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Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 40
EARLY REVIEWS
NATION PAGE 7
AS TIED FOR
WEST LEAD
SPORTS PAGE 11
SALMON BLAMED
FOR SALMONELLA
FOOD PAGE 21
GOP TURNING NEGATIVE ON ROMNEYS CAMPAIGN
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The man facing kidnapping and
molestation charges after allegedly
snatching a 9-year-old girl from a
San Mateo school campus has been
linked to an unsolved incident at a
Daly City elementary school in
which four girls say a man tried
photographing them from under-
neath bathroom stalls.
In March, six months before 25-
year-old Bradley Mrozek was
arrested for allegedly grabbing a
Parkview Elementary School stu-
dent inside the girls bathroom,
authorities believe he holed up
inside a stall at George Washington
Elementary School in Daly City and
tried photographing young girls as
they used the facilities. On March
16, the girls reported seeing a ash
and fetched a teacher who tried
forcing the man from the stall. He
nally ran from the bathroom and
ed. The case remained unsolved
until the school principal read of
Mrozeks arrest in several bizarre
on-campus incidents and told police
they might want to investigate the
earlier case, too.
The teacher picked Mrozek out of
a photo lineup and a second witness
also supports the identication, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
His photo has not been
released publicly although
Wagstaffe said it may be in com-
ing weeks to see if there are
other cases that come forward.
If you have March and you have
September, dont you think con-
ceivably he could have done some-
thing in the middle? Wagstaffe
said.
On Tuesday, prosecutors added
10 charges to his case including
School abduction linked to other incident
Police link suspect in San Mateo crime to unsolved campus bathroom case
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Property owners in downtown San
Mateo will have greater exibility in
what uses are allowed on ground
oors as the City Council unani-
mously voted to relax its retail
requirements and allow for some
ofce uses in spaces that have deep-
er depths.
City staff had recommended man-
dating retail use for storefronts up to
60-feet deep but the Planning
Commission decided at its last
meeting that a 40-foot retail depth
would be enough to maintain the
retail character of downtown.
The council, however, moved
against that recommendation
Monday night and sided with city
staff as property owners will be able
to seek a special-use permit to set
the depth at 40 feet on a case-by-
case basis, Deputy Mayor David
Lim wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
We also kept in the review in
three years, claried that applicants
have a right to appeal the Planning
City relaxes
downtown
retail rules
San Mateoto allow expanded office use
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The countys top nancial ofcer
should be appointed by county
supervisors rather than chosen by
voters because it is more an admin-
istrative than policy-making posi-
tion, according to proponents who
hope San Mateo Countys electorate
agree on the Nov. 6 ballot.
There is no public opposition to
the idea but
advocates, like
S u p e r v i s o r
Carole Groom,
who helped
move Measure
C on the ballot,
are still making
an effort to drum
up support.
Voters to decide how
controller is named
Measure C to move position from elected to appointed
Bob Adler
See MEASURE C, Page 30
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Caltrains numbers for total ridership in August were up 7.8 percent compared to last year from 1.25 million to
1.35 million.The service had about 3,000 more riders a day in August as the average weekday ridership jumped
from 45,204 last year to 48,634 this year.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Caltrains trend of increased rid-
ership has now reached 25 consecu-
tive months as the commuter rail
line set another ridership record for
the month of August.
The numbers are up, in part, due
to the more than 86,000 fans who
rode Caltrain to the San Francisco
Giants 12 home games at AT&T
Park in August, an 11 percent
increase over 2011 numbers.
In June, Caltrain broke an all-time
ridership record when an average of
more than 50,000 riders a day
hopped on the local commuter train,
the most in its 150-year history.
It also had the best July ever and
the numbers for total ridership in
August were up 7.8 percent com-
pared to last year from 1.25 million
to 1.35 million. The service had
about 3,000 more riders a day in
August as the average weekday rid-
ership jumped from 45,204 last year
to 48,634 this year.
More riders increased farebox
revenue in August by 12.1 percent,
according to a staff report the
Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers
Board will hear at its Thursday
meeting.
Ridership has climbed for more
than two years now as Caltrain sets
to embark on a multi-year modern-
ization project that will electrify its
tracks, allowing it to run more trains
when the project is completed in
Caltrain sets another record
Average ridership highest ever for August
See CALTRAIN, Page 22
See RULES, Page 22
See CRIME, Page 22
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Clive Owen
is 48.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
Astronaut Wally Schirra became the
fth American to y in space as he
blasted off from Cape Canaveral aboard
the Sigma 7 on a 9-hour ight.
The worst disease in the
world is the plague of vengeance.
Dr. Karl Menninger, American psychiatrist (1893-1990)
Rock musician
Tommy Lee is 50.
Actress-singer
Ashlee Simpson-
Wentz is 28.
Birthdays
JASON MAI/DAILY JOURNAL
On Saturday, San Mateo-Foster City School Districts S.P.O.R.T (Sage Parents Organizing Resources for our Teams) held their
annual Fun Run at Aragon High Schools track.Teachers,students and friends from four different middle schools,Abbott,Bayside
S.T.E.M, Borel and Bowditch, ran and walked laps to help raise money to sustain childrens after-school athletic programs. At
the end of the three-hour event, Borel ran more than 2,000 laps, winning rst place.
Wednesday: Sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the upper 60s. South
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog.
Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 10 to
20 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in
the mid 60s. South winds around 10 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy
fog. Highs in the 60s.
Friday night through Sunday night: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6, in rst place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place; and Hot Shot,No.3,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:43.60.
(Answers tomorrow)
BISON STAND IMPACT HYPHEN
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When the poker player got a royal flush, all his
opponents could do was HAND IT TO HIM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TREUT
PEWTS
YAELVL
TEKLET
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
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Print your
answer here:
1 4 3
10 11 20 42 55 9
Mega number
Oct. 2 Mega Millions
9 19 23 33 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 0 4 8
Daily Four
2 4 3
Daily three evening
In 1789, President George Washington declared Nov. 26, 1789,
a day of Thanksgiving to express gratitude for the creation of
the United States of America.
In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last
Thursday in November Thanksgiving Day.
In 1932, Iraq became independent of British administration.
In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Ofce
of Economic Stabilization.
In 1951, the New York Giants captured the National League
pennant by a score of 5-4 as Bobby Thomson hit a three-run
homer off the Brooklyn Dodgers Ralph Branca in the shot
heard round the world.
In 1952, Britain conducted its rst atomic test as it detonated a
25-kiloton device in the Monte Bello Islands off Australia. The
situation comedy Our Miss Brooks, formerly a radio show,
premiered on CBS-TV with Eve Arden again in the title role.
In 1962, the British musical Stop the World I Want to Get
Off opened on Broadway with Anthony Newley and Anna
Quayle reprising their West End roles.
In 1967, folk singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie died in New
York at age 55.
In 1970, the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA) was established under the Department of Commerce.
In 1992, Barack Obama married Michelle Robinson at the
Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago.
In 1995, the jury in the O.J. Simpson murder trial found the
former football star not guilty of the 1994 slayings of his for-
mer wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and Ronald Goldman (how-
ever, Simpson was later found liable in a civil trial).
In 2008, O.J. Simpson was found guilty of robbing two sports-
memorabilia dealers at gunpoint in a Las Vegas hotel room.
(Simpson was later sentenced to nine to 33 years in prison.)
Basketball Hall of Famer Marques O. Haynes is 86. Composer
Steve Reich is 76. Singer Alan ODay is 72. Rock and roll star
Chubby Checker is 71. Actor Alan Rachins is 70. Sen. Jeff
Bingaman, D-N.M., is 69. Magician Roy Horn is 68. Singer
Lindsey Buckingham is 63. Jazz musician Ronnie Laws is 62.
Blues singer Keb Mo is 61. Former astronaut Kathryn Sullivan
is 61. Baseball Hall of Famer Dave Wineld is 61. Baseball Hall
of Famer Dennis Eckersley is 58. Civil rights activist Rev. Al
Sharpton is 58. Actor Hart Bochner is 56. Actor Peter Frechette
is 56. Golfer Fred Couples is 53. Actor-comedian Greg Proops is
53. Actor Jack Wagner is 53. Actress Janel Moloney is 43.
Mime artist Marcel Marceau (1923-2007)
created a character called Bip; a white-
faced clown that wore a striped shirt and
battered hat. Bip hunted butteries, tamed
lions and struggled with umbrellas, all in
mime.
***
Merv Grifn (1925-2007), a San Mateo
native, hosted the game shows Play Your
Hunch (1958-1963) and Word for
Word (1963) before creating and produc-
ing the game shows Jeopardy! (1964-
present) and Wheel of Fortune (1975-
present).
***
Although best known as supermarket
manager Mr. Whipple in Charmin com-
mercials, actor Dick Wilson (1916-2007)
had recurring roles in television sitcoms
including Bewitched (1964-1972)
Gidget (1965-1966) and McHales
Navy (1962-1966).
***
A popular toy of the 1970s was the Evel
Knievel Super Stunt Set in which kids
could recreate the motorcycle jumps of
Evel Knievel (1938-2007). The set came
with an action gure with removable hel-
met, a motorcycle, ramps and a hoop of re.
***
The birth year of actress Jane Wyman
(1917-2007) is often incorrectly stated as
1914. Wyman added three years to her age
hoping it would help her break into acting.
Born in St. Joseph, Mo., Wymans actual
birthday was Jan. 5, 1917.
***
Bill Walsh (1931-2007) was a football
coach at Stanford University before he
became the head coach of the San
Francisco 49ers in 1979. Walsh led the
49ers to three Super Bowl championships
in 1982, 1985 and 1989.
***
Swedish lm director Ingmar Bergman
(1918-2007) was a three-time winner of
the Academy Award for best foreign lm.
Can you name the movies for which he
won the awards? See answer at end.
***
Beginning in 1992, opera singer Luciano
Pavarotti (19352007) held the Pavarotti
& Friends concert annually in his home-
town of Modena, Italy. The concert raised
funds for charities that aid child victims of
war.
***
Robert Goulet (1933-2007) was born in
Massachusetts but moved to Canada at
age 13. As his singing career took off, Ed
Sullivan (1902-1974) dubbed Goulet the
American baritone from Canada.
***
Anna Nicole Smith (1967-2007) appeared
on the cover of Playboy in March 1992.
The cover got the attention of Guess pres-
ident Paul Marciano (born 1952) who
made her the face of Guess jeans the fol-
lowing year.
***
In 1956, at age 22, the Rev. Jerry Falwell
(1933-2007) founded the Thomas Road
Baptist Church in his hometown of
Lynchburg, Va. The church started with 35
members and was located in a building
that was formerly used by the Donald
Duck Soft Drink Bottling Company.
Today the church has more than 24,000
members.
***
At age 21, Liz Claiborne (1929-2007)
entered her drawing of a womans coat in
a design competition sponsored by
Harpers Bazaar magazine. She won the
competition which led to a job as a clothes
designer in New York.
***
As a boy, Russian leader Boris Yeltsin
(19312007) blew off two ngers of his
left hand while playing with a live
grenade.
***
While her husband was vice president,
Lady Bird Johnson (1912-2007) was an
ambassador of goodwill for the White
House. She traveled to 33 foreign coun-
tries over three years.
***
In 2002, Tammy Faye Bakker Messner
(1942-2007) was asked to do a televised
celebrity boxing match against Sylvester
Stallones mother Jackie Stallone (born
1921). Tammy Faye turned down the
offer.
***
Answer: The Virgin Spring (1960),
Through a Glass Darkly (1961) and
Fanny & Alexander (1982). Most of
Bergmans lms were set in Sweden. His
lms were emotionally intense, often with
themes of illness, death and insanity.
3 4 27 30 39 3
Mega number
Sept. 29 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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FOSTER CITY
Theft. A bicycle worth $780 was stolen from
a carport on Admiralty Lane before 11:41 a.m.
on Sunday, Sept. 30.
Burglary. Costco Wholesale reported a
shoplifter in custody who was later arrested on
a $20,000 warrant on Metro Center Boulevard
before 3:51 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29.
Fire assist. A pot left on a stove activated a
smoke detector and led reghters to forceful-
ly enter a home on Port Royal Avenue before
11:02 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29.
Petty theft. A person reported money was
stolen from her purse twice at Starbucks on
Foster City Boulevard before 7:08 a.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 29.
Suspicious person. A man was seen in a
bathrobe with no shoes on walking along
Crane and Gull avenues before 2:04 p.m. on
Friday, Sept. 28.
Burglary. A man was seen stealing bottles of
alcohol from a store on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 1:48 p.m. on Friday, Sept.
28.
Property damage. A woman reported a hit
and run by what she believed was a rental
truck on Chess Drive before 1:39 p.m. on
Friday, Sept. 28.
SAN CARLOS
Weapon. A Redwood City man was arrested
for possession of a concealed rearm and driv-
ing under the inuence at the intersection of
Eaton Avenue and Stanford Lane before 12:15
a.m. Saturday, Sept. 29.
Petty theft. A purse was stolen from Alameda
de las Pulgas and Alma Street before 2:57 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 27.
Warrant arrest. A man was arrested and
booked in county jail for an outstanding war-
rant on the 500 block of Chestnut Street before
8:23 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 27.
Grand theft. A catalytic converter was stolen
from a vehicle on the 2300 block of Howard
Avenue before 7 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 27.
Vandalism. Grafti was found on a building
on the 1300 block of El Camino Real before
2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 26.
Police reports
Four-way stop
Four men were reported to be intoxicated
and kicking stop signs on the rst block
of North B Street in San Mateo before
9:10 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 30.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Redwood City construction company was
hit with a $77,878 stipulated judgment for
violating environmental law related to a toxic
explosion in January that sent three trash col-
lectors to the hospital.
The San Mateo County District Attorneys
Consumer and Environmental Unit led the
civil complaint in July alleging that Pellarin
Construction Group and its Chief Executive
Ofcer Arron John Pellarin unlawfully dis-
posed of hazardous waste and engaged in
other unlawful business practices at its Main
Street building.
The stipulated judgment, however, was
entered without ndings or admissions of
wrongdoing, according to a District
Attorneys statement.
The incident started when ve plastic con-
tainers being kept outside the construction
companys building at 1520 Main St. in
Redwood City were thrown in a dumpster by
a supervisor of the company back in
December, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce.
The containers contained poly carboy;
lithiochrome that contains hydrochloric acid;
chrome chloride; cupric chloride; ferrus chlo-
ride and ferric chloride; Baume hydrochloric
acid; El Diablo Drain Cleaner that contains
sulfuric acid; ammonia; and Marine Resin,
according to the District Attorneys Ofce.
The containers had been kept on the proper-
ty for prolonged periods of time, some for at
least 10 years, according to the civil com-
plaint.
In early January, two Recology employees
unknowingly moved the ve containers of
hazardous waste from the dumpster to their
garbage truck, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce.
Just as the garbage trucks actuator blade
began moving the items to the rear of the
truck, an audible explosion occurred. Turning
from the noise, the two workers just missed
being sprayed by toxic liquid, according to the
District Attorneys Ofce.
However, the two workers inhaled smoke
emanating from the chemical brew that caused
them both breathing difculties, eye pain and
prolonged and sustained coughing to the point
that one of them vomited, according to the
District Attorneys Ofce. A Recology super-
visor also unknowingly walked through a vis-
ible gas cloud that was still present near the
rear of the truck, according to the District
Attorneys Ofce. The incident sent all three
to the hospital.
Police, re and a hazardous materials crew
were called to the scene and spent hours going
through the contents of the garbage to locate
and identify the toxic substances.
Recology does not handle hazardous mate-
rials but the countys Environmental Health
Department does.
Volatile chemicals cannot be mixed in
trucks, according to a Recology statement.
The District Attorneys Ofce sought reim-
bursement for the cost of cleaning the site and
a permanent injunction against Pellarin to
force it to comply with environmental law.
The civil complaint alleged that the defen-
dant violated environmental protection and
workplace safety laws and regulations, includ-
ing the disposal of hazardous or extremely
hazardous waste at an unauthorized point; not
maintaining a safe work environment; and not
properly training employees.
We are pleased to have been able to coop-
eratively resolve this matter with San Mateo
County. As long-standing citizens of
Redwood City and the county of San Mateo,
we take these matters very seriously. It was
especially important to us to reimburse the
county and all the rst responders for their
costs, the company responded to the Daily
Journal in an email yesterday.
The judgment against Pellarin included
$45,000 in penalties and about $30,000 in cost
reimbursement to the county and responding
agencies.
Company dinged with $77K hazmat judgment
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
John Muniz and Lois Way were recently
selected as Millbraes 2012 Man and Woman
of the Year.
Celebrating the 40th year of the award, a
dinner and ceremony will be held for this
years recipients Thursday, Oct. 11. San
Mateo Police Chief Susan Manheimer will be
the evenings keynote speaker.
Muniz has been a Millbrae resident for
more than 18 years, has two children and has
been a vital part of the community for many
years, according to a press release. Muniz vol-
unteers with the Millbrae Lions Club,
Millbrae Historical Society, Italian Catholic
Federation, Peninsula Italian American Club,
American Cancer Society, Millbrae Chamber
of Commerce, Millbrae Community Youth
Center, St. Bruno and St. Dunstan parishes,
Helen Keller Fellow of the Lions Eye
Foundation and the
American Heart
Association.
Way has been a Millbrae
resident for more than 52
years. She has two chil-
dren and was a foster
mother for many abused,
homeless and neglected
children. Way had time on
her hands and continues to
be a dedicated volunteer with the Millbrae
Historical Society, AARP, the Chamber of
Commerce Annual Art and Wine Festival,
serves the New Vision United Methodist
Church in Millbrae as a board member for the
Nurturing Committee, and she raises money
for the missionary work of the Wesleyan
Service Guild.
The Millbrae Man and Woman of the Year
Awards began in 1972 by the original co-
sponsors the Millbrae
Chamber of Commerce
and the Millbrae Sun, the
community newspaper at
the time. The awards were
presented in conjunction
with the Millbrae Chamber
of Commerce Annual
Installation of Directors
and Ofcers. In 1993, the
Mayors Civic
Coordinating Council
decided it should be an annual event, which it
has been ever since.
A dinner celebrating Muniz and Way will be
held Thursday, Oct. 11 at the Westin Hotel, 1
Old Bayshore Highway, Millbrae. Social will
start at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. The three-
course dinner is $45 per ticket. To attend, con-
tact Jack Gardner at 777-0061.
