagement
created a slow-growing crisis that explod-
ed in 2002, said Arturo Lopez-Levy, a Cu-
baneconomist at theUniversityof Denver.
At that time, sugar sold for just 6 cents a
pound on world markets.
Cuban officials mothballed much of the
industry, shuttering100 of the islands 156
refineries and converting some 3 million
acres of cane fields to other crops.
Production plummeted. From a peak of
approximately 8 million tons in1989, sug-
ar output hit a105-year-lowof 1.1millionin
2010.
Now with sugar topping 20 cents a
pound worldwide, Cuba is newly motiva-
ted to revive the industry and stimulate
production.
Authorities have begun overhauling the
Brasil and other mills, paying farmers
more for cane and handing over fallow
land to private growers and agro-cooper-
atives. As with other sectors of the econo-
my, efficiency is the buzzword, and offi-
cials hope Azcuba will be more nimble
than the ponderous Sugar Ministry.
Wilson Morell, vice president of Azcu-
ba, set a goal of returning to 4 million tons
per year by modernizing the 56 refineries
still online, though he did not set a date.
That would achieve half of Cubas histor-
ical peak output with about a third of the
facilities.
Cuba acknowledges it still must address
issues suchas installingmodernirrigation
systems, improving the supply chain and
guaranteeing quality of cane sent to the
mills. Foreign investment in the sector is
nonexistent, thoughMorell andPerezsaid
negotiations are under way on possible
British investment in a bioelectrical plant
at one refinery.
Lopez-Levy, whose father was an engi-
neer in the industry, applauded measures
such as Azcubas financial independence.
But he cautioned that its too early to brag
about a major comeback, sayingit remains
to be seen whether the sector can over-
come the stubborn bureaucratic mindset
that has long plagued Cuba.
After so many disasters, a measure of
skepticism is realistic, the economist
said.
SUGAR
Continued from Page 1D
AP PHOTO
Workers irrigate a sugar cane field in Jaronu, Cuba. Just two years ago, Cubas
sugar industry was on its knees after the worst harvest in more than a century.
Now Cubas signature industry is showing signs of life.
WILKES WELCOMES NEWFACULTY
Wilkes University welcomed new faculty members at its fall convocation. New faculty
joining Wilkes University for the 2012-2013 are, from left, first row: Del Lucent, assistant
professor of physics; Maureen Schoch, assistant professor of nursing; Lori Ann Pajalich,
assistant professor of nursing; Pei Zhang, assistant professor of mathematics. Second
row: Morgan Clevenger, instructor of entrepreneurship; Lisbeth Turner, assistant profes-
sor of nursing; Christopher Henkels, assistant professor of chemistry; and Andrew Wilc-
zak, assistant professor of sociology.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
WELCOME TO THE FALL
The summer was great for stocks, but not so much for corporate profits.
September marks the close of the third quarter, and financial analysts
have low expectations. They say earnings fell from a year ago for five of
the 10 industries that make
up the S&P 500, with the
sharpest drop for energy
stocks. Coal producers in
particular are struggling,
because their power-plant
customers are switching to
burning natural gas, which is
cheaper.
Aluminum producer Alcoa
has traditionally been the
first major company to report
earnings each quarter, and
its scheduled for Oct. 9.
Analysts expect it to report a
drop of 93 percent.
ACTIVE LOSERS
Index mutual funds certainly arent sexy. They are content to simply
move up and down with the market, usually at a relatively low cost for
investors. Theyre not like actively managed mutual funds, where man-
agers try to own only win-
ners and beat the market.
Yet index funds are on
track to once again offer
better returns than most
actively managed funds.
Only 29 percent of large-
cap core mutual funds are
beating the S&P 500 in-
dex so far this year, ac-
cording to Goldman
Sachs. Last year, only 19
percent of them did so,
and the average over the
last 10 years is 40 per-
cent, according to S&P.
AP
STILL GLITTERING
Most commodities have lost their shine following a strong summer
rally. Excitement has faded that stimulus by the Federal Reserve
and other central banks will bolster the economy, and thus de-
mand for commodities. Crude oil fell 6 percent in the week follow-
ing the Feds stimulus announcement, coffee lost 5.7 percent and
corn lost 3.6 percent. An-
alysts at Barclays say
the declines could con-
tinue, except for gold.
The stimulus has raised
worries about inflation,
and investors have his-
torically bought gold
when theyre scared of
rising prices. Barclays
forecasts the price of
gold to average $1,810
per ounce in the last
three months of 2012. Source: FactSet
Expected 3Q growth in
earnings per share
Overall S&P 500
Energy
Materials producers
Telecom
Health care
Utilities
Consumer staples
Consumer discretionary
Technology
Industrials
Financials 10.3%
1.8
1.0
0.9
0.4
-0.5
-4.6
-9.9
-20.3
-21.2
-2.8
1,500
1,600
1,700
$1,800
Price of Gold
per ounce
O N D J F M A M J J A S
12
Sept. 28
$1,773.90
Title: Portfolio manager, Forward
International Real Estate fund
What he suggests: Consider
foreign real estate
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Michael McGowan
Being a foreign landlord can be
lucrative. Investors in mutual
funds that own global real
estate have seen some of the
best returns so far this year, an
average of 22 percent through
Tuesday. Michael McGowans
fund, Forward International Real
Estate (FFIRX) has returned 46
percent over the same time. He
explains the strong performance
for funds that specialize in office
buildings and other real estate in
foreign countries.
Whats behind the big jump for
global real estate?
Part of it is that last year wasnt
good. A lot of international stocks
sold off on fears about Europe.
So, some of that is just a rebound
from last year, when they were
down about 25 percent in the third
quarter.
The main reason why a lot of
overseas people buy real estate
is for asset protection. In times
of high inflation or in crisis, real
estate is something that has held
its value over long periods of
time. You have a very dim view
of currencies in Europe, because
of Germany (and its battles with
hyperinflation in the last century).
The idea of owning property in
Europe is deeply embedded. That
translates into demand for real
estate stocks. Asia is the same
thing: People want to pass down
property to the next generation.
Youre interested in companies
that do business in major
cities, like London, Paris,
Tokyo. Youre not worried that
those brand-name cities get
overpriced?
They will get overpriced at times,
just like any place will. But I want
to invest in a place that gets
demand after times of trouble. If
you look at longer-term cycles,
New York suffers in recessions
like any city, but then it comes
back. As long as the transporta-
tion is there, the knowledge, the
culture and the entertainment, it
will always come back.
Its a pretty basic real estate
premise: Going for supply
constrained areas versus going
for growth.
So I guess you like established
cities in developed markets. No
emerging markets?
I spent a lot of time in Manila and
Kuala Lumpur last month. Theyre
some of the best emerging
markets in terms of growth and
safety. They have better policies
than, say, China and better legal
systems than India or the Middle
East. Culturally, they are the capi-
tals of their countries. So if youre
a young person in the Philippines,
and youre smart, youre probably
going to want to move to Manila.
What about Canada?
They have dividend yields in the
4 to 6 percent range, and they
have good growth and good
corporate governance. And they
have a currency thats one of the
more stable ones. I have more
invested in Canada than Europe.
Im worried about the euro right
now.
Spanning the
globe
InsiderQ&A
AP
Fears of a rough-and-
tumble stock market have
become entrenched since
the financial crisis. But by
one popular measure, the
market is the calmest it has
been in five years.
The Chicago Board of
Options Exchange Volatility
Index has dropped to its
lowest level since June
2007.
The VIX, known as the
markets fear gauge, tends to rise when stocks fall,
and vice versa. Thats because the VIX reflects
investors expectations of how volatile the market
will be over the next 30 days, as measured by
options prices. Options are contracts to buy or sell a
stock at a specified price and time.
If investors expect the
market to move sharply,
theyre willing to pay more
for options, which offer
protection against fluctuating
stock prices. When options
are sold at higher prices, the
VIX rises.
The VIX usually ranges
between 18 and 30 points.
Yet it has been steadily
below that range for much of
the summer. It closed below
14 on August 13 for the first time since the
recession began. The VIX closed at 14.9 Thursday.
The last time it closed above 18 was Aug. 1.
Despite the recent calm, mutual fund investors
continue to be wary. They have pulled their cash
out of stock funds each month since March.
Alls quiet, for now
At ease: The Federal Reserves latest bond-buying program announced on Sept. 13, went further than
many investors expected and helped lower the VIX to its lowest point in more than five years.
500
1,000
1,500
2,000
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
0
30
60
90
S&P 500
VIX
Mark Jewell Jenni Sohn AP Source: FactSet; Investment Company Institute
80.9
Nov.20
14.8
Sept. 27
1,447.15
1,418.30
11.6
Dec. 29
Air Products APD 72.26 6 92.79 82.70 -1.17 -1.4 s s -2.9 +11.56 3 -1.0 15 3.1
Amer Water Works AWK 28.34 8 39.38 37.06 0.25 0.7 s s 16.3+25.91 225.8a 19 2.7
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.00 8 46.47 43.66 0.86 2.0 s s -4.9 +6.30 4 10.1 ... 7.3
Aqua America Inc WTR 20.16 7 26.93 24.76 0.49 2.0 t t 12.3+17.85 3 4.1 22 2.8
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 4 33.98 27.18 0.15 0.6 s t -5.0+12.37 3 -1.8 15 2.6
AutoZone Inc AZO 307.16 7399.10 369.67 -2.13 -0.6 s s 13.8+15.82 3 26.1 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 8 10.10 8.83 -0.28 -3.1 s s 58.8+44.93 2-25.1 9 0.5
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 8 24.95 22.62 -0.68 -2.9 s s 13.6+24.48 2-10.4 12 2.3
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 6 14.99 9.50 -1.00 -9.5 t s 181.9+95.17 1-15.1 ... 2.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 32.28 0 48.69 48.42 0.55 1.1 s s 18.7+45.97 1 4.9 17 1.3
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 8 49.89 47.17 0.07 0.1 s s 12.3+12.57 3 -2.3 10 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 31.67 7 41.25 37.93 -0.10 -0.3 s t 8.4+15.25 3 8.0 20 2.7
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.72 0 36.90 35.74 -0.48 -1.3 s s 50.8+73.49 1 9.1 20 1.8
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.86 9 29.50 28.19 -0.59 -2.1 s s 1.4+28.87 2 11.0 14 3.8
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 0 29.59 29.14 0.45 1.6 s s 67.0+75.12 1 -1.5 10 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 30.78 0 46.07 45.20 -0.01 0.0 s s 11.4+37.15 2 10.3 28 5.5
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 6 8.64 6.86 -0.35 -4.9 s s 11.5+30.67 2-16.6 10 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 6 15.90 13.12 -1.02 -7.2 t t 9.0+21.48 3 -6.8 22 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 5 7.19 4.92 -0.06 -1.2 s s -4.611.58 4 -8.7 31 8.1
Genpact Ltd G 11.76 9 17.70 16.68 -0.58 -3.4 s s 26.9+31.48 2 2.2 22 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 6.16 2 10.24 6.93 -0.16 -2.3 t t -23.814.33 4-15.5 ... 4.9
Heinz HNZ 48.54 8 58.31 55.95 -0.30 -0.5 s s 3.5+14.78 3 7.0 19 3.7
Hershey Company HSY 55.32 9 73.42 70.89 -0.79 -1.1 t t 14.7+22.17 3 10.8 24 2.1
Kraft Foods KFT 31.88 9 42.44 41.35 -0.43 -1.0 t s 10.7+26.59 2 6.4 20 2.8
Lowes Cos LOW 18.55 9 32.29 30.24 0.05 0.2 s s 19.1+59.36 1 2.9 20 2.1
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 0 95.98 95.16 0.17 0.2 s s 24.7+40.14 2 1.1 17 2.9
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.74 5102.22 91.75 -1.96 -2.1 s s -8.6 +7.66 4 13.8 17 3.4
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.47 7 24.10 22.07 -0.46 -2.0 s s -0.3+22.82 3 3.7 13 3.6
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 6.00 9 11.32 10.62 0.21 2.0 s s 35.5+60.67 1 0.3 38 ...
PNC Financial PNC 44.74 8 67.89 63.10 -2.75 -4.2 s s 9.4+34.05 2 0.6 13 2.5
PPL Corp PPL 26.68 7 30.27 29.05 0.32 1.1 t s -1.3 +6.80 4 -4.9 10 5.0
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 9 17.44 15.86 -0.15 -0.9 s s 51.9+113.20 1 -11.5 ... 4.0
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 9 73.66 70.77 0.22 0.3 t s 6.7+17.73 3 1.8 19 3.0
Philip Morris Intl PM 60.45 9 93.60 89.94 -1.35 -1.5 s s 14.6+49.25 126.3a 18 3.8
Procter & Gamble PG 59.07 0 69.97 69.36 -0.06 -0.1 s s 4.0+13.22 3 2.2 18 3.2
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 6 65.17 54.51 -2.44 -4.3 r s 8.8+19.42 3 -9.4 7 2.7
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 8 16.94 15.72 -0.57 -3.5 t s 17.3+30.08 2-19.9 9 3.2
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 9 51.25 49.50 -0.25 -0.5 s s 26.9 ... 0.0 ... 4.6
TJX Cos TJX 26.44 0 46.67 44.79 0.24 0.5 t s 38.8+63.35 1 26.1 20 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 0 31.87 31.75 0.48 1.5 s s 8.0+24.90 2 6.9 18 3.4
Verizon Comm VZ 35.17 0 46.41 45.57 -0.07 -0.2 s s 13.6+29.27 2 5.8 46 4.5
WalMart Strs WMT 50.80 0 75.24 73.80 -0.65 -0.9 s s 23.5+45.20 2 12.9 16 2.2
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 7 45.96 42.33 -0.11 -0.3 s t 6.0+20.16 3 2.9 14 2.8
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
The most popular stocks
Stock
Screener
Source: FactSet; Citi Research
Apple (AAPL) 22 $667.11 $354 $705 68.0% 1.6%
Microsoft (MSFT) 20 29.76 24 33 16.4 3.1
Wells Fargo (WFC) 17 34.53 23 37 41.2 2.6
Google (GOOG) 15 754.50 481 765 42.7 0.0
Philip Morris Intl. (PM) 15 89.94 60 94 41.9 3.8
Pfizer (PFE) 13 24.85 17 25 41.5 3.5
AT&T (T) 13 37.70 27 39 32.1 4.7
Chevron (CVX) 12 116.56 87 119 27.1 3.1
Home Depot (HD) 12 60.37 31 61 79.7 1.9
Merck (MRK) 11 45.09 31 46 41.2 3.7
Exxon Mobil (XOM) 10 91.45 69 93 26.9 2.5
Amazon.com (AMZN) 9 254.32 167 264 10.7 0.0
General Electric (GE) 9 22.71 14 23 47.0 3.0
LOW HIGH
DIVIDEND
YIELD
1-YR
STOCK
CHANGE CLOSE
# OF FUNDS
WITH STOCKAS
TOP 10 HLDG COMPANY
52-WEEK
Mutual fund managers
love Apple.
The iPad maker is a top
10 holding for nearly half of
the largest actively
managed U.S. stock mutual
funds, according to a review
by Citi Research. Its not a
huge surprise: Apple is also
the biggest stock in the
market.
But the popularity of
Apple is also emblematic of
a larger trend among the
largest mutual funds:
Technology stocks are hot.
Besides Apple, mutual
funds are also placing big
bets on Microsoft, Google
and Amazon.com.
This screen shows which
stocks appear most often
on the top-10 holdings lists
of the 50 largest actively
managed U.S. stock mutual
funds. Apple has become
more popular with this
group by the quarter. It was
a top 10 holding for 22 of
the 50 largest funds last
quarter. Thats up from 20 in
the first quarter of 2012 and
from 15 in the first quarter
of 2011.
American Funds BalA m ABALX 20.23 -.15 +1.9 +20.2/A +3.1/B
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.97 +.03 +.7 +7.0/C +4.0/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 52.87 -.49 +1.2 +17.3/A +.6/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 36.02 -.58 +2.5 +21.0/B -1.4/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 39.70 -.57 +3.3 +16.8/B -2.2/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 40.12 -.59 +2.5 +25.3/C +.4/C
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 33.86 -.49 +3.1 +24.9/B +.1/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 17.98 -.13 +1.8 +19.2/B +2.2/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 30.65 -.52 +1.4 +25.0/C -.2/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 30.34 -.50 +2.4 +21.0/B +.6/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 31.31 -.31 +1.5 +23.9/D +.5/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 19.57 -.18 +1.9 +12.2/D +2.6/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 19.67 -.18 +2.0 +12.5/C +2.9/A
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.83 -.08 +.9 +8.5/B +7.1/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 32.45 -1.05 +2.5 +14.8/C -3.7/B
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 118.94 -2.69 +2.7 +29.4/A -1.8/D
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 79.68 -.92 +3.1 +24.6/B +2.8/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 98.24 -2.07 +1.6 +26.4/B +4.4/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 39.19 -.55 +2.0 +23.8/C +3.6/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX 51.30 -.68 +2.4 +27.9/A +1.0/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.23 -.02 +1.9 +18.6/A +3.6/C
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.25 -.02 +1.8 +18.4/A +3.0/D
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 20.60 -.66 +1.0 +16.4/C -1.8/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 13.39 +.02 +2.2 +12.4/A +9.5/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 13.35 +.03 +2.2 +12.7/A +9.8/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 58.81 -1.58 +2.0 +18.8/A -2.2/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 29.09 -.35 +1.4 +15.5/D +3.8/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.67 -.04 +2.5 +15.3/ +6.7/
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.66 +1.0 +6.4/ +5.3/
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.58 +.01 +1.1 +11.0/A +8.5/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 11.58 +.01 +1.2 +11.2/A +8.7/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.58 +.01 +1.2 +11.4/A +8.9/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.58 +.01 +1.2 +11.1/A +8.6/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 49.53 -.32 +2.7 +9.3/E +8.0/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 26.11 -.47 +2.4 +27.4/B +.6/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 38.25 -.51 +2.3 +27.2/A +2.5/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.88 -.04 +2.3 +18.2/A +8.1/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 59.09 -.84 +1.8 +21.1/C +4.2/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.96 +.03 +1.1 +7.5/C +7.1/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 132.83 -1.74 +2.4 +28.0/A +1.1/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 132.83 -1.74 +2.4 +27.8/A +1.0/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.11 +.5 +4.2/B +6.8/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 131.95 -2.45 +2.4 +28.0/A +1.1/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 131.95 -2.46 +2.4 +28.0/A +1.1/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 32.44 -.62 +2.4 +28.1/A +1.6/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.42 +.07 +.7 +7.6/B +5.7/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.87 +.01 +.6 +4.4/B +4.4/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 13.70 -.13 +2.1 +18.7/C +1.7/B
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 11.20 +.04 +.5 +5.4/E +6.5/C
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 11.20 +.04 +.5 +5.4/D +6.6/C
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 14.23 -.27 +3.1 +14.1/C -4.5/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 35.85 -.50 +2.5 +28.0/A +1.6/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 35.85 -.50 +2.4 +28.0/A +1.6/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 35.84 -.50 +2.4 +27.8/A +1.5/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 59.28 -.45 +1.1 +16.1/A +6.9/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 34.23 -.38 +2.0 +20.0/A +3.9/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 59.11 -.68 +2.0 +20.1/A +4.0/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 52.19 -.65 +2.4 +28.7/A -.1/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 29.40 -.37 +2.3 +28.6/A -.2/C
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 12.98 -.05 +2.0 +11.9/ +2.5/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
-1.1%
+2.7%
Nasdaq
-2.0%
+1.6%
S&P 500
-1.3%
+2.4%
Russell 2000
-2.1%
+3.1%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
p
p
q
p
p
q
p
p
q
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+10.0%
+19.6%
+14.6%
+13.0%
Mortgage rates, yields fall again
Worries about a weak economy sent Treasury
yields lower last week. The yield on the 10-year
note fell below 1.7 percent, down from 3.7 percent
in early 2011. Lower yields helped push the aver-
age rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage to 3.4 per-
cent, a record low. Mortgage rates are getting an
extra shove lower by the Federal Reserve, which
is buying mortgage bonds to keep rates low.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Direxion US Govt MMF/Cl A 0.12 $ 25,000 min (800) 851-0511
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Alpine Municipal MMF/Inv 0.09 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578
Broad market Lehman 1.60 -0.13 t t -0.79 2.55 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moodys 3.37 -0.13 t t -0.73 4.18 3.22
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 2.81 -0.06 t t -1.03 4.03 2.81
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.18 -0.05 t t -0.74 5.05 4.18
U.S. high yield Barclays 6.55 0.31 t t -2.61 10.15 6.15
Treasury Barclays 0.91 -0.07 s t -0.20 1.34 0.80
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.09 -0.01 r s 0.07 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.19 -0.01 s t 0.03 0.25 0.10
6-month T-Bill 0.13 -0.01 r t 0.09 0.15 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.23 -0.03 s t -0.03 0.40 0.21
5-year T-Note 0.63 -0.04 s t -0.37 1.20 0.54
10-year T-Note 1.63 -0.12 s t -0.37 2.40 1.39
30-year T-Bond 2.82 -0.12 s s -0.24 3.48 2.45
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
7
7
6
5
0
2
Name That Company
ln 97, l was spun oll lromLhe Colum
bia BroadcasLinq SysLem(CBS). 1oday
l'ma Lop Video and Audio CommunicaLions
company, ollerinq enLerLainmenL around
Lhe qlobe. l oversee brands such as BL1,
M1V, VH, Nickelodeon, Nick aL NiLe, Comedy
CenLral, CenLric, CM1, Spike, 1V Land, Loqo,
1r3s, VlVA and ParamounL PicLures. Para
mounL is 00 years old Lhis year and remains a
ma|or producer and disLribuLor ol lilmed enLerLain
menL. My media neLworks reach abouL 700 million
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Palmolive. At the other end of the
spectrum are speculative stocks,
typically tied to young, relatively
unknown and risky companies.
Many promise great things, but have
yet to prove themselves. Examples
include gold miners or firms trying
to develop cures for cancer.
'Growth stocks, Iavored by
aggressive investors, tend to grow
faster than the market average.
They often dont pay any dividends,
using profits to fuel their growth.
Their stock prices can go up and
down quickly. (Telegraph and
fax-machine businesses were growers
once. Fortunes change over time.)
'Value stocks are Iavored by
investors looking to buy the prover-
bial dollar for 50 cents. They seek
promising companies that are tem-
porarily out of favor.
'Income stocks may not grow
too quickly, but they pay significant
dividends, ideally hiking them regu-
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stocks are often favored by those in
or near retirement, who seek income
to supplement pensions or savings.
Many companies fit into several
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both growing briskly and valued
attractively.
K_\ Dfkc\p =ffc KXb\
Shopping for Shops
Investors seeking income should
consider REITs (real-estate invest-
ment trusts), and among REITs, Retail
Opportunity Investments Corp. (Nas-
daq: ROIC) deserves consideration.
A REIT is a public company that
invests in real estate. Many REITs
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oIIice buildings. REITs aim to buy
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Our analysts like the companys
CEO, Stuart Tanz, who has been buy-
ing up shopping center properties in
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can West. Revenue has increased
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four quarters alone, that number has
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Just as important, the company is
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Retail Opportunity recently offered
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of Retail Opportunity and our news-
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Historical Prices
Q
Where can I look up how
much a stock traded for on a
particular day some years ago?
S.S., Spokane, Wash.
A
Try calling the companys
investor relations department
and asking. Another good resource
is your public library, where
librarians can help you look up
the price in newspaper archives
or elsewhere.
II you`re online, it`s much
easier. Click over to finance.
yahoo.com, type in the companys
ticker symbol, and once you get its
quote page, click on the Historical
Prices link in the blue box on the
left side of the page.
***
Q
Whats a pure play com-
pany? R.C., Springfield, Mo.
A
It`s a company that Iocuses
on one single business. When
investors are drawn to a particu-
lar industry, they may look for a
company thats a pure play, so
that their invested dollars wont be
spread out over other, less desir-
able businesses.
Massive conglomerate General
Electric, for example, is about as
far as you can get from a pure play,
making everything from security
systems to power-plant equipment
to aircraft engines, and with each
operation having varying profitabil-
ity characteristics.
II your research suggests that
cosmetics retailing should grow
briskly and you want to invest
in it, you might invest in
drugstores or department
stores that sell makeup.
They sell a lot of other items,
too, though, many of which might
grow less briskly and might thus
bring down the companys overall
growth rate. So instead, you can
look at Sally Beauty Holdings and
Ulta Salon, which are pure plays in
the business.
Coca-Cola is a beverage pure
play, unlike PepsiCo, which has a
giant snack operation in Frito-Lay.
(The Motley Fool owns
shares of and/or has recom-
mended Coca-Cola, PepsiCo
and Ulta Salon.)
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
see Write to Us
=ffcj JZ_ffc
Know Your Company
It`s important to have a handle on
the different kinds of companies out
there, lest you end up filling your
portfolio with too many of one type.
Here are some common types:
'Cyclical companies are very
tied to the economic climate. Dur-
ing downturns, people spend money
more conservatively, putting off
major purchases such as cars, wash-
ing machines and big trips. Thus,
makers of large appliances are
cyclical. Companies selling items
such as drugs, soap or energy are
'deIensive. II you`re taking heart
medications, youre not going to stop
because of a recession.
'Seasonal companies experi-
ence significantly different sales
at various times of the year. Many
retailers, for example, see sales
surge during the holiday season.
Tax-preparation and lawn-servicing
companies are also seasonal.
'Blue chip companies have
been around a long time and are
known for being solid, relatively
safe investments. Theyre steady
growers, usually paying dividends.
Examples: General Electric, Wal-
Mart, Caterpillar and Colgate-
2012 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 9/27/2012)
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
timesleader.com
SHARKARA Peters is
a 35-year-old single
mother of two. She
works 34 hours a week
at a fast-food restau-
rant. A few months
back, she was hospital-
ized with a blood clot
in her lung. Then, one of her daughters
needed surgery. As a result, Peters lost
about three weeks of work, and could
not muster her $335 monthly rent.
When I met her last month while in
Charlotte reporting on poverty on the
eve of the Democratic National Conven-
tion, she was facing eviction.
I asked Peters what President Obama
should do for people in her economic
situation and she answered without
hesitation. Obama, she said, needs to
do something about girls on welfare
that only sit up and have baby after
baby and never try to better them-
selves.
You see, nobody likes freeloaders.
The point is made for the benefit of
Mitt Romney. Of course, hed likely
consider Peters herself a freeloader. Ive
not seen her W-2, but it seems a safe
bet that, working less than full time for
fast-food wages, she doesnt pay much if
anything in federal income taxes. Rom-
ney was heard this month in a secretly
recorded video disparaging the 47 per-
cent of Americans low income earners
such as Peters, Social Security recip-
ients and others that he says pay no
taxes. Speaking before a room full of
well-heeled donors in Boca Raton, Fla.,
who had paid $50,000 a plate for some
face time with him, the Republican
presidential nominee described those
non-taxpayers with contempt as people
who are dependent upon government,
who believe that they are victims ...
In the video, posted online by the
liberal magazine Mother Jones, Rom-
ney says itd be a waste of time pitching
his campaign to those moochers: Ill
never convince them that they should
take personal responsibility and care for
their lives.
Sharkara Peters does not need Rom-
neys lectures about personal responsib-
ility.
Nor does George Farmer, 61, who
became homeless when he was diag-
nosed with prostate cancer and could
no longer drive his truck. Nor does
Michelle, an unemployed appliance
repair technician trying to raise four
girls on $694 a month plus food stamps.
Nor do most of the invisible poor, the
cashiers and servers, floor moppers and
burger flippers whose annual income
probably wouldnt cover maintenance
on one of Romneys car elevators.
If the gaffe concretizes the caricature
of an out-of-touch rich guy, a cognac-
swilling peer of Thurston Howell III,
Charles Emerson Winchester and Mont-
gomery Burns, its important to remem-
ber that Romney is hardly alone in his
sentiments. They are called animals by
Ann Coulter, takers by Michelle Malkin,
accused of laziness by Rush Limbaugh.
Fox News person Charles Payne la-
ments the entitlement mentality
under which they fail to even be proper-
ly embarrassed by their poverty.
For the record, I gave you no sur-
name for Michelle, the single mother
referenced above, precisely because she
was too embarrassed to let me use it.
Romneys remarks, then, are of a
piece with a narrative poverty as
character defect favored by many who
know exactly jack about the reality of
poverty, but who have discovered that
demonizing the faceless poor, giving us
someone new to resent and blame, is
good politics. They wrap their attacks
in rags of righteousness and pretensions
of pragmatism, but there is something
viscerally wrong, morally shrunken, in a
nation where the most fortunate are
encouraged to treat the least fortunate
as some enemy race.
So the big story here is not about
what damage Romney did to his cam-
paign. Yes, the fact that he used con-
demnation of the poor as a lever of
political advantage shames him.
But the very fact that the lever exists
shames us all.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
Shame on us
for demonizing
least fortunate
Leonard Pitts Jr. is a columnist for the
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132.
Readers may write to him via email at
lpitts@miamiherald.com.
GLORIA Steinem is
unmistakable.
Across the room
surrounded by a clutch
of admirers, she is
utterly ageless sleek
and svelte in black
form-fitting pants and
top, a gold braided belt with sparkly
fleurettes draped along her slender hips.
At 78, she looks, well, fabulous.
I suppose its not very feminist of us
to comment on how great she looks,
says the woman next to me, apparently
feeling compelled to inject the appropri-
ate corrective.
But at a certain age, isnt a woman
happy to accept a compliment? And
havent we come a long way, baby?
Judging by the current debate in
some Republican circles, one has occa-
sion to pause and wonder.
The purpose of the Thursday evening
gathering in a private home was to
celebrate Makers: The Women Who
Make America, a multiplatform video
production from PBS, AOL and Maker-
s.com, which launched in February
2012.
The documentary chronicles the
history of the womens movement and
features women who have, indeed,
made things happen so that subsequent
generations could do what women were
not allowed to do not so long ago to
become doctors, lawyers, legislators,
secretaries of state and, perhaps, even
president.
Among those assembled were seven
of the Makers who appear in the film,
including, in addition to Steinem, Su-
preme Court Justice Ruth Bader Gins-
burg, actress Marlo That Girl Thomas,
Rebecca Adamson (founder of First
Peoples Worldwide), Karen Nussbaum
(executive director of Working America
and founder of 9to5), Malika Saada Saar
(executive director, Human Rights Pro-
ject for Girls) and Muriel Siebert (the
first woman to earn a seat on the New
York Stock Exchange and namesake of
the investment firm Siebert & Co.).
Thats quite a lot of feminine and
feminist power in one room. Quoting
John F. Kennedy, Steinem said there
hasnt been so much talent in one place
since Thomas Jefferson was alone in a
room. Except now, she cracked, we
know Sally Hemings was probably do-
ing the writing.
The centerpiece of the evening was a
preview of excerpts from the docu-
mentary, which is scheduled for release
in February 2013, the 50th anniversary
of Betty Friedans The Feminine Mys-
tique.
In one interview, Ginsburg recalls
being one of nine women in a class of
500 men at Harvard Law School. Gins-
burg remembered being herded into a
room with the other women where a
professor asked why they were taking
up seats that could be filled with men.
She transferred to Columbia University,
where she finished first in her class.
Other women tell similar, barrier-
breaking tales. All remind us that wom-
en really have come a long way, often,
one hastens to mention, with the help of
enlightened men. Ginsburg paid hom-
age to her husband, who gave up his
own successful law practice to follow
her to Washington so that she could
accept her place on the Supreme Court.