Millbrae names man, woman of the year
John Muniz Lois Way
4
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
FREE JOINT PAIN SEMINAR
Local orthopaedic surgeon
Nikolaj Wolfson, MD
will be discussing
Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Time: 6:30 pm
(light refreshments will be served)
Location: Te Poplar Creek Golf Course
1700 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo, CA 94401
Space is limited! So, register today!
To register call 1-888-STRYKER (787-9537)
or go to: www.aboutstryker.com/seminars
Sponsored by: Stryker Orthopaedics
New Technologies in
Hip and Knee Replacement
Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery -
Direct Anterior Approach
STATE GOVERNMENT
Legislation introduced by
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, allowing Caltrans to
conduct a pilot program using an
innovative transportation project
construction contracting method
known as Construction
Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) was signed by
Gov. Jerry Brown Saturday.
Currently, public entities must fully complete the design
of a project prior to awarding a construction contract.
However, in this design-bid-build process, the project
designer does not have the benet of consulting with the
entity ultimately responsible for construction, according to
Gordons ofce.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Creating additional parking in down-
town Burlingame could require combin-
ing lots or purchasing land all options
the city will study.
On Monday, the Burlingame City
Council gave the go-ahead to conduct a
study on the feasibility of a downtown
parking structure near Burlingame
Avenue. On Sept. 4, the council held a
study session to discuss an initial analy-
sis of such a structure and requested a
more detailed study. The study approved
Monday with CDM Smith will cost
$31,203 and include a variety of options
including the cost of purchasing proper-
ty and combining lots, said Public Works
Director Syed Murtuza.
Vice Mayor Ann Keighran wanted to
make sure the trafc study took into
account the possible impact of closing
Donnelly Avenue just north of
Burlingame Avenue, which Murtuza
said it would.
Councilwoman Terry Nagel wanted to
take into consideration how far people
will walk from the parking lot to shop.
Also, she was curious about the possibil-
ity of including retail in any develop-
ment. Councilwoman Cathy Baylock
appreciated the idea of mixed use but
noted the city is considering lifting
restrictions on restaurants since the area
isnt currently drawing in enough retail.
If parking is the focus, she didnt want to
lose it. Keighran said the whole point is
to have options. The option of retail
means the possibility of realizing some
revenue in a rather large investment, she
said.
Among the options that will be looked
at are:
Update Lot J with or without the pur-
chase of adjacent property;
Update Lot E with and without the
purchase of adjacent property;
Lot N with the purchase of
adjacent property;
Combination of Lots A and C; and
Combination of Lots C and D togeth-
er with the purchase of adjacent proper-
ties.
Lots A, C and D are located on
Donnelly Avenue. Lots J and E are in
blocks between Primrose Road,
Burlingame Avenue, Howard Avenue
and Lorton Avenue.
An analysis will take the 55-foot
height limit and trafc into account.
There would also be focus groups held
before putting recommendations togeth-
er. Work could be conducted in October
and would be estimated to take four to
six weeks. However, City Manager Jim
Nantell warned it might take longer. The
focus group work may be ready to begin
during the holidays, he noted.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
City moves forward with parking study
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 33-year-old Sacramento man
accused of striking and strangling a
prostitute at a South San Francisco motel
because he felt she was not being loyal is
looking at up to four years in prison after
pleading no contest to felony pimping.
Prosecutors sought a straight four-year
term for Marshaun Spencer Jourdan but
Judge Craig Parsons agreed to consider
less at a Nov. 21 sentencing hearing.
South San Francisco police arrested
Jourdan in April on suspicion of pimp-
ing and human trafcking after being
called to the La Quinta Inn by somebody
who overheard a ght. The woman said
Jourdan became violent when he felt she
was not loyal and, on April 24, had beat
and grabbed her by the throat before tak-
ing her money and leaving. Jourdan was
arrested shortly after at a Burlingame
hotel.
According to prosecutors, Jourdan
contacted the 28-year-old Minnesota
woman in 2010 through an online pros-
titute ad and ew her out to California
where she was advertised on
MyRedbook.com. The woman brought
in $3,000 weekly but Jourdan kept near-
ly all the money, according to the
District Attorneys Ofce.
Jourdan remains in custody in lieu of
$500,000 bail.
Pimp facing four years prison term
Police arrest woman believed to
be linked to several thefts in the county
Palo Alto police have arrested a Santa Clara woman who they
believe may be responsible for a number of thefts in the county.
Just after 7:10 a.m. Monday, police responded to a call from a
man who said there was a woman he did not know inside his
parked car in the 500 block of Fulton Street.
Ofcers arrived and arrested 30-year-old Abigail Lee, who had
been going through the contents of the car and had property
stolen from three other victims with her, according to police.
The stolen property included a credit card, a social security
card, a gym membership card and vehicle registration and insur-
ance, police said.
Police said Lee had more than 50 car keys with her, one of
which was in the ignition of the car she was found in.
Investigators believe the key allowed her to enter the car, and
because of that is considered a burglary tool, police said.
Lee was arrested on suspicion of felony possession of stolen
property and attempted vehicle theft, as well as misdemeanor
possession of burglary tools and vehicle tampering, police said.
Police said two of the other victims one from Santa Clara
and one from San Jose told police that someone had burglar-
ized their cars.
Local brief
5
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Anita Lazo Tolentino
Anita Lazo Tolentino was born on August 29,
1926 in San Vicente Ilocos Sur, Philippines as
the third child of the late Apolonio and Demetria
Lazo. She passed away in the comfort of her home
in Hillsborough, California on Monday, October 1,
2012. Anita is survived by four of her ve sons: Gary,
James, Gilbert, and Broderick. Having entered rst
grade at age four, Anita consistently excelled in her
academic studies leading her to follow her passion as a couture fashion designer
in Hawaii. Anita then moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1962 where she
became a successful business woman and continued to grow her family with
her late husband, Patricio Farinas Tolentino, to include seven grandchildren:
James Paul, Maile Lichelle, Aaron, Dominique, Tracee, Alisha & Lily and
thirteen great grandchildren: Kalani, Tama, Mikaela, Sydney, Akea, Keoni, Taj,
Jaena, Marli, Noah, Paka, Koa, and Bubu. Anita will always be remembered as a
dedicated, strong-willed and loving Mother, Grandmother, Great Grandmother,
and Sister. Everything she did was for the love of her family. The Vigil will be
held on Sunday, October 7 at Crosby N. Gray & Co. in Burlingame beginning
at 6:00 p.m. The Rosary Service will begin at 7:30 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be
held on Monday, October 8 at Our Lady of Angels Roman Catholic Church in
Burlingame at 10:00 a.m. Interment is at Skylawn Memorial Park in San Mateo.
Arrangements by Crosby N. Gray & Co.
Obituary
Edilberto C. Magallanes
Edilberto C. Magallanes Ed Born February 26, 1930 in Biliran, Biliran, Philippines passed
away peacefully at home September 26, 2012. The youngest of his siblings Antera, Paz,
Norberta, Domingo, Sylvestre, & Anacoreta Magallanes, he is survived by his beloved wife
Natividad, his six devoted daughters Edna, Ethel, Edith, Ellen, Elouise, and Eleanor; loving
sister Norberta M. Alvarado, nieces and nephews here in the U.S. and Philippines.
Edilberto earned his Bachelors Degree in Education from Leyte Normal College in
Tacloban, Leyte. For 24 years he taught History and Social Studies at the local elementary
school in his native Biliran.
In 1979 Ed and Naty nally migrated to the U.S. where he joined his sister Norbertas
(Alvarado) family in San Francisco. Soon his six daughters followed along. They lived in Noe
Valley until buying their home in the early 1980s. Pinole, California, became his permanent
residence.
As foreman at SSF Auto Imports in South San Francisco for 15 years, he retired in 1995
when his rst grandson Edward was born and younger granddaughter Rhea (Sugismundo).
Other grandchildren, Julian (Arnold) and Ryan (Ranihan) all miss their Lolo. He leaves
behind sons in law Noel, Alvin, Alan and Paul.
He was a sports enthusiast. He especially loved baseball, basketball, football and tennis. He
tended to his lush garden and plants and always had a great sense of humor. Edilberto Ed
will be fondly remembered by family, friends and his loving community.
Services
Viewing: 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. Wednesday, October 3, and Thursday October 4.
Saint Joseph Cemetery Holy Angels Funeral Center
2540 Church Lane San Pablo
Funeral Mass
Friday, October 5th 11:30 a.m.
St. Josephs Church, 837 Tennent Avenue, Pinole
Telephone: (510) 234-2012 Fax: (510) 234-0256
Obituary
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Southern California man
accused of beating his wifes head
against a car and the ground after
she requested a divorce over break-
fast in Pacica pleaded not guilty
yesterday to charges of premeditat-
ed attempted murder and domestic
violence.
John Howard Hunt, 67, of Julian,
Calif., is also charged with felony
assault and felony assault causing
great bodily
injury which are
a l t e r n a t i v e
charges to the
more serious
count. He plead-
ed not guilty to
all charges in
Superior Court
yesterday and
set jury trial for
Jan. 4.
Hunt has been held without bail
since his May 5 arrest shortly after
sheriffs deputies were flagged
down by a motorist seeking help for
Hunts bleeding and disoriented
wife.
The altercation between Hunt and
his wife of 21 years began that
morning after the woman
announced over breakfast that she
wanted a divorce, according to the
Sheriffs Ofce.
The couple reportedly drove
down Highway 1 and Hunt pulled
into a cul-de-sac near Montara
where he asked her to get out and
give him a hug. After the embrace,
Hunt slammed his wifes head into
the car several times until she fell to
the ground where he further hit her.
The woman told authorities he
wrapped his belt around her neck
until she couldnt breathe and she
thought she was going to die.
Hunt allegedly pulled his wife
back into the car and took off again,
with her feet dangling from the pas-
senger side door, and she managed
to reach up and turn off the ignition.
The woman reported she grabbed at
a steel water bottle but he grabbed it
away and held her head down while
driving. Once the green Subaru
came to a stop, the profusely bleed-
ing woman ran to another car in
search of help and that motorist
drove to the rst sheriffs unit avail-
able.
Man pleads not guilty to abusing wife who wanted divorce
John Hunt
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man previously convicted of
contracting fraud was sentenced
yesterday to six months in jail for
passing himself off as a PG&E
affiliate offering contract work
vouchers for allowing him to make
energy conservation improvements
to peoples home.
Michael Phong Nguyen, 43,
instead charged
the victims
credit cards
beyond the
amount of the
voucher and his
hired laborers
did not com-
plete the jobs
p r o p e r l y ,
according to
prosecutors who asked for an
eight-month jail term.
The defense asked for four
months and a judge split the differ-
ence with a six-month term.
Nguyen receives credit of one day
served and must surrender Jan. 12
at the county jail. Nguyen pleaded
no contest in July to felony theft
from an elder victim and misde-
meanor counts of violating a court
order, fraudulently contracting for
home improvement and identity
theft.
On Aug. 13, 2010, Nguyen
reportedly cold-called several resi-
dents and identified himself as
operating the Professional Gas
and Electric Company, an affiliate
of Pacific Gas & Electric. Two
homeowners accepted the voucher
offers and in neither case was the
work completed well.
In one case, workers did one
day of work before abandoning
the job with exposed wires and
damaged stucco. The homeowner
required expensive repairs by a
legitimate contractor. At the time,
Nguyen had a permanent injunc-
tion from San Francisco in 2007
prohibiting him from this same
practice.
Fake Professional Gas and Electric Company worker gets eight months jail
Michael Nguyen
6
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
Trial opens in nursing student murder trial
OAKLAND A murder trial is underway for a woman
accused of stalking and killing a San Francisco Bay area nurs-
ing student.
Alameda County Prosecutor Butch Ford argued Monday
that Giselle Esteban killed former friend Michelle Le last year
out of jealousy, hatred and rage, because she blamed Le for
ruining her relationship with Scott Marasigan, her daughters
father.
Ford said Esteban texted Marasigan that punishment would
be swift if he didnt cut Le out of his life. Ford also said that
Esteban went to great lengths to hunt Le down, including
stealing a security badge and a class roster from Les nursing
school.
But Estebans defense attorney, Audrea Aura, admitted
while theres a mountain of evidence against her client,
Esteban did not plan to kill Le, but snapped due to extreme
provocation and heat of passion.
Esteban has pleaded not guilty.
Supervisor Wiener wants to crack down on nudity
SAN FRANCISCO A San Francisco supervisor, fed up
with the almost-daily displays of nudity in one city neighbor-
hood, introduced legislation Tuesday that would make it ille-
gal to walk around naked on San Francisco streets.
The city allows nudity except in parks, on port property and
in restaurants, but under the ordinance by Supervisor Scott
Wiener, nudity at city plazas, parklets, sidewalks, streets and
public transit would be banned. The legislation would, howev-
er, allow nudity at parades and street festivals.
The legislation was spurred by an increase in nudity in the
Castro neighborhood, where nudists gather almost every day
at a plaza, Wiener said.
Wiener proposed a law last year that would have required
nudists to put a cloth or other barrier under their bottoms if
they take a seat in public, but he hoped that the situation in the
Castro would resolve itself before he proposed a ban on nudi-
ty.
Oracle CEO to experiment on his Hawaiian island
SAN FRANCISCO Oracle CEO Larry Ellison says he
plans to turn the Hawaiian island that he recently bought into
a laboratory for experimenting with more environmentally
sound ways of living.
Ellison says he hopes to convert sea water into fresh water
on the 141-mile-square mile island of Lanai. He also wants
more electric cars on the island and hopes to increase its fruit
exports to Japan and other markets.
Around the Bay
By Anne DInnocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Americans are
expected to spend more during whats
traditionally the busiest shopping sea-
son of the year, but theyre not exactly
ready to shop til they drop like they
have been in the past two years.
The National Retail Federation, the
nations largest retail trade group, said
Tuesday that it expects sales during the
winter holiday shopping period in
November and December to rise 4.1
percent this year. Thats more than a
percentage point lower than the growth
in each of the past two years, and the
smallest increase since 2009 when sales
were up just 0.3 percent.
The projections are an important
indicator for retailers that depend on
the last two months of the year for up to
40 percent of their annual sales. But the
estimates also offer valuable insight for
economists who closely watch con-
sumer spending, which accounts for up
to 70 percent of economic activity.
The holiday shopping season is one
gauge of not only the shopping habits,
but also the mindset of the average
American during what has turned out to
be a slow and uneven economic recov-
ery. Right now, people are feeling better
about rising home prices and a rebound-
ing stock market, but job growth is still
weak and prices for everything from
food to gas are higher.
Holiday sales seen rising 4.1 percent in 2012
By Paul Davenport
and Jacques Billeaud
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NACO, Ariz. A Border Patrol
agent was shot to death Tuesday in
Arizona near the U.S.-Mexico line, the
first fatal shooting of an agent since a
deadly 2010 firefight with Mexican
bandits that spawned congressional
probes of a botched government gun-
smuggling investigation.
The agent, 30-year-old Nicholas Ivie,
and a colleague were on patrol in the
desert near Naco, about 100 miles from
Tucson, when gunre broke out shortly
before 2 a.m., the Border Patrol said.
The second agent was shot in the ankle
and buttocks, but was reportedly in sta-
ble condition.
Authorities have not identified the
agent who was wounded, nor did they
say whether any weapons were seized at
the site of the shooting.
At a news conference in Naco, an FBI
ofcial said the agency still was process-
ing the crime scene and that it might take
several days to complete. The FBI and
the Cochise County Sheriffs Ofce,
which is also investigating, declined to
say whether investigators have recov-
ered guns or bullet casings.
No arrests have been made, but
authorities suspect that more than one
person red at the agents.
Border Patrol agent shot, killed on duty
By Justin Pope
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the Supreme Court revisits the use
of race in college admissions next week,
critics of afrmative action are hopeful
the justices will roll back the practice. A
new report out Wednesday offers a big
reason for their optimism: evidence from
at least some of the nine states that dont
use afrmative action that leading public
universities can bring meaningful diver-
sity to their campuses through race-neu-
tral means.
That conclusion is vigorously disputed
by supporters of race-based afrmative
action, including universities in states
like California which cannot under state
law factor race into admissions deci-
sions. The new report, by the Richard
Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at the
Century Foundation and prominent
advocate of class-based affirmative
action, calls those states race-neutral
policies largely successful. The
University of California and others call
them a failure thats left their campuses
inadequately representative of the states
they serve.
Kahlenberg also acknowledges that
highly selective universities like UCLA
and the Universities of California-
Berkeley and Michigan havent recov-
ered from drop-offs in minority enroll-
ments after voters in those states out-
lawed racial preferences.
But in most places, the report argues, a
combination of measures aggressive
outreach, de-emphasizing of standard-
ized tests, afrmative action based on
class instead of race, and even getting rid
of legacy preferences that mostly benet
whites has allowed minority repre-
sentation on their campuses to recover to
previous levels.
Study: Race-neutral admissions can work
NATION 7
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON On the eve of the
rst presidential debate, the early autumn
Republican reviews are in for Mitt
Romneys presidential campaign, and
they are not pretty.
In some states, candidates who share
the Nov. 6 ballot with the former
Massachusetts governor already have
taken steps to establish independence
from him. Party strategists predict more
will follow, perhaps as soon as next week,
unless Romney can dispel fears that he is
headed for defeat despite the weak econo-
my that works against President Barack
Obamas prospects.
Former Mississippi Gov. Haley
Barbour, who headed the Republican
Party when it won control of Congress in
the 1990s, said disapprovingly over the
weekend that Romneys campaign has
been focusing on polling, political process
and campaign management. Its about
everything but the issues. Its about every-
thing but Obamas policies and the fail-
ures of those policies, he said.
Matthew Dowd, who was a senior polit-
ical adviser to President George W. Bush,
said the Romney campaign was almost
guilty of political malpractice over the
summer and during the two political con-
ventions. It left the playing eld totally to
Barack Obama and the Obama campaign
and basically set the tone for the nal 60
days of this campaign, which put them
behind after the conventions, said Dowd,
who worked for Democrats before signing
on with Bush, a Republican.
He and Barbour both spoke on ABC.
Ed Gillespie, a senior adviser to
Romney, defended the campaign in a con-
ference call with reporters on Monday.
Our message is very clear, which is we
cannot afford four more years like the last
four years. And we need a real recovery,
we need policies that are going to help,
he said.
Republicans say there is time for
Romney to steady his campaign but only
if he acts quickly.
Recent public polls show Obama mov-
ing out to a modest lead in most if not all
of the battleground states where the race
will be decided. But Republicans with
access to Romneys polling data said
Tuesday that he has begun regaining some
support among independent voters,
enabling him to cut into the presidents
advantage.
It is unclear how long congressional
candidates are willing to wait for a turn-
around. Several Republican strategists
point to this week, which includes the
debate and Fridays release of September
unemployment gures.
Some Republicans who are in periodic
contact with the campaign say Romneys
strategists have concluded that a recent
uptick in public optimism, coming on top
of Obamas success to date, complicates
the attempt to defeat the president solely
on the basis of pocketbook issues.
In recent days, Romney has emphasized
criticism of the presidents foreign policy,
particularly in the Middle East, where a
terrorist attack at the U.S. Consulate in
Benghazi, Libya, left Ambassador
Christopher Stevens and three other
Americans dead.
Barbour, echoing what others say pri-
vately, was dismissive of the suggestion
that Romney should spread his campaign
focus. The public is concerned about
how backwards the Middle East has gone
during the last year. But theyre much
more concerned about their children hav-
ing jobs, about them being able to pay for
their health insurance, for $3.85 gasoline,
he said.
Privately, GOP strategists also agreed
with Barbours public statement that
Romneys campaign has been unable so
far to settle on a single, overarching theme
to tie together its advertising, the rhetoric
of its candidate and appearances by surro-
gates.
GOP reviews turning
negative on Romney
REUTERS
Mitt Romney greets audience members at a campaign rally in Denver, Colo.
Part I: Aw-shucks time
Setting low expectations can help a so-so performance seem like
a success.
So in the days before their rst meeting, President Barack Obama
called Republican challenger Mitt Romney a good debaterand
deemed his own skills just OK.His aides groused that Romney
got more rehearsal time, while Obama was busy being
president.
For his part, Romney praised Obama as a very eloquent, gifted
speaker.And, despite his numerous GOP primary match-ups,
Romney noted,Ive never been in a presidential debate like this.
Part II: Tension city
The rst of the three presidential debates starting at 9 p.m.
EDT in Denver should bring the biggest audience of any
campaign event. More than 52 million TV viewers watched
Obamas initial match-up with John McCain in 2008.
Despite all the rehearsal, somethings bound to take the
candidates by surprise, and theyll be judged by how they
improvise on the y.Talk about tension city,as former President
George H.W. Bush described it.
But maybe Romney and Obama should each take a deep breath.
After all, how likely is it that either one will commit a big enough
blunder to overshadow months of campaigning? Studies nd
viewers tend to see the guy they preferred going into the debate
as the winner when its over.
When is it that anybody performs so badly that youd just say,
Oh, my God, I would never vote for this person?said Rutgers
University professor Richard Lau, who studies how voters decide.
Someone would have to seem so incompetent.Thats not going
to happen.
Part III: The spin
Its not over when the candidates walk off stage.
Campaign aides and big political names will descend on the
spin roomto tell reporters and after-debate TV audiences that
the other guy blew it, and why.
Viewers may feel theyre judging what they saw and heard for
themselves. But campaign strategists think getting the spin right
goes a long way toward deciding who won.
According to Tad Devine, who was a top adviser to Democratic
candidates Al Gore and John Kerry, pre-debate expectations and
post-debate spin can take on more signicance than what
happened in the debate itself.
Each one of those three is critically important,he said.
Debate in three parts
NATION 8
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
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Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Christopher S. Rugaber,
Tom Krisher and Dee-Ann Durbin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The U.S. economy is
looking more resilient, thanks in part to
encouraging signs for the two most expensive
purchases most Americans make: cars and
homes.
Cheap loans and a bounty of fuel-efcient
models enticed people to buy new vehicles at
a brisk pace last month. And the nation
enjoyed another year-over-year surge in home
prices in August a sign that the housing
industry is making a sustained comeback.
Both trends reect rising condence in the
economy. More families are replacing aging
cars. And rising home prices are leading more
would-be buyers to conclude that a home is a
good investment.
Two surveys last week also reported
improving consumer condence.
The apparent progress could benefit
President Barack Obama, who faces off with
Mitt Romney on Wednesday in an economy-
focused debate just ve week ahead of the
election.
Despite the brightening auto and housing
industries, the broader American economy is
still struggling. It grew at a meager 1.3 percent
annual rate in the April-June quarter. Most
economists foresee little strengthening the rest
of the year.
Hiring remains too sluggish to reduce high
unemployment, which is at 8.1 percent. The
manufacturing sector is struggling to grow
consistently. Workers pay is lagging ination.
A dismal European economy has cut demand
for U.S. exports.
And the economy remains at risk of falling
off a scal cliff early next year. Thats when
tax increases and deep spending cuts take
effect unless Congress reaches a budget deal.
If those measures do take effect, the economy
could fall into recession.
Yet many Americans appear to be looking
past the economys troubles.
Surveys by the private Conference Board
and the University of Michigan show that
while consumers are anxious about current
conditions, theyre more optimistic about the
future.
That helps explain why Americans are
expected to step up spending during this
years holiday shopping season. The National
Retail Federation, the largest retail trade
group, predicts sales will rise 4.1 percent.
Thats less than in each of the past two years
but more than the average growth over the past
10. And it extends a growth trend that began
after holiday sales sank 4.4 percent in 2008 in
the midst of the recession.
Increased consumer condence is also a fac-
tor in this years auto sales gains. On Tuesday,
automakers reported solid increases in
September. Total sales for the month are
expected to exceed 1.1 million vehicles, up 11
percent from September 2011.
Analysts expect sales to total about 14.3
million this year, up from 12.8 million last
year. Sales peaked at 17 million in 2005
before hitting a 30-year low of 10.4 million
during the recession in 2009.
Auto sales and home prices
help buoy weak economy
REUTERS
A Jeep Wrangler is shown on the showroom oor at the Criswell Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep-Fiat-
Ram truck dealership in Gaithersburg, Md.
OPINION 9
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Investigative skills
Editor,
Univision News found 57 unreport-
ed rearms from Fast and Furious.
How can this be? The Department of
Justice (DOJ) after months of investiga-
tion found only three weapons. They
have nally found an ofcial to blame.
However, no charges were made
against this ofcial.
Univision was able to identify many
of the major players. Univision identi-
ed Mexican citizens murdered with
these weapons. It appears that
Univision has better investigative skills
and abilities than the DOJ. Perhaps we
should disband DOJ and hire
Univision. Think of the billions of tax
dollars we could save.
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Letter to the editor
I
f there is ever a time when it was
appropriate to hold your nose and
vote, it is in the case of
Proposition 30. The path this particular
proposition took to make it on the bal-
lot was lled with stench. Its essential
message is: vote for this proposition to
raise your sales tax a quarter-cent for
four years and income tax on those
making more than $500,000 a year or
face huge cuts to education to the tune
of about $6 billion. It didnt have to be
this way. Education could have been
funded in the last state budget cycle and
the option would have been to raise
these taxes or face cuts to any other
state program. Yet the governor knows
education is a soft spot for many and
the specter of untenable cuts, higher
class sizes, laid-off teachers and shorter
school years is too scary for the average
voter. And so there is this terrible
choice.
It is appealing to say no to the propo-
sition on principle alone, and send a
message that the state needs to get its
house in order. Allocating money to
high-speed rail and a Delta tunnel are
ambitious projects but costly. And tak-
ing a small step toward pension reform
that wont see impact for 30 years is
nowhere near the type of reform needed
for the state to meet its bottom line.
The state has cut billions from its budg-
et in the last few years to reect the
new economic reality, yet legislators
and the governor were hoping that the
impact of social media and Facebook
going public, in particular, would some-
how magically cure the states nancial
ills. This is evidence of the states poor
budget judgment, in which it counts on
the booms to get it through the busts,
while overspending during the boom.
That is one major shortfall of the state,
and yet recent propositions to force the
state to live within its means and adopt
a more robust rainy day fund have
failed. So we, the voter, are partly to
blame.
In addition, schools across the state
often fall victim to the states mandated
programs and class sizes with little
exibility in how they can determine
how best to teach our children. That
should change. And yet legislators
spend most of their time conjuring up
hundreds and hundreds of bills every
year that sometimes get signed, and
sometimes dont. Rather than spend
time working on legislation to prove the
value of their jobs, wouldnt it be nice
if more legislators spent time actually
working on funding formulas and
removing the shackles of school man-
dates?
But alas, that is wishful thinking.
Instead, we are faced with the option of
saying no to this proposition and risk-
ing wide-scale cuts to our schools for
up to ve years about one-third of
an average childs time in public educa-
tion or saddling the state with anoth-
er sales tax that will hurt our ability to
compete with other states. And one of
the saddest components of this proposi-
tion is that it will not result in one addi-
tional dime for education, it simply
maintains the status quo. Wed like to
say the choice is clear, but its not. Vote
yes on Proposition 30 for the sake of
our schools and yes, local school
districts are making plans for a catas-
trophe if it does not pass. But dont
vote yes with any amount of pride in
our state or its governance.
Vote yes on Proposition 30
Childhoods future?
C
hildhood today is defined by the expansion
of experience and the contraction of positive
adult contact ... Children and adults pass
each other in the night at ever increasing speeds, and the
American social environment becomes increasingly lonely
for both. Richard Louv, Childhoods Future.
This column is dedicated to my first great-grandchild,
Savannah, now 6 months old, and to Jon Mays little
daughter celebrating her first
birthday in October.
When I used to drive along
El Camino Real with my 3-
year-old first granddaughter
in her car seat beside me (it
was legal then), she would
often point out something
she wanted me to see.
Grandma, look at that pret-
ty rainbow, she once said
about an arc of color off in
some unknown direction.
Sorry, I cant look now, I
answered. The most impor-
tant thing for me to do is to
look where Im going. After a brief and thoughtful
silence, she said, No, Aunt Col said the most important
thing is love.
Yes, I agreed. You are right. Its very important that
we all love each other. That is the most important thing in
the world. But while were loving each other, we must be
careful to look where were going.
As I thought about this later, the importance of love and
looking where were going says it all when it comes to the
plight of so many children in todays society. The increas-
ing number of children growing up without that all-impor-
tant love and the great unwillingness of so many parents
and other adults (including government leaders) to consid-
er the consequences for the future is threatening a national
disaster of unheard proportions.
Besides children who are obviously unloved (the overtly
abused and neglected), this is evident in the many parents
who love their children only for what they expect the
kids can do for them like make them parents (mom and
dad and society expect it), give the parent the love that
he/she didnt get as a child, be a cute and/or obedient
diversion, make the parents look good through the childs
accomplishments. And they love them as long as they
dont get in the way of the parents activities and goals too
much. And as far as many of our government leaders are
concerned (and society in general), professed interest in
this most precious national resource is merely lip service.
As Madeline Levine, Ph.D., wrote in her new book,
Teach Your Children Well: No parent should tolerate
what has become a culturally normalized form of child
abuse sleep deprivation, repetitive stress injuries from
early and excessive athletics, overwhelming academic
stress and a complete disregard for the known protective
factors of child development.
What a child needs most is at least one adult (more is
better) who bonds with him/her. Though, at times, the par-
ents may wish they were doing something else, they
believe strongly enough and care enough for the welfare of
the child to devote a lot of their time to the child. Our
deep desire to connect with our children doesnt pay off if
we dont give our kids enough time to actually do the con-
necting. Christine Carter, Ph.D., Raising Happiness.
The fact that this is happening for so few children does not
mean that it is not essential for the optimum development
of the child. Many parents and our supporting institutions
seem to have cavalierly gone off to pursue their own inter-
ests a truly dismaying and serious threat to the future of
our children and our society as a whole.
You wonder what is in store for well-loved children
when, as they grow up, they have to deal with so many
who have not been as fortunate and with institutions that
make it more difficult for them to make their way to pro-
ductive adulthood. What chance will they have to see a
rainbow through the numerous dark clouds of indifference
and neglect that will hover over their horizons? As M.
Scott Peck wrote in The Road Less Traveled: The feel-
ing of being valuable ... is essential to mental health and a
cornerstone of self-discipline. It is the direct product of
parental love ... When children have learned through the
love of their parents (and other adults) to feel valuable,
it is almost impossible for the vicissitudes of adulthood to
destroy their spirit.
During all of these ensuing years, Savannahs mother
(the 3-year-old who saw the rainbow) has been surrounded
by many people from whom she has experienced an out-
pouring of love and attention and who have tried to help
her make sense of the world and keep her spirit intact.
Now its her turn (with the help of Savannas daddy and
the rest of us) to carry on and do what she can to help her
child feel loved and valuable.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 500
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
T
ime and time again, there are
propositions that are well-
meaning and sound great, but
fall short in their efcacy and provide
greater risks than what the authors
intended. Proposition 38 is one of those
propositions.
Proposition 38 would raise personal
income tax for a large range of incomes
beginning with a single ler making
$7,316 a year and arc higher for those
making more than $2.5 million a year.
It would result in an estimated $10 bil-
lion in additional revenue for schools
and would be guaranteed funding.
However, that could mean state legisla-
tors could simply reduce its funding,
resulting in a net gain of zero. And
most of the benet would not go into
effect this scal year so schools would
still have to continue with plans for
drastic cuts right now.
Vote no on Proposition 38
Editorial
San Mateo County voters will
head to the polls Nov. 6. The
Daily Journalhas made the
following endorsements for local
candidates and measures.
San Mateo County Board of
Education, area seven: Joe Ross
San Mateo County Harbor
District Board of
Commissioners: Sabrina
Brennan, William Holsinger and
Pietro Parravano
Sequoia Healthcare District:
Kim Griffin, Katie Kane
San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors, District Four:
Warren Slocum
Half Moon Bay City Council:
Marina Fraser, John Muller
Half Moon Bay Measure J, half-
cent sales tax increase to fund
city services: NO
To find your polling location or read
other nonpartisan election informa-
tion prepared by the League of
Women Voters visit
http://www.smartvoter.org/.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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choose to reect the diverse character of this
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Mixed signals on the
world economy tugged on major stock
indexes Tuesday.
The countrys largest fertilizer compa-
ny, Mosaic, said weak demand from
China and India have hurt its prots.
Mosaic, Dupont and stocks of other com-
panies in the materials industry fell.
But utilities and health care stocks,
where investors often retreat in a slow-
growing economy, helped pull the
Standard & Poors 500 index above the
break-even mark.
The S&P 500 index gained 1.26 to
close at 1,445.75. The Dow Jones indus-
trial average dropped 32.75 points to
13,482.36. Dupont led the Dow lower,
sinking 86 cents to $49.50.
The market could remain quiet until
the government gives its monthly jobs
report on Friday, said Paul Zemsky, chief
investment ofcer of multi-asset strate-
gies at ING Investment Management.
Economists expect the unemployment
rate increased to 8.2 percent in
September from 8.1 percent in August.
Zemsky said a surprise swing up or
down could change the direction of the
stock market and the Presidential elec-
tion.
Indexes took a turn lower at midday
after Spains prime minister said that hes
not preparing a request for a bailout loan.
Traders have been anticipating that the
Spanish government would ask for help
for nearly a month. Spain needs to ask for
money from Europes bailout fund before
the European Central Bank can start buy-
ing Spanish government bonds.
Mosaic reported net income and sales
early Tuesday that fell short of analysts
estimates. The company blamed slump-
ing demand for its fertilizer overseas as
well as hurricanes for slower production.
The results pushed the companys stock
down $2.25 to $55.76.
In other trading, the Nasdaq composite
rose 6.51 points to 3,120.04.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year
U.S. Treasury note slipped to 1.61 per-
cent from 1.63 percent late Monday after
Spains prime minister, Mariano Rajoy,
said a bailout request wasnt coming.
Wall Street wavers
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily
TuesdayontheNewYorkStockExchangeandNasdaq
Stock Market:
NYSE
MetroPCS Communications Inc., up $2.05 at $13.57
Deutsche Telekom AG, parent company of cellphone
carrier T-Mobile USA, said it is in talks to buy smaller
rival MetroPCS.
Express Inc., down $3.33 at $11.68
The clothing retailer cut its forecast for the current
quarter because of fewer shoppers in September and
heavy discounting.
Fifth & Pacic Cos. Inc., down $1.45 at $11.32
Due to weaker sales of Juicy Couture products, its
largest division, the clothing company cut its 2012
earnings guidance.
Acuity Brands Inc., down $2.99 at $60.11
The lighting makers scal fourth-quarter net income
fell 3 percent due to a charge and expenses related
to a plant closing.
The Mosaic Co., down $2.25 at $55.76
The fertilizer company said that its scal rst-quarter
net income fell 18 percent and missed Wall Streets
expectations.
Stage Stores Inc., up 73 cents at $21.99
The operator of the Peebles and Stage stores said that
its sales at stores open at least a year rose 11.1 percent
in September.
Nasdaq
Old Dominion Freight Line Inc., down $1.01 at $29.12
RBC Capital Markets downgraded the trucking
companys stock, citing a slowdown in certain kinds
of shipping.
RadiSys Corp., down 28 cents at $3.15
The provider of wireless infrastructure systems
replaced its CEO.It also lowered revenue guidance for
its third quarter.
Big movers
Facebook revamps
its help center
NEW YORK If youve used
Facebook, chances are youve needed
help with reporting spam, un-tagging
photos or understanding the sites ever-
changing privacy settings over the years.
Facebooks redesigned help center
aims to make it easier for users to navi-
gate and nd what they need help with
on the site or its mobile applications.
Though its only fully accessible on
Facebooks website, the new help center
is designed to look and feel more like a
mobile app, said Terry Guo, product
manager at the Menlo Park, Calif.-based
social media company.
Finding answers has also been stream-
lined so that what might have taken ve
clicks of a mouse on the old help center
will now take three or fewer, Guo said.
American says installation
job caused seat snafu
DALLAS American Airlines says
improperly installed clamps caused seats
to come loose on some planes, and its
expanding an inspection to cover dozens
of jets.
In the past week, rows of seats have
come loose on three separate ights, two
of which made emergency landings.
American said Tuesday the problem
was caused by improper installation of a
clamp used to attach each row of three
seats to tracks on the aircraft oor.
The airline had planned to inspect
eight of its Boeing 757 jets, but says
instead it already inspected 36 and plans
to check 11 more. All have the same
model of seats in the main cabin.