He never felt slighted, she said, noting
that he was also an excellent cook.
The value of the film cant be over-
stated. We have lived in a feminist world
for decades, yet younger generations
have no sense of the struggle. And
though we are correctly horrified at the
disenfranchisement of women in other
parts of the world, it is useful to recall
that American womens freedoms are
relatively fresh.
Steinem, her fire somewhat tempered
by time and grace, noted that loss of
memory is the source of oppression. For
centuries, womens stories werent told.
Women had no place at the campfire, as
she put it.
The story of womens struggle for
equality belongs to no single feminist,
Steinem insists, nor to any one orga-
nization but to the collective efforts of
all who care about human rights. Heres
to memory.
COMMENTARY
K A T H L E E N P A R K E R
Heres to the
women who
made history
Romney.
I wouldnt say the election is the No. 1
hot-button issue here, Mulberry says,
disappointedly.
Granted, you dont see many signs of
campaign enthusiasm in the neighbor-
hoods that surround his campus, or
elsewhere for that matter. But its tell-
ing that, on many college campuses
across the country where, in 2008,
then-candidate Obamas messages of
hope and change easily took hold
the mood is markedly more sub-
dued.
Certainly, some (young peo-
ple) have stopped believing,
says Molly Andolina, a political
scientist at DePaul University in
Chicago who tracks young vot-
ers. Maybe thats inevitable. For
AP PHOTO
What a difference four years can make. In 2008, college campuses, including Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Ill., shown
above, were filled with campaign posters and political rallies -- and frenzy. This year, its difficult to find a college student
whos truly excited about the presidential race.
Election mania
missing on campuses
YOUNG VOTERS
E
LMHURST, Ill. What a differ-
ence four years can make.
In 2008, college campuses were
filledwithcampaignposters andpolitical
rallies and frenzy. Remember Oba-
mamania? This year, its difficult to find
a college student whos truly excited
about the presidential race.
Politics has gone back to that thing
you dont want to bring up, says Abra-
ham Mulberry. Hes a freshman at Elm-
hurst College in suburban Chicago
whos trying to start a club for young
Democrats.
Last election, his campus had an
active Students for Obama chapter,
organized well before the election.
But this time, theres nary a campaign
placard, for either President Barack
Obama or Republican candidate Mitt
By MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer
See YOUNG, Page 2E
Lots of people thought President Obama could go in and break
gridlock and that didnt happen. Thats the scariest thing to a
lot of young people that nothing is going to happen.
Ethan Weber
Senior at Miami University in Ohio
WASHINGTON Get in line, Medi-
careandSocial Security. Seniors, likejust
about everyone else, have money on
their minds.
Who wins the trust of seniors, a group
that votes at ahigher ratethananyother,
will be a deciding factor in the presiden-
tial election. That should be good news
for Mitt Romney, because those 65 and
older have backed the Republican candi-
date in both of the last two presidential
elections.
But President BarackObamahasbeen
pounding Romney and his running
mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, on their plan for
Medicare. Those attacks are starting to
bear fruit for Obama, who is gaining
ground among seniors in two key battle-
grounds: Florida and Ohio.
Still, Romney has the edge nationally
amongseniorsinnosmall part thanks
to seniors concerns about Obamas
handling of the economy.
Nowhere will the senior vote be as
powerful or as prominent as in Florida,
where Romney and Obama are compet-
ing fiercely.
Its not just the cookie cutter that ev-
ery senior here is totally dependent on
Social Security and Medicare, said Su-
sanMacManus, apolitical scientist at the
Universityof SouthFlorida. As theFDR
generation has passed and generational
replacement has occurred, you get a
more divided senior electorate.
More seniors say the economy is ex-
tremely important to their vote than
Medicare, says a poll released Thursday
by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foun-
dation. A recent Associated Press-GfK
poll shows 7 in 10 seniors say taxes and
the federal deficit are important tothem.
Even for those well into retirement, a
feeble economy affects older Americans
inwaysyoumight not realize. Manyhave
had to bail out adult children who have
lost their jobs and turned to their aging
parents for help. And those who lived
through the Great Depression as chil-
dren relate intimately to the perils of an
over-indebted nation.
Just ask Dominic Santoro, an 81-year-
old retiree from Sunny Isles Beach, Fla.,
whosaiditsdifferent forseniorsthanit is
for younger Americans, who have years
to make up what was lost during the re-
cession.
Thats very nice, but what about the
poor senior citizenthats nolonger work-
ing and cant replace that money? said
Santoro, who plans to vote for Romney.
But if seniors concernsextendbeyond
Money really matters to senior voters
By JOSH LEDERMAN
Associated Press
The economy is important McCain: 53% Obama: 45%
Voters over age 65 Seniors registered to vote
SOURCE: AP-GfK Poll; Exit polls AP
Aging America: Senior sentiments
Economic issues loom large in the minds of registered seniors.
Bush: 52% Kerry: 47%
Other Gore: 50% Bush: 47%
The federal deficit is important
Taxes are important
Other
86%
73%
72%
08
04
00
See SENIOR, Page 2E
Kathleen Parkers email address is kathleen-
parker@washpost.com.
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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entitlements, those seeking the White House dont
seemto have caught on.
Obama and Ryan both hewed closely to themes of
Medicare and Social Security in their speeches last
week to an AARP summit in New Orleans. Ryan,
who was loudly booed for vowing to repeal Obama-
care, offered assurances that he and Romney
wouldnt alter Medicare for those in or near retire-
ment.
Medicareisapromise, andwewill honorit,Ryan
said. A Romney-Ryan administration will protect
and strengthen Medicare for my moms genera-
tion and for my kids and yours.
Not so, said Obama, warning seniors that Ryan
andRomneywant toreplaceMedicarewithvouchers
that wouldnt keep up with health care costs. Its an
admonition echoed in a television ad Obamas cam-
paign started airing Friday in Florida, Colorado and
Iowa.
Both Ryan and Romney invoked their late grand-
mothersinworkingtoconvinceAARPmembersthat
they understand what seniors go through.
Shewasagreat citizenwholiveduptoherrespon-
sibilities, Obama said. And after a lifetime of hard
work, what she hoped for in return was to be able to
live out her golden years with dignity and security,
andtoseeher grandchildrenandher great grandchil-
dren have a better life.
Although far from a monolithic bloc, seniors by
and large have sided with Romney throughout this
years electionandfavoredtheformer Massachusetts
governor 52-41 in a national AP-GfKpoll in Septem-
ber. While Romney has lost his edge among overall
voters on handling of the economy, seniors are the
holdout, preferring Romney by 10 points over Oba-
ma on that issue.
But incompetitive states that coulddetermine the
elections outcome, seniors attitudes are on the
move. Over the past month, Obama has climbed 9
points in Florida and 4 points in Ohio, giving himan
edge over Romney inbothstates, accordingtoa new
Quinnipiac University/CBS News/NewYork Times
poll. Its the opposite in Pennsylvania, where Obama
has lost his edge among seniors and nowtrails Rom-
ney 45-50.
Older voters will make up a dramatically larger
part of thepopulationinthecomingdecades, accord-
ing to a report released Tuesday by the National A-
cademy of Sciences. Americans are living longer,
working longer and waiting until later in life to have
children.
In the near term, that shift may work in Repub-
licans favor, offsetting some of the boost that Demo-
crats are expected to enjoy fromthe growing minor-
ity population.
SENIOR
Continued from Page 1E
AP PHOTO
Republican vice-presidential candidate Rep.
Paul Ryan, R-Wis., right, introduces his mother,
Betty Ryan Douglas, to supporters at a cam-
paign rally in The Villages, Fla., in August.
structural reasons, its easier to
offer hope and change as a candi-
date, than as a president.
Excitement was sohigh, it real-
ly had nowhere to go but down,
she says. This time, theres also
no obvious chance to make histo-
ry, as there was when students
helped elect the countrys first
African-American president.
For young voters, it was like
going to Woodstock in 1968,
says JohnDella Volpe, the polling
director at Harvard Universitys
Institute of Politics.
Now like a lot of Americans,
theyre more worried about the
economy and finding jobs. Voter
IDlaws insomestates, whichban
or restrict the use of student IDs
at the polls, also are causing con-
fusion on campuses at a time
when students are already weary
and cynical about political bick-
ering in Washington.
Lots of people thought Presi-
dent Obama could go in and
break gridlock and that didnt
happen, says Ethan Weber, a se-
nior at Miami University in Ohio,
wholl be graduating in Decem-
ber. Thats the scariest thing to a
lot of young people that noth-
ing is going to happen.
In 2008, Weber cast a half-
hearted vote for Republican John
McCain, certain Obama would
win. This time, hes voting for
Romney and sees the election as
a toss-up.
He is still in the minority in the
18- to 29-year-old age group, ac-
cording to polls. Young people
are leaning strongly Democratic,
as they traditionally do, andfavor
Obama by a wide margin
though some pollsters say the
youngest newvoters are showing
signs that they may buck that
trend.
An Associated Press-GfK poll
conducted earlier this month
found that 61 percent of regis-
tered voters in the18-to-29 brack-
et support the president, com-
pared with 30 percent for Rom-
ney.
In 2008, young people ended
up voting for Obama by a 2-to-1
margin, with just over half of U.S.
citizens, ages 18 to 29, casting a
ballot in 2008. It remains to be
seen, however, whether theyll
show up at the polls this time.
A Gallup poll taken Aug. 27-
Sept. 16 found that 63 percent of
registered voters, ages 18 to 29,
said they definitely plan to
vote.
That compares with at least 80
percent of registered voters in ol-
der age brackets who said the
same.
By comparison, before the
election in 2008, 79 percent of
young registered voters said they
definitely planned to cast a bal-
lot, according to a Time/Abt
SRBI poll, taken in later Septem-
ber of that year.
Older voters were about as
committed to vote then as they
are this time. (Amongself-report-
ed registered voters, turnout in
2008 was 84 percent for 18- to 29-
year-olds, according to the U.S.
Census, compared with 91 per-
cent for older voters.)
After that banner turnout, Alli-
son Byers, a 25-year-old in San
Francisco, finds young Ameri-
cans waning commitment to
vote in this election frustrating.
It kind of breaks my heart,
says Byers, whoworks incommu-
nications at an arts college and
was an active organizer for the
Obama campaign in 2008, when
she was a junior at Virginia Tech.
Even she concedes that shes
feeling more realistic than ex-
cited about this election her
optimism tempered by the diffi-
culties the nation and the presi-
dent have faced in the last four
years. But she remains commit-
ted to him.
Its important to note, though,
that for a whole newcrop of eligi-
ble voters those who werent
yet 18 in November 2008 this
will be the first time theyre able
to cast a ballot.
And that has Della Volpe at
Harvard wondering if the enthu-
siasm gap may be, at least partly,
the result of a growing schism
between older and younger mil-
lennials, the age group so named
because theyve reached adult-
hood in the new millennium.
Older millennials came of age
amid the terror attacks of Sept.
11, 2001, and Hurricane Katrina,
sparking some to become more
civically and politically engaged.
Meanwhile, the political awak-
ening of the younger millennials
is happening during the reces-
sion, Della Volpe says.
How that will affect them, or
influence this election, remains
to be seen.
But already, Della Volpe and
his staff have found that Obama
holds a wider margin of support
among older twentysomethings
than with potential voters who
are 18 to 24 especially 18- and
19-year-olds.
Whether Republicans know
that, or whether they simply
noted young voters influence on
the last election, they have been
spending more time courting col-
lege students lately.
Republican Paul Ryan, being
framed as the younger vice
presidential candidate, has spent
time on campuses recently.
That is a very, very astute
move by Republicans, Della
Volpe says.
They wont win the youth vote,
he predicts.
But they might win the white
18- to 24-year-old vote and
they could block some additional
gains that Obama might make.
YOUNG
Continued from Page 1E
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3E
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
Iran is 70 percent of the way
there
Benjamin Netanyahu
Israels prime minister last week addressed the
United Nations General Assembly, urging the world
to draw a clear red line on Irans nuclear program,
which he said could enter its final stage sometime next summer.
YOUD THINK that being
a gorgeous, charming,
sophisticated young prin-
cess fully accessorized
right down to having an
adoring, healthy and atten-
tive young king-to-be at
ones side would have solved most prob-
lems, wouldnt you?
Ive had plenty of off-days when any com-
bination of those elements gorgeous,
charming, king-to-be at my side would
have gone a long way toward cheering me
up.
But weve learned recently that even Kate
Middleton isnt enviable at least not all
the time.
This months collective cultural copping
of a feel has transformed the Duchess of
Cambridge into merely a pair of breasts,
the holder of the Royal Rack. Gone from
sight and sound are the young womans
good works and bon mots; eclipsed are the
dazzling smiles and apparently affectionate
interactions with her delighted audiences
in Britain and abroad.
Shes been reduced to a just another girl
gone wild, a young woman without a bath-
ing suit top sunning herself on a deck. She
could be a Page Three girl from the English
tabloids or a cast member from Jersey
Shore (although shed need a bigger tan.
Thats right: tan).
The paparazzi wanted to get those pho-
tographs of Middleton because shes some-
body. Yet the effect of being photographed
in such a way is to be cut down to size: to
be made into any body, to be made into
an object. Finally, it is to be treated like
nobody at all: just a pair of breasts and a
behind.
Mostly people seemed disappointed that
there werent little crowns on her, or some
other distinguishing features. 32B or 32 not
to be? Thats the only question.
Ask any woman when she was first re-
duced to body parts as if being evaluated
by Perdue for sale by the pound and shell
tell you. Most of us remember.
Mine was when I was walking home from
school by myself in the eighth grade. I was
wearing a new pea coat Id bought with
baby-sitting money. This was the early
1970s and I looked more like a stowaway
from Palermo than a chorus girl; I looked
like the old cartoon character Dondi
except with longer hair.
Whether it was the hair or the coat, it
was enough to get me noticed by a Monte
Carlo filled with high school guys who
drove by and shouted really dirty stuff.
Really. Dirty.
I was deeply ashamed of myself. And
thats the part that still gets me: I didnt do
anything. Why should I have been embar-
rassed? The guys were the morons. They
were the ones engaged in nasty behavior. If
their mothers heard what they said, they
would have hit them over the head with
frying pans and not just once.
But instead I was the one who slunk
down, red-faced, hating my new jacket.
Some of Middletons critics argue that, as
a royal supported by the state, she should
have known better than to reveal her
naughty bits except indoors with the black-
out curtains drawn, as if she were living
during the Blitz. Or under Shariah law,
perhaps.
But of what, exactly, is Middleton meant
to be ashamed?
Is she being punished for making us want
to look at her? Cmon, shes one of the most
photographed women in the world. Shes
not some poor girl with low self-esteem
who misjudged how to become popular and
removed her top for Twitter.
Nor is the princess hoisting up a frothing
pint of Whitbread and flinging her breasts
into the camera as if proclaiming Oyik!
These belong to Britain!
The photographs of Middleton are pretty
far from lascivious. They have all the illicit
sexuality of the puppy tugging at the bath-
ing suit bottom of the 4-year-old in the
Coppertone ad. Sure, you can make that
image erotic if you choose, but if you do,
youre probably already on the predators
list and have other stuff to worry about.
One thing Middleton or any other
woman shouldnt have to worry about in
the 21st century is being ashamed of herself
for having a body. Just shout Honi soit qui
mal y pense, that phrase on Great Britains
royal coat of arms meaning Youve got the
problem, buddy, not me whenever the
paparazzi, or guys in Monte Carlos, go by.
No shame for Princess Kate only for her stalkers
Gina Barreca is a columnist for the Hartford
Courant. She can be reached through her website
at www.ginabarreca.com.
COMMENTARY
G I N A B A R R E C A
JAMES CHARLES Lehrer
will gavel America to order
at 9 p.m. Wednesday from
inside the University of
Denvers Magness Arena
for the first debate between
President Barack Obama
and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Rom-
ney.
At that moment, Lehrer, 78, executive
editor of the PBS NewsHour, will become
moderator of an unprecedented 12th presi-
dential debate.
His first was in 1988 when Vice President
George H.W. Bush faced off against Mas-
sachusetts Democratic Gov. Michael Duka-
kis at Wake Forest University in Winston-
Salem, N.C.
As Dukakis looked on, Lehrer, 54, direct-
ed his first question to Bush: The polls say
the number-one domestic issue to a majority
of voters is drugs. What is there about these
times that drives or draws so many Amer-
icans to use drugs?
Lehrer also moderated two of three presi-
dential debates in 1992, two between Presi-
dent Bill Clinton and Sen. Robert Dole in
96, and the three in 2000 featuring Vice
President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George
W. Bush.
Lehrer says the intense responsibility of
officiating a presidential debate, upon which
so much could depend, is like walking
down the blade of a knife.
Lehrer is in charge. The questions are his.
Follow-ups are his. And the six topics for
discussion during Wednesdays 90-minute,
domestic policy debate divided into 15
minute-segments: economy I, economy II,
economy III, health care, the role of govern-
ment and governing are all his.
Its difficult to win an American presi-
dential debate, given the knowledge, skill
and experience of the men and women
disciplined enough to scale the cliffs leading
to that exclusive terrain atop the presiden-
tial debate stage. But debates are easy to
lose.
Roughly 132 million Americans cast presi-
dential ballots in 2008. More than half that
number tuned to the first presidential de-
bate between Senators Barack Obama and
John McCain, with millions more catching
all or part of their two subsequent meetings.
For President Obama and Gov. Romney
the stakes could not be higher as the first
presidential debate almost always draws the
largest television audience.
As Lehrer and his wife Kate, the only
person with prior knowledge of his ques-
tions, exit the Magness Arena, an equally
important post-debate-debate already will
have commenced.
In adjoining rooms off the event floor,
campaign operatives and the nations news
media will engage in lengthy post-debate
analysis that will extend through the Sunday
morning news shows.
Did Romney exceed expectations? Did
Obama fall short? Was a knockout punch
delivered, a home run hit or a candidacy-
ending gaffe uttered by either man?
Were ties straight, color appropriate,
knots centered, on white shirts or blue? Its
all been tested, discussed and decided.
The endless nitpicking that follows is fine
with Lehrer: When a debate is over that I
moderate, I want everybody to say you have
seen and heard the candidates for president
on the same stage, at the same time, talking
about the same things, and you can judge
them, not just on content because by then
people already know about the issues. We
want to take a measure of the person.
Obama will need to be convincing when
discussing the economy. While Romney will
be forced to defend the Ryan-Romney plan
to undo Medicare, which placed a lid on
Romneys poll numbers and has given Oba-
ma a perceptible lead in every swing state.
Gov. Romney needs a breakout night in
front of an enormous television audience.
The president needs to maintain Americas
confidence.
This is reality TV.
When Jim Lehrer finishes blade-walking
on Wednesday evening he will have moder-
ated his last presidential debate, he says. To
have been selected by the Commission on
Presidential Debates and approved by candi-
dates of both parties 12 times in six presi-
dential cycles over 24 years is a tribute to
Lehrers excellence and a record of DiMag-
gio-esque proportions unlikely to be sur-
passed.
Tune in and watch. Nobody does it better.
Master of debate Lehrer will moderate one last time
Kevin Blaums column on government, life and
politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at
kblaum@timesleader.com.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
Obama will need to be convincing when
discussing the economy. While Romney will
be forced to defend the Ryan-Romney plan
to undo Medicare
B
EFORE VOTING IN
November for the per-
son who will repre-
sent you in Congress
for at least the next two years,
what would you like to ask him
or her?
Do questions about the U.S.
debt currently pegged at $16
trillion top your list? Are you
most concerned about pocket-
book issues such as the re-
gions still-sagging job prospec-
ts and the steadily rising per-
gallon price of gasoline? Or,
maybe, youd like to gauge how
the candidates would vote if,
for instance, the U.S. House of
Representatives began debat-
ing a response to Irans contin-
ued work on attaining nuclear
capabilities.
Submit your question or
questions on these and other
subjects that will influence
your decision on Election Day
to The Times Leader. Its staff-
ers will review input from you
and other readers, weaving it
into a series of questions to be
posed later this month directly
to contenders vying to repre-
sent Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia in the nations capital.
A forum featuring candi-
dates in the11th Congressional
District incumbent U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta and Gene Stilp
has beenset for Oct. 8at Wilkes
University in Wilkes-Barre.
Candidates in the 17th Con-
gressional District Matt Cart-
wright andLaureenCummings
will participate in a forum at
the university on Oct. 10.
This years congressional
races, which tend to be over-
shadowed by presidential hub-
bub, could help to determine
whether gridlock persists in
Washington or voters signal a
clear directionfor the countrys
elected leaders. These impor-
tant races deserve your atten-
tion.
Tell us which topics matter
most to you.
Send your questions by
email to mjones@timeslead-
er.com. Use the subject line
Forum and, if desired, in-
clude your name and contact
information in the body of the
email.
Or send traditional mail to
The Times Leader, Attn: Mark
Jones, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711.
Your questions much like
your opinions matter.
OUR OPINION: READER INPUT
Have questions
for candidates?
11th Congressional District
candidates U.S. Rep. Lou Barlet-
ta and Gene Stilp will answer
questions Oct. 8 at Wilkes
University in Wilkes-Barre.
17th Congressional District
candidates Matt Cartwright and
Laureen Cummings will answer
questions Oct. 10.
Both events, open to the public,
will be held beginning at 7 p.m.
in Room101 of the Stark Learn-
ing Center, 150-180 S. River St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
C A N D I D AT E F O R U M S
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
S
PREADING FALSE in-
formation because you
dont know the facts is
a mistake. Continuing
to spread false information
when you know the truth is ly-
ing.
Thats what a Washington-
based, big-money political
group did by continuing to run
TVcommercials that used false
information to smear Pennsyl-
vania Attorney General candi-
date Kathleen Kane as being
soft on rape.
The TVad cited two cases in
whichit saidKane, aDemocrat,
let rapists off withlight pleabar-
gains. But the Lackawanna
County District Attorneys Of-
fice, andone of the rape victims
fathers, said Kane wasnt in-
volved.
Once the group, the Republi-
can State Leadership Commit-
tee, was confronted with the in-
accuracies by the Daily News
Chris Brennan, it was obligated
to pull the ad.
It said it would, and even ad-
mitted to the errors. But the ad
ranfor three more days. Contin-
uing to broadcast the false ad
turned what could have been
explained as an unintended
mistake into a lie.
Unfortunately, voters across
thenationcanonlyexpect more
misinformationandshadings of
the truth as PACS, super-PACs,
and other groups continue to
bombardtheairwaveswithneg-
ative ads, fueled by seemingly
nave Supreme Court decisions
and Congresss failure to put
more controls on political
spending.
The RSLC spent more than
$500,000 to buy a week of ad-
vertising in the Philadelphia
market. The group has filled its
coffers with money from shale-
gas drillers, tobacco interests,
casinos and the financial sector
all trying to influence govern-
ment by backing specific candi-
dates.
The candidates typically say
they have nothing to do with
theads paidfor byinterests out-
side their campaigns, but they
dont mindreapingthebenefits.
The media also have to bear
some responsibility. Political
speech is protected by the Con-
stitution, but that doesnt pre-
vent the media fromvettingads
for accuracy andrefusingtorun
blatant lies. Would TV stations
run pornographic or racist ads?
Why cant they tell political ad-
vertisers to show accurate sup-
porting documentation for
their assertions andcheck the
facts?
As for voters, they must care-
fully consider what a political
ad might present as truth, espe-
cially when the ad wasnt paid
for by the candidates official
campaign.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: CAMPAIGNING
Beware TV ads
paid for by PACs
An company
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
V I E W S
7
7
9
5
7
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ENDS
OCT. 6, 2012
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Fault progressives
for Scranton woes
T
he financial plight of the
city of Scranton has gar-
nered national attention.
Why does Scranton have such
a problem?
The truth is this devel-
opment has been decades in
the making. Scranton has
been plagued with financial
difficulties since at least the
early 1970s. Nearly every year
the city has spent more money
than it takes in. During this
long period of financial stress
there has been one constant:
The vast majority of Scran-
tons elected officials have
been progressives.
The residents of Scranton
need to put two and two to-
gether. The city has been
plagued with fiscal problems
for a long time. Scrantons
government has been dom-
inated by progressive ideology
for a long time.
If Scranton is ever to turn
itself around and get its fi-
nancial house in order, it must
reject progressive ideology.
Willie Speare
Scranton
Our nation needs
gutsy leadership
T
here are so many things to
write about, so many frus-
trations with the state of
our nation and community, its
difficult to know where to
begin. But I know where all
the problems can begin to end
with true leadership.
Gen. Norman Cota was a
leader during the second wave
of the D-Day invasion. On
June 6, 1944, he said these
remarkable words to his men:
Gentlemen, we are being
killed on the beaches. Let us
go inland and be killed.
Think about that! Let us go
inland and be killed. He and
the men who served with him
had something we all really
need to pay more attention to
intestinal fortitude (aka
guts).
Where have those with such
intestinal fortitude gone?
Where are the leaders willing
to put doing the right thing
over doing what is best for
their own hides?
We need leaders willing to
take hard stands against illegal
immigration, excessive taxa-
tion, excessive government
regulations that impede busi-
ness growth, attacks upon
religion, out-of-control govern-
ment spending, etc. We need
leaders who wont tolerate
unproductive workers telling
productive ones what to do.
We need leaders who inspire
us rather than those who only
show up at ribbon-cuttings
and spew empty rhetoric such
as We need family-sustaining
jobs, and I am working for
that.
Rather than such blather,
tell us your detailed, strategic
plan as to how you plan to
reduce excessive regulations
upon the private sector
(which is what creates jobs,
not the government) and tell
us how you will ensure those
who can afford to employ/
build companies will not be
hindered by absurdly high
corporate tax rates.
True leaders take the tough
route over the easy course. Its
easy for politicians to raise
taxes and say they want to do
property assessments. Its far
harder to trim the fat and get
rid of wasteful spending,
wasteful departments and
unnecessary employees. But
tough times require the harder
route to be taken.
The people of this country
and community should de-
mand term limits for our
politicians. Maybe if politics
cant become a career, poli-
ticians would be less apt to do
what will keep the peace
(and keep them in office forev-
er) and more apt to stir the
pot and do what is right.
Leadership requires the sort of
heart and fighting spirit held
by the soldiers who stormed
Omaha Beach, a desire to
fight for beliefs with passion
and conviction.
As area voters listen to
candidates over the coming
weeks, they should ask them-
selves who has shown a wil-
lingness to take tough stands,
who has guts, who may bring
strength to office.
Why? Because cowards
wont lead us out of this mess.
Louis J. Booty Beltrami
Drums
Library Friends
thank community
I
f you missed the recent
wine-and-cheese event at
the West Pittston Library,
never fear. There will be an-
other one.
But you did miss a great
event. It was a fundraiser, but
most important it was a com-
munity get-together. Library
personnel, board members
and Friends of the Library
members were there to meet
and greet everyone.
There were plenty of smiles
to go around. Great snacks,
including those chocolate-
covered strawberries, cookies
and a wonderful assortment of
cheeses, brought the whole
thing to life. The fall deco-
rations, courtesy of Diane
Melvin, were spectacular.
Friends of the West Pittston
Library President Sara Kelly,
the food staff of Edythe Kepics
and Jazz Mikita, as well as all
Friends officers and members,
the library board and library
Director Ann Barr and her
staff thank all who participa-
ted toward this hugely suc-
cessful project.
Walter Bechtold
Pittston
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5E
V I E W S
IN mid-Sep-
tember 2008,
Lehman
Brothers
collapsed and
the bottom
fell out of the
financial sys-
tem. Barack Obama handled it
coolly. John McCain did not.
Obama won the presidency.
(Given the countrys condition,
he would have won anyway.
But this sealed it.)
Four years later, mid-Sep-
tember 2012, the U.S. mission
in Benghazi went up in flames,
as did Obamas entire Middle
East policy of apology and
accommodation. Obama once
again played it cool, effectively
ignoring the attack and the
region-wide American humili-
ation. Bumps in the road, he
said. Nodding tamely were the
mainstream media, who would
have rained a week of vitriol on
Mitt Romney had he so casu-
ally dismissed the murder of a
U.S. ambassador, the raising of
the black Salafist flag over four
U.S. embassies and the epidem-
ic of virulent anti-American
demonstrations from Tunisia
to Sri Lanka to Indonesia.
Obama seems not even to
understand what happened. He
responded with a groveling
address to the U.N. General
Assembly that contained no
less than six denunciations of a
crackpot video, while offering
cringe-worthy platitudes about
the need for governments to
live up to the ideals of the
United Nations.
The United Nations being an
institution of surpassing cyn-
icism and mendacity, the
speech was so nave it would
have made a fine middle-school
commencement address. In-
stead, it was a plaintive plea by
the worlds alleged superpower
to be treated nicely by a room-
ful of the most corrupt, repres-
sive, tin-pot regimes on Earth.
Yet Romney totally fumbled
away the opportunity. Here
was a chance to make the
straightforward case about
where Obamas feckless ap-
proach to the regions tyrants
has brought us, connecting the
dots of the disparate attacks as
a natural response of the more
virulent Islamist elements to a
once-hegemonic power in
retreat. Instead, Romney did
two things:
He issued a two-sentence
critique of the initial statement
issued by the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo on the day the mob at-
tacked. The critique was not
only correct but vindicated
when the State Department
disavowed the embassy state-
ment. However, because the
critique was not framed within
a larger argument about the
misdirection of U.S. Middle
East policy, it could be and
was characterized as a parti-
san attack on the nations lead-
er at a moment of national
crisis.
Two weeks later at the Clin-
ton Global Initiative, Romney
did make a foreign-policy ad-
dress. Here was his opportuni-
ty. What did he highlight?
Reforming foreign aid.
Yes, reforming foreign aid! A
worthy topic for a chin-pulling
joint luncheon of the League of
Women Voters and the Council
on Foreign Relations. But as
the core of a challengers major
foreign-policy address amid a
Lehman-like collapse of the
Obama Doctrine?
It makes you think how far
ahead Romney would be if he
were actually running a cam-
paign. His unwillingness to go
big, to go for the larger argu-
ment, is simply astonishing.
For six months, hes been
matching Obama small ball for
small ball. A hit-and-run cri-
tique here, a slogan-of-the-
week there. His only momen-
tum came when he chose Paul
Ryan and seemed ready to
engage on the big stuff: Medi-
care, entitlements, tax reform,
national solvency, a restruc-
tured welfare state. Yet he has
since retreated to the small and
safe.
When youre behind, howev-
er, safe is fatal. Even his coun-
terpunching has gone minia-
ture. Obama has successfully
painted Romney as an out-of-
touch, unfeeling plutocrat
whose only interest is to cut
taxes for the rich. Romney has
complained in interviews that
its not true. He has proposed
cutting tax rates, while pledg-
ing that the share of the tax
burden paid by the rich re-
mains unchanged (by broad-
ening the base as in the wildly
successful, revenue-neutral
Reagan-ONeill tax reform of
1986).
But how many people know
this? Where is the speech that
hammers home precisely that
point, advocates a reformed tax
code that accelerates growth
without letting the rich off the
hook, and gives lie to the Oba-
ma demagoguery about dis-
mantling the social safety net
in order to enrich the rich?
Romney has accumulated
tons of cash for 30-second ads.
But unless theyre placed on
the scaffolding of serious
speeches making the larger
argument, they will be treated
as nothing more than tit for
tat.