LinkedIn links up
with panel of influencers
SAN FRANCISCO LinkedIn is
adding more expert advice to its website
and making it easier for its users to nd
their pearls of wisdom.
The online professional networking
service hopes the proffered tips and
advice will help it extend its clout
beyond the help-wanted market.
The new feature added Tuesday will
encourage LinkedIns more than 175
million members to sign up to follow the
musings of inuencers a 150-per-
son panel that includes President Barack
Obama, business moguls, Internet blog-
gers, self-help gurus and entrepreneurs.
LinkedIn Corp. plans to anoint other
people as inuencers, but only after
screening candidates in order to ensure
they are qualied to dispense helpful
advice.
Business briefs
SPORTS 12
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A walk onto the College of San
Mateo football eld on Monday may
have prompted a couple people to
call the CSM maintenance depart-
ment.
Two days after the Bulldogs suf-
fered their rst loss of the season, a
29-28 defeat to San Joaquin Delta
College, the scoreboard still display-
ing the score almost like it stayed
there the entire weekend waiting for
the players to show up on Monday.
But it wasnt an electrical mal-
function Tell the Truth Monday
at CSM began with the Bulldogs
reminded of how important every
single play against solid competition
can be.
We had too many mistakes, said
Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive coordi-
nator and assistant head coach. The
mistakes that we made, they capital-
ized on them. Theyre a good team
and when you make mistakes
against a good team its going to cost
you. We have to do a better job of
protecting the football and executing
during crunch time.
Weve made a lot of these mis-
takes over the rst four games. Its
just, we were able to nd a way to
win. And as the teams get tougher,
you dont always have that luxury. I
think it was good. What Delta
showed us was that were not going
to win conference until we deal with
those things, get them cleaned up,
which is the focus for the next two
weeks.
The Bulldogs wont hit the foot-
ball eld this weekend against an
opponent. Instead, theyll have two
weeks to battle themselves, both
physically and mentality, in hopes of
learning from the 1-point loss and
preparing for the 5-week war that is
the Coast Conference.
But step one in that process is tak-
ing Saturdays loss and tackling it
head-on.
How we respond to it means
everything, Tulloch said. This is a
team that, it could light an absolute
re under our players and could be
the best thing that could ever happen
to us.
The locker room was silent, said
CSM defensive lineman Valentino
Coleman about Saturdays loss. No
one said a word. You could feel,
especially with the sophomores,
everyones heart was broken. People
wanted to cry. People were crying. It
was a hard loss.
Coleman said the majority of the
CSM players were content with try-
ing to put the past behind them and
look forward. But when they hit the
practice eld on Monday, the play-
ers were greeted by a scoreboard
that still read just how it did when
the Bulldogs waltzed into the locker
room last Saturday.
All the defensive players were
looking at that like, no, thats never
going to happen again, especially in
our backyard, on our field,
Coleman said. People are nally
realizing that its going to take more
than just talent to win games.
If we put it behind us and dont
change anything, itll be the biggest
mistake we can make, Tulloch said.
Tulloch said there might have
been a dozen mistakes in Saturdays
loss. But the two most glaring hap-
pened on special teams. First, the
safety in the rst quarter happened
on a punt attempt. And second, the
missed eld goal that would have
given CSM the lead with less than a
minute to play in the game was wide
left those ve points meant the
difference between a win and a loss.
Delta also outgained CSM on
offense. Coleman said there are
improvements to be made.
On the eld, there are a lot guys
still getting used to the speed of the
game, he said. I believe there are a
lot of players that are just now get-
ting their feet wet. We do give up a
lot of yards, but its all correctable.
We just have to go back, watch lm
and get better.
Still, the bend-but-dont-break
attitude of the defense has produced
ve of northern Californias top 20
tacklers.
Were looking at the rst half and
its the good, the bad and the ugly,
Tulloch said. What did we do well?
What didnt we do well? Were sit-
ting there looking at our defense and
if Im any of these teams [in the
Coast Conference], where are they
going to attack us? What do they see
on tape? And we better x those
things. We dont have too much
time.
Coleman said he and the rest of
the Bulldogs understand that time is
of the essence. All of CSMs next
ve opponents are ranked no lower
than 14th in NorCal.
Staying hungry, Coleman said
when asked what his teams primary
focus is during the bye week. Dont
ease up at all. If anything, press the
gas pedal a little harder oor it.
There is no time to hold back.
Especially for us sophomores, even
the freshman. There is no time to
hold back. Its all or nothing. If we
have 60 minutes of hell, we take it
one play at a time. Thats what we
really have to live though.
Bulldog football looks inward after first loss
CAROL LAPINSKI ERDIE
Deshane Hines and Matt Vinal converge on San Joaquin Delta College
quarterback Sam Hutsell during CSMs 29-28 loss.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The table is set for the College of
San Mateo womens water polo
team. And head coach Randy
Wright said hes hoping his players
treat it like a four-course buffet.
After dismantling Laney College
in the Coast Conference opener 17-
5 last week, the Bulldogs have a
date with Merced College on
Wednesday. And with the middle of
the conference pack being so
bunched up, Wright isnt sugar-
coating the fact that the Merced
game is huge.
Its going to be a really good
game, Wright said. You just hope
in a big game, if you dont win, you
dont beat yourself and the other
team plays well enough to beat you.
So, I dont want to turn around and
say, man, we gave the team 20
turnovers and didnt control the ball
and thats the reason why we lost.
Were not going out there to lose.
Were going out there to win this
game.
CSM has seen Merced twice
already this season both times
resulting in losses for the Bulldogs.
But that was in non-conference play
a win on Wednesday would more
than make up for those two.
Its going to be important to
come and score, Wright said. We
dont want to get behind. We want
to go out there and establish our
defense, force them to make mis-
takes and make it harder on them
because when youre the team that
has to come back, its a lot more dif-
cult then just hunkering down and
playing.
CSM did a lot of hunkering
against Laney. The Bulldogs came
out on re and scored on their rst
six possessions and ultimately rode
an 8-1 rst quarter lead to the victo-
ry.
We knew that Laney wouldnt be
a real tough test so we set out some
goals in terms of efciency, Wright
said. We wanted to come out and
score on ve of our rst nine pos-
sessions. And we wanted to score on
ve of our rst seven shots. So I
kind of put those parameters on our
game and forced them to execute,
which was a good thing it makes
it a little more pressure-packed. It
was a positive thing. It forced the
extra pass, it forced the better shot
on target and thats what were
preparing for.
Erica Staben led the CSM offense
with six goals. Jasmine Zaldivar
added four while speedster Miya
Oto scored a pair. Meaghan
Ramstack, Morgan Gassmann,
Sinclaire Cheong, Andrea Carranza,
Rachel Wright and Kelly Dwyer all
got on the score sheet.
CSMs goal keeper extraordinaire
Daria Kekuewa had 23 saves.
It appears Wright and the
Bulldogs have prepared for this
match-up against Merced from day
one of the season. After two close
losses, Wright said Merced should
be favored by a goal. But playing at
home might even things up for the
Bulldogs.
The one thing we want to focus
on is that none of their best players
beat us, Wright said. We want to
force them to work extra hard. We
want to make sure that we cover up
on our assignments. Nothing comes
easy to the best players and thats
the way it should be.
It will also be important for the
Bulldogs to not waste any of their
scoring opportunities its that
particular mistake that has cost
CSM wins in their previous games
against Merced.
I think the hunger comes from
within, Wright said. I dont think
there is anything I can do in terms of
hunger. There is only so many
things you can do to get your team
hungry. Im just hoping that the
education, the learning increases the
condence. And with increases in
condence, comes more desire to be
hungry. Because its hard to be hun-
gry when you dont know what
youre doing. I hope its a regular,
four-course buffet [against Merced].
I want them that hungry. In the end,
its all about execution in any sport.
Its an important win, Wright
said.
CSM water polo ready for Merced showdown
SPORTS 13
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD There will be no quarter-
back change at Stanford this week. And if
David Shaw had his way, there will be no
questions about the quarterbacks job status
either.
The second-year coach
stood behind redshirt jun-
ior Josh Nunes on
Tuesday, delivering an
unprompted and unscript-
ed message at the begin-
ning of his weekly news
conference that his strug-
gling quarterback will
start for the No. 18
Cardinal (3-1, 1-1 Pac-
12) against Arizona (3-2, 0-2) on Saturday.
The only quarterback change Shaw wants
to see is a change in Nunes play.
Nunes completed 18 of 37 passes for 170
yards and an interception in Stanfords 17-13
loss at Washington last week. The offense
converted 5 of 18 third downs, never scored
a touchdown and looked lost for the first time
since Andrew Luck left.
After last Thursday nights game, Shaw
took exception to a reporter asking if hed
switch quarterbacks. Before anybody had the
chance to ask at Stanford, Shaw squashed the
subject.
Josh is the starting quarterback, Shaw
said. He played well the first game. He
played much better the second game. He
played an OK half against USC, then an out-
standing half against USC and is coming off
a bad game. Were not changing quarter-
backs. That doesnt make any sense to me.
We wanted to bronze his arm and his legs
after USC, and then now I have to answer a
hundred questions about how come were not
changing quarterbacks. Its asinine.
Shaw, Nunes and everybody else on The
Farm recognize the quarterback play has not
been up to Stanfords standard.
While nobody expected Nunes to live up to
Lucks legacy, Shaw wants the quarterback
to complete 60 percent of his passes, not turn
the ball over and manage the running game.
Nunes is 65 of 125 (52 percent) for 785
yards, six touchdowns and four interceptions
in four games.
Dropped balls by receivers have not
helped. Neither has an inconsistent running
game, which racked up a school-record 446
yards on the ground in a 65-21 stampede past
Washington last year but totaled only 68
yards in the loss to the Huskies this season.
Most of that is a product of defenses stack-
ing nine players even 10, at times close
to the line of scrimmage to dare Nunes to
complete passes. And until he does so with
more consistency, Nunes knows that will not
change.
Ive just got to get settled in early, he
said. Its something that, well, now I know.
Outside of a second-half surge highlighted
by a pair of game-changing runs to upset
USC, Nunes arm has been mostly off target
this season. While receivers have created lit-
tle separation and dropped several deep balls,
including Ty Montgomerys miss on the final
possession against Washington, Nunes has
underthrown fades, tossed at the feet of tight
ends across the middle or panicked in the
pocket to take an unnecessary sack.
On one play last week, he underthrew an
uncovered screen pass by 5 yards and
showed a rare display of emotion, pumping
his arms in the air, hitting his hands against
his helmet and yelling in frustration. Facing
fourth and 4 at the Washington 34-yard line
with 2 minutes left, Nunes left a fade route to
6-foot-8 tight end Levine Toilolo incredibly
short, getting the ball intercepted by
Desmond Trufant at the 8 to seal Stanfords
loss.
Shaw attributed some of the setbacks to
mechanics, noting that Nunes has too often
forgotten to keep his weight on his back foot
while going through his progressions, which
has hampered the quarterbacks ability to
generate enough force behind his throws.
Nunes agreed, though he offered a simpler
solution to his struggles.
I just need to throw it better, he said. Its
something thats very fixable.
While some fans took to social media call-
ing for backups Brett Nottingham or Kevin
Hogan already, one place Nunes will not find
any detractors yet is in his locker room.
Shaw emphatically said, I dont overre-
act. Other players backed Nunes even more,
not only putting faith in the quarterback, but
making comparisons that hes not that far off
from his prolific predecessor.
Stanford coach David Shaw stands behind QB
David Shaw
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
early goals came in transition. Twice she stole
the ball near midpool and barreled in on the
Mills goaltender, always with a defender on
her hip.
But that defender could never get around
Chinn and she easily beat the Mills goaltender
time and time again.
In the set, she was even more of a handful
for the Mills defense. Nine times the Knights
earned man advantages and each time it was
Chinn drawing the kickout. Hillsdale went 5
for 9 on the power play, with Chinn scoring
each time.
Its fun being aggressive, Chinn said.
You cant do that in real life, shove someone
out of the way.
Twice, she was in the right place at the right
time, putting home a rebound off the missed
shot of a teammate.
And just to show off her range, Chinn ried
home a goal from the outside wing in the
fourth quarter.
[Chinn] was ready to go and our [defense]
wasnt, Anderson said. You have to double
team her and force someone else to beat you.
Chinn teamed well with Darya Shtykalo,
who assisted on ve of Chinns goals and n-
ished with six assists overall. The Knights got
their other goal from Isik Yildiz.
Despite failing to stop Chinn, Mills did a
good job of hanging tough and staying in the
game. The Vikings jumped out to a quick 1-0
lead on a Saige Daniel fadeaway shot, off an
assist from Kaylene Co. After Hillsdale tied
the game, Mills went up 2-1 when Kristen
Lastofka oated home a shot from the left
wing to the far right corner of the cage.
It would be Mills last lead of the match.
Hillsdale nished the rst period with four
unanswered goals and led 5-2 after the open-
ing eight minutes.
Hillsdale moved ahead 6-2 on a Chinn
power-play goal, but goals from Josefina
Madrigal and Daniel pulled two goals back
for the Vikings, who trailed 6-4 at halftime.
The Vikings stayed within striking distance
of the Knights in the third and fourth quarters,
but could never get that one goal to put pres-
sure on Hillsdale, which maintained a three-
goal lead for most of the second half.
Mills made a bit of a run in the nal period,
cutting the Hillsdale lead to 11-9, but Chinn
outscored Mills 3-2 the rest of the way as the
Vikings had a number of shots rattle the
Knights cage, but didnt go in.
If we wouldnt have missed so many [shots
off the post], it could have been a one-goal
game, Anderson said. We had our opportu-
nities.
Daniel led the Vikings with ve goals.
Continued from page 11
KNIGHTS
with 19 kills. Nicole Connolly added nine kills
and a pair of aces, while Fusaro chipped in
with seven kills.
We try to move the ball around as much as
we can, said Mercy-Burlingame coach Alicia
Karver.
As Kaiser goes, so go the Gryphons, but they
did not have enough help from the rest of the
team to pick up the slack when Kaiser rotated
to the back row.
We were trying to nd a rhythm (offensive-
ly), said Crystal Springs coach Steve Cavella,
noting injury and illness have sidelined impor-
tant pieces to the offense. I think well be
ne.
Kaiser led all hitters, nishing with 21 kills.
Caroline Dicioccio added nine kills for the
Gryphons and Maddison Clay nished with
ve kills and an ace.
Mercy-Burlingame (2-0 WBAL Skyline, 13-
3 overall) won the rst two games rather hand-
ily. In Game 1, a Mercy hitting error coupled
with a kills from Crystal Springs Kaiser tied
the score at 8. The Crusaders responded by
winning the nine of the next 10 points to take
a commanding 18-9 advantage. Crystal
Springs (3-1, 13-4) rallied a bit, eventually cut-
ting its decit to seven points, 21-14, but the
Crusaders won the nal four points to take the
rst game.
Game 2 saw Mercy-Burlingame ring on all
cylinders early. A Kaiser killed tied the game
at 6, but a kill from Healy gave the Crusaders
a sideout. Mercy went on to win ve straight
points behind the serving of Shay Scerri, giv-
ing the Crusaders a 12-6 lead.
Mercy eventually stretched its lead to 22-13
before Crystal Springs came roaring back.
Another Kaiser kill gave the Gryphons a side-
out and they went on to win seven straight
points, cutting the Crusaders lead to just two
points, 23-21.
A kill from Mercys Fusaro and a service ace
from Gama gave the Crusaders the win, but the
momentum had shifted to Gryphons, who took
advantage in Game 3.
The score stayed close early in the third set.
Dicioccio had back-to-back kills to give
Crystal Springs a 5-3 lead, but a pair of kills
from Healy kept Mercy close, down just a
point a 6-5.
The Gryphons then ran away and hid from
the Crusaders. Crystal Springs won 16 of the
next 18 points to take a huge 22-8 advantage.
The Gryphons nished the game with an
exclamation mark, getting blocks for kills
from Dicioccio and Kaiser and ending it on a
Rose Gold ace.
Our passing went down and we werent
talking much, Molina said of her teams
Game 3 meltdown. We just came from a tour-
nament (over the weekend). Maybe we werent
ready for ve, 25-point games.
Most tournaments play best of three sets,
instead of the usual best of ve.
Game 4 was the most competitive of the
match, as neither team managed to pull away.
There were six ties and two lead changes
before the Crusaders began pulling away. The
last tie came at 12 and Mercy took the lead for
good following a Crystal Springs serving error
that gave the Crusaders a 13-12 lead.
Mercy eventually built a 20-16 lead, but the
Gryphons had one last run, closing to 21-19,
but the Crusaders nished the game and the
match by winning four of the nal ve points.
Continued from page 11
MERCY
New Zealand bars
Mike Tyson as tour looms
WELLINGTON, New Zealand In a rever-
sal, New Zealand authorities on Wednesday barred
Mike Tyson from entering the country whose
indigenous Maori people Tyson says inspired his
facial tattoo.
And a Downunder speaking tour for the former
heavyweight boxing champion was threatening to
fall apart altogether as
Australian immigration
authorities said theyve yet to
decide whether to allow him
into that country. Tickets for
appearances in New Zealand
and ve major Australian
cities in November are still
being promoted by a Sydney
agency.
Tysons 1992 rape convic-
tion would normally prevent his entry in New
Zealand and could be grounds for denial in
Australia as well. He had been granted an exemp-
tion for New Zealand before that visa was can-
celled Wednesday, days after the prime minister
spoke out against the visit.
Tyson was to speak at a November event in
Auckland, the Day of the Champions, which is
being promoted by Sydney agency Markson
Sparks!
Sports brief
Mike Tyson
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
165 North Amphlett Blvd San Mateo, CA 94401
650 227 4882 | www.rudolphsinteriors.com
Rudolphs Interiors
East Division
W L Pct GB
z-New York 94 67 .584
z-Baltimore 93 68 .578 1
Tampa Bay 89 72 .553 5
Toronto 72 89 .447 22
Boston 69 92 .429 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Detroit 87 74 .540
Chicago 84 77 .522 3
Kansas City 72 89 .447 15
Cleveland 68 93 .422 19
Minnesota 66 95 .410 21
West Division
W L Pct GB
z-Oakland 93 68 .578
z-Texas 93 68 .578
Los Angeles 89 71 .556 4
Seattle 73 87 .456 20
TuesdaysGames
N.Y.Yankees 4, Boston 3, 12 innings
Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 12 innings
Toronto 4, Minnesota 3
Baltimore 1,Tampa Bay 0
Kansas City 4, Detroit 2
Oakland 3, Texas 1
L.A. Angels at Seattle, late
AL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Washington 97 64 .602
y-Atlanta 93 68 .578 4
Philadelphia 81 80 .503 16
New York 73 88 .453 24
Miami 69 92 .429 28
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Cincinnati 97 64 .602
z-St. Louis 87 74 .540 10
Milwaukee 83 78 .516 14
Pittsburgh 79 82 .491 18
Chicago 60 101 .373 37
Houston 55 106 .342 42
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Francisco 94 67 .584
Los Angeles 85 76 .529 9
Arizona 80 79 .503 12 1/2
San Diego 75 85 .469 18
Colorado 62 97 .390 30 1/2
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
TuesdaysGames
Pittsburgh 5, Atlanta 1
Washington 4, Philadelphia 2
Miami 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 11 innings
Houston 3, Chicago Cubs 0
Milwaukee 4, San Diego 3
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 1
Arizona 5, Colorado 3
San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
NL STANDINGS
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
End
Regular
Season
Playoffs
TBA
End
Regular
Season
End
Regular
Season
@Dodgers
4:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
10/3
Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/3
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/11
vs.Bears
5:30p.m.
ESPN
11/19
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
Bye
@Ravens
10a.m
CBS
11/11
vs.Saints
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/18
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 81 109
New England 2 2 0 .500 134 92
Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 115 131
Miami 1 3 0 .250 86 90
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 4 0 0 1.000 126 56
Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83
Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 62 97
Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 81 151
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 83
Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 112 112
Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75
Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 98
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 3 1 0 .750 100 71
Denver 2 2 0 .500 114 83
Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 88 136
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 1 0 .750 66 83
Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88
Washington 2 2 0 .500 123 123
N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 111 84
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 4 0 0 1.000 124 76
Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 80 109
New Orleans 0 4 0 .000 110 130
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Minnesota 3 1 0 .750 90 72
Chicago 3 1 0 .750 108 68
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 85 81
Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 4 0 0 1.000 91 61
San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 65
St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 79 91
Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 58
ThursdaysGame
Arizona at St. Louis, 5:20 p.m.
SundaysGames
Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Miami at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 1:25 p.m.
NFL
WEDNESDAY
BOYSWATERPOLO
Burlingame at Menlo-Atherton, 5:15 p.m.St.
Ignatius at Serra, 6:30 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Carlmont at Sequoia, 4 p.m.; Burlingame at
Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.; Aragon at Castilleja, 5
p.m.; St. Ignatius at Notre Dame-Belmont, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE
WOMENSVOLLEYBALL
Hartnell at Canada, 6:30 p.m.
MENS SOCCER
Pacic Union at Menlo, 3 p.m.
WOMENS SOCCER
UC Merced at Menlo, 1 p.m.
THURSDAY
BOYSWATERPOLO
San Mateo at Sequoia, 4 p.m.; Terra Nova at Mills,
4:15 p.m.; Half Moon Bay at Hillsdale, 5:15 p.m.;
Menlo at Serra, 7 p.m.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Woodside at Menlo School, Terra Nova at Mills, 3
p.m.; Half Moon Bay at Hillsdale, 4 p.m.; Mercy-
Burlingame vs. San Mateo at Menlo School, 4:15
p.m.
GIRLSTENNIS
Notre Dame-Belmont at Presentation, Castilleja
vs. Mercy-Burlingame at Skyline College, 3:30
p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep at Crystal Springs, 3:30
p.m.; Capuchino at South City, El Camino at Half
Moon Bay, Westmoor at Oceana, Sequoia at Terra
Nova, Hillsdale at Woodside, San Mateo at Menlo-
Atherton, Aragon at Carlmont, Mills at
Burlingame, 4 p.m.
WHATS ON TAP
GIRLSTENNIS
Sequoia5, SouthCity2
SINGLES Leung(SC) d.Rehn6-1,6-1;Ciambrone
(S) d. Pangan 6-2, 5-7, 6-4; C.Yee (SC) d. Self 6-1, 6-4;
Clark (S) d. Pacheco 6-2, 6-2. DOUBLES New-
man-Hilbert (S) d. W. Yee-Leviste 6-1, 6-2;
Lauese-Cunningham(S) d.Liu-Li 6-3,6-1;Johal-Burtt
(S) d. Pakgalinawan-DuLaire 6-4, 6-1. Records
Sequoia 6-2 PAL Ocean.
Burlingame5, Aragon2
SINGLES Harrigan (B) d.Ishikawa 4-6,6-4,6-3; L.
Sinatra (B) d.Oka 4-6,6-2,6-2;Wong (A) d.N.Somers
6-3,6-4; S.Sinatra (B) d.Eliazo 4-5,retired.DOUBLES
Ma-Sun (A) d. Muprhy-Hu 6-2, 6-4; Patel-Lange
(B) d. Ngirchemet-Nasser 6-2, 6-4; M. Somers-Kot-
mel (B) d. Kuo-Kim 6-7(7), 6-2, 6-3. Records
Burlingame 5-3 PAL Bay, 7-5 overall.
Menlo-Atherton6, Hillsdale1
SINGLES Iinuma (H) d.Andrew 6-2,6-1; LaPorte
(MA) d. Palisoc 6-0, 6-2; LaPlante (MA) d. Ota 6-1, 6-
0; Scandalios (M)a d. Bodin 6-0, 6-1. DOUBLES
Samuelian-Giordano (MA) d. Banting-Banh 6-0, 6-
0; Kelly-Tiemann (MA) d. Mercado-Lin 6-0, 6-0;
Volpe-Perrine (MA) d. Lewis-Kelada 6-0, 6-0.
GIRLSWATERPOLO
Mercy-Burlingame12, MenloSchool 10
Mercy2514 12
Menlo1234 9
Goal scorers: MB Brenining,Vukashin 4; Ballard
2; Arnold, Gomes. MS Dunn 5, Flower 4; Meyer.
Records Mercy-Burlingame 5-1 PAL Ocean;
Menlo School 4-2.
Half MoonBay16, SanMateo5
Half MoonBay392216
SanMateo1031 5
Goal scorers: HMB Kemp, White 4; Clark, Chee,
Beebe 2; Zell, LaFace. SM Grimes 3; Oey, Zhang.
GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Sacred Heart Prep def. Castilleja 25-22, 29-27,
25-16(Highlights: SHP Smith 13 kills, 7 blocks;
Shannon 9 kills, 6 blocks; Gannon 15 digs; Merten
19assists).Records SacredHeart Prep3-0WBAL
Foothill, 18-2 overall.
Carlmont def. Mills 25-13, 26-24, 25-18 (High-
lights: C Jackman 11 kills; Bedard 9 kills, 4 digs;
Rice 14 assists,6 digs).Records Carlmont 5-0 PAL
Bay, 10-8 overall; Mills 0-5, 4-13.
Westmoor def. Capuchino 25-8, 25-13, 25-12
(Highlights:W Tagoai 6 kills; Marlene Alcantara
11 digs; Kong 34 assists).Records Westmoor 3-
2 PAL Ocean, 13-8 overall.
GIRLS GOLF
Castilleja232, SacredHeart Prep266
At SharonHeights G&CC, par 36
SHP Dake46;Ellison48;Ulam,Koenig56;Wilson
60; Cacchione 64.
C Sales 40; Debs 46; Wilkerson 47; D. Mitchell
49; N. Mitchell 50; Zales 51.
Records Sacred Heart Prep 2-3 WBAL,3-5 over-
all; Castilleja 4-0, 5-0.
BOYSWATERPOLO
MenloSchool 19, Carlmont 4
MenloSchool 7525 19
Carlmont 0301 4
Menlo goal scorers Bisconti 6; dAlencon, Xi 2;
Avery,Katsis,Wilson,Rozenfeld,Ho,Hammarskjold,
Yock, Rosales, Carlisle. Menlo goaltender saves
Lazar 8. Records Menlo School 1-0 PAL Bay, 8-4
overall; Carlmont 0-1.
Woodside11, Aragon5
Aragon1301 5
Woodside125311
Goal scorers: A Like 2; Steven, R. Nathan, E.
Nathan. W Cremers 4; Mendoza, Dallimonti,
Bourgeois 2; Fortes, Toulouse. Records Wood-
side 1-0 PAL Bay, 6-1 overall; Aragon 0-1.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
16
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Wide receiver
Darrius Heyward-Bey practiced for
the rst time Tuesday since being
hospitalized by
a helmet-to-hel-
met hit as the
O a k l a n d
Raiders worked
on fixing their
problems dur-
ing the bye
week.
Heyward-Bey
took part in
individual drills
as the Raiders
(1-3) held their rst of two practices
this week before getting four days
off for the bye. He ran some routes
and caught some passes in his rst
step back.
Were kind of at that stage, just
trying to take the necessary steps,
he said. Weve got a plan for me,
and today was step No. 1 and I feel
pretty good.
Heyward-Bey was knocked
unconscious on Sept. 23 by a hel-
met-to-helmet hit in the end zone
from Pittsburgh safety Ryan
Mundy. Heyward-Bey appeared to
be knocked out by the hit. He then
crashed to the turf headrst and his
neck twisted awkwardly. He was
taken to the hospital for a concus-
sion and sprained neck.
Heyward-Bey did not practice
last week as he waited to pass the
NFL concussion tests. But he was
able to participate Tuesday and said
he plans to play in the teams next
game Oct. 14 at Atlanta.
This is the second straight year in
which Heyward-Bey has had to be
carted off the eld during a game.
He suffered a neck injury against
Minnesota in 2011 but did not miss
a game.
I took a hard hit last year but that
was a lot more of a neck injury than
a head injury when it came to that
one and I came back the next
week, he said. For each person
individually its different.
Everybody works differently,
everybody is a different personality,
so got to look at it that way.
Heyward-Bey is coming off his
best season as a pro, when he had
64 catches for 975 yards and four
touchdowns. Heyward-Bey was
picked seventh overall in 2009 and
struggled his rst two seasons. But
the Raiders were counting on him
to build on his breakthrough cam-
paign this year and be a key part of
the offense with quarterback
Carson Palmer.
Heyward-Bey had nine catches
for 98 yards and one touchdown at
the time of the injury.
The Raiders depth at receiver has
been tested early this season, with
Heyward-Bey missing one game,
fellow starter Denarius Moore
missing the opener with a ham-
string injury and projected third
receiver Jacoby Ford out for the
season with a Lisfranc injury to his
left foot. Rookies Rod Streater and
Juron Criner have also been nursing
minor injuries that have limited
their practice time so far this sea-
son.
It denitely was a plus for us
just to have the whole group out
there healthy going into the bye
week, receiver Derek Hagan said.
Thats the main thing going into
the bye week, you want everybody
to be healthy and focusing on the
job they have to do.
The Raiders are also waiting to
get back starting cornerback
Shawntae Spencer, who has been
out since spraining his right foot
Sept. 16 at Miami. Oaklands other
starting cornerback, Ron Bartell,
broke his shoulder blade in the
opener and cant return until at least
Nov. 11 at Baltimore.
The injuries in the secondary
have played a role in Oaklands
struggles this season as the Raiders
have allowed opponents to com-
plete 71.5 percent of their passes
higher than any team has ever
allowed in a full season. Oakland
also has been unable to generate
any pass rush with just three sacks
as quarterbacks have been able to
get rid of the ball quickly to open
receivers.
Heyward-Bey back at practice for Raiders
Darrius
Heyward-Bey
said the Chicago Tribunes Dan
Pompei, who voted Arizona No. 1
for the second week in a row. Even
if a lot of the wins have been ugly,
they still count.
If the NFL conducted its coach
of the year balloting at the end of
September, Ken Whisenhunt would
be the slam-dunk choice, said the
Dallas Morning News Rick
Gosselin of the Cardinals coach.
New England was sixth, followed
by Green Bay with Philadelphia up
four places to eighth after its 19-17
win over the New York Giants, who
tumbled seven spots to 11th.
The Eagles are the NFLs shaki-
est 3-1 team with all three victories
coming by a combined total of four
points. No matter. Theyre still 3-1,
said Alex Marvez of Foxsports.com.
Winless New Orleans was 26th,
up a spot after its 28-27 loss to the
Packers.
Not even an impassioned speech
from Drew Brees at a midweek
team meeting was enough to get the
Saints in the win column, said Bob
Glauber of Newsday. Stunningly,
the seasons just about over after a
month.
Winless Cleveland was 32nd and
last for the second straight week.
Continued from page 11
RANK
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP)
Every week, 49ers tight end Vernon
Davis anxiously awaits the game
plan offensive coordinator Greg
Roman is conjuring up. For Davis,
Romans creativity has stood out
since his arrival as part of Jim
Harbaughs staff prior to last season.
Davis has been particularly
impressed by Romans acumen for
taking advantage of each individ-
uals strengths and nding ways to
keep everyone involved.
In the 49ers 34-0 win against the
New York Jets on Sunday, it was
backup quarterback Colin
Kaepernicks turn to show how he
can help the team. The 2011 second-
round pick made his rst appear-
ance on the teams second drive and
quickly made an impact by rushing
for 17 yards on a triple option out of
the shotgun.
Starter Alex Smith rotated back
in, but three plays later Kaepernick
entered again, this time to throw a
pass nearly 60 yards to Randy Moss
in the end zone.
The pass fell incomplete, but it
became clear Kaepernicks talent
warrants consideration for the
game plan each week and that
opposing defenses will have to
account for him.
This staff has always been cre-
ative, Davis said. Greg Roman,
hes one of the best at it, as far as
being an offensive coordinator. Hes
getting guys involved and at the end
of the day, thats what its about.
Roman waited until the 49ers
faced a third and 6 from the Jets 7-
yard line on their next drive to go
back to Kaepernick. He dialed up a
designed quarterback sweep and
Kaepernick went nearly untouched
into the end zone to give the 49ers
their rst points of the game.
At Nevada, Kaepernick ran the
pistol offense and became the rst
player in NCAA history to throw for
over 10,000 yards and rush for over
4,000. The 49ers showcased his
ability to run the read option during
the preseason, but until Sunday, his
lone regular-season highlight was a
17-yard draw that set up kicker
David Akers NFL-record tying 63-
yard eld goal in the season opener
against Green Bay.
Colins a very dynamic player,
Harbaugh said. A great team play-
er, too. Everybody wants to play and
feel a part of contributing to the
winning. But theres been no self-
serving, shameless self-promotion
by Colin, as hes been in this under-
study role, this backup role, to lobby
for packages or play time.
Harbaugh said Smith and
Kaepernick both rep the option
plays in practice but its clear
Kaepernick is more dangerous than
Smith with his feet.
With the game out of hand in the
fourth quarter, Kaepernick came
back for some mop-up duty, but still
found a way to make a positive
impression on his coaches. It
appeared his job would be to hand
off to Anthony Dixon and let the
time wind down, but on third and 4
following the two-minute warning,
Kaepernick took a bootleg 30 yards
and, despite a clear path to the end
zone, slid at the 3-yard line.
It wasnt a decision based on
sportsmanship, it was a conscious
decision to end the game. Two kneel
downs followed and the 49ers moved
to 3-1.
Thats one less kickoff we have to
cover, Kaepernick said. Thats one
less time we have to go out on
defense. We can end the game with
no more collisions or chance of
injury.
Harbaugh said the situation had
been discussed before the play, but
understood how it could have been a
difcult play to make considering the
nature of the game.
When youre out there running in
the open eld and the end zones
there right in front of you, thats still
up to the man, Harbaugh said.
How Roman and Harbaugh allow
Kaepernicks role to evolve remains
to be seen, but the potential has team-
mates and fans excited.
Im sure Greg Roman will contin-
ue to put him in and do some things
with him, Davis said. Hell have
his own little package, whatever he
can do to help the team win.
Kaepernick makes his way onto field in key moments
REUTERS
Colin Kaepernick celebrates his
touchdown during the 49ers 34-0
win over the New York Jets.
17
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
18
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES The Los Angeles
Dodgers were eliminated from playoff con-
tention, their wild-card hopes dashed Tuesday
night with a 4-3 loss to Barry Zito and the San
Francisco Giants.
The defeat left the Dodgers two games behind
St. Louis with only one game left in the regular
season. Los Angeles had won six in a row to stay
in the race for the second NL wild-card spot, but
Mark Ellis lined out to center eld with a runner
on second base to end it.
The defending World Series champion
Cardinals claimed the nal berth in this years
major league playoffs. St. Louis will be at
Atlanta on Friday in a one-game matchup to see
which team advances to the division round.
Zito won his seventh straight decision, Buster
Posey and Joaquin Arias homered and the NL
West champion Giants nished off their long-
time rivals.
The Dodgers knew early in their game that
Cincinnati had beaten St. Louis 3-1, opening the
door for them to remain in the chase. But they
couldnt capitalize, and will miss the playoffs for
the third straight season and rst under the clubs
new ownership, including Magic Johnson and
Mark Walter, who watched from their box.
Zito (15-8) continued his best stretch since
joining the Giants in 2007. Theyve won his last
11 outings as the left-hander has gone 7-0 for the
rst time since he won eight in a row with
Oakland from June 28-Aug. 4, 2005.
The former AL Cy Young winner allowed two
runs and six hits in six-plus innings, struck out
six and walked one to put himself in contention
for a start in the NL division series.
Sergio Romo got three outs in the ninth to earn
his 14th save in 15 chances after Jeremy Affeldt
gave up a leadoff single to Andre Ethier that had
Dodgers fans on their feet to end the game.
Pinch runner Dee Gordon stole second with two
outs on a close play, but Ellis hit a liner that cen-
ter elder Angel Pagan charged in to catch.
Giants eliminate Dodgers
The As will try to cap the comeback
Wednesday in game No. 162 when A.J. Grifn
(7-1) takes the mound against Ryan Dempster
(7-3). Only four teams have won a division or
pennant after trailing by at least 13 games.
The loser will go the postseason as one of
the two AL wild-card teams, needing to win a
one-game playoff with Baltimore or the New
York Yankees on Friday to advance to the divi-
sion series.
The Rangers, who had held sole possession
of the AL West lead since April 9, never
expected to be in that position. But now they
need one more victory to win their third
straight division title.