Its time for Romney
to go big or go home
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
F
rom the shadows, I watch as you hold court, captivating in the way you
move, sound and shower the scene with your brightness. Do you even rec-
ognize how luminous you are?
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
THE Monday
night NFL
game between
the Green Bay
Packers and
the Seattle
Seahawks was
a microcosm
of beautiful America.
The Packers, Americas
Team because it is not owned
by any billionaire, but by thou-
sands of stockholders, is truly
a public team and would not
exist if the National Football
League was not a socialist
organization.
Because NFL teams share
TV revenues, Green Bay gets
just as much as a New York
team. It is pure socialism. It
creates parity.
If it were not for the social-
ist NFL, there would be no
Green Bay, Wisconsin, with an
NFL franchise.
The state of Wisconsin, how-
ever, after decades as the bas-
tion of middle-class, white,
working values, has gradually
become uppity, anti-union turf.
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker
is the Sophia Loren of anti-
union allure.
He is bankrolled by the bil-
lionaire Koch brothers and
like-minded oligarchs of cap-
italism, whose idea of repub-
lic is take-no-prisoners cap-
italism. Walker this year
passed legislation to limit
collective bargaining for
public employees, which
caused a firestorm of protest in
Wisconsin and unnecessary
fighting among neighbors.
So here we are on a Monday
night with a minute left in the
game (and like an idiot I went
to work), thinking the Sea-
hawks had lost. I saw most of
the game, and it was a travesty
of officiating.
The Packers, the symbol of
middle-class, fair Cheese-
heads who have gradually
moved to the anti-labor side,
facing the Seahawks of Seattle,
the most liberal city on Earth,
and the owners were putting
up replacement referees
because their billionaire club
didnt want to give profession-
al referees, the guys we trust
every Sunday, a pension.
Seattle is so liberal that
conservatives are as rare as
20-somethings without a tat-
too, so there is not a lot of
Citizens United money spent
out here.
Washington state has the
chutzpah to elect two female
U.S. senators and a female
governor; it just legalized
same-sex marriage and in all
likelihood will be the first to
legalize pot.
Conservative groups chal-
lenged the same-sex marriage
law, so it must be approved
this fall on a referendum,
which should win big. Jeff
Bezos, CEO of Amazon, donat-
ed more than $2 million to the
cause. Not all billionaires are
Kochs.
The Seattle economy is hum-
ming, real estate is up for three
consecutive quarters and Boe-
ing, Microsoft, Amazon and
other employers are hiring at a
good clip. Last year, Microsoft
gave all of its employees a
$5,000 bonus, across the
board, to give the local econo-
my a boost.
While mean-spirited states
are trying to limit peoples
access to voting, Pennsylvania
leading the way (sadly), in
Seattle in the last election I
voted by mail. They send you a
ballot and you drop it off at the
library. (There is no such thing
as in-person voter fraud and
therefore no reason to pass
photo identification require-
ments other than to limit seg-
ments of the population from
voting.)
Seattle is one of the last
places where private unions
are viable. But more impor-
tant, its about people, not
unions. The city recently
passed a law requiring all em-
ployers to provide paid sick
days.
The minimum wage out here
is the highest in the country at
$9.04 an hour. In Pennsylvania
it is at the national shame:
$7.25.
I like it that one of the most
intelligent guys in town is
Ronald Reagan. And, like me,
he loved his dad.
The state is free from the
pernicious romp to privatize
everything from prisons to
schools in goose step with the
Cheney/Bush privatization of
our military. Seattle likes to
spend money on teachers and
building stuff.
Topics such as gay marriage
and female reproductive rights
are not discussed because it
shows you are a dummy.
So what happened in the
game?
The wrong team won be-
cause billionaires were more
intent on breaking a union
than letting professional refs
have a pension.
But well take the win.
(P.S.: RIP, Steve Sabol)
NFL owners penny-wise and pension foolish
JOHN WATSON
C O M M E N T A R Y
John Watson is the former publisher
of the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston.
He lives in Seattle. Contact him via
email at jwatson@timesleader.com.
With mean-spirited states
trying to limit peoples access
to voting, Pennsylvania leading
the way (sadly), in Seattle in
the last election I voted by
mail. They send you a ballot
and you drop it off at the
library.
YOU DONT have
to be an Islamo-
phobe to say,
Enough already.
Its time for U.S.
officials to stop
apologizing for the
YouTube video that
supposedly sparked recent riots in Islam-
ic countries. The video is merely a conve-
nient pretext for religious radicals and
irresponsible politicians to stir up anti-
Western anger; they would have found
another excuse if it hadnt surfaced.
In an effort to avoid violence in Pakis-
tan, the U.S. embassy in Islamabad
broadcast ads on local TV showing
American leaders denouncing the brief
film. I understand the impulse after
what happened in Libya, the embassy is
trying to protect its staffers. But attack-
ing the video doesnt get to the heart of
the problem.
Here are six things you need to know
about whats really going on.
One: The YouTube video was delib-
erately promoted by radical clerics in
Egypt, Pakistan and elsewhere to arouse
publics who otherwise wouldnt have
seen it. In Cairo, a radical sheikh aired it
on his satellite TV channel (allegedly
funded by Gulf money) and called for
protests.
Two: The violent demonstrators
represent only a minority of Muslims
(and their numbers in most countries
were relatively small). In Libya, the
attacks that killed Ambassador Chris
Stevens and three of his staff appear to
have been preplanned by radicals, sur-
prising the Libyan government. Libyan
good Samaritans carried Stevens to the
hospital, and were caught on amateur
video praising God that he appeared still
to be alive. In Tunis, the majority of
people also appeared genuinely shocked
when hard-line Salafis sacked the U.S.
embassy, and local businessmen offered
to help restore the destroyed American
school.
Three: Violent protests against
critiques of Islam have no roots in the
Muslim religion. As the grand mufti of
Saudi Arabia recently said, the web video
would never harm the noble Prophet in
any way, nor the religion of Islam. He
denounced the destruction of embassies
and public buildings as un-Islamic. Its
ironic to hear a leading Saudi cleric
condemn the violence given that private
Saudi money is probably financing the
hard-line clerics who promote it. But the
grand mufti was correct to bemoan the
fact that the violent reaction to the video
advances the negative stereotype of
Islam that the filmmaker wants to pro-
mote.
Four: The anger sparked by the
video has roots far deeper than this
dumb film. Pakistan is the perfect exam-
ple: a third of Pakistani children never,
ever attend school, the literacy rate bare-
ly tops 50 percent and the economy is in
the tank. The country has 90 million
youths under the age of 21, with no
prospect of jobs, and unable to afford
marriage, so you have a powder keg,
says Hussein Haqqani, the former Pakis-
tani ambassador to Washington, and
longtime critic of radical Islamic move-
ments in his country.
Five: Supposedly moderate Muslim
leaders are afraid to challenge the rad-
icals or want to play the populist card
to hide their economic failures. Thus, in
Egypt, instead of trying to calm people,
President Mohammed Morsis Muslim
Brotherhood called for a million-man
march against the video, until a phone
call from President Obama persuaded
him to call it off. Pakistani leaders also
called for a demonstration that was
manipulated by Islamists.
The White House must make clear
that its unacceptable for Muslim politic-
ians to abet violence against U.S. citizens
on grounds that Islam has been insulted.
If leaders such as Morsi or Pakistan
Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf dont
respond, its time to reconsider our help
with economic aid and loan forgiveness.
Six: Muslim leaders in Egypt, Pakis-
tan and elsewhere have the mistaken
idea that their blasphemy laws should be
applied elsewhere. This cant happen.
Egypts Morsi instructed his Washing-
ton embassy to bring charges against the
filmmaker. Clearly, he doesnt under-
stand U.S. protections of free speech
(despite a doctorate earned in Califor-
nia), or he is ignoring them to play to
the crowd.
Meantime, Ashraf called on Muslim
nations to band together to press the
United Nations to pass blasphemy laws,
outlawing criticism of religion. Presum-
ably that means his religion, since Pakis-
tans notorious blasphemy law is often
used to persecute minorities, especially
Christians.
This is a reminder that, despite our
many warts, the United States is more
tolerant toward other religions than
many Muslim majority countries. Within
Pakistan, minorities have been killed by
terrorist groups without stirring up the
anger invoked by the video. In other
Arab countries, insults to Christians,
Jews, Bahais, Ahmadis, and others rarely
muster government outrage.
Clearly, Ashrafs idea of promoting
global laws against blasphemy is a non-
starter. The entire world will not censor
itself to avoid offending a minority of
Muslims stirred up by radicals and irre-
sponsible populist leaders.
In the West, we have different laws
and customs, and that must be made
clear to Muslim leaders. If the French
satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo wants
to publish caricatures of Muhammad to
mock religious fundamentalism, it is
entitled to do so under French law. If
some crackpot in California makes a film
that is legal here, there are no grounds to
arrest him, no matter how obnoxious the
provocation. He is not violating Amer-
ican law.
Back in 2009, when Obama made his
address to Muslims in Cairo, he famous-
ly called for mutual respect between
cultures. That is what he must insist on
now.
Video just an excuse for radicals to incite violence in Middle East
COMMENTARY
T R U D Y R U B I N
Trudy Rubin is a columnist and editorial
board member for the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Readers may write to her at: Philadelphia
Inquirer, P.O. Box 8263, Philadelphia PA19101,
or by email at trubin@phillynews.com.
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Bet on Romney?
Better think twice
W
e are now less than six
weeks away from the
Nov. 6 elections, and I
feel sorry for my Republican
friends who are desperate to
oust President Obama from
office. They placed their hopes
on one Willard Mitt Romney,
the former Massachusetts
governor. But betting on Rom-
ney is a little like deciding to
place your chip on red, black
or the long-shot green.
Will we get the Mitt who
offered himself as the Mas-
sachusetts moderate, or the
Mitt who highlighted himself
as being severely conserva-
tive?
Would we get a Mitt who
vowed to protect a womans
right to choose, or would we
see the Mitt who recently
stated he wants the Supreme
Court to overturn Roe v. Wade
and that hes profoundly pro-
life?
Maybe we would get the
pro-health care mandate Mitt,
or maybe the Mitt who wants
full repeal of Obamacare.
Then again, perhaps we could
get the Mitt who recently told
a group of Latinos hes proud
to be the grandfather of Oba-
macare.
Its possible we could get the
Mitt who stated illegal im-
migrants should have a chance
to obtain citizenship, or could
it be the Mitt who said in 2007
that illegal immigrants should
receive no special pathways
to citizenship. It might even
be the Mitt who hoped illegal
immigrants would self-de-
port as part of his immigra-
tion policy.
Would it be the Mitt who
stated, Deadly assault weap-
ons have no place in Mas-
sachusetts? Or would we get
full-metal-jacket Mitt who
declared: I dont support any
gun control legislation; the
effort for a new assault weap-
ons ban, with a ban on semi-
automatic weapons, is some-
thing I would oppose?
Will we get the Mitt who
favored gays serving openly in
the military, or the Mitt who
felt dont ask, dont tell
should stay in force?
Maybe we would get the
Mitt who signed Grover Nor-
quists no-tax pledge, but then
again maybe we get the Mitt
who said signing such a docu-
ment would deny him the
opportunity to raise revenue.
Hopefully we would get the
Mitt who publicly stated hes
for the 100 percent of Amer-
icans. But wed probably get
the Mitt who privately af-
firmed hes not worried about
47 percent of us. Maybe wed
get the Mitt who remembered
his own mother and father
were on welfare for a time in
their lives, though most likely
wed get the red-meat Romney
only interested in pandering to
his base.
And if I were part of that
base, I wouldnt know where
to place my chip.
Christopher Carney
Dimock
A reality check
on Pres. Obama
H
ere are five reasons to vote
for President Obama. In a
January 2009 radio ad-
dress, Obama announced he
was releasing a report based
on rigorous analysis that
charted unemployment
through 2013, so the Amer-
ican people can see exactly
what this plan (stimulus) will
mean for their families. The
report stated unemployment
would stand at 5.7 percent by
summer 2012 and 5.2 percent
by January 2013 after spending
about a trillion dollars of
stimulus.
If you believe the unemploy-
ment rate is 5.7 percent, fall-
ing to 5.2 percent by January,
then you need to vote for Oba-
ma and get a reality check.
While in San Francisco
speaking to a group of his
supporters, Obama defined
small-town Pennsylvanians
with the following statement:
they cling to guns or religion
or antipathy toward people
who arent like them or anti-
immigrant sentiment or anti-
trade sentiment as a way to
explain their frustrations. If
you have no self-respect and
agree with this, then you need
to keep him in office.
Real median household
income in March was down
$4,300 since Obama took
office in January 2009, ac-
cording to a Bloomberg news
report by Mike Dorning (April
30, 2012) titled Obama Fails
to Stem Middle-Class Slide He
Blamed on Bush. If youre OK
with a dwindling middle class
and want to participate in
Obamas trickle-up poverty,
then vote for Obama and enjoy
your limited station in life.
If you believe that an un-
elected board in Obamacare
should have control over what
medical procedures you de-
serve, then you need to vote
for Obama and get your affairs
in order. Buried in Section
3403 of Obamacare is a pow-
erful board of unelected bu-
reaucrats, the so-called Inde-
pendent Payment Advisory
Board. Tony Perkins of the
Family Research Council has
said the IPAB could lead
not only to the death of pa-
tients, but also to the death of
innovation.
If you believe that the pri-
ority for allocation of medical
resources is to provide coeds
with birth control free of
charge for recreational sex
over people suffering with
diabetes, cancer, MS, and so
on, then by all means vote for
Obama.
C. Mangan
Kingston
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THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
A peasant girl believes she hears voices,
says shes on a mission fromGod, leads an ar-
my against the English and crowns the dau-
phin, heir to the throne of France, so he can
become Charles VII.
Perhaps that sums up
what youve heard about
Joan of Arc, along with her
trial, execution and eventu-
al canonization as a saint.
But author and scholar
Nancy Goldstone has inves-
tigated another aspect of
Joans life, delving into the
hows and whys of a woman
who backed her efforts.
Yolande of Aragon, queen
of Sicily, was the dauphins
mother-in-law, andshe used
her wealth and influence to
make things happen for
Joan.
That takes nothing away
from Joans courage and
conviction, said Goldstone,
author of The Maid and
the Queen: The Secret His-
tory of Joan of Arc, which she will discuss
this week at Misericordia University.
Joan is completely genuine, Goldstone
said. But she hadhelpgetting there. No peas-
ant got in to see a king. It takes nothing away
fromher that someone else helpedher get in.
Calling Joan one of the most courageous
andinspiringpersons, manor woman, tohave
lived, Goldstone continued, She never ran
away. She just rode her horse out intothe mid-
dle of all those arrows and all those swords.
Thats what makes her so important. She
didnt shrink under battle. She was in fact
wounded in battle three times. Thats what
makes her such a marvel.
While Nancy Goldstone will discuss her re-
cent historical book at 7 p.m. Wednesday, her
husband, Larry Goldstone, at 11 a.m. Thurs-
day, will discuss his 2011project, a non-fiction
booktitledInherentlyUnequal: TheBetrayal
of Equal Rights by the Supreme Court, 1865-
1903.
InAmericanhistory we have this tendency
to jump over some of the bad periods or deal
withthemas if its anhistorical anomaly, Lar-
ry Goldstone said, explaining he prefers to
take an unflinching look at bad periods, in-
cluding Supreme Court decisions that, he ar-
gues, set the stage for Jim Crow laws.
To conclude the lecture series, the Gold-
stones, who live in Long Island, N.Y., will take
part together in a round-table discussion on
History, Literature and the Imagination,
starting at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
Working together for years, the couple co-
authored books as diverse as The Friar and
the Cipher, which is the saga of a mysterious
medieval manuscript kept at the Yale Univer-
sity Library, and Deconstructing Penguins,
which offers tips for parent-child book groups
Thenonedayoneof theGoldstones wanted
to include something in a book and the other
emphatically did not
Each of us was convinced the editor would
side with one of us, Nancy Goldstone said.
The editor did make a decision, which re-
sulted one half of the partnership disappoint-
ed.
The one who pouted will not be named,
Larry Goldstone said. But that author took to
heart the advice, If you want it so much, go
write your own book.
Writing separate books makes them more
prolific, said the Goldstones, who remain
huge fans of each others works.
Wetakea lookat history, LarryGoldstone
said.
We try to showyou the world today, Nan-
cy Goldstone said, by showing you the world
before.
A world
we dont
all know
The Goldstones, married historical
authors, will speak at Misericordia.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
Nancy Goldstone
Larry Goldstone
What: Nancy Goldstone Lecture on The
Maid and the Queen: The Secret History
of Joan of Arc
When: 7 p.m. Wednesday
Where: Walsh Auditorium, Misericordia
University Campus

What: Larry Goldstone Lecture on In-


herently Unequal.
When: 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Thursday
Where: Sandy and Marlene Insalaco Hall,
Misericordia University Campus

What: Larry and Nancy Goldstone in


roundtable discussion, History, Litera-
ture and the Imagination
When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday
Where: Mary Kintz Bevevino Library

Admission to all three talks: Free


IF YOU GO
NEW YORK When the 2011-2012
Tony nominators ignored just about
everything that opened before last
spring, we wondered if producers
would bother with a fall season alto-
gether.
But here we are with 16 upcoming
Broadway openings, not counting
Elf and A Christmas Story: The
Musical at the holidays. And if we
add those, plus Bring It On and
Harvey, which opened in the sum-
mer, we get 20 productions for the
first half of the season, which ends
Dec. 31. Thats one more than the
number we had at this time last year
and the previous year.
Like last year, there are just as many
plays as musicals (five each), and
more play revivals (seven) than re-
turns of familiar musicals (three). The
other shocker, in our musical- and
Brit-obsessed corner of the culture, is
that all the new plays are by Ameri-
cans.
Speaking of things American, it just
may be excellent timing for Annie,
the little-orphan hit machine from
1977, whensome pundits ascribedthe
unlikely success of the sunny and sim-
ple showto something called Carter-
era optimism. No kidding.
The musical, with book by Thomas
Meehan, music by Charles Strouse
and lyrics by Martin Charnin, will be
directed this time by James Lapine,
the sophisticated fellow best known
for his collaborations with Stephen
Sondheim, who also happens to make
remarkable theater with child actors.
It may always be tomorrow some-
where in the world for the icon with
the orange poodle wig and the pooch
and the seven Tonys.
But this will be Broadways first
Annie revival since 1997, the 20th-
anniversary production that barely
ran seven months. Perhaps nobody
was talking about the New Deal in
those prosperous times, much less
singing about federal works projects.
The new revival has the advantage,
such as it is, of being a Depression-era
musical in a Depression-mentality
era.
Of course, neither Annie nor
Broadway statistics will be the real
story of the autumn. The news, just
like last year, will be the stars.
Al Pacino is doing Glengarry Glen
Broadway in fall: From Chaplin to Cyrano
By LINDA WINER
Newsday
See BROADWAY, Page 5F
W
hen he visited the Lower East Side Tene-
ment Museum in New York in 2002, writ-
er/producer Jay Kholos remembered the
stories his grandfather had told him so
long ago.
Jewish people really werent wanted, Kholos said,
explaining why his grandfather fled Russia as a young
man. The Cossacks would be
coming through and raiding
the villages.
Kholos grandfather escaped
the pogroms of EasternEurope
and came to America, entered
through Ellis Island, and
worked hard to earn enough
money to send for his future
wife Kholos future Bubbie
to join himin the newland of
opportunity.
I got the idea in 2002; in
2003 the play opened off-
Broadway and ran for 16
months, Kholos said of his A
Stoop On Orchard Street.
The writer/producer recent-
ly arranged another run for the
play, on stage in Philadelphia
starting Oct. 7. But first
Bubbie, the grandmother of the family, shares a moment with young
Seama.
After his father leaves, young Benny assures his mother, sister and grandmother that hell be the man of the family.
A fruit peddler offers young Benny a job in A Stoop on Orchard
Street.
Playwright Jay Kholos playfully poses
on a stoop in downtown Wilkes-Barre,
the kind of place where the characters
in his play might gather.
Much of the neighborhood socializing takes place outside on the
steps in AStoop on Orchard Street, which will be presented at
the Jewish Community Center in Wilkes-Barre at 8 p.m. Oct. 6.
Musical tour makes its debut
at the JCC in Wilkes-Barre
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
See STOOP, Page 4F
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
KENKEN
JUMBLE
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
The moon is no longer full,
but its still in your sign,
offering you more than the
usual amount of attention.
You will receive compli-
ments, encouragement
and congratulations.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Dont be surprised when
people gather around you.
Thats what happens to
people who create exciting
events and make their own
fun. You just cant help but
be effective in this regard.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Usually, a leap of faith
requires that you jump
into unknown territory.
But the leap of faith you
take now looks an awful
lot like you staying in
one place. By staying,
youre postulating that
things will get better and
they will.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Seek friends with simi-
lar interests. A sense of
belonging is whats needed
now, whether or not you
consciously realize it. Your
spirit will be made light by
a kindred soul.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). If you
dont feel as motivated as
youd like, your environ-
ment may be to blame.
Too many distractions
zap your energy. Clear
the clutter on surfaces to
restore your energy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
You do not try to be an
intimidating presence, and
yet theres someone who
doesnt quite know how to
act around you. If you can
put this person at ease,
your life will get easier.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
The morning may feel like
someone called a meet-
ing without having a clear
purpose as to why. You will
realize that you have to
supply your own why for
the people who havent a
clue.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You may want more, but
thats only because you
dont fully realize what you
have. When you realize the
potential of all thats avail-
able to you, youll
be amazed at what you
can do.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). With so many people
trying to involve you in
their lives, you may
forget that youre the
one in charge of your
schedule. You stay
powerful and in control by
being slow to commit to
others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). A change in your
schedule, eating habits or
responsibilities at home
will cause a degree of
stress, even though the
change is for the better. So
be good to yourself. Take
it easy.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
There are choices on the
table. Decisions need to
be made now, or some
of those options will no
longer be available. Making
choices is work. Accept
the responsibility because
youre very good at
this now.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
The main mission of your
day could be derailed
by a host of interesting
tangents. Youll wonder
whether your original goal
is still a good one. For
now, assume it is and push
forward.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept.
30). Plans not only suc-
ceed this year; they tri-
umph. October brings a
financial bonus. Younger
friends will credit you
later for helping them
in November. Also,
November brings a sur-
prise announcement. Youll
finish home projects in
January. In love, refuse to
settle and agree to com-
promise, and your relation-
ships will rock. Cancer and
Virgo people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are:
33, 19, 24, 15 and 35.
GROUP PRACTICE
Gail Grabowski
9/30/12
1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies:
Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
9/30
DEAR ABBY
Senioritis is contracted
by teens younger sister
Dear Abby:
A year ago
I remarried
and gained
three great
stepkids.
Im worried
about the oldest, who is a
senior (18). She doesnt care
about school anymore. Shes
smart enough. When she
tries, she gets As. But when
she doesnt want to do the
work, she gets Fs. There is
no in-between. Shes capable,
but lazy.
Her youngest sister (12)
is doing the same thing
now, too. Neither one is
using drugs or alcohol or
skipping school. They are
fundamentally good kids. I
recognize that its laziness
because I did the same thing
30 years ago. What turned
me around was the U.S.
Navy. I literally grew up on
an aircraft carrier.
Abby, until now I had
only sons. I understand boys
and men. Having daughters
now is a very steep learning
curve. I need suggestions on
how to help their mom par-
ent them through this rough
period. I love our children
deeply and want to be the
kind of stepdad God wants
me to be for them.
Clueless Stepdad
Dear Clueless: For a man
who signed himself clueless,
you have clear insight. You
and your wife should sched-
ule an appointment with
the oldest girls school coun-
selor and find out to what
degree her grade point aver-
age has been affected by her
laziness.
Then ask your stepdaugh-
ter what she plans to do
after high school. Does she
plan to go straight into a
minimum-wage job if she
can find one with little
chance of advancement?
Trade school? College? If
she wants to further her
education, she needs to
understand that schools
pay attention to applicants
high school records. At 18,
she should be treated like
the young adult she is, and
you and her mother deserve
some answers.
The 12-year-old is another
story. Find out from her
teachers whether she has
fallen behind in any of her
classes and see that she
gets tutoring if she needs
to catch up. Make sure she
completes her homework
assignments. You and her
mother should impress
upon her that you expect
the best shes capable of,
and for good grades there
will be rewards just as for
poor grades there will be
consequences, such as re-
duced privileges. Then
practice what you preach.
Dear Abby: My husband
and I are retired. He has
a small farm, which isnt
profitable, so he calls it his
hobby farm.
When we retired, we
agreed to have our main
meal at noon every day. I
work hard to have a nutri-
tious meal on the table
promptly at 12 noon. My
husband knows this, but
he comes in from working
whenever hes ready
sometimes hours late.
He always has an excuse.
He has a cellphone and
could call to let me know
hes going to be late, but he
rarely does. When he finally
gets in, the food is cold and
I am upset.
He thinks Im unreason-
able to expect him to be
on time or call. He has
never cooked a meal in his
life, so he has no idea what
is involved. Im fed up with
his behavior and need some
suggestions on how to han-
dle this.
Boiling Mad in
Alabama
Dear Boiling Mad: Perhaps
agreeing to have your main
meal together at noon was
unrealistic. Talk calmly to
your husband and ask if it
would be more practical to
schedule it for 1 p.m. or 2
p.m. That he wouldnt call
to let you know hes run-
ning late does seem incon-
siderate, and if the problem
persists, it might be better
for both of you if his main
meal consists of a sand-
wich he makes for himself
whenever he finally returns
home.
To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most
frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for
$3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
KenKen
9/30
New York Times
9/30
Bonus Puzzle
9/30
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA
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12:00PM, 2:20PM, 4:50PM
CAMPAIGN, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
(12:25PM, 2:35PM, 4:45PM, 7:05PM,
9:20PM, DOESNT PLAY ON 10/4)
DREDD (3D) (R)
12:35PM, 5:25PM, 7:55PM, 10:25PM
DREDD (DIGITAL) (R)
3:00PM
END OF WATCH (DIGITAL) (R)
11:55AM, 2:30PM, 5:05PM, 7:50PM,
10:30PM
EXPENDABLES 2, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
(12:15PM 2:45PM 5:15PM, 7:45PM,
DOESNT PLAY ON 10/3), 10:25PM
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9:35PM
LOOPER (DIGITAL) (R)
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1:20PM, 4:30PM, 7:25PM, 10:05PM
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1:35PM, 4:20PM, 7:10PM, 10:20PM
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Stoop will visit the Jewish
Community Center in Wilkes-
Barre.
You dont have to be Jewish to
enjoy this play, Kholos said with
a chuckle. But it couldnt hurt.
Seriously, he said, he believes
the setting in Manhattans Lower
East Side and the characters
dreams of a better life will reso-
nate with many Americans
whose ancestors emigrated from
other countries.
The story isnt autobiographi-
cal, he says, except that he sprin-
kled some family names into the
script.
If you attend Sundays show
you will meet an old Vaudevillian
namedBenwhowill lookbackon
his life, in particular the year
1910. That was a particularly
challenging time for young Ben-
ny, who felt he had to become the
manof the house whenhis father,
Hiram, abandonedhis wife, Ruth,
and two children.
Seeking to fill the void in
Ruths life, a neighbor falls inlove
with her. He feels terribly guilty,
terribly conflicted because shes
still married, Kholos said, refer-
ring to the lyrics of Another
Mans Wife.
As to how the play turns out,
Kholos advisedyoutojointhe au-
dience and find out in person.
It is a very romanticized ver-
sion of what life was like, he
said. We showa little of the hard-
ship of 12 people living in a place
that has enough room for four,
but we really delve into the hopes
and dreams of people in a tene-
ment house.
They had no television, no ra-
dio, just the socializing withtheir
group on the stoop, and the gos-
sip.
There was always hope on the
stoop.
STOOP
Continued from Page 1F
What: A Stoop on Orchard Street
When: 8 p.m. Saturday
Where: Jewish Community Center,
60 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre
Tickets: $49.95
More info: 824-4646
IF YOU GO
A stoop describes the high en-
trance steps that almost give the
old New York houses the appear-
ance of small castles. In the ghetto
neighborhoods especially, stoops
served many different functions:
Projected outward into the great
theater of the street, these elevat-
ed platforms were ideal for obser-
vation, courting, a chat, or gossip.
The first builders in the city
brought with them their customs
of erecting buildings that were
elevated (as protection against the
havoc wreaked by North Sea
floods) and flush to the street (to
make up for the lack of space in a
canal-dominated city like Am-
sterdam.) The early village of New
York thus assumed an identity
that, three centuries later, it still
retains and charmingly so along
certain streets and in certain
neighborhoods.
Mario Maffi, New York City: An
Outsiders Inside View.
THE MYTHOLOGY
OF THE STOOP
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
timesleader.com
7
6
6
8
3
1
Ross again, but hes doing a different
character than he played in the movie.
Single mom Katie Holmes, who had a
modest part in Arthur Millers All My
Sons in2008, takes center stageinanew
drama, Dead Accounts. Paul Rudd and
Ed Asner cross demographics in a dark
comedy, Grace. Henry Winkler takes
on a comedy about the porn industry,
The Performers. Theater newcomer
Debra Winger joins Broadway pro Patti
LuPone in David Mamets The Anar-
chist, while Jessica Chastain, who
sprang into consciousness with her Os-
car nomination for The Help, dares
one of the stages bigfemale roles inThe
Heiress.
It would be nice if, next spring, the To-
ny nominators found at least a few of
them unforgettable.
BROADWAY
Continued fromPage 1F
Here are 16 big shows coming to Broad-
way this fall:
CHAPLIN: THE MUSICAL (BARRY-
MORE THEATRE, 243 W. 47TH ST. NOW
PLAYING). The most famous icon of silent
movies, Charlie Chaplin, becomes bio-
musical material, with Rob McClure play-
ing the British-born artist from his tough
boyhood on the streets through his death
at 88 in 1977. Thomas Meehan (Annie)
wrote the book, with music and lyrics by
Broadway newcomer Christopher Curtis
and direction by Warren Carlyle (Finians
Rainbow).
AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE (FRIED-
MAN THEATRE, 261 W. 47TH ST.,
OPENS THURSDAY). Henrik Ibsens
still-modern late-19th-century drama
about a doctor who tries to expose water
contamination hasnt been produced on
Broadway since a much earlier incarnation
of the Lincoln Center Theater did it in 1971.
The Manhattan Theatre Club brings a new
adaptation, first done in London in 2008,
and has cast such splendid actors as Boyd
Gaines and Richard Thomas. Doug Hughes
(Doubt) directs.
GRACE (CORT THEATRE, 138 W.
48TH ST., OCT. 4). Michael Shannon, the
deliciously creepy Prohibition guy in
Boardwalk Empire, has been delightfully
making the rounds in off-Broadway pro-
ductions this year. Now he comes to
Broadway with Paul Rudd and the redoub-
table Ed Asner in Craig Wrights dark
comedy about Gospel motels.
CYRANO DE BERGERAC (AMERICAN
AIRLINES THEATRE, 227 W. 42ND ST.,
OCT. 11). One of the most romantic of all
the classics returns for the first time since
Kevin Kline and Jennifer Garner brought it
to Broadway in 2007. This time, Edmond
Rostands drama about internal beauty
will star Douglas Hodge, Tony winner from
the most recent La Cage aux Folles, as
the poetic swordsman with the life-defin-
ing nose. Patrick Page, whose Green Gob-
lin was the only real fun in Spider-Man:
Turn Off the Dark, also stars.
EDWARD ALBEES WHOS AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF? (BOOTH THEATRE,
222 W. 45TH ST., OCT. 13). The Steppen-
wolf revival of Albees devastating 1962
domestic dissection arrives with massive
acclaim both from Chicago and a Washing-
ton run. Directed by Pam MacKinnon
(Clybourne Park), the production stars
Tracy Letts best known as the playwright
of August: Osage County and the re-
markable Amy Morton. To add to the
sense of occasion, the play will open on its
50th anniversary.
THE HEIRESS (WALTER KERR THE-
ATRE, 219 W. 48TH ST., NOV.1). It will be
hard, at least for a few minutes, not to
picture Cherry Jones, so luminous as the
unmarried Catherine Sloper in the 1995
revival of Ruth and Augustus Goetzs 1947
adaptation of Henry James Washington
Square. On the other hand, the new
production has Jessica Chastain, Holly-
woods newest thinking-persons It Girl, in
her Broadway debut. Dan Stevens (Down-
ton Abbey) and David Strathairn co-star
in Moiss Kaufmans production.
ANNIE: THE MUSICAL (PALACE THE-
ATRE, 1564 BROADWAY, NOV. 8). Hey,
kids, watch out for the terrific Katie Finne-
ran as Miss Hannigan. Bet shell be the
scariest.
GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS (SCHOEN-
FELD THEATRE, 236 W. 45TH ST., NOV.
11). Two years ago, Daniel Sullivan directed
Al Pacino in that riveting production of
The Merchant of Venice. Now the two
pair up for a revival of David Mamets
merciless Pulitzer Prize-winning eviscer-
ation of competition and the American
dream. Pacino, who played upstart Ricky
Roma in the 1992 movie, ages here into
Shelley Levene, the character played on
film by Jack Lemmon. The unstoppably
charming Bobby Cannavale is Ricky now,
in a cast that also includes Richard Schiff
and Jeremy Shamos.
THE PERFORMERS (LONGACRE
THEATRE, 220 W. 48TH ST., NOV. 14). A
couple of high school buddies and their
women reconnect at the wait for it
Adult Film Awards in Vegas. The new
comedy by David West Read stars wait
again Henry Winkler and multitalented
Broadway hunk Cheyenne Jackson, and
promises sex, love and Barry Manilow.
SCANDALOUS: THE LIFE AND TRIALS
OF AIMEE SEMPLE MCPHERSON
(NEIL SIMON THEATRE, 250 W. 52ND
ST., NOV. 15). Kathie Lee Gifford may not
be the first, or maybe the 101st, celebrity
youd expect to find as the composer and
lyricist of a musical about the 1920s celeb-
rity evangelist, but get used to it. The
wonderful Carolee Carmello has been
recruited to play the soul-saving media
magnet.
REBECCA (BROADHURST THEATRE,
235 W. 44TH ST., NOV. 18). Direct well,
after six years from runs in Finland,
Japan and Austria comes this period
musical based on Daphne du Mauriers
30s-gothic mystery about the shadow of
a dead wife on a new married couple. The
production, reportedly a big one, was
supposed to open last season, but the
money is said to have run out. Francesca
Zambello, the opera director who staged
the European version, is joined now by
Michael Blakemore (Kiss Me Kate and a
specialist in the heady dramas of Michael
Frayn).
DEAD ACCOUNTS (MUSIC BOX THE-
ATRE, 239 W. 45TH ST., NOV. 29). The
new life of famous divorcee Katie Holmes
will be marked by her Broadway turn in
the New York premiere of Smash cre-
ator Theresa Rebecks five-character
comedy. Holmes plays a sister obsessed
with understanding the return of her
brother (Norbert Leo Butz). Jack OBrien
(The Coast of Utopia) directs.
THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD
(STUDIO 54, 254 W. 54TH ST., NOV. 13).
How odd that this is Broadways first
revival of the lark that began life under
Joseph Papps wing in 1985. Written and
composed by Rupert Holmes, the musical
is a murder mystery on the stage of a
Victorian music hall and, each night, the
audience chooses the killer. Scott Ellis
directs the production, which stars, among
other enticements, Chita Rivera as Prin-
cess Puffer and Stephanie J. Block as
young Edwin Drood.
THE ANARCHIST (GOLDEN THEAT-
RE, 252 W. 45TH ST., DEC. 2). For dec-
ades Patti LuPone has given lie to the
reasonable belief that David Mamet cant
write female characters. She has done
some of her strongest dramatic work in
Mamet plays and, in this two-fister, she is
joined by Debra Winger in her Broadway
debut. Winger plays warden to LuPones
inmate. Imagine the possibilities. Mamet
directs.
GOLDEN BOY (BELASCO THEATRE,
111 W. 44TH ST., DEC. 6). Seth Numrich
(best friend of Joey the horse in War
Horse) stars as a gifted violinist lured
into high-prize boxing in Clifford Odets
drama. Bartlett Sher, who staged South
Pacific and Odets Awake & Sing! for
the Lincoln Center Theater, directs the
same theaters 75th anniversary revival
with a cast that includes Danny Burstein
and Tony Shalhoub.
THE OTHER PLACE (FRIEDMAN
THEATRE, 261 W. 47TH ST., PREVIEWS
BEGIN DEC. 11): Laurie Metcalf was stag-
gering as an unhinged neurologist in the
off-Broadway premiere of this psycholog-
ical thriller by Sharr White and directed by
Joe Mantello. Now Broadway gets to see
this fascinating work.
GET THEE TO NEW YORK
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. Winter of the World. Ken Follett. Dut-
ton ($36)
2. A Wanted Man. Lee Child. Delacorte
($28)
3. The Time Keeper. Mitch Albom. Hype-
rion ($24.99)
4. Gone Girl. Gillian Flynn. Crown ($25)
5. Low Pressure. Sandra Brown. Grand
Central ($26.99)
6. Zoo. Patterson/Ledwidge. Little,
Brown ($27.99)
7. Severe Clear. Stuart Woods. Putnam
($26.95)
8. Delusion in Death. J.D. Robb. Putnam
($27.95)
9. The Tombs. Clive Cussler. Putnam
($27.95)
10. Telegraph Avenue. Michael Chabon.
Harper ($27.99)
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. No Easy Day. Mark Owen. Dutton
($26.95)
2. I Declare: 31 Promises to Speak. Joel
Osteen. FaithWords ($21.99)
3. The Price of Politics. Bob Woodward.
Simon & Schuster ($30)
4. Guinness World Records. Guinness
World Records. Guinness World Re-
cords ($28.95)
5. Divine Healing Hands. Zhi Gang Sha,
M.D. Atria ($29.95)
6. Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Salman
Rushdie. Random House ($30)
7. Killing Lincoln. Bill OReilly. Henry Holt
($28)
8. The Oath: The Obama White House.
Jeffrey Toobin. Doubleday ($28.95)
9. Free Market Revolution. Brook/Wat-
kins. Palgrave Macmillan ($27)
10. Obamas America. Dinesh DSouza.
Regnery Publishing ($27.95)
B E S T S E L L E R S
S
o look, heres the thing: This. Is. Not.
A. Childrens. Book. If youre looking
for what made Harry Potter magical
Wizards! Spells! Flying Broom-
sticks! youre not going to find it.
If youre looking for what makes J.K. Row-
ling magical emotion, heart you will.
The Casual Vacancy is the first novel writ-
ten for adults fromRowling, the successful-be-
yond-belief author behind the Harry Potter
series about the young boy who discovers hes
a wizard.
Already at No. 1 on Amazon, the book has
gotten early buzz from references to sex and
drugs that might be a tadmature for the young-
est Potter fans.
Its set in the small British village of Pagford
and tells the story of what happens after the
unexpected death of a town official leaves a va-
cancy on the towns governing body. A long-
simmering conflict over what the solidly mid-
dle-class village should do about the residents
of a poverty-stricken, drug- and crime-infested
housing project on the edge of town gets heat-
ed, interwoven with the personal lives and
problems of Rowlings characters.
This isnt a book thats easy to fall in love
with, the way Harry Potter was with its char-
ming, winningheroandhis pluckyfriends, sav-
ing the world from evil with the help of a pow-
erful spell or two.
Even with its moments of humor, its a hard
story where some people just dont get saved,
because really, they never had a chance. Its fil-
led with often unlikeable people, some of
whom cross the line into ter-
rible. Theyre all unhappy in one
way or another, even if the only people
who know that are themselves, if that. They
can be judgmental, mean, petty and violent.
Some are damaged beyond repair. Even the de-
ceasedofficial, insome ways the most positive,
moral force in the story, is shown to have hurt
his wife with his dedication to his cause that
clearly came at her emotional expense.
Readers know these people. Theyre famil-
iar, with their moments of lashing out in anger
or hoping against hope that this time things
will be different. Theyre people the reader
feels something for, even its just pity, because
theyre struggling, because life canbe hardand
sometimes there just arent any breaks, be-
cause even people who look like nothing but
trouble can do something good. A number of
her characters are teenagers, trying to figure
out their places in the world, with all the emo-
tional peaks and valleys that can bring.
That ability to bring her characters to their
emotional life was a hallmark of the Harry Pot-
ter series it didnt become a global phenom-
enonjust because it was anexcitingadventure,
but because there was a real heart to it, charac-
ters who had both strengths and weaknesses,
who struggled with their choices.
Thats what makes this book worth it, de-
spite a slow start and sometimes too much of
the descriptions and adjectives that added life
to Harry Potter but at times tend to bog Row-
ling down here. Thats what makes the books
ending scenes so heartbreaking turning the
page seems unbearable, but not as much as
putting down the book would be.
The Casual Vacancy (Little, Brown and Com-
pany), by J.K. Rowling.
By DEEPTI HAJELA Associated Press
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Call or visit us online for details on many other tours.
821-3855 or 1-800-432-8069 www.martztours.com
Oct. 8-12 ($831) Superb
sightseeing in the White
Mountains! Drift & dream on a
Squam Lake (On Golden Pond)
Cruise. Catch awesome vistas
on a mountains Train Ride.
NEW HAMPSHIRE &
VERMONT 5-DAY
PA GRAND
CANYON
Oct. 6 ($105) Clip-clop along the
Canyons Upper Gorge for a scenic
Covered Wagon Tour. Includes
Lunch and Free Time in Wellsboro.
PHILADELPHIA
GHOST TOUR
Oct. 13, 20 ($75) Whats
in store? Spooks galore!
Independence National
Park and Eastern State
Penitentiary.
C
ONCORD, N.H.
For a small state,
NewHampshire of-
fers a variety expe-
riences for free in
thefall, whether its
scenic drives, hiking, moose
watching, browsing antiques
shops and spotting huge pump-
kins. Foliage reports show leaf
color has started showing up in
the Great North Woods, White
Mountains and Lakes regions,
and the state just released a fo-
liage tracker to help visitors find
the best spots. The states tou-
rism division has also started a
new campaign this year, Live
Free and ... The fill-in-the-blank
play on the state motto, Live
Free or Die, suggests that there
many possibilities when it comes
to exploring New Hampshire.
Here are a few suggestions to en-
joy the beautiful foliage, water-
ways and mountains in the state
at no cost:
KANCAMAGUS HIGHWAY:
The 34.5-mile (55.5-kilometer)
east-west drive on State Route
112 winds through the White
Mountains between the towns of
Lincoln and Conway. There are
no restaurants, gas stations or
other amenities; the emphasis is
on the stunning natural beauty
surrounding you. Visitors can
seek out hiking trails, camp-
grounds and waterfalls. Some ar-
eas, such as the Rocky Gorge,
were damaged during Tropical
Storm Irene but have since been
restored. Some color already is
showing, but the maple, birch
and beech trees are at their peak
usually in the first and second
weeks of October. Details at
http://www.visitnh.gov or
www.kancamagushighway.com .
CAMPING: Day use and camp-
ing fees are not charged at 26
camping sites, trailheads, ponds
and picnic areas in the White
Mountain National Forest. This
is for the adventurous type who
wants to backpack in and camp
off the trail or at a backcountry
shelter or tent platform in unde-
veloped or wilderness areas. Oth-
er free activities include hiking,
biking, scenic drives. The trails,
some of themheading up a fewof
the 4,000-foot (1,200-meter)
mountains, offer varying degrees
of difficulty. For more free oppor-
tunities, information and back-
country rules visit www.fs.us-
da.gov/whitemountain
MOOSE WATCHING: Theres
still a good chance to view a
moose in New Hampshires
North Country through mid-Oc-
tober. Some companies offer
moose-watching tours, but the
intrepid traveler can set out at
dusk on Route 3 in Pittsburg,
Route16 in Errol and other roads
to try to spot one. Moose are un-
predictable, so its common to
see the Brake for Moose signs
up north. More information can
be found at www.nhgrand.com/
itineraries.aspx .
QUIETESCAPES: NewHamp-
shire has many peaceful, scenic
settings such as the Cathedral of
the Pines in Rindge, an open-air
cathedral on a hilltop in the
southwest part of the state with a
great view of the Mount Monad-
nock. Stones taken from across
the country and from overseas
make up an altar recognized by
Congress as a National Memorial
to American men and women
who lost their lives in war. The
site holds public events promot-
ing peace, interfaith understand-
ing and respect for the environ-
ment. It is free and open through
Oct. 31. Information is available
at www.cathedralofthepines.org.
SURFING: Not into leaf-peep-
ing? Turn to the ocean beaches.
The sand-sculpting competitions
and sunbathers may be gone, but
New Hampshires mere 17 miles
(27 kilometers) of coastline are
attracting more surfers in wet-
suits, of course this time of
year. The watch for hurricanes
and other extreme weather con-
ditions may keep some wary, but
surfers say they contribute to
some of the best surfing condi-
tions in the Northeast. Surf spots
include North Hampton Beach,
Jenness Beach, Rye Rocks and
The Wall on Route 1A for those
who want to ride the waves, or
just watch. Information on condi-
tions can be found at magicsea-
weed.com .
A colorful fall in New Hampshire
AP PHOTOS
Peak fall foliage colors come alive in the White Mountain National Forest in Twin Mountain, N.H.
The highest point of the Kancamagus Highway is seen in Albany ,
N.H. The scenic road passes through New Hampshires White
Mountain national forest and is free to drive. An adventurer surfs off New Hampshires coast line in Hampton,
N.H. When the weather gets bad the surf gets great and is free
along the states coastline.
Moose-watching, surfing and more:
New England state offers plenty to do
By KATHY McCORMACK
Associated Press
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 1G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Burne Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certied
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
Black/Black Sunroof,
OnStar, Chrome Wheels,
Black/ Cashmere leather
Sunroof, XM, Onstar,
Heated & Memory Seats
2006 DTS
by Cadillac
2008
STS AWD
by Cadillac
White Daimond/Cashmere
Leather Sunroof, Navigation,
Rear Entertainment, Chrome
Wheels, Must See!
#9004A Platinum/Leather,
Sunroof, Heated & Memory
Seats ONLY 28,973 MILES!
2004 Escalade
ESV AWD
by Cadillac
White Diamond/Shale Leather
Ultraview Sunroof, heated &
memory Seats, Navigation,
Onstar, XM
Gold Mist/Shale Leather,
Sunroof, 18 Chrome Wheels,
XM, Onstar ONLY 32,862 Miles!
2007
SRX AWD
by Cadillac
2009 CTS AWD
Performance
by Cadillac
Gold Mist/Leather,
Chrome Wheels, Heated
& Memory Seats, OnStar
Gold Mist/Cashmere Leather,
Entertainment System, Navigation,
22 Chrome Wheels, XM, Onstar,
Only 54,105 Miles!
2009 DTS
by Cadillac
2007
EscaladeAWD
by Cadillac
$
13,996
$
22,998
$
17,994
$
25,998
$
17,997
$
28,999
$
19,999
$
32,997
$
21,998
$
36,991
White Diamond/Shale
Leather Cooled Heated &
Memory seats, Chrome
Wheels, on star, XM
platinum, Leather,
Chrome Wheels, Sunroof, XM,
Onstar, Heated &
Memory Seats
2008 DTS
by Cadillac
2011 DTS
by Cadillac
CONSTRUCTION SPECIALS... PLEASE EXCUSE OUR DUST AS WE REMODEL TO SERVE YOU BETTER
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 1-888-880-6537
www.rjburne.com Mon-Thurs 9-8 Sat 9-4
2011 CTS Luxury by Cadillac
$
32,991
Radiant Silver, Leather,
Heated & Memory Seats, XM,
Onstar, 6,601 miles
Brand New 2011 CTS by Cadillac
$
35,990
Radiant Silver, Leather,
Sunroof,
Onstar, XM,
Only 20 miles!
2008 CTS
Luxury AWD
by Cadillac
of Scranton - NEPA
of Scranton - NEPA
7
7
4
3
7
0
PETILLO MOTORS
910 Moosic Rd. Old Forge, PA
(570)457-5441
OUR OCTOBER SHOWCASE
FULL INVENTORY AT
PETILLOMOTORS.COM
2010 CHEVY COBALT
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, ABS, Cruise, 50,123 Miles..... $10,995
2008 CHEVY IMPALA
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Rr. Air, ABS, Digital Dash, 52,432 Miles $10,995
2007 CADILLAC STS
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Heated Drivers Seat, Rr. Air, ABS, 70,543 Miles $14,995
2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Rr. Air, ABS, Cruise ................. $4,995
2007 HUMMER H3
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl,Cruise, Luggage Rack, 37,654 Miles .... $19,995
2006 CHEVY MONTE CARLO
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Power Seat, Rear Air, ABS ............ $6,495
2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Rr. Air, ABS, Digital Dash............. $6,995
2006 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Heated Drivers Seat, Luggage Rack ...... $5,395
2006 FORD MUSTANG
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Power Windows, Digital Dash, 30,543 Miles $17,495
2006 JEEP LIBERTY
Dual Zone Climate Ctrl, Rr. Air, ABS, Luggage Rack, 73,241 Miles $9,995
NO HAGGLE
PRICING
WE BUY CARS! WE BUY CARS!
FULL INVENTORY ONLINE
518 Burke Bypass Olyphant, PA 18447
924 Scranton Carbondale Hwy Dickson City
570-383-9555
TWO LOCATIONS-
Dickson City Olyphant
F
E
E
L
G
O
O
D
M
O
T
O
R
S
I
N
C
.
N
E
T
F
E
E
L
G
O
O
D
M
O
T
O
R
S
I
N
C
.
N
E
T
FEATURED INVENTORY
85 CADILLAC ELDORADO
Only 68K! Coupe, Leather ......................... $4,995
05 SUZUKI XL7 EX III
4WD, Auto, V6.................................... $6,950
07 HONDA ACCORD EX-L
97K, Leather, 5-Speed ....................... $11,780
09 FORD FOCUS SE
Only 44K! Auto, Gold............................ $11,946
10 FORD RANGER XLT
Only 34K, Leather .............................. $11,990
11 NISSAN VERSA
Only 15K, 5 Speed.............................. $12,895
04 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad Cab, Only 27K! ......................... $14,888
11 VW JETTA SE
Only 32K! Leather, Auto, Silver................. $14,995
10 SUZUKI SX4 SPORT AWD
Only 1,259 Miiles! .............................. $15,864
7
7
8
6
1
0
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AAA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
GAS SAVER SPECIALS
2001 HYUNDAI
ACCENT
Auto, A/C, AM/FM, 72K Miles
ONLY
$
4,495
2004 CHRYSLER
SEBRING
4 Cyl, PW, PDL, Tilt
ONLY
$
4,850
2002 SUBARU FORRESTER
AWD
PW, PDL
ONLY
$
2,995
2002 SATURN LW300
WAGON
PW, PDL, P. Seat, A/C, Low Miles
ONLY
$
4,995
2005 KIA SPECTRA EX
PW, PDL, A/C
ONLY
$
4,995
2002 PONTIAC SUNFIRE
Auto, AM/FM, Tilt, Moonroof,
49K Miles
ONLY
$
5,425
7
7
7
3
1
9
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
$
5,295
*
2004 Saturn Ion
$
5,590
*
2000 Dodge
Stratus
$
3,695
*
1997 Honda
Civic 4dr
2002 Hyundai
Elantra
$
5,995
*
5 Speed, Sharp!
Low Mileage
2003 Ford Taurus
SE
$
5,595
* $
3,990
*
1999 Ford
Escort 2dr
2010 BMW X3 28,826 Miles.........................$28,500
2003 Ford F150 88,031 Miles ......................$11,890
2007 Ford Mustang 32,569 Miles.................$19,990
2003 Nissan Frontier 87,667 Miles.................$9,750
2006 Toyota Corolla 53,236 Miles ................$10,980
2010 Volkswagen Tiguan 21,500 Miles.........$22,300
2005 Audi A8 89K Miles.............................$15,900
2006 Chevy Cobalt 78,925 Miles....................$8,900
2008 Chevy TrailBlazer 19,670 Miles............$19,763
2011 Ford Econoline 11,100 Miles ...............$18,500
2007 Ford Econoline 56,256 Miles ...............$13,999
2008 Ford Mustang 59,632 Miles.................$17,999
2008 Jeep Wrangler 36,600 Miles................$23,900
2009 Jeep Wrangler 35,760 Miles................$20,999
2007 Mercedes-Benz CLK-Class 45K Miles ...$27,988
2007 Nissan Murano 56,784 Miles ...............$16,487
2009 Nissan Sentra 34K Miles ...................$12,900
2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid 76,625 Miles ......$13,900
2011 Ford F150 18K Miles .........................$28,699
2008 Mazda 3 49K Miles ...........................$14,299
2010 Mazda 6 30K Miles ...........................$15,699
2007 Mercury Grand Marquis 49K Miles .....$12,299
2009 Subaru Forester 43,100 Miles .............$19,678
2004 Dodge Ram 1500 87,500 Miles ...........$15,300
2008 Honda CRV 59,100 Miles.....................$18,499
2010 Mazda 3 Speed GT Turbo 33,352 Miles ...$19,999
2009 Pontiac Vibe 58,525 Miles ...................$12,900
2003 BMW 3 Series 28,826 Miles ................$12,999
2001 Mercury Sable 83,459 Miles..................$5,900
2011 Hyundai Elantra ..........................$14,999
2011 Nissan Frontier ...........................$22,499
2002 Ford Thunderbird ........................$21,999
2010 Suzuki Kizashi SLS AWD..............$18,999
2003 Audi A4.......................................$10,890
2009 Suzuki SX4 Crossover .......................$13,890
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
PRESTIGE
ONE AUTO
WEBUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
250 General Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
Octagon
Family Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Anniversary Week Specials
35 Wings
by the dozen
$7.95 Large Pie
free topping on all larges & smalls
Dine in OR out. No coupon needed
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
7
8
1
0
4
4
PUBLIC AUCTION PUBLIC AUCTION
SA SATURDA TURDAY Y, OCT , OCT. 6 . 6
2012 - 10:00 AM 2012 - 10:00 AM
WILKES-BARRE CITY
3 Conyngham St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Cars, trucks, equipment
LAGAUCTION SERVICES
(570) 883-1276 or
www.lagauctions.com
Lic.# AU002629L
BUYERS PREMIUM
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
EMISSIONS
& SAFETY
INSPECTION
SPECIAL
$39.95 with
this coupon
Also, Like
New, Used
Tires & Bat-
teries for
$20 & up!
Vitos &
Ginos
949 Wyoming
Avenue
Forty Fort, PA
574-1275
Expires
12/31/12
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
JACK RUSSELL
Female brown &
white Jack Russell
mix. Lost in the
vicinity of the
Huntsville Reservoir.
Collar missing.
Answers to Pebbles
570-675-0385
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LOST. Jacket,
mens navy blue
blazer. Sentimental
value, wedding ring
& Rosary in pocket.
reward.
570-824-9784 or
570-899-0601
120 Found
CAT, Maine Coon
female polydactyl,
by Dairy Queen,
Kingston. 479-7634.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN TO the per-
son or persons who
claim or may claim
the easement to
bury in the Ascen-
sion Cemetery
located on Lee
Road in
Mocanaqua, PA in
the single grave
plot assigned to the
family of KOKORA,
which is located
between the graves
assigned to SOPHIE
KOKORA and JOHN
& EMILY TEAR-
POCK. Any per-
son(s) claiming the
easement to bury in
this single plot has
(have) thirty (30)
days from the date
of this publication to
make claim by pre-
senting an ease-
ment deed or proof
of sale to the Parish
Administrator at the
office of Holy Spirit
parish located at
150 Main Street
Mocanaqua, PA
18655. If no claim
is made within said
period of time, the
right to bury in the
said grave plot will
be assigned to
another interested
party.
Reverend Donald
Williams
Holy Spirit Parish
Administrator
BID NOTICE
The Luzerne Con-
servation District
will be accepting
bids for construc-
tion of two stream-
bank protection
projects in Salem
and Huntington
Townships, Luzerne
County. The full bid
package and sup-
porting information
is available online at
www.luzcd.org or
by calling 570-674-
7991 ext. 2. There
will be a mandatory
site showing on
Tuesday, 10/5/12 at
10:00 AM. Bids will
be accepted until
10:00 AM on
Wednesday,
10/10/12.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, that on
October 8, 2012, at
6:30 p.m., at the
Fox Hill Firehouse
Building, 50 Second
Street, Plains Town-
ship, Luzerne Coun-
ty, Pennsylvania,
the Plains Township
Board of Commis-
sioners shall take
public comment
regarding an Ordi-
nance (of which this
notice is a summa-
ry), of Governing
the Mining and
Quarry operations
within the
Municipality.
Said Ordinance
shall govern the
transportation of
materials from the
facility, cleaning up
of materials, hours
of operation and
enforcement
provisions.
Copies of the full
text of the pro-
posed Act 167 Ordi-
nance is available
for examination at
the Plains Township
Municipal Building,
126 North Main
Street, Plains,
Pennsylvania, dur-
ing normal business
hours of : 8:00 a.m.
through 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through
Friday.
Stephen A. Menn,
Esquire
Solicitor, Plains
Township
253 South Franklin
Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701
570.270.3133
LEGAL NOTICE
Middle Smithfield
Township, Monroe
County,
Pennsylvania
SEEKS MUNICIPAL
CERTIFIED PUBLIC
ACCOUNTANT /
AUDITOR
REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL Due By:
October 26,
4:00pm
NOTICE TO
RESPONDENTS
See www.Middle-
SmithfieldTown-
ship.com for pack-
age or email
MiddleSmithfield-
Township@
gmail.com with
REQUEST RFP FOR
CPA in the subject
line, or call 570-
223-8920, x10
LEGAL NOTICE
The Luzerne County
Council announces
a a Special Meet-
ing to be held on
Tuesday, October 2,
2012 in the Jury
Room, 2nd Floor of
the County Court-
house beginning at
6:45 pm. The pur-
pose of the meeting
is to address the
Luzerne County
Flood Protection
Authority.
Brittany M. Burgess
Clerk of Council
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING
YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Endless love, joy,
security awaits.
Maryann and Matt
888-225-7173
Expenses Paid
< < < < < <
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
ADOPTION
Adopting a
newborn is our
greatest wish.
Forever love,
family and secure
future awaits.
Michelle & Todd
866-936-8363
Expenses Paid.
150 Special Notices
Looking for a
unique picture
opportunity for
your wedding
photos? How
about elegant
photos by a
Rolls Royce?
Always included
in your Oyster
Wedding
Package.
bridezella.net
HOLIDAY BUS To
New York City! Sun-
day, November 4th.
Depart from the
Park and Ride on
315 Pittston at 9 am.
$45 per person.
Prize giveaways!
Reserve your seat!
570-457-3337
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
380 Travel
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
WICKED
Wed. Oct. 10
$149
ORCHESTRA SEATS
A CHRISTMAS
STORY
WED. DEC. 12th
$150 Orch seats
RADIO CITY
XMAS SHOW
Mon. Nov. 26
$85.
Wed. Dec. 12
$95.
Sat. Dec 15th
$130.
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS
& SHOW
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
NOV. 10 NYC
CHOCOLATE SHOW
9/11 MEMORIAL
CENTURY 21
DISCOUNT
STORE
NOV. 17 PHILA
Lunch at LeBec
Fin, Exhibit &
Barnes Museum
LIMITED
SPACE
FOR BOTH
call 570-655-3420
or email
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
www.cameohouse
bustours.com
LIKE US
NYC/RADIO CITY
Christmas Show
Veterans Day, 11/12
$85 bus/ticket. $32
bus only. 574-6375
380 Travel
FUN GETAWAYS!
Mountain of
Vermont & New
Hampshire
5 day Oct 8-12
includes: 8
meals, train ride,
cruise & more!
Englishtown
Flea Market
Oct 6
Jersey Boys
Oct 13
Salem & Boston
Halloween
Happenings
Oct. 19-21
Philadelphia
Ghost Tour &
Eastern &
State
Penitentiary
Oct. 20
Giants/Redskins
10/21
1-800-432-8069
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
ATLANTIC CITY
9/30, 10/6 $39.
Resorts Casino
NYC Wed/Sat $34
JERSEY BOYS $99
10/13, 10/17
WICKED 10/17
$141 Orchestra
PHANTOM OF
THE 0PERA
* MAMA MIA
Call for Dates
A CHRISTMAS
STORY 12/1
RADIO CITY
SHOWS
CALL for Dates
LEAVE PARK/
RIDE RT 309/315
SPORTING EVENTS
Oct. 6th
NASCAR at Dover
$144 includes
breakfast & buffet
after race.
OVERNIGHT TRIPS
Salem
Oct 26th, 27th &
28th
$209. Includes Bus
transportation &
hotel.
COOKIES
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
cookiestravelers.com
WINTER CRUISE
SPECIALS
1/05/2013 Enchant-
ment of the Seas
9 night Baltimore
to the Caribbean
$872.00 per person
******************
1/13/2013 Explorer
of the Seas
9 nights NJ to
Caribbean
$799.00 per per-
son-Senior Special
******************
1/17/2013 Carnivals
Miracle 7 night NY
to Bahamas
$587.00 per person
for Balcony
******************
1/22/2013 Explorer
of the Seas 10 night
NJ to Caribbean
$855.00 per person
Ask about other
dates! All rates are
per person based
on Double occupan-
cy and subject to
change
Tenenbaums
Travel
288-8747
403 Aircraft
TOYOTA 11 CAROLA S
8500k Excellent
condition. Extend-
ed 5 year warran-
ty. Daughter joined
airforce.
570-401-1062
Berwick
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $700. OBO
570-674-2920
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `99
DEVILLE
White, beige leather
interior, fully
equipped.
Inspected. $1,950.
(570)299-0772
DODGE 98 NEON
Moving must sell.
Excellent condition.
108,000 mi. 4 cylin-
der great on gas.
$1995 OBO.
570-436-3779
570-459-1913
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4495.
LEOS AUTO SALES
93 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Ford 01 Explorer
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, 4WD
$2,650
Ford 95 Ranger
PickUp with cap
6 cylinder, auto,
2WD
$1,950
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
MAZDA `90 MIATA
Clean unmodified,
maintained. Recent
clutch, brakes.
good top. Inspected
until 3/2013. $2500.
Call or text 570-
407-4541 between
10 a.m. & 2:30 p.m
(570) 407-4541
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
SUBARU `01 OUTBACK
151,000 miles, all-
wheel drive, runs
well, green. $3,000.
(570) 693-4080
after 5:00 p.m.