Its not easy to run to a title three times,
manager Ron Washington said before the
game. Its not easy at all. Its not easy
because so much can go wrong. Whats been
wrong for us weve been able to weather it.
They had been counting on Matt Harrison
(18-11) to wrap up the title but now need to
survive one more storm Wednesday to do it.
Harrison had been cruising along, retiring
10 straight batters before running into trouble
in the fth. Josh Donaldson led off with a sin-
gle and advanced to third on Brandon Moss
double. Norris then lined a single to right eld
that scored Donaldson with the tying run.
Third base coach Mike Gallego initially held
up Moss, but Cruz bobbled the ball for an
error that allowed Moss to score.
Oakland tacked on an insurance run when
Gomes hit his 18th homer with two outs in the
sixth to make it 3-1, delighting the crowd of
30,660.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
By John Marshall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX Oregon State was coming off
two losing seasons and there wasnt much
hope outside the program that it would get any
better this year.
The Beavers entered the season picked to
nish last in the Pac-12 North and there were
rumblings that affable coach Mike Rileys job
could be on the line if things didnt turn
around quickly.
Despite the seemingly dire prospects, Riley
liked his teams chances.
Of course, every coach heads into the sea-
son optimistic and many come away disap-
pointed once the games start.
Riley hasnt been.
Behind stellar sophomore quarterback Sean
Mannion, the 14th-ranked Beavers have been
one of the surprises of the college football sea-
son, tied with Oregon atop the Pac-12 North
after beating up-tempo Arizona over the
weekend.
The seasons are always a little bit of a mys-
tery, but coming off a 3-9 (in 2011), you real-
ly dont know what to expect, Riley said
Tuesday on the Pac-12 coaches teleconfer-
ence. The only thing I will say is this team
worked hard, right through the summer and
we had a real good fall camp. All the signs
were good. You just had to see what came out
of it.
Oregon States rise has been just a part of
what has been a jumbled start to the Pac-12
season.
Second-ranked Oregon has played about the
way everyone expected, rolling to ve victo-
ries, and the conference has six teams in the
Top 25, its most since 2002.
There also have been plenty of surprises
good and bad up and down the board.
Arizona State, playing under new coach
Todd Graham, is leading the Pac-12 North at
2-0.
Utah, a preseason pick to challenge
Southern California in the division, is 2-2,
with a loss to Utah State and the Sun Devils in
its Pac-12 opener.
The Trojans, ranked 13th, had their national
championship hopes dented by losing to
Stanford out of the conference gate. The
Cardinal then lost the next week to
Washington, which moved into the poll at No.
23.
California hasnt lived up to expectations, 1-
4 and winless in the Pac-12 after two games.
Arizona got off to a ying start under new
coach Rich Rodriguez, rolling to three impres-
sive wins. The Wildcats wilted once the con-
ference season started, giving up 87 combined
points in losses to the two Oregon schools.
We know were going to be in a lot of bat-
tles and were not at a point where we can play
poorly at any stretch of a game and hope to
win, Rodriguez said. But our guys are bat-
tling and theyre hanging in there.
Stanford has gone through the biggest
swing of momentum.
The Cardinal seemed to have no trouble
without quarterback Andrew Luck, the top
overall pick in the NFL draft, opening with
three straight victories. They made a state-
ment in the third one, manhandling then-No. 2
USC 21-14 to move into the top 10. Stanford
made another statement 12 days later, rushing
for just 65 yards while losing a 10-point lead
in a 17-13 loss to Washington that dropped
them to No. 18 in the poll.
We all learned a valuable lesson, which is
if we dont play our best football for 60 min-
utes, we can get beaten, Stanford coach
David Shaw said. Washington played well,
but at the same time we didnt play our best
football. Its not just about keeping it close so
we can win it at the end. Weve got to play our
best football for 60 minutes.
Oregon State has had no trouble doing that
despite a stop and start season.
The Beavers didnt open their season on
time, thanks to a hurricane that led to the post-
ponement of their opener with Nicholls State.
They had no trouble with the extra time,
knocking off then-No. 13 Wisconsin.
Pac-12 full of surprises so far
Giants 4, Dodgers 3
FOOD 19
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When I told my mother a end for
candied ginger that I was testing a
batch of these mufns, she said she
wished she could y right over and dig in.
Shes not the only one.
Theres just something about the com-
bination of sweet potatoes and sweet
spices that makes us happy. Every time
my grandmother Ruth made her signature
spice balls wonderfully chewy cookies
lled with every possible sweet spice
all the grandkids wafted into the kitchen
from miles away.
These mufns start with cooked sweet
potatoes, which not only provide great a-
vor and sugar, but also a tempting moist-
ness. Slowly baking sweet potatoes in the
oven intensies their sweetness. For expe-
diency, we chose to microwave them for
this recipe. But if youd rather do it the old
fashioned (and tastier) way, plan to bake
them for 1 to 1 1/2 hours at 400 F.
However you cook them, consider mak-
ing extra. You can freeze the pulp for
future batches of mufns. And I dont
bother to puree the potatoes; I just mash
them. It leaves the texture slightly and
pleasantly chunky.
By the way, if youre wondering about
the difference between sweet potatoes and
yams, dont expend much energy on it. In
the United States, just about anything
labeled a yam (or a sweet potato) is really
just a sweet potato. True yams, a staple of
the Caribbean diet, are rough-skinned,
starchy and not very sweet. The vegetable
we love at Thanksgiving and the right
potato for this recipe is the true sweet
potato.
Though there still are plenty of die-hard
devotees of white our, I have snuck some
whole-wheat our into this recipe because
it is a healthier choice. And the nished
mufns golden color will camouage the
whole-wheat our. As a practical matter,
when a baking recipe calls for white our,
you can almost always swap out half of it
for whole wheat with little effect on the
color, taste or texture of the nished prod-
uct.
Another important player in this recipe
is buttermilk, one of my favorite ingredi-
ents, especially for baking. I like butter-
milks creaminess and its tang. And, con-
trary to the impression by its luxurious
texture, its actually very low in fat.
Buttermilk is a great item to keep in the
fridge; you can use up any extra by adding
it to smoothies.
Finally, these bad boys are topped off
with some chopped, crystallized ginger
(also called candied ginger). But if for
some reason youre not a fan, you can top
these with the chopped nut of your choice.
Just dont tell my mother.
SWEET POTATO
BUTTERMILK MUFFINS WITH
CANDIED GINGER TOPPING
White whole-wheat our is available in
the baking aisle of most grocers. It has all
the nutrition of regular whole-wheat our,
but it is made from a different variety of
wheat that produces a our with a lighter
taste, texture and color.
Start to nish: 1 hour (30 minutes
active)
Servings: 12 mufns
3/4 to 1 pound sweet potatoes (2 small
or I medium)
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1 cup white whole-wheat our
1 cup all-purpose our
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, preferably freshly
ground
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, room temper-
ature
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
1 large egg
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger
Heat the oven to 400 F. Line a 12-cup
mufn pan with paper cupcake liners or
lightly spray the cups with cooking spray.
Prick the sweet potatoes several places
with a knife. Microwave on high (or on
the baked potato setting) until tender,
about 10 minutes. Let cool, then peel and,
in a medium bowl, mash with a fork. You
should have about 1 1/4 cups of mashed
sweet potato. Mix in the buttermilk, then
set aside.
Meanwhile, in a medium bowl stir
together both ours, the baking powder,
baking soda, salt, nutmeg and allspice.
In another medium bowl, combine the
butter and both sugars. Use an electric
mixer to beat until the mixture is light and
uffy, about 3 minutes. Using a spatula,
scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add
the egg and vanilla, then mix on medium
speed for about 1 minute, until thorough-
ly combined. Scrape down the sides of the
bowl.
Add half the our mixture and beat the
batter on low speed just until the mixture
is partly mixed. Add half the buttermilk-
sweet potato mixture and mix until com-
bined. Add the remaining dry ingredients
and mix until just combined, then mix in
the remaining buttermilk mixture.
Divide the batter among the prepared
mufn cups. Top it with the crystallized
ginger and bake on the middle rack of the
oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the tops
are golden and a toothpick inserted at the
center comes out clean. Remove the
mufns from the pan and tip on their sides
on a cooling rack; this prevents the bot-
toms from getting soggy. Let cool 10 min-
utes before serving. They are best eaten
while still hot.
Healthy muffin with a sweet side
These mufns start with cooked sweet potatoes, which not only provide great
avor and sugar, but also a tempting moistness.
CARDAMOM CRANBERRY PEAR CRISP
Start to nish: 1 hour 15 minutes (15 minutes active)
Servings: 8
For the topping:
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 cup all-purpose our
3/4 cup oats (see above)
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
For the lling:
8 pears, peeled, cored and sliced
8-ounce package frozen or fresh cranberries
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons cornstarch
Heat the oven to 400 F. Coat a 9-by-9-inch pan with cooking
spray.
To make the topping, in a medium bowl use an electric mixer
to beat together the butter and brown sugar until creamy. Add the
our, oats, cinnamon and salt. Stir together until the mixture just
forms moistened crumbs and small clumps. Set aside.
To make the lling, in a medium bowl, toss together the pears,
cranberries, brown sugar, cardamom, salt and cornstarch. Spread
the mixture evenly into the prepared pan. Sprinkle the topping
evenly over the lling. Bake for about 1 hour, or until the pears
are tender and bubbling and the topping is well browned.
Quick bites
FOOD 20
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: October 31, 2012
JACKS RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
M
mmm. Nothing says good
eats like soy residue. Except
that in Chinese cooking, it
really can. And you very likely have
enjoyed that soy residue, many times
and in many ways.
Im talking
about hoisin, a
classic ingredient
for sauces both
for dipping at the
table and basting
during cooking
in China. Hoisin is
a thick, dark red-
to-brown sauce
that blends sweet-
spicy-savory a-
vors, a prole not
all that different from ketchup.
It is made from the leftover mash of
fermented soy beans produced when
making traditional soy sauces. That
mash is combined with sugar, chilies,
garlic, vinegar, salt, sometimes ve-
spice powder and either our or corn-
starch (to thicken). Though hoisin is
widely used on grilled meats (as a bar-
becue sauce) and in dipping sauces, its
best known for a starring role in Peking
duck and moo shu pork.
The trick with hoisin is to use it spar-
ingly. Unlike ketchup (which I rmly
believe should be served by the gallon),
a little hoisin goes a long way.
To make a dipping sauce, thin a tea-
spoon or so with sesame oil and soy
sauce. Uncut, it can be brushed directly
onto meats for grilling.
Youll usually nd hoisin in glass jars
amongst the grocers other Asian ingre-
dients. Refrigerated after opening, it
should last months. For more ideas for
using hoisin, check out the Off the
Beaten Aisle column over on Food
Network: http://bit.ly/QTxLLa.
HOISIN TURKEY
MEATBALL GRINDERS
WITH SPICY TOMATO RELISH
Start to nish: 30 minutes
Servings: 4
1 egg
2 tablespoons nely chopped fresh
cilantro
2 scallions, nely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
Zest of 1 lime
1/4 cup hoisin
Salt
1 1/3 pounds ground turkey
3/4 cup panko (Japanese-style) bread-
crumbs
4 tablespoons butter, divided
2 plum tomatoes, diced
1/2 cup creme fraiche
1 teaspoon hot sauce
Four 6-inch sub rolls
Heat the oven to 425 F. Coat a baking
sheet with cooking spray.
In a large bowl, combine the egg,
cilantro, scallions, garlic, ginger, lime
zest, hoisin and 1/2 tablespoon salt.
Mix well. Add the turkey, then knead
well with your hands until evenly
mixed. Add the breadcrumbs and mix
again. Form the mixture into about 20
balls.
In a large skillet over medium-high,
melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. Add
half of the meatballs and brown on all
sides, about 5 minutes total. Transfer to
the prepared baking sheet, then repeat
with the remaining butter and meat-
balls.
Bake the meatballs for 7 to 8 min-
utes, or until cooked through and a ther-
mometer inserted at the center of a
meatball reads 165 F.
Meanwhile, in a small bowl mix the
tomatoes, creme fraiche, hot sauce and
1/2 teaspoon of salt. Spread a quarter of
the mixture down the center of each sub
roll. When the meatballs are done,
arrange 5 in each roll. Serve immediate-
ly.
Nutrition information per serving
(values are rounded to the nearest
whole number): 560 calories; 240 calo-
ries from fat (43 percent of total calo-
ries); 27 g fat (12 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 175 mg cholesterol; 44 g carbohy-
drate; 39 g protein; 3 g ber; 1,620 mg
sodium.
Massive flavor in a little bottle: A hoisinprimer
J.M. HIRSCH
The trick with hoisin is to use it sparingly.Unlike ketchup,a little
hoisin goes a long way.
FOOD 21
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


Open for Dinner
Wednesday to
Sunday
5PM to 9PM
Borel Shopping Center
59 Bovet Road San Mateo
650-525-1941
Now Serving
Fresh Homemade Pasta
with our Family Sauces.
Charlie The Meatball" Esposto
loves it, so will you!
By Mike Corder and Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
THE HAGUE, Netherlands Smoked
salmon tainted with salmonella has sickened
hundreds of people in the Netherlands,
authorities said, sparking major recalls there
and in the U.S.
U.S. health authorities say they are also
investigating whether the salmon could be at
the root of a multi-state outbreak of the ill-
ness.
The Netherlands National Institute for
Public Health and the Environment said the
salmon was traced to a Dutch company called
Foppen, which sells sh to many major super-
markets in the Netherlands and stores around
the world.
In the U.S. Foppen said it only supplied the
sh to CostCo Wholesale Corp. It did not
believe the contaminated sh was sold to any
other countries.
The Dutch public health institute said that
around 200 people and likely more have
been sickened in the Netherlands by a strain
of the bacteria called Salmonella Thompson.
A representative for the U.S. Centers for
Disease and Control Prevention, Lola Russell,
says the federal agency has 85 recorded cases
of the same strain from 27 states starting from
July 1. Without an outbreak, she said the aver-
age number of such cases over that time
would be about 30.
Weve investigating a possible link
between the cases in the U.S. and cases in the
Netherlands, Russell said.
That process entails state public health of-
cials interviewing patients to nd out what
they may have eaten before they got sick,
including the smoked salmon.
Russell said 10 people have been hospital-
ized, with no deaths.
Craig Wilson, vice president of food safety
at Costco, said the company immediately
pulled the smoked salmon from shelves after
receiving a call from Foppen late Monday.
CostCo also blocked sale of the salmon in
stores, meaning the products wont scan at
registers.
The smoked salmon was sold under the
Foppen name, as well as under Costcos store-
brand name, Kirkland. Wilson did not know
how much of the product was sold.
Customers who purchased the items will be
called by CostCo to notify them of the recall,
Wilson said. The calls will be followed up
with a letter.
Wilson said Costcos independent testing of
the smoked salmon hasnt yet turned up any
positive results for salmonella. He said the
company has not received any reports of ill-
nesses.
In the Netherlands Foppen estimated the
number of infections could rise.
Since the company set up a public informa-
tion phone line two days ago, de Vries said
about 1,400 people had called and around 350
of the callers reported symptoms consistent
with a salmonella infection.
Those infected by the salmonella bacteria
can suffer symptoms including fever, vomit-
ing and diarrhea.
Foppen, which processes fish in the
Netherlands and at a factory in Greece, is
investigating the cause of the outbreak.
The investigation into the cause is under
way and has been narrowed down to one pro-
duction line at one factory (in Greece), De
Vries said. We cant yet say what the cause
of the infection was.
Foppen has halted all production of smoked
salmon until the investigation is completed,
he added.
Smoked salmon blamed for salmonella outbreak
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adding coffee to coffeecake is a simple way
to take something great and make it even bet-
ter.
Because if you think conventional cof-
feecakes pair well with your favorite cup of
java, wait until you try a coffeecake spiked
with coffee. Still not enough jolt for you?
Head to the grocers coffee aisle and grab a jar
of instant espresso powder, then substitute
that for the instant coffee.
COFFEE COFFEECAKE
Start to nish: 1 hour (20 minutes active)
Servings: 12
For the topping:
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, room temperature
2 tablespoons sugar
Pinch salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup all-purpose our
For the cake:
2 tablespoons instant coffee granules
2 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room tem-
perature
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
2 cups all-purpose our
1 cup sour cream
Heat the oven to 350 F. Coat a 9-by-9-inch
baking pan with baking spray.
To make the topping, in a medium bowl use
an electric mixer to beat together the butter,
sugar, salt and vanilla until creamy. Add the
our and mix just until moist crumbs form.
Set aside in the refrigerator.
To prepare the cake, in a medium bowl mix
the coffee granules and water until dissolved.
Add the cinnamon, vanilla, butter, sugar, bak-
ing powder, baking soda and salt. Use an elec-
tric mixer to beat until uffy. Beat in the eggs,
one at a time, scraping the bowl between addi-
tions.
Stir in half the our followed by half the
sour cream, then the remaining our and sour
cream. Spread the batter evenly in the pre-
pared pan. Sprinkle the cake batter with the
topping. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes.
Let cool in the pan. Serve warm or at room
temperature.
Putting the coffee back in the coffeecake
Tainted smoked salmon has been sold under the Foppen name, as well as under Costcos
store-brand name, Kirkland.
DATEBOOK
22
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
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Homes Multi-Family Mixed-Use Commercial
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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3
Palo Alto Medical Foundation
(PAMF) CEO to Speak. Refreshments
5:30 p.m. Presentation 6 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. PAMF CEO
Dr. Richard Slavin to give presentation.
Free. RSVP by Oct. 1 by calling 508-
3501. For more information email
advevents@ndnu.edu.
Presidential Debate Watch Party.
San Mateo County Democratic
Headquarters, 650 El Camino Real,
Belmont. Join fellow Democrats in
cheering President Obama as he takes
on his Republican challenger in the
first of three debates. Free. For more
information contact
contact@sanmateodemocrats.org.
Marty Brounsteins presentation on
his book, Two Among the
Righteous Few: A Story of Courage
in the Holocaust. 6 p.m. dinner, 6:30
p.m. presentation. St. Bedes Episcopal
Church, 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo
Park. For more information or to RSVP
call 854-6555.
Presidential DebateViewing. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Lane Community Room,
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Free. For
more information call 558-7444 ext. 2
or visit burlingame.org/library.