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI `01 A6
4.2 Engine, good
condition, per kelly
blue book, Quatro
awd, abs 4 wheel,
navigation system,
integrated phone,
plus all standard
Audi options, super
clean, garage kept,
recently inspected.
If you ever wanted
an Audi, heres
your opportunity!
Asking $4,900.
570-678-5618
570-574-3441
AUDI `01 S4
VG TURBO
6 speed, manual
transmission, all
wheel drive, power
leather seats, sun-
roof, multiple disc
CD player, 4 snow
tires 105,000 miles.
$6500.
(570) 696-4853
BMW `95 325I
Convertible, power
roof, manual trans-
mission, black/tan
leather, 1 owner,
garage kept. Com-
plete service
record. Very good
condition. 206K.
KBB value $4,000,
asking $3,750.
(570)655-4465
BUICK 04
LESABRE
Silver.
32K miles. Very
nice condition.
$9,950.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC `01 DEVILLE
Black, gold pack-
age, heated seats,
exquisite grill, vogue
tires & wheels, car-
riage top, back up
sensors. You name
it, this car has it!
$8,495.
570-457-7854
CADILLAC 05
DEVILLE
One owner, low
miles, Pearl White,
new tires.
Warranty. $12,500.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CADILLAC 06 DTS
Grey, low miles,
local trade.
Performance pack-
age with navigation.
sunroof. $17,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
CHEVY 04
MONTE CARLO SS
Extra Sharp.
Warranty. $6,995
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Limited Edition.
Black, good condi-
tion. 97,000 miles.
Tires and battery 2
years old. New
Alpine radio CD
player. $8500 neg.
570-693-4549
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
HONDA `12
ACCORD LX
Grey. 6K miles.
Factory Warranty.
Was 20,900, sale
price $19,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
HONDA 08
CIVIC LX
4 door, automatic,
22,000 miles. Extra
Sharp. Warranty.
$12,495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA 09 ACCORD
CD, keyless, extra
clean 39k $15,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA 09
CIVIC EX
Grey. 42K miles.
Moon roof, alloys.
Reduced Price
$14,495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
HONDA 09 CRV-EX
Sunroof,
well equipped, 30k
miles.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
412 Autos for Sale
MAZDA 3 08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MERCEDES 06 BENZ
S-CLASS S500
90,000 miles, full
options, silver, very
good condition.
$18,500.
570-814-9286
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MERCEDES-BENZ `07
C280
4 matic, 73K miles.
Full options, 1
owner, dealer serv-
iced. Black exterior/
cream interior. Very
good condition.
$16,000
(570)262-0313
MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500. OBO
570-899-1896
PONTIAC 07
G6 GT
Good condition. 69k
FWD, auto, all
power, Remote
start, 4 Door, Heat-
ed leather seats.
$9,200, OBO
570-793-3412
412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC `00
SUNFIRE
Silver, 2.2 liter, auto
30 mpg. Like new,
garage kept, non
smoker with sun-
roof & rear spoiler.
Air. AM/FM CD.
Flawless interior.
Rides & handles
perfect. New tires.
Regular oil
changes. Always
maintained, 89,900
miles. $3,995.
(570)592-0997
SATURN 04 ION
Quad Coupe
67k miles
$6,999.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Line up a place to live
in classified!
SUBARU 11 OUTBACK
SW keyless, well
equipped, AWD
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA 03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$3,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Travel
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 3G
SA VE $2000O FF M SR P !
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f
Au gu s t2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 10 /1/12 . *O ffers b a s ed o n: 2 0 12 N is s a n R o gu e SL AW D w ith M SR P $3 1,15 0 a nd B u y Fo r$2 6 ,6 5 0 + T/T w / $15 0 0 N is s a n R eb a te & $5 0 0
N M AC Ca ptive. 2 0 12 N is s a n Fro ntierPro 4 x 4 x 4 w ith M SR P $3 4 ,4 10 a nd B u y Fo r$2 8 ,9 10 + T/T w / $15 0 0 N is s a n R eb a te + $5 0 0 N M AC Ca ptive Ca s h. 2 0 12 N is s a n M u ra no LE AW D w ith M SR P $4 5 ,0 6 0 a nd B u y Fo r$3 8 ,5 6 0 + T/T w /
$2 ,0 0 0 N is s a n R eb a te, $5 0 0 N M AC Ca ptive Ca s h + $5 0 0 Sept. B o nu s Ca s h. 2 0 12 N is s a n Pa thfind erSilver4 x 4 w ith M SR P $4 0 ,6 5 5 a nd B u y Fo r$3 3 ,6 5 5 + T/T w / $2 5 0 0 N is s a n R eb a te, $5 0 0 N M AC Ca ptive Ca s h + $1,0 0 0 Sept.
B o nu s Ca s h. N o tres po ns ib le fo rtypo gra phic a l erro rs . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au gu s t2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 10 /1/12 .

2013N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5
S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
T ilt, Zero Gra vity S ea ts ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
STK# N22468
M O DEL# 13013
V IN# 125432
M SRP $22,410
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,410
*
+ T/T
OR
L EAS E
FOR
$
259
*
P ER
M O.
2012N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5S
COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea ther, Prem iu m
Pa cka ge, F o g L ights , M o o n ro o f, Bo s e
S o u n d , Cn v. Pkg, & M u ch M o re!
STK# N22155
M O DEL# 15112
V IN# 260196
M SRP $31,530
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,530
*
+ T/T
$
299
*
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $5000O FF M SR P !
U P TO
$
4,50 0
*
OFF M S R P ON
20 12 R OGU ES IN S TOCK
2012
N IS S A N
ROGUE
U P TO
$
5,50 0
*
OFF M S R P ON
20 12 FR ON TIER S IN S TOCK
2012
N IS S A N
FRON TIE R
U P TO
$
6,50 0
*
OFF M S R P ON
20 12 M U R AN OS IN S TOCK
2012
N IS S A N
M URA N O
U P TO
$
7,0 0 0
*
OFF M S R P ON
20 12 P ATH FIN D ER S IN S TOCK
2012
N IS S A N
P A THFIN DE R
H U R R Y
O NLY
40
2012 R O G U ES
LEFT IN
STO C K!
H U R R Y
O NLY
30
2012 FR O NTIER S
LEFT IN
STO C K!
H U R R Y
O NLY
25
2012 M U R A NO S
LEFT IN
STO C K!
H U R R Y
O NLY
13
2012 P A TH FINDER S
LEFT IN
STO C K!
L OW
FIN A N CE
RA TE S !
DON T BUY
A N YW HE RE
E L S E !
THRU OCT. 1ST ONLY
2012N IS S A N
S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $10,292.60;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22431
M O DEL# 12112
V IN# 757810
M SRP $19,420
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E! SA VE $3000O FF M SR P !
B U Y FOR
$
16,420
*
+ T/T
OR
$
18 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $7000O FF M SR P !
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S L IM ITE D E DITION
V-6, CVT , A/ C, S u n ro o f,
Bla ck W heels , F lo o r
M a ts , AM / F M / CD,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,627.95;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N22368
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 861635
M SRP $34,435
5 A T TH IS 5 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
27,435
*
+ T/T
OR
$
28 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $350 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
H U R R Y ! H U R R Y !
A N D
THA TS THE
BOTTOM
L IN E !
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e
eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
L EAS E
FOR
OR
HIGH
TRA DE
V A L UE S !
OV E R 400 N E W N IS S A N S
RIGHT N OW !
O N O UR
LOT
YO UV E G OT
TO SEE THIS!
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,457.80.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,757.00
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo Per Mo.
LLease
* **
Model #FB2F5CEW 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
Cruise Control Remote Entry
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers ABS
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY EX
MPG
18 City
27 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $18,174.80
Per Mo.
Lease
Model #RL5H4CEW
248-hp, 3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
V-6 Engine 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with Trac-
tion Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
including Power Lumbar Support Power Slid-
ing Doors 17 Alloy Wheels 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers includ-
ing Subwoofer 2GB CD-Library Bluetooth
HandsFreeLink USB Audio Interface
Exterior Temperature Indicator Multi-Function
2nd-Row Center Seat Three-Row Side Curtain
Airbags with Rollover Sensor Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position
Detection System (OPDS) Tri-Zone Automatic
Climate Control System with Humidity Control
and Air Filtration One-Motion 60/40 Split
3rd-Row Magic Seat
2012 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
Model RM4H5CJW 185-hp
2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC 4-Cylinder
Engine Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) with
Traction Control Automatic Transmission
Cruise Control A/C One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature Remote Entry
System Bluetooth HandsFreeLink
Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers Bluetooth Streaming Audio
Pandora Internet Radio compatibility
SMS Text Message Function
USB Audio Interface
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
VTEC
mission
h Trac-
m (ABS)
ustment,
wer Slid-
att AM/
includ-
etooth
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 10/31/2012
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
*2.9% on Certifed Accords thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C. up to 60 mos. Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k
Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ODYSSEY
10 ODYSSEY EX Slate, 24K.....................NOW $23,750
10 ODYSSEY EX White, 33K....................NOW $23,750
10 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Slate, 33K ...NOW $24,950
10 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Slate, 24K ...NOW $25,950
ACCORDS
09 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 36K..........................NOW $14,950
09 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 37K......................NOW $15,500
10 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 31K.........................NOW $15,950
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 29K......................NOW $16,500
09 ACCORD EX SDN Gold, 31K..........................NOW $16,750
08 ACCORD EXL NAVI SDN Red, 46K ..........NOW $16,950
08 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Green, 52K .............NOW $17,500
09 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 37K ..............NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Burgandy, 19K ....................NOW $18,500
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Burgandy, 30K .................NOW $18,950
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Gray, 39K ...............NOW $18,950
11 ACCORD SE SDN Gray, 16K ..........................NOW $19,950
11 ACCORD EXL V-6 SDN Amber, 21K............NOW $22,950
ELEMENT 4WD
09 ELEMENT EX Red, 53K ...................................NOW $16,950
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
2.9% on
Certied
Accords
2.9%
APR
2.9%
APR
CIVICS
09 CIVIC HYBRID SDN Black, 37K....................NOW $14,500
10 CIVIC LX CPE Gray, 19K..................................NOW $14,950
10 CIVIC LX SDN White, 29K................................NOW $15,750
11 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 19K ............................NOW $15,950
10 CIVIC EX SDN Blue, 26K.................................NOW $16,500
10 CIVIC EX SDN Black, 25K................................NOW $16,500
12 CIVIC EXL SDN Gray, 11K ..............................NOW $19,999
PILOT 4WD
09 PILOT EX Silver, 58K ..........................................NOW $22,500
11 PILOT LX Gray, 37K............................................NOW $23,500
11 PILOT LX Silver, 17K...........................................NOW $24,750
11 PILOT EXL-DVD Cherry, 36K...........................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT EXL White, 17K .......................................NOW $28,950
CRV 4WD
08 CRV LX Silver, 60K...............................................NOW $16,750
08 CRV LX Green, 57K..............................................NOW $16,750
08 CRV EX White, 46K ..............................................NOW $17,750
11 CRV LX Red, 6K..................................................NOW $20,500
08 CRV EXL Red, 18K .............................................NOW $20,750
What You See Is What You Pay!
MODEL YEAR CLEARANCE SALE!
RIDGELINE 4WD
09 RIDGELINE RTL Cherry, 33K ..........................NOW $26,950
11 RIDGELINE RTS Black, 19K ...........................NOW $26,950
Red, 34K
Now $15,750
10 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Navy, 71K, Was $9,850
Now $8,750
07 CHRYSLER
SEBRING TOURING
Silver, 37K, Was $11,950
Now $10,500
06 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS SDN
Silver, 68K, Was $12,500
Now $11,500
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER LS 4WD
Black, 73K, Was $13,950
Now $12,500
07 FORD FUSION
SEL SDN
Navy, 69K, Was $17,950
Now $14,950
07 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
Gold, 76K
Now $8,950
04 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CL AWD
Black, 25K
Now $19,500
10 TOYOTA CAMRY
XLE SDN
Green, 65K
Now $13,750
08 NISSAN ALTIMA
SL SDN
Gray, 23K, Was $18,950
Now $16,950
10 TOYOTA MATRIX
S AWD
White, 19K, Was $14,950
Now $14,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
EX SDN
Silver, 37K
Now $9,950
03 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
HONDA
RIDGELINE 4WD
08 RTS, White, 87K
$17,500
09 RTL, Silver, 93K
$16,950
HONDA
PILOT 4WD
06 LX, Silver, 76K $12,500
06 EXL, White, 56K $15,950
Silver, 37K
Now $13,950
06 HONDA ACCORD
LX SEDAN
YOURE
NICE
TRADE
HERE
Club Cab, Black, 26K
07 DODGE DAKOTA
SXT 4X4
Now $19,950
Silver, 26K
Now $22,950
10 TOYOTA VENZA
AWD
YOURE
NICE
TRADE
HERE
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 5G
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
EXIT 1 70B OFF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH L IGHT. JUST BEL OW W YOM ING V AL L EY M AL L .
*P r ices p lu s ta x & ta g s . P r io r u s e d a ily r en ta l o n s electvehicles . Selectp ictu r es f o r illu s tr a tio n p u r p o s es o n ly.
XM a n d On Sta r f ees a p p lica b le. Lo w AP R to w ell q u a lif ied b u yer s .N o tr es p o n s ib le f o r typ o g r a p hica l er r o r s .
M o n .- Thu rs .8:30- 8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30- 7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30- 5:00p m
821-27721-800-444-7172
601 Kid d er Street, W ilkes-Ba rre, PA
VA LLEY
CHEVROLET
Sca n Fr om
M ob ile
D evice For
M or e
Sp ecia ls
C hevy R uns Deep
V is itu s 2 4 /7 a tw w w .va lleyc hevro let.c o m
VALUES
VALUES VALUES
VALLEY
VALLEY VALLEY
IN
THE
PRICES
FOR
E
V
E
R
Y
O
N
E
2001 CHEVY IM PALA LS
$
8,999
*
#12709B,6 C yl,A uto,A /C ,PW ,
PD L,A lloy W heels,Tilt,C ruise
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
53K
M ILES
$
8,999
*
2001 FORD RANGER
SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 W /CAP
#12790A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
A M /FM /Stereo C D ,A lloy W heels
ONE
OW NER
2005 CHEVY COBALT
4 DOOR
$
8,999
*
#12014A ,4 C yl.,A uto.,A ir,SteelW heels,PD L,
Tilt,A M /FM /C D ,Rear Spoiler,O nly 58K M iles
ONE
OW NER
$
10,950
*
02-03 CHEVY ASTRO
& GM C SAFARIVANS
O nly 35K A verage M iles,
Som e w ith Bin Packages
YOUR CHOICE
$
12,999
*
2007 HONDA ACCORD SE
4 DOOR
#12175A ,4 C ylinder,A utom atic,A M /FM /C D ,
Pow er W indow s,Pow er D oor Locks,C ruise C ontrol
$
15,900
*
2010 CHEVY
M ALIBU LS
#13059A ,2.4LA utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,
XM Satellite,O nStar,PW ,PD L,Keyless Entry
ONLY
26K
M ILES
$
11,999
*
2011 CHEVY HHR LT
#Z2751,4 C yl.,A uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Keyless
Entry,C ruise,A M /FM /C D ,O nly Low M iles
ONE
OW NER
2010 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA
4DOOR
$
14,999
*
#12095A A ,4 C ylinder A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
A M /FM /C D ,XM Satellite Radio
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
12K
M ILES
$
14,900
*
#12094A ,V6,A uto.,A ir,A M /FM /C D ,Leather,
PW ,PD L,H eated Seats,Pow er Passenger Seat
2010 CHEVY IM PALA LS
$
18,999
*
2007 FORD EDGE SE
AW D
#13094A ,V6 A utom atic,Traction C ontrol,PW ,
PD L,A ir,A M /FM /C D ,C ruise,A lloy W heels
ONLY
47K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
2010 M AZDA 6
$
15,999
*
#13042A ,A uto,A /C ,PW ,
PD L,Tilt,C ruise,Sunroof
ONLY
29K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
2009 CHEVY IM PALA
SS
$
20,999
*
#13066A ,V8 A utom atic,A ir,Leather,Sunroof,Rem ote
Start,Pw r H eated M irrors,H eated FrontSeats,6 D isc C D
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
16K
M ILES
$
13,999
*
2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT 4X4
#12416A ,A uto.,A ir,PW ,PD L,RoofRack,
C ruise,D VD ,O nly 47K M iles,Pow er Seats
ONE
OW NER
Leather
$
16,999
*
2008 TOYOTA RAV4
AW D
ONE
OW NER
#12737A ,A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,C ruise C ontrol,Front
Buckets,SteelW heels,A M /FM /C D
ONLY
45K
M ILES
$
23,999
*
2012 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA
LS
#Z2729,4C yl.,A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,
A M /FM /C D ,C ruise C ontrol,Traction
C ontrol,Privacy G lass,A lloy W heels
11K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
$
20,999
*
2009 TOYOTA TACOM A SR5
ACCESS CAB
W / CAP
4W D
#12482A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,
Keyless Entry,Bedliner,A M /FM /C D ,
Sliding Rear W indow ,C ruise,Tilt
ONLY
34K
M ILES
BACKUP
CAM ERA
$
15,999
*
2010 M ERCURY
M ILAN
#12739A ,4 C yl.,A uto.,A ir,PW ,
PD L,A M /FM /C D ,A lloy W heels,
Fog Lam ps,Sunroof
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
22K
M ILES
$
25,999
*
2010 CHEVY CAM ARO
2LT COUPE
$
12,999
*
2007 CHEVY UPLANDER
LS 7 PASSENGER
#Z2743,A uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Privacy G lass,
C ruise,SteelW heels,O nly 57K M iles
2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE
LT AW D
$
19,999
*
#12746A ,8 Passenger Seating,3.6LA uto.,A /C ,
PW ,PD L,Keyless Entry,C ruise,O nstar w /
Turn-By-Turn N avigation,XM Radio,18A lum .W heels
ONE
OW NER
$
18,999
*
2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
OVERLAND AW D
HEM I
#12662B,5.7LV8 A utom atic H em i,A ir
C onditioning,D ualPow er Seats,PW ,PD L,
RoofRack,A lloy W heels,Leather & M ore
SUNROOF
ONLY
41K
M ILES
$
23,999
*
2008 HUM M ER H3 4W D
#Z2390,3.7LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er
H eated Leather Seats,Running Boards,
Keyless Entry,RoofRack,A M /FM /C D
ONLY
28K
M ILES
ONE OW NER
$
27,999
*
#Z2735,6.0L6 Speed A utom atic,Front/Rear
A /C ,PW ,PD L,Keyless Entry,A ppearance Package,
C ruise,D eep Tinted G lass,A ux,Rear H eater,Pow er
H eated M irrors,Stabilitrak,O nly 5K M iles
2012 CHEVY EXPRESS 3500
1LT 12 PASSENGER VAN
ONE
OW NER
$
30,999
*
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 EXT CAB LTZ 4X4
12617A ,5.3LV8 A uto.,A /C ,Leather,Pow er
O ptions,18A lum W heels,O n/O ffRoad Tires,
Rancho Shocks,Bose Stereo,Rear Parking A ssist,XM
Satellite,O nStar,Step Bars,Locking Rear D ifferential
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
12K
M ILES
$
37,900
*
#13013A ,V8,A T,A /C ,Sunroof,N avigation,Leather,
Touch Screen C D /D VD ,Rearview C am era,& M uch M ore!
2009 CHEVY TAHOE LTZ
4X4
ONLY
39K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
$
14,999
*
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
REGULAR CAB
4X4
#Z2763,4.3LV6 A utom atic w / O verdrive,A ir C onditioning,
Pow er W indow s & M irrors,Locking Rear D ifferential
ONLY
20K
M ILES
#Z2738A ,Rem ote Starter,Sunroof,Rear
Parking A ssist,Pow er O ptions,D ualExhaust,
20Polished A lum .W heels,C D ,Bluetooth
STARTING
AT
ONLY
37K
M ILES
SANTOVOLVO
5
YEAR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
207-8149All prices plus tax and tags.
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Montage Auto Mile 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
Final 2012 Model Year End Sell Down
$1000 volvo/SAAB owner loyalty bonus included in all prices 2.49% apr. available to 72 months with approved credit Offer expires 10/1/12.
Get The Best Deals Of The Year On Our Final Remaining 2012 Volvos
2012 VOLVO S60 T5
Save
$
4,880
#382092 MSRP:
$32,370
2012 Volvo S60 T5
Save
$
5,575
#382074
MSRP:
$38,065
2012 Volvo S60 T6 AWD
Save
$
5,430
#382066 MSRP:
$42,920
2012 Volvo S60 T5 Premier
Save
$
5,230
#382071 MSRP:
$36,720
2012 Volvo C30 T5 R
Save
$
3,085
#323007 MSRP:
$32,825
2012 Volvo C70 Convertible
Save
$
6,085
#342005
2012 Volvo S80 3.2
Save
$
6,680
#372006 MSRP:
$43,170
2012 Volvo S80 T6 AWD
Save
$
6,680
#372004 MSRP:
$47,670
2012 Volvo S80 T6 AWD Platinum
Save
$
7,035
#372002 MSRP:
$53,425
Just
$
27,490
Just
$
32,490
Just
$
37,490
Just
$
31,490
Just
$
29,740
Just
$
38,490
Just
$
36,490
Just
$
40,990
Just
$
46,390
Premium w/
Navigation
MSRP:
$44,575
2.49
%
Apr
S
O
L
D
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
09 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Silver, V6
07 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, black, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR
grey, tan leather,
sun roof
05 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, blue, sun-
roof, 87k miles
05 CHEVY IMPALA
silver, alloys, V6
04 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS GS mint
green, grey int.
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 CHEVY CAVALIER
Blue, 4 cyl., auto
(R-title)
03 CHEVY MONTE
CARLO LS blue
V6 auto
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 TOYOTA CELICA
GT silver, 4 cyl
auto sunroof
00 BMW 323i
silver auto
98 NISSAN ALTIMA
Gold, auto, 4 dr
4 cyl.
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 JEEP PATRIOT
grey, auto, 4 cyl.,
4x4
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, black, V6,
4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 MERCURY MARINER
premium seafoam
green, leather int.,
V6, 4x4
06 INFINITY QX56
Pearl white, tan
leather, Naviga
tion, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
premier black, grey
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4.
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
blue, auto, V6 4x4
05 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
green, V6, 4x4
05 FORD FREESTAR SE,
white, 7 pax mini
van
05 CADILLAC SRX
black, leather, V6,
AWD
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
05 JEEP LIBERTY
RENEGADE Blue,
5 speed, V6, 4x4
04 FORD ESCAPE XLT
red, V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
lt green V6 4x4
04 MITSUBISHI
OUTLANDER XLS
red, auto, 4 cyl.,
AWD
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Se patriot blue, V6,
4x4
04 FORD SUZUKI XlS LX
blue V6 4x4
04 KIA SORENTO EX
blue, auto, V6 AWD
04 NISSAN XTERRA XE
blue, auto, 4x4
04 CHEVY TAHOE LT
4x4 Pewter, grey
leather, 3rd seat
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
Z71, green, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 GMC ENVOY XL
burgundy, grey int.,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY EL
4 door,
7 pass mini van
01 DODGE SLT
Durango 5.9l,
peweter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
Sport teal blue,
2 door, auto, 4x4
01 FORD F150 XLT
white, super cab,
4x4 truck
01 FORD F150 XLT
Blue/tan, 4 door,
4x4 truck
99 NISSAN PATHINDER
gold, V6, 4x4
98 FORD EXPLOREER XLT
red, auto, 4x4
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
412 Autos for Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
96 Ford Taurus,
30 V6, 4 door,
power window &
door locks, A/C
$1,800
96 Buick Skylark
Auto, 4 door, 81K
$2,300
00 Chevy S10
Blazer. 4 door.
4wd. Red.
$2,500
96 Pontiac Grand
Prix. White, Air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good.
106K.
$2,995
02 Ford Windstar
44K, auto, 6 cyl-
inder, air, all
power options,
runs good.
$4,600
95 Buick Park Ave
54k. $3,995
03 Ford Windstar
LX, 6 cylinder,
A/C, 94K, all
power options,
$4,300
94Cadillac Fleet-
wood Limo, ex -
cellent condition,
40K $6,000
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $10,000
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $11,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$47,000
Junk
Cars,
Used Cars
& Trucks
wanted.
Cash paid.
574 -1275
Subaru `04 Out-
back
5 speed. 88,000
miles. Serviced &
inspected. $8,500.
Chrysler 05
Town & Country
Mini-Van. 108,000
miles. All options.
$5,950.
Corvette 00
Convertible. Auto,
63,000 miles, yel-
low/black. $17,500
.
Mercedes Benz
00 S430. Luxury
sedan, 120,000.
$9,900.
Corvette 90
Convertible. Auto,
85,000 miles, new
tires, white/black.
$7,900
Buick 98 Park
Avenue. 75,000
original miles, serv-
iced & inspected.
$2,950.
Ford 96 Bronco.
4 x 4 all custom,
one of a kind.
$3,950.
Kingston Corners
Auto Sales
570-299-9370
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA 09
CAMRY
18,000 Miles,
1 owner,
4 cylinder.
$15,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
VOLKSWAGEN 04
JETTA GL
Black. 75K miles.
5 speed stick.
Warranty.
$7495.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 7G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
*PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED.
ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. PRICES AVAILABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY. MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIRED AT TIME OF DELIVERY.
FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS THRU ALLY FINANCIAL, MUST QUALIFY. TO QUALIFY FOR CONQUEST REBATE YOU MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 9/30/12.
MOTORWORLD CADILLAC
SUMMER EVENT
NEW 2012 CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD PREMIUMCOLLECTION
STK# C3575
LEASE FOR
$
829
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,4955 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $3,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
LEASE FOR
$
379
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
STK# C3605
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,4955 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
STK C360
NEW 2012 CADILLAC SRX LUXURY
LEASE FOR
$
319
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
STK# C3596
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,4955 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
STK C3 96
NEW 2012 CADILLAC CTS AWD LUXURY COLLECTION
PLUS
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,4955 TOTAL DUE AT S
$129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. INCLUDES $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST.
COME SEE THE NEW 2013 CADILLAC XTS!
$2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE
$3,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE $2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE
PL
ASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,4955 TOTAL DUE AT
$2,000 LUXURY LEASE CONQQQQQQQQQQQQQQUEST CASH! MUST BE IN A
1. 866. 356. 9383 MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM MOTORWORLD DRIVE JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81 WILKES-BARRE, PA
SALES HOURS MON FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
North Eastern Pennsylvanias #1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$2,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
FORD `90 MUS-
TANG
Convertible, 5.0
auto. Red with new
black top, black
interior, good look-
ing car, good run-
ner, good tires.
$5300. Wyoming,
(570) 283-8235
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
MERCURY `55
MONTCLAIR
99.9% original. 4
door sedan, black &
yellow. Motor re-
built, 250 miles on
it. Youve got to
see it to believe it!
call for more infor-
mation after 1:00pm
(570)540-3220
421 Boats &
Marinas
FISHING BOAT.
Like new. 16 1/2
Trophy Fiberglass.
25 HP Johnson
motor, 48 lb
thrust, trolling
motor with foot
control. Recharg-
er, pedestal front
seat, carpeted
floor. Live well,
storage compart-
ment. Excellent
condition. $4500.
570-675-5046
after 12 noon
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SEA NYMPH
BT165 96
16 boat with 25hp
motor, electric lift,
12 lb. thrust trolling
motor, batteries,
extra seat, fish find-
er, canopy, includes
trailer. $1,995.
570-574-9243
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
UTILITY TRAILER 13
7x20, 7,000 GVW,
Can be purchased
with or without 3
wheel chocks. 5
10,000lb tie downs
Pricing @ $2,799,
570-690-8588
439 Motorcycles
12 BRAND NEW
SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
HARLEY 10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HONDA 05
750 SHADOW
Windshield, saddle-
bags & new battery.
2,190 Miles Garage
Kept. Asking $4500.
570-430-3041
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
SANDPIPER 00
TRAVEL TRAILER,
38 foot with 2 slide
outs, front kitchen,
living room with
queen convert-a-
bed, bath with tub &
shower, bedroom
with queen bed, lots
of closets. On per-
manent site but can
be moved. 40X14
deck & screen
house. Asking
$7,000.
570-655-1699
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `99 S-10
64,000 miles, 4
cylinder, auto, great
on gas. $4,500.
570-947-0032
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
2007 DODGE 07
GRAND CARAVAN
XE, 54,000 miles 1
owner, brand new
tires, loaded, sto-n-
go seats, Power
windows, power
locks, remote
starter & sliding
doors. Must see
asking $11,000
570-655-1699
ACURA `04 MDX
MUST MUST SELL! SELL!
BEAUTIFUL. White,
all wheel drive,
compact SUV. 3rd
row seat, remote
starter, sun roof,
heated seats, tan
leather interior.
Absolutely like new!
99k miles. NADA
book price $13,550
asking $11,550.
MUST SELL!
570-332-6012
CADILLAC 08 SRX
AWD. Beige
metallic. 60K miles,
sunroof,
heated seats.
$19,995.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
CHEVROLET `04
BLAZER
2 door, 4 wheel
drive, air, all power,
89K. Excellent
condition. $5,995.
570- 814-0633
CHEVY 99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03 IMPALA
auto, V6. very
clean car! $3,995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE 03 CARAVAN
Auto, V6. Nice
clean car $4495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO 4X4
REG CAB
AUTO, V8. LOOKS
& RUNS GREAT
$6995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 04
COLORADO SPORT
5 speed, 2WD,
Like New, 1 Owner
Truck $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `00 ECONOLINE
E350 SUPER DUTY VAN
V8 Turbo Deisel,
Blue Book value
$4554. 132,942
Miles. Will sell for
$3800. 862-7155
FORD `08 EXPEDITION
Black, 32,500
miles, leather
upholstery, 3rd seat
pkg., optional tow
pkg. with 910lb,
tongue/9,100lb tow
- all the goodies.
Excellent condition
$22,900
(570)690-8588
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
EXPLORER XLT
EXTRA CLEAN!
4X4.
$3,495.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 03
EXPLORER XLT
4X4, leather,
sunroof, like new!
$5,495
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 03 F150 XL
4x4, 6 cyl., auto, 1
owner, great work
truck $4495.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 99 F150
4X4. Super Cab.
Extra Clean!
1 owner truck!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA `05
ELEMENT LX
4 wd, auto, 58k
miles, excellent
condition. $12,000
(570)472-9091
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
JEEP `12
LIBERTY SPORT
4 x 4. Silver. 14K
miles. Factory War-
ranty . Sale Price -
$20,900.
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 01
SANTA FE
4WD, AUTO, V6
EXTRA CLEAN!
$4,995.
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LOREDO
4x4, 6 cyl, 1
Owner, Extra
Clean SUV!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LAND ROVER 97
DISCOVERY
inspected runs well
$1800.
RANGE ROVER 95
CLASSIC
runs well not
inspected $1500.
570-239-4163 or
570-675-9847
leave message
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18 alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MITSUBISHI 04
ENDEAVOR SUV
in EXCELLENT con-
dition. Exterior
Color "Pearl", 4
Wheel drive,
87,000 miles. NO
past or present
mechanical issues
at all. $6200 FIRM
Please call
570-217-7819
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN 04 VUE
Front wheel drive,
4 cyl, 5 speed,
sunroof, clean,
clean SUV! $4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
TOYOTA `04 SIENNA
LE
Clean & well main-
tained, auto car
starter, gold, low
mileage, 65K, Kelly
blue book value of
$11,300.
Asking $9,900
(570)283-3086
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
BUYING
USED
VEHICLES
Call
Vitos & Ginos
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort, PA
288-8995
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Full-service floral &
gift shop for sale.
Turn key operation
in prime retail loca-
tion. Stable revenue
growth & flexible
operating hours.
Includes delivery
van, all inventory,
walk in cooler, sup-
plies, website &
customer list. Must
sell, Owner re-
locating. $63,000
570-592-3327
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUE OAK
BED
(late 1800s) with
matching dresser
and mirror.
Additional night-
stand included. All
refinished. Excellent
condition.
$1,050. 466-6499.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
ANTIQUE OAK
HIGHBOY
refinished with new
vintage hardware
Excellent condition
$350.
570-466-6499
CARDS, Football,
college players on
professional teams,
Notre Dame, 70
cards, $4. Penn
State, 85 cards,
$5.50. Basketball,
Phila 76ers, 45
cards, $3. Baseball,
ny Mets 78 cards,
$4. Phila Phillies,
200 cards, $8.
Football, New Eng-
land Patriots, 70
cards, $4. 313-5214.
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
COLLECTOR
PLATES 6 of chil-
dren, good condi-
tion $15. each.
Roseback antique
rocker, cane back &
seat with natural
cane $65. 819-2174
FIGURINES, Pre-
cious Moments,
various pieces. call
to see what I have
and price, also
Blushing Bunnies.
570-474-5492
PUNCH bowl set.
$20.
570-675-0920
RADIO. Antique
table top. About mid
60s. Silvertone tube
type. Needs minor
repair and TLC. $75
570-855-3113
STATUES, Kiss in
boxes, 2002. $80
for all. 574-0271.
TABLE, Harry Potter
custom aibrushed
full sized table. Fea-
tures Harry and
friends, Voldemort
and Hogwarts cas-
tle. Heavy table
with chrome legs.
$299.
570-477-5955
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (25)
1928-1980, GAR,
(22) 1928-2006,
MEYERS, (9) 1957-
1981, WYOMING
VALLEY WEST, (11)
1970-1992. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
FREEZER. Upright,
Older Montgomery
Ward unit, com-
plete. Runs well,
very quiet. $75.
570-788-5030
MICROWAVE, GE,
1100 watts. Like
new, black, 1 year
old. $25. 451-0313
WASHER, Hotpoint,
heavy duty, extra
large capacity,
7 cycle. $250. Dryer
Kenmore portable,
heavy duty. $175.
Frigidaire, gallery
series $70.
570-825-4031
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
AMERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
CARS, TRUCKS
CONVERTIBLES
SUVS, VANS
*PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
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WE BUY
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$
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2008 DODGE AVENGER R/T AWD
#18798A, AWD,
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$
7,866*
2009 FORD
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#18809, Leather, Alloys,
PW, PL, Keyless
$
11,825*
2011 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE
#18841, 20 Wheels, AWD,
PW, PL, CD
$
26,855*
2011 TOYOTA
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#18834, Auto, Air,
PW, PL, CD
$
13,945*
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#18947, Stow-N-Go, Pwr Sliding Doors,
Pwr Liftgate, 4 To Choose From
$
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STARTING AT
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#18984, Alloys, Sunroof,
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$
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2012
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#18983, Alloys, Auto,
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$
13,950*
2008 NISSAN ROUGE SL
#18803, Alloys,
PW, PL, CD $
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2011 MAZDA 6
#18707, PW,
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14,988*
2011 CHEVY AVEO LT
#18861A, Auto, Air,
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10,995*
2008 MERCEDES-BENZ ML350 4MATIC
#18967, Navigation,
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26,895*
2007 FORD EDGE SEL
#18948, Skyroof, AWD,
Leather, Chrome Wheels
$
16,488*
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS
#18974, PW, PL,
CD, Low Miles
$
15,869*
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ
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#18966, AWD,
Leather, Sunroof, Alloys
$
24,966*
$
24,961*
2010 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE
#18965, Leather,
Sunroof, 4x4, Alloys,
Low Miles
$
24,288*
2011 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR AWD
#18960, Alloys, PW,
PL, CD, Keyless $
16,988*
2011 NISSAN
ALTIMA
#18941, PW, PL, CD,
Alloys, Keyless
$
15,988*
2006 GMC
ENVOY XL
#18821B, Leather, Sunroof,
7 Pass, 4x4
$
11,150*
2011 NISSAN
VERSA
#18978, PW, PL,
CD, Auto, Air
$
12,966*
2011 MITSUBISHI
GALANT
#18981, Auto, PW,
PL, CD, Keyless
$
13,275*
2011
CHRYSLER 200
#18980, PW, PL, CD,
Keyless, Auto
$
14,988*
2005 ACURA
MDX
#18964A, Navigation,
Leather, Sunroof, AWD
$
16,833*
2010 MAZDA CX7
GRAND TOURING
#18885, Leather,
Alloys, PW, PL, AWD
$
15,865*
2003 TOYOTA TACOMA
ACCESS CAB
#18699B, 4X4,
Auto, Cap, Air
$
6,984*
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 9G
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Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
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Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
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Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
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Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 10/31/12.
$24.95
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NEW CARS
USED CARS
*All lease payments based on 39 mos with 10,000 miles per year, $3,000 cash or trade down plus tax,
tags and rst payment due at signing. All factory rebates applied. See Dealer for details. Lease pro-
gram subject to change by lender. Residual Values: A=$14,379 B=$23,172.25 C= $20,812 D=$21,609.50
STK#2115,
PREFERRED EQUIPMENT PKG.,
BLACK BEAUTY
LEASE FOR $183
.09
PER MO.
A
NEW 2012 BUICK VERANO
1-888-307-7077
WE ARE OPEN
Please Pardon Our Dust
As We Remodel To Serve You Better!
STK#2001,
8 PASSENGER SEATING,
LOADED W/ LUXURY
NEW 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE AWD
STK#2065
SLE PACKAGE, POWER
TECH PACKAGE
NEW 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 EXT. CAB 4X4
STK#2113
SLE PACKAGE, POWER
TECH PACKAGE
NEW 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB 4X4
04 MERCEDES BENZ C240
4-Matic, Leather, Moonroof, 89K Miles, Local Trade As Traded.... $11,995
05 FORD F-150 X-CAB 4X4
Just Traded, XLT 5.4 Package As Traded.............................. $12,995
08 PONTIAC TORRENT AWD...........................................
$
12,995
10 CHEVY HHR LT
Silver Beauty, Power Galore ............................................
$
13,995
11 HYUNDAI ACCENTS (4 AVAILABLE) .........................
$
13,995
11 TOYOTA YARIS SEDANS.............................................
$
14,900
10 DODGE CALIBERS (2 AVAILABLE)...........................
$
14,995
10 CHRYSLER SEBRING (2 AVAILABLE) ............From
$
14,995
11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Power Equipped, Tons of Warranty ...............................
$
15,995
11 DODGE AVENGER SXT ...............................................
$
16,900
12 FORD FOCUS SDNS ....................................... From
$
16,900
11 TOYOTA COROLLA 27K Miles .....................................
$
16,995
11 NISSAN ALTIMA 23K Miles..........................................
$
17,995
05 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4X4
Cummings Turbo Diesel, Automatic, SLT Equipment
PKG., Just 108K Miles As Traded.......................................... $18,995
08 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4X4
83K Miles..............................................................................
$
18,995
12 FORD E-150 CARGO VAN..........................................
$
19,900
11 NISSAN ROGUE AWD.................................................
$
19,900
11 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD.........................................
$
20,900
09 LINCOLN MKZ ALL WHEEL DRIVE
One Owner, Local Trade, Only 45K Miles .......................
$
21,995
11 DODGE CHALLENGER..................................................
$
22,900
11 CHEVY CAMARO LT..................................................
$
22,900
11 MAZDA CX-7 AWD...................................................
$
23,900
12 NISSAN MAXIMA 16K Miles ....................................
$
25,995
11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT AWD.......................................
$
26,995
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4
13K Miles, White Beauty, SLT Equipment.....................
$
26,995
10 TOYOTA TACOMA 4 DOOR 4X4 PICK UP
24K Miles, SR5 V6, TRD Pkg. .......................................
$
26,995
LEASE FOR $366
.11
PER MO.
B
LEASE FOR $366
.90
PER MO.
C
LEASE FOR $393
.56
PER MO.
D
HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm
2012 CHRYSLER
300 TOURING
STK#120803C
NOW
$24,900
WE HAND PICK THE BEST NEW CAR TRADE-INS & LEASE TURN-INS & SELL THEM
RIGHT HERE IN TUNKHANNOCK AT A FRACTION OF THEIR ORIGINAL PRICE.
THEY DRIVE LIKE NEW & SOME SMELL LIKE NEW BUT COST THOUSANDS LESS.
www.TunkAutoMart.com
06 FORD FUSION SEL
6 Disc CD Changer, PWR. Drivers Seat,
Aluminium Wheels, Only 40,630 miles ................... $11,700
03 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4
1 Owner, Local Trade, Only 35,751 Miles, V-8,
Off Road Group.......................................................... $12,900
03 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
Only 73,822 miles, Just Serviced and Fresh
PA Inspection, Local Trade........................................... $7,990
11 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SE 2.5
Only 16,417 Miles, 1-Owner, Former Florida Car,
Automatic, Leather Seating, CD,
Electronic Stability Control ..................................... $18,700
11 NISSAN VERSA 1.8S
Fresh from Florida, 32 MPG Hwy,
Carfax 1-Owner Vehicle, Automatic .......................... $14,900
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, Never Titled, Only 9,000
Miles, Air Conditioning, Power Windows and Locks,
Automatic Transmission ......................................... $17,900
11 DODGE AVENGER MAINSTREET
Redline Red, Fresh from Florida,
Power Driver Seat, Sirius Satellite Radio ........... ..$16,500
10 FORD FOCUS SES
One Owner, Only 26,000 Miles, Sangria Red
Metallic Exterior, Synch Microsoft System,
Remote Start, Rear Spoiler, Sirius Satellite Radio...... $15,700
12 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
V6, Automatic, Satellite Radio
Stk# 120830C.............................................................. $21,000
11 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW
Rear DVD, Power Sliding Doors and Liftgate,
Rear Parkview Backup Camera, Alloy Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio ................................................ $22,300
11 DODGE AVENGER EXPRESS
4 Cylinder, Automatic, Pwr. Drivers
Seat, Heated Front Seats, Satellite Radio............. $15,900
12 KIA RIO 5 LX
40 MPG Hwy, Available Sirius Satellite Radio,
Automatic, 4 dr Hatchback...................................... $15,900
11 KIA SEDONA LX
7 Passenger Minivan, Bluetooth,
Available Sirius Satellite Radio............................... $18,600
11 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE 4X4
Heated Front Seats, Alloy Wheels, Remote
Start, Fog Lamps, Only 17,400 miles....................... $19,900
11 DODGE CHARGER
Former Chrysler Company Field Vehicle,
Redline Red Exterior with Bluetooth,
Remote Start, Rallaye Package...............................$20,900
11 KIA FORTE KOUP LX
Only 10,617 Miles on this Florida Car, A Rare Find!
6 Spd. Manual Transmission, Rear Spoiler,
Traction Control, Bluetooth Connection................ $17,900
12 DODGE AVENGER SE
Bright Silver Metallic Ext., 18 Aluminum
Chrome Clad Wheels, Security Alarm,
4 cyl., Automatic.........................................................$17,800
11 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING CONVERTIBLE
V6, Automatic, only 12,163 miles, Pwr.
Convertible Top, Priced well below
Kelly Blue Book Retail .............................................. $18,800
11 FORD TAURUS LIMITED
Tuxedo Black Metallic, Leather Seating, Reverse
Sensing and Rear Camera, Chrome Wheels........ $19,900
11 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN MAIN STREET
Dark Charcoal Exterior, Rear DVD,
Rear Power lilt Gate, Only 20,000 Miles................. $22,600
11 FORD MUSTANG V6 PREMIUM
Red Candy Metallic Ext, Leather Seating,
SYNC Voice Activated System, Shaker Audio ..... $19,700
11 RAM CARAVAN C/V
Only 285 miles on this Cargo Van, Former
Chrysler Display model for Auto & Trade Shows..... .$18,900
12 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle
Only 9,073 Miles, Bluetooth,
Sirius Satellite Radio ................................................ $27,900
12 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4
V8, Automatic, 12,000 Miles, Sirius Satellite
Radio, STK #120726K................................................ $26,500
12 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, V6,
Leather, Navigation, Pwr. Sunroof, 1,400 Miles ... $22,900
12 RAM 2500 SLT CREW CAB 4X4
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, only 241 Miles, Pwr. Sunroof, 8ft
Cargo Box, Pwr. Adjustable Pedals,
U Connect Bluetooth
Streaming Audio ......................................................... $39,700
11 DODGE NITRO DETONATOR 4X4
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, Redline Red,
4.0 6 Cyl., Chrome Accent Group, GPS Navigation,
UConnect Bluetooth................................................... ..$24,900
11 DODGE DURANGO CREW AWD
All Wheel Drive, Former Chrysler Group
Company Vehicle, Hemi V8, GPS Navigation,
Power Sunroof, Only 15,000 Miles ............................ ..$31,500
12 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4X4
Only 7,000 Miles, Former Chrysler Executive
Vehicle, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats............ $22,700
11 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LT EXT. CAB 4X4
1-Owner, Local Trade, 6.2 L V8, Leather Seating,
Park Assist, OnStar, Remote Start, 23,390 Miles .. $25,900
11 DODGE DURANGO EXPRESS AWD
Forme Chrysler Company Vehicle, 3rd
Row Seat, Bluetooth Streaming
Audio, Rear Air & Heat, Only 8,713 miles ............... $28,500
12 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
Automatic, Trail Rated, Alloy Wheels,
Air Conditioning........................................................... $24,900
11 CHRYSLER 300C AWD
All Wheel Drive, Dual Pane Sunroof,
GPS Navigation, Safety Tec Package,
Former Chrysler Group Company Vehicle.............. $36,300
12 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 4X4
V6, Automatic, 8 Foot Box, Bedliner....................... .$22,900
12 JEEP COMPASS LIMITED 4X4
Former Promotional Vehicle, Only 5,000 Miles,
Leather Seating, GPS Navigation........................... $25,900
12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Leather Seating, Rear DVD, Pwr. Side Sliding
Doors, Pwr. Liftgate, Silver Exterior ....................... $26,200
12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L
Leather Seating, Rear DVD w/ 2 Screens,
Safety Tech Pkg., Saphire Blue Exterior ................ $26,600
12 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SAHARA 4X4
Only 6,000 Miles, 4 Door, Automatic,
Deep Cherry Red Ext. w/ matching Painted
Hardtop, Navigation, Heated Front Seats .........$33,900
Clearance Priced
For Quick Sale!
More Values...
Hand Picked Just for You!
DONT RISK PAYINGTOO MUCH SOMEWHERE ELSE!
Tunkhannock Auto Mart
www.tunkautomart.com
888-323-6924
OPEN FRIDAYS
TIL 8:00 PM!
Prices are Plus Tax, Registration Fees and Documentation Fees. All payments are for 72 months to qualied buyers with excellent credit @ 6.99 APR. Your rate may
vary depending on credit rating status. $2499 down payment or trade equity. In addition to tax and registration, doc fees. Must take delivery by 10/5/12.
Jeep

2011 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN
MAINSTREET
NOW
$22,000
2012 CHEVY
SILVERADO 4X4
STK # 120726J
2011 KIA
SEDONA LX
STK# 120607K
STK#120710H
NOW
$20,900
NOW
$18,600
2011 DODGE
DURANGO
EXPRESS AWD
2011 VOLKSWAGEN
JETTA 2.5 SE
STK# 120904E
NOW
$28,500
NOW
$18,700
2011 FORD
TAURUS LIMITED
STK#120405L
AS LOWAS
$262
AS LOWAS
$296
AS LOWAS
$313
AS LOWAS
$275
NOW
$17,900
NOW
$19,900
2011 DODGE NITRO
DETONATOR 4X4
2012 RAM 1500
EXPRESS 4X4
STK # 120720H STK# 120813A
HEMI
V8
NOW
$24,900
NOW
$25,300
2011 FORD MUSTANG
V6 PREMIUM
STK#120405A
NOW
$19,700
AS LOWAS
$293
GPS
NAVIGATION
AS LOWAS
$381
NOW
$22,900
2012 CHRYSLER
300 LIMITED
AWD
STK#120802E
NOW
$34,400
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE
2011 DODGE
CHARGER
REAR
DVD
AS LOWAS
$274
3RD
ROW
SEAT
AS LOWAS
$276
2010 RAM 2500 SLT
CREW CAB DIESEL 4X4
STK# 120925A
NOW
$36,800
ONLY
27,300
MILES
2011 KIA FORTE
KOUP
AS LOWAS
$262
2012 RAM 1500 ST
QUAD CAB
STK#120515A
ONLY
49,700
MILES
2012 CHRYSLER
200 LX
2007 TOYOTA
COROLLA S
STK# 120830J STK#120827C
AS LOWAS
$364
STK # 120711C
STK # 120802D
NOW
$15,900
2012 KIA
RIO 5 LX
STK#120710J
AS LOWAS
$228
2006 FORD
FUSION SEL
STK # 120911B
NOW
$11,700
ONLY
40,639
MILES
2011 CHRYSLER
200 TOURING CONVERTIBLE
STK#120529E
NOW
$18,800
AS LOWAS
$279
2006 MERCURY
MILAN
STK # 120913E
ONLY
40,897
MILES
NOW
$10,900
STK#120710F
NOW
$17,900
NOW
$18,700
NOW
$12,700
2012 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
TOURING-L
STK # 120823D
LEATHER &
REAR DVD
NOW
$26,600
2012 DODGE
JOURNEY HERO
AWD
STK# 120921B
NOW
$23,300
AS LOWAS
$354
SOLD
SOLD SOLD
SOLD
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
710 Appliances
WASHER, Maytag
2011 $200.
570-474-5277
WASHER, Roper
automatic, used one
month $200 firm.
570-457-7854
712 Baby Items
BABY BOYS nautical
suit, with pants,
vest, dress shirt &
tie, size 2T, blue &
black, perfect con-
dition. $20. Also,
boys clothes size
12-24 months, mix-
ture of pants, shirts,
shoes socks &
hoodies, take all for
$20. 570-704-6185
BOPPY, Pink Lady-
bug, $20, ROCK n
PLAY sleeper, Fish-
er Price, $25.
CLOTHES, newborn
-12 mos. $1-$3
each. COSTUME,
Minnie Mouse, 6-9
mos., $25. DRESS,
Pumpkin, 6 mos.,
CLOTHES, Materni-
ty, barely used.
Sweaters, jeans,
etc. $10 each. All
negotiable. Can
send photos. Call
570-760-1005
BOYS fall & winter
jackets, camouflage
pattern, size 2T $5
each. Toddler Boys
blue snow boots
size 8, $5. Toddler
boys black Jordan
shoes size 7, $5.
Boys gray old navy
pull over size 2T, $3.
BABY GIRL clothes
sizes newborn to 6
months. Excellent
condition! no
stains!! Between 15-
20 outfits, some
with matching hats
& booties, dresses,
sleepers, 3 piece
outfits, onsies, 3
pair of brand new
shoes with tags,
headbands brand
new with tags,
socks brand new
with tags, hats
brand new with
tags, carseat cover
blanket. Take all for
$30. 570-704-6185
CAR SEATS 2 (1)
Graco (1) Evenflo
$25. each. Excellent
condition. 819-2174
HALLOWEEN COS-
TUMES Optimus
prime transformer
size M (7-8) $5 and
bumblebee trans-
former size (2T) no
mask, $3. J.J.Cole
baby bag with
changing mat, very
stylish with lots of
compartments!!
Green & brown
polka dot pattern.
Like new. Paid $60
asking $20.
570-704-6185
716 Building
Materials
WINDOW. Anderson
double pane. Brand
new 3x6. $200
OBO. 570-762-1197
WINDOWS. Alu-
minum double hung
with screens. (8) at
$15 each. Call for
sizes. 654-2955
722 Christmas
Trees
WHOLESALE
CHRISTMAS TREES
Frazier Fir
Frank at
570-752-3315 or
570-764-2153
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
726 Clothing
CLOTHING 3x-22/
24, summer & win-
ter, short & long
sleeve tops,
sweaters & blouses
$3-$5 each. Slacks
& Capris, $4 & $5.
Pant suits & Dress-
es. $10. Winter
coats, $25.
570-779-4310
CLOTHING. Boys
Fall/winter size 8/10.
50+ pieces all very
good condition. $30
Size 7, 30+ pieces,
very good condition.
$20. 570-474-2606
CLOTHING. JEANS.
12 pair of Jrs/wom-
ens designer jeans.
Express, Gap,
Bongo, Lucky
Tommy and Aero-
postale. 3/4 long,
5/6 long, 7/8 long.
gently worn, excel-
lent condition from
smoke free/pet free
home. $60 for all
570-709-9863
COAT, leather, XL
heavy brown, new.
$75. 570-388-6089
JACKET black
leather mens Adler
large worn once
excellent condition
$75. 570-819-2174
JACKET leather,
ladies size medium,
excellent condition -
$45 call (570) 606-
7010. or text only
(570) 285-5517 pic-
tures available at
request.
JACKET, Navy blue
blazer, 46R, Student
Holy Redeemer.
Excellent $45
570-474-9866
LADIES, size medi-
um, 45 items, must
take all. $30 or best
offer. 570-654-3870
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
DELL 19 flat screen
monitor, keyboard,
mouse & Wing Man
joy stick $75. for all.
(570) 714-3693 or
(570) 301-2458.
ROUTER. Wireless.
Verizon. #A99-
750015-00. New in
box. $40
570-825-3784
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
DELL Inspiron 1501
laptop with cd
rewritable/dvd-rom.
Gently used. 1 gb
hard drive. WiFi
enabled. 4 usb
ports. SD slot.
Headphone & micro
-phone ports. Ether-
net & phone outlets.
Windows Vista
Home Basic OS.
Trial Windows Office
2003. New battery.
Power cord & origi-
nal disks included.
$200 or best offer.
Call
(570) 821-0876.
732 Exercise
Equipment
GYM, Body Glide,
row Denise Austin.
$90. 570-825-4031.
HARD CORE GYM,
Plate loaded cable
pulley machine; lat
pull down, chest
press, pec deck, leg
ext, lower pulley for
curling. $150.
570-868-6024
WEIGHT BENCH.
BIODINE. 275 lb free
weights, with lift and
curl bars and leg
attachment. $160
570-332-2487
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
FIREPLACE. Gas
fireplace heater.
Natural gas, vent
free. Decorative
ivory metal with
blower and thermo-
stat. 25,000 BTU.
12x38. $200
570-823-0026
HEATERS vent free
propane & natural
gas heaters, new
with warranty &
refurbished units.
$60. 675-0005
PEA COAL. 700
Lbs. in plastic pails.
$60 for all.
570-328-6257
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BEDROOM SUITE
1955 Thomasville.
Includes Queen bed
frame, 2 night
stand, 1 tall chest of
drawers and large
vanity with attached
mirror. Must see.
Asking $500. Diane
570-814-6352
CHAIR, light gold
accent chair, basket
weave size, $40.
570-288-4852
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each. SOFA,
CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 12 noon
570-675-5046
CLOCK, Grand-
mothers, 72 tall.
Paid $400, sell $200
Rack, garment,
large with top shelf,
$10. Desktop, fold
down, $10. Cart,
microwave, large,
simulated oak finish.
$40. 675-0920.
CONSOLE lovely
cherry finish con-
sole for TV & acces-
sories $50. Floral
sofa & matching
Queen Anne chair
$150. excellent con-
dition. Beautiful,
decorative walnut
finish dining room
hutch by Pilliod Fur-
niture $375.
570-472-0285
DESK. Very heavy
computer desk.
Cherry, large.
Hutch, side shelves
and file drawers.
Some wear and
scratches on top
from use. $200
OBO 570-825-9654
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE. FREE!
Entertainment Cen-
ter, coffee table,
couch, chairs, TV
stand.
570-675-8262
FUTON like new.
$80. 570-714-3693
or 570-301-2458
KITCHEN/DINING
SET, 4 maroon swiv-
el chairs. Table is
light oak finish.
$100.570-362-4322
LOVESEAT, new
$150.
570-824-6770
LOVESEAT, teal
green with pillows.
Never used. $125.
Kitchen table, oak,
with two chairs.
Good condition.$50.
570-313-0495
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $139
Full sets: $159
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MATTRESS/box
spring, brand new
p-top queen size,
still in bags! must
sell! $150.
570-280-9628
RECLINER, Lazyboy,
dark tan, perfect
condition. $300.
570-823-2709
744 Furniture &
Accessories
PINE LOFT
BEDROOM SUITE:
Includes 3 dresser
drawers, book
shelve, desk with
drawers, and clos-
et. Asking 1000.00
or best offer. ALSO
HESS TRUCKS in
mint condition,
never out of the
boxes. From 1995-
2005 asking 35.
each. Call after 6:00
570-417-1088
ROCKER RECLINER
Micro suede tan
color, medium size,
comfortable but
firmer cushions,
very good condition.
Asking $125 OBO.
LIVING ROOM SET-
Large & plush couch
& loveseat, neutral
solid-tone tan/olive
color micro suede,
$300 OBO. QUEEN
BEDROOM SET
complete matching
longer 9 drawer
dresser with large
mirror, taller 5 draw-
er dresser, & night-
stand, oak color.
$400 OBO. COM-
PLETE FULL BED
SET with metal
frame, very clean,
$95 OBO. 262-9162
SOFA & LOVE SEAT.
Red Microfiber.
Beautiful. Comes
with 6 matching pil-
lows. My living room
is too small for both
pieces. Comes from
pet free/smoke free
home. Asking $825.
570-814-3634
SOFA maroon
Berkline reclining
sofa with fold down
center console &
reclining love seat .
Good Shape. Asking
$300. 762-7495
SOFA-HIDE A BED,
queen size, 6 ft.
long $50. OBO Call
570-693-1918
TABLE LAMP Orien-
tal Chinese woman
1960s ceramic, pink
-white-gold. $35.
Collector spoons 18
different, $30. neg.
570-696-1927
TABLE, Black Japa-
nese coffee with
inlaid glass fig-
urines. Mint condi-
tion. $200 or best
offer. End tables,
coffee table,oak,
ottoman to match,
Mint condition.
$150. Desk, com-
puter with drawers.
$10. 829-3483
TABLE, kitchen, 4
chairs, wood-round,
very good condition.
$50. Entertainment
center, like new
$25. 570-388-6089.
TABLE. Dining room
with 4 high back
chairs. $225. CABI-
NET, white with
wood countertop,
$20.570-674-2630
TABLE. Kitchen/din-
ing room with 4
chairs. Solid wood
oval plus (2) 12
extenders, 4 match-
ing chairs with
padded seats. Very
nice condition. $100
570-902-5598
ASHLEY
197 West
Cemetery St.
Sat., Sept. 29 and
Sun., Sept 30
8AM to 4PM
ENTIRE CONTENTS
OF HOUSE
including Singer
sewing machines
and sewing items,
fishing gear,
furniture, household
and kitchen items,
small appliances,
costume jewelry,
vinyl records and
much more.
E D WA R D S V I L L E
Collectors
Market Now Open!
378 Main St
Open Saturday &
Sunday 9am-5pm
570-718-1123
Minutes from
Wilkes-Barre.
Antiques, Col-
lectibles, toys &
MUCH MORE!
Bid Board, Sunday,
SEPT. 30, 12 noon
FLEAMARKET
& BID BOARD
EXETER
811 Schooley Ave
9-29 & 9-30
8am - ?
Yard sale under
tent, follow signs
from Wyoming Ave
onto Schooley Ave.
Antique furniture, &
figurines, Hummel
plates, comic
books, toys, baby
items, pool items &
clothing.
NOXEN
GARAGE/YARD SALE
(near Harveys
Lake)
164 Tulip Rd
Sat & Sun, 9/29 &30
8am - 1pm
Household items,
Harley Davidson
clothes & more!
EXETER
FREEZER $100.
Special tables
$100. Loads of
sporting equipment,
hunting, fishing &
golf gear. Some
new, some used.
Over 100 other
items. 459 Wilson
St., Exeter Call
570-693-2423
anytime
FALLS
330 SUSQUEHANNA
BEACH RD
SAT 9-3 & SUN. 9-1
Housewares
Clothes Jewelry
Clocks Unicorns
Kokopellis Toys
Furniture And More!
HAZLETON
145 -147 S. Church
(309 South)
Empty Lot
Thurs, Fri &
Sat 10-6
Sunday, 2-6
Over 1,000 records
(45, 33 1/3, 78),
Rock, Rock-n-Roll,
R & B, Jazz, Easy
Listening, Country,
Comedy, Gospel;
sheet music, VHS
tapes, kitchen
appliances, leather
chairs, glassed
bookcase, 2 dog
crates, books,
clothes & other
items If rain see
signs for garage.
KINGTSON
78 N Welles Ave.
Sat., 9/22 8am
Household,
Christmas,Tools,
Furniture, & More.
MINERSMILLS
Hosted by W-B
Bears Jr. Football &
Cheerleading
Children, Parents,
Family & Friends
Please join us:
Saturday Oct. 6
at 5:00
158 E. MAIN ST.
MARINE CORP
LEAGUE
Admission $5.
at door which will
include 3 Bingo
cards
Additional cards,
special, snacks &
refreshments will
also be available.
PITTSTON
20 Laurel St.
Sat. & Sun., 10-3
Teens clothes &
accessories,
excellent condition.
Holister, AE &
more! Coach
purses, jewelry,
sports collectibles
& holiday.
PITTSTON TWP.
633 Suscon Rd
Sat, Sun, 9/29 & 30
9am - 6pm
RAIN OR SHINE
household, holiday,
sports cards and
Nascar, watches
knives, Precious
Moments, and
more
SHAVERTOWN
THE
SNOOTY FOX
103 E. Overbrook Rd
Sun, 12-4 BYOB,
bring your own bag.
Grocery bag $5,
shopping bag $8.
Womens clothing &
accessories.
570-675-2670
WARRIOR RUN
360 CHESTNUT ST.
Sept. 29 9am-2pm
NASCAR, Books,
Home Decor, etc.
WILKES BARRE
48 Marjorie Ave.
9-29 8:30-3
9-30 8-2
Mattress, 2 bed
frames, couch, end
tables, coffee table
2 computer tables,
dryer, games,
clothing, toys.
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
750 Jewelry
DIAMOND RING
Ladys 14 carat yel-
low gold ring, 3/4
carat, I to J quality,
2 baguettes, .20
carats, H to I.
Appraised at
$4,450, will
sell for $2,000.
570-592-5661
RING, Engagement.
14k yellow gold.
Recently appraised
$3000, asking
$675. NECKLACE,
heart, diamond,
Asking $300. Seri-
ous inquiries only
570-814-7614
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LAWN MOWER
Husqvarna zero turn
lawn mower 15 hp,
38 deck, 336 hours
of use $400 obo.
(570) 762-1173
LAWN MOWERS (2)
(1) MTD Kawasaki
Pro, 6.5 hp, self pro-
pelled hi wheeler.
Like new, $150
OBO, (1) 20 Push,
$45. SNOW BLOW-
ER. Toro. 20 5 hp,
electric start. 2 cyc,
used 3 times. Cost
$600, Sell $350
OBO 570-283-9452
LAWNMOWER,
needs some work.
$10. Weedwacker,
includes 6 pack-
ages of oil and roll
of string. paid $90,
sell for $45.
570-736-6239
LAWNMOWER,
Sears 6.5 hp, S/P,22
$200. 825-5053
PRESSURE
SPRAYER, Aeroil
pressure sprayer
with hose and noz-
zle. $25 OBO
570-693-1918
TRACTOR ATTACH-
MENTS, Planet Jr.,
made in the USA,
Cultivator #2368;
Right Plow #1096
and left plow #5568.
$50. for all three.
TRACTOR HITCH,
David Bradley walk
behind, $50.
WHEELBARROW,
steel front wheel,
needs work. $20.
OBO 570-693-1918
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: From
only $3,997.00-
MAKE/ SAVE
MONEY with your
own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
756 Medical
Equipment
CANES, aluminum
adjustable,
CRUTCHES, 1 pair,
WALKER, 4 wheel,
PORTA POTTY (2),
LIFT CHAIR. $200
for all. 570-693-1918
JAZZY POWER
chair/ model #1121, 5
to 6 years old but
used only 1 year
then stored needs 2
batteries $800.
570-824-7015
WHEELCHAIR,
electric, $150.
570-474-0282
WHEELCHAIR, extra
wide, heavy duty
footrest, $200. Bed-
pan, stainless steel,
new. $25. Bladder
control pads. $40.
570-852-0661
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
AIR MATTRESS, full
size with pump. 19
inch rise $40.
570-823-2709
AIR TANK, co2.
asking $30.
570-474-5492
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
AUTO PAINT (base
coat) one gallon of
GM Rally Red
corvette color, sell-
ing for $100.00 call
570-883-7007
BAND SAW. For
stained glass
includes pattern
books. 7 sheets of
stained glass all
sizes. Lots of
accessories, too
much to mention.
Call for details. All
for $160. Very good
condition.
570-696-2169
BEER MEISTER set.
$30
570-474-5492
BOOKS hardcover &
paperback, various
Authors, 2 Boxes
$20. a box.
Bread Machine, like
new $20. Sleeping
bags-4 of them
$10, $15. $20.$25.
like new. 4 shelf cor-
ner unit $20. TV, 19
Curtis Mathes Color
with remote, $15.
Calculator, Texas
Instrument. New,
$40 570-474-6028
CANES & walking
sticks. 30 available.
Many different
sizes, heights,
shapes, made from
slippery maple trees
$5. each. Christmas
& household over
200 items available
includes trees,
ornaments, lights,
vases, knick-
knacks, figurines,
lamps, baskets,
flowers, Samsonite
belt massager,
all for $60 Electric
sewing machine
with cabinet, excel-
lent condition $45.
Stove, old fash-
ioned coal. White
Dickson with warm-
ing closet and 6
lids. Excellent con-
dition. $500
570-735-2081
CAR RAMPS, steel,
$40. POST HOLE
DIGGER, $15
570-288-4852
CHINA 12 piece
place setting with
serving pieces, Star
Light pattern, fine
china by Harmony
House, great condi-
tion $295.
570-472-0285
CHINA SET 40 piece
75-100 years old
Austrian, hand
painted blue rose
design with scal-
loped gold fringe
edge, includes plat-
ter, 2 tureens with
cover, butter dish
with cover, gravy
boat with attached
dish, relish dish. $40
570-819-2174
CLOTHING RACKS
4 steel approxi-
mately 6 $75. each.
570-883-4443
DISHES, Christmas
Noel china, pearl
green & berry on
white. Service for 16
complete set, per-
fect condition $350.
570-655-9221
JARS, Ball and Kerr
canning.$3 for 12.
570-825-5053
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LADDER, 40 ft. alu-
minum extension.
$300. 675-0107
LITTERMAID. 2
boxes waste recep-
tacles and carbon
filters. $50.
570-256-3983
MANUAL, complete
car care, $15. All
about music, $15.
Bonsai, $10.50. Elvis
and me plus pro-
gram musical, $25.
Baseball hall of
shame, $15.
570-825-2494
MANUALS, Chrysler
service, $5. Wall-
board, Homasote
soundproof, $10.
570-474-0282.
MOVING OCT. 4TH
Selling Everything.
Appliances & furni-
ture. All items under
$50. Sun., Sept. 30,
9-5. 160 Grand St.,
Nanticoke. Call
735-8480 or
239- 4131 for details
.
NOOK, by Barnes
and Noble. Includes
anit-glare screen
protector, green
cover, USB cable,
wall charger
adapter and reading
light. Like new con-
dition. $75.
570-823-5625
RADIATORS (7)
cast iron steam
radiators with
valves, $50. each.
570-655-4198
758 Miscellaneous
READING PRO-
GRAM. Scholastic
Phonic. Excellent
condition. CDs.
workbooks, etc.
Orig. $120, sell for
$50. 570-788-5030
RECORDS, 60 play-
ing, number 33, $15.
570-824-2055
RECORDS. 33 RPM
in sleeves. 60
records, all for $5.
570-735-6638
ROTORS. (2) New
front. For 2009 Jeep
Liberty. Must take
pair, $40. TIRE, on
Jeep Liberty Rim.
New,. $40. TOOL
BOX, (2) black plas-
tic for full size truck,
$50 , black plastic
for Small size truck
$50. 570-430-4647
SAFE, Sentry, like
new, 2 keys. $60
570-574-0271
SAW, Radial arm,
$125, HEATER, nat-
ural gas, vented,
$40, Toy Box, Spi-
derman, $10. SHOV-
EL, Toro snow, $25,
BAR SINK, stainless
steel double, $50,
ICE MAKER, for
Frigidaire fridge,
$20, RODS, Tra-
verse, $10 ea, HUB
CAPS, Chevy Super
Sport. 823-2889
SILVER EAGLE
SILVER
DOLLARS
FOR SALE
Each 1 oz.,
0.999%. Available
are 500 Eagles in
monster box,
minted by the US
Treasury at the
West Point Mint.
$40 per coin, if
bought separately
or $39 each if
buying all 500.
570-856-1045
SILVERWARE, eight
place setting,
Holmes & Edwards.
$10. Painting, large
framed Schooleys
Farm, Trucksville,
$50. Pot, large
Philodendron, $5.
Plants, large hang-
ing Spider, $10.
Pedestal, silver plat-
ed cake, $10.
570-675-0920
SNOW THROWER,
Troy-Bilt, like new, 2
stage electric start
24 inch. $450 neg.
570-905-4818
SOUP TUREEN with
lid, platter, spoon,
salt and pepper
shaker. Garden Har-
vest by Arnart. New,
excellent condition,
never used. 45
years old, received
for wedding pres-
ent. $30
570-696-2169
SWEEPER, Bissel,
upright, very good
condition. $20
Hoover, sweeper
upright, very good
condition. $20.
570-451-0313
TIRES. (Snow) 4
Firestone Winter-
force. 215/55/R17.
Like new. $200
570-262-2959
TIRES. Various sizes
and types. $15 &
$30. DVD/CD video
CD player. Sony $10
570-674-2630
TOILET SEAT, new, 3
inch rise. $30. Mat-
tress topper, new,
very thick with gel,
full size. $70.
570-823-2709
WINDMILL BLADES,
4 Plastic Blades
about 7 X 28- set
of 2 for $25.
570-693-1918
762 Musical
Instruments
ACCORDION, mint
condition, 60 years
old, $400.
570-825-5053
CONSOLE PIANO:
Kohler Campbell,
very nice cabinetry,
with bench.
$1750 negotiable
Call 570-430-7212
GUITAR, Banez
electric Bass. $135.
570-574-0271
PIANO. Rudolph
Wurlitzer. FREE
570-283-5142
SPEAKER SET, new
in-ceiling, $15. Case
new Fender electric
guitar. $10.
570-474-0282.
772 Pools & Spas
COVER, pool 12
round , new $20.
570-388-6089
774 Restaurant
Equipment
PRICES PRICES
REDUCED REDUCED
HOBART MIXER
Used. Model H600
60 qt. bowl, dolly,
wire whip, dough
hook, mixing
paddle plus 30 qt.
bowl, 2 wire whips,
mixing paddle
$4,500.
WALK-IN
COOLER
used, size: 65wide
x 6 deep x 86 high
with floor, remote
outdoor compres-
sor & 25 line set
$3,400.
570-675-7423
776 Sporting Goods
BASEBALL, machine
Striker automatic,
used twice. Paid
$200, asking $100.
570-690-3840
before 7pm.
776 Sporting Goods
BOW. PSE Game
Sport Strato-Flite.
Includes 18 arrows,
very good condition.
$60. JACKET, Wool-
rich Hunting and
Pants, size 48, $15.
Call for details
570-696-2169
BOWS, 1 Pse Triton,
right hand-45-60 lb
drawweight, 28-30
inch draw length,
with arrows &
accessories $125. 1
Pse Firestorm, right
hand, 45-60 lb draw
weight, 28-30 inch
draw length with
arrows & acces-
sories. $125.
570-574-4698
JACKET, extra large
with pants Mossy
Oak camo. $140,
sell for $60. Excel-
lent. 570-287-2073
TENNIS RACKET
girls Wilson, pink &
brown breast
awareness. Comes
with case. Only
used once. Mint
condition. $20.
570-704-6185
784 Tools
BLOWER, leaf $15.
Snow shovel, Toro
electric, $25.
570-824-6770
LADDER 24 alu-
minum extension
ladder $100.
570-829-5542
SPRAY GUN. Crafts-
man HVLP heavy
duty high perform-
ance. New in box.
$85. 570-735-2236
786 Toys & Games
CAR. Barbie Power
Wheels Electric
Jeep Wrangler. Like
new. 2 forward
gears and reverse.
Battery and charg-
er, FM radio., Com-
pletely assembled.
Asking $125
570-472-9614
TRAIN, Burlington
Ho set. $28.
570-574-0271
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
PS3 160GB slim with
pink remote &
uncharted 3 asking
$160. Ps3 160gb
slim like new in box
no remote with fall-
out 3 & fallout new
vegas asking $150.
call 570-7046185
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Sept. 28 - $1,776.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
CATS (2) FREE
mother and daugh-
ter. Spayed. People
and chocolate lab
friendly. Used to
fenced in back yard
570-690-8243
KITTENS (2) FREE to
good homes only.
Need indoor homes
and adults who can
provide permanent
placement and vet-
erinary care. No
shots, need help
now! Dallas, PA
570-428-5210, seri-
ous inquiries only
please!
KITTENS, (2) free to
good home. 8
weeks old, black,
white and tiger.
570-575-9984
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Poms, Husky, Labs,
Yorkies, Puggles,
Chihuahuas, Pugs
Dachshund, Goldens,
Shepherds, Dober-
mans, Shih-Tzus
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
MALTESE-POO
MIXED PUPPIES
Toy. Health
guarantee. $300.
570-765-0936
timesleader.com
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE
THAT
STUFF
CALL
800-273-7130
OR VISIT
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24/7 TO PLACE YOUR
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STARTING AT
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Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
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Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 11G
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WERE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 PITTSTON
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***
$
20,799*
BUY NOW FOR:
4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated Navigation w/ Blue Tooth,
Automatic Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks,
PowerMirrors, Electronic Stability Control
2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA
4WD
MSRP
$
24,554*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,799*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2137
$
15,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital Climate Control,
Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors,
AM/FM/CD, 6 Speed Manual Transmission
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S FWD
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
20,493*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
18,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
Stk#S2210
Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, 8 Standard Air-
bags, Dual Zone Digital Climate Control, Automatic
CVT Transmission, TouchFree Smart Key, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Molded Mud ap package
MSRP
$
23,294*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S AWD
NEW
Stk# S2289
$
19,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
2012 SUZUKI SX4 LE
POPULAR SEDAN
MSRP
$
18,439*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2148
LE Popular Package, 8 Standard Airbags,
Automatic Transmission, Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels
NEW
$
15,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
NEW
NEW
*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, and SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki Grand Vitara and Kizashi. Buy now for sale prices includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012
Suzuki SX4 Sedan, Equator and Grand Vitara. Buy now for sale price includes $1,000 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Crossover and Kizashi. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Prices
are VALID ON IN STOCK VEHICLES ONLY **0% Financing up to 72 Months with approved credit for S Tier Customers. $13.89 for every $1,000 nanced. 0% Financing in lieu of Manufacturer Rebate. Offer Ends 10/1/2012. ***Based on 2010 and 2011 Presidents Club Standings.
NOWITSYOURTURN
HOWMUCH WILL YOU SAVE?
$
15,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
MSRP
$
20,025*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
17,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
1,000*
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive,
8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows,
Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Automatic
NEW
2012 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AUTO AWD
Stk#S2298
4 Wheel Drive, Automatic Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks, Power Mirrors,
4.0L V6, Factory Spray In Bed Liner
MSRP
$
29,824*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
27,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
2,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2371
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW
CAB SPORT 4X4
NEW
$
24,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
Carol & Angel H. from Jessup
Dennis & Susan M. from Wyoming
Donna D. from Duryea
Dan N. from Kingston
Diane H. from Plymouth
Leslie K. from Scranton
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 13G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchen
& Baths
DAVE JOHNSON
Expert Bathroom &
Room Remodeling,
Carpentry & Whole
House Renovations.
Licensed &Insured
570-819-0681
GENERAL CONTRACTING
Bathrooms $7,995
Kitchens, (free
design) roofing,
siding, & painting.
570-831-5510
Looking for
answers
to the
changes in
the Building
Trades ?
Join the BIA
and get
all the
answers &
many
benefits.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
NORTHEAST
CONTRACTING
GROUP
Decks, Sunrooms,
Additions, Windows,
Kitchens & Baths.
Concrete
Driveways,
Walkways & Patios
570-338-2269
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Handyman
Services also,
Electric, Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa &
MasterCard
call 570-852-1578
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
Ref. Ins. Free Est.
570-332-7023
Or 570-855-2506
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Inspections. Con-
crete & metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY
ALL CHIMNEY
REPAIR
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel
Lining, Parging,
Stucco, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Licensed-Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
A+ VERAS CLEANING
Homes,
Apartments,
Offices.
(570)817-3750
BEST
CLEANERS
Most thorough
home or office
cleaning at
reasonable prices.
Satisfaction Guar-
anteed!
REFERENCES AVAIL.
570-704-8288
Connies Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Connie Mastruzzo
Brutski - Owner
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
A. CHAIRGE CONCRETE
25 Years Exp.
Concrete/Masonry
Quality Work
Affordable Prices
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
W. Pittston
570-760-6720
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
CHIMNEYS,
Masonry, Con-
crete, Brick,
Stonework, Stucco
Damage repair
specialist
570-466-2916
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
MICHAEL
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
& HOME BUILDER
30 Years Exp.
SPECIAL SALE
25% off our normal
low prices. Have
your home beautiful
for the holidays.
Interior / Exterior
WE DO IT ALL!
Why pay more.
Pay when youre
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
Free Estimates.
570-899-3123
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
INVENTORY
CLEARANCE SALE
Specials on new &
used fencing.
All Types & Styles
Sales & Installation
Call today for a
FREE estimate!
570-602-0432
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
1099 Fencing &
Decks
PISANOS FENCE &
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
1399 Susquehanna
Ave, Exeter, PA
40 years in
business, free esti-
mates, fully insured.
Sales and installa-
tion of chainlink,
custom built wood,
PVC, and all types
of fencing. Call
570-654-2257 or
570-654-2286
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
HARDWOOD FLOOR
REFINISHING &
INSTALLATION
Recoat your hard-
wood floors starting
at $1.25/SQ FT
Free Estimates
570-793-4994
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
Home
Winterization
Roof Repairs,
Chimney Rebuilds.
You Name It. 30
Years Experience.
Licensed & Insured.
570-704-8759
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
FALL CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
JAYS LAWN SERVICE
Summer clean-ups,
mowing, mulching
and more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING
RAKED?
Specializing In
Trimming and
Shaping of Bush-
es, Shrubs, Trees.
Also, Bed
Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch and Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465 570-823-8465
Meticulous and
Affordable.
F Free ree E Estimates stimates
Brizzys
Arbor Care &
Landscaping
Tree trimming,
pruning & removal.
Stump grinding,
Cabling. Shrub and
hedge sculpting
and trimming.
Spring cleanup,
retaining walls
and repair.
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
570-542-7265
KELLERS LAWN CARE
Mowing, mulching,
Fall cleanup, gravel
& trimming.
Landscaping,
planting. Affordable.
Free Estimates.
Fully Insured.
Commercial
& Residential.
570-332-7016
LANDSCAPE TREES
Farm Fresh
9 White Pine $95
9-10 Norway
Spruce $105
Great for natural
fences. Other
sizes & types.
Delivery & Installa-
tion Available
helenandedstree
farm.com
570-498-6209
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping.
Tree pruning. Gar-
den tilling. Fall
Clean Ups. Leaf
removal. Weekly &
bi-weekly lawn
care. Fully Insured.
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
TREE REMOVAL
Stump Grinding, Haz-
ard Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing, Stone/
Soil Delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1183 Masonry
OLD TIME MASONRY
Voted #1
MasonryContractor
Let A Real
Mason Bid Your
Project!
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Stone,
Chimney &
Stucco Repair,
Retaining Walls,
Patio & Pavers,
Stamped &
Colored
Concrete, etc.
Fully Insured.
570-466-0879
oldtimemasonry.com
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, chimneys .
Lic. & insured.
570-283-5254
STEVE WARNER
Masonry/Concrete
Custom Work
Small Jobs &
Repairs. Free esti-
mates. Lic. & Ins.
570-561-5245
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
ABLE & READY
We buy homes
in foreclosure
If you are
under water
and you want
to
walk away
CALL US TODAY
570-266-5333
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
JACOBOSKY JACOBOSKY
P PAINTING AINTING
Get your home
painted today, We
have an eye for
detail!
Power Washing,
Quality Painting,
Affordable prices,
$50.00 off with
this ad.
Free Estimates.
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTYS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIP
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
L&M BLACKTOPPING
Driveways, exca-
vating & resurfac-
ing. Concrete &
pavers. Licensed &
Insured. Call Ron
570-290-2296
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1219 Photo
Services
Full Service
Photography,
Photo
Restoration,
Stock Aerial
Photos
www.Rittinger
aerialphoto.com
570-288-5158
1234 Pressure
Washing
POWER WASHING!
Concrete, Houses,&
Decks. The weather
is changing. Now is
the time to have
your concrete
washed and sealed!
Call now:
(412) 346-2025 or
(570) 591-1933
PA094210
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
RE-CON RE-CON
Reconstruction
Specialists
For all your home
improvement needs
Heating, plumbing
& remodeling.
One Phone Call
Does It All!
570-406-4738
1252 Roofing &
Siding
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1339 Window
Service
PJS WINDOW
CLEANING &
JANITORIAL
SERVICES
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
570-283-9840
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
POLLOCKS USED CARS
Ken Pollock AT
339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA
Hours
M-F 9-8pm
Sat 9-5pm
1-800-223-1111
www.kenpollocksuzuki.com
CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE
WERE EASY TO FIND
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 PITTSTON
SCAN HERE FOR
MORE INFO
*All Prices Plus Tax, Tags, & Fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars pass PA State Inspection.
See sales person for complete details. **1.74% on bank approved credit for 60 month term. Just Traded As Traded Vehicles are sold as is where is with no warranty.
GOLD CHECK CERTIFIED VEHICLES
JUST TRADED
AS TRADED!
RATES AS LOW AS
1.74%
**
The Best Vehicle At The
Absolute Lowest Prices.
3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee**
30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty**
All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass
PA State Inspection**
Value Vehicle Outlet
GOLD CHECK CERTIFIED
MANAGERS SPECIALS
$
16,499
*
2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI
SE AWD
Stk# S1695, Company
Vehicle! Power Seat,
18 Alloys, PW, PL,
All Wheel Drive!
PRICES FOR EVERY BUDGET!!!
OVER 50 USED VEHICLES IN STOCK UNDER $20,000!
$
10,999
* 2010 HYUNDAI SONATA
Stk#S2050A, GLS Package, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
10,999
* 2009 NISSAN SENTRA SEDAN
Stk#P14710, SR Pkg, Power Windows & Locks, Automatic
$
11,899
* 2008 CHEVY IMPALA LT SDN
Stk#S2366A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
11,999
* 2010 SUZUKI SX4 SPORTBACK
Stk#S2301A, Power Windows & Locks, Manual Trans., CD
$
11,999
* 2011 TOYOTA YARIS HATCHBACK
Stk#S2175A, Power Windows & Locks, Manual Trans., Awesome on Gas, Only 12K Miles
$
12,499
* 2008 DODGE NITRO 4X4
Stk#P14714, SXT Pkg, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, PW, PL
2011 MITSUBISHI GALANT
Stk# P14728, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels, CD, A/C
$
12,499
*
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA SL SEDAN
Stk# P14723, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL
$
12,799
*
2011 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER TECH AWD
Stk# S2254A, Custom Wheels, Automatic, Navigation, PW, PL
$
13,999
*
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA S SEDAN
Stk# P14722, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Low Miles! Auto, PW, PL
$
14,999
*
2007 MINI COOPER S HATCHBACK
Stk# S2296A, Sunroof, Automatic, S Package, Alloy Wheels
$
15,499
*
2011 KIA SOUL
Stk# S1731B, Power Windows & Locks, Automatic, CD, Only 8K Miles!
$
15,799
*
2007 MAZDA CX-7 AWD
Stk# P14738, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL
$
14,999
*
2011 DODGE AVENGER SXT
Stk# P14720, Alloy Wheels, Power WIndows & Locks, CD, Onlky 16K Miles!
$
15,999
*
2009 HONDA CIVIC EX-L SDN
Stk# S2346A, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, PW, PL, Only 14K Miles!
$
16,499
*
2009 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
Stk# S2228A, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
16,799
*
2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4
Stk# S2360A, Bose Stereo, Sunroof, Alloys, 3rd Row!
$
16,999
*
Stk# P14684A, Power Windows &
Locks, CD, Alloy Wheels, Auto
2005 PONTIAC VIBE
NOW
$
6,999
*
Stk# P14716, Power Windows &
Locks, Automatic, A/C, CD
2006 PONTIAC G6
SEDAN
NOW
$
6,299
*
Stk# P14718, Sunroof, Alloy
Wheels, Automatic, PW, PL
2004 OLDSMOBILE
ALERO COUPE
NOW
$
4,999
*
Stk# S2359A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2008 SUZUKI SX4
SEDAN LE
NOW
$
9,999
*
Stk# S2252B, Leather, Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks
2006 SAAB 9-5
SEDAN
NOW
$
8,799
*
Stk# S2235A, Sunroof, 5 Speed
Manual, A/C, Low Miles!
2009 HYUNDAI
ACCENT SEDAN
NOW
$
9,499
*
Stk# P14715, Leather, Sunroof,
Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
2004 SATURN ION
SEDAN
NOW
$
7,499
*
Stk# S2282A, Sunroof,
Automatic, Power Windows
2001 CHRYSLER
SEBRING
NOW
$
4,999
*
Stk# S2323A, Power Windows
& Locks, Automatic, CD
2008 SUZUKI
FORENZA SEDAN
NOW
$
8,999
*
Stk# S2357A, Power Windows
& Locks, Automatic, CD
2010 KIA SOUL
NOW
$
9,999
*
$
10,999
* 2006 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
Stk#P14671, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, PW, PL
2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA PREMIUM 4X4
Stk# P14727, Alloy Wheels, Auto, Navigation, Power Windows & Locks
$
17,999
*
2008 SUZUKI XL-7 AWD
Stk#S2211A, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, Low Miles, PW, PL
$
17,999
*
2007 HONDA PILOT EX-L SUV 4WD
Stk# S2261A, 3rd Row Seating, Leather, Sunroof, Power Seat
$
18,799
*
2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE AWD
Stk# P14735, Leather, Dual Sunroof, 3rd Row, Rear Park Assist
$
20,499
*
2011 DODGE NITRO HEAT 4WD
Stk# S2270A, Sunroof, 20 Chrome Wheels, Automatic, Only 10K Miles!
$
20,899
*
2010 JEEP WRANGLER 2DR 4X4
Stk# P14725, Lift Kit, Off Road Tires, Winch, PW, PL, Ready for Some Mud
$
21,999
*
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR EXT CAB 2WD
Stk# S2358A, Only 500 Miles On It! Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks,
$
19,499
*
2010 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE 4X4
Stk# P14747, Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, 3rd Row Seats, Alloys
$
21,899
*
2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB 4X4
Stk# S2356A, 6FT Bed, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD
$
21,999
*
2010 SUZUKI EQUATOR RMX-4 CREW CAB
Stk# P14748, Navigation, Alloy Wheels, Tonneau Cover, PW, PL
$
22,499
*
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI SLS AWD
Stk# P14726A, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Power Seats, 1-Owner!
$
22,999
*
2010 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA 2DR 4X4
Stk# S2368A, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Keyless Entry, Only 7500 Miles!
$
24,999
*
1998 DODGE AVENGER COUPE
Stk# S2257B, Only 74K Miles, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
2,199
*
2001 DODGE RAM 2500 EX CAB 4X4
Stk# S1797B, Plow Package w/Plow, Automatic
$
3,499
*
1985 CADILLAC ELDORADO COUPE
Stk#S2238A, Automatic, A Classic! Power Windows & Locks
$
1,199
*
1998 VOLVO V70 WAGON
Stk# P14731, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
2,499
*
2001 DODGE INTREPID SEDAN
Stk# P14691B, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
1,499
*
2004 KIA RIO HATCHBACK
Stk# S2204A, Great on Gas, Good Runner!
$
2,199
*
2000 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN
Stk#S2273A, Automatic, Great on Gas!
$
3,999
*
1998 CHEVY TRACKER 2DR 4X4
Stk# S2248A, Convertible Fun!
$
1,999
*
2003 SUZUKI AERIO SEDAN
Stk# S2370A, Automatic, Great Runner!
$
2,499
*
2002 SUBARU IMPREZA WRX WAGON AWD
Stk# S2272A, Alloys, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
5,499
*
All prices plus tax and tags. Discount includes $1000 Volvo Saab owner loyalty. Offer good thru 8/ 31 or while supplies last. 2.49% with approved credit.
207-8149All prices plus tax and tags.
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Montage Auto Mile 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
SANTOVOLVO
5
YEAR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE
2012 VOLVO MODEL YEAR END
* Pay nothing to repair
or maintain your volvo
for the rst 5 years.
2012 VOLVO S60 T5 Premier
2012 VOLVO C70 T5 Polestar Inscription
2012 VOLVO XC 60 Premier AWD
2012 VOLVO S60 T6
APR.
72 months
2.49
%
SELL DOWN
JUST
$31,490
JUST
$40,990
JUST
$35,990
JUST
$37,490
#382100
MSRP $36,220
#342006
MSRP 47,225
Hard top convertible All Wheel Drive
#362030
MSRP $41,265
#382066
MSRP 42,920
UP
TO
UP
TO
UP
TO
UP
TO
$
4,730OFF
$
5,725OFF
$
6,235OFF
$
5,430OFF
All pmt. based on 36 month closed end.Lease tax and fees not included with 995 cash down or equal trade in value. First pmt. and bank acquisitions fees ($695).
due on delivery. No security deposit required. 30,000 miles allowed. Balance due A=2054, B=2189, C=2059, D=2149 Plus taxes and tags. Offer expires 10/1/12.
207-8149
VIEW OUR INVENTORY 24/7 AT WWW.SANTOCARS.COM
Montage Auto Mile, 3514 Birney Ave., Moosic
The All New 2013 Volvos have Arrived
Your 2013 Volvo S60 T5
List Price $37,545
Santo Discount -$2,305
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty -$1,000
or Conquest Savings
$
369
Per Mo.
36 Months
Just $995
Down
Per Mo.
36 Months
Just $995
Down
Per Mo.
36 Months
Just $995
Down
Per Mo.
36 Months
Just $995
Down
OR LEASE FOR
OR LEASE FOR
All Wheel Drive
All Wheel Drive All Wheel Drive
Your 2013 Volvo XC70 Wagon
Just
$
37,990
2.9% Apr.
72 months
List Price $41,195
Santo Discount -$2,205
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty -$1,000
$
469
Heated Leather Seats, Power Glass,
Moonroof, Blind Spot Monitoring
Your 2013 Volvo XC60 3.2 AWD
Just
$
40,680
2.9% Apr.
72 months
List Price $43,610
Santo Discount $1930
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty -$1,000
$
499 OR LEASE FOR
OR LEASE FOR
Panoramic Vista Roof, Heated Leather Seas,
Keyless Drive, Bi Xenon Head Lamps Power Tailgate
Premier Plus
Your Volvo XC90 3.2
Just
$
38,990
2.9% Apr.
72 months
List Price $43,795
Santo Discount -$3,805
Volvo/Saab Owner Loyalty -$1,000
$
459
7 Passenger, Heated Leather Seats, Power
Glass, Moonroof, Blind Spot Monitoring
2.9% Apr.
72 months
$
34,240
A
C
B
D
Heated Leather Seats, Keyless Drive,
Power Glass, Moonroof and More
Just
610 Business
Opportunities
610 Business
Opportunities
610 Business
Opportunities
7
8
0
8
0
3
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI Metals
Cash Paid for Gold Silver Jewelry Coins
any type or condition
We will beat any competitors advertised
price by up to 20% Guaranteed
Licensed & Insured
(11AM - 6PM | M-Sat)
Condential & Secure
570-735-1487
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classied
To place an ad call 829-7130
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LE EEE DER.
timesleader.com
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 PAGE 15G
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 15G
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Discover LF Homefinder at www.lewith-freeman.com
Ready for a New Home?
Call the experts. We can help.
ATTENTION SMARTPHONE USERS:
Try our new QR Code
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6
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~
127 SWEET VALLEY RD.
HUNLOCK CREEK
12-1060
21 scenic acres and
outstanding value!
Features modern and well-
maintained Cape Cod
home, partially wooded
acreage, spring-fed creek,
pole barn w/stalls, other
out buildings and electric
fencing. Imagine the
possibilities!
CALL CARY 240-3552 $199,900
DIR: Rt 11S to Hunlock Creek Post Office. Go 6 miles & turn right onto Sweet
Valley Rd. Continue1/2 mile; property is on right. From SR 118 go 6.5 miles
& turn left onto Main (Sweet Valley Rd). Continue 6 miles; home is on left.
Open House!
12:00-1:30
PM
7 MANOR DRIVE
SHAVERTOWN 12-1184
Well maintained,
quaint 3 bedroom
Cape Cod located in
the beautiful Back
Mountain. Home
features first floor
master bedroom,
extra large bedroom
on 2nd floor,
hardwood floors, shed
and covered deck. Conveniently located; close to Cross Valley
Expy and 8th Street. CALL KIM 466-3338 NEW PRICE: $139,900
DIR: Cross Valley Expy (Rt 309) to Carverton Road. Turn left on
Manor Drive. Home is on the right.
Open House - Huge Price Reduction!
2:30
-4:00
P
M
248 LYNDWOOD AVE.
HANOVER TWP. 12-3106
Comfortable 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath,
2-story home with modern kitchen,
fenced yard & private drive. Large
modern kitchen has granite
countertops, tile backsplash,
island with granite countertop,
separate breakfast nook area &
solid maple cabinets. A great place
to call home!
CALL KIM 466-3338 $106,000
DIR: From Route 11 in Larksville,
turn onto Cary Avenue Bridge
(Bridge Ave.). At first stop light over
bridge make right onto Lyndwood
Ave. House will be on your left.
Open House!
12:00
- 1:30
PM
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Ofce
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
Watch this Community come to life by
becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere
has never been a better time to join us
Prices Starting in the $140s
Find us in our convenient Location:
Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn
onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.
Two-story
New Construction
Townhomes
1st oor master
Formal Dining Room
Eat-in Kitchen
Loft
Valuted Ceilings
Front Porch
Garage
Garden Area
Pure Indulgence...
Luxury
Condominiums
nestled in a quiet
corner of Northeast
Pennsylvania
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!
Waypoint
In Luzerne
Contact one of our
Luzerne County
Real Estate
Professionals at
570.403.3000
Only 1
Remains!
P
E
N
D
IN
G
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
10 NORMAN ST.,
PITTSTONTWP.
Very nice, classic two story brick home with
large rooms, 4 bedrooms, large basement,
open deck and covered deck, large eat in
kitchen, lots of off street parking.
MLS #11-2887.
Call Colleen 237-0415. $144,900
Dir: Pittston By-Pass to Norman St, home
on left.
48 LEWIS ST., PITTSTONTWP.
Charming cape cod in quiet neighborhood
includes an economical geothermal en-
ergy system which may lower your heat
bills. 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. MLS #12-
265. Call Joe C. 239-9663. $145,000
Dir: North on S. Main St, turn right onto
Swallow, continue to Tedrick, right on
Pine, right on Front, Home is on the cor-
ner of Lewis St.
251 BROAD ST., PITTSTON
Much bigger than it looks, this modular
constructed cape cod has 3 bedrooms,
2 full baths, heated sunroom and beauti-
ful kitchen with granite countertops and
stainless appliances. Fully fnished base-
ment. MLS #12-2939.
Call Charlie 829-6200 $189,900
Dir: Pittston by-pass to West on Broad St,
1st home on left.
OPEN HOUSES TODAY
1
2
-1
:3
0
1
2
-1
:3
0
1
2
-1
:3
0
WILKES-BARRE
Elegant tudor with 4800 sq ft
in Downtown Wilkes-Barres
Historic District. Te 1st
oor oce has 1860 sq ft w/
central air and 2 restrooms.
Te residence upstairs in-
cludes 5 bedrooms, 2 baths,
custom kitchen w/ an island
& sunny breakfast room, formal dinning room. Te formal living room has
a tray ceiling, picture windows and wet bar. Also, a cozy den. Private drive,
OSP for 5 cars. $325,000
Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
5 Unit property for sale on
the campus of Wilkes Uni-
versity with a Cap Rate of
8.14%. Annual Net Oper-
ating Income of $32,169.
100% occupancy over the
last 5 years.
$395,000
Call Darren Snyder
570-825-2468
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
YATESVILLE
Better than new
end unit town-
house with 3 bed-
room, 2.5 baths, 1
car garage, modern
kitchen with break-
fast bar, dining area
and all appliances
included. Master bedroom with beautiful master bath. Fenced yard
with patio. Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468 $219,900
BEAR CREEK
Immaculate 2-Story Co-
lonial on 3 acres in Lau-
relbrook Estate complete
with a nished lower
level that walks out to a
professionally landscaped
yard and inground pool.
3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths w/ oversized 2 car garage. Kitchen has stainless steel
appliances, a center island and granit countertops with a tiled backsplash.
Family room has a cathedral ceiling with a propane replace. $384,900
Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468
7
7
3
3
7
7
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
2297 W. 8TH ST., DALLAS
NEWLY DRILLED PRIVATE WELL
+ PEX PLUMBING INSTALLED 2
or 3 bedroom 2- story farmhouse
located in the Village of Orange.
1st foor bedroom, living room with
hardwood fooring, eat-in kitchen.
1st foor laundry. garage & shed with
loft. Rear deck overlooking cleared
lot. New furnace, new kitchen foor
(October, 2011)
JOE MOORE $119,900
78 LACKAWANNA AVENUE,
SWOYERSVILLE, PA 18704
2-bedroom & bath cape cod with
enclosed 3-season porch. Finished
room in basement. Great 2-car
detached garage (20 x 26)with
concrete driveway. Fenced rear
yard. MLS#11-3566
JOE MOORE $94,500
For Instant Pricing & More Info TEXT:
ML26 TO: 88000
N
E
W
P
R
IC
E
849 NANDY DRIVE, KINGSTON
Spacious 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
home in popular Green Acres.
Good foor plan. Living room
with bay window; formal din-
ing room;kitchen with breakfast
room. 2nd foor laundry. Great
closets. Covered rear patio. 2
separate heating/air conditioning
systems. MLS#12-2969
JOE MOORE $259,000
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
EMAIL:
JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM View Our Listings on Realtor.com
Pat Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
KINGSTON -
MAKE AN OFFER!
Huge Rooms! Lots of Space
! This home has a huge living
room and dining room, den, 2
full baths, 3-4 bedrooms, a
massive yard and a large garage
with a second foor for storage.
Dont Wait ! MLS#11-3753
Call Jerry Busch Jr
New Price $104,900
753 North Walnut Street, Luzerne
Here s The STARTER Home For
You ! Stop Paying Rent Buy Your
Own Home ! This home has 3
bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, care-
free vinyl siding, replacement
windows, comforatable gas heat,
HUGE garage, private drive and a
great yard.
Host: Jerry Busch Jr $79,900.
DIR: Bennet Street to left on Par-
ry Street to left on Walnut Street.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY
1-3PM
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
WILKES BARRE
MINERS MILLS SECTION!
Seller Is Anxious This Is
A Great Buy ! Large eat-in
kitchen, spacious living room
and dining room, carefree
vinyl siding, replacement
windows, yard, comfortable
gas heat, porch and lots of
off street parking.
MLS#12-3674 $74,900
Call Jerry Busch Jr
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE!
Heres The STARTER Home
For You! This home needs
some TLC but has fantastic
location and a great yard.
Call Pat Busch Today !
MLS#12-1137
New Price $39,900
Story by
Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
Pull up a chair and get ready to enjoy
the change of seasons from the veranda
of this unique home at 54 Loop Rd. in his-
toric Glen Summit. Reminiscent of one
you might nd in Savannah or Charles-
ton, this covered porch spans the rear
of the home and offers a mix of open air
space with windows here and there, all of
which offer a view of the swimming pool
and landscaped yard. Electric hurricane
shutters provide protection in inclement
weather.
This veranda is just one of the many
amenities in this 3,050-square-foot home
on a two-acre lot listed by Maribeth
Jones of Poggi of Prudential Poggi
& Jones Real Estate for the recently
reduced price of $450,000. An adjacent
piece of property is also available at a
sale price of $550,000 for 4.13 acres.
Highlights include a custom kitchen
with cherry cabinets and plenty of tile, an
artists studio located above the three-car
garage, an enclosed custom dog yard,
and a built-in generator. There is also a
full security system.
The exterior features white vinyl sid-
ing with a forest green front door. The
front foyer offers a look at hardwood
ooring found throughout much of the
rst oor.
French doors open to the left to the
17-by-14 dining room, where there is a
panel of ve front-facing windows and el-
egant crown molding accenting pale pink
walls. A right off the foyer leads into the
14-by-13 living room, which is much the
same with windows front, taupe walls and
more of the hardwood ooring.
A library is located off the living room
has its own panel of ve windows facing
front, and a full wall of built-in bookcases.
This cozy room has forest green walls
and hardwood ooring.
All eyes are sure to be on the natural
stone replace with stone hearth and
wooden mantle in the nearby family
room. This 21-by-15 space has knotty
pine wainscoting, hunter green walls,
and a beamed ceiling. There is a full wall
of built-ins with space for an entertain-
ment system.
The 23-by-14 ultra-modern kitchen
is pleasing on the eye thanks to cherry
cabinets topped by cream Formica
countertops punctuated by top-of-the-line
stainless steel appliances, including two
wall ovens, cooktop, dishwasher and an
oversized refrigerator. An eye-catching
modern light hangs above a large island,
Covered veranda highlights elegant Glen Summit two-story
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#12-3611 $260,000
DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100
Colonial style home locatedon
3.77acres. Tis home oers
formal living &dining rooms,
4bedrooms withplenty of closet
space, family room, hardwood
throughout, large 3-season
room, fencedrear yard, replace.
Come take a look!
#12-3596 $174,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Exceptional quality inevery
square foot of this 4bedroom,
2.5bathForty Fort charmer!
Spacious living roomwith
parquet oors, eat-inkitchen,
plus formal dining room, front
andrear staircases, grandentry
foyer &woodburning replace.
Very spacious, traditional Cape
Codon7.6acres inserene
country setting, minutes from
downtownandclose proximity
to turnpike andGeisinger. 5bed-
rooms, hardwoods throughout,
family room, two replaces.
Nice home inwonderful setting!
#12-2627 $199,900
Karen Ryan 283-9100 x14
#12-3696 $159,900
Bob Cook 696-6555
Great location! Just one block
fromHarveys Lake andclose to
the outlet section, onlyone mile
tothe Grottoandexit of the lake.
Large fencedyard. Beautiful view
of the mountains. 3bedrooms,
2baths, familyroomwithstone
fireplace.
Harveys Lake-Great Location
2012 BRERAfliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Ready and waiting for your offer! Call Now!
Bear Creek-Serene Setting Forty Fort-Exceptional! Mountain Top-Colonial
NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING!
View Open Houses and Featured
Properties Online at
Click on Homes
timesleader.com
www.timesleader.com
Scan to View
Listings
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
which offers breakfast bar seating. Double doors lead
to the veranda.
A nearby bath has a marble-topped vanity, a cream
tile oor and a walk-in shower. An adjacent laundry
room also has a tiled oor and a door to the rear porch.
The 18-by-13 master bedroom is located on the
second oor and offers pale mauve carpeting, pale pink
walls and four front-facing windows. The adjacent mas-
ter bath provides an oak vanity set on a white tile oor
with gray sink and tub set into a tiled shower surround.
Bedrooms two and three, at 14-by-10 and 14-by-11,
are well decorated and have plentiful windows and a
double closet.
A sitting room has a full wall of windows and doors
that open to an elevated deck.
There is plenty of color in the second full bath on this
level. Navy blue and gold wallpaper accents navy blue
tile on the oor. An oak vanity offers a cream sink.
A possible fourth bedroom also serves as an artists
studio above the garage. It includes a vaulted ceiling,
and two oor-to-ceiling windows that offer plenty of
natural light. There is plenty of storage space found in
an adjacent attic space.
This home has electric and propane forced hot air
heat, central air conditioning, a private well and public
sewer connections.
For additional details or to make an appointment
to see this lovely home, contact Maribeth Jones of
Prudential Poggi & Jones Real Estate, (570) 696-6565;
mbjones@poggi-jones.com.
SPECIFICATIONS
Two-story
3,050 square feet
BEDROOMS: 3
BATHS: 3
PRICE: $450,000
LOCATION: 54 Loop Rd., Mountain Top
AGENT: Maribeth Jones
REALTOR: Prudential Poggi & Jones Real Estate,
ofce (570) 696-6565; mbjones@poggi-jones.com
Glen Summit
Continued from front page
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
7
2
0
1
9
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ALDEN
Large home on a
huge lot. Needs
some care so come
put your personal
touch into this great
value. Off street
parking, 2 car
detached garage
and a large fenced
in yard. Did we men-
tioned 4 bedrooms.
MLS 12-1589
$64,900
Call/text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
BACK
MOUNTAIN
2 or 3 bedroom 2-
story farmhouse
located in the Vil-
lage of Orange. 1st
floor bedroom, living
room with hard-
wood flooring, eat-
in kitchen. 1st floor
laundry. garage &
shed with loft. Rear
deck overlooking
cleared lot. NEWLY
DRILLED PRIVATE
WELL & ''PEX''
PLUMBING, Sept.
2012. New furnace,
new kitchen floor
(October, 2011)
$119,900
MLS-12-3255
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
LAFLIN
3 Bedroom
Log Cabin
home on 2 acres.
Country Living
in Town! $190,000
570-829-2022
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
For Sale
by Owner
4 PARK STREET
Ranch, 3 bedroom,
1 bath. Corner lot.
Gas heat, 2 car
garage. $96,000.
570-823-8833
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Immaculate 2 story
Colonial on 3 acres
in Laurelbrook
Estates, finished
lower level &
access to a profes-
sionally landscaped
yard & in- ground
pool. 3 bedrooms, 3
1/2 baths & over-
sized 2 car garage.
Kitchen has stain-
less steel appli-
ances, a center is-
land, granite coun-
tertops & tiled back-
splash. Family room
with cathedral ceil-
ing & propane fire-
place.
MLS# 12-3600
$384,900
Darren G. Snyder,
Broker
825-2468
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
BIG BASS LAKE
$135,000.
This is a large
Chalet has a full
kitchen on the
ground floor with full
bath. This would be
great for two fami-
lies to share or in
laws quarters. This
is in Big Bass Lake
community which
has indoor pool,
outdoor pool, club
house, gym, also
lake front beaches,
This is conveniently
locate near RT 380,
435, and 307.
ERA ONE SOURCE
REALTY
Call Tom
cell 515-507-9403
Office
570-842-2300
DALLAS
95 JACKSON ST.
New Stainless steel
appliances. Great
Low Cost Utilities,
Taxes and no Water
bill. Your own fresh
Water well. Bath on
each floor, 3 Good
sized Bedrooms,
Paved Drive leading
to an oversized
Garage. Owner
Motivated.
MLS 12-2006
$179,000
570-675-4400
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
201-203 West
Church Street. 3
unit building for
sale. Call
(570)881-1229
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
36 Hemlock Street
Brick Front Ranch
on quiet dead end
street 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths,
new carpet, large
kitchen, finished
basement with
plenty of storage
on 125x125 lot.
$144,000.
call 675-0537
Line up a place to live
in classified!
DALLAS
Haddonfield Hills
Corner Lot
4 bedroom, 2
bath split level.
Hardwood floors.
Gas heat.
2 car garage.
MLS #12-1942
NEW PRICE
$194,900
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept 30th,
2:30 - 4 pm
Gorgeous does not
begin to describe
this 3-4 bedroom
ranch home built in
2008. Every up-
grade you could
think of - hardwood
floors, 10 ceilings,
tile, granite. Ultra,
ultra kitchen. Tiled
baths. Beautiful
3.86 acre lot in a
cul-de-sac with
magnificent vistas.
Walk out lower level
easily finished.
Superior Wall
System.
MLS# 12-2423
$369,900
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
696-3801
DALLAS
REDUCED!
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
MOTIVATED SELLER!
2 bedroom - 2 bath
condo in very nice
condition. Tiled
baths. 2 balconies.
Nearby 1-car
garage. New vinyl
exterior. Assess-
ment paid by sell-
er/owner. New roof
2005. New electri-
cal system.
$99,500.
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept. 23, 2-3
21 Colonial Drive
Carefully hidden on
a 0.82 acre wooded
lot, this freshly reno-
vated 2,800 sq. ft.,
2 story colonial
home is ready to
move in to! It offers
an attractive floor
plan with 9 rooms, 4
bedrooms & 2.5
baths. The private
development, High
Point Acres, boasts
a community swim-
ming pool with life-
guard. Additionally,
the home offers
central air, a
screened in porch,
fireplace, finished
basement & a 2 car
garage. Directions:
Huntsville Rd. from
Dallas Corners to
Elizabeth St., make
left, follow to end in
High Point Acres,
bear right onto
Colonial Dr., home
on right.
MLS #12-2703
$265,000
Ted Poggi
283-9100 x 25
570-696-2600
DALLAS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept 30th,
Noon - 1:30
If you have seen it
before, TAKE
ANOTHER LOOK!
Freshly painted,
new tile. Open floor
plan & so much
room! Well main-
tained home on
wooded lot in desir-
able neighborhood.
4-6 bedrooms, 3.5
baths, tile kitchen,
hardwoods in family
room, new carpet.
Finished walk-out
lower level with two
additional bed-
rooms & 3/4 bath.
Two fireplaces. ONE
YEAR HOME TRUST
WARRANTY includ-
ed! Additional Lot
available.
Directions: Rt.309
to left on Irem Rd -
left on Fox Hollow
Dr. - Home on left
(corner lot).
MLS# 12-3348
$270,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
696-3801
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Lovingly restored
farmhouse with
newer kitchen with
ceramic tile.
Approximately 500
of stream frontage
on Sutton Creek.
Bonus 30' x 60'
drive-through heat-
ed garage with over
20' clearance.
Natural wood
built-ins, archway &
under carpets.
Seller to credit
buyer $3,000
towards a water fil-
tration system.
MLS# 12-1624
$169,900
call Tracy
McDermott
570-696-2468
DRUMS/
BUTLER TWP.
4 bedroom bi-level.
Large stone patio.
Brick fireplace in
rec room. 12x24
exercise room.
Remodeled kitchen.
Heated 12x24
sunroom. Shed.
Deep yard.
MLS# 12-1442
Call Vieve
570-474-6307
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
DURYEA
$239,900
705 Blueberry Lane
Large 4 bedroom
Bi-level Pwith large
master bedroom
with sliding glass
doors leading to
private deck. Mod-
ern kitchen with
skylights, skylights
also in master bath.
Dining room with
sliding glass doors
to deck. Large cor-
ner lot with
attached 2 car
garage ready to
move right in.For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2379
Call Fred
570-817-5792
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WILKES-BARRE
14 Thompson St.
2 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath. Offstreet
parking with
garage. Deck.
New kitchen and
bath. Good loca-
tion, Must See!
$84,500.
570-417-9970
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$49,900
97 Chittenden
St.
Flood damaged
home with new
furnace, electric
box, water
heater, outlets
and switches.
1st floor gutted
but already insu-
lated and ready
for sheetrock.
2nd floor has 4
bedrooms and
bath with double
sinks. Large
yard. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1225
Sorry, cash buy-
ers only!
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
DURYEA
REDUCED
$99,5000
226 Church St.
Four square home
with large rooms
and old world fea-
tures in the wood-
work and stained
glass. A must see
home. MLS #12-
2596. For more
information and
photos visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
VM 101
DURYEA
BLUEBERRY HILL
ESTATES
205 Strawberry Ln
$369,000
Almost new home
only 5 years old.
Large corner lot. 3
bedrooms, 3 baths,
2200 sq. ft. Some of
the nice touches
include: central vac-
uum, lawn sprinkler
system, bay window
seat & large (16x16)
deck. Move right in
with nothing to do!
DIRECTIONS:
Entering Blueberry
Hill Estates turn
right on Raspberry
Drive, then left on
Strawberry, follow
to end, at corner of
Strawberry and
Huckleberry.
Call Paul Pukatch at
696-6559 for your
appointment!
MLS#12-3194
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
IS TWO BEDROOMS
ENOUGH FOR YOU?
Quaint & Quiet reno-
vated two bedroom
features new trendy
large tiled Kitchen,
hardwood floors in
living room, formal
dining room & bed-
rooms. New tiled
bath with jetted tub
to de-stress in. Two
porches, yard &
plenty of parking.
New furnace, hot
water heater (with
warranty) & new
100 amp box. Great
starter home or
someone looking to
down size. Solid
Buy! Taxes are not
accurate. Owner is
a Realtor. $79,900.
11-4472. Please call
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
EAGLE ROCK
Beautiful, true log
home very privately
located on a
gorgeous, scenic
lot. Approximately
1920 sq. ft. interior
offers 3 bedrooms,
3 baths, huge great
room with fireplace.
Exquisite. Still time
to choose colors,
etc. Amenities
galore in this
upscale, gated
community.
MAKE YOUR
DREAM COME
TRUE!
Asking $309,000
M.S. PECORA
RELATOR
570-455-9463
or Cheryl at
570-436-3790
SWEET VALLEY
Grassy Pond Road
6.69 wooded acres.
Great building site
and/or ideal hunting
property. No utili-
ties. REDUCED
$65,000
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901
McDermott Real
Estate
570-696-2468
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
25 Tobin Lane
Well maintained
2 bedrooms,
1.5 bath home on
a quiet street.
3 car garage.
Gas heat, nicely
landscaped fenced
in yard.
forsalebyowner.
com
$92,000
call 570-288-0590
EDWARDSVILLE
32 Atlantic Ave.
Remodeled home
with new electrical
and plumbing and
hot water heater.
Nice backyard with
off street parking.
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901
MLS # 12-3612
570-696-2468
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
EXETER
ONE OF A KING
CONTRACTORS HOME!
3 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, huge family
room, stone fire-
place, stone bar,
granite kitchen,
dining room, office
exercise room.
BEAUTIFUL VIEW
2 ACRES
$425,000 neg.
shown by appt only
570 690-6245
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-899-8877
570-654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom
home in mint metic-
ulous condition, with
2 full baths, and a 2
car garage, hard-
wood floors, tile
floors, exterior com-
posite wood deck,
fully finished lower
level family room,
large closets, up-
graded kitchen with
stainless steel appli-
ances, granite
countertops, gas
heat, excellent
neighborhood.
$174,900
Bob Stackhouse
654-1490
HUNLOCK CREEK
Sorbertown Hill Rd.
Nice ranch style
home. 3 bed-
rooms, modern
kitchen & bath.
Move in condition.
Country living
at its best.
Affordable @
$119,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 PAGE 17G
Erics Career Highlights & Afliations
- Nationally Recognized Top Producing Loan Omcer
- More than 3,000 Northeast Pa. Families Served
- Mortgage Industry Veteran with More Tan 20 Years Experience
- Branch Team with more than 200 Years Combined Experience!
- Past President & Board of Governors Member - Mortgage
Bankers Association
- Seasoned Professional in FHA, PHFA, VA, & USDA Loan Products
- Greater Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Association of Realtors -
Amliate Member
Navigating today's mortgage approval process is challenging and requires the advice of an
experienced Mortgage Professional. Eric McCabe, a life-long resident of Northeast, PA, has
built his career helping area families realize their dream of homeownership. If you would
like to see exactly what it takes to own a new home for your family, Eric is ready
and eager to help.
When it comes to getting you Home...
EXPERIENCE COUNTS!
Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319. Individual NMLS# 139699. Licensed by the Pennsylvania Banking Department. Guaranteed Rate, Inc. is a private corporation organized under the laws of the
State of Delaware. It has no affiliation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any other government agency.
o: 570.714.4200 x24 c: 570.954.6145
www.mccabemortgagegroup.com
Eric McCabe
Branch Manager
400 Tird Avenue, Suite 100 - Kingston, PA 18704
ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
For more information or to
schedule an appointment, contact:
Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569
DIR: South Main St., Hanover to right on
Bunker Drive.
Fairway Estates Phase II, Hanover
Home and lot packages available!
Bring your house plan and choose your lot!
Construction by:
Premiere Home Builders, Inc.
Dave & John Pieczynski
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA
Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207
Fax: 696.0677
Direct: 696.6569
cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com
www.poggi-jones.com
Home and Lot Packages
Available!
Only 10 5 Lots Left!!!
2012 BRERAfliates INc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Level Building Lots .40 1.50 Acres
All Underground / Public Utilities
Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks
Rental / Lease Options Available
Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park
NEPAs Leader in Energy Ecient Construction
Alternative Energy Solutions
Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40,000
LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION
For Specics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40 000
EVERY NEWHOME CONTRACT INCLUDES
HEATINGANDCOOLINGBILLS FOR
10YEARS
COUNTRYWOOD
ESTATES
EILEEN R. MELONE
Real Estate 821-7022
EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022
Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre
SUSQUEHANNA
MODULAR HOMES
BE HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
Less than half the time to complete project!
Call us for
your consultation.
Well work with you!
Proud builder
of affordable
handicapped
accessible
housing.
Rear 913 Wyoming Ave, Wyoming, PA
(Behind McDonalds) 1-866-823-8880
KINGSTON CLARKS SUMMIT NORTH POCONO TUNKHANNOCK POCONO MOUNTAINS
*CLOSEDSALES BASEDONCOMPANYWIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERNPAFROM1/1/2011 to 12/31/2011
*Ranking as of Jan. 2012
NEPAS #1 Real Estate Website!
Steve Farrell
Owner/Broker
OVER 880 SALES IN2011*
KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700
Top 500 Largest
Brokers in the U.S.
570-718-4959
Open House September 30th
WILKES-BARRE
15 Amherst Avenue
4BR/2BA MLS#12-216
DIR: S on S River St, R on W River St, 1st
R on Riverside Dr, L on Old River Rd, R on
Marlborough, R on Locust, R on Amherst
$69,900
Hosted By: Steve Shemo 570-793-9449
12:00-2:00
Open House September 30th
WILKES-BARRE
67 Grove Street
3BR/1.5BA MLS#12-1820
DIR: S on W-B Blvd, thru light on Hazle
St, 1st L on Grove St
$69,900
Hosted by: Steve Shemo 570-793-9449
2:30-4:30
Open House September 30th
EDWARDSVILLE
163 Green Street
3BR/1BA MLS#12-3338
DIR: Wyoming Ave, R on Main St
Edwardsville, L on Green St
$54,900
Hosted by: Darcy Usavage 570-239-0558
1:00-2:30
New Listings New Listings
PLYMOUTH
4BR/1.5BA
Large Two Story,
nice lot
MLS#12-3584
$99,900
Call Darcy U
570-239-0558
HUNLOCK
CREEK
4BR/3.5BA
Two Story, 20 ac,
horse barn
MLS#12-3520
$429,900
Call Michelle
570-371-1567
KINGSTON
4BR/1.5 BA
Large Double
w/osp
MLS#12-3605
$47,900
Call Steve S
570-793-9449
LAKE
SILKWORTH
4BR/2BA
Ranch, a minute
from the lake
MLS#12-3555
$159,000
Call Jaime
570-317-5710
New Listings
ASHLEY
Double Block,
3BR each
side, osp
MLS#12-3558
$99,800
Call Darcy U
570-239-0558
or Carol
570-407-2314
WILKES-
BARRE
3BR/1.5BA
Two Story, osp
MLS#12-3514
$19,500
Call Paul
570-718-4959
X1357
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design
Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Ofcenter250
250 Pierce Street
Ofcenter270
270 Pierce Street
Park Ofce Building
400 Third Ave.
Ofcenter220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
PRICE
$599,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
77 Wesley St.
$84,900
Classic 4 square
home in desirable
neighborhood. Four
bedrooms, nice old
woodwork, stained
glass and built ins
plus 3 car garage
on extra deep lot.
MLS #12-2612. For
more information
and photos, visit
atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
829-6200
VM 101
PAGE 18G SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Parsons Section of Wilkes-Barre - Ready to Move In
$89,900
3 BR, 2 bath, LR, eat in kitchen, DR, two car garage, all
season heated breezeway between garage and home,
sunroom, nice yard completely fenced in for pets, shed
approx 12x12. Interior recently remodeled -- new solid oak
stairway, solid oak hardwood foors throughout
main bath has whirlpool tub and shower, kitchen is newly
remodeled/ new ceramic tile foor, new Wilsonart bevel edge
countertops and glass tile back splash, appliances included
DW, frig, g/d, natural gas range, combination space saver
microwave and hood over range, laundry in basement, 2 zone
high effciency hot water heat and hot water furnace, plenty
of storage areas
For more information or to see the home
call Bill, 570-885-0790
906 Homes for Sale
FALLS
REDUCED
$189,900
This home was built
with energy efficien-
cy in mind. Nestled
in a wooded setting
and close to Wilkes
-Barre and Clarks
Summit. Floor to
ceiling windows in
the 3-season sun
room, hardwood
and tile throughout,
spacious room
sizes, wood/coal
stove for those win-
ter evenings. 3 bed-
rooms, with 16x20
master and adja-
cent sitting room or
den. Call for an
appointment today.
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565 or
Chris Jones
570-696-6558.
#12-3048
696-2600
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave
You will fall in love
with this grand Vic-
torian with magnifi-
cent entry foyer,
modern kitchen
with new counter-
tops, enclosed 3
season side and
rear porch, reno-
vated large front
porch. Off street
parking and so
much more.Proper-
ty could also be
used as profession-
al office in home
use. MUST SEE!
MLS 12-3604
$199,900
Jay A. Crossin
Extention 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
PRICE REDUCED
1908 Wyoming Ave
Plenty of TLC is
reflected in this
attractive 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
in a convenient
location. Offers for-
mal living room/din-
ing room & family
room with sliding
doors to large rear
deck & a great level
lot. MLS# 11-2083
Only $95,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
FORTY FORT
OPEN HOUSE
Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28
2:00 to 4:00
84 Wesley St.
DIR: Wyoming Ave.,
North, left on Wes-
ley, house on left.
Motivated Seller!
Priced to sell
below appraised
value asking
$174,000
Newly renovated
interior and exterior.
Home features 3
bedrooms with
large closets, 2
large bathrooms,
one with a double
vanity, the other
with laundry hook-
up, ultra modern
kitchen with honey
oak cabinets, gran-
ite countertops and
stainless steel appli-
ances, oversized 2-
car garage, walk-up
attic, full basement,
large yard, very
desirable location!
MLS #12-3227
Eric Feifer
570-283-9100 x 29
570-696-2600
WEST PITTSTON
Split level, stone
exterior, multi-tiered
deck, bluestone
patio, flood dam-
aged, being sold as
is condition.
$73,500
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
GLEN SUMMIT/
MOUNTAIN TOP
PRICE REDUCED!
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for
hiking & biking.
This home boasts
perennial gardens
& mature landscap-
ing, fenced rear
yard enclosing
20x40 heated in-
ground pool, raised
garden, custom
dog house & run.
Entertain & dine on
the wrap-around
porch with
mahogany flooring
& electric hurricane
shutters. The
residence features
hardwood flooring,
French doors,
cherry kitchen, 3-4
bedrooms, updated
heating/air.
Emergency genera-
tor for inclement
weather. Call me,
Maribeth Jones at
my direct number
696-6565 or the
office number 696-
2600 ext. 210.
#12-1647 $450,000
HANOVER TWP.
58 Simon Block
Nice home with
private driveway
features gas heat
with baseboard
heating, large room
sizes, lower level
with front walk-out
ideal for finishing or
extra storage.
Directions: Sans
Souci Pkwy, turn
onto Main Rd, right
on Mary St., left
onto Simon Block,
home on left.
MLS# 12-2157
$55,000
Call
Lynda Rowinski
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
Constitution Avenue
Spacious traditional
5 year old, 2 story, 8
room, 4 bedroom
home on a gener-
ous lot. Featuring a
formal Dining room,
first floor family
room, hardwood
floors, 2 car garage,
gas heat, central air
and a deck with a
fantastic view. A
must see home.
MLS#11-2429
$279,900
Florence Keplinger
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
CONSTITUTION AVE
Spacious traditional
5 year old, 8 room,
4 bedroom home on
generous lot.
Featuring a formal
dining roon, first
floor family room,
hardwood floors, 2
car garage, gas
heat, central air and
a deck with a fan-
tastic view. A must
see home!
MLS# 11-2429
$279,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Tastefully remod-
eled rancher on 87
x 100 lot with in-
ground pool. Home
boasts brand new
kitchen & bath. Full
basement is ready
for finishing. Home
is move-in-ready
for a new buyer.
Total electric @
$177/month for all
utilities. 40 year
roof, central air.
MLS# 12-3399
$140,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
570-696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
NEW PRICE!
2 Betsy Ross Drive
Warmly inviting 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath
Tudor. Striking high-
lights in this beauti-
ful home include
custom blin