Summit Preparatory Charter High
School and Everest Public High
School Open House. 7 pm. Summit
PreparatoryCharter High School, 890
Broadway, Redwood City. Come learn
about the both Summit and Everest
high schools as well as the admissions
process for each. For more
information visit summitprep.net.
Bluesmix at the Club Fox Blues Jam.
7 p.m. to 11 p.m. The Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5 at the
door. For more information visit
www.rwcbluesjam.com.
Salsa, Argentine Tango. 7:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City, Blvd., Suite G, Foster
City. 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. Salsa, 7:30 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Beginning Argentine Tango,
8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Intermediate
Argentine Tango, 9:30 p.m. to 10:30
p.m. Practica. For more information
visit boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
presents Purcells Dioclesian. 8 p.m.
to 10:30 p.m. The Center for
Performing Arts, Menlo-Atherton High
School, 555 Middlefield Road,
Atherton. Tickets start at $25 and can
be purchased by phone or in person.
For more information call (415) 392-
4400 or visit
philharmonia.org/oct2012/.
THURSDAY OCT. 4
Second Annual At the Movies
Fundraiser. Sparkys Hot Rod Garage,
975 Industrial Road, San Carlo`s. Alisa
Clancy of KCSM 91.1 FM will emcee
the event. There will be a movie trivia
contest, silent auction and more. The
fundraiser will benet Phase2Careers,
which provides a growing number of
services for workers over 40 years of
age. $40. For more information visit
phase2careers.org.
Eighth Annual Presentation Free
from Violence. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Gellert Clubhouse in Gellert Park, 50
Wembly Ave., Daly City. Free Education
Forum & Resource Fair: Survivor will
talk about abusive relationship and
what helped in healing. Free. For more
information call 872-2301.
San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors and S.M.C. Board of
Education present Candidate
Forums. 7 p.m. San Mateo Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Co-
sponsored by the San Mateo Library.
Free. For more information call 839-
8647.
Foxtrot, Bachata, Salsa. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551
Foster City, Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. 7
p.m. to 8 p.m. International Standard
Level II Foxtrot, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
International Standard Level I Foxtrot,
7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bachata, 8 p.m. to 9
p.m. Salsa. For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
The CreativeWriters Series at Notre
Dame de Namur University present
authors K.M. Soehnlein and
Catherine Brady. 7:30 p.m. Wiegand
Gallery, Notre Dame de Namur
University, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Both acclaimed authors will
read from their work. Free. For more
information call 508-3713.
The Little Dog Laughed. 8 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo
Alto. $25 general, $20 seniors and $16
students. For more information call
493-2006.
FRIDAY OCT. 5
Woodside International Horse
Trials. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Woodside
Horse Park, 3674 Sand Hill Road,
Woodside. Meet the riders and horses
and watch them compete in
Dressage, Cross Country Jumping
and Stadium Jumping. Free. For more
information visit
woodsideeventing.com.
Just Between Friends Childrens
and Maternity Consignment Sale. 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo County
Event Center (Fairgrounds), 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Shop for
new and gently-used childrens and
maternity items, usually far below
retail prices - often 50 percent to 90
percent off. $2 admission. $10
parking fee. For more information
visit www.jbfsale.com.
San Mateo County History
Museum continues its Free First
Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The old
Courthouse, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
call 299-0104.
Skyline College Welcomes Dr.
George Lakoff. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Building 6, Room 6202, Skyline
College, San Bruno. Lecture by Dr.
Lakoff on Cognitive and Neural
Linguistics. Free. To RSVP call 738-
4325.
A General Art and Sculpture Show.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Betty Weber Gallery,
S.S.F. Municipal Services Building, 33
Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco.
Free. For more information call 829-
3800 or visit ssf.net.
First Friday Flicks: The Pirates!
Band of Misfits. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Cha Cha, Tango Ballroom, Dance
Party. 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City,
Blvd., Suite G, Foster City. 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. For-beginners-only Cha Cha 2.
$10 at 8 p.m. for Tango lesson and
dance party. $5 at 9 p.m. for dance
only. For more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Chocolate Fest 2012. 7:30 p.m. to 10
p.m. Congregational Church of
Belmont, 751 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Taste the chocolate wares
of local candy/dessert makers, sip
champagne and listen to live jazz.
$25. Order tickets at
uccbelmont.org/events.html. For
more information call 593-4547.
The Little Dog Laughed. 8 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo
Alto. $25 general, $20 seniors and $16
students. For more information call
493-2006.
Broadway By the Bay Presents: A
Chorus Line. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Tickets
range from $37.50 to $57.50. To
purchase visit broadwaybythebay.org
or call 369-7770.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Commission nding to the City Council and
cleaned up some of the language in the ordi-
nance, Lim wrote.
The amendment to the citys ground-oor
retail requirements ordinance also dictates
what percentage of a storefront can be devot-
ed to retail uses and other uses. Smaller store-
fronts would be allowed to have up to 25 per-
cent committed to ofce use while larger
storefronts would be allowed to have up to 33
percent committed to ofce uses.
The city has recognized the changing needs
of retail and the shift to e-commerce,
Councilman Jack Matthews said about chang-
ing the retail requirements.
The change should encourage startups and
other businesses to locate downtown,
Matthews said.
We need to periodically review our zoning
requirements in our downtown area to be sure
we are creating the ingredients for a lively and
commercially viable area that adds to the
quality of life for all of our citizens,
Matthews wrote the Daily Journal in an email.
The Required Retail Frontage requirements
were rst established in 1986 that allowed for
a small percentage of the ground oor to be
devoted to any type of ofce use.
In 2000, however, the City Council adopted
an urgency ordinance prohibiting the estab-
lishment of any new ground oor ofces in
downtown during the dot-com boom.
Earlier this year, downtown property owner
Steve Musich requested a conditional-use per-
mit to allow startup SnapLogic to occupy
some ground-oor space at the Collective
Antiques building on Third Avenue.
But the Planning Commission denied the
request as did the City Council on an appeal.
Musich said that move would likely send
SnapLogic looking elsewhere to expand.
Musich has since sold the Collective
Antiques building to venture capitalist Tim
Draper, who started a university for entrepre-
neurs across the street at the old Benjamin
Franklin Hotel.
The councils response was inuenced in
part by the Downtown San Mateo Association,
San Mateo Area Chamber of Commerce and
local real estate brokers who urged for greater
flexibility downtown, Councilman Robert
Ross said.
The ordinance will need a second reading
within 30 days before the council can formal-
ly adopt it.
Commercial Realtor Clarke Funkhouser
supports the changes after previously telling
the Planning Commission that a property at
18-20 Third Ave. has been vacant for nearly
15 years. Relaxing the retail requirements
could help ll the space, he told the commis-
sion at its last meeting.
Yesterday, he told the Daily Journal that
relaxing the rules will be good for downtown
overall but that it is not a perfect x for
everyone.
The councils actions, Funkhouser said, will
benet larger buildings more than smaller
ones.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
RULES
2019. The state just released $40 million last
week in Proposition 1A bond money to kick-
start the project, estimated to cost about $1.5
billion when complete.
This is unprecedented growth in our sys-
tems history and highlights both the demand
for our services and the requirement that we
continue to grow and improve our system to
continue to be a vital part of the Peninsulas
transportation network, Chuck Harvey,
Caltrains deputy chief executive officer,
wrote the Daily Journal in an email.
Ridership has climbed 75 percent at
Caltrain since 2004 when it introduced its
baby bullet service.
Total farebox revenue for August was near-
ly $6 million, up from the $5.3 million in
August 2011.
For the year, total farebox revenue is up
14.4 percent from $10.3 million last year to
$11.8 million this year. The fiscal year start-
ed July 1.
Total ridership for the year is up 9.8 per-
cent and the average weekday ridership is up
8.9 percent. More than 2.6 million riders
have taken the train this year compared to the
2.4 million it carried last year at this time.
Shuttle ridership was also up in August by
23.5 percent and, for the year, the shuttle
numbers are up 22.1 percent compared to the
numbers last year, according to the staff
report.
More than 8,300 riders rode shuttles in
August compared to the 6,753 who rode
shuttles last year.
On-time performance for August also was
better than the numbers in 2011 at 93.3 per-
cent compared to 92.1 percent last year. For
the year, on-time performance is at 93.4 per-
cent compared to 91.9 percent last year.
Caltrain just added six trains to its week-
day schedule to accommodate the increase in
ridership.
We have made it clear that one of our top
priorities is the electrification of this corridor
to provide this region with faster, cleaner,
quieter Caltrain service but we will also be
looking for innovative ways to meet the
growing ridership demands between now and
2019, when modernization is completed,
Harvey wrote in the email.
In other JPB news, the board is expected to
approve a resolution of appreciation at its
next meeting for Richard Napier, the execu-
tive director at the City/County Association
of Governments. C/CAG deals with regional
transportation issues and works closely with
the San Mateo County Transportation
Authority on what local transportation proj-
ects to fund.
The Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers
Board meets 10 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 4,
Bacciocco Auditorium, second floor, 1250
San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
CALTRAIN
felony charges of burglary and attempted
possession of child pornography and four
misdemeanor counts each of child annoyance
and disorderly conduct involving loitering at
a rest room. Mrozek was in court on the pre-
viously filed charges of kidnapping, assault,
molestation, trespassing on school grounds,
child annoyance and offering alcohol to a
minor.
He put off a plea until Oct. 10 while he
attempts to retain defense attorney Dek
Ketchum.
Ketchum declined comment until after he
is officially attached to the case.
Mrozek was arrested a day after police say
Mrozek approached the girl at Parkside
Elementary School, offered vodka to two 12-
year-old boys and verbally harassed two girls
at Bayside STEM Academy and was escorted
off the Horrall Elementary School campus by
a suspicious administrator.
In the most serious case, prosecutors say
Mrozek groped the girl and covered her
mouth with his hand before carting her off
campus just before 2:45 p.m. Sept. 21. A
short distance away, the girl escaped by kick-
ing her attacker and running back to the
school where she reported the incident,
according to San Mateo police.
Mrozek has no similar criminal history but
Wagstaffe said there may be some other cir-
cumstances in play.
I wouldnt be surprised if there was some
mental health component but right now there
is nothing beyond the fact he is motivated by
a perverse sexual interest, he said.
He remains in custody without bail.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
CRIME
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Do your very best not to
disrupt anything that is presently running smoothly,
because you could be all thumbs and make matters
worse. Let your motto be: If it isnt broke, dont fx it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Youre asking for all
kinds of trouble if you deliberately play up to some-
one in order to make another person whom you dont
like jealous. Dont play games.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Only if you are
tenacious and consistent will success be within your
reach. However, the odds are against you if you try to
gamble your way to greener pastures.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Friends and associ-
ates arent likely to have any respect for your ideas
or opinions if they sense that you have little regard
for theirs. Be sure to keep an open mind and avoid
premature judgment.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Dont allow anybody
whos notorious for being unable to manage his or
her resources to handle your own. This error in judg-
ment could turn out to be very expensive.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Things you envision
can be brought into being, if you work at it. However,
this does not mean you could succeed teaming up
with another. Go it alone.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You wont mind going
out of your way to assist a friend. However, it will
really irk you if the recipient has a total lack of
acknowledgement and appreciation.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If your old standbys
arent available to do something fun with you, it
might be best to go it alone. Involvements with
substitutes arent likely to work out too well.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Once you successfully
have achieved something, let it go and move on to
something new. If you keep trying to improve it, you
could unravel your own accomplishment.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Your keen imagination
can be a very big plus, provided you remain positive
and channel it constructively. Once you start to think
negatively, it will be a different story.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Avoid any speculative in-
volvements, especially those that require you have to
dip into your savings in order to participate. Chances
are what starts out wrong will end up wrong.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- This might not be one of
your better days for decision-making, but what could
make it even worse is that the persons to whom you
go for counsel could be even more inept than you.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
10-3-12
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Iceberg
5 Negotiators proposal
10 Gives lodging
12 Hardly well-behaved
13 Part below Earths crust
14 Chicken soup ingredient
15 -- Khayyam
16 Arabian Nights bird
18 Mdse.
19 Lofty goals
22 Clear the wings
25 Does a double take
29 Maui hello
30 Discussion panel
32 Yearned
33 Crocketts last stand
34 Maintain
37 Gangplanks
38 Vitamin B component
40 Fan noise
43 Postal Creed word
44 Two tablets, maybe
48 Lipstick holders
50 They have pseudopods
52 Go by, as time
53 Kind of biology
54 Artists plaster
55 Latin I verb
DOWN
1 Fire extinguisher output
2 Moon goddess
3 Big birds
4 Electric swimmer
5 Name in Beatles history
6 Kermit, e.g.
7 Elmer of cartoons
8 Pipe bends
9 Deli bread
10 MD employer
11 Dried up
12 Cousins dad
17 Rowboat need
20 Muffe, as sound
21 Bwanas trip
22 Skip stones
23 Name in essays
24 Charged particle
26 Cooks sieves
27 Cable car
28 Drainage pit
31 Jan. and Feb.
35 Hair conditioner
36 Eastern principle
39 Study late
40 Festive log
41 Important decades
42 Venomous snakes
45 Kyoto sashes
46 Sound in the head
47 Wind dir.
48 Golf gadget
49 Paul Ankas -- Beso
51 West of She Done Him
Wrong
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE
GET fUZZY
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOW HIRING
Caregivers/CNAs
Experience working with individuals who have
Alzheimers or dementia strongly preferred.
We are currently offering a hiring bonus
for our Caregivers!
$250: $125 upon hire and $125 after 90 days.
Please apply in person at:
1301 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
BIKE MECHANICS WANTED.
Burlingame, (650)393-4303
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVER NEEDED for Assisted
Living facility located in South San
Francisco - 30-40 hours per week -
evenings, including weekends. Apply
in person to Westborough Royale, 89
Westborough Blvd, SSF, CA 94080.
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont
DRIVERS NEEDED!
Palo Alto & Redwood
Make Xtra money!!
Delivering phone books.
Must hv license,
transprtation w/ auto
Insurance. Call now!!
1-888-430-7944
www.deliveryofphonebooks.com
HIRING MASSEUSES!!
Need 2 Masseuses Now (Full or Part
Time). If you are interested, please visit
us at 2305A Carlos St., Moss Beach, CA
(alongside Hwy. 1 next to Post Office).
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by
regular mail to
800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING Cooks, Busboys & Serv-
ers - FT & PT, good pay (D.O.E.).
Apply in person: Neals Coffee Shop,
114 DeAnza Blvd., San Mateo, CA
(650)581-1754
129 Cemetery Plots
CEMETERY LOTS - Skylawn Memorial,
6 adjoining lots, retail at $7,600 each.
Asking for $6500 each. Located at
beautiful "Garden of Inspiration"
(415)525-9961
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515368
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Douglas Mark Brenner
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Douglas Mark Brenner filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Douglas Mark Brenner,
aka Douglas Mark McShane, aka Doug-
las M. Brenner
Proposed name: Douglas Mark McShane
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/05/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/05/2012
(Published, 09/12/12, 09/19/12,
09/26/12, 10/03/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252179
The following person is doing business
as: Law Center, 1660 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
Ste. 116, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Andrew M. Agtagma, A Law Corporation,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/12/2003.
/s/ Andrew M. Agtagma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252306
The following person is doing business
as: JJB Link Logistics Company Limited,
1200 Corporate Center Dr. Ste 350,
MONTEREY PARK, CA 91754 is hereby
registered by the following owner: James
J. Boyle & CO, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/09/2007
/s/ Greg Kodama /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515735
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
J. Susan Reece
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, J. Susan Reece filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: J. Susan Reece, aka
Susan Reece Tuttle, aka Susan R. Tut-
tle, aka Jo. Susan Reece, aka Susan Re-
ece Oziel, aka Susan Reece, aka J. Sus-
an Reece Oziel
Proposed name: Janet Susan Reece
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
14, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/25/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/25/2012
(Published, 09/26/12, 10/03/12,
10/10/12, 10/17/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252333
The following person is doing business
as:Express Yourself! Photo Booth Rent-
al, 250 S. B St. SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Margaret Kling 1393 Jenevein
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Margaret Kling /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515903
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Brittany Hope Arthur
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Brittany Hope Arthur filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Brittany Hope Arthur, aka
Brittany Arthur, aka Brittany H. Arthur
Proposed name: Chloe Hope Arthur
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
21, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/10/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2012
(Published, 09/26/12, 10/03/12,
10/10/12, 10/17/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252242
The following person is doing business
as: BN Jabba Consulting, 144 Oakdale
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Barbara N. Jabba, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2012.
/s/ Barbara N. Jabba /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251918
The following person is doing business
as: Twin Star Flowers, 2323 Flores St.,
#203, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Rox-
anne Baumann, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Roxanne Baumann /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
25 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS
Newspaper: San Mateo Daily Journal
Publication Date: October 3, 2012
Address: City of San Mateo
Neighborhood Improvement & Housing Division
330 W. 20th Ave, San Mateo, CA 94403
650-522-7220
On or about October 12, 2012 the City of San Mateo will submit a re-
quest to the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development for the release
of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds under Title 1 of
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, Public Law 93-
383, as amended; 42 U.S.C.-5301 et seq., to undertake the project
known as 2013 CDBG Sidewalk Improvements Project, for the pur-
pose of replacing sidewalks, curb cuts, and wheel chair ramps. The
cost for this work is expected to be approximately $225,000.00. This
project will be fully funded with CDBG funds. This project is located
within the eligible areas of North Shoreview, North Central, as well as
various designated CDBG Program Areas.
The proposed activity is in a floodplain for which an 8-Step decision-
making process was completed on May 4, 2009. An Environmental
Review Record (ERR) that documents the environmental determina-
tions for this project is on file at Neighborhood Improvement & Housing
Division office located at 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo, CA 94403
where ERR can be examined and/or copied weekdays 8:00 A.M. to
5:00 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS: Any individual, group, or agency may submit
written comments on the ERR to Chris Wahl, Neighborhood Improve-
ment & Housing Specialist, City of San Mateo, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo, CA 94403 or cwahl@cityofsanmateo.org. All comments re-
ceived by October 12, 2012 will be considered by the City of San Ma-
teo prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds.
ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION: The City of San Mateo certifies
to HUD that Sandra Council in her capacity as Neighborhood Improve-
ment & Housing Manager consents to accept the jurisdiction of the
Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in rela-
tion to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities
have been satisfied. HUD's approval of the certification satisfies its re-
sponsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows
the City of San Mateo to use Program funds.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS: HUD will accept objections
to Responsible Entitys (RE) Request for Release of Funds and envi-
ronmental certification for a period of fifteen days following the antici-
pated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is
later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification
was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of San Mateo; (b)
the City of San Mateo has omitted a step or failed to make a decision
or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58 or by CEQ
regulations at 40 CFR 1500-1508, as applicable; (c) the RE has omit-
ted one or more steps in the preparation, completion or publication of
the Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Study per 24
CFR Subparts E, F or G of Part 58, as applicable; (d) the grant recipi-
ent or other participant in the development process has committed
funds for or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 be-
fore release of funds and approval of the environmental certification;
(e) another Federal, State or local agency has submitted a written find-
ing that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environ-
mental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accord-
ance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec 58.76) and
shall be addressed to HUD, Community Planning & Development, U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development, San Francisco Re-
gional Office, 600 Harrison St., Third Floor, San Francisco, CA 94107-
1300. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last
day of the objection period.
Certifying Officer
Sandra Council, Acting Neighborhood Improvement & Housing Manag-
er
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252137
The following person is doing business
as: The Chateau, 1422 Bellevue Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 1422 Bel-
levue Avenue, LP, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 07/30/2012.
/s/ Carl Goldstone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252342
The following person is doing business
as: Mikes Garage Sales, 525 5th Ave,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Michael
Joseph Hutton, same adress. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Michael Joseph Hutton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252334
The following person is doing business
as: Pita Gyros, 44 Hilsdale Mall, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Feti Karadogan,
4333 Beresford St. Apt. 5, SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Feti Karadogan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252202
The following person is doing business
as: Pomdoro, 1530 Edinburgh St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Sarah OConnell,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Sarah OConnell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252287
The following person is doing business
as: Dreams Cosmetics, 130 Produce
Ave., Ste. F, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Empire Enterprise Corp,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Geoffrey Au /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252252
The following person is doing business
as: Bertos Garden Maintenance, 915 S.
Claremont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Julia Heredia-Faustor, 231 Victo-
ria Rd., Burlingame, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Julia Heredia-Faustor /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251959
The following person is doing business
as: WRB Rapid Services, 2000 Crystal
Springs Rd., #2614, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Gary Mirzoyev, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/22/2012.
/s/ Gary Mirzoyev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252434
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Baywide Limousine, 7800 El
Camino Real, #3113, COLMA, CA 94014
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Daniel N. Yambao, Sr. & Elsa M.
Yambao, same address. The business is
conducted by Husband & Wife. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Elsa M. Yambao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/26/12, 10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252271
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bad Juju Productions, 1292
Edgewood Way, SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Jason Krams &
Jacqueline Corbiere, same address. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jason Krams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252298
The following person is doing business
as: Cargo Alliance Service, 1071 Sneath
Lane, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Profes
NWFS, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/21/2007.
/s/ Yeau Myung Yoon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252292
The following person is doing business
as: New World Freight System, 1071
Sneath Lane, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Profes NWFS, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/21/2007.
/s/ Yeau Myung Yoon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252509
The following person is doing business
as: DLM Resources, 333 Hickey Blvd.,
Suite 301, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Diane L. Seguine, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Diane L. Seguine /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252155
The following person is doing business
as: G. Rabbitt Design, 400 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., #106, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gregory Rabbitt, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Gregory Rabbitt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252517
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Phlow Engineering, 130 Gra-
mercy Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Mary Pham & Keith Low, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Keith Low /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252549
The following person is doing business
as: CMO Advisory, 392 Greenoaks
Drive, MENLO PARK, CA 94027 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Anne-Flore Goldsberry, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Anne-Flore Goldsberry /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252490
The following person is doing business
as: Stearns Home Loans, 205 Rockaway
Beach, Suite 3, Pacifica, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Stearns Lending, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/14/2012.
/s/ Katherine T. Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252491
The following person is doing business
as: Stearns Home Loans, 1818 Gilbreth
Road, #150, Burlingame, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Stearns Lending, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/14/2012.
/s/ Katherine T. Le /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/03/12, 10/10/12, 10/17/12, 10/24/12).
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV511223
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): BRUCE E. ROBINSON
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): PRIDE ACQUISITIONS LLC
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Michael W. Reich, Esq. #268525
Baker, Sanders, Barshay, Grossman,
Fass, Muhlstock & Neuwirth, LLC
4300 Redwood Highway, Ste. 100
San Rafael, CA
(877)741-7370
Date: (Fecha) January 20, 2012
203 Public Notices
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 12, 19, 26, October 3, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ FOUND!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NHL SPORTS Figures, (20) new, un-
used, original packaging, collectible su-
perstars, Gretzki, Messier, more, OK
sold separately, $100 obo, (650)578-
9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, $30., (650)365-3987
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RARE BASEBALL CARDS- Five Non-
Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball Cards
(Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst, Mitchell,
Hegan), SOLD!
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From 70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)375-8044
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
26
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BANK OWNED HOMES
Free list with Photos & Maps
of Bank Foreclosures
www.PeninsulaDistressHomes.com
Get a Fantastic Deal on a Home
or
Free recorded message
(866) 262-8796, ID# 2042
ACROSS
1 Hunger hint
5 Shorn shes
9 Indonesian island
13 Pinza of South
Pacific
14 Pulsate
16 Yaks, e.g.
17 Endures an
onslaught of
criticism
20 Prognosticator
21 RR terminus
22 Center opening?
23 Aus. setting
24 Puts the kibosh
on
26 Kind of contact
banned by the
NFL
32 Golden Bears
school, familiarly
33 Joanie Loves
Chachi co-star
34 Like James Bond
35 Carpeting
computation
37 Cyclist
Armstrong, or
what completes
the ensemble
found in the four
long across
answers
40 It may be impish
41 24-hr. news
source
43 If __ a nickel ...
45 Category
46 Use a sun visor,
say
50 Currently
occupied with
51 She, in Lisbon
52 Justice Dept.
bureau
55 Greeting card
figure, maybe
56 Pacific Surfliner
and Acela
60 Vulnerable spot
63 Muslim pilgrim
64 Passover month
65 Melville South
Seas novel
66 Candy bar with a
cookie center
67 More than just
hard to find
68 Stir-fry cookware
DOWN
1 Cops quarry
2 Cte d__: French
resort area
3 Padres boy
4 Mass reading
5 Unworldly
6 Spark, as an
appetite
7 Unit of energy
8 Such that one may
9 Put (down) on
paper
10 Car bar
11 Prezs backup
12 Opponent
15 __! that deep
romantic chasm
...: Coleridge
18 Hitchhikers aid
19 Neck parts
24 Lining with
decorative rock
25 Slimy garden pest
26 Severe
27 Nicholas Gage
memoir
28 Mexican aunt
29 Antarcticas __
Byrd Land
30 Pandoras boxful
31 Six-mile-plus run,
briefly
32 Rotating machine
parts
36 In the sack
38 Activist Guevara
39 Nonowners
property right
42 Commonly long
garment
44 __ blues:
Mississippi genre
47 Eat up!
48 Frequent final
soccer score
49 Peter who co-
wrote Puff, the
Magic Dragon
52 Berliners eight
53 Leave out of the
freezer
54 Pacific
archipelago
56 Triumphant
cries
57 Magazine filler
58 Eccentric sort
59 Bway hit signs
61 Veto
62 General linked
with chicken
By Michael Dewey
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
10/03/12
10/03/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
SOLD!
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NIGHT STANDS - $20., obo, SOLD!
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new, SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
NIGHT STANDS - $35., SOLD!
304 Furniture
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CALIFORNIA KING Sleep Number Bed
like new, with Frame, $400,
(650)347-7188
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh, SOLD!
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
304 Furniture
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 SOLD!
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)857-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
304 Furniture
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
AS NEW Bar-B-Q electric outdoor/in-
door, easy clean, no scrubbing./brushing,
as new, $15., 650-595-3933
AUTO WINE OPENER - mint condition,
one-touch, rechargeable, adapter, foil
cutter, built-in light, easy open, great gift,
$12.00, (650)578-9208
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25.,SOLD!
COFFEE MAKER- Gevalia Connaissuar
ten cup. white, filters included, makes
great coffee, $9., 650-595-3933
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RIVAL "CUTABOVE": Small task quik-
food chopper, electric, under cabinet
model; includes beverage mixer attach-
ment, $ 20., 650-375-8044
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
WAXER & polisher, Chamberlain Was-
master 900. Never used. In box. $45.
San Mateo (650)341-5347
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
LORUS WATCH- date, sweep second
hand, new battery, stainless steel adjust-
able band, perfect, $19., 650-595-3933
308 Tools
71/" WORM saw $80 (650)521-3542
BANDSAW CRAFTMENS - hardly used
$80. obo, 650 345-7352
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN 3X20 1 BELT SANDER -
with extra belts, $35., (650)521-3542
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)857-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRILL PRESS -Craftmens, works great
$85., obo, (650) 345-7352
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
RYOBI TRIM ROUTER - with butt tem-
plate, $40., (650)521-3542
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100., SOLD!
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60., SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, SOLD!
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
310 Misc. For Sale
AUTHENTIC ITALIAN book, hard cover,
unopened, recipes, menus picture by re-
gions shown, great gift $10.00, (650)578-
9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLANKET- Double bed size, dusty rose,
satin bindings, warm, like new, washa-
ble. $8., 650-375-8044
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, SOLD!
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HALLOWEEN DECORATIONS Pump-
kins, Lights, Large spiders, ect. all for
$20 D.C. (650)755-9833
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARMON/KANDON SPEAKERS (2)
mint condition, work great for small of-
fice/room, extra speakers, 4 1/2 in. high,
includes cords. $8.00, (650)578-9208
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEADER shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle
$20., SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40
SOLD!
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
SOLD!
ROCKING HORSE- solid hardwood,
mane, tail, ears, eyes, perfect condition
for child/grandchild, $39., 650-595-3933
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
27 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOMTOM GPS- every U.S./Canadian
address, car/home chargers, manual,
in factory carton, $59., 650-595-3933
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, $15., 650-375-8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE Bongo's $65.,
(650)348-6428
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2 L x 27 W x 30 like new, $95. firm,
SSF, SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
316 Clothes
COWBOY SHIRTS - pearl snaps, pock-
ets, XL/XXL, perfect $15 each, cowboy
boots, 9D, black, $45., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HALLOWEEN COSTUME "Little miss
Muffet" outfit with blonde braided wig
never warn Fredrick of Hollywood $35
D.C. (650)755-9833
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 1950's Poodle
skirt Black & Pink from Fredrick of Holly-
wood $35 D.C. (650)755-9833
HALLOWEEN COSTUME Tony Martin
size 40 warn only once from Selix $25
D.C (650)755-9833
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PLYWOOD - good plywood, 4x8, various
sizes, 1/4to 3/4, SOLD!
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)375-8044
318 Sports Equipment
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHING EQUPMENT 3 rods with reels,
2 Tackle boxes full fo supplies, $100 all,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
SHIMANO 4500 8 runner real with 6'
white rhino fishing pole (650)521-3542
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
BURLINGAME
1517 Cypress Ave.
(x-st. El Camino)
Saturday
October 6th
9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Antiques, old silver,
chairs, blue/white
plates, Mexican pots,
toys, Christmas items,
furniture & much more!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
WEED WHACKER-STIHL FS45 curved
bar, never used, $85.,obo,
(650)345-7352
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
620 Automobiles
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
INFINITI Q45 94 - Black, lots of extras,
$3500. obo, Annie (650)740-1743
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE LTD - 94K
miles, 4 wheel Drive, $6,500, or obo
(650)591-0063
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
FORD 97 Arrowstar Van XLT - 130K
miles, $3500. obo, (650)851-0878
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, 3700 miles, extras, $8,500.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, SOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
317 Building Materials
Cabinetry
Contractors
NORTH HOMES
Additions, Baths, Kitchens,
Driveways, and Decks.
(650)232-1193
www.northhomes.biz
Lic.# 97583
Contractors Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Construction
28
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, Roofing.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Hauling
Landscaping
EXOTIC GARDENS
Sod Lawns, Sprinklers,
Planting, Lighting, Mason
Work, Retaining Walls,
Drainage
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Painting
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING
Top Attorney With Masters
In Tax Law Offers Reduced
Fees For New October Clients.
(650)342-3777
Ira Harris Zelnigher, Esq.
(Ira Harris)
1840 Gateway Dr., Ste. 200
San Mateo
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
29 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Bookkeeping
TAX PREPARATION
Book Keeping
No Job Too Small
Lorentz Wigby, CPA
(650)579-2692
Larry@wigby-CPA.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
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LOCAL/WORLD 30 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
During a sit-down in the Daily Journal ofce,
Groom along with current Controller Bob
Adler, County Manager John Maltbie and
Lisa Conrad, president of the southern San
Mateo County League of Women Voters,
shared why they think county residents will be
better served with the change.
If approved, a controller will be named for
up to two six-year terms, which gives county
ofcials the responsibility of choosing but
voters the reassurance the appointment isnt
indenite. The limited span tells the position
holder to be proactive, Groom said.
Youre not going to be there forever so if
there are things to be done, get them done,
Groom said.
Maltbie isnt worried the term limit will
give qualied candidates pause, concluding
that anyone worth being named is likely mid-
career or moving toward retirement.
The switch would also add San Mateo
County to nine of 58 other counties with
appointed controllers. Of those, six have con-
solidated departments of nance including the
controller, treasurer and tax collector and
nearly all have switched fairly recently.
Currently, state law holds that the controller
must meet at least one of several criteria: be a
certied public accountant; hold a baccalaure-
ate degree in accounting or its equivalent and
not less than three years experience within the
last ve years in a senior management posi-
tion in a public agency, private rm or non-
prot organization.
The proposed change to appointment would
exceed the minimum qualications by adding
that being designated a professional internal
auditor and/or experience as a county auditor
would not be sufcient. The supervisorial sub-
committee that brought forward the change
also recommended candidates have knowl-
edge of public administration principles and
practices, budgeting, scal administration and
effective personal administration, employee
relations and management in a public setting.
The charter change would allow the county
manager to select a candidate for considera-
tion with nal approval by the Board of
Supervisors. The controller would be an at-
will employee who can be removed without
cause or a public hearing as long as it comes
with a county managers recommendation and
a four-fths vote of the board.
The Board of Supervisors began looking at
the possibility of changing the ofce after
naming assistant controller Adler to the vacant
position left by former controller Tom
Huenings mid-term resignation. In 2010, a
17-person Charter Review Committee recom-
mended making both the controller and treas-
urer-tax collector appointed jobs but county
supervisors unanimously rejected the idea.
The League of Women Voters has backed
the controller as appointed position for more
than 40 years, Conrad said.
Naysayers may worry that a lack of election
leaves the county without an independent
overseer but Maltbie ticked off the civil grand
jury as one example of another entity serving
a watchdog function.
The controller is not the only set of eyes
and ears, he said.
The proposed charter amendment could be
just the rst step toward other changes in the
countys scal management. Once current
Treasurer-Tax Collector Sandie Arnott is done
with ofce, Maltbie and Groom said the coun-
ty may look at further consolidation into
something equating a chief nancial ofcer
position. Doing so isnt out of the ordinary,
Adler said.
Government is trying to become more and
more like business, he said.
Continued from page 1
MEASURE C
Popes butler pleads
innocent to theft charge
VATICAN CITY Pope Benedict XVIs
onetime butler declared Tuesday he was inno-
cent of a charge of aggravated theft of the
popes private correspondence, but acknowl-
edged he photocopied the papers and said he
feels guilty that he betrayed the trust of the
pontiff he loves like a father.
Paolo Gabriele took the stand Tuesday in a
Vatican courtroom to defend himself against
accusations of his role in one of the most dam-
aging scandals of Benedicts pontificate.
Prosecutors say Gabriele stole the popes let-
ters and documents alleging power struggles
and corruption inside the Vatican and leaked
them to a journalist in an unprecedented papal
security breach.
Gabriele faces four years in prison if he is
found guilty, although most Vatican watchers
expect he will receive a papal pardon if he is
convicted.
During Tuesdays hearing, Gabrieles attor-
ney complained that her client spent his rst
20 days in Vatican detention in a room so
small he couldnt stretch his arms out and
with lights kept on 24 hours a day.
Around the world
WORLD 31
Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Elizabeth A. Kennedy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT An American free-
lance journalist who has been miss-
ing in Syria since mid-August has
been shown in a video clip posted
online, blindfolded and saying Oh,
Jesus in a frightened voice in the
custody of armed men.
The video, which came to light
Monday, was the rst sign of Austin
Tices condition since he disap-
peared more than seven weeks ago.
Tice, a 31-year-old former Marine,
had been reporting on Syrias civil
war for The Washington Post,
McClatchy Newspapers and others.
The Tice family conrmed to sev-
eral media outlets that their son
appears in the video.
In the 47-second clip, Tice tries to
recite the Muslim declaration of
faith, or shahada, but then switches
to English and says, Oh Jesus. Oh
Jesus and rests
his head on a
captors arm.
T h e
Associated Press
could not inde-
pendently con-
rm the origin or
the content of the
video clip.
Although the
footage shows a
group of captors dressed like Islamic
extremists and shouting God is
Great, the clip lacks the customary
appearance of jihadist videos.
The discrepancies have raised
concerns that the video was staged
to make it appear Tice was being
held by extremists. Previous reports
have indicated that Tice is in gov-
ernment custody, although President
Bashar Assads regime has not
acknowledged holding him.
In the weeks after Tice went miss-
ing, the Czech government which
represents American interests in
Syria said it had information that
Tice was in Syrian government cus-
tody but had yet to get conrmation
from Syrian authorities.
The video was posted online Sept.
26, but it went unnoticed until
Monday when a pro-government
Facebook page called the Media
Channel for Assads Syria posted it
with a caption that reads: To those
who accuse the Syrian army,
American journalist Austin Tice is in
the hands of al-Nusra Front and al-
Qaida gangs in Syria.
Jabhat al-Nusra, or Victory Front,
and other extremist groups release
videos that are clearly labeled with
logos and have a higher production
value, unlike the shaky and amateur-
ish footage in which Tice is seen.
Extremist videos usually are
released on jihadist websites, not on
YouTube by unknown users.
Video shows U.S. journalist held in Syria
Austin Tice
REUTERS
Residents protest against Syrias President Bashar al-Assad in Sermada
near Idlib.
32 Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL