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Vision

.an educated and enlightened society of gyalyong gakid


pelzom at peace with itself, at peace with the world, built
and sustained by the idealism and the creative enterprise of our
citizens.

Mission of the Ministry of Education


1.

To formulate sound policies governing all levels of learning to guide the educational destiny
of the nation as it aspires to become a knowledge society worthy of our vision and our heritage,
both as a means as well as an end;

2.

To build a broadly liberal, culturally sensitive, forward-looking, standard based education


system that combines the best of received wisdom of successive generations and the results of
innovation and enterprise in the diverse fields of human endeavour;

3.

To create the necessary learning space and opportunities to engage the genius and potentials
of all the children and youth of the country in keeping with provisions of the Constitution of
the Kingdom of Bhutan, and to realize our pledge of green schools for green Bhutan;

4.

To prepare our young men and women with the right values and skills, usefulness and gracefulness, to meet the ever-growing needs of a developing country against the backdrop of a fast
globalizing world;

5.

To build a cadre of highly motivated and competent educators who are endowed with an
abiding love of children, a deep love of learning, and who passionately value education as a
positive instrument of empowerment;

6.

To promote a system of continuous and life-long learning though formal, non-formal as well
as informal modes to enable our citizens to participate meaningfully and constructively in the
life of the society;

7.

To enable the participation of private individuals and institutions -both from within Bhutan
and beyond- to build model seats of learning and to inspire excellence

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

We would like to take this opportunity to thank Honble Secretary and the Management
Committee of the MoE for their valuable inputs in improving the Annual Education Statistics
report.

ANNUAL EDUCATION STATISTICS, 2012

Published by:
Policy and Planning Division
Ministry of Education
Royal Government of Bhutan
Telephone:

+975-2-334307

Fax:

+975-2-325183

We would like to thank all the Principals and teachers of the schools, who were the main
contributors providing the required school data, and the Dzongkhag Education Officers, who
helped to ensure that the data provided were accurate and timely.

Email: dechenzam@education.gov.bt

sangaychoden@education.gov.bt
Website: www.education.gov.bt

Copyright 2012 Policy and Planning Division, Ministry of Education


All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form
without prior permission from the Policy and Planning Division, Ministry of
Education.

First Edition

The Policy and Planning Division, MoE is greatly indebted to the National Statistics Bureau,
MoLHR, MoF, RUB, MoA, Dratshang Lhentshog, WFP and also the Departments and Divisions
within the Ministry, for their support in bringing out this report. This support has enabled the
publication of increasingly more relevant, accurate and timely information on education in
Bhutan.

1988

Twenty fourth Edition :

2012

Lastly we would like to congratulate and thank our ICT team for enabling the automation
of education statistics through the Education Management Information System which has
become fully functional. We hope that the institution of the EMIS and new system of reporting
information will make it easier and more convenient for all stakeholders and especially the
schools who are ultimately responsible for ensuring that accurate and timely data is reported.
We also solicit our readers valuable comments and suggestions to help improve our AES in
the future.

Policy and Planning Division


Ministry of Education
Thimphu, Bhutan

Annual Education Statistics

Page

III

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT................................................................................................ III
TABLE OF CONTENTS.................................................................................................. IV-VI
LIST OF FIGURES.......................................................................................................... VII
LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................ VIII-IX
ACRONYMS, ABBREVIATIONS AND GLOSSARY.......................................................X-XII
SUMMARY OF EDUCATION STATISTICS 2012...........................................................1
Figure 1a: Summary of schools, institutes and centres...........................................1
Figure 1b: Summary of students, learners, trainees and novitiates........................2
Figure 1c: Summary of teachers, lecturers, instructors, trainers & caregivers.......3

AT A GLANCE......................................................................................................... 4-5
Table I: Education Indicators at a glance................................................................. 6
Table II: EFA Indicators............................................................................................ 6-7
Table III: MDG Indicators ........................................................................................ 7
Table IV: OTHER Indicators...................................................................................... 7-8
Figure IIIa: Number of schools and ECRs by dzongkhag and level..........................8
Figure IIIb: Number of private schools by dzongkhag and level.............................9
Figure IIIc: Number of students by dzongkhag and level........................................9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................ 10-12
1. OVERVIEW OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM........................................................ 13-18
1.1. The modern education system......................................................................... 13

1.1.1. General education structure................................................................ 15
1.1.2. Schools in General Education............................................................... 16
1.3 General Education Curriculum.......................................................................... 16
1.4 Education Administration.................................................................................. 18
2. PRE-PRIMARY AND PRIMARY EDUCATION..................................................... 19-30
2.1. Early Childhood Care and Development..........................................................19
2.2. Extended Classrooms....................................................................................... 20
2.3. Pre-Primary and Primary Education................................................................. 21
2.4. Primary Net and Gross Enrolment Ratio (GPER and NPER...............................24
2.4.1. Net Attendance Ratio........................................................................... 25
2.4.2. Adjusted Net primary enrolment Ratio (ANPER...................................28
3. SECONDARY EDUCATION (VII-XII...................................................................... 31-34
3.1 Lower and Middle Secondary Education (VII-X.................................................31
3.2 Higher Secondary Education (XI-XII................................................................... 32

Page

IV

Annual Education Statistics

4. TERTIARY AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION....................................................... 35-37


4.1 Vocational education........................................................................................ 35
4.2 Tertiary education............................................................................................. 35
4.3 Tertiary Students Abroad.................................................................................. 36
5. NON-FORMAL, CONTINUING AND SPECIAL EDUCATION.............................. 38-39
5.1 Non Formal Education....................................................................................... 38
5.2 Continuing Education........................................................................................ 40
6. MONASTIC EDUCATION.................................................................................. 41-42
6.1 Monastic Education........................................................................................... 41
6.2 Sanskrit Patshala............................................................................................... 42
7. SPECIAL EDUCATION....................................................................................... 43-44
7.1 Special Education.............................................................................................. 43
8.


GIRLS ENROLMENT.......................................................................................... 45-50


8.1 Current Situation of Girls participation in education........................................45
8.2 Girls participation in education by Dzongkhags................................................47
8.3. Girls enrolment in HSS and tertiary education................................................49
8.4. Gender Parity Index........................................................................................ 50

9. TEACHERS........................................................................................................ 51-55
9.1 Teacher strength............................................................................................... 51
9.1.1 Proportion of Non-Bhutanese Teachers................................................52
9.2 Teacher education............................................................................................. 52

9.2.1 Pre-service training............................................................................... 52

9.2.2 In-Service training................................................................................. 53
9.3 Academic profile of teachers............................................................................ 55
10. QUALITY INDICATORS..................................................................................... 56-61

10.1 Student-Teacher Ratio..................................................................................... 56


10.2 Class size......................................................................................................... 61

11. EXAMINATION RESULTS AND EFFICIENCY INDICATORS............................... 63-70


11.1 Efficiency Indicators........................................................................................ 63
11.1.1 Promotees, Repeaters and Drop-outs.................................................63
11.1.2 Fast Track promotion of over-aged students......................................66
11.2 Completion rate.............................................................................................. 67
11.3 Trend in Survival rates..................................................................................... 68
11.4 Internal efficiency measures........................................................................... 68
11.5 Examination Results........................................................................................ 71
11.5.1 Class X Examination............................................................................ 71
11.5.2 Class XII Examination.......................................................................... 72

Annual Education Statistics

Page

LIST OF FIGURES

12. SCHOOL FEEDING................................................................................. 73-74


12.1 School Feeding Programme............................................................................ 73

13. EDUCATION FACILITIES................................................................................... 74-81


13.1 The Water facilities in Schools........................................................................ 74
13.2 Provision of classrooms, laboratories and computers in schools....................76

13.2.1. Laboratories in schools...................................................................... 77

13.2.2. Computers in schools......................................................................... 78
13.3 Electricity, telephone and internet connectivity...........................................79
13.4 Road accessibility......................................................................................... 80

Figure Ia: Summary of Schools, Institutes and Centres......................................................... 1


Figure Ib: Summary of Students, Learners, Trainees and Novitiates..................................... 2
Figure Ic: Summary of Teachers, Lecturers, Instructors, Trainers & Caregiver...................... 3
Figure 1.1 Growth in the number of Schools and Institutes.................................................. 13
Figure 1.2 Growth in the number of enrolments in Schools and Institutes.......................... 14
Figure 1.3 General education structure................................................................................. 15
Figure 1.4 General Education curriculum PP-XII.................................................................... 17

14. BUDGETS AND EXPENDITURES ON EDUCATION............................................ 82-89


14.1 Free services and sharing of costs................................................................. 82
14.2 Annual budget............................................................................................... 82
14.3 Per head costs................................................................................................ 88

Figure 2.1 Pre-primary enrolments by age, March 2012....................................................... 22


Figure 2.2 Primary enrolment, NER....................................................................................... 27
Figure 2.3 Net enrolment ratios since 1998.......................................................................... 27
Figure 2.4 Division of primary aged Children (6-12 yrs......................................................... 29

ADDITIONAL STATISTICAL TABLES........................................................................ 89

Figure 3.1 Enrolment trend in class XI and XII since 2004..................................................... 32


Figure 3.2 Divisions of streams in the Public and Private Higher Secondary School............. 34

ANNEXURES.......................................................................................................... 103
Annex 1. New and Upgraded schools in Bhutan in 2012........................................104
Annex 2. Comparative enrolment........................................................................... 106
Annex 3. Comparative dropouts and repeaters......................................................107
Annex 4. Organization of the MoE Headquarters...................................................108-110

Annex 4.1 Organizational Structure, Ministry of Education...........................109

Annex 4.2 Headquarter staff details, 2012....................................................106
Annex 5. WFP Beneficiaries and Boarders, 2012....................................................111-115
Annex 6. Enrolment details by Dzongkhag, Category and Level.............................116-151
Annex 6.1 Enrolment in Continuing Education Program and NIVI, 2012................152-153

Figure 8.1 Girls participation in the Public Secondary Education since 2003........................ 46
Figure 9.1 Proportion of Bhutanese and non Bhutanese teachers (2002-2012.................... 52
Figure 10.1 Teacher-pupil ratio by Dzongkhag below and above mean................................ 57
Figure 10.2 Student-Teacher Ratio by Dzongkhag above and below 24................................ 58
Figure 10.3 Division of Student-teacher ratio........................................................................ 59
Figure 11.1 Repetition and dropout rate for class PP-X since 2002....................................... 64
Figure 11.2 Repetition and dropout rate by class.................................................................. 64
Figure 11.3 Primary repetition and dropout rate by class and gender.................................. 65
Figure 11.4 Primary enrolment (PP-VI................................................................................... 66
Figure 11.5 Primary and basic completion rates since 2006................................................. 67
Figure 11.6 Survival to the grade V and X............................................................................. 68
Figure 11.7 Class X passed trend since 2000......................................................................... 71
Figure 11.8 Class X detailed result......................................................................................... 72
Figure 11.9 Class XII passes trend since 2002........................................................................ 72
Figure 13.1 Total student per class........................................................................................ 77

Page

VI

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

VII

LIST OF TABLES
Table 2.1 Gross or Apparent Intake Ratio (AIR) 2006-2012.......................................................... 21
Table 2.2 New admissions in PP 2002-2012................................................................................. 23
Table 2.3: Enrolment in Primary Education, 2002-2012............................................................... 23
Table 2.4 Primary enrolment by age............................................................................................. 24
Table 2.5 Enrolment Ratios since 2006......................................................................................... 24
Table 2.6 Net attendance ratio by Dzongkhag, BMIS 2010........................................................... 26
Table 3.1 Enrolment in class VII-X since 2002............................................................................... 31
Table 3.2 NER and GER for Higher Secondary Schools................................................................. 33
Table 3.3 Transition rates.............................................................................................................. 33
Table 4.1 Staff and students in Vocational Training Institutes academic year 2011..................... 35
Table 4.2 Staff and Students in the Royal University of Bhutan academic year 2011.................. 36
Table 4.3 Bhutanese Undergraduate students abroad with RGOB Scholarships, 2012................ 37
Table 4.4 Bhutanese privately funded Tertiary Education students abroad, 2012....................... 37
Table 5.1 Number of NFE centres and Enrolments as of March 2012.......................................... 39
Table 5.2 Enrolment in Continuing Education, March 2012......................................................... 40
Table 5.3 Enrolment in Continuing Education since 2006............................................................ 40
Table 6.1 Enrolment in monastic schools, 2011........................................................................... 42
Table 7.1 Enrolment in Special Education Institute, March 2012................................................. 44
Table 8.1 Percentage-wise girls enrolment per level and type of school, March 2012................ 45
Table 8.2 Girls enrolment by type/level of school, March 2012.................................................. 47
Table 8.3 Girls enrolment by category and Dzongkhag, March 2012.......................................... 48
Table 8.4 Girls enrolment in class X and class XI public and private schools 2003- 2012............ 49
Table 9.1 Teacher strength March 2012....................................................................................... 51
Table 9.2 Enrolment in the Colleges of Education 2004-2012...................................................... 53
Table 9.3 Number of teachers who have been awarded with various Degrees 2010.................. 54
Table 9.4 In-service Workshops.................................................................................................... 54
Table 9.5 Number of Teachers who have upgraded their Qualification ...................................... 54
Table 9.6 Teacher graduate with various degrees and qualifications, 2004-2012 ....................... 55
Table 9.7 Number of trained teachers by degree, March 2012.................................................... 55
Table 10.1 Student Teacher ratio in schools per location March 2012......................................... 56
Table 10.2 Number of schools with different STR by different level............................................. 58
Table 10.3 Target T: P ratio reached per Dzongkhag, March 2012............................................... 59
Table 10.4 Student-Teacher Ratio in Schools per Dzongkhag 2008-2010..................................... 60
Table 10.5 Class size per location per school, March 2012.......................................................... 61
Table 10.6 Schools by Average Class size per Dzongkhag, March 2012........................................ 62
Table 11.1 Survivors to the grade 2005-2011 .............................................................................. 69
Table 11.2 Coefficient of the internal efficiency in basic education ............................................ 70
Table 12.1 School feeding in 2012................................................................................................ 74

Table 12.2 Number of schools offering Day feeding and boarding facillities by level...........74
Table 13.1 Water facillities in the schools, March 2012............................................................... 75
Page

VIII

Annual Education Statistics

Table 13.2: Student-tap ratio by Dzongkhag for schools with tap stands, March 2012................ 76
Table 13.3 Laboratory by level of school, public schools, March 2012........................................ 77
Table 13.4 Computers in the schools, March 2012...................................................................... 78
Table 13.5: Electricity connectivity, per level, March 2012.......................................................... 79
Table 13.6: Schools with working landline phone, per category, March 2012............................. 79
Table 13.7: Internet connectivity per level, March 2012.............................................................. 80
Table 13.8: Road accessibility by dzongkhag, March 2012........................................................... 81
Table 14.1(a). Top 5 Utilizers of Budget........................................................................................ 83
Table 14.1(b). Top 5 under Utilizers of Budget............................................................................. 83
Table 14.1(c) Education revised budget and expenditure (FY 11-12) by dzongkhag...............84-87
Table 14.2: Estimated cost per student, May 2011...................................................................... 88
Additional Statistical Tables................................................................................................... 89
Table A1.1 Enrolment per Dzongkhag per type of School 2012................................................... 90
Table A1.2 Enrolment growth rate per Dzongkhag per level 2011-2012...................................... 91
Table A1.3 Total enrolment by Dzongkhag by gender ................................................................. 91
Table A1.4 Enrolment in Class XI and XII, 2011-2012................................................................... 92
Table A1.5 Enrolment in class XI-XII per stream, 2012................................................................. 92
Table A2.1 Public and Private Schools per Dzongkhag 2012........................................................ 93
Table A2.2 Electricity, Phone and internet connectivity by dzongkhag........................................ 93
Table A3.1 Public and Private Teachers per Dzongkhag 2012....................................................... 94
Table A3.2 STR per school type per Dzongkhag,2012.................................................................. 94
Table A3.3 Proportion of Non-Bhutanese teachers 2002-2012.................................................... 95
Table A3.4 Teachers qualification in public and private school, March 2012............................... 95
Table A3.5 Numbers of teachers by academic qualification, March 2012.................................... 95
Table A4.1 Student-Teachers Ratio in Schools per Dzongkhag 2009-2012................................... 96
Table A4.2 Promotion, Repeater and Dropout rates, 2002-2012................................................ 96
Table A4.3 Dropout rates, 2003-2012......................................................................................... 97
Table A4.4 Repetition rates, 2003-2012..................................................................................... 97
Table A4.5 Class X results , 2011................................................................................................... 97
Table A4.6 Class XII results , 2011................................................................................................. 98
Table A4.7 Survival rate to grade 5 and 10, 2006-2011................................................................ 98
Table A4.8 Pre-Primary enrolment by Age................................................................................... 98
Table A4.9 Details on the 6-12 years old children since 2009...................................................... 98
Table A4.10 Completion Rate for Primary and Basic education................................................... 99
Table A4.11 Right age, underage and overage details by class 2012............................................ 99
Table A4.12 Age specific enrolment details ................................................................................. 100
Table A5.1 Enrolment of girls in primary and secondary education............................................. 101
Table A5.2 Growth in girls enrolment in public secondary schools (VII-XII.................................101

Schools established in 2012..................................................................................................104


chools Upgraded in 2012.......................................................................................................104
Schools Downgraded in 2012................................................................................................104
Annual Education Statistics

Page

IX

ACRONYMS, ABBREVIATIONS AND GLOSSARY


Acronyms
AES
AFD
AIR
ASCF
BBE
BCSE
BCSEA
B.Ed
B.Ed (D)
B.Ed (P)
B.Ed (S)
BHSEC
BLC
CAPSD
CE
CECD
CoE
CPS
DAHE
DCRD
DDA
DEO
DPP
DSE
DYS
ECCD
ECR
EFA
EM
EMSSD
FYP
GBER
GER
GES
GIR
Page

Annual Education Statistics


Administrative and Finance Division
Apparent Intake Ratio
Annual School Census Form
Bhutan Board of Examinations
Bhutan Certificate for Secondary Education
Bhutan Council for School Examination and Assessment
Bachelor of Education
Bachelor of Education (Dzongkha)
Bachelor of Education (Primary)
Bachelor of Education (Secondary)
Bhutan Higher Secondary Education Certificate
Basic Literacy Course
Curriculum and Professional Support Services Division
Continuing Education
Career Education and Counseling Division
College of Education
Community Primary School
Department of Adult and Higher Education
Department of Curriculum Research and Development
Dzongkha Development Authority
Dzongkhag Education Officer
Dzongkhag Population Projection 2006-2015
Department of School Education
Department of Youth and Sports
Early Childhood Care and Development Division
Extended Classroom
Education For All
Education Media
Education Monitoring & Support Service Division
Five Year Plan
Gross Basic Enrolment Ratio
Gross Enrolment Ratio
Geog Education Services
Gross Intake Ratio
Annual Education Statistics

GoI
Government of India
GER
Gross Enrolment Ratio
GPER
Gross Primary Enrolment Ratio
GPI
Gender Parity Index
GSD
Games and Sports Division
HRD
Human Resource Division
HSS
Higher Secondary School
IA
Internal Audit
ICSE
Indian Certificate for Secondary Education
ISE
Indian Secondary Examination Certificate
LSS
Lower Secondary School
MDG
Millennium Development Goal
M.Ed
Masters in Education
MoE
Ministry of Education
MoF
Ministry of Finance
MoLHR
Ministry of Labour and Human Resource
MSS
Middle Secondary School
NBER
Net Basic Enrolment Ratio
NER
Net Enrolment Ratio
NFCED
Non Formal and Continuing Education Division
NFE
Non-Formal Education
NGO
Non-Governmental Organization
NIVI
National Institute for Visually Impaired
NIZC
National Institute of Zorig Chusum
NIR
Net Intake Ratio
NPER
Net Primary Enrolment Ratio
NSB
National Statistics Bureau
NWAB
National Womens Association of Bhutan
PCR
Primary Completion Rate
PGCE
Post Graduate Certificate in Education
PGDE
Post Graduate Diploma in Education
PHCB
Population and Housing Census of Bhutan
PLC
Post Learning Course
PP Pre-Primary
PPD
Policy and Planning Division
PS
Primary School
PTC
Primary Teaching Certificate
PTR
Pupil Teacher Ratio

Annual Education Statistics

Page

XI

RCS
RGoB
RUB
SCD
SD
SDG
SLCD
SLD
SPBD
SPS
STR
TIZC
UPE
VTI
WFP
YC
YIC
ZDS
ZLT
ZTC

Resource Centre Services


Royal Government of Bhutan
Royal University of Bhutan
Scouts and Culture Division
Scholarship Division
SAARC Development Goals
School Liaison and Coordination Division
School Library Development
School Planning and Building Division
School Procurement Services
Student-Teacher Ratio
Trashiyangtse Institute of Zorig Chusum
Universal Primary Education
Vocational Training Institute
World Food Programme
Youth Centre
Youth Information Centre
Zhungkha Development Services
Zhungkha Language Teachers
Zhungkha Teaching Certificate

Abbreviation

Ave

Average

Bht

Bhutanese

Enrol.

Enrolment

GR

Growth Rate

NBht

Non-Bhutanese

No.

Numbers

Mgt

SUMMARY OF
EDUCATION
STATISTICS 2012
Figure Ia: Summary of Schools, Institutes and Centres
Type of Schools and Institutes

Government

Private

Total

61

35

96

Primary Schools

344

353

Lower Secondary Schools

92

93

Middle Secondary Schools

57

59

Higher Secondary Schools

34

14

48

527

26

553

109

109

11

A Early Childhood Care & Development


ECCD Centres*
B

Glossary
Dzongkhag District
Dratshang
Monk body
Lhakhang Temple
Dungkhag Sub-District
Dzongdag
Head of District Administration
Gewog
Block

School Education

Sub- Total (B)


C Extended Classrooms
D Special Institutes**

E Tertiary Institutes under RUB

10

F Vocational Institutes

G Sanskrit Patshala

Total Institutes~

20

Management

H Monastic Education (Lobdra, Shedra, etc)

388

N/Bht

Non-Bhutanese

I Continuing Education Centres

13

Nu.

Ngultrum

J Non-Formal Centres****

953

Pvt

Private

TOTAL***

1949

Std

Student

T:P

Teacher Pupil Ratio

Voc.

Vocational

Page

XII

21
388

21
953

62

2011

* Private ECCD inclusive of ECCD under NGO, private & Work place
** Special Institutes (6 of these schools are included in the schools under B above).
~ Including NIVI only, excludes Special Education institute under the school since its a part of school
*** This doesnot include ECR and continuing education centre since they are part of the parent school.
*** *source: Non formal and Continuing Education Division, DAHE

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

Figure Ic: Summary of Teachers, Lecturers, Instructors, Trainers & Caregivers

Figure Ib: Summary of Students, Learners, Trainees and Novitiates


Government
Boys
A

Private

Total

Government

Total

Boys

Girls

Total

Boys

Girls

Total

1,543

521

522

1,043

1,341

1,245

2,586

820

723

Female

Private

Total

Male Female

Total
Total

Male

Female

Total

Early Childhood Care & Development


ECCD Centre

School Education

84

87

12

130

142

15

214

229

24,585 24,220 48,805

991

937

1,928

25,576

25,157

50,733

B School Education

Lower Secondary School 24,665 25,110 49,775

107

116

223

24,772

25,226

49,998

Primary School

1,548

787

2,335

44

88

132

1,592

875

2,467

Middle Secondary School 19,065 19,714 38,779

600

584

1,184

19,665

20,298

39,963

3,310 3,283 6,593

16,465

16,237

32,702

Lower Secondary School

1,032

944

1,976

13

21

1,040

957

1,997

1,711

1,540

3,251

Middle Secondary School

954

731

1,685

35

54

89

989

785

1,774

88,189

88,458

176,647

Higher Secondary School

772

421

1,193

257

98

355

1,029

519

1,548

222

128

350

Extended Classroom

125

21

146

125

21

146

Sub-Total (B)

4,431

2,904

7,335

597

4,775

3,157

7,932

86

91

177

86

91

177

671

232

903

45

702

246

948

175

48

223

175

48

223

45

889

297

1,186

314

635

949

784

5,993

4,303

10,296

Primary School

Higher Secondary School 13,155 12,954 26,109


Extended Classroom
Sub-Total

1,711

1,540

3,251

83,181 83,538 166,719 5,008 4,920 9,928

B
[ii]

Bhutanese students
studying in India*

88,586

176,997

Special Institutes**

203

140

343

203

140

343

Continuing Education

308

323

631

414

625

1,039

722

948

1,670

Tertiary Education

Sub-Total (B [i]+[ii])

Tertiary Institutes under


RUB***

Male

Early Childhood Care & Development


ECCD Centre

B [i]

Girls

222

128

350

83,181 83,538 166,719 5,230 5,048 10,278 88,411

Tertiary Institutes under


RUB

E Vocational institutes
3,343

2,041

5,384

Tertiary Students in India

143

69

212

Tertiary Students abroad

182

109

291

Sub-Total (C+D+E)

3,996

2,564

6,560

Vocational institutes

694

323

1,017

Sub-Total (F)

694

323

1,017

7,240

5,149

388

473

861

58

6,245

1,913

1,460

3,373

206

167

373

6,592

5,111

11,703

694

323

1,017

694

323

1,017

* All teachers in the special institutes including teachers who teach special needs in 6 formal school

5,149

12,389

12,389

** Only teachers teaching in NIVI ( 14 teachers) are counted here and not all the teachers mentioned in C as they are
already counted in Subtotal B

82

2,596 2,547 5,143

14

2,514

1,770 1,391 3,161


24

F Sanskirt Patshala

31

253

3,731

Monastic Education ****


(Lobdra, Shredra,etc)

7,240

Non-Formal Centres

3,882

9,478

13,360

3,882

9,478

13,360

Sanskrit Patshala

GRAND TOTAL

C Special Institutes*

344

Total (Schools and Institutes)


(C+D+E+F) **
G Non-Formal Centres
GRAND TOTAL

1
858

283

1,141

314

635

949

5,606

3,906

9,512

31

387

14

397

99,818 96,628 196,446 13,496 8,117 21,613 113,314 104,745 218,059

* The data is based on informal estimates of students studying in India. The number could actually be higher.
** All special needs children enrolled in special institute as well as in formal school
*** Private Tertiary enrolment in Royal Thimphu College
**** The monastic enrolment reflected under public is from 2011, the enrolment reflected under private is
from 2004

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Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

AT A GLANCE

Figure III: Growth in the number of schools and enrolment 2002-2012

Value

Total population (in 000)*

719

Population 0-14 years (%)*

29

Annual Population Growth Rate


(2010)*

1.91
0.1

Annual GDP Growth rate


GDP per capita in Nu, (2011)**

128,946.5

GDP (million Nu), (2010/2011)**

Access to safe drinking water


2010****
Life Expectancy at Birth (years)
(2010)*

Education Expenditure as % of GDP


(2010/2011)**

6.9

EFA Development Index (EDI)

0.850

Adult Literacy Rate

52.8

Unemployment rate~~

3.1

0.522

Children of primary school-age who are outof-school (%)

2.0

88.0

Gross Enrolment Rate (GER) at tertiary level

11

Literacy Rate, 2005~

59.5

52

52

50

102
GPI on NER

49

48
46

46

44

44

47

50

50

50

48

100

2012

89

2011

84

50

GER in secondary level for Female

100000
80000

200

60000
40000

100

20000
0

0
2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Private
Lower Secondary School

2007

2008

2009

Higher Secondary School


Primary School

2010

2011

2012

Middle Secondary School


Enrolment (in 000)

Figure IV: NER trend since 1990


120%
115%
110%

90%

40
1999
2005
2008
2011
2012
% of girls in Primary
% of girls in Secondary

98

85%
80%
75%
1998 2002 2005 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

92
NER

100

GER

PCR

* Source: Population Projections Bhutan 2005-2030


** Source: Ministry of Finance
*** Source: Human Development Report 2011
**** Source: Annual Health Bulletin, 2011
~ Source: Socio-Economic and Demographic Indicators 2005
~~Source: Labour Force Survey, 2011, MoLHR

37
41

1999

120000
300

95%

48
46

2005

140000

400

100%

54
56

2008

Page

Survival to
grade 5

160000

105%

42

NER, Primary96

180000

15.8

54

GER(PP)
120
100 84
80
60
40
20
0

118
GER, Primary

Education expenditure as % of government


expenditure, (2010/2011) **

200000

500

35

69

600

Value

Female Teachers (%) at primary level

76241.3

Human Development Index (HDI)

Indicators

Number of Schools

Indicators

Student Enrolment (in 000)

Figure II: Fact Sheet: Bhutan: Some Education Indicators 2012

150

GER in secondary level for Male

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

EFA Indicators
Male

TABLE I: EDUCATION INDICATORS AT A GLANCE

AGE GROUP POPULATION*

GROSS ENROLMENT
RATIO (GER)

Primary
(PP-VI)

7635

47254

13258

14148

14528

Female

7501

46426

12961

13754

14044

Total

15136

93680

26219

27902

28572

Male

85%

118%

101%

77%

55%

Female

82%

119%

113%

83%

51%

Total

84%

118%

107%

80%

53%

GPI

0.96

1.01

1.12

1.08

0.93

Male

46%

95%

35%

26%

18%

44%

96%

43%

32%

22%

46%

96%

39%

29%

20%

GPI

0.94

1.02

1.22

1.24

1.20

Male

85%

85%

102%

81%

51%

Female

82%

82%

110%

90%

52%

Total

84%

84%

106%

85%

Male

NET ENROLMENT RATIO Female


(NER)
Total

GROSS INTAKE RATIO


AT THE FIRST GRADE
OF THE LEVEL

NET INTAKE RATIO AT


THE FIRST GRADE OF
THE LEVEL

Lower Secondary Middle Secondary Higher Secondary


(IX-X)
(XI-XII)
(VII-VIII)

Pre-Primary
(PP)

Female

Total

10th FYP Target

Goal

12

GER Higher Secondary (including CE)

60%

58%

59%

50%

EFA

13

Adult Literacy

65%

38.7%

52.8%

70%

EFA/SDG

14

GPI Primary

1.02

1.00

EFA/SDG/MDG

15

GPI Secondary

1.18

1.10

EFA/SDG/MDG

Table III: MDG INDICATORS


Goals, Targets and Indicators

1990 2000 2004 2007

2009

2010

2011

2012 2015

State of
Progress

Goal 2: ACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION


Target 3: Ensure by 2015 children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling
Gross Primary Enrolment Ratios (%)

55 %

Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (%)

72 % 84 %

106% 115.7%

117%

120%

118% 100 % Achieved

83.7%

91.8%

93.7%

95%

96%

100% On track

Proportion of Pupils starting grade 1 who


reach grade 5 (%)

73 %

91 % 94 %

92.4%

96.4%

93.6%

97%

100% 100 % Achieved

51%

Proportion of pupils starting grade 1 who


reach grade 7 (%)

35 %

81 % 86 %

85.4%

89.9%

86.9%

93%

98%

100 % On track

GPI

0.96

0.96

1.08

1.11

1.01

GOAL 3: PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMEN

Male

46%

46%

20%

15%

10%

Female

44%

44%

24%

19%

13%

Total

46%

46%

22%

17%

11%

GPI

0.94

0.94

1.19

1.27

1.25

Target 4: Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably by 2005, and to all levels of
education by 2015
Ratio of girls to boys in primary
69 %
82 % 95 % 99.5 % 99%
99.4% 99%
99% 100 % Achieved
(91)
schools (%)
Ratio of girls to boys in secondary
43 %
78 % 96 % 97.2% 101.6% 103.5% 107% 107% 100 % On track
(91)
schools (%)
Ratio of females to males in tertiary 12 %
41 % 53 % 54% 53.2% 60.8% 67.3% 71% 80 % On track
(91)
institutes (%)

*Source: Dzongkhag Population Projection 2006-2015

Table II: EFA INDICATORS

Source: PPD MOE, Annual Statistics Reports

EFA Indicators
Male

Female

Total

10th FYP Target

Goal

Gross enrolment in ECCD

Apparent Intake Ratio (AIR)

Net Intake Ratio (NIR)

Gross Enrolment Ratio (Primary) GPER

Net Enrolment Ratio (Primary) NPER

Repetition Rate (Primary)

6.1%

4.5%

5.3%

4.5%

EFA/ABSD

Primary Completion Rate

115%

119%

117%

100%

EFA/ABSD

Survival Rate to grade 6

97%

99%

98%

95%

EFA/SDG/MDG

Coefficient of efficiency (Primary)

86%

92%

93%

NA

10

Coefficient of efficiency (Basic)

60%

58%

59%

NA

11

Repetition Rate (Secondary)

3.6%

3.5%

3.5%

4.5%

Page

Table IV: OTHER INDICATORS

6%

5%

5%

NA

EFA

85%

82%

84%

NA

EFA

Other Indicators

Male

Female

Total

GPI

46%

44%

46%

NA

EFA

Survival Rate to Class VI

96%

99%

98%

1.03

118%

119%

118%

NA

EFA

Survival Rate to Class X

84%

85%

85%

1.02

95%

96%

96%

~100%

EFA/SDG/MDG/ABSD

Survival Rate to Class IV

99%

100%

100%

1.01

Transition rate (Primary to Lower Secondary)

97%

100%

98%

1.03

Transition rate (Lower Secondary to Middle Secondary)

95%

94%

95%

0.99

Transition rate (Middle Secondary to Higher Secondary)

73%

69%

71%

0.95

Adjusted NPER (6-12 aged at all level of school, monastic/abroad)

97%

98%

98%

1.01

Adjusted NSER (13-16 aged at all level of school, monastic, abroad)

100%

98%

99%

0.98

EFA

ABSD

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

Other Indicators

Male

Female

Total

GPI

NER(Basic)

92%

96%

94%

1.05

GER (Basic)

106%

110%

108%

1.03

GER (Secondary)

89%

98%

93%

1.10

NER(Secondary)

52%

61%

56%

1.18

Secondary Completion Rate

73%

76%

74%

1.04

GER (Tertiary within Bhutan )

13%

9%

11%

0.71

GER (Tertiary both within Bhutan and outside Bhutan )

21%

15%

18%

0.74

Average
study time
at Grade
(in years)

Grade
1

Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade Grade


2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Grade
10

Grade
11

Grade
Average
12

Male

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

12.6

Female

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

12.5

Total

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

12.6

Figure IIIa: Number of Schools and ECRs by Dzongkhag and level


Bumthang
Chhukha
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
Pema Gatshel
Punakha
Samdrup Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thimthrom
Thimphu
Trashigang
Trashiyangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue Phodrang
Zhemgang
Total

Page

ECR

PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

Total

2
6
7
2
3
4
6
3
9
8
6
26
4
0
2
9
0
1
2
8
1

12
26
12
3
5
22
38
7
20
10
18
17
11
12
6
41
21
19
11
19
23

2
6
7
0
3
2
7
6
6
3
4
7
6
5
2
10
7
2
2
3
3

3
6
2
1
0
2
2
4
1
5
5
3
2
7
2
5
1
2
1
2
3

2
4
2
0
1
1
4
6
2
2
1
3
3
6
0
4
1
1
1
2
2

21
48
30
6
12
31
57
26
38
28
34
56
26
30
12
69
30
25
17
34
32

109

353

94

58

48

Figure IIIb: Number of private schools by Dzongkhag and level


HSS
Bumthang
Chhukha
Mongar
Paro
Pema Gatshel
Punakha
Samdrup Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thim Throm
Thimphu
Zhemgang
Total

LSS

1
1
1
4

MSS

PS

1
4
1
14

1
2
1
5
0
1
1
0
1
12
1
1
26

6
1

Total

Figure IIIc: Number of students by Dzongkhag and level


Bumthang
Chhukha
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
Pema Gatshel
Punakha
Samdrup Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thimthrom
Thimphu
Trashigang
Trashiyangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue Phodrang
Zhemgang
Total

ECR

PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

Total

43
187
264
77
98
58
148
107
231
169
139
1051
123
0
16
190
0
13
92
222
23

1220
3948
2093
297
773
2016
3601
1560
1682
1718
3762
3054
1776
6356
819
4486
1478
1801
2490
3625
2178

1145
4987
2319
0
1532
638
3043
3420
2651
1546
1653
4432
5128
4531
570
3444
2600
727
2082
2420
1130

1228
4574
1749
437
0
826
1035
2652
769
2865
3094
3732
2319
6905
1338
2363
702
364
641
973
1397

672
3512
1098
0
591
431
2579
3537
1074
1715
488
3728
2037
5674
0
2132
490
446
763
1151
584

4308
17208
7523
811
2994
3969
10406
11276
6407
8013
9136
15997
11383
23466
2743
12615
5270
3351
6068
8391
5312

3251

50733

49998

39963

32702

176647

662

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

The total number of schools in the general education system in Bhutan consists of 344 Primary
Schools, 9 private Primary Schools, 93 Lower Secondary Schools, 1 private Lower Secondary
Schools, 56 Middle Secondary Schools, 2 private Middle Secondary Schools, 34 Higher
Secondary Schools, 14 Private Higher Secondary Schools and 96 ECCD centers (29 private, 8
NGO based and 54 community based). The total school enrolment for the current academic
year is 1,78,359 which includes 1,10,575 in primary schools, 50,828 in Lower and Middle
Secondary Schools, 15,244 in Higher Secondary Schools, 42 in the National Institute for the
Visually Impaired and 1670 in the Continuing Education programme.

EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY

The Policy and Planning Division (PPD) collects data on school enrolment and other information from
the schools, and other agencies every year in order to ensure that all relevant stakeholders have
access to good quality information on the education sector. The information collected is compiled
in the form of this report which provides summarized information on general school-based, nonformal, continuing, vocational, tertiary and monastic education within Bhutan and to some extent
information on Bhutanese students studying outside Bhutan. In addition to information on the
academic year 2012, some historical comparisons are also made.
The report aims to help stakeholders in planning, monitoring and evaluating education sector
programmes, and to make informed decisions. At the same time, it provides data required for
monitoring progress towards the MDGs, SDGs, and other international goals and targets which
the country is party to. It is hoped that the findings will serve as a basis for equity-based programming, as well as contribute towards sound policy analysis and planning and also serve as a
pointer to a whole spectrum of studies and surveys on the Bhutanese education system.

The EMIS data collection tool, a digitized version of the Annual School Census Forms - (ASCF)
built in excel is used to collect the data for preparing this report. The tools are distributed to all
the schools and extended classrooms through the Dzongkhag Education Offices at the beginning
of the academic year. The school principals take the responsibility for filling in the information
and the Dzongkhag Education Offices for collecting, checking and returning it to the PPD by end
of March.
This annual report presents national data in primary and secondary schools. Enrolment patterns,
regional geographical trends, types and location of schools, students and staffing, demographic
characteristics and student participation in selected education programs are reported. Where data
permits, the exhibits compare information across years.

10

Adult literacy programmes are offered to 13,360 learners in 953 Non-Formal Education centres across the country.
The RUB has 11 colleges located across the country, while under the MoLHR there are 8
vocational training institutes. The central monastic body has 388 monastic schools (the
number of private monastic institutions remains unaccounted for). That makes a total of 2011
educational institutions in the country.
In 2012, three Primary Schools, one private Higher Secondary School and 17 Extended
Classrooms were opened while seven schools were upgraded to Lower Secondary, six to
Middle Secondary (4 public and 2 private) and three to Higher Secondary. At the same time, 7
Primary Schools were downgraded to ECRs, while 8 ECRs were upgraded to Primary Schools.
Additonally, 5 ECRs and 3 Primary Schools(1 public and 2 private) were closed.
Excluding the monastic teachers, there are 10,459 teachers and Instructors in Bhutan. In the
school system alone, there were 7932 teachers as of March 2012.

DATA COLLECTION

Page

Additionally a substantial number of children are studying abroad. Many parents send their
children to schools in towns like Kalimpong, Darjeeling and Chennai in India under private
funding. At the school level there are over 350 students studying outside Bhutan and about
3855 students at the tertiary level with majority of them studying in India.

Annual Education Statistics

This year the Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (NER) stands at 96% , meaning that 96% of 6-12
years old are enrolled in the primary education program. This does not include the 6-12 year
olds who are enrolled abroad, in the secondary levels, or in the monastic education system.
Indicator

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

NER primary education (PP-VI)

88.0%

91.82%

94%

95%

96%

GER primary education (PP-VI)

112.0%

115.73%

118%

120%

118%

NER Basic education (PP-X)

85.0%

88.36%

91%

93%

94%

GER Basic education (PP-X)

96.0%

100.30%

104%

108%

108%

Annual Education Statistics

Page

11

The increasing enrolment and primary school completion rates indicate that Bhutan is on
track to achieving the Millenium Development (MDG) Goals. However the last mile will be
the hardest to achieve. Currently, it is estimated that 2% of primary age children are out of
school. This 2% are expected to be children in remote and hard to reach areas, children of nomadic communities and migrant populations, children with learning disabilities whose special
learning needs are currently not catered for and children of the urban poor. These children
may be out of school because of their differing needs from the majority of the students, and
the key challenge is to put in place innovative and cost effective strategies to provide access
to a quality education.
The increase in enrolment at the primary education level is now placing enormous pressure
at the secondary schools, thus resulting in overcrowded classrooms. Therefore another key
challenge will be to provide space at the secondary level for students moving up from the
primary level. Progress made within the primary education programme over the last decade
to meet the MDGs and the Education for All goals has placed enormous pressure on limited
resources of teachers, facilities and finance and severely tested the capacity of the system to
deliver Bhutans commitment to provide quality education for all. A major challenge therefore
lies in maintaining a level of resources to support both expansion and qualitative development
of the basic education programme.

OVERVIEW OF
THE EDUCATION
SYSTEM
1.1. THE MODERN EDUCATION SYSTEM
Until the 1950s, education in Bhutan was mainly monastic. Literacy was confined to the
monasteries, and many eminent Bhutanese scholars traveled to Tibet to study Buddhist
scriptures. The only formal education available to Bhutanese students, (with the exception of
a few private schools in Haa and Bumthang established in 1913/1914), was through Buddhist
monasteries. Today, the education system in Bhutan has three main elements: general
education, monastic education and non-formal education. The first type of education is by far
the biggest and is commonly seen as the only educational structure.
While monastic education continues to be an important part of the national culture, the
current formal education system has been promoted and expanded since the first Five Year
Plan in 1961 to address the basic educational needs, and develop human resources required
for the socio-economic development of the country. Within a period of five decades, the
Royal Government has been able to expand the modern education system from about 11
schools prior to the first Five Year Plan in 1961 to 670 schools and institutes in 2012, spanning
from primary schools and early childhood care and development (ECCD) centres to tertiary
and vocational institutes. Fig. 1.1 shows the progressive growth of the number of schools and
institutes since the 1st Five Year Plan (FYP).
Figure 1.1 Growth in the number of Schools and Institutes
730
670
610
550
490
430
370
310
250
190
130
70
10

Page

12

Annual Education Statistics

666

670

535
408
268
98

119

11
1961 1971 1981 1992 2002 2008 2011 2012

Annual Education Statistics

Page

13

1.1.1. General education structure


At the same time the expansion of the education system has been accompanied by rapid
growth in the enrolment of students. From about 400 students in the early 1960s, total
enrolment has increased in all levels of formal education and tertiary institutes in Bhutan
to 1,88,214 as of March 2012, reflecting a growth of about 20% since the start of the 10th
Five Year Plan in 2008.
Fig. 1.2 shows the progressive increase in enrolment in schools and institutes since the
1st Five Year Plan
Figure 1.2 Growth in enrolment in Schools and Institutes

The school-based education structure in Bhutan comprises of 11 years of free basic education
from classes PP to X, divided into 7 years of primary education (PP-VI), which starts at the age of
6, and 4 years of Secondary Education (VII-X). At the end of the cycle (Class X) there is a national
board examination, Bhutan Certificate for Secondary Education (BCSE).
Beyond class X, students either continue their general education in classes XI and XII in Higher
Secondary schools or join the vocational training institutes or enter the labour market based on
the students performance in the board examinations (BCSE). Students who do not qualify for
government funded education attend private higher secondary schools in Bhutan or abroad and
vocational courses organized by private training institutes. The duration of vocational training in
both government and private institutes vary depending upon the type of course.
After completing class XII (public and private), graduates either continue their studies at the
tertiary level under one of the institutes under the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB) for a diploma
or a bachelors degree, or enter the job market. Selection for the RUB is based upon BHSEC results.
A limited number of students are selected for government scholarships for professional studies
abroad, while others fund themselves to tertiary education institutes in country and abroad. Some
graduates from the Vocational Training Institutes are selected to continue education at the tertiary
level.
Figure 1.3 gives a schematic overview of the general education structure in Bhutan.
Figure 1.3 General education structure

For those who could not attend general or monastic education, basic and post literacy
courses in Dzongkha are offered all over the country in non-formal education centers.
Since 2006, the Ministry of Education in collaboration with higher secondary schools,
has initiated a continuing education programme, to allow school drop outs the opportunity to continue their education and upgrade their qualifications.

Page

14

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

15

1.1.2. Schools in General Education

Figure 1.4 General Education curriculum PP-XII

At the primary education level a school was earlier either called a primary school or a community
primary school. Since both schools offer, in principle, similar kind of schooling (seven years of
education, from PP to VI), the decision to rename all Community Primary Schools as Primary
Schools was endorsed during the 15th Annual Education Conference (AEC). As of the 10th FYP,
and in order to reach the smallest population catchment areas, extended classrooms (ECRs)
have also been established. Extended Classrooms are extensions of primary schools in remote
and scattered settlements, established with the intention of bringing education closer to
communities and reducing walking distances for very young children.
At the secondary level, the classification of a school depends on the final class that is taught.
Schools that have Class VIII as their final class, are called Lower Secondary, while schools that
have Class X or XII as their terminal classes are called Middle Secondary and Higher Secondary
Schools respectively.

1.2 GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM


Encapsulated under the Educating for GNH umbrella, the objective of all school education in
Bhutan is to impart a well rounded and value based education so that the product is a GNH
graduate with the right skills, attitudes and values. In this respect, and in order to ensure that
the values and principles of GNH are infused into the education system and practised as a way of
being by both students and teachers, the Guidelines for Educating for GNH have been developed
and all school leaders are currently undergoing training.
At a basic level, the objective of primary education in Bhutan is to impart basic literacy and
numeracy skills, to provide knowledge of the countrys history, geography, culture and traditions
and to teach the fundamentals of agriculture, health & hygiene, and population education.
Moral and value education are given special attention. Activity-based learning is used uniformly
across the country to teach these skills and knowledge. Class IX students can choose between
Economics, Commercial Studies and Computer Applications while in higher secondary education
students have to choose between Arts, Commerce and Science. From 2011, 6 schools located
near vocational training institutes also offer vocational skills as an optional subject in classes IX
and X.
The Bhutan Council for School Examinations and Assessment (BCSEA) [formerly known as BBE]
conducts the national examinations for classes X and XII. The examinations for classes VI and VIII
have been decentralized to the schools, although the questions, model answers and marking
schemes are provided by the BCSEA.
Curriculum reforms of English, Dzongkha and Mathematics were initiated in the 9th FYP and
are continued in the 10th FYP, especially for Dzongkha and Mathematics. Figure 1.4 provides an
overview of the curriculum up to Class XII.

Learning areas with specific subjects and periods set in the time table
Learning areas addressed in co-curricular programmes, school organisations or
integrated in the subject areas

Page

16

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

17

1.3 EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION


The responsibility for the administration of education in Bhutan is shared amongst the Ministry
of Education (MoE), the Ministry of Labour and Human Resources (MoLHR), the Royal University
of Bhutan (RUB), the Dzongkhags and the Gewogs. Monastic education is the responsibility of
the central monastic body and privately managed independent monasteries.
The MoE is responsible for policy planning, curriculum development and administration of
Basic (Primary up to Middle secondary), Higher Secondary and Non Formal and Continuing
Education. It is also responsible for ex-country tertiary level scholarships, and the design and
implementation of Higher Education Policy. This includes liaising with institutions at that level,
such as the RUB. The organizational structure of the MoE is presented in the appendices.
The Dzongkhag Administrations are entrusted with a range of responsibilities in the education
sector, both formal and non formal education, school construction and maintenance, supply of
teaching learning materials, deployment of teachers within the Dzongkhag and implementation
of national policies. These responsibilities are carried out by Dzongkhag Education Officers
(DEOs), and Assistant DEOs, all of whom report both to the Dzongdag and the Ministry of
Education.
The MoLHR is responsible for vocational training after class X and the Royal University of
Bhutan (RUB) is responsible for planning, curriculum development and administration of the
eleven tertiary institutions responsible for the provision of public education after class XII.

PRE-PRIMARY
AND PRIMARY
EDUCATION
2.1. EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT
Early Childhood Care and Development
(ECCD) is defined as programmes and
services for children from conception to age
eight and their families, encompassing health
and nutrition services, early stimulation
and education, and parent education
and support. ECCD emphasizes a holistic
approach focusing on the childs physical,
emotional, social and cognitive development,
so as to nurture childrens physical and
mental development and to prepare them
for school and life with the right attitudes
and dispositions. ECCD is therefore seen as
a way to maximize developmental potentials
of children, and improving learning outcomes
ultimately leading to reduction in costs
and improvements in the efficiency of the
education and health systems.
In order to provide the best start in life for
young children and especially those from the
disadvantaged sections of the community,

Page

18

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

the Ministry of Education has adopted a


two pronged strategy for the provision of
ECCD through a) the promotion of sound
parenting and child care practices for
young children through home and family
based interventions using the mass
media, NFE centres, health
facilities and schools and b) promotion of
and support to early childhood care and
development centres to enhance early
learning opportunities for children age
3 to 6, through community based ECCD
centres and centres run by private sector,
civil society organizations and corporate
bodies.
As of March 2012, there are 96 ECCD
Centres in the country as shown in the
map below:

Page

19

Work Place ECCD Centre - 5


Community ECCD Centre - 54
Private ECCD Centre -29
NGO ECCD Centre -8

2.2. EXTENDED CLASSROOMS


The 10th FYP emphasizes the universalization
of primary education, to ensure that all
citizens are equipped with at least the
minimum knowledge and skills to lead
better lives. The plan envisages achieving
100% NER in primary education, 90% NER in
basic education, and a literacy rate of 70%
in the 15+ age group. To achieve this target
the Ministry of Education is committed to
improving the quality of basic education and
also the efficiency of the education system,
and at the same time increasing access to
primary and secondary education.

3251 students or over 3% of primary


students are enrolled in ECRs this year.
Without ECRs, these students would
otherwise have been out of school, or
had to either walk long distances or be
enrolled in boarding schools to access
education.
These initiatives have enabled the RGoB
to improve Net Primary Enrolment Ratio
(NPER) from 88% at the start of the 10th
FYP to 96% in 2012.

The establishment of Extended Classrooms


(ECRs) is aligned with these efforts to improve
access to school for every child, and especially
in remote, rural and scattered villages where
students have to walk long distances to school

Page

20

Annual Education Statistics

2.3. PRE-PRIMARY AND PRIMARY EDUCATION


Primary education is universally agreed to be a
prime driver of sustainable economic and social
development. It helps accelerate progress
towards the achievement of development goals
of other sectors in addition to the fact that a
well educated population is a huge asset and a
desirable end in itself. Moreover, investments
in primary education pay off handsomely in the
long term and have a notable impact in helping
reduce poverty and inequity. Recognizing this,
the Royal Government has continually invested
in expanding primary education over all the
five year plans and is well on track towards
achieving all of its education related goals and
targets under the Millennium Development
Goals. In the 9th FYP, 111 community primary
and primary schools were established
increasing the total primary enrolment from
93,974 in 2003 to 106,100 in 2008. Over the
same period, the gross primary enrolment
ratio increased from 81 % to 112%, while the
net primary enrolment ratio increased from
62% to 88%.

As of 2012, which marks the last year of


the 10th FYP, there are 353 primary schools
and the total primary enrolment stands at
1,10,575. The primary GER has increased
to 118% and the Primary NER to 95.7% in
2012.
While there has been considerable
expansion in the first grade of primary
education with an average growth rate of
0.6% per annum from 2002 to 2012, there
has also been a notable decline in growth
rate from 2009 onwards, with a decrease
of 8% between 2011 and 2012.
This may be an indication of the reduction
in the number of out of school students as
well as the decline in population growth
rate due to family planning and or delayed
marriage and childbirth. The decrease
could also be attributed to the increase in
the number of ECRs which help in enrolling
right age children and also covering
the out of school children starting from
2010 onwards, leading to some sort of
stabilization in the enrolment in the early
grades. This is shown in table 2.1 below:

Table 2.1 Gross or Apparent Intake Ratio (AIR) 2006-2012


Class

Year

Enrolment

PP

2012

13464

762

12702

15136

84%

PP

2011

15581

911

14670

14813

99%

PP

2010

17165

1130

16035

13665

117%

PP

2009

17305

1055

16250

13485

121%

PP

2008

16434

1192

15242

13343

114%

PP

2007

16392

1127

15265

13347

114%

Annual Education Statistics

Repeaters New Entrants Pop. 6 yrs old

AIR

Page

21

Table no 2.1 shows the Apparent Intake Ratio


(AIR) (which is an indication of the number
of children enrolled in PP for the first time as
a percentage of the right age population or
6 years old) and the Net Intake Ratio (NIR)
(which indicates the number of 6 year old
children enrolled in PP for the first time as a
percentage of the number of 6 year olds in the
population), for the last 6 years for both private and public students (excluding those 6-12
years old children enrolled in the monasteries
and abroad).

As shown in the table, the AIR which had


always exceeded 100% in the past years,
showed a decrease from 2011 onwards.
This could be due to the decline in new
admissions in PP since 2010 against the
increasing population of 6 year olds. Such
deflation of figures could also be attributed
to the high variation in population figures.

Figure 2.1 Pre-primary enrolment by age, March 2012

Table 2.2 New admissions in PP 2002-2012


Year

PP Enrolment
Boys

Girls

Growth
Total

%gr

2012

6947

6517

13464

-1206

-8%

2011

7370

7300

14670

-1365

-9%

2010

8088

7947

16035

-215

-1%

2009

8145

8105

16250

1008

7%

2008

7612

7630

15242

-23

0%

2007

7751

7514

15265

-320

-2%

2006

7967

7618

15585

1574

11%
-6%

2005

7187

6824

14011

-864

2004

7565

7310

14875

891

6%

2003

7052

6932

13984

493

4%

2002

6967

6524

13491

614

Average annual growth rate

5%
0.6%

Table 2.3 below shows that the total enrolment in primary education has decreased by 598 students
in 2012.
Table 2.3 Enrolment in Primary Education, 2002-2012
Years

The Net Intake Rate (NIR) in 2012 stands


at 46%, meaning that 46% of the right age
population (6 years old) are enrolled in the
1st grade (PP) of primary. However according to our administrative data, 52% of the PP
enrolment including the repeaters are of right
age (6 years old), while 48% are either overage
(41%) or underage (8%).

Table 2.2 below shows the new admissions


in PP for the last 9 years. The declining PP
enrolment since 2010 could be a positive
impact of the initiatives taken by the
government to improve access, such as the
establishment of ECRs, provision of boaring
and feeding etc, which may have resulted
in the enrolment of most out of school
children.

Students

Annual Growth

Boys

Girls

Total

2012

55624

54951

110575

598

1%

2011

55941

55232

111173

804

1%

2010

55346

55023

110369

1527

4%

2009

54705

54137

108842

2742

3%

2008

53571

52529

106100

1633

2%

2007

53260

51207

104467

2275

2%

2006

52187

50005

102192

2318

2%

2005

51218

48656

99874

2025

2%

2004

50443

47406

97849

3875

4%

2003

48921

45053

93974

3030

3%

2002

48006

42938

90944

2752

3%

Average annual growth rate

2%

While the government has been successful in reaching almost all the children, ensuring right age
admission will always remain a challenge since children enrol in school at different ages due to
various factors such as parental preference, walking distance, illness, special needs etc.

Page

22

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

23

Table 2.4 Primary enrolment by age


Class

Right age(in
years)

PP
I
II

Right age enrolment

Overage

underage

2011

2012

2011

2012

44.6%

52.0%

43.6%

41.0%

11.8%

8.0%

38.5%

43.0%

47.7%

46.0%

13.8%

12.0%

31.8%

36.0%

56.2%

50.0%

12.1%

14.0%

III

28.0%

31.0%

61.2%

57.0%

10.9%

12.0%

IV

10

24.5%

26.0%

65.9%

63.0%

9.7%

10.0%

11

22.6%

24.0%

68.9%

67.0%

8.5%

10.0%

VI

12

20.2%

22.0%

71.8%

69.0%

8.1%

9.0%

30.0%

33.4%

59.3%

56.1%

10.7%

10.7%

Average

2011

2012

The table above shows the age-specific enrolment rates for primary classes. This actually highlights
the extent to which the offical age of admission is followed and maintained. Therefore, on average,
only about 33% of primary enrolment is of right age and about 67%, or more than half the primary
enrolment comprises of over aged and under aged children.

2.4. PRIMARY NET AND GROSS ENROLMENT RATIO (GPER AND NPER)
Table 2.5 below presents the key education indicators for access to education, Gross Primary
Enrolment Ratio (GPER) and Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (NPER). These are calculated based on
the population provided in the Projection of Population and Housing Census 2005. We can see
from the table below that the NPER and GPER at all levels have increased significantly since 2007.

Table 2.5 Enrolment Ratios since 2007


Gross Primary Enrolment

Page

Net Primary Enrolment


Male

Female

Total

2012

118%

95%

96%

96%

2011

120%

94%

96%

95%

2010

118%

93%

95%

94%

2009

116%

91%

93%

92%

2008

112%

87%

89%

88%

2007

106%

84%

84%

84%

24

Annual Education Statistics

The biggest increases are observed for the NPER


increasing from 88% in 2008 to 95.7% percent
in 2012; with an almost equal representation of
boys and girls.
The NPER for girls grew by 12 percentage points
over the four-year period, compared to 11
percentage points for boys, indicating increased
girls enrolment. This can also be attributed
to the fact that fewer boys than girls enroll in
school at the official school age.

2.4.1. Net Attendance Ratio


The adjusted Net Primary Attendance Ratio
(NAR), an indicator generated from a household
survey the Bhutan Multiple Indicator Surveyconducted by the National Statistics Bureau, is
an indicator analogous to the adjusted NER. Its
primary function is to indicate the participation
rates of children aged six to twelve in education
and not the number of days the child is
attending school. Although the data is from
the survey conducted in 2010, in the absence
of reliable dzongkhag level population data, it
is presented here in order to provide an idea of
the indicators at the dzongkhag level. It would
also be useful to bear in mind that the findings
of house-hold surveys typically under report
the findings from administrative data sources
(UNESCO, 2010). However, the adjusted NAR
for Bhutan from the BMIS at 91.9%, compares
to the NER for 2010 at 93.7%. The difference
between the two indicators is well within the
error margins of the survey.

Annual Education Statistics

Table 2.6 below presents the adjusted


NAR by Dzongkhags and gender for 2010.
Bumthang, Sarpang, Pemagatshel, Thimphu
and Trongsa are the five Dzongkhags with
the highest surveyed adjusted NAR, while
Punakha, Chukha, Mongar, Lhuentse,
Wangdue and Gasa are the six Dzongkhags
with the lowest adjusted NAR. These six
Dzongkhags also have adjusted NAR below
90%.
In 2006, only Bumthang and Trongsa had
NER above 90%. In all 20 Dzongkhags,
participation rates of six to twelve years
old children in education had improved
significantly by 2010 as per the BMIS 2010.
Samtse, Tsirang, Sarpang, Haa and Chukha
had increased participation rates of children
six to twelve years old in education by more
than 15% each.

In terms of gender, 15 of the 20 Dzongkhags


had GPI close to 1.0, indicating equity in
terms of participation. Thimphu, Dagana,
Samtse and Gasa are the only four
Dzongkhags that have GPI of exactly 1.0.
The five Dzongkhags that have GPI score
that diverge from 1.0 by more than 0.03,
indicating inequity in terms of participation
of the two genders, are Pemagatshel,
Trongsa, Haa, Punakha and Mongar. In each
of these Dzongkhags, the participation
levels of girls in primary education greatly
exceeds that of boys.

Page

25

Table 2.6 Net attendance ratio by Dzongkhag, BMIS 2010

Figure 2.2 Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (NPER)

Net attendance ratio (adjusted)


Male

Female

Total

GPI

Bumthang

96.7

98.4

97.6

1.02

Sarpang

95.3

96.1

95.7

1.01

Pemagatshel

94.1

97.5

95.7

1.04

Thimphu

94.7

94.9

94.8

1.00

Trongsa

92.5

96.8

94.5

1.05

Samdrup jongkhar

94.0

95.0

94.5

1.01

Haa

91.3

96.6

93.7

1.06

Dagana

93.6

93.4

93.5

1.00

Trashiyangtse

93.5

92.2

92.8

.99

Tsirang

92.9

92.1

92.5

.99

Trashigang

92.4

91.8

92.1

.99

BHUTAN

91.2

92.7

91.9

1.02

Paro

90.2

93.2

91.7

1.03

Samtse

91.6

91.2

91.4

1.00

Zhemgang

88.7

91.5

90.1

1.03

Punakha

85.9

93.8

89.6

1.09

Chukha

88.5

90.1

89.3

1.02

Mongar

84.6

90.3

87.4

1.07

Lhuntse

88.0

86.8

87.4

.99

Wangdue

84.9

87.0

85.9

1.02

Gasa

75.3

75.2

75.3

1.00

100%
95%

93%
91%

96%
94%

96%
95%

2011

2012

89%
87%

90%
85%

95%
93%

84%
84%

80%
75%
2007

2008

2009

2010

Boys

Girls

Figure 2.3 Net Primary Enrolment Ratios since 1998

100%
95%
90%
85%
80%
75%
70%
65%
60%
55%
50%

84%

88%

92%

94%

95%

96% 100%

53%
1998 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2015

The net primary enrolment ratios for girls showed much higher growth rates than for boys.
In terms of enrolment, there are no gender disparities between boys and girls, with girls
sometimes doing better than boys at the national level. However as per the BMIS 2010, there are
significantly more boys enrolled in T/Yangtse and Lhuentse, while, in Punakha Mongar and Haa,
there are more girls enrolled.

Page

26

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

27

Figure 2.4 Division of primary enrolment

2.4.2. Adjusted Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (ANER)


Despite the increase in NPER over the
years, full enrolment would never actually
be achieved unless all children enrolled in
various levels of education and in various
forms are accounted for. The traditional
definition of NPER looks only at children
aged 6-12 years enrolled in the primary
grades.
This leaves out children of the same age
group enrolled abroad, in secondary levels
or in the monastic education system.
Recognising this drawback of the traditional
definition, the Ministry of Education has now
come up with a new definition to ensure
that all children are accounted for when
measuring primary education coverage.
The new definition is called Adjusted Net
Enrolment Ratio (ANER) and looks at all
6-12 year old children enrolled in the school
system both in-country and abroad and also
children enrolled in the monastic system. In
2012, 1.3% of the 6-12 years old children
are enrolled in secondary classes.
While it is not possible to know how many
children are exactly enrolled abroad and in
the monastic system, the BMIS 2010 survey
provides an indicative figure of the proportion of children studying abroad and in the
monastic system as follows:

Page

28

a) The BMIS indicates that about 0.7% of 6-12


year old children are studying in the monastic
schools.
b) The BMIS also indicates that about 0.4
percent of 6-12 year old children are studying
outside Bhutan.
c) We know from administrative data that 1.3%
of the 6-12 years old children are enrolled in
secondary schools in Bhutan.
From the above, we can conclude that the adjusted net enrolment ratio for primary education or 6-12 years old children is 98%.
This means that approximately 2% of the
primary age children are out of school. It is
expected that these may be children in remote
and hard to reach areas, children of nomadic
communities and migrant populations, children
with learning disabilities whose special learning
needs are currently not catered for and children
of the urban poor. These children have different
needs from the majority of the students, and
the key challenge is to put in place innovative
and cost effective strategies to provide equal
and equitable access to quality education for all
children.

Annual Education Statistics

The estimated number of out of school primary school age children is around 2,348 (2%). The
box below analyses some of the possible reasons why these children may be out of school.

Box 2.1 Assumptions on why 2% of primary school aged children are


out of school

A large proportion of these children are 6 years old and not yet in school. Since
the NIR is estimated to be around 46%, while the AIR is around 84%, more than
50% of the children entering school for the first time are older than 6 years old,
while some 8% are younger, especially in the private schools. Based on the available data, around 18% of the primary enrolment are over the age of 12 and 1%
of the primary enrolment are 5 years and below. It is estimated that around 7% of
the 6-12 year old children are 6 years old and not yet enrolled. Given the limited
spaces in urban areas and the difficult walking distances in remote areas, it is
very likely that most of them will be enrolled next year or the year after.

The last group are the children 7 years and older who are currently out of school.
They will have dropped out or never went to school. Looking at the current age
of entrants in PP some might still enroll or return to school while some will not.
Since the age of the drop-outs is unknown, it is not possible to estimate how
many of these children have actually dropped out and how many never went to
school.

Some of the out of school children mentioned above would also include disabled
children who may not be able to access education due to lack of adequate facilities. In order to achieve universal primary education it would be necessary to
make provisions also for the education of all disabled and special needs children.

Annual Education Statistics

Page

29

Map showing Primary Net Attendance Rate, Completion rate (CR), Transition Rate (TR) and Gender(GPI) by

Dzongkhag, BMIS, 2010

Page

30

SECONDARY
EDUCATION
VII-XII
The objective of the secondary education
development programme in the 10th FYP
is to enhance net enrolment ratio in basic
education level to near 90% and maintain the
proportion of students continuing to class
XI in government schools at approximately
40% of the graduating grade X cohort. The
other objective of the secondary education
programme is to make it more relevant by
realigning the curriculum to meet the emerging
needs of the Bhutanese economy.

NAR: Adjusted Net Attendance Rate


CR: Completetion
TR: Transition Rate
GPI: Gender Parity Index

Secondary education in Bhutan follows a fouryear cycle (VII-X) comprising of two years of
lower secondary (VII-VIII), and two years of
middle secondary (IX-X), followed by two years
of higher secondary school (XI-XII).

Annual Education Statistics

With the basic education level being raised


from grade VIII to X, a majority of the students
now proceed on to grade X and beyond.
Enrolment in classes VII to X increased from
31,448 in 2004 to 50,828 in 2012 or with an
average increase of 6% over the last eight years.
To accommodate this expansion, seven schools
were upgraded to Lower Secondary and three
public and two private to Middle Secondary
in the 2012 academic year. Currently, there
are 152 lower and middle secondary schools
contributing to the gross enrolment ratio and
net enrolment ratio, at basic education level,
of 108% and 94% respectively.

Annual Education Statistics

3.1 LOWER AND MIDDLE SECONDARY


EDUCATION (VII-X)

The following table gives the enrolment for


classes VII to X since 2002. Since private
schools hardly offer these levels there is no
distinction made between public and private
students. The annual growth at this level
has been very high since 2002, especially
compared with the growth in primary
education.
Table 3.1 Enrolment in class VII-X since
2002

Year

Enrolment in Class VII-X


Boys

Girls

Total

Annual
Growth
Growth

2012

24530

26298

50828

1994

4.1%

2011

23606

25228

48834

2112

4.5%

2010

22958

23764

46722

3117

7.1%

2009

21627

21978

43605

2750

6.7%

2008

20353

20502

40855

1944

5.0%

2007

19664

19247

38911

2714

6.5%

2006

18315

17882

36197

2367

7.0%

2005

17258

16572

33830

2382

7.6%

2004

16256

15192

31448

2565

8.9%

2003

15131

13752

28883

1472

5.4%

2002

14647

12764

27411

27411

6.0%

Average annual
growth rate

6.3%

Page

31

There is a remarkable increase in the


secondary enrolment with an average
annual increase of 6.3% for the past ten
years, although the enrolment ratio is
low in terms of correct age enrolment i.e.
39 %( VII-VIII) and 29 %( IX-X) in Lower
and Middle Secondary level respectively,
with again more girls enrolled at the
correct age. But the overall secondary
(VII-X) gross enrolment ratio stands at 107
and 80% respectively. (See summary for
details)

As of recent statistics, Transition Rate from


Primary to Secondary education is 98.5% i.e.
about 1.9% increase since last year. This means
that almost 99% of students enrolled in class VI
in 2011 are enrolled in class VII in 2012.
The transition rate from primary to secondary
was 99.8% for girls and 97% for boys, indicating
that more girls transition to the secondary level
than boys. Not only do girls have very high
primary school enrolment ratios, they are also
more likely to continue their education at the
secondary level.

3.2 HIGHER SECONDARY EDUCATION (XI-XII)


There are currently 48 higher secondary schools
including 14 private schools in the country.
Establishment of private schools is being
encouraged to develop a more sustainable
education system as well as to diversify choices
for education to the public. Today, there are
twenty six private schools catering to the
various education levels in the country.

Due to the increased enrolment at the


primary, lower and middle secondary
education levels, and the Royal
Governments decision to raise the basic
education level to grade X, there has
been a notable increase in the number
of students continuing their education
beyond grade X. Three middle secondary
schools have been upgraded to higher
secondary level in 2012. The enrolment in
grades XI-XII has increased from 6,691 in
2004 to 15,244 in 2012, with an average
increase of 11% over the last eight year.

Figure 3.1 shows the enrolment trend in class XI


and XII since 2004

Figure 3.1 Enrolment trend in class XI and XII since 2004


16000
15000
14000
13000
12000
11000
10000
9000
8000
7000
6000

10157

32

8102

While the enrolment of right age (1718 year olds) students is low, the overall
enrolment in classes XI and XII is 59%
(GER) including the students in continuing
education (53% for only regular students).
Over all both NER and GER at the HSS level
has increased as compared to last year by
about 3 and 10 percent respectively.

Table 3.3 Transition rate


Male

Female

Total

GPI

Transition rate
(Primary to Lower 97.1% 99.8% 98.5%
Secondary)

1.03

Transition rate
(Lower Secondary
94.9%
to Middle Secondary)

94.4%

94.7%

0.99

Transition rate
(Middle Secondary
72.6%
to Higher Secondary)

68.6%

70.6%

0.95

8816

Male

Female

Total

GPI

NER

18%

22%

20%

1.20

Adjusted NER

87%

86%

86%

1.00

GER (in school)


GER (including
CE)

55%

51%

53%

0.93

60%

58%

59%

0.97

6691
2004

Page

13,940

11815

7684

The NER in Higher Secondary education


currently stands at only 20%, which means
only 20% of 17-18 years old are enrolled
in Class XI and XII. The remaining 80%
are either enrolled at the lower classes
(50%), monastic(8%) education, studying
outside Bhutan (0.7%) or are out of school
(14%). The adjusted NHSER stands at 86%
indicating that 86% of 17-18 year olds are
accessing education.

As could be seen from the above tables, girls


have overtaken boys in terms of right age
enrolment both in primary and secondary
education with the GPI at the primary level
of 1.02 and at secondary level of 1.1 in 2012
indicating that more girls participate in
education than boys in both primary and
secondary levels. However the GPI of 0.97 at
grades XI & XII reverses the gender situation
completely in favour of boys, indicating that
significantly fewer girls transition to the Higher
Secondary level than boys.

Table 3.2 NER and GER for Higher


Secondary Schools

15,244
13314

Overall, the enrolment has increased


tremendously in the last 9 years. With
the increase in enrolment at the primary
level and the continued improvement in
transition rates from Primary to Secondary
and from Secondary to Higher Secondary,
this growth will continue for quite some
time.

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

33

Figure 3.5 shows the distribution of enrolment among the streams offered by public and private
schools. Only a few private schools offer Science. The majority of the students in government
schools opt for Science. The main reason for the increase in Science enrolment this year could be
attributed to the increase in number of Science seats in government schools. Commerce appears
to be the most popular stream among the private school students.

TERTIARY AND
VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION

Figure 3.2 Division of streams in the Public and Private Higher Secondary School

4.1 VOCATIONAL EDUCATION


Provision of vocational education is the responsibility of the Ministry of Labour and Human
Resources. At the moment there are 8 Vocational Training institutes.
Table 4.1 Staff and students in Vocational Training Institutes academic year 2011
Dzongkhag

Thimphu

Wangdue
Punakha
Bumthang
Trashi
Yangtse
Trashigang
Sarpang

Name of the Institute

Length
of
course

Thimphu Institute of Auto2 Years


mobile Engineering
National Institute of Zorig
2-6
2
Chusum
Years
6
Samthang Institute of Auto- months
3
mobile Engineering
to 2
yrs
Khuruthang Institute of
4
2 Years
Electrical Engineering
Chumey Institute of Civil
5
2 Years
Engineering
Yangtse Institute of Zorig
2 to 6
6
Chusum
Years
Rangjung Institute of Elec7
2 Years
trical Engineering
Sershong Institute of Civil
8
2 Years
Engineering
1

Total

Total Enrolment

New Admission

2011

2011

FeTotal Male
male

FeTotal Male
male

Male
33

38

16

88

74

162

193

197

72

117

63

180

38

36

74

55

38

93

117

71

188

63

53

32

85

694

323

1017

Teacher
FeTotal NBht
male

17

11

19

24

28

72

19

24

71

37

108

28

13

41

25

21

46

16

19

22

28

28

91

32

37

28

11

39

23

27

275

98

373

175

48

223

4.2 TERTIARY EDUCATION


All publicly financed tertiary education in Bhutan is under the umbrella of the Royal University
of Bhutan. At the moment 10 different institutes and one private Tertiary Institute constitute the
Royal University of Bhutan. Girls enrolment is seen to be less than boys in the RUB, with female
male ratio of 2:3. While the majority of the students under RUB (with the exception of RTC) are
funded by the RGoB, about 16% are self financed.
Page

34

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

35

Table 4.2 Staff and Students in the Royal University of Bhutan academic year 2011
Sl.

Level of schools

Students

Table 4.3 Bhutanese Undergraduate Scholarship Students Abroad and in RTC,2012

Teachers

Boys

Girls

Total

Bht

N/Bht

Total

Public Institutions

India
(RGOB funding)

Year of
passing out

India (GOI funding)

Third countries, RGOB

Third countries (Bilateral funding), RTC,


Thimphu
(RGoB funding)

Male

Female

Total

Male Female Total

12

Male

Female

Total

21

12

21

14

40

32

16

48

16

37

40

24

64

16

46

96

39

135

23

32

18

12

30

113

47

160

19

19

38

15

20

90

38

128

60

18

27

81

18

99

316

149

92

241

464

191

655

College of Natural Resources, Lobesa

121

30

151

73

75

335

142

477

90

96

2018

215

203

418

78

79

2017

26

College of Science and Technology, Rinchhending


Institute of Language and Culture Studies, Semtokha
Jigme Namgyel Polytechnic, Dewathang

321

92

413

75

77

2016

19

27

21

National Institute of Traditional Medicine, Thimphu

32

19

51

27

27

2015

13

57

19

76

30

Paro College of Education

494

355

849

106

106

2014

69

20

89

Royal Institute of Health Sciences, Thimphu

197

158

355

58

59

2013

14

48

56

Samtse College of Education

426

231

657

99

106

2012

12

56

Sherubtse College, Kanglung

642

426

1,068

131

35

166

Total

27

21

48

255

61

10

Gaeddug College of Business Studies

580

415

995

78

34

112

3,363

2,071

5,434

815

88

903

403

478

881

13

32

45

3,766

2,549

6,315

828

120

948

Sub-Total

Male Female Total Male Female Total

Private funding
Royal Thimphu College

Total

Country
India

4.3.

TERTIARY STUDENTS ABROAD

Every year, the RGoB provides scholarships for class XII graduates to study various professions
abroad. These slots are limited and merit based. Several other funding agencies like the
Government of India also provide undergraduate scholarships. Table 4.3 gives the number of
undergraduate students with scholarships abroad.

17

Male

Female

Total

Scholarship
Student

Total

1770

1391

3161

364

3525

Bangladesh

33

41

14

16

Thailand

14

13

27

29

31

Australia

36

39

Cuba

Korea

Nepal

126

136

Thimphu

20

50

USA

Malaysia

610

3855

Sri-Lanka

A significant number of students also study abroad through private funding. Table 4.4 gives
the students studying privately in India and in other countries. The private student numbers
are based upon the membership figures of the Bhutanese Student Associations in the different
towns and countries.

33

50

Table 4.4 Bhutanese privately funded Tertiary Education students abroad, 2012

Private Institute
11

Total

Total

14

1794

15

1451

3245

The number of girls receiving scholarships and those under private funding is much lower than the
number of boys. i.e. only 38 and 47 percent respectively. It remains a challenge to improve the
participation of girls at that level.

Page

36

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

37

Instructor

Literacy is deeply linked to all aspects of


life and livelihood and is unquestionably
a powerful instrument for empowerment
and improvements in quality of life.
It remains an essential condition for
sustainable socio-economic development
and a critical tool to eradicate poverty,
enhance
employment
opportunities,
advance gender equality, improve family
health, conserve the environment and
promote democratic participation. In
particular, there is a close and deep
interrelationship between illiteracy and
poverty at the global, national, and local
levels with countries and communities with
the lowest levels of literacy doing poorly.
Poverty breeds illiteracy and vice versa in
a vicious cycle that is often hard to break.
Hence tackling poverty as a prime objective
and theme of the 10th FYP will also
depend on how effectively the high rates
of adult illiteracy are tackled in Bhutan, and
particularly in the rural areas. The Bhutan
Living Standards Survey (2007) reported
national literacy rates at 55.5% .

BLC Learners
PLC learners
Grand Total
No. of
CenMale Female Total tres Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Dzongkhag

Bumthang

21

24

24

27

133

160

16

17

28

149

177

Chhukha

20

29

49

56

204

567

771

18

59

77

222

626

848

Dagana

22

43

65

65

238

360

598

128

159

287

366

519

885

Gasa

13

15

15

50

85

135

11

56

90

146

Haa

16

18

13

43

118

161

10

48

123

171

Lhuentse

17

28

45

58

88

265

353

20

69

89

108

334

442

Mongar

36

87

123

128

230

818

1,048

50

193

243

280

1,011

1,291

Paro

13

20

20

45

157

202

53

62

54

210

264

P/Gatshel

12

23

35

33

39

263

302

14

98

112

53

361

414

10 Punakha

20

24

22

49

122

171

12

48

60

61

170

231

With the objective of enhancing adult


literacy, the Non Formal Education (NFE)
programme was introduced in 1992 initially
as a joint effort between the Dzongkha
Development Authority (DDA) and the
National Womens Association of Bhutan
(NWAB). The Ministry of Education formally
took over the NFE programme in 1994,
now called the Non-Formal and Continuing
Education Division (NFCED).

11 S/jongkhar

30

30

60

74

254

704

958

12

20

262

716

978

12 Samtse

32

44

76

72

313

469

782

128

196

324

441

665

1,106

13 Sarbang

25

36

61

64

302

551

853

59

171

230

361

722

1,083

14 Thim Throm

23

27

14

22

228

250

23

166

189

45

394

439

15 Thimphu

17

16

37

123

160

186

64

250

223

187

410

16 T/gang

24

70

94

92

483

94

350

444

577

1,674

2,251

17 T/yangtse

23

32

25

81

244

325

23

32

90

267

357

18 Trongsa

11

29

40

40

97

239

336

15

26

41

112

265

377

19 Tsirang

11

18

29

31

145

123

268

38

21

59

183

144

327

The Non Formal Education Programme has


gained widespread popularity as an effective
programme for providing basic literacy
and functional skills amongst the adult
population, and particularly in rural areas.
The programme has expanded from 365
centres with 428 instructors in 2003 to 953
centres with 949 instructors in 2012. Over
the same period, the number of learners
increased from 12,838 to 13,360.

20 Wangdi

23

38

61

59

131

365

496

45

176

221

176

541

717

21 Zhemgang

12

22

34

32

126

283

409

10

27

37

136

310

446

314

635

949

953

NON-FORMAL
AND CONTINUING
EDUCATION
5.1 NON FORMAL EDUCATION

Table 5.1 Number of NFE centres and Enrolment as of March 2012

nevertheless indicates a low level of literacy


by both international and regional standards.
It is thus a key area for improvement to scale
up Bhutans progress towards achieving its
human development goals and attaining the
MDGs.

Total

1,324 1,807

3,004 7,541 10,545 878

1,937

2,815 3,882 9,478 13,360

It is interesting to note that participation of women in the NFE programme is high, both as
instructors and learners. Participation in Trashigang is the highest in absolute numbers while
participation in Samtse is comparatively high.

While national baseline data on literacy


still needs to be developed, the BLSS 2007

Page

38

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

39

5.2. CONTINUING EDUCATION

In order to institute a system of continuous learning and to provide school leavers with an opportunity
to upgrade their academic qualifications, the Continuing Education (CE) programme was initiated in
Kelki Private HSS, in Thimphu in 2006.
Started as a pilot, the Continuing Education Programme which offers 2 year courses for completion of
classes X and XII has been expanded to 15 Dzongkhags in both public and private HSS. A total of 1670
learners are currently enrolled in this programme. Since most of the participants are in-service people,
the classes are conducted in the evenings and on the weekends, so that the employed can study
without having to give up their jobs. While there is a subsidised annual fee, text books are provided
free by the government. This program has greatly benefitted those who need to be employed and
yet wish to upgrade their level of education. The following table shows the enrolment in the CE
programme as of March 2012.
Table 5.2 Enrolment in Continuing Education, March 2012
Dzongkhag

School

Male

Female

Total

Bumthang

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Sonam Kuenphen HSS (Pvt)


Chukha HSS
Gedu HSS
Reldri HSS (Pvt)
Lhuentse HSS
Sherab Reldri HSS
Tenzin HSS (Pvt)
Yoezerling HSS (Pvt)
Nangkhor HSS
Peljorling HSS
Samtse HSS
Khendrup HSS (Pvt)
Kelki HSS (Pvt)
Nima HSS (Pvt)
Rinchen HSS (Pvt)
Jampeling HSS
Bayling HSS
Sherubling HSS
Damphu HSS
Bajo HSS
Zhemgang HSS

2
25
11
31
19
6
7
33
19
8
66
46
145
37
113
12
26
26
16
66
8
722

2
32
13
46
4
11
13
45
8
6
72
73
263
37
146
17
19
24
39
73
5
948

4
57
24
77
23
17
20
78
27
14
138
119
408
74
259
29
45
50
55
139
13
1670

Chukha
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
Pemagatshel
Samtse
Sarpang
Thim Throm
Trashigang
Trashiyangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue
Zhemgang

Grand Total

Table 5.3 Enrolment in Continuing Education since 2006


2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006

Page

40

Male
722
707
735
391
266
177
78

Female
948
920
783
475
311
216
70

Total
1670
1627
1518
866
577
393
148

GR%

2.6%
7.2%
75.3%
50.1%
46.8%
165.5%

Annual Education Statistics

MONASTIC
EDUCATION

6.1. MONASTIC EDUCATION


Buddhism arrived in Bhutan in the 8th century
and has since then played a vital role in shaping
the social, political, economic and cultural
evolution of the country. Until the modest
beginning of modern education in the 1950s
the only education available in Bhutan was in
monastic schools.
There are two types of monastic schools, the
government supported ones that come under
the Je Khenpo and private monastic schools that
are established and managed by other religious
leaders. Shedras, the monastic colleges teach
Buddhist studies and philosophy, astrology,
language [Choekay, Dzongkha and Sanskrit],
religious practice, etc. and award certificates
that are equivalent to Bachelors and Masters.
Completion of studies in Shedras generally
takes up to nine years. Graduates of Shedras
are able to serve as national language teachers
in schools and increasingly find employment in
the government.
Other religious institutes teach monks in
reading and writing, religious practices,
meditation, etc. so that they are able to fulfill
the religious requirements and functions of
the society. The religious institutes under the
government receive annual budgets from the

Annual Education Statistics


1

Source: National report on the development of education.

government whereas the private ones depend


on donations from the supporters of individual
Lamas. Education is provided free in monastic
schools1.
Private monastic schools supported by
prominent religious leaders and organizations
also provide education in ecclesiastical affairs.
These religious institutes also provide free
education.
Table 6.1 gives an overview of the monastic
novices. The Monastic body has reported
that there are 7,240 monastic novices in 388
monastic schools and 3 nunneries over Bhutan.
This enrolment is significantly lower than the
one reported for 2006, which was 9287.
Information on monasteries not administered
by the central monastic body is not available in
detail. The central monastic body has reported
that in 2004, there were 5,149 learners enrolled
in these monasteries. It is obvious that more
boys than girls are enrolled in these schools.

Page

41

Table 6.1 Monastic novices administered by the central monastic body, 2011
Dzongkhag

Monastic schools

Monastic novices

Bhutan

388

7240

Chhukha

25

184

Dagana

11

207

Gasa

120

Haa

18

168

Lhuentse

10

280

Mongar

27

300

Paro

43

400

Pemagatshel

135

Punakha/Thimphu

71

3096

Samdrup Jongkhar

100

Samtse

240

Trashiyangtse

145

Trashigang

30

280

Trongsa/Bumthang

70

708

Tsirang

115

Wangdiphodrang

30

400

Zhemgang

212

Sarpang

150

7
SPECIAL
EDUCATION

7.1. SPECIAL EDUCATION


The long-term objective of the Special
Education Services Programme is to provide
access for all children with disabilities and
special needs, including those with physical,
mental and other types of impairment, to
general education in regular schools. The
Royal Government thus seeks to maintain an
inclusive approach to improve educational
access to and meet the special needs of
those with physical disabilities and learning
impediments.

6.2. SANSKRIT PATSHALA


Presently, there is one school in Sarpang with 7 students catering to the study of Sanskrit for young
children.

In the Ninth Plan, a Special Education Unit was


established within the Department of School
Education and a draft Special Education Policy
and Guidelines were formulated. The existing
National Institute for the Visually Impaired was
partially rebuilt and expanded to accommodate
additional students with impaired vision.
In Thimphu, a new resource center to help
children with special needs (mental and physical
impairments) was established at Changangkha
Lower Secondary School (LSS). To cater to
the education of hearing impaired children,
Bhutanese sign language was developed and
a deaf education center established at the
Drugyal LSS in Paro.
The objective of this programme during the
Tenth Plan is to provide enhanced special

Page

42

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

education services to the children with a


wide range of disabilities including learning
difficulties by providing support facilities in
selected schools across the country.
The Tenth Plan will support the development
of additional physical facilities in the National
Institute for Visually Impaired (NIVI), Khaling
and the Deaf Education Center in Drugyel to
cope with the increasing enrolment pressure for
special education services. Further, five more
special education centres were established on
the Changangkha model to allow children with
special needs to access general education in
regular schools. To develop national capacity
and expertise, the plan will support training
on special needs education. Teaching-learning
materials will also be provided to strengthen
the special education services in the existing
and new centers.
In addition to Drugyel LSS in Paro and the
Changangkha MSS in Thimphu, 6
other
schools also cater to special needs education.
These schools contribute towards the RGoBs
objective to make schools as inclusive as
possible and integrate special education into
mainstream education. There are about 343
students and 177 teachers in these 8 special
education schools as of March 2012.

Page

43

Table 7.1 Enrolment in Special Education Institute, March 2012


Dzongkhag Name of the Institute

Enrolment

Instructors/teachers
Bhutanese

Boys

Girls

Male

Female

Female

Samtse

Tendu HSS

Mongar

Mongar LSS

34

29

13

30

Thimphu

Changangkha MSS

35

19

10

Drugyel LSS

35

27

10

Deaf Education Unit

46

27

Jigme Sherubling HSS

11

17

Khaling LSS

National Institute for


Visually Impaired

20

22

11

Paro

Trashigang

Zhemgang Zhemgang LSS


Total

GIRLS
ENROLMENT

Non Bhutanese
Male

12

203

140

74

87

8.1 CURRENT SITUATION OF GIRLS PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION

12

Despite a slow increase over the last few years, the enrolment in the NIVI has decreased this
year, especially compared to the spectacular enrolment increase in regular education. One of
the challenges for the education sector is to ensure that all children with special needs receive a
suitable education so they can become full members of society.

enrolment at the secondary level. Even at


the higher secondary level, the enrolment
of girls has been increasing steadily over
the years. Fig. 8.1 below shows the steady
increase in participation of girls in secondary
education.

Bhutan
has
witnessed
impressive
achievements in terms of girls participation
rates with an NPER of 96% for girls as
compared to 95% for boys with a girl/boy ratio
of 100 girls for every 100 boys. The national
survival rate for girls in primary school stands
at 99.2% exceeding that of boys at 96.2%.

The enrolment in private Secondary Schools


grades VII to XII - has increased to 10% of
total enrolment, compared to 8% in 2006.
Girls enrolment in private higher secondary
schools has increased to 49.6% (see Table
8.1 below), an increase of about 7.4 % since
2006.

With the exception of the higher secondary


level, girls enrolment as a percentage of
total school enrolment is about 50%, at every
level of general education. The percentage of
girls enrolment in Secondary education has
increased from 45% in 2002 to 50.1% in 2012
with an increase of 0.3% over last year. Girls
therefore make up more than half the total

Table 8.1 Percentage-wise girls enrolment per level and type of school, March 2012

Page

44

Annual Education Statistics

Class

Private

ECR

PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

ALL

PP-VI

49.2%

47.4%

49.6%

50.0%

49.9%

49.7%

49.7%

VII-VIII

51.4%

51.6%

52.5%

54.3%

52.2%

IX-X

49.3%

50.7%

51.8%

51.2%

XI-XII

49.7%

45.6%

47.3%

PP-XII

49.6%

49.6%

50.1%

47.4%

Annual Education Statistics

49.6%

50.4%

50.8%

Page

45

Figure 8.1 Girls participation in Public Secondary Education

Table 8.2 Girls enrolment by type/level of school, March 2012


Private
Schools

Extended
Classroom

Primary
Schools

Class

Lower
Secondary
Schools

Girls Total Girls Total Girls Total Girls

The administrative data shows that about


89 girls for every 100 boys continue their
education in grades XI and XII. When we
compare the same figures for students of
the appropriate age for the level, i.e. 17 to
18 years of age- we see that there are 109
girls for every 100 boys enrolled in classes
XI and XII. This indicates that right age
participation level of girls is higher than of
boys.

indicators for GER and NER at this level


separately for boys and girls. The higher
secondary GER for boys stands at 55%
-significantly higher than for girls at 51%,
while the NER for boys at 18% is much
lower than the 22% NER for girls. (see
Table III Education Indicators at a Glance).
This indicates that while the participation
levels of boys is higher than that of girls at
the higher secondary level, the right age
participation level of girls exceeds that of
boys. Further research to better understand
the underlying causes of this phenomenon
is essential to promote a better gender
balance at this level.

Higher
Secondary
Schools

Total

Total

Girls

Total

Girls

Total

Girls

Total

PP

378

765

397

856

2,925

6,014

1,755

3,568

910

1,923

152

338

6,517

13,464

320

656

506

1,028

3,575

7,193

2,205

4,443

989

2,022

242

501

7,837

15,843

II

223

503

378

804

3,701

7,481

2,643

5,296

1,130

2,312

302

571

8,377

16,967

III

195

393

247

531

3,751

7,631

2,679

5,233

1,229

2,422

254

511

8,355

16,721

IV

162

315

13

3,862

7,675

2,778

5,608

1,386

2,686

240

453

8,435

16,750

137

274

19

3,399

6,852

2,702

5,392

1,361

2,718

252

518

7,856

15,773

VI

141

255

3,007

5,959

2,787

5,581

1,388

2,750

251

512

7,574

15,057

8,393

16,833

1,693

3,404

SubTotal

Though girls are doing well both at


the primary and secondary levels, girls
enrolment decreases drastically when they
reach Class XI. Table 8.2 show that girls
enrolment declines as they proceed to
higher classes and especially after class X.

Middle
Secondary
Schools

1,556 3,161 1,540 3,251 24,220 48,805 17,549 35,121

54,951 110,575

VII

71

138

3,973

7,813

2,748

5,355

577

1,053

7,369

14,359

VIII

57

111

3,588

6,841

2,902

5,405

631

1,171

7,178

13,528

SubTotal

128

249

7,561

14,654

5,650

10,760

1,208

2,224

14,547

27,887

IX

51

101

3,237

6,269

3,174

6,038

6,462

12,408

53

110

2,434

4,917

2,802

5,506

5,289

10,533

SubTotal

104

211

5,671

11,186

5,976

11,544

11,751

22,941

XI

1,451

2,717

2,184

4,669

3,635

7,386

XII

1,681

3,590

1,893

4,268

3,574

7,858
15,244

SubTotal

3,132 6,307

4,077

8,937

7,209

Total

4,920 9,928 1,540 3,251 24,220 48,805 25,110 49,775 19,714 38,779 12,954

26,109

88,458 176,647

8.2 GIRLS PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATION BY DZONGKHAG

This is borne out when analyzing the

Table 8.3 gives a regional picture of girls participation in education under the different categories of
schools by Dzongkhag. Girls enrolment as a percentage of the total enrolment is a crude indicator,
since it does not take into account differences in overall population, especially in small population
groups where a 50-50 gender division is almost never present.
Page

46

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

47

On average, girls make up 50% of the enrolment in Bhutanese schools and in several Dzongkhags
it is above 50%. Since enrolment and population figures are so small, these are only indicative
figures. It is difficult to draw valid conclusions without knowing the actual population in the
Dzongkhags and regional categories.
Table 8.3 Girls enrolment by category and Dzongkhag, March 2012

Dzongkhag

Urban
Enrol

Bhutan

SemiUrban
Enrol

SemiRemote
Enrol

Remote
Enrol

36279 51% 6029 49% 16022 49% 17064 50%

Bumthang

1163

51%

Chukha

3203

51%

587

Very Remote
Enrol

Only 40% of the students studying in the RUB


Colleges and Institutes are girls. Girls make
up about 38% of the students that receive
scholarship to study in India and abroad,
showing an improvement of 11% since last year
and about 47% (4% increase since last year) of
the students studying outside Bhutan without
Royal Governments financial assistance.

2208 51%
49%

8693 51%

Table 8.4 Girls enrolment in class X and class XI public and private schools 2003- 2012.

267

49%

3706 49%

171

45%

398

49%

Year

Difficult
Enrol

Total
Enrol

7623 49% 5471 49% 88458 50%

400

52%

58

49%

642

50% 2806 50%

975

50%

282

50%

785

Dagana

284

50% 1554 49% 1342

49%

259

54%

Gasa

227

52%

lower than in the earlier stages of the


general education system. In table 8.4 the
girls enrolment in class X and class XI is
compared over the years.
In 2012 the relative percentage of girls
enrolment in class XI in Public Higher
Secondary Schools had increased by 5%
compared to last year. In the publicly
financed tertiary education system, both
in and ex-country enrolment of girls is still
much lower than that of boys.

52%

8.3. GIRLS ENROLMENT IN HSS AND TERTIARY EDUCATION

X (Public & Private)

XI public

XI private

Girls

Total

%G

Girls

Total

%G

Girls

Total

%G

Haa

561

49%

758

50%

50%

95

49%

60

48%

1479 49%

2012

5289

10533

50%

2184

4669

47%

1451

2717

53%

Lhuentse

341

49%

187

50%

899

51%

388

47%

134

44%

1949 49%

2011

5273

10390

51%

1493

3564

42%

1604

3123

51%

Mongar

1688

53%

1241 49%

678

48%

910

48%

670

48%

5187 50%

2010

5025

10293

49%

1415

3425

41%

1608

3021

53%

Paro

3586

52%

774

51%

746

46%

492

53%

114

50%

32

41%

5744 51%

2009

4262

8757

49%

1361

3271

42%

1356

2719

50%

Pemagatshel

637

47%

214

44%

500

51%

612

49%

787

49%

355

49%

3105 48%

2008

3883

7909

49%

1116

2885

39%

1320

2541

52%

Punakha

1527

50%

277

59%

482

49% 1743

53%

115

50%

4144 52%

Samdrupjongkhar

2007

3675

7691

48%

1096

2667

41%

942

1914

49%

1359

54%

81

49%

307

50%

968

48%

1466 50%

50%

4613 50%

2006

3275

6856

48%

944

2525

37%

865

1709

51%

Samtse

2194

50%

998

50% 2138 47% 1126

48%

187

41% 1128 49%

7771 49%

2005

3038

6427

47%

770

1539

33%

851

1688

50%

Sarpang

3323

51%

30%

50%

27

5713 50%

2004

2842

6246

46%

656

2031

32%

774

1579

49%

Thimphu

12032 51%

12032 51%

2003

2361

5264

45%

571

1751

33%

613

1240

49%

Trashigang

716

50% 1638

39%

466

51%

539

323

51%

27%

32

52%

1363 50%

Trashiyangtse 1343

50%

1924 48% 1661

49%

752

50%

512

51%

6192 49%

Trongsa

647

52%

364

47% 1062

49%

435

53%

136

52%

2644 51%

Tsirang

215

48%

45%

239

48%

800

52%

138

47%

49

45%

1643 49%

1444 47%

328

51%

652

50%

493

47%

202

48%

432

Wangdue

Zhemgang

1448

51%

510

49%

510

51% 1149

54%

591

50%

96

50%

4304 51%

406

53%

367

44%

96

45%

52%

438

49%

616

51%

2653 50%

730

Overall enrolment of girls in tertiary education is much lower than that of boys with only 5 girls for
every 7 boys enrolled in the tertiary level.

2917 48%

As mentioned earlier, the comparative enrolment of girls in public Higher Secondary Schools is
Page

48

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

49

8.4. GENDER PARITY INDEX


The Gender Parity Index (GPI) is a

socioeconomic index designed to measure


the relative access to education of males and
females. In its simplest form, it is calculated
as the quotient of the number of females
by the number of males enrolled in a given
stage of education (primary, secondary, etc.).
It is used by international organizations,
particularly in measuring the progress of
developing countries. The Institute for
Statistics of UNESCO also uses a more general
definition of GPI: for any development
indicator one can define the GPI relative to
this indicator by dividing its value for females
by its value for males.
If this index is between 0.97 and 1.03,
it is considered to be parity or equal
representation of both sexes. A GPI of
less than 1 indicates that there are fewer
females, in proportion to the appropriate
school-age population, than males in the
formal education system however, if it is
higher or lower, one of the two sexes is
underrepresented.

Gender inequities continue to exist in society.


In many cultures and traditions, girl children
are discouraged from pursuing an education.
Not only do girls experience barriers to
accessing education, but girls attending school
face certain barriers to education that are not
shared by their male classmates.
In Bhutan, girls by and large dont
experience discrimination with regards to
access to education, as is commonly seen in
some parts of the world.
This year, the national GPI is 1.02. This indicates
that on the whole, the correct proportions of
females in relation to males are enrolled in the
education system there is no gender inequality
in the Bhutanese education system. Both boys
and girls have equal opportunities in terms of
access, quality of learning process, equality of
outcomes and external results.

9
TEACHERS
9.1 TEACHER STRENGTH
The total number of teachers as of March 2012 is 10,296. This includes teachers of government
schools, private schools, institutes and Non Formal Centers. The number of teachers in regular
government schools is 7932. Table 9.1 shows the teacher strength in Bhutan at the moment.
Table 9.1 Teacher strength March 2012
Government

Private

Male Female Total


A

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Early Childhood Development


ECCD centres

84

87

12

130

142

15

214

229

Primary Schools

1,548

787

2,335

44

88

132

1,592

875

2,467

Lower Secondary Schools

1,032

944

1,976

13

21

1,040

957

1,997

Middle Secondary Schools

954

731

1,685

35

54

89

989

785

1,774

Higher Secondary Schools

772

421

1,193

257

98

355

1,029

519

1,548

Extended Classrooms

125

21

146

125

21

146

4,431

2,904

7,335

344

253

597

4,775

3,157

7,932

86

91

177

86

91

177

671

232

903

31

14

45

702

246

948

175

48

223

175

48

223

858

283

1,141

31

14

45

889

297

1,186

School Education

Sub-Total (B)
C Special Institutes*
Tertiary Institutes under
D
RUB
E Vocational institutes
F Sanskrit Patshala
Total (C+D+E+F)
G Non-Formal Centres*****

314

635

949

314

635

949

GRAND TOTAL

5,606

3,906

9,512

387

397

784

5,993

4,303

10,296

The proportion of female teachers in the public Higher Secondary Schools is around 35%, a bit less
than the proportion of girls in these schools (46%). The teachers above also include 116 community
based teachers (CBT) who had been recruited as a temporary measure to help overcome the
shortage of teachers in primary schools and especially in rural areas. CBTs for any school are class
XII graduates from within the same dzongkhag.
Page

50

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

51

9.1.1 Proportion of Non-Bhutanese Teachers


From an almost total dependence on expatriate
teachers in the 1960s, the Bhutanese education
system has moved towards self-sufficiency.
However, dependence on expatriate teachers
continues at the secondary levels and private
schools recruit a comparatively large number
of ex-pat teachers. At present around 8% of the
total teaching force are expatriate teachers. A
comparison between 2002 and 2010 shows
a notable increase in the proportion and
absolute numbers of Bhutanese teachers over
the years.
Figure 9.1 Proportion of Bhutanese and non
Bhutanese teachers (2002-2012)
2012

595

2011

643

7514
6927

821

2010

6369

653

2009
2008

647

2007

614

2002

669
0

6028
5111
4757
3007
2000

4000
NBht

6000

8000

Bht

Expatriate teachers constitute 8% of the


teaching force. Of these the majority teach at
the higher secondary and middle secondary
levels. Expatriate teachers make up 21
percent of the teachers in the public higher
secondary schools and 25 percent in the
private HSS.
Similarly, approximately 11 percent of the
lecturers in the institutes under the Royal
University of Bhutan are expatriates. Gaeddug
College of Business Studies has the highest
proportion with 30% followed by Sherubtse
Page

52

Table 9.2 Enrolment in the Colleges of Education 2004-2011

College with 21% of teaching staff being


expatriates lecturers.
The vocational institutes under the Ministry of
Labour and Human Resources (MoLHR), and
the special institutes and ECCD centers under
the Ministry of Education are fully staffed by
Bhutanese nationals.

9.2 TEACHER EDUCATION


9.2.1 Pre-service training
Pre-service teacher education is provided at the
Colleges of Education (CoE) in Samtse and Paro,
the former established in 1968 and the latter
in 1975. There are two pre-service programmes
offered, a Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) and a
Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).
The four-year B.Ed. programme caters for
primary, secondary and Dzongkha teaching and
is provided in both the CoEs, whereas the one
year PGCE programme caters for secondary
teaching and is provided in the institute at
Samtse only.
Entry into the PGCE programme requires a 1st
degree, while the B.Ed programme requires
a class XII or equivalent certificate. Earlier,
the B.Ed degree included a one year field
attachment programme for the candidates as
apprentice teachers in selected schools at the
beginning of the programme. In 2008, 325
students were sent as apprentice teachers. From
2009 onwards the apprenticeship programme
at the beginning was discontinued and the
B.Ed students now undergo the apprenticeship
during the 3rd year of the programme.
The B.Ed programme, which used to be only
in English, has now been expanded to include
Dzongkha.
Annual Education Statistics

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Ratio of
female to
Male

2004

327

162

489

355

282

637

682

444

1,126

0.65

2005

321

166

487

462

317

779

783

483

1,266

0.62

2006

320

163

483

419

325

744

739

488

1,227

0.66

2007

359

187

546

428

275

703

787

462

1,249

0.59

2008

352

188

540

430

294

724

782

482

1,264

0.62

2009

580

386

966

719

343

1,062

1,299

729

2,028

0.56

2010

434

230

664

536

371

907

970

601

1,571

0.62

2011

426

231

657

494

355

849

920

586

1,506

0.64

Diff. Between
2010 & 2004

99

69

168

139

73

212

238

142

380

30%

43%

34%

39%

26%

33%

35%

32%

34%

Year

CoE, Samtse

COE, Paro

The enrolment in the 2 teacher colleges has


increased to about 1506 students which
constitutes a 34% increase since 2004. The
proportion of girls choosing to become
teachers continues to hover around 40%. This
maybe a reflection of the lower proportion
of girls enrolled in higher secondary schools.
The proportion of girls enrolled in the teacher
colleges has remained consistent over the last
eight years at about 38-40%. Considering the
overall enrolment in the RUB-colleges, the
proportion of girls studying in the teacher
colleges is higher than the average.

9.2.2 In-Service training

Grand Total

0.62

therefore the linchpin on which the success


of the education system in Bhutan hinges.
Teachers are regularly updated on new
developments in curriculum and other
educational issues through in-service
training and workshops organized at
national, Dzongkhag and school levels, as
well as through fellowships outside the
country. Every year about 30-40 in-service
workshops and trainings are conducted for
teachers, out of which more than 10 courses
offered are award bearing courses. About
496 teachers were awarded with various
masters, degree and diploma certificates in
2011. The details are as follows.

Although many factors combine to make a


successful school and therefore a successful
education system, the Ministry of Education
believes that a high quality teaching force is
the most basic element for success. This is
especially crucial when the success of a school
is defined by the ability of a school to raise
the achievement of its students. Teachers are

Annual Education Statistics

Page

53

Table 9.3 Number of teachers who have


been awarded with various Degrees 2011

Table 9.5 Number of Teachers who have


upgraded their qualifications

Degree

No.

Year BHSEC

M.Ed (D)

M.Ed (Physics and Mathematics

2012

38

46

Enrolled for
examination

B.Ed (P)

207

2011

45

10

55

B.Ed(D)

39

Enrolled for
examination

2010

83

16

99

Enrolled for
examination

2009

110

40

150

Enrolled for
examination

2008

330

116

447

Enrolled for
examination

244

Appeared for
examination

303

Enrolled for
examination

B.Ed (S)

85

Certifiate in Teaching English

25

Certifiate in Teaching mathematics

25

Post Graduate Diploma in Mathematics

Post Graduate Diploma in Arts

12

Post Graduate Diploma in Commerce

34

Post Graduate Diploma in Economics

15

Post Graduate Diploma in IT

Post Graduate Diploma in Dzongkha

22

Post Graduate Diploma in Science

12

Total

496

The table below shows the number of inservice workshops and training organized at the
national level from 2002 - 2011.
Table 9.4 In-service Workshops
Year
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002

National Level
Courses
61
35
18
17
16
20
10
22
27
31

Participants
3874
1,645
577
1,743
1,800
2,345
560
851
1,358
2,033

ILCS

ICSE Total

1
1

Remarks

2007

203

40

2006

267

36

2005

190

54

225

Enrolled for
examination

2004

91

10

102

Appeared for
examination

2003

103

14

119

Appeared for
examination

Since 2000, in-service teachers have had the


opportunity to upgrade their qualifications
to Bachelors of Education (B.Ed) in primary
education via a distance education programme.
In 2002, a Masters of Education programme was
also started at the Paro College of Education
using the same mode. Table 9.6 shows the
number of graduates so far.

54

Year of
Graduation

B.Ed
(P)

M.Ed

B.Ed
(S)

2012

207

85

2011

195

230

2010

256

197

2009

190

2008

228

2007

BE.d
(D)

Bachelor's
Degree

Annual Education Statistics

Diploma
in Other
Field

39
76
61

Masters
in other
field

PGDE

Other
Certificate
courses

128

12

67

26

15

61

29

97

43

164

16

72

142

36

23

16

256

134

47

23

2006

211

140

21

37

2005

137

39

28

21

2004

56

61

28

21

197

Ph.D

9.3 ACADEMIC PROFILE OF TEACHERS


This programme is in great demand, especially
after a first degree became an official
requirement for advancing in ones career. The
Distance B.Ed is facilitated from Samtse College
of Education, and the Distance M.Ed from Paro
College of Education. Participating teachers are
offered classes during the winter break and
offered remote education during the academic
year. In that sense, both programmes are mixed
mode degrees rather than distance education.
Out of a total of 7932 teachers, 87% are trained
in the teaching profession. 55% of our teachers
have at least a Bachelors Degree. In addition,
about 9% of the teachers have a PG Diploma.
Less than 3% of the teachers have only a class
10 or 12 certificate as of current statistics.
There is a comparatively low percentage of the
teachers with a Masters and Ph.D Degree. 13
% of teachers were reported not to have been
trained in the teaching profession but have
been appointed based on need.

Since 1995, the Ministry has provided


opportunities for in-service teachers to upgrade
their qualifications by sitting for the national
level examinations as private candidates. In
December 2012, 46 will avail this opportunity.
Page

Table 9.6 Teacher graduate by various degrees and qualifications, 2004-2012

Annual Education Statistics

Table 9.7 Number of trained teachers by


degree, March 2012
Academic
degree

Trained as
teacher
#

Ph.D in
Education
Masters
Degree

177

Post Gradu606
ate Diploma
Bachelors
3,636
Degree
Higher Secondary/
Matriculation"
ZTC/PTCs
Total

2,165

6,584

Not trained
as teacher
#

Total
Teachers*

0.1%

100%

2.7%

519

7.9%

696

100%

9.2%

72

1.1%

678

100%

55.2%

600

9.1%

4,236 100%

150

2.3%

150

32.9%
87%

100%

2,165 100%

1,348

13%

7,932

Page

55

Figure 10.1 Teacher-pupil ratio by Dzongkhag below and above mean

10

35
30

30

25

QUALITY
INDICATORS

24 25

20

20 19

22 21

25

24

20 20

27
17

15

15

24

21 22

21

22
18

16

10

Table 10.1 Teacher pupil ratio in schools by location in 2012


Level of Schools

Difficult

Higher Secondary
Schools

Remote

SemiRemote

SemiUrban

Urban

Very
Remote

Total

23

22

24

12

13

21

Lower Secondary
Schools

30

24

24

29

20

25

25

Middle Secondary
Schools

37

23

22

28

26

19

23

Primary Schools

18

21

21

21

22

20

21

Extended Classrooms

17

27

26

23

22

19

22

Total

22

22

22

25

22

21

22

Nationwide, the STR is now at 22 students


per teacher (see table 8.1 above) on average.
The decrease in STR has been accompanied
by uneven progress among the different
categories of schools and Dzongkhags, with
a standard deviation of 3.51 and median of
21 at the Dzongkhag level. On average the

Page

56

ratio has improved in all Dzongkhags. Also


averages of more than 50 for a certain type of
school in a Dzongkhag no longer occurs as was
the case in previous years. The figure below
shows the ratios by Dzongkhag.

Annual Education Statistics

Standard deviation is a measure of the


variability or dispersion within a dataset. A
low standard deviation indicates that the
data points tend to be very close to the mean
i.e. evenly or uniformly distributed, while a
high standard deviation indicates that the
data are spread out over a large range of
values ( data is not evenly distributed).
The STR in Trongsa is 16 (Lowest ratio apart
from Gasa,) while it is 30 (highest ratio) in

Annual Education Statistics

Zhemgang

Tsirang

WPhodrang

Trongsa

Tgang

Tyangtse

TThrom

Though the national average student- teacher


ratio is low, it is accompanied by high standard
deviation of 12.3 indicating a a very high and
uneven distribution of teachers among the
schools and Dzongkhags with some having
very high STR and some very low STR.

Thimphu

Samtse

Sarpang

Punakha

S Jongkhar

Paro

P Gatshel

Mongar

Haa

Lhuentse

Gasa

Dagana

0
Chhukha

The student-teacher ratio (STR) measures


the number of students per teacher.
It reflects teacher workload and the
availability of teachers services to their
students. The lower the STR, the higher the
availability of teacher services to students.
The STR has implications not only for the

cost of education, but also for the quality.


The relationship between these two
measures of teacher workload is affected
by a variety of factors, including the
number of classes for which a teacher is
responsible and the number of classes
taken by students.

Bumthang

10.1 STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO

Samtse, The variation is very high at the


school level. We focus on school rather
then Dzongkhag because the latter would
miss the potentially large differences among
schools within Dzongkhag in terms of teacher
distribution. The STR ranges from 2 to 61;
which means that some remote schools have
ratios as less as 2 while other have STR as
high as 61.
The tenth FYP envisages that all schools will
be staffed with a minimum STR of 1:24 and
that all schools have at least two teachers.
The following figure shows the STR by
dzongkhag who have achieved the target of
1:24.

Page

57

Figure 10.2 Student-Teacher Ratio by Dzongkhag above and below 24

Figure 10.3 Division of student-teacher ratio

35
30

30

25

24 25

20

18

15

20 19

22 21

25

27
24

20 20

15

24

21 22

21
17

16

18

10
5
Bumthang
Chhukha
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
P/Gatshel
Punakha
S/Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thimthrom
Thimphu
T/gang
T/yangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
W/ Phodrang
Zhemgang

As can be seen from the above figure most


dzongkhag have more or less achieved the
target of STR of 1:24 except for Chukha,
Punakha, Trongsa and Samdrupjongkhar. About
49% of schools have reported to have STR less
than 20 while only 6 schools reported STR of
less than 1:6
Table 10.2 gives the teacher-pupil ratio for
different school levels by location. It shows
that, on average, the highest ratios are found in
the remote and very remote schools. The table
includes private schools which are mainly in the
urban category. It is interesting to note that the
ratio in the PSs has dropped since last year.

Page

58

Table 10.2 Number of schools with different


STR by different level
Range

ECR

PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

Total

1-20

58

217

17

19

22

333

20-24

11

71

33

19

17

151

25-30

10

38

26

14

95

30-40

12

27

11

55

40-50
above
50

11

20

13

It is interesting to also note that about over


41% of remote schools reported to have STR of
less than 20 against that of only 35% of urban
schools. About 74% of schools have reported
to have reached the target of STR 1:24 with
most of them located in the remote areas
mostly PSs.

Annual Education Statistics

About 50% of the schools have a STR


between 1 and 20. A significant number of
PSs also have a low ratio. This is because
PSs are usually established in smaller
communities, where multi-grade strategies
have to be adopted. If we exclude the PSs,
62 public schools have a STR of less than 20,
while more than 111 schools have a student
-teacher ratio of over 30.
Table 10.3 shows the number of schools
per Dzongkhag that have a STR lower than
or equal to 24 and schools that have a STR
higher than 24. In Gasa, Haa and Thimphu
Dzongkhag all schools have a Teacher: Pupil
ratio in line with the Royal Government
target, while Trongsa and Trashi yangtse are
almost nearing the target ratio. Trashigang
and Pemagatshel has the highest number
of schools that have reached the target.
Chukha and Samtse have comparatively high
number of school that still has to reach the
target ratio.

Annual Education Statistics

Table 10.3 Target STR


Dzongkhag, March 2012
Dzongkhag STR<24 STR>24

reached

per

%STR<24
2012

2011

Bumthang

18

86%

81%

Chukhaa

25

23

52%

43%

Dagana

14

16

47%

67%

Gasa

100%

100%

Haa

12

100%

91%

Lhuentse

27

87%

73%

Mongar

42

15

74%

70%

Paro

19

73%

71%

P/Gatshel

58

18

76%

74%

Punakha

24

86%

93%

s/jongkhar

20

14

59%

45%

Samtse

13

43

23%

29%

Sarpang

13

13

50%

31%

Thim Throm

21

70%

67%

Thimphu

12

100%

92%

Trashigang

55

14

80%

70%

T/Yangtse

27

90%

83%

Trongsa

24

96%

96%

Tsirang

13

24%

35%

Wangdue

23

11

68%

53%

Zhemgang

25

78%

67%

Page

59

In March 2012, 13 PSs and 71 Extended


Classrooms reported they had only 1 teacher.
Of these, 1 PS and 32 Extended Classrooms
reported to have an enrolment of more than 25
students. The policy is to have a maximum of
25 students in a MG situation. Nine Extended
Classroomss each with 1 teacher and an
enrolment of more than 25 opened this year.

The figure below gives the changes in STR


over the years. It shows a steady decline in the
primary and lower secondary schools, with
the rate of decrease slowing down for the last
3 to 4 years. The ratio in the middle & higher
secondary schools has been stable over the
last few years.

Table 10.4 Student-Teacher Ratio in Schools per Dzongkhag per type of school 2010-2012
PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

Public

10.2 CLASS SIZE


In addition to the student-teacher ratio,
another proxy indicator that gives some insight
into the quality of education is the number of
students per class or student: section ratio.
Student-teacher ratio and class size are not
same. This assumes that every section in a
school is a different class. Table 10.5 shows
the class size per section per school. It shows
that in urban and semi-urban areas the classes
are crowded. It also shows that the classes in
the Lower Secondary, Middle Secondary and
Higher Secondary Schools are more crowded

than the Primary Schools. Primary schools


have on average the smallest class sizes,
however multi-grade teaching is adopted as a
strategy in these schools.
The differences between the regions
and school types are considerable. The
Dzongkhag with large class sizes last year
have all improved a bit, despite increases
in enrolment. The average class size in all
schools is 26 or less. The average class size for
Bhutan has reduced to 22 indicating that the
school system has been able to accommodate
the increasing enrolment.

2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012
Bhutan

24

22

21

26

25

25

26

24

23

20

20

21

24

23

22

Bumthang

16

21

15

27

21

24

21

21

20

18

16

15

20

20

18

Chukha

40

25

23

28

28

26

22

25

25

22

23

22

30

25

24

Dagana

22

26

22

29

31

27

33

30

30

21

19

25

29

25

Gasa

13

10

12

16

15

18

14

13

15

Haa

19

16

19

25

23

22

Lhuentse

19

19

19

25

25

23

23

20

Mongar

24

24

22

25

23

26

20

Paro

18

19

20

19

22

22

Pemagatshel

18

19

15

26

26

Punakha

21

18

17

21

22

Samdrupjongkhar

27

26

25

29

Samtse

25

19

41

Sarpang

24

14

21

Thim Throm

19

18

16

21

20

20

18

22

16

14

22

20

19

30

20

22

19

20

23

23

22

33

21

21

20

18

22

22

21

21

27

26

22

23

20

20

19

22

21

20

22

22

21

21

18

18

21

21

20

20

28

24

28

25

25

23

23

27

26

25

44

32

30

35

34

30

28

27

24

32

33

30

39

30

28

28

26

23

16

15

21

27

26

24

20

22

21

23

Thimphu

21

21

15

24

22

20

26

23

19

21

24

Trashigang

23

22

20

24

25

24

23

23

21

20

21

Trashiyangtse

21

14

13

29

27

32

17

23

22

19

Trongsa

18

16

17

14

14

15

20

18

17

Tsirang

33

27

27

31

31

32

22

23

Wangdue

24

23

24

26

26

30

26

Zhemgang

23

22

18

17

24

16

36

Page

60

21
22

23

17

21

23

22

21

19

20

21

20

22

19

16

18

18

16

16

20

21

22

27

28

27

27

22

20

15

15

18

23

22

24

24

23

27

21

12

26

23

18

Annual Education Statistics

Table 10.5 Class size per location per school, March 2012
Urban

Semi-Urban Semi-Remote Remote Very-Remote Difficult Average

ECR

12

17

16

31

12

PS

24

18

19

29

14

13

19

LSS

36

23

24

25

27

22

28

MSS

24

39

21

19

16

37

23

HSS
Average

28

30

35

14

17

28

25

23

24

15

One of the targets in Tenth Plan is that


all schools maintain a class size of 3036 students in regular schools and 20
students in smaller schools with multi-grade
teaching. Currently about 53% of schools
have achieved the target of maintaining
class sizes at 30-36 students. The remaining
47% of schools have average class sizes
exceeding or below the target, indicating
either over-crowded classrooms or wastage.
About 15% of schools have class sizes of less
than 20 while more than 10% of schools

Annual Education Statistics

29
16

23

have class size above 60s. Most PSs have


class size of less than 20.
But, as school improvement ideas go,
reducing class sizes is costlier than others
and usually more complicated than it
appears.
Table 10.6 shows by Dzongkhag how many
schools have average class sizes smaller
than, equal to or larger than 30 students per
class.

Page

61

Table 10.6 Schools by Average Class size per Dzongkhag, March 2012
Class size
Less than 30

30

More than 30

% Less
than 30

Bumthang

17

89%

Chukhaa

23

18

55%

Dagana

14

61%

Gasa

100%

Haa

78%

Lhuentse

24

89%

Mongar

35

16

69%

Paro

15

65%

P/Gatshel

22

76%

Punakha

12

60%

s/jongkhar

17

11

61%

Samtse

20

30%

Sarpang

10

11

45%

Thim Throm

13

17

43%

Thimphu

70%

Trashigang

44

16

73%

T/Yangtse

23

77%

Trongsa

21

88%

tsirang

10

67%

Wangdue

18

69%

Zhemgang

22

71%

367

178

66%

Dzongkhag

11

EXAMINATION
RESULTS AND
EFFICIENCY
INDICATORS
11.1 EFFICIENCY INDICATORS
11.1.1. Promotees, Repeaters and Drop-outs
The efficiency of the Education System can
be monitored by efficiency indicators such
as repetition rate, dropout rate, promotion
rate and survival rate at various levels of
education.
The Net and Gross enrolment (NER and GER)
and intake ratios (AIR) indicate access to
education. The efficiency indicators and the
access indicators together give quantitative
information on the quality of the system. If
children come to school, remain in school
and do not repeat too much, it gives an
indication of the accessibility and the
efficiency of the system.
However, as we near universal primary
education, it is imperative to devise
innovative programmes and create facilities
to enroll the population group that are not
so visible at present. Currently, the Ministry
of Education has adopted Extended
Classroomss (ECRs) to reach the unreached
and fast track promotion of over-aged
children to reduce classroom congestion
and discourage dropouts to some extent.
Similarly, the Dzongkhag Administrations

Page

62

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

have also designed their own strategies and


programme to track out-of- school children
and enroll them in schools to achieve 100
percent Net Enrolment Ratio by 2013.
Such initiatives have contributed in reduction
of dropout and repetition rates over the
past few years. It is essential to eliminate
drop out or reduce the dropout rate to 0%
at the Primary Education level in order to
achieve the goal of 100% NER. Moreover it
is also essential to ensure that every citizen
of Bhutan completes at least the primary
education cycle to ensure literacy and
numeracy. It is estimated that within the 9th
FYP period, around 10,000 children have left
the education system illiterate.
The figures below shows that repetition and
dropout rates have gone down considerably
since 2002 by about 13 and 5 percent with
an annual decrease of about 7 and 3 percent
respectively.

Page

63

Figure 11.1 Repetition and dropout rate for class PP-X since 2002
Repetition Rate

Dropout Rate

Linear (Repetition Rate)


13%

Though the reduction in the average


dropout and repetition rates seem to be
progressing toward the Ministrys Tenth Plan
commitment, in specific grades both these
efficiency indicators remain undesirably high.

Linear (Dropout Rate)

11%
10%
7%
5%

4%

2002

7%

6%

5%

2003

2004

4%

4%

3%

2005

2006

6%

2007

3%

2008

6%

6%

5%

5%

3%
2%

2009

2%

2%

2010

2011

2012

As can be seen in the above figure, the


repetition and dropout rates are very high
in class IV and VII, and these have also been
observed in previous annual education
statistics reports. While studies to understand
this spike in repetition and dropout in these
two grades have not been conducted, we
know that schools terminate at grade III
(17PS & 24 ECRs) and grade VI (336 PS), thus

requiring many children to walk longer distances


the following year to their new schools or to
live separately from their families for the first
time for many - in boarding schools to continue
their education. Moreover additional subjects
are introduced in grades IV and VII. These two
reasons amongst others may be responsible
for the spike in repetition and dropout rates
in these two grades. The drop-out rate in class
IX has also increased. It is quite surprising to
see that there is no dropout in class PP, I, III
and VI, while this may be a statistical error; it is
quite impressive to see 100% retention in these
levels. The total number of drop-outs is lower
than last year.

Figure 11.3 Primary Repetition and dropout rates by class and gender
Figure 11.2 Repetition and dropout rate by class
10%
9%
8%
7%
6%
5%
4%
3%
2%
1%
0%

0.35
0.3
0.25
0.2
0.15
0.1

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

VIII

IX

Repeaters 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.05 0.08 0.05 0.04 0.06 0.03 0.04
Dropouts

Page

64

5%
4%

0.01

X
0

6%
5%

7%

Dropout

3%

9%

2%

2%
6%

6%

5%

6%
4%

4%

1%

2%
4%
3%

1%

1%

1%

1%
PP

0.05
0

Repetition

I
Male

II

III

IV
Female

VI

0%

0%0%
PP

0%0%
I
Male

0%
II

0%0%
III

0%
IV
Female

0%0%
VI

On the whole girls seem to be doing much better in terms of promotion and exhibit lower rate
of repetition and dropout compared to boys at the primary level.

0.01 0.02 0.1 0.29

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

65

11.1.2. Fast Track Promotion of Over-aged Students

11.2. Completion rates

The Royal Government has initiated a


provision of fast tracking or promoting of
students in order to enable students who
are over aged and who have better learning
abilities beyond their cohorts to advance to
higher levels on merit basis. This is expected
to induce healthy competition around
the year and also provide much needed
confidence to learners who are competitive
and also cater to the needs of the fast
learners.

The completion rate for primary and basic


education indicate how many children
actually complete education. This indicator,
which monitors education system coverage
and student progression, is intended to
measure human capital formation and school
system quality and efficiency.

It is worth mentioning here that such


initiatives have been one of the factors
contributing to the reduction of overage and
under aged children enrolling in school.

We have seen a reduction from 60% of


overage children in PP-III in 2009 to 48% in
2012. There is also a decrease of 4 percentage
points with regard to primary underage
students as compared to last year (from 12%
to 8% in 2012)
The proportion of right aged enrolment has
also increased compared to last year from
79% to 81% this year and a decrease of about
1% of underage proportion as compared to
last year, whether this would be the trend or
not can be seen next year.

The Gross Intake Ratio for the last grade


of the education cycle is used. Figure 11.5
gives the completion rates for 2006 to 2012
for primary and basic education. Compared
to last year, the completion rate has gone
up significantly at both the primary as well
as basic level with an increase of 14 and 2
percentage point respectively.

Figure 11.5 Primary and Basic completion rates since 2006

The figure below shows the Division of Primary


enrolment by age

Figure 11.4 Primary enrolment (PP-VI)

The current statistics shows that almost 100%


of children complete primary education. i.e.
almost all the children who enter school
complete primary education, and about 3

Page

66

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

out of every 4 complete basic education (PP-X).


There are no gender gaps, with both boys and
girls having equal probability of completing the
primary education.

Page

67

year, and it is fair to say that for the last 7 years, 63 to 80% of all the children starting PP will
eventually graduate. The survival incidence for girls is much higher than boys, which means that
more female students who enter PP are likely to reach the last grade as compared to boys. Some
more years of gender disaggregated data is required to analyze the gender differences. Since
Bhutan has a small education system individual incidences have a great impact, while quite often
they may not be indicators of a trend.

11.3. Trends in Survival rates


Figure 11.6 Survival to the grade V and grade X
Survial to the Grade 5

89%92%

95%
83%

96%
90%

92%95%

Survival to grade 10

97%98%

99%100%
71%72%

76%
65%

2006

2006

2007

2008
Boys

2009

2010

2011

Boys

80%
75%

2007

84%85%

93%97%

Table 11.1 Survivors to the grade 2005-2011 (both sexes, boys, girls)
PP

II

III

Survivors to the grade 2011

1,000

1000

1000

996

Survivors to the grade 2010

1,000

971

971

971

Survivors to the grade 2009

1,000

967

955

Survivors to the grade 2008

1,000

1000

987

Survivors to the grade 2007

1,000

986

Survivors to the grade 2006

1,000

Survivors to the grade 2005

1,000

IV

VI

VII

VIII

IX

996

983

983

983

973

953

851

971

941

933

933

913

910

850

943

936

898

869

857

808

802

802

974

964

933

899

882

841

819

777

967

942

924

887

854

839

786

757

701

997

988

962

954

911

874

856

808

786

720

1,000

980

947

932

886

844

815

750

720

682

Both Sexes

2008
Girls

84%
76%

2009
Linear (Boys)

2010

2011
Linear (Girls)

Girls

Boys

The survival rate to grade V and grade X has


improved between 2006 and 2012. For all
children, the survival rate grew from 91% and
71.9% to 100% and 95% percent respectively.
Compared to boys, girls have more probability of advancing to the fifth and tenth grade.
Generally there are more females participating at Primary to Middle Secondary level than
males, this pattern shifts at the Higher Secondary level where there are more males than
female learners.
The Net Primary Enrolment Ratio (NPER) has
increased rapidly within a very short period,
from 53% in 1998 to 95.7 % in 2012 (excluding children studying abroad and enrolled in
monasteries). In addition to the Royal Governments commitment to education, the rapid
improvement in NER can also be attributed to
increased private participation, as seen by the
fact that private school enrolment makes up 3
percent of the total primary enrolment.

Page

68

11.4. Internal efficiency measures


The coefficient of internal efficiency for
basic education reveals the efficiency of the
Bhutanese education system. The coefficient
has increased by about 17% since 2004, and
about 4% since last year, displaying an increased
internal efficiency.
The survival rate to the last grade of primary
school is an official indicator to track progress
toward the second UN Millennium Development
Goal (MDG), which calls for universal primary
education by the year 2015. The survival rate
to the last grade is the percentage of a cohort
of students who enter the first grade of primary
education and who are expected to reach the
last grade, regardless of repetition.

Survivors to the grade 2011

1,000

1000

1000

987

987

968

962

962

946

930

838

Survivors to the grade 2010

1,000

966

966

966

966

936

912

912

892

892

837

Survivors to the grade 2009

1,000

973

952

933

918

865

823

804

760

760

760

Survivors to the grade 2008

1,000

997

981

960

939

902

851

832

788

780

753

Survivors to the grade 2007

1,000

979

950

919

882

831

790

767

717

684

645

Survivors to the grade 2006

1,000

1,000

988

959

948

894

844

815

781

762

713

Survivors to the grade 2005

1,000

999

979

937

913

862

811

775

710

681

657

Girls

Survivors to the grade 2011

1,000

1000

1000

1000

1000

992

992

992

989

966

854

Survivors to the grade 2010

1,000

976

976

975

975

945

945

945

925

917

852

Survivors to the grade 2009

1,000

961

957

952

952

929

914

909

855

842

842

Survivors to the grade 2008

1,000

1,000

991

986

986

962

945

930

894

856

797

Survivors to the grade 2007

1,000

993

985

968

968

946

922

916

861

837

760

Survivors to the grade 2006

1,000

982

976

953

948

918

895

887

824

800

717

Survivors to the grade 2005

1,000

1,000

980

957

950

911

877

857

793

763

707

Table 11.1 compares the indicator survivors to


the grade for the last seven years. Since 2005
gender disaggregated data is available. Similar
to the previous years, the girls seem to be
performing very well as compared to boys in
terms of survival. On average 2005 was a weak
Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

69

From the above table, we could derive that


almost 98% of children enrolled in grade PP
reach the last grade of Primary, about 14%
jump since 2005. This shows the positive
impact of the primary education system in
Bhutan. There are no major gender disparities
between boys and girls, with girls sometimes
doing better than boys in terms of enrolment.
In fact girls have been doing much better then
boys for the past 7 years. Although there is

room to improve the data quality for this


indicator, the general trend in the last
seven years is that more children who start
primary are reaching grade 7 (Class VI).
The recent statistics show a significant
increase in the number of students
completing basic education, 85% (850 of
every 1,000 student who enroll in grade PP)
graduate.

Table 11.2 Coefficient of internal efficiency in the basic eduction


Both Sexes
PP

II

III

IV

Promotion rate

96.44%

96.09%

93.98%

96.94%

91.02%

Repetition rate

4.89%

5.17%

5.66%

4.79%

7.73%

3.62%

Dropout rate

-1.33%

-1.27%

0.36%

-1.73%

1.26%

-0.18% -2.08%

95.11%

94.83%

93.98%

95.21%

91.02%

1,000.0

1,000.0

1,000.0

996.2

996.2

982.6

982.6

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.0

Adjusted promotion
rate
Survivors to the
Grade
Average study time
at Grade

VI

VII

VIII

IX

95.22% 98.46% 93.00%

94.65%

85.74%

70.57%

4.96%

6.09%

3.37%

3.97%

0.48%

0.90%

1.98%

10.30%

28.95%

95.04% 96.38% 93.00%

94.65%

85.74%

70.57%

982.6

973.1

953.2

851.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

Graduates

11.5 EXAMINATION RESULTS


11.5.1 CLASS X EXAMINATIONS
The national level examinations at the end
of Primary Education were instituted in 1972
with the aim of ensuring uniformity in the
standard of education among the different
schools across the country. It was also used
as a criterion for screening the candidates
for entry into the next level of general
education. With the upgrading of the basic
education level to class X, this examination
no longer serves as a screening mechanism
but provides feedback to the Ministry on
the quality and standard of education in the
different schools across the country.

For many students the class X examinations


marks the end of their general education
careers. Non-successful students reappear the examinations as supplementary
candidates and do not attend regular
classes in government schools due to lack
of space and over-crowding. However, these
conditions may not apply to cases where
students were sick or have valid reasons
for not appearing the examinations. Figure
11. 7 below reflect the results of regular
candidates since 2000.

Figure 11.7 Class X passed trend since 2000


603.4
11.5

Pupil-years invested per Graduate

18.6

Coefficient of Internal Efficiency

59.0%

Male
Promotion rate

PP

II

III

IV

VIII

IX

95.47%

95.12%

92.17%

95.14%

89.10%

93.75% 97.06% 92.10%

VI

VII

94.91%

86.67%

72.56%

Graduates

Repetition rate

5.32%

5.71%

6.63%

5.86%

9.14%

5.68%

3.83%

6.35%

3.38%

3.88%

0.53%

Dropout rate

-0.79%

-0.83%

1.19%

-0.99%

1.75%

0.57%

-0.90%

1.55%

1.70%

9.46%

26.91%

94.68%

94.29%

92.17%

94.14%

89.10%

93.75% 96.17% 92.10%

94.91%

86.67%

72.56%

1,000.0

1,000.0

1,000.0

987.2

987.2

968.1

962.3

962.3

946.3

929.7

838.2

611.5

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

11.6

Adjusted promotion
rate
Survivors to the
Grade
Average study time
at Grade

Pupil-years invested per Graduate

18.3
60.2%

Coefficient of Internal Efficiency


Female
Promotion rate

PP

II

III

IV

97.45%

97.10%

95.83%

98.72%

93.01%

VIII

IX

96.72% 99.81% 93.82%

VI

VII

94.41%

84.83%

68.63%

Repetition rate

4.45%

4.62%

4.66%

3.73%

6.26%

4.22%

3.42%

5.86%

3.35%

4.05%

0.44%

Dropout rate

-1.90%

-1.72%

-0.48%

-2.46%

0.74%

-0.94% -3.23%

0.32%

2.24%

11.12%

30.93%

95.55%

95.38%

95.34%

96.27%

93.01%

95.78% 96.58% 93.82%

94.41%

84.83%

68.63%

1,000.0

1,000.0

1,000.0

1,000.0

1,000.0

992.1

992.1

992.1

988.7

965.8

853.9

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.0

Adjusted promotion
rate
Survivors to the
Grade
Average study time
at Grade

Page

70

Pupil-years invested per Graduate


Coefficient of Internal Efficiency

Graduates

588.6
11.5

The annual increase in the number of


students appearing for exams has been
very steady. Given the increased enrolment
in primary and secondary education, the
annual number of Class X graduates is likely

to keep increasing. A total of 10,190


candidates sat for the Bhutan Certificate
of Secondary Education Examination
(BCSE) in December 2011. The overall
pass percentage was 97%, which is about

19.1
57.5%

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

71

3% increase from 2008. A total of about


7,332 students have been admitted in class
XI in Bhutan this year. i.e about 71%, of
which 40% are enrolled in public schools
and 31% in private schools. The remaining
29% might be either continuing their
education in private schools within Bhutan
and schools outside Bhutan, or enrolled in
the VTIs or joined the labour force.
Figure 11.8 gives a more detailed overview
of what happens with the class X students of
2011 in 2012.

11.5.2 CLASS XII EXAMINATIONS

96%
94%
92%

94%

92% 93%

92%
90%

12.1. SCHOOL FEEDING PROGRAMME

91%

90%

88%
86%
84%

87%
85%

85%

86%

82%
80%
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

The number of students appearing for the class


XII examinations has increased substantially
compared to last year. This might be due
to increase in Private and Supplementary
candidates. The pass percentage however
has been showing a decrease over the last
few years, as you could see from the above
figure. One reason cited is the introduction of
the new curriculum in English and Business
Mathematics. However, this is just an
assumption, and a comprehensive study is
needed to validate these assumptions.

Page

72

SCHOOL
FEEDING

Figure 11.9 Class XII passed trend


since 2002

90%

Figure 11.8 Class X detailed results, 2011

12

In 2006 the Bhutan Board of Examinations


took over the conduct of the class XII exams
from the Council for Indian Secondary
Certificate Examinations (CISCE).

Annual Education Statistics

The policy of the Ministry of Education is


to provide primary schooling within easy
walking distance, in order to allow children
to attend school near their homes. However,
given the mountainous terrain, the dispersed
settlement patterns of the population and
resource constraints, some children have to
enroll in primary schools more distant from
their homes as day scholars, or as boarders.
At the secondary levels, due to economy of
scale issues, many children have to study as
boarders in schools which are distant from
their homes.
This is made possible, largely due to the
provision of meals through the school
feeding program which is supported by the
World Food Programme (WFP) and the Royal
Government. Approximately 33,000 students
or 24% of students in classes PP-VIII receive
two meals a day from the WFP. Out of these,
10% or 13,686 students are boarding students

Annual Education Statistics

and therefore also receive a stipend of Nu


240 per month per student from the RGoB
to cover the third meal.
In classes IX -XII, there are 13,491 boarding
students (or 35% of total students)
supported with a stipend of Nu 700 by the
RGoB for all three meals. As of July 2012,
the stipend will be increased to Nu 1000 per
month per student for three meals.
All together, there are about 46,401 (26%
of all students) students who benefit from
the school feeding programme from classes
PP-XII. The success of the Education System
in rapidly increasing school enrolment over
a short period of time can be attributed
to the provision of free food and boarding
facilities provided based on need.

Page

73

Table 12.1 School feeding in 2012, WFP-support and Government stipend


Primary Students

VII-VIII

Receiving
Receiving WFP Receiving
WFP and
and Stipend
WFP
Stipend
Day feeding
students
% of total students

IX-X

XI-XII

Receiving Stipend Boarding /Day


WFP
Feeding

17,749

1,475

19,224

16%

5%

11%

Boarding students

7,255

7,255

6,431

6,431

8,675

4,816

27,177

% of total students

7%

7%

23%

23%

38%

32%

15%

Total Feeding
Students

7,255

25,004

6,431

7,906

8,675

4,816

46,401

% of total students

7%

23%

23%

28%

38%

32%

26%

Table 12.2 Number of schools offering Day feeding and boarding services and the
beneficiaries by level of schools
Day feeding

Primary Schools

Boarding

No. of schools offering


Day feeding

Enrolment

No. of schools offering


boarding facillities

Enrolment

139

12901

43

3743

EDUCATION
FACILITIES

34

5670

37

6654

Middle Secondary
schools

531

28

8385

Higher Secondary
schools

122

25

8395

182

19224

133

27177

13.1 WATER FACILITIES IN SCHOOLS

To provide quality education it is


important that facilities in the school
are adequate and up to date. In this
chapter the status of some of these
facilities viz. water provision, electricity,
telephone connection, laboratories,
computers and classrooms, as reported
by the schools is reflected.

Based on the reports from the schools with


regard to the sufficiency of water supply, an
analysis has been made of the on the water
facillities in our schools as shown below in
table 13.1.

Table 13.1 Water facilities in the schools, March 2012


No tapstand

1 or more tapstands

Status

Sufficient Water
supply

Insufficient Water
Supply

Sufficient Water
supply

Insufficient Water
Supply

Public

28

308

185

26

26

54

334

Private
Total

Lower Secondary
schools

Total

13

PP-XII

About 61% of the schools reported to have


sufficient water supply, the same percentage
for day school and 46% for boarding schools.
Around 46 boarding schools reported to
have insufficient water supply, while 11 of
these boarding schools had no tap stands for
their students.
When analyzing the water supply situation

185

for day schools without tap stands, it was


found that around half of them have a source
or stream, especially the remote schools.
Most of the water problems in schools are
to do with their source.
The table 13.2 shows the average number
of tap stands available for students by
Dzongkhag.

In the appendix an overview of the WFP-supported schools per Dzongkhag is given. (Annex 5)

Page

74

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

75

Table 13.2: Student-tap stand ratio by Dzongkhag for schools with tap stands, March 2012

Dzongkhag

Schools with tapstand

Without
tapstand

No. of school

Student:Tapstand ratio

Bumthang

19

227

Chukhaa

37

465

Dagana

22

342

Gasa

248

Haa

333

Lhuentse

26

153

Mongar

48

217

Paro

23

490

P/Gatshel

28

229

Punakha

19

422

s/jongkhar

27

338

Samtse

24

652

Sarpang

21

542

Thim Throm

29

809

Thimphu

343

Trashigang

59

214

T/Yangtse

29

208

Trongsa

21

158

Tsirang

13

467

Wangdue

24

350

Zhemgang

30

161

The number of classrooms available in a


school is another facility that influences
the quality of education. Some schools face
shortage of classrooms and have to operate
shift systems.
Figure 13.1 shows the availability of
classrooms. Collecting information on
classrooms was more difficult as there are
many types of classrooms (temporary, semipermanent, permanent) and opinions on
the category and utility of classrooms differ

76

which most of these schools are located in


the public remote and semi remote schools.
And some 12 schools reported to have class
size of 80 and above. These schools are also
located in the remote areas.

15%
5%
49%

13%

13.2.1. Laboratories in schools


18%

Less than 20

20-30

30-36

37-40

Above 40

One of the targets in the 10th Plan is to achieve


class size of 30-36, while 80% of school has
already achieved the target; in fact more than
65% of these schools are below the target
line with less than 30 students per class. As
you see from the above figure almost 49% of
schools have less than 20 students per class of

Another basic minimum facility that is


required in the schools is a laboratory.
Classes VII and VIII require a general science
laboratory, while classes IX and above require
separate laboratories for physics, chemistry,
and biology. A computer laboratory is also
required for class IX and above.
Table 13.3 shows the current provision of
laboratories in the schools. A word of caution
is required with regard to data-collection. It
is unclear regarding the usage of existing
classrooms in the absence of dedicated
laboratories.

Table 13.3 Laboratory by level of school, public schools, March 2012

13.2 PROVISION OF CLASSROOMS, LABORATORIES AND COMPUTERS IN SCHOOLS

Page

Figure 13.1 Total Student per class

based on context and level. Therefore, the


information reported here may not be 100
percent accurate.
Analysis of the information, as in figure 13.1,
indicates that most of the schools that gave
information have enough classrooms. Only
15% of schools reported to have more than
40 students per class.

Annual Education Statistics

No
Laboratory

General Science
Laboratory

Biology
Laboratory

PS

295

52

LSS
MSS

27
2

63
17

2
42

2
42

2
43

36
49

39

39

39

46

HSS

From the above we can see that 39 higher


secondary schools have fully equipped
science laboratories as well as computer
laboratories. Additionally 7 HSS also have
an additional general science laboratory.
Two Middle secondary schools do not have
a laboratory at all as they have only recently

Annual Education Statistics

Chemistry
Laboratory

Physics
Computer
Laboratory Laboratory

been upgraded. The same is true for the lower


secondary schools. Due to admission pressure
so many schools were upgraded before
putting in adequate facilities. This is one of
the main challenges for the 10th FYP.

Page

77

13.2.2. Computers in schools


Information and Communication Technology
Education (ICT) and ICT in Education has been
introduced in schools at all levels with the aim
to build the capacity of Bhutans educational
system to deploy Information Technology
for independent learning and life-long
learning skills. In view of this, ICT in schools
is to be used as a pedagogical tool to create
a stimulating and empowering classroom
learning experience. The ultimate aim is to
ensure the pervasive and effective use of IT
in Education. One of the goals of the 10th

FYP is to equip all Higher and most Middle


Secondary Schools with computers.
IT literacy is also an invaluable asset to
students for their future careers and
Computer Science and Computer Applications
courses in secondary level of education are
offered, IT teachers continue to be trained,
and schools are provided with computer
laboratories and computer laboratory
assistants, along with both hardware and
software for IT education. Table 13.4 shows
the current status of this programme.

823
774
686
503
2,786
30
1
57
307
395

448

3181

13

At the PS and LSS level the number of


computers is less. On average, the schools

Page

78

105

that have computers, have just a few and


these are probably used by the office staff.
Quite a number of Primary Schools have
computers (including 54 OLPC Laptop), given
the fact that a lot of them are in remote
places, and some do not have access to
electricity.

Annual Education Statistics

Total

Yes

No

% Yes

PS

226

118

66%

344

LSS

81

12

87%

93

MSS

50

89%

56

HSS

34

100%

34

Sub-Total

391

136

74%

527

PS

100%

LSS

100%

MSS

100%

HSS

14

100%

14

Sub- Total

26

100%

26

Total

417

75%

553

136

Almost over 65% of the public PSs have


electricity. While it is not clear whether the
question of access to electricity may have
been interpreted as including access to solar
power, the data shows that a lot of areas in

Annual Education Statistics

Telephone access is another important facility


which is necessary for ensuring communication
between parents and the school, between
the school and the Dzongkhag and central
administration etc. This can also benefit the
larger community in case of remote schools.
Table 13.6: Schools with working landline
phone per category, March 2012
Category
Urban
Grade 2
SemiUrban
Remote
Semiremote
Very Remote
Difficult

Working Landline Phone


Yes

No

% Yes

Total

76

100%

76

18

82%

22

120

44

73%

164

73

11

87%

84

73

34

68%

107

49

25

66%

74

Sub-Total
Urban
Grade 1
Urban
Grade 2
SemiUrban
Semi
Remote
Very
remote
Sub-Total

409

118

78%

527

100%

19

100%

19

100%

100%

100%

26

100%

26

Total

435

79%

553

Private

All Higher Secondary Schools have


computers, with an average of 19 per school.
Of the 58 Middle Secondary Schools, 56 have
computers, with an average of 21 computers
per school.

98
4
2
1
105

Level

Schools with electricity


connectivity

Bhutan are not yet electrified. As of recent


statistics it is reported that almost about 75%
of schools in Bhutan are electrified, i.e. 7 %
increase since last year. While 25% of schools
are still not connected to electricity which
includes remote, very remote and difficult
schools. Almost all the HSS and MSS are
reported to have the electricity connection as
of March 2012.

Public

246
89
54
33
422
9
1
2
14
26

Average Computer per


school
3
9
13
15
10
3
1
29
22
15

Without
computer

Private

Private

Grand Total

For the schools at level VII and higher being


connected is very important and computers
and laboratories need electricity.

Public

Public

PS
LSS
MSS
HSS
Total
PS
LSS
MSS
HSS
Total

With Computer
No. school No of computers

The priority after the provision of basic


facilities like water and classrooms is
to ensure that schools have access to
electricity, a working telephone-line and a
working internet connection. This paragraph
describes the current situation with regard
to these facilities.

Table 13.5: Electricity connectivity, per


level, March 2012

Table 13.4 Computers in the schools, March 2012


Level

13.3 ELECTRICITY, TELEPHONE AND INTERNET CONNECTIVITY

118

Page

79

78% of the public schools in Bhutan report


that they have a working landline phone. Even
in the more remote areas around 68% of the
schools can be contacted through telephone.
Almost all the Middle Secondary and Higher
Secondary School have the telephone
connection.

Further IT facilities in schools are being


enhanced with training of IT laboratory
assistants in setting up and maintenance of
Local Area Networks (LAN).
Table 13.7: Internet connectivity per level,
March 2012

Level

Schools with internet connectivity


No

% Yes

Total

0
109
57
30
33

108
235
36
26
1

0%
32%
61%
54%
97%

108
344
93
56
34

229

406

36%

635

7
0
2
14

2
1
0
0

78%
0%
100%
100%

9
1
2
14

Sub-Total

23

88%

26

Total

252

409

38%

661

Public

ECR
PS
LSS
MSS
HSS

Sub-Total
Private

PS
LSS
MSS
HSS

Page

80

Ownership

13.4 ROAD ACCESSIBILITY


Accessibility by road is another very
important indicator. While it has less to do
with the quality of education, it enables
supply of goods and materials and facilitates
the movement of teachers and students.
About 65% of our schools have access to
road.
Road access per Dzongkhag is reflected in
table 13.8; Apart from Thim Throm, about
90% of schools in Bumthang have road
access, followed by Punakha and Paro with
84 and 83 percent respectively. Schools
in Zhemgang show low road connectivity
followed by P/Gatshel, Samdrupjongkhar,
Gasa, Lhuentse and Mongar with only 4055% of schools connected to road.

Annual Education Statistics

Dzongkhag

Road acessibility
Yes

No

% Yes

Total

Bumthang

17

94%

18

Chukhaa

25

15

63%

40

Dagana

17

74%

23

Gasa

50%

Haa

67%

Lhuentse

14

13

52%

27

Mongar

26

24

52%

50

Paro

15

83%

18

P/Gatshel

12

17

41%

29

Punakha

16

84%

19

S/jongkhar

13

14

48%

27

Samtse

17

13

57%

30

Sarpang

15

71%

21

Thim Throm

18

100%

18

Thimphu

89%

Trashigang

41

19

68%

60

T/Yangtse

18

12

60%

30

Trongsa

13

11

54%

24

Tsirang

10

67%

15

Wangdue

19

73%

26

Zhemgang

12

18

40%

30

334

193

Sub-Total

Private

Yes

Table 13.8. Road accessibility by Dzongkhag, March 2012

Public

Internet facilities are now increasingly being


introduced in our schools. Most schools with
internet are connected via dial-up. However,
this is not adequate for schools and a few
Middle and Higher Secondary Schools are now
moving from dial-up to lease-lines.

From the above table we could see that


88% of private schools are connected to
the internet while only 36% of the public
schools have that access, an improvement
of about 5% since last year. However 97%
of Public HSS have access to internet while
only 32% of PS have access.

63%

527

Bumthang

100%

Chukhaa

100%

Mongar

100%

Paro

100%

Punakha

100%

S/jongkhar

100%

Sarpang

100%

Thim Throm

12

100%

12

Thimphu

100%

Zhemgang

100%

Sub-Total

25

96%

26

Total

359

194

65%

553

Annual Education Statistics

Page

81

of Curriculum Research and Development for


which Nu. 39.391m was budgeted.

14

Further, in order to ensure the quality of education, and assure independent assessment of
the education system, the examinations board,
formerly called the Bhutan Board of Examinations was renamed the Bhutan Council for
School Examination and Assessment (BCSEA),
and delinked from the Ministry of Education. A
budget of Nu. 66.670 m was provided in the FY
2011-12 for the BCSEA.

BUDGET
AND
EXPENDITURES
ON EDUCATION
14.1

FREE SERVICES AND SHARING OF COSTS

The Bhutanese education system is built


upon the concept of free services from
primary to tertiary level. Students are not
only given free tuition but also provided with
many facilities viz. stationary, textbooks,
sports-items and boarding facilities and food
based on need. The policy trend during the

last few years is, however, to work towards


cost-sharing with parents, especially
amongst those populations that are in a
position to do so. Accordingly students
studying in the urban areas have had to
buy their own stationeries since 1993.

In general, all students are required to contribute to a School Development Fund at the following
rates:


Primary Schools
Lower Secondary Schools
Middle and Higher Secondary Schools

14.2

ANNUAL BUDGET

The Government stands committed in its


conviction that improving education will enhance prospects to further socio-economic
development. Accordingly, the sector has
always received a high share of the total allocation. In the 10th FYP too, it received the
highest individual sector share amounting
to 17% of the total outlay2.
Among many programmes, the MoE has
embarked upon a programme to improve
the quality of education in line with the
project Accelerating Bhutans Socio-ecoPage
2

82

Source: 2011-2012 National budget report

Nu 30/- per student per annum


Nu 100/- per student per annum
Nu 200/- per student per annum

nomic Development (ABSD). Some of the


areas of improvement include the development of curriculum, competency-based
testing, in-service education of teachers,
development of education qualification
framework for all awards/ programmes,
school assessment and performance systems
training to DEOs and ADEOs and training
of School Principals. For these initiatives, a
budget provision of Nu. 11.700 m was provided in FY 2011-12.

The Royal Government provides numerous


scholarships for Bhutanese students to pursue
higher education outside Bhutan. This is a
major programme of the Ministry and in the FY
2011-12, a total of Nu. 284.134 m was allocated.The education sector budget also included a
provision of Nu. 82.429 m for the Royal Education Council to carry out the on-going projects
for improving the quality of education.
A budget of Nu. 43.950 m was kept for the
Royal Institute of Management for the construction of conference block, IT library,
renovation of auditorium and procurement
of teaching aid. Nu. 21.531 m was kept for
Dzongkha Development Commission for activities geared towards Zhungkha education. The
education sectors budget also includes Nu
1,333.485 m for the Royal University of Bhutan
(RUB). The RUB has been made autonomous
and the system of its operational expenses was
based on a per student fee-system.
On the whole, a total budget of Nu. 6,957.711
m including Nu. 3,917.094 m for recurrent
expenditure was allocated for the education
sector for FY 2011-12.

Table 14.1(a). Top 5 utilizers of budget


#

TOTAL

Dzongkhag
Bud.
SJongExpe.
khar
%
Bud.
Trongsa Expe.
%
Bud.
Wangdue Expe.
%
Bud.
Lhuentse Expe.
%
Bud.
Mongar Expe.

Cur.
142.03
141.63
100%
52.67
51.61
98%
150.26
147.00
98%
97.65
89.81
92%
202.53
189.65
94%

Cap.
59.97
64.35
107%
54.55
57.09
105%
32.99
35.81
109%
37.99
44.29
117%
86.01
95.81
111%

Tot.
202.01
205.98
102%
105.89
107.38
101%
180.30
180.49
100%
135.64
134.10
99%
288.53
285.46
99%

Table 14.1(b). Top 5 under utilizers of budget


#

TOTAL

Dzongkhag

Dagana

Pgatshel

Chukha

Thimphu

Tsirang

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

Bud.
Expe.
%
Bud.
Expe.
%
Bud.
Expe.
%
Bud.
Expe.
%
Bud.
Expe.

102.28
100.66
98%
145.64
142.61
98%
119.08
126.34
106%
15.05
14.30
95%
103.24
85.94

85.99
75.11
87%
65.32
53.52
82%
95.32
66.20
69%
13.47
9.65
72%
37.07
30.60

188.27
175.77
93%
210.96
196.13
93%
214.39
192.53
90%
27.65
23.80
86%
135.27
114.12

83%

83%

84%

Further, the Curriculum Division in the Ministry has been upgraded to the Department

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

83

Table 14.1 (c) Education revised budget and expenditure


(FY 2011-2012) by dzongkhag (Nu. in million)

Bumthang

Chukha

Dagana

Gasa

Haa

Lhuntshe

Mongar

10

Page

NFE

Dzongkhag

Paro

P/Gatshel

Punakha

84

Cur.

Cap.

Textbooks procurement
Tot.

Cur.

3.68

0.35

Cap.

SLD

Tot.

Cur.

Bud.

1.63

1.63

3.68

Expe.

1.31

1.31

3.68

3.68

0.35

0.35

80%

80%

100%

100%

100%

100%

Bud.

0.01

0.01

3.72

3.72

9.26

9.26

4.18

3.70

3.70

13.87

13.87

4.18

0.000

0%

0.994

99%

1.497

150%

100%

Expe.

Cap.

Sports Services
Tot.

Cur.

0.35

0.83

Cap.

RCS
Cap.

ZDS
Tot.

Cur.

Cap.

Primary School
Tot.

Secondary School

TOTAL

Tot.

Cur.

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

0.83

0.11

0.11

27.36

5.10

32.46

59.16

30.24

89.40

93.12

35.34

128.46

0.83

0.83

0.07

0.07

24.27

5.04

29.31

54.64

29.49

84.12

85.14

34.52

119.66

100%

100%

61%

61%

89%

99%

90%

92%

97%

94%

91%

98%

93%

4.18

0.05

0.05

53.86

59.33

113.19

47.99

35.99

83.98

119.08

95.32

214.39

4.18

0.04

0.04

53.65

43.23

96.88

50.90

22.97

73.87

126.34

66.20

192.53

100%

0.844

84%

0.996

0.729

86%

1.061

0.638

88%

106%

69%

90%

Bud.

3.24

3.24

4.54

4.54

0.00

1.61

1.61

0.27

0.27

0.10

0.10

63.13

50.16

113.29

29.49

35.73

65.22

102.28

85.99

188.27

Expe.

3.24

3.24

4.54

4.54

0.00

0.09

0.09

0.24

0.24

0.10

0.10

63.14

46.25

109.39

29.41

28.76

58.17

100.66

75.11

175.77

100%

100%

100%

100%

6%

6%

89%

89%

99%

99%

100%

92%

97%

100%

80%

89%

98%

87%

93%

Bud.

0.59

0.59

0.73

0.73

0.75

0.75

0.20

0.20

0.06

0.06

0.15

0.15

8.97

1.75

10.72

1.86

5.10

6.96

13.16

7.00

20.16

Expe.

0.34

0.34

0.69

0.69

0.72

0.72

0.16

0.16

0.05

0.05

0.15

0.15

8.95

1.61

10.56

1.55

4.83

6.38

12.44

6.59

19.04

57%

57%

95%

95%

96%

96%

76%

76%

74%

74%

100%

100%

100%

92%

98%

83%

95%

92%

95%

94%

94%

Bud.

1.22

1.22

0.73

0.73

0.91

0.91

0.15

0.15

0.09

0.09

44.46

8.95

53.41

47.41

9.10

56.51

Expe.

1.42

1.42

0.73

0.73

0.87

0.87

0.09

0.09

0.09

0.09

43.14

7.72

50.87

46.24

7.81

54.05

116%

116%

100%

100%

96%

96%

60%

60%

98%

98%

97%

86%

95%

98%

86%

96%

Bud.

3.65

3.65

3.51

3.51

2.70

2.70

1.22

1.22

0.18

0.18

0.06

0.06

40.97

15.25

56.22

45.42

22.69

68.11

97.65

37.99

135.64

Expe.

3.41

3.41

3.51

3.51

1.98

1.98

1.22

1.22

0.06

0.06

0.06

0.06

37.15

20.55

57.70

42.48

23.69

66.17

89.81

44.29

134.10

93%

93%

100%

100%

73%

73%

100%

100%

35%

35%

100%

100%

91%

135%

103%

94%

104%

97%

92%

117%

99%

Bud.

7.61

7.61

6.88

6.88

4.33

4.33

2.55

2.55

0.02

0.02

0.15

0.15

67.63

40.26

107.89

113.51

45.59

159.10

202.53

86.01

288.53

Expe.

6.07

6.07

6.88

6.88

4.33

4.33

2.55

2.55

0.02

0.02

0.10

0.10

63.51

32.70

96.21

106.30

63.01

169.31

189.65

95.81

285.46

80%

80%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

67%

67%

94%

81%

89%

94%

138%

106%

94%

111%

99%

Bud.

1.85

1.85

5.39

5.39

1.61

1.61

1.01

1.01

74.90

3.70

78.60

66.63

27.57

94.20

151.39

31.27

182.66

Expe.

1.55

1.55

4.48

4.48

0.86

0.86

1.00

1.00

74.84

2.59

77.42

64.38

21.43

85.81

147.10

24.02

171.11

84%

84%

83%

83%

53%

53%

99%

99%

100%

70%

99%

97%

78%

91%

97%

77%

94%

Bud.

3.07

3.07

6.15

6.15

4.14

4.14

2.10

2.10

0.10

0.10

0.15

0.15

44.51

20.79

65.30

85.57

44.38

129.95

145.64

65.32

210.96

Expe.

2.71

2.71

5.04

5.04

3.94

3.94

2.05

2.05

0.01

0.01

0.15

0.15

43.63

17.00

60.64

85.24

36.36

121.60

142.61

53.52

196.13

10%

88%

88%

82%

82%

95%

95%

97%

97%

Bud.

2.09

2.09

5.11

5.11

5.58

5.58

1.94

1.94

0.00

0.15

0.00

0.14

Expe.

2.09

2.09

5.11

5.11

5.53

5.53

1.94

1.94

100%

100%

100%

100%

99%

99%

100%

100%

Annual Education Statistics

10%

99%

0.13

99%

Annual Education Statistics

99%

98%

82%

93%

100%

82%

94%

98%

82%

93%

0.15

32.44

19.45

51.89

70.35

26.20

96.55

117.64

45.65

163.29

0.28

32.27

15.91

48.18

67.56

25.42

92.98

114.63

41.46

156.09

188%

99%

82%

93%

96%

97%

96%

97%

91%

96%

Page

85

Sl.
No

NFE

Dzongkhag

Cur.
Bud.

11

12

13

14

16

17

18

19

20

21

S/Jongkhar

Samtse

Sarpang

Thimphu

Trashigang

T/Yangtse

Trongsa

Tsirang

Wangdue

Zhemgang

Total

Page

86

4.32

Cap.

Textbooks procurement
Tot.

Cur.

4.32

5.63

Cap.

Sports Services

Tot.

Cur.

5.63

1.61

Cap.

SLD
Cap.

RCS
Cap.

ZDS

Primary School

Tot.

Secondary School

TOTAL

Tot.

Cur.

Tot.

Cur.

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

Cur.

Cap.

Tot.

1.61

1.77

1.77

0.02

0.02

0.15

0.15

45.12

16.93

62.05

83.57

42.90

126.46

142.03

59.97

202.01

Expe.

4.30

4.30

5.63

5.63

1.61

1.61

1.61

1.61

0.02

0.02

0.10

0.10

45.12

18.21

63.33

83.35

46.04

129.39

141.63

64.35

205.98

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

91%

91%

90%

90%

65%

65%

100%

108%

102%

100%

107%

102%

100%

107%

102%

Bud.

6.60

6.60

15.68

15.68

4.31

4.31

3.33

3.33

0.08

0.08

0.15

0.15

0.16

26.25

26.42

132.16

36.99

169.15

162.32

63.39

225.71

Expe.

5.66

5.66

15.70

15.70

4.00

4.00

2.96

2.96

0.05

0.05

0.02

0.02

0.16

19.17

19.33

131.77

35.56

167.32

160.29

54.74

215.03

68%

68%

12%

12%

86%

86%

100%

100%

93%

93%

89%

89%

99%

73%

73%

100%

96%

99%

99%

86%

95%

Bud.

4.18

4.18

7.54

7.54

0.68

0.68

2.00

2.00

26.13

20.72

46.86

112.08

23.07

135.15

152.60

43.79

196.40

Expe.

3.96

3.96

6.34

6.34

0.61

0.61

1.80

1.80

26.16

16.65

42.80

112.06

23.25

135.31

150.92

39.89

190.82

95%

84%

90%

100%

101%

95%

84%

90%

90%

100%

80%

91%

100%

99%

91%

97%

Bud.

0.86

0.00

0.92

0.92

0.00

0.03

0.03

0.15

0.15

13.24

13.32

26.56

0.00

15.05

13.47

27.65

Expe.

0.15

0.00

0.00

0.01

0.01

0.06

0.06

13.22

9.59

22.81

0.00

14.30

9.65

23.80

17%

38%

38%

43%

43%

100%

72%

86%

95%

72%

86%

Bud.

5.13

15.30

15.30

Expe.

5.19

10.15

10.15

2.39

2.39

101%

66%

66%

100%

100%

0.92

0.92

100%

100%

2.39

2.39

3.42

90%

3.42

0.29

0.00

3.42

3.42

0.26

0.14

100%

100%

91%

0.29

0.09

0.10

0.19

2.25

64.88

67.13

147.54

84.74

232.27

176.39

149.72

320.98

0.40

0.02

0.09

0.11

1.71

55.15

56.86

145.36

86.20

231.57

168.51

141.59

304.90

142%

25%

86%

58%

76%

85%

85%

99%

102%

100%

96%

95%

95%

Bud.

1.22

4.92

4.92

1.65

1.65

1.66

1.66

0.05

0.05

0.00

40.67

26.96

67.63

66.24

54.28

120.52

116.41

81.24

196.43

Expe.

1.21

4.84

4.84

1.59

1.59

1.66

1.66

0.04

0.04

0.00

40.69

26.18

66.86

62.73

50.44

113.17

112.76

76.62

188.16

99%

98%

98%

96%

96%

100%

100%

76%

76%

100%

97%

99%

95%

93%

94%

97%

94%

96%

Bud.

1.33

3.47

3.47

2.83

2.83

0.00

0.12

0.12

21.63

21.63

44.92

32.92

77.84

52.67

54.55

105.89

Expe.

1.33

3.42

3.42

2.83

2.83

0.00

0.12

0.12

23.76

23.76

43.92

33.33

77.25

51.61

57.09

107.38

100%

100%

100%

99%

99%

100%

100%

110%

110%

98%

101%

99%

98%

105%

101%

Bud.

5.04

2.74

2.74

1.55

1.55

1.42

1.42

33.90

11.98

45.88

58.59

25.09

83.68

103.24

37.07

135.27

Expe.

2.42

2.71

2.71

1.09

1.09

1.41

1.41

25.24

8.15

33.39

53.07

22.45

75.52

85.94

30.60

114.12

48%

99%

99%

70%

70%

100%

100%

74%

68%

73%

91%

89%

90%

83%

83%

84%

Bud.

2.95

7.14

7.14

2.33

2.33

2.59

2.59

61.71

15.35

77.06

73.54

17.64

91.18

150.26

32.99

180.30

Expe.

2.32

6.98

6.98

2.23

2.23

2.18

2.18

61.77

15.41

77.19

71.53

20.40

91.93

147.00

35.81

180.49

79%

98%

98%

96%

96%

84%

84%

100%

100%

100%

97%

116%

101%

98%

109%

100%

Bud.

1.07

7.54

7.54

3.14

3.14

1.38

1.38

0.06

0.06

48.93

22.04

70.97

63.98

24.81

88.79

126.10

46.84

171.88

Expe.

1.00

5.01

5.01

3.14

3.14

1.16

1.16

0.00

0.00

46.91

23.31

70.22

60.04

23.03

83.08

117.26

46.34

162.60

93%

66%

66%

100%

100%

84%

84%

7%

7%

96%

106%

99%

94%

93%

94%

93%

99%

95%

Bud.

57.67

40.07

109.66

109.66

50.85

50.85

34.11

34.11

1.43

0.00

1.43

0.23

1.31

1.54

685.98 455.84 1,141.82 1,347.05 624.87 1,971.91 2,286.97 1,082.02 3,351.39

Expe.

49.66

36.05

98.40

98.40

52.66

52.66

31.07

31.07

0.99

0.14

1.14

0.17

1.04

1.21

662.46 400.43 1,062.90 1,309.41 604.39 1,913.80 2,204.83 1,006.01 3,197.23

86%

90%

90%

90%

104%

104%

91%

91%

69%

79%

71%

80%

78%

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

97%

88%

93%

97%

97%

97%

96%

93%

Page

95%

87

14.3

PER HEAD COSTS

The estimated per head cost by school levels as given in table 14.3
Table 14.2 : Estimated cost per student, May 2011*
Schools & Institute under the Ministry of Education
Primary Schools

Cost per student per annum (in Nu)


12,382

a) Day Scholars

12,329

b) Boarders

21,200

Lower Secondary Schools

19,396

a) Day Scholars

14,952

b) Boarders

26,621

Middle Secondary Schools

46,007

a) Day Scholars

35,797

b) Boarders

53,549

Higher Secondary Schools

55,021

a) Day Scholars

48,844

b) Boarders

62,333

National Institute for Visually Impaired

158,838

Institutes & Colleges under Royal University of Bhutan


College of Natural Resources, Lobesa

208,609

College of Science and Technology, Rinchhending

77,851

Institute of Language and Culture Studies, Semtokha

67,258

Jigme Namgyel Polytechnic, Dewathang


National Institute of Traditional Medicine, Thimphu

67,184
203,294

Paro College of Education, Paro

56,912

Royal Institute of Health Sciences, Thimphu

74,634

Samtse College of Education, Samtse

68,129

Sherubtse College, Kanglung

63,354

Gaeddug College of Business Studies

50,508

Total

68,523

Institutes under the MoLHR


Khuruthang Vocational Training Institute

72,517

Ranjung Vocational Training Institute

70,995

Sherzhong Vocational Training Institute

138,635

Chumey Vocational Training Institute

172,432

Samthang Vocational Training Institute

56,183

Institute of Automibile Engineering

156,579

National Institute for Zorig Chusum

106,012

Trashiyangtse Institute for Zorig Chusum

101,226

*This is based on 2010-2011 expenditures


Page

88

Annual Education Statistics

Additional
Statistical
Tables

Table A1.2 Enrolment growth rate per Dzongkhag per level 2011-2012

3625 7.4%

2178 4.5%
23

0.7%

222 6.9%

Zhemgang

Wangdue

2490 5.1%
2.9%
92

1801 3.7%
0.4%
13

Tsirang

Trongsa

1478 3.0%

4486 9.2%
190 5.9%

Trashiyangtse

Trashigang

3251 100% 48805 100% 1928 100% 49775 100% 223 100% 38779 100% 1184 100% 26109 100% 6593 100% 176647 100%

4.8%

2.3%
1130

2420

4.1%

1.4%
727

2082

6.8%

5.2%
2600

3444

1.1%
570
7.7%
148

Thimphu

671
0.5%
16

1.4%

9.0%

10.2%
5128

1534 79.6% 4531


9.9%
0.0%
0

4822

1776
3.8%
123

Thim Throm

Sarpang

0.0%

3.3%

8.8%
4432

11.4% 1653
219

3054

6.2%

7.2%
3543
4.3%
139

1051 32.4%

S/ongkhar

Samtse

5.3%

3.1%
1546
3.5%

3.4%

5.3%

1682
7.2%

169

Punakha

Pema Gatshel

231

1718

2651

6.0%

6.8%
3420

3043

1.4%
3.1%
3.3%

1533

4.6%

107

Paro

Mongar

148

3601

7.9%

27

1.3%

3.0%
1532

638
4.1%

1.6%

1.8%

773
3.1%

58

Lhuentse

Haa

98

2016

0.5%
297
1.5%
77

Gasa

8.2%

Dagana

Total

2.7%

4.7%
8391

1.7% 134 2.0% 5312


450
3.6%

1151 4.5%
2.5%
973

1397
1.7%

4.8%

3.4%

1.9%
3351

6068
3.0%

1.7%
446

763
1.7%

0.9%
364

641
4.1%

1.4%

3.4%

12615 7.1%

5270
1.9%
490

2132 8.3%
6.1%

1.8%
702

2363
6.8%

6.6%

1.6%
2743
3.5%
1338
1.1%

6.4%
757 11.5% 11383

13.9% 2121 32.2% 23466 13.3%

5.0%
1280
6.0%

14.8% 1184 100.0% 3553


5721

2319
10.2%

9.6%

8.0%
3094

3732
8.8%

3.3%

7.4%

2.0%
769

2865
3.1%

5.3%

6.8%

2.7%
1035

2652
6.8%

6.0%

2.1%

0.0%
0

826
1.3%

3.0%

1.1%

4.5%
1749

437
0.0%

11.8%
4574
9.9%

4.6%
4.6%
4.3%

8.1%
5.8%

Chhukha

264

3948

2319

187

2093

4764

9.9%

223

9.0%

8.9%

5.2%
9136

15997

1.9%

14.3%

488

3728

3.6%

4.5%
8013

6407
0.0%
0

2.7% 1019 15.5%

4.2%

696

1074

379 5.7%
2.3%
591

6.4%

6.0%

7.6% 1600 24.3% 11276


1937

10406
8.6%
2200

1.7%

2.2%
3969

2994

1.7%
431

0.4%
811
0.0%
0

9.7%

4.3%
7523
4.3%
1098

17208
12.1% 405 6.1%
3107

4308

#
%

178 2.7%

#
%
#

1.9%
1228
2.3%

#
%
#

1145

%
%
#
%

1.3%

Bumthang

43

1220

2.5%

2.3%

3.2%

494

Total
ECR

Public PS

Private PS

Public LSS

Private LSS

Public MSS Private MSS Public HSS Private HSS

90

Dzongkhag

Table A1.1 Enrolment per Dzongkhag per type of School 2012

A1. Additional tables on primary and secondary enrolment


Page

2.4%

Dzongkhag

Annual Education Statistics

PP-VI
2011

VII-X

XI-XII

2012

GR

2011

2012

GR

2011

PP-XII

2012

GR

2011

2012

GR

Bumthang

2607

2499

-4.1%

1348

1412

4.7%

457

397

-13.1%

4412

4308

-2.4%

Chukha

11119

11108

-0.1%

4945

5056

2.2%

996

1044

4.8%

17060

17208

0.9%

Dagana

5186

5154

-0.6%

2073

2204

6.3%

128

165

28.9%

7387

7523

1.8%

Gasa

442

577

30.5%

222

234

5.4%

664

811

22.1%

Haa

2039

1955

-4.1%

924

862

-6.7%

175

177

1.1%

3138

2994

-4.6%

Lhuentse

2727

2680

-1.7%

1161

1161

0.0%

112

128

14.3%

4000

3969

-0.8%

Mongar

6756

6748

-0.1%

2644

2789

5.5%

769

869

13.0%

10169

10406

2.3%

Paro

5708

5643

-1.1%

2903

3001

3.4%

2367

2632

11.2%

10978

11276

2.7%

Pemagatshel

3923

3790

-3.4%

2133

2230

4.5%

372

387

4.0%

6428

6407

-0.3%

Punakha

4369

4238

-3.0%

2262

2425

7.2%

1155

1350

16.9%

7786

8013

2.9%

S/jongkhar

6184

6250

1.1%

2666

2657

-0.3%

301

229

-23.9%

9151

9136

-0.2%

Samtse

11436

11516

0.7%

3797

4154

9.4%

347

327

-5.8%

15580

15997

2.7%

Sarpang

7248

7256

0.1%

3063

2990

-2.4%

956

1137

18.9%

11267

11383

1.0%

Thimphu

14666

14755

0.6%

6848

7231

5.6%

3745

4223

12.8%

25259

26209

3.8%

Trashigang

8207

7913

-3.6%

3782

3833

1.3%

784

869

10.8%

12773

12615

-1.2%

Trashiyangtse

3538

3351

-5.3%

1481

1684

13.7%

288

235

-18.4%

5307

5270

-0.7%

Trongsa

2347

2192

-6.6%

973

1027

5.5%

85

132

55.3%

3405

3351

-1.6%

Tsirang

3884

4018

3.5%

1759

1745

-0.8%

249

305

22.5%

5892

6068

3.0%

Wangdue

5354

5733

7.1%

2061

2385

15.7%

294

273

-7.1%

7709

8391

8.8%

Zhemgang

3433

3199

-6.8%

1789

1748

-2.3%

360

365

1.4%

5582

5312

-4.8%

-0.5%

48834

50828

4.1%

13940

15244

9.4%

173947

176647

1.6%

Total

111173 110575

Table A1.3 Total enrolment by Dzongkhag by gender


Dzongkhag
Bumthang
Chukha
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
Pemagatshel
Punakha
S/jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thim Throm
Thimphu
Trashigang
Trashiyangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue
Zhemgang
Total

PP-VI

VII-X

XI-XII

PP-XII

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

1205
5518
2611
297
995
1367
3423
2844
1945
2071
3088
5958
3663
6327
1082
3957
1665
1114
2073
2857
1564
55624

1294
5590
2543
280
960
1313
3325
2799
1845
2167
3162
5558
3593
6314
1032
3956
1686
1078
1945
2876
1635
54951

2499
11108
5154
577
1955
2680
6748
5643
3790
4238
6250
11516
7256
12641
2114
7913
3351
2192
4018
5733
3199
110575

673
2458
1118
116
422
559
1342
1390
1095
1110
1272
2091
1420
3083
298
1927
816
507
893
1076
864
24530

739
2598
1086
118
440
602
1447
1611
1135
1315
1385
2063
1570
3519
331
1906
868
520
852
1309
884
26298

1412
5056
2204
234
862
1161
2789
3001
2230
2425
2657
4154
2990
6602
629
3833
1684
1027
1745
2385
1748
50828

222
539
88

175
505
77

397
1044
165

98
94
454
1298
262
688
163
177
587
2024

79
34
415
1334
125
662
66
150
550
2199

177
128
869
2632
387
1350
229
327
1137
4223

539
145
87
185
154
231
8035

330
90
45
120
119
134
7209

869
235
132
305
273
365
15244

2053
8481
3806
413
1496
1960
5180
5568
3165
3843
4426
8199
5633
11609
1380
6214
2571
1666
3086
4052
2562
88189

2255
8727
3717
398
1498
2009
5226
5708
3242
4170
4710
7798
5750
11857
1363
6401
2699
1685
2982
4339
2750
88458

4308
17208
7523
811
2994
3969
10406
11276
6407
8013
9136
15997
11383
23466
2743
12615
5270
3351
6068
8391
5312
176647

Annual Education Statistics

Page

91

A2. Additional tables on infrastructure, 2012


Table A2.1 Public and Private Schools per Dzongkhag 2012
Dzongkhag

Table A1.4 Enrolment in Classes XI and XII , 2004-2012


Enrolment in Classes XI & XII
Public

Year

Private

Total

Annual growth

Boys

Girls

Total

Boys

Girls

Total

Boys

Girls

Total

2012

4,860

4,077

8,937

3,175

3,132

6,307

8,035

7,209

15,244

1,304

9.4%

2011

4,192

3,039

7,231

3,335

3,374

6,709

7,527

6,413

13,940

626

4.7%

2010

3914

2821

6735

3225

3354

6579

7139

6175

13314

1499

12.7%

2009

3665

2519

6184

2797

2834

5631

6462

5353

11815

1658

16.3%

2008

3326

2181

5507

2277

2373

4650

5603

4554

10157

1341

15.2%

2007

3142

2023

5165

1845

1806

3651

4987

3829

8816

714

8.8%

2006

3069

1695

4764

1665

1673

3338

4734

3368

8102

418

5.4%

2005

2900

1432

4332

1698

1654

3352

4598

3086

7684

993

14.8%

2004

2546

1213

3759

1514

1418

2932

4060

2631

6691

887

15.3%

Average annual growth rate

11.4%

Table A1.5 Enrolment in Class XI and XII per stream.

Class
XII

Class
XI

Public Schools

Page

Arts
Commerce
Science
Sub-total
Arts
Commerce
Science
Sub-total

92

#
961
1,732
1,976
4,669
622
1,701
1,945
4,268

%
21%
37%
42%
100%
13%
36%
42%
100%

Private Schools
#
1,245
1,307
165
2,717
1,125
1,799
666
3,590

%
46%
48%
6%
100%
41%
66%
25%
100%

Private
Public HSS Private LSS Public LSS
HSS
#

%
30%
41%
29%
100%
24%
47%
35%
100%

Annual Education Statistics

Private
MSS
%

Public PS

Total

1.8%

1 7.1%

2.9%

2.2%

5.3%

12

3.5%

21 3.2%

Chhukha

5.5%

1 7.1%

8.8% 1 100.0% 5

5.4%

10.5%

26

7.6%

48 7.3%

Dagana

6.4%

5.9%

7.6%

3.5%

12

3.5%

30 4.5%

Gasa

1.8%

1.8%

0.9%

Haa

2.8%

Lhuentse

3.7%

Mongar

5.5%

1 7.1%

Paro

Public MSS Private PS

Bumthang

0.9%

2.9%

3.3%

0.0%

1.5%

12 1.8%

2.9%

2.2%

3.5%

22

6.4%

31 4.7%

8.8%

7.6%

3.5%

38 11.0% 57 8.6%

2.8%

4 28.6% 2

5.9%

6.5%

7.0%

1 11.1% 6

1.7%

26 3.9%

Pema Gatshel 9

8.3%

5.9%

6.5%

1.8%

20

5.8%

38 5.7%

Punakha

7.3%

2.9%

3.3%

8.8%

10

2.9%

28 4.2%

S/ Jongkhar

5.5%

2.9%

4.3%

8.8%

1 11.1% 17

4.9%

34 5.1%

Samtse

26 23.9%

8.8%

7.6%

5.3%

17

4.9%

56 8.5%

Sarpang

3.7%

1 7.1%

5.9%

6.5%

3.5%

11

3.2%

26 3.9%

Thim Throm

0.0%

4 28.6% 2

5.9%

5.4% 2 100.0%

8.8%

6 66.7% 6

1.7%

30 4.5%

Thimphu

1.8%

0.0%

2.2%

3.5%

1 11.1% 5

1.5%

12 1.8%

Trashigang

8.3%

4 11.8%

10 10.9%

8.8%

41 11.9% 69 10.4%

2.9%

7.6%

1.8%

21

6.1%

30 4.5%

Trongsa

0.9%

2.9%

2.2%

3.5%

19

5.5%

25 3.8%

Tsirang

1.8%

2.9%

2.2%

1.8%

11

3.2%

17 2.6%

Wangdue

7.3%

5.9%

3.3%

3.5%

19

5.5%

34 5.1%

Zhemgang

0.9%

2.9%

3.3%

5.3%

23

6.7%

32 4.8%

57

100% 9

1 7.1%

Trashiyangtse

Total
#
2,206
3,039
2,141
7,386
1,747
3,500
2,611
7,858

ECR

Total

1 7.1%

109 100% 14 100% 34 100% 1 100% 92 100% 2 100%

100% 344 100% 662 100%

Table A2.2 Electricity, phone and internet connectivity by dzongkhag


Dzongkhag
Bhutan
Bumthang
Chukhaa
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
P/Gatshel
Punakha
S/Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thim Throm
Thimphu
Trashigang
T/Yangtse
Trongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue
Zhemgang

Electricity connectivity
Yes
Yes %
417
15
32
17
2
6
21
32
22
20
19
20
16
17
30
9
58
28
13
7
22
11

75%
79%
76%
74%
50%
67%
78%
63%
96%
69%
95%
71%
53%
77%
100%
90%
97%
93%
54%
47%
85%
35%

Annual Education Statistics

Working Landline Phone


Yes
Yes%
435
16
36
17
3
6
13
38
19
24
18
17
17
17
30
8
51
22
22
13
20
28

79%
84%
86%
74%
75%
67%
48%
75%
83%
83%
90%
61%
57%
77%
100%
80%
85%
73%
92%
87%
77%
90%

Working Internet Connection


Yes
Yes %
252
8
22
9
2
6
7
13
17
12
10
7
11
12
24
1
37
18
8
3
14
11

46%
42%
52%
39%
50%
67%
26%
25%
74%
41%
50%
25%
37%
55%
80%
10%
62%
60%
33%
20%
54%
35%

Page

93

A3. Additional tables on teachers, 2012


Table A3.1 Public and Private Teachers per Dzongkhag
Dzongkhag

ECR
#

Private
HSS
#
%

Private
LSS
#
%

Public HSS
#

32

2.7%

Public LSS
#

Private
MSS
#
%

62

Public PS

Total

3.7%

79

3.4%

235 3.0%

Table A3.3 Proportion of Non-Bhutanese teachers 2002-2012


2002

Bumthang

1.4% 12 3.4%

Chhukha

4.8% 19 5.4% 139 11.7% 21 100.0% 169 8.6%

181 10.7%

170

7.3%

706 8.9%

Dagana

6.2%

Gasa

2.1%

Haa

2.1%

Lhuentse

2.7%

Mongar
Paro
Pema Gatshel

19 13.0%

2008

2009

Bht NBht Total Bht NBht Total

Bht

2010

2011

NBht Total Bht NBht Total Bht

2012

NBht Total

Bht NBht Total

PS

1251

33

1284 1790

1799 2202

10

2212 2197 76 2273 2260

2268 2332

2335

LSS

948

205 1153 1537

90

1627 1696

89

1785 1729 128 1857 1884

65

1949 1918

58

1976

359 1016 1492 439 1931 1762

424 2186 1992 487 2479 2266

427

2693 2468

410 2878

71

215

279

109

388

355

130

485

328 130 458

386

141

527

491

106

597

13

13

13

13

123

15

17

161

16

177

116

116

144

146

4.9%

87 4.4%

58

3.4%

94

4.0%

307 3.9%

0.0%

0.0%

24

1.4%

22

0.9%

49 0.6%

37

3.1%

71 3.6%

0.0%

41

1.8%

152 1.9%

30

2.5%

28 1.4%

45

2.7%

104

4.5%

211 2.7%

M&
657
HSS
Pvt.
144
Schools

5.5% 18 5.1% 112 9.4%

118 6.0%

53

3.1%

174

7.5%

483 6.1%

NID

2.7% 92 25.9% 68

5.7%

157 7.9%

127 7.5%

72

3.1%

526 6.6%

ECR

58

4.9%

99 5.0%

33

2.0%

110

4.7%

319 4.0%

Punakha
Samdrup
Jongkhar
Samtse

11 7.5% 46 13.0% 37

3.1%

71 3.6%

136 8.1%

104

4.5%

405 5.1%

Total

3,007 669 3,676 5,111 647 5,758 6,028 653 6,681 6,369 821 7,190 6,927 643 7,570 7514

595 8109

1.8%

68 3.4%

125 7.4% 10 7.6% 139

6.0%

369 4.7%

82% 18%

7%

29 19.9%

144 12.1%

149 7.5%

123 7.3%

75

3.2%

520 6.6%

Sarpang

2.7% 26 7.3%

71

182 9.2%

102 6.1%

85

3.6%

470 5.9%

Thim Throm

0.0% 132 37.2% 114 9.6%

206 10.4% 89 100.0% 242 14.4% 105 79.5% 212

9.1% 1100 13.9%

Thimphu

1.4%

28 1.4%

71

45

1.9%

157 2.0%

Trashigang

14 9.6%

103 8.6%

144 7.3%

111 6.6%

228

9.8%

600 7.6%

Trashiyangtse

0.0%

24

2.0%

104 5.3%

32

1.9%

114

4.9%

274 3.5%

Trongsa

1.4%

25

2.1%

48 2.4%

20

1.2%

107

4.6%

202 2.5%

Tsirang
Wangdue
Phodrang
Zhemgang

2.1%

28

2.3%

66 3.3%

32

1.9%

92

3.9%

221 2.8%

14 9.6%

64

5.4%

80 4.0%

48

2.8%

148

6.3%

354 4.5%

Total

59

48 2.4%

Public MSS Private PS

4.1%

21

1.4% 10 2.8%

27

6.0%

2.3%

53 2.7%

60

4.5%

4.2% 11 8.3%

3.6%

120

5.1%

272 3.4%

146 100% 355 100% 1193 100% 21 100% 1976 100% 89 100% 1685 100% 132 100% 2335 100% 7932 100%

Table A3.2 STR per school type per Dzongkhag, 2012


Dzongkhag

ECR

HSS

LSS

MSS

PS

Public

Private

ALL

Bhutan
Bumthang
Chukha
Dagana
Gasa
Haa
Lhuentse
Mongar
Paro
Pemagatsel
Punakha
S/Jongkhar
Samtse
Sarpang
Thim Throm
Thimphu
T/gang
T/yangtse
Tongsa
Tsirang
Wangdue
Zhemgang

22
22
27
29
16
33
15
19
27
12
15
23
36
31

21
15
22
19

25
24
28
27
22
23
26
22
27
22
24
30
28
22
20
24
32
15
32
30
16

21
15
23
22
12
19
19
22
21
15
17
25
41
21
23
15
20
13
17
27
24
18

23
19
25
25
15
20
19
22
23
20
19
25
30
24
24
18
21
22
16
27
24
18

17
15
16

16
14
20
28
19
19
23
24
18
31

23
20
25
30
18

22
18
24
25
15
20
19
22
21
20
20
25
30
24
21
17
21
22
16
27
24
18

8
14
7
31
16
12

21
20
18
27
18
11

18
20
21
23
21
25
30
23
24
19
21
22
17
20
20
23

21
17
22
22
29
15
13

13

89% 11%

94

Annual Education Statistics

123

89% 11%

92%

8%

93%

Table A3.4 Teachers qualification in public and private school, March 2012
Public
Ph.D
Masters
Bachelors Degree

Private

Total

Bht

NBht

All

Bht

NBht

All

Bht

NBht

289

244

533

93

70

163

382

314

696

All

32

292

3,984

252

4,236

604

606

3,724

220

3,944

260

PGDE

597

599

PGCE
Higher Secondary/
Matriculation
PTC

59

60

12

12

71

72

115

115

35

35

150

150
1,644

1,578

1,579

61

65

1,639

ZTC

498

498

23

23

521

521

Total

6,862

473

7,335

491

106

597

7,353

579

7,932

Table A3.5 Numbers of teachers by academic qualification, March 2012


Academic degree

Teachers
Public

Private

B.Ed(P)

2075

33

2108

B.Ed(S)

1402

19

1421

B.Ed (Dzongkha)

99

107

Bachelors Degree

368

232

600

M.ED

135

42

177

Masters Degree

398

121

519

Total

PGDE

599

606

PTC

1579

65

1644

PhD

Post Graduate Diploma in otherfield

60

12

72

ZTC

498

23

521

High School/Matriculation
Total

Page

90.2% 9.8%

Annual Education Statistics

115

35

150

7335

597

7932

Page

95

Table A4.3 Dropout rates,2003-2012

A4. Additional tables on education indicators, 2012


PS

LSS

MSS

HSS

Public

2009 2010 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 2012 2009 2010 2011 2012

Class

2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012


#`

#`

#`

#`

#`

#`

#`

PP

44

0.3%

33

0.2%

275 1.8% 168 1.1% 302 1.8% 127 0.8% 310 1.8% 192 1.2% 194 1.2%

0.0%

0.0% 21 0.1% 216 1.3%

#`

#`

Total

534 3.1% 476 2.8%

Ave %

Table A4.1 Student-Teachers Ratio in Schools per Dzongkhag per type of school, 2009-2012

221 1.1%
224 1.2%

Bhutan

24

24

22

21

27

26

25

25

27

26

24

23

21

20

20 21

24

24

23

22

II

267 1.9% 355 2.4% 481 3.1% 389 2.4% 361 2.3% 211 1.3% 190 1.2%

0.0% 165 1.0% 302 1.7%

Bumthang

18

16

21

15

26

27

21

24

25

21

21

20

17

18

16 15

24

20

20

18

III

314 2.3% 234 1.7% 223 1.5% 118 0.8% 239 1.6% 146 1.0% 103 0.6%

0.0%

Chukha

28

40

25

23

29

28

28

26

26

22

25

25

23

22

23 22

27

30

25

24

IV

492 3.8% 584 4.2% 611 4.4% 600 4.1% 530 3.6% 444 2.9% 576 3.8% 460 2.8% 281 1.7% 509 3.5%

Dagana

10

22

26

22

30

29

31

27

35

33

30

30

21 19

21

25

29

25

Gasa

16

13

10

12

18

16

15

18

17

14

13

15

566 5.0%

Haa

18

19

16

19

23

25

23

22

VI

532 5.2% 154 1.5% 366 3.3% 242 2.1% 178 1.5% 227 1.8% 173 1.3%

Lhuentse

21

19

19

19

23

25

25

23

21

23

20

VII

822 9.0% 565 5.6% 766 7.3% 581 5.2% 673 5.7% 524 4.3% 694 5.4% 265 2.0% 179 1.3% 563 5.1%

Mongar

27

24

24

22

27

25

23

26

24

20

30

VIII

164 2.3% 169 2.2% 343 3.8% 237 2.6% 409 4.0% 273 2.5%

Paro

IX

169 2.3% 507 6.7% 388 5.0% 257 2.9% 691 7.6% 474 4.9% -305 0.0% 731 6.3% 927 7.8% 427 4.8%

20

19

18 16

20

21

20

20

18

22

22

16 14

21

22

20

19

20

21

22

19 20

25

23

23

22

19

20

25

19

22

22

20

33

21

21

24

20

18 22

22

22

21

21

18

19

15

28

26

26

27

24

26

22

23

28

20

20 19

24

22

21

20

Punakha
Samdrupjongkhar
Samtse

22

21

18

17

25

21

22

22

25

22

21

21

16

18

18 21

22

21

20

20

33

27

26

25

36

29

28

24

28

28

25

25

23 23

32

27

26

25

33

25

19

41

28

44

32

30

36

35

34

30

23

28

27 24

31

32

33

30

Sarpang

22

24

14

21

34

39

30

28

30

28

26

23

16

16

15 21

26

27

26

24

Thim Throm

20

22

21

23

21

83

0.0%

267 2.1%

0.7% 34 0.3% 58 0.5% 197 2.1%

After class X school leaver continue in class XI or in vocational training or join the labor market

Table A4.4 Repetition rates, 2003-2012


Class

2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012


#

Ave %

18

4.2% 570 4.5% 479 3.8% 457 3.4% 477 3.5% 432 3.0% 112 0.8% 79 0.5% 358 3.2%

Ave

20

Pemagatshel 20

49

197 1.2%

PP 1761 11.0% 1507 9.1% 1257 8.1% 1131 6.7% 1192 7.3% 1055 6.4% 1130 6.5% 911 5.3% 762 4.9% 1190 7.3%

Thimphu

22

21

21

15

24

24

22

20

22

26

23

19

21

21

24

22

22

23

17

Trashigang
Trashiyangtse
Trongsa

24

23

22

20

25

24

25

24

23

23

23

21

22

20

21 21

23

23

22

21

1739 11.2% 1359 8.5% 1280 7.8% 1173 7.5% 1113 6.6% 1043 6.5% 1091 6.6% 968 5.8% 866 5.2% 1181 7.3%

19

21

14

13

29

29

27

32

27

17

23

22

19

19

19 20

23

21

20

22

II

1526 10.7% 1235 8.2% 1236 7.9% 1299 8.1% 1100 7.1% 1240 7.5% 1042 6.5% 1034 6.4% 966 5.7% 1186 7.6%

18

18

16

17

17

14

14

15

21

20

18

17

20

19

16 18

19

18

16

16

III

1223 9.0% 924 6.8% 856 5.9% 961 6.5% 920 6.0% 944 6.3% 938 5.8% 802 5.1% 767 4.8% 926 6.2%

Tsirang

31

33

27

27

32

31

31

32

31

22

23

20

19

21

22 27

29

28

27

27

IV

1726 13.3% 1265 9.2% 1255 9.1% 1208 8.3% 1285 8.6% 1416 9.1% 1369 8.9% 1347 8.2% 1280 7.7% 1350 9.2%

Wangdue

24

24

23

24

30

26

26

30

20

26

22

20

15

15

15 18

23

23

22

24

1035 9.2% 679 5.8% 734 5.8% 665 5.3% 731 5.4% 887 6.4% 848 5.8% 813 5.7% 762 5.0% 795 6.0%

Zhemgang

25

23

22

18

25

17

24

16

22

36

24

23

28

27

21 12

24

26

23

18

VI

805 7.8% 465 4.4% 389 3.5% 464 4.0% 442 3.7% 599 4.7% 571 4.4% 506 3.7% 500 3.6% 527 4.4%

VII 1100 12.0% 828 8.3% 917 8.6% 873 7.8% 1010 8.5% 972 7.9% 782 6.1% 794 6.1% 862 6.1% 904 7.9%

Table A4.2 Promotion, Repeater and Dropouts rates, 2002-2012


2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Enrolment

118,355

122,857

128,771

133,288

138,422

143,378

146,955

152,447

157,091

160,007 161,403

Promotees

92,883

98,218

105,384

113,948

118,262

134,545

127,606

132,777

136,678

143,839 148,352

Repeaters

14,767

13,604

12,206

9,266

8,743

8,833

8,833

9,343

8,856

8,126

7,681

Dropouts

6,421

6,533

5,267

5,557

4,055

4,989

4,064

2,901

2,674

5,126

6,943

Repetition Rate

12.9%

11.5%

9.9%

7.2%

6.6%

6.4%

6.0%

6.1%

5.6%

5.1%

4.8%

Dropout Rate

5.4%

5.3%

4.1%

4.2%

3.0%

3.6%

2.8%

1.9%

1.7%

3.2%

4.3%

VIII

344 4.8% 318 4.2% 275 3.1% 457 4.9% 715 7.0% 615 5.6% 442 3.9% 389 3.3% 418 3.4% 441 4.5%

IX

867 12.0% 636 8.4% 516 6.7% 542 6.1% 606 6.6% 520 5.4% 603 5.7% 483 4.2% 471 4.0% 583 6.6%

Table A4.5 Class X results, 2011


Year

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010 2011

No. of students appeared

3159

4596

4791

5298

6057

6392

6893

7924

7982

8898

9320 10190

No. of students passed

2519

4215

4411

5110

5822

5945

6338

7573

7526

8671

8961 9888

No. of students failed

640

381

380

188

235

447

555

351

456

227

367

80%

92%

92%

96%

96%

93%

92%

96%

94%

97%

Pass %

Page

96

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

302

96% 97%

Page

97

Table A4.6 Class XII results, 2011


Year

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Table A4.10 Completion Rate for Primary and Basic education


New Entrants
Correct Age
Completion rate

No. of students appeared 529 1206 1703 2997 3170 3871 3969 5027 5510 6530 6346 8576
No. of students passed
No. of students failed
Pass %

469

1115

60

91

VI

12

16

Primary

Basic

1582 2688 2904 3494 3737 4263 4768 5950 5424 7380

2012

14,557

10,483

12464

14120

117%

74%

121

309

266

377

232

764

533

600

922

1196

2011

13,300

10,311

12859

14274

103%

72%

93%

90%

92%

90%

94%

85%

87%

91%

85% 86%

2010

13,259

10,253

13,541

14,029

97.9%

73.1%

2009

12,451

8,705

13,814

14,645

90.1%

59.4%

2008

12,246

7,870

14,127

14,577

86.7%

54.0%

2007

11,474

7,619

15,131

15,404

75.8%

49.5%

2006

11,331

6,828

14,789

16,039

76.6%

42.6%

89% 92%

Table A4.7 Survival rate to grade 5 and 10, 2006-2011


Survival to class IV

Survival to class X

Boys

Girls

Total

Total

Total

Total

2006

89%

92%

91%

71%

72%

72%

2007

83%

95%

89%

65%

76%

70%

2008

90%

96%

93%

75%

80%

78%

2009

92%

95%

94%

76%

84%

80%

2010

97%

98%

97%

84%

85%

85%

2011

99%

100%

100%

93%

97%

95%

Table A4.11 Right age, underage and overage details by class 2012.
PP

II

III

IV

Right Age 51.6%

42.5%

35.9%

30.6% 26.3% 23.7% 22.3% 19.5% 20.0% 18.9% 19.2% 21.9% 19.0%

Underage

7.7%

11.7%

13.6%

12.4% 10.4%

Overage

40.7%

45.8%

50.5%

57.0% 63.3% 66.7% 68.9% 72.5% 72.9% 74.7% 74.3% 70.1% 73.9%

9.6%

VI

8.8%

VII

8.0%

VIII

7.1%

IX

6.4%

6.5%

XI

8.0%

XII

7.1%

Table A4.8 Pre-Primary enrolment by Age


2009

2010

2011

2012

More than 6yrs

52%

42%

44%

41%

6yrs

41%

47%

45%

52%

5 years and below

7%

11%

12%

8%

Table A4.9 Details on the 6-12 years old children since 2009
Division of 6-12 years old children

2009

2010

2011

2012

Right aged primary enrolment

86352

92%

87998

94%

88133

95%

89591

96%

Primary aged enrolled in Secondary school

1024

1%

3068

3%

1065

1%

1242

1.3%

Primary aged children abroad*

940

1%

470

1%

463

1%

375

0.4%

Primary aged enrolled in Monastery**

1881

2%

939

1%

671

1%

665

0.7%

Primary aged not in school

3852

4%

1426

2%

2348

3%

1807

1.9%

* assuming 0.04% of primary aged children are abroad from BMIS 2012 2005 2010
** Source: Dratshang Lhentshog, MoHCA

Page

98

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

99

2%

1%

0%

0%

0%

23%

14%

7%

3%

1%

Table A5.1 Enrolment of girls in primary and secondary education 2002-2012


PP-VI
Public

0%

0%

2%

STD

5%

13%

4%
26%
21%

5%
19%
28%

6%
7%
22%

7%
0%
7%

7%
0%
0%

7%
0%
0%

7%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

8%
0%
0%

5%
0%
0%

1%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%

XI

XII

A5. Additional tables on girls participation in primary and secondary education

0%
0%
0%
0%

0%
0%
0%
0%

1%
0%
0%
0%

3%
1%
0%
0%

7%
3%
1%
0%

16%
9%
3%
1%

21%
15%
7%
3%

27%
21%
14%
7%

19%
26%
21%
14%

STD

STD

Public
STD

XI-XII
Private
STD

Public
STD

Private
STD

53706 49.7% 1526 48.8% 13817 52.5% 120 53.3% 11220 50.7% 71 45.2% 3039 42.0% 3374 50.3%

2010 53567 49.9% 1456 48.3% 12754 51.6% 98

49.5% 10862 50.1% 50 40.0% 2821 41.9% 3354 51.0%

2009 52770 49.8% 1367 49.1% 12419 51.5% 70

43.2% 9455 49.2% 34 32.7% 2519 40.7% 2834 50.3%

2008 51255 49.6% 1274 47.8% 11759 50.8% 32

39.5% 8698 49.5% 13 27.1% 2181 39.6% 2373 51.0%

2007 50071 49.1% 1136 47.5% 10995 49.8% 12

38.7% 8210 49.1% 30 41.7% 2023 39.2% 1806 49.5%

2006 49003 48.9% 1014 49.7% 10251 50.0%

0.0%

7585 48.4% 23 54.8% 1695 35.6% 1673 50.1%

2005 47514 48.7% 1142 48.0%

9734

49.5%

0.0%

6829 46.2%

2004 46237 48.4% 1079 48.1%

8653

49.1%

0.0%

6518 47.3% 22 50.0% 1213 32.3% 1418 48.4%

2003 44235 48.0%

818 49.4%

7926

49.0% 10

50.0% 5802 46.4% 14 43.8% 1092 32.6% 1196 48.8%

2002 42244 47.2%

694 47.7%

7681

48.0%

0.0%

5083 44.5%

29.0% 1432 33.1% 1654 49.3%

0.0%

844

32.0%

856

46.6%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%

Year

Girls

%Girls

2012

30,143

7.4%

2011

28076

6.2%

2010

26437

8.4%

2009

24393

7.8%

2008

22638

6.6%

2007

21228

8.7%

2006

19531

8.5%

2005

17995

9.8%

2004

16384

10.6%

2003

14820

8.9%

0%
24

0%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
23

0%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
22

0%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
21

0%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
20

0%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
19

0%

1%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
18

0%

3%
1%
0%
0%
0%
0%
17

0%

6%
2%
1%
0%
0%
0%
16

0%

6%
19%
26%
21%
12%
5%
2%
1%
0%
0%
15

0%

0%
6%
20%
26%
20%
11%
4%
1%
0%
0%
14

0%

0%
1%
6%
20%
27%
17%
8%
2%
1%
0%
13

0%

0%
0%
1%
7%
22%
30%
17%
6%
2%
0%
12

1%

0%
0%
0%
1%
8%
24%
31%
14%
4%
0%
11

1%

0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
9%
26%
32%
10%
1%
10

2%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
9%
31%
32%
1%
9

8%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
11%
36%
5%
8

33%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
12%
33%
7

43%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
52%
6

11%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
7%
5

1%

0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
4

0%

X
IX
VIII
VII
VI
V
IV
III
II
I
PP

Table A4.12 Age-specific enrolment rates by Class

IX-X
Private

Table A5.2 Growth in the Girls enrolment in the Public Secondary School (VII-XII)

Age

100

STD

Public

2012 53,395 49.7% 1,556 49.2% 14,419 52.2% 128 51.4% 11,369 50.0% 104 49.3% 4,355 48.7% 3,132 49.7%
2011

Page

VII-VIII
Private

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

101

ANNEXURES

Annex 1. New and Upgraded schools in Bhutan in 2012


Schools established in 2012
Dzongkhag

Chukha
Samdrup Jongkhar
Samtse
Paro

School

Level

Public School
1
Khatekha
2
Jangsa
3
Bukey
Private School
4
UTPAL Academy (Pvt)

PS
PS
PS

Bumthang
Chukha

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

Dagana
Mongar

Samtse

Sarpang
Thim Throm
Trongsa
Tsirang
Thim Throm

23
24

Name of the School


Public School
Tang
Kamji
Drujeygang
Daleythang
Phekoma
Yadhi
Peljorling
Sengdhyen
Chargarey
Tachey
Jaringay
Gawaling (Baseni)
Bindu
Pagli
Gangthok
Ghatia
Chargarey
Taba Dramtoe
Umling
Changangkha
Samcholing
Daunthrey
Private School
Druk Pvt
Dr Tobgyel Pvt

HSS

From

To

LSS
LSS
MSS
PS
PS
MSS
MSS
CPS
CPS
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
PS
PS
PS
LSS
LSS
ECR

MSS
MSS
HSS
LSS
LSS
HSS
HSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
LSS
LSS
LSS
MSS
MSS
PS

LSS
LSS

MSS
MSS

Name of the
School

From

To

Paro
Wangdue

1
2
3
4
5
6

Nabesa
Athang
Dagor
Resinang
Tahogang
Phulusu

PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR

Totogom

PS

ECR

Chukha
Page

104

Haa
Samtse

Zhemgang

1
2
3
4
5
6

Sarpang
Thim Throm

7
8

Dzongkhag

Dzongkhag

Punakha

Name
Public School
Thangdokha
Gibjee
Threphu
Bedingphu
Breng
Dali
Private School
Samphel
Rigpey Jungney

Level
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
PS
PvtPS
PvtPS

School Name change in 2012

Sarpang
Punakha
Samtse
Trashigang
Tsirang
Wangdue

From

To

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Thoembatar PS
Maugaon PS
Pangkhey PS
Gong PS
Bhur PS
Thinleygang MSS
Garigaon ECR
Bindu PS
Chengmari LSS
Ghumauney MSS
Kanglung HSS
Patala PS
Migtana PS

Singye PS
Lhayul PS
Jangchubling PS
Gakiling PS
Samtenling PS
Dechentsemo MSS
Buka ECR
Soeltapsa PS
Norbugang LSS
Yoeseltse MSS
Jampeling HSS
Sergithang PS
Singay Namgay PS

Extended Classrooms established in 2012


Dzongkhag

School

Chukha
Gasa

1
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

Totogom
Mendrelthang
Bebji
Shaba- Shebji
Pam
Nabesa
Jishigang
Dagor
Resinang
Tahogang
Phulusu
Martang
Khamethang
Somlachen
Majuwa
Kachin
Bhoteykharka
Tashichholing
Fenchi
Kencholing
Phoshing
Ridha
Athang(Ada)
Dongkobji
Yumdang

Haa
Lhuentse
Paro
Pemagatshel
Punakha
Samdrup
Jongkhar

Schools downgraded in 2012

Pgatshel

Dzongkhag

Trashigang

Schools upgraded in 2012


Dzongkhag

Closed schools and ECRs in 2012

Samtse

Sarpang
Trashigang
Wangdue
Zhemgang

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Level
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR

Parent School

Remark

Chungkha PS
Lunana PS
Sombeykha PS
Sombeykha PS
Ladrong PS
Shaba PS
Gaupey LSS
Tshatsi PS
Gonpasingma PS
Thinleygang PS
Logodama PS
Rikhey PS
Phuntshothang MSS
Dorokha MSS
Bara LSS
Tendu HSS
Nainital PS
Peljorling MSS
Bara LSS
Sarpang LSS
Bikhar LSS
Noding LSS
Migtana PS
Kazhi PS
Panbang PS

Downgraded from PS
New
Shifted from Thangdokha ECR
New
New
Downgraded from PS
New
Downgraded from PS
Downgraded from PS
Downgraded from PS
Downgraded from PS
New
New
New
New
New
New
New
New
New
New
New
Downgraded from PS
New
New

Page

105

Page

106
Annual Education Statistics
Annual Education Statistics
Page

107

255

111

304
258
217
3,125 3,161
138

389

112
113
225
65
92
157
3,123 2,717 (406) -13.0%
3,586 3,590

IV
V
VI
SubTotal
VII
VIII
SubTotal
IX
X
SubTotal
XI
XII
SubTotal
VII-X

19

0.0%

50,272

10,216

460

74

19.4%

+or-

%*

2011

2012

2,870

3,251 381 13.3%


50,272

0.9%

451

77
8.2%

1.1%

48,805 (1,467) -2.9%

7,628 7,655

25,414

88,865

36,036

7,856

15,773

16,750

440

768

466

321

508

299

393

7,547

7,900

8,022

761

7,222

1,276 7,477

765

961

861

7,524

7,335

7,535

7,927

8,056

7,984

7,458

15,012

15,474

15,956

16,006

14,982

189

157

5,244

10,390

5,117

5,273

22,266 11,190 11,751

5,289

22,941

10,533

12,408

27,887

13,528

14,359

15,057

251

27

224

626

201

425

261

265

23

242

653

217

436

239

5,722

6,149

6,565

6,220

6,961

6,933

516

50

466

8,930

3,713

5,217

8,885

3,619

5,266

1,279 11,871 13,181

418

861

500

252

1,580

-0.1% 5,401

-1.3% 5,461

2.6%

811

769

453

5,506

6,038

2,224

1,171

1,053

564

111

32.5% 16,569 16,750 181

110,575

105

6.3%

1.9%

7,253

6,661

7,858

7,386

4.5%

605

8.3%

725 10.9%

2.9%

1.1%

8,937 1,732 24.0% 13,914 15,244 1,330 9.6%

601 16.4%

22,292 22,941 649

10,416 10,533 117

577 10.6% 11,876 12,408 532

644 40.8% 26,568 27,887 1,319 5.0%

360 44.4% 12,418 13,528 1110 8.9%

1.5%

(598) -0.5%
284 36.9% 14,150 14,359 209

4,669 1131 32.0%


4,268

1.1%
2.6%
260 103.2% 13,806 15,057 1251 9.1%

232 81.1% 15,369 15,773 404

4.4%

1.6% 12,442 13,768 1,326 10.7% 48,860 50,828 1,968 4.0%

7,205

3,667

3,538

%*

289 102.5% 17,082 16,967 (115) -0.7%


229 81.2% 16,020 16,721 701

3,404 1,327 63.9% 111,173

512

518

+or-

Repeaters

510

103

42

95% 6.1%

94% 95%

94% 5.0%

96.3% 96.0% 96.2% 3.4%

927 89.1% 87.5% 88.3% 3.8%

237

58

80% 2.3%

2.3%

0.4%

4.0%

4.7%

3.3%

5.8%

4.5%

3.4%

96.4% 99.1% 97.8% 3.8%


93% 96%

4.2%

6.2%

3.7%

4.6%

4.6%

4.5%

93.3% 96.2% 94.7% 5.7%

179 91.9% 93.3% 92.7% 6.4%

525

79

281 88.7% 92.6% 90.6% 9.1%

94.8% 98.3% 96.6% 5.9%

165 91.6% 95.3% 93.4% 6.6%

1,377 1,631 3,008 72.6% 68.6% 70.6% 0.5%

417

134

16

61

100

92

94.6% 96.6% 95.6% 5.7%

95.3% 97.1% 96.2% 5.3%

17,815 1,794 2,141 3,935 81% 79%

7,332

10,483

25,052

11,942

13,110

13,498

Promotees

Percentage

8.5%

0.7%

0.6%

0.8%

0.2%

0.0%

0.0%

1.1%

0.0%

0.1%

0.0%

0.0%

* The students who leave school after Class X are Graduates and school leavers and not drop-outs

7.8%

0.9%

0.5%

1.3%

0.5%

0.0%

0.5%

1.7%

0.0%

1.0%

0.0%

0.0%

4.3%

2.3% 16.3% 19.0% 17.7%

0.5% 26.9% 30.9% 29.0%

3.9% 7.1%

4.8% 1.1%

3.4% 0.3%

6.1% 1.8%

5.3% 0.8%

3.6% 0.0%

5.0% 1.0%

7.7% 2.2%

4.8% 0.0%

5.6% 1.8%

5.1% 0.0%

4.9% 0.0%

Total

Dropouts

Total 79,547 80,460 160,007 80,154 81,249 161,403 4,282 3,399 7,681 73,058 75,294 148,352 3,171 3,772 6,943 92% 94% 93% 5.4% 4.2% 4.8% 4.0% 4.7%

Sub10,975 11,291
Total

6,462

5,946

11,876

6,018

5,858

7,178

IX

6,350

12,418

7,369

7,574

26,568 13,340 14,547

6,990

7,483

14,150

13,806

Sub12,631 13,937
Total

6,479

7,458

6,997

5,939

7,917

8,435

16,721

568

379

762

VIII

15,369

8,315

8,355

16,967

482

342

118

6,809

VI

7,628

16,569

8,366

8,377

15,843

420

6,692

7,741

8,135

16,020

8,590

7,837

13,464

Total

VII

8,434

IV

8,063

17,082

8,006

6,517

342
286

511

571

2012

FeFeFeFeMale
Total Male
Total Male
Total Male
male
male
male
male

425

7,957

III

8,457

16,746

6,947

(6)

(81)

651

Promotees Imputed Dropouts imputed

Sub55,941 55,232 111,173 55,624 54,951 110,575 3,405 2,481 5,886 52,257 53,228 105,485
Total

8,625

II

8,269

15,581

282
282

2011

17.8% 15,581 13,464 (2117) -13.6%

%*

155 44.8% 16,746 15,843 (903) -5.4%

51

+or-

Total

88,554 (311) -0.3% 21,724 26,109 4,385 20.2% 173,947 176,647 2,700 1.6%

36,600

79

8,477

7,683

Total

6.4%

0.7%

3.2%

0.4%

501

338

2012

11,273 11,186 (87) -0.8% 10,862 11,544 682

4,923 4,917

6,350 6,269

24,763

FeMale
Total Male Female
male

2012

Repeaters
Dropouts imputed

502

60

256

27

346

287

2011

51,954 (875) -1.7% 2,077

14,557

7,898

Male Female

Male Female
PP

2012

2011

Enrolment
Repeaters

Total

%*

13,168 (101) -0.8%


13,269
11,494 12,246 752 6.5%

52,829

7,829 8,331

8,050 8,110

(197) -2.5% 8,038 8,294

70

Details on dropouts and repeaters by gender by class 2011-2012


Class

+or-

Lower & Middle Secondary


Higher Secondary Schools
Schools

(415) -5.3% 7,772 7,608 (164) -2.1%

48,805 (1,467) -2.9%

5,508 5,959

7,872 7,675
6,775 6,852

382

3,251 381 13.3%

19

13

531 371 231.9% 7,561 7,631

9,928 (268) -2.6%

2012

804 169 26.6% 7,896 7,481

2,870

13

160

635

6,709 6,307 (378) -5.6%

31.8%

15.2%

55.4%

10.7%

-1.8%

23.2%

1.2%

17.5%

6.2%

3.6%

1.0%

1.2%

28

50

14

36

24

(2)

26

36

38

16

11

2011

0.8%

211

110

101

249

315

393

503

%*

Primary School

856
-27.7% 7,072 6,014 (1,058) -15.0% 6,185 5,491 (694) -11.2%
1,184
(328)
878 1,028 150 17.1% 7,588 7,193 (395) -5.2% 7,327 6,465 (862) -11.8%

2011 2012 +or-

Extended Classroom

Annex 3. Comparative dropouts and repeaters

Total

274

497

8.1%

III

49

(88) -10.3%

II

656

607

765

853

%*

2011 2012 +or-

Private Schools

PP

Class

Comparative Enrolment in Different Levels of Schools 2011-2012

Annex 2. Comparative enrolment

Annex 4.1 Organization Structure, Ministry of Education

Annex 4. Organogram

The Ministry is headed by a Minister. The Minister is supported by the Ministry Secretariat, headed
by a Secretary. The Secretariat comprises of the following divisions
a)

Administrative and Finance Division (AFD)

b)

Human Resource Division (HRD)

c)

Policy and Planning Division (PPD)

d)

Information and Communication Division (ICD)

e)

National Commission for UNESCO

f)

Internal Audit Unit (IA)

Minister

BCSEA

REC
PPD

IA

Secretary

AFD

Nat. Com

HRD

There had been changes in the structure of the Ministry as a result of the creation of a new
department and Divisions and expansion of existing divisions. This has been done to enable the
Ministry to respond effectively to the demands and challenges arising from the ever growing
education system. The Ministry now comprises of four Departments namely the Department of
School Education, Department of Youth and Sports, Department of Adult and Higher Education
and Department of Curriculum Research and Development (formerly known as CAPSD).
Furthermore, the Bhutan Board of Examinations has been reconstituted as the Bhutan Council for
School Examinations and Assessment (BCSEA) and delinked from the Ministry to function as an
autonomous agency.
The Department of School Education is organized into six Divisions. The Divisions are the School
Liaison and Coordination Division(SLCD), the School Agriculture, Feeding and Environment (SAFED),
the Education Monitoring & Support Service Division (EMSSD), the School Planning and Building
Division (SPBD), the Private School Division (PSD) and the Early Childhood Care and Development
and Special Educational Needs Division (ECCD&SEN).
The Department of Adult and Higher Education is organized into the Scholarship and Student
Support Division (SSSD), the Non Formal and Continuing Education Division (NFCED), Higher
Education and Planning Division (HEPD) and Quality Assurance and Accreditation Division (QAAD).
This department is also responsible for liaising with the Royal University of Bhutan.
The Department of Youth and Sports is organized into the Career Education and Counseling
Division (CECD), Games and Sports Division (GSD), Scouts and Culture Education Division (SCED)
and Comprehensive School Health Division (CSHD) and Youth Centre Division. The Games and
Sports Division also works closely with the National Sports Federations. The Youth Centre Division
(YCD) is further supported by the Youth Information Centres (YIC) for delivering youth related
information and services.

Curriculum, Research
and Development
Primary Curriculum
Secondary
Curriculum
Programmes &
Support Service
Publication &
instructional Media

for UNESCO

Info.& Communication

Adult & Higher


Education

Youth & Sports

School Liasion &


Coordination

Higher Education
& Planning

Career Education
& Counseling

School Agriculture,
Feeding &
Environment

Quality Assurance
& Accerditation

Scouts & Culture


Education

Scholarship &
Student Support

Games & Sports

School Education

School Planning &


Building

Education Monitoring
& support services

Non-Formal &
Continuing Education

Comprehensive
School Health

Youth Centre

Private School

ECCD and Special


Education

Department
21 Dzongkhag/Thromde

Division

Education Offices

Autonomous Agency

The next page shows the organizational structure of the ministry.

Page

108

Annual Education Statistics

Annual Education Statistics

Page

109

Annex 5. WFP beneficiaries and Boarders, 2012

Annex 4.2. Head quarter staff details, 2012.


Officers

Office

Pool Staff
(Drivers,
Messengers,
Cleaners)

Support

14

Total

1.00 Office of the Minister


Sub-total

2.00 Secretariat
Office of the Secretary
Internal Audit

Policy and Planning Division

2
0

14

11

19

19

28

Bhutan Board of Examinations

10

10

20

11

10

21

Human Resource Management Division

11

20

10

11

21

39

79

Sub-total

40

Administration and Finance Division

National Commission of Unesco

11

54

40

94

12

21

3.00 Directorates
3.01 Department of School Education
Office of Director General
ECCD and Special Education Division

Education Monitoring and Support Service Division

11

20

Private School Division

School Feeding, Agriculture & Enviorment Division

School Liaison and Coordination Unit

School Planning and Building Division

20

27

24

32

Sub-total

44

24

68

51

26

77

Dzongkhag

1
2
3
4

Bumthang
Bumthang
Bumthang
Bumthang
Sub-Total
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Chukha
Sub-Total
Dagana
Dagana
Dagane
Dagana
Dagana
Dagana
Dagana
Dagana
Dagana

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Higher Education Planning Division

Non Formal and Continuing Education Division

Quality Assurance & Accreditation Division

Scholarship Division

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Sub-total

13

21

14

11

25

10

Dagana

11
12

Dagana
Dagana
Sub-Total
Gasa
Gasa
Gasa
Gasa
Sub-Total
Haa
Haa
Haa
Haa
Haa
Haa
Sub-Total
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse

3.02 Departement of Adult & Higher Education


Office of Director

3.03 Department of Youth & Sports


Office of Director

Comprehensive School Health Division

Career Education and Counselling Division

Games and Sports Division

Information and Communication Division

Scouts Division

Youth Information Center

Sub-total

21

1
0

28

17

45

1
16

37

3.04 Department of Curriculum Research and Development


Office of Director

Primary Curriculum Division

Programmes and Support Services Division

Publication and Instructional Media Division

15

22

166 100

Sub-total
Grand Total

Page

110

14

19

133

93

226

28

21
266

Annual Education Statistics

1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3

School
Name

Type

Jakar
Chhumey
Tang
Ura

HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS

Chukha
Chapcha
Kamji
Pakshikha
Dungna
Logchina
Baikunza
Bongo
Chimuna
Chongaykha
Chungkha
Getena
Kesari
Ketokha
Metakha
Rinchenling
Sinchula

HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Daga
Drujeygang
Gesarling
Namchela
Tshangkha
Lhaling
Lungtengang
Nimtola
Phekoma
Phuensemgang
Samey
Zinchella

HSS
HSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Bjishong
Gasa
Laya
Lunana

MSS
PS
PS
PS

Ugyen Dorji
Tshaphel
Jyensa
Jyenkana
Rangtse
Sombekha

HSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Lhuentse
Autsho
Tangmachu

HSS
MSS
MSS

Day
B

WFP Beneficiaries
Boarder
T
G
B
T
G

15
13

4
22

19
35

42
96
26
16
77
23
24
46
54
40
82
21
132
707

46
107
45
17
94
22
28
40
85
31
52
26
158
777

88
203
71
33
171
45
52
86
139
71
134
47
290
1484

159
74
8
45
97
103

169
80
9
48
109
69

328
154
17
93
206
172

57
108
651
35
47
26

44
120
648
34
47
16

101
228
1299
69
94
42

108

97

205

83

86

169

PS
PS
PS

Annual Education Statistics

74
23
180

67
16
169

141
39
349

Total
B

25
65
22
112

35
53
27
115

60
118
49
227

25
65
22
112

35
53
27
115

60
118
49
227

55
186
134
119
75

36
210
121
116
90

91
396
255
235
165

22

27

49

74

77

151

665
36
126
205

677
29
94
183

1342
65
220
388

84

94

178

70
199
134
161
171
26
38
77
23
98
46
54
40
82
21
132
1372
36
126
205
159
158
8
45
97
103

40
232
121
162
197
45
44
94
22
105
40
85
31
52
26
158
1454
29
94
183
169
174
9
48
109
69

110
431
255
323
368
71
82
171
45
203
86
139
71
134
47
290
2826
65
220
388
328
332
17
93
206
172

80

82

162

80

82

162

57
108
1182
153
47
50
19
269

44
120
1130
139
47
67
42
295

101
228
2312
292
94
117
61
564

83
150
74
44
351
2
95
59

86
130
67
31
314
3
109
84

169
280
141
75
665
5
204
143

531
118

482
105

1013
223

24
19
161

51
42
198

75
61
359

150

130

280

21
171
2
95
59

15
145
3
109
84

36
316
5
204
143

Non WFP
Boarders
G
B
T

75
61
32
49
217
176
103
55
112

119
72
26
61
278
245
107
62
126

194
133
58
110
495
421
210
117
238

446
165
121

540
189
162

986
354
283

286
44

351
47

637
91

44
175
77

47
194
68

91
369
145

252
108
46
77

262
157
41
68

514
265
87
145

Page

111

Dzongkhag

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Lhuentse
Sub-Total
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Mongar
Sub-Total
Paro
Paro
Paro
Paro
Paro
Paro
Sub-Total
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Page

112

School
Name

Type

Khoma
Thimyul
Dungkhar
Gortshom
Kupinyesa
Ladrong
Ney
Tshochen
Wambur
Zangkhar
Zham

LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Mongar
Yadi
Drametse
Kidheykhar
Kengkhar
Nagor
Serzhong
Balam
Dhaksa
Ganglapong
Junmey
Lingkhar
Narang
Pangthang
Silambi
Thangrong
Tsakaling
Tsamang
Udaric
Waichur
Wama
Yangbari
Yaragla
Zunglen

HSS
HSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Drukgyel
Betikha
Dawakha
Wanakha
Drugyel
Gonyetsawa

HSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS

Nganglam
HSS
Nangkhor
HSS
Pgatshel
HSS
Dechheling
LSS
Gonpasingma LSS
Tsebar
LSS
Yurung
LSS
Kerong
PS
Chimong
PS

Day
B

25
119
21
74
12
45
12
64
31
8
17
428

33
102
40
84
16
46
16
75
40
5
17
474

WFP Beneficiaries
Boarder
T
G
B
T
G
58
221
61
158
28
91
28
139
71
13
34
902

153

133

286

34

37

71

22
34

36
45

58
79

399

447

846

178
119
55
74
12
45
12
64
53
42
17
827

Total
B

166
102
77
84
16
46
16
75
76
50
17
921

344
221
132
158
28
91
28
139
129
92
34
1748

74

48

122

3
30

7
41

10
71

77
30

55
41

65
76
78
110
19
31
45
28
54
21
37
46
34
12
62
31
17
36
27
30
933

83
81
61
101
18
19
60
27
72
16
29
50
41
5
58
46
11
42
20
35
923

148
157
139
211
37
50
105
55
126
37
66
96
75
17
120
77
28
78
47
65
1856

46
53
59

59
73
58

105
126
117

111
129
137
110
60
31
119
28
88
21
37
111
66
72
62
31
17
36
27
40
1440

142
154
119
101
60
19
110
27
121
16
29
119
73
67
58
46
11
42
20
46
1476

179

144

323

28
207

22
166

50
373

120
77
46
65
6
9

126
80
58
52
5
8

246
157
104
117
11
17

41

42

83

74

50

124

34

49

83

65
32
60

69
32
62

134
64
122

10
507

11
553

21
1060

77
87

71
78

148
165

27
21
212

34
20
203

61
41
415

58
113
17
88

66
105
13
85

124
218
30
173

21

29

50

77
87
179
27
49
419

178
190
63
153
6
30

71
78
144
34
42
369

192
185
71
137
5
37

Non WFP
Boarders
G
B
T

231
150
132 131
71 70
37
253 31
283
256
211
120
50
229
55
209
37
66
230
139
139
120
77
28
78
47
86
2916 419
268
148
42
165
323
61
91
788
310
109
255
67
370
375
134
78
290
11
67

266
187
126
120
44
38

497
337
257
190
81
69

Dzongkhag

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

1
2
3
4
5
6

P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
P Gatshel
Sub-Total
Punakha
Punakha
Punakha
Punakha
Punakha
Punakha
Sub-Total
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
SJongkhar
Sub-Total
Samtse
Samtse
Samtse
Samtse
Samtse
Samtse

Samtse

8
9

Samtse
Samtse
Sub-Total
Sarpang
Sarpang
Sarpang
Sarpang
Sarpang
Sarpang
Sub-Total

1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

515 934
269
537
39
81

308
172
282
135

57

618
281
537
202

135

Annual Education Statistics

1
2
3
4
5
6

School
Name
Choekhorling
Dagor
Dungmin
Khangma
Mikuri
Norbugang
Rezimo
Thongsa
Tshatse
Woongchiloo
Yelchen

Type
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Punakha
HSS
Tashidingkha MSS
Dechentsemo MSS
Shengana
LSS
Goenshari
PS
Thinleygang
PS
Orong
Martshala
Gomdar
Menjiwoong
Orong
Barzor
Dungmanma
Lauri
Martshala
Sarjung
Tsosalo
Wooling
Yarphu
Zamtari
Zangthey

HSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Tendu
HSS
Dorokha
MSS
Bara
LSS
Denchukha
LSS
Sengdhyen
LSS
Mindruling
PS
NamgeychoePS
ling
Panabari
PS
TabaDramtoe
PS
Sarpang
Norbuling
Umling
Gakiling
Jangchubling
Lhayul

HSS
MSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS

Annual Education Statistics

Day
B

22
6
13
41
30
53
9
29
48
45
56
675

20
11
10
42
29
59
12
34
38
53
54
691

WFP Beneficiaries
Boarder
T
G
B
T
G
42
17
23
83
59
112
21
63
86
98
110
1366

37

59

96

37

59

96

18
60
38
39
77
31
60
33
51
21
88
68
60
62
706

25
68
42
35
105
44
47
35
67
26
103
55
51
37
740

43
128
80
74
182
75
107
68
118
47
191
123
111
99
1446

304
177
37
56

312
187
37
59

616
364
74
115

237

274

511

213 226 439


119 188 307
1143 1283 2426

114
64
116
62
356

140
43
106
47
336

254
107
222
109
692

17

17

34

31

28

59

24

26

50

369

369

738

108
78
32

93
65
34

201
143
66

73
291

77
269

150
560

33
106
123
43

33
106
128
48

66
212
251
91

78
119

88
131

166
250

502

534

1036

66

67

133

196

228

424

262

295

557

14

18

32

14

18

32

Total
B

22
6
30
41
61
53
9
29
72
45
56
1044

20
11
27
42
57
59
12
34
64
53
54
1060

42
17
57
83
118
112
21
63
136
98
110
2104

108
78
32
37
73
328

93
65
34
59
77
328

201
143
66
96
150
656

51
166
161
82
77
31
138
152
51
21
88
68
60
62
1208

58
174
170
83
105
44
135
166
67
26
103
55
51
37
1274

109
340
331
165
182
75
273
318
118
47
191
123
111
99
2482

66
304
177
233
56

67
312
187
265
59

133
616
364
498
115

237

274

511

213
119
1405

226
188
1578

439
307
2983

14
114
64
116
62
370

18
140
43
106
47
354

32
254
107
222
109
724

Non WFP
Boarders
G
B
T

509
260
138
133

646
282
157
82

1155
542
295
215

531
181
95

521
248
146

1052
429
241

62

59

121

338
27
83

453
27
90

791
54
173

110
119
71

117
134
95

227
253
166

190

229

419

Page

113

Dzongkhag

Thimphu

Thimphu

Sub-Total
Trashigang

Trashigang

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Trashigang
Sub-Total
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Tyangtse
Sub-Total

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Page

114

School
Name

Type

WFP Beneficiaries
Boarder
T
G
B
T
G

Genekha
Yangchen
Gatshel

LSS

57

45

102

LSS

156

138

294

213

183

396

Rangjung
J
i
g
meSherubling
Jampeling
Tashitse
Bartsham
Dungtse
Gongthung
Bidung
Bikhar
Kangpar
Sakteng
Thungkhar
Uzorong
Wamrong
Benshingmo
Berdungma
Brekha
Chiya
Daliphangma
Dungmanma
Jerelemi
Jonkhar
Kurichilo
Lumang
Merak
Pasaphu
Phongmey
Thongrong
Thrimshing
Tokshingmang
Yangnyeer

HSS

0
161

0
208

0
369

HSS

144

234

378

HSS
HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

78
238
121
77

75
246
117
107

153
484
238
184

Bayling
HSS
Tsenkharla
MSS
Bumdeling
LSS
Kheni
LSS
Thragom
LSS
Tongmijangsa LSS
Dhalikha
PS
Dukti
PS
Jangphutse
PS
Melongkhar
PS
Shingkhar
PS
Shongring
PS
Tarphel
PS
Tokaphu
PS
Womanang
PS
Yallang
PS

13

26

39

104
51
154
16
32
31
38
38
37
53
60
44
42
7
47
7
90
25
81
37
42

124
46
182
30
48
34
49
25
52
45
56
34
44
12
72
8
94
22
78
22
37

228
97
336
46
80
65
87
63
89
98
116
78
86
19
119
15
184
47
159
59
79

87
79
166
1136 1219 2355
56

55

111

19
18
15
9
28
36
52
22
18
42
36
33
384

13
30
14
5
30
30
44
27
19
32
33
31
363

32
48
29
14
58
66
96
49
37
74
69
64
747

70
70

82
82

152
152

15
107
79
106
41
79

20
94
60
111
36
88

35
201
139
217
77
167

87
115
88

103
107
108

190
222
196

17
54
3

24
43
9

41
97
12

60

80

140

851

883

1734

18
113
77
90
106

17
120
75
82
103

35
233
152
172
209

46

44

90

450

441

891

Total
B

127

127

254

156

138

294

283

265

548

Non WFP
Boarders
G
B
T

Day
B

15
107
92
106
145
130
154
103
147
119
38
38
37
53
60
44
42
24
101
10
90
25
81
37
42
60
87
1987

20
94
86
111
160
134
182
133
155
142
49
25
52
45
56
34
44
36
115
17
94
22
78
22
37
80
79
2102

35
201
178
217
305
264
336
236
302
261
87
63
89
98
116
78
86
60
216
27
184
47
159
59
79
140
166
4089

74
113
77
109
124
15
9
28
36
52
22
64
42
36
33
834

72
120
75
95
133
14
5
30
30
44
27
63
32
33
31
804

146
233
152
204
257
29
14
58
66
96
49
127
74
69
64
1638

Dzongkhag

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Trongsa
Sub-Total
Tsirang
Tsirang
Tsirang
Tsirang
Sub-Total
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue
Wangdue

14

Wangdue

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Sub-Total
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang
Zhemgang

1
2
2
4

819
119
193

312

987
176
220

396

1806
295
413

708

Annual Education Statistics

Type

Sherubling
Taktse
Langthel
Tshangkha
Bemji
Jangbi
Karshong
Kela
Korphu
Nabji
Nimshong
Tongtongphey

HSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Damphu
Mendregang
Tsirang toe
Patala

HSS
MSS
LSS
PS

Gaselo
Phobjikha
Samtengang
Gaselo
Nobding
Dangchu
Jala
Khotokha
Nahi
Rameychen
Samtengang
Sephu
Sha Tasha
Singay
Namgay

HSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

61
14
98
29
99
47
52
31

50
7
89
18
80
48
70
18

111
21
187
47
179
95
122
49

PS

69

75

144

500

455

Zhemgang
Buli
Sonamthang
Yebilaptsa
Gomphu
Bardo
Barpong
Bjokha
Budashi
Digala
Dunmang
Goshing
Khomsher
Langdurbi
Nimshong
Panbang
Pantang
Shingkhar
Tashibi
Tradijong
Tshaidang

HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

68

Annual
Education Statistics
Sub-Total
Grand Total

WFP Beneficiaries
Boarder
T
G
B
T
G

School
Name

Day
B

Total
B

27
81
111
48
31
37
14
23
26
35
40
473

22
54
112
40
31
29
19
24
37
47
49
464

49
135
223
88
62
66
33
47
63
82
89
937

96
149
142
387

205
277
281
763

27
81
59
12
31

22
54
60
5
31

49
135
119
17
62

10

16

26

220

188

408

109
53

96
77

205
130

162

173

335

109
128
139
376

51

31

82

51

31

82

149
24

88
17

237
41

38

33

71

51

55

106

149
24
61
14
98
67
99
47
52
82

88
17
50
7
89
51
80
48
70
73

237
41
111
21
187
118
179
95
122
155

69

75

144

955

313

224

537

813

679

1492

54

122

136

108

244

204

162

366

41
30
15
18
40
80
18
27
36
59
45
25
67
20
11
19
29
37

52
28
12
24
22
67
17
25
38
56
30
24
78
18
8
15
31
36

93
58
27
42
62
147
35
52
74
115
75
49
145
38
19
34
60
73

66
54
27

70
66
23

136
120
50

45

59

104

44
41
8

43
41
11

87
82
19

23
40
61
24

28
29
61
20

51
69
122
44

107
84
42
18
85
80
18
27
80
100
53
25
90
60
72
43
29
37

122
94
35
24
81
67
17
25
81
97
41
24
106
47
69
35
31
36

229
178
77
42
166
147
35
52
161
197
94
49
196
107
141
78
60
73

685

635

1320

569

559

1128

1254

1194

2448

52
36

52
35

104
71

37
14
13
26
35
40
253

29
19
8
37
47
49
276

66
33
21
63
82
89
529

75
139
214

72
142
214

147
281
428

Non WFP
Boarders
G
B
T
93
93

109
122

202
214

186
104
128

231
167
133

416
271
261

232
153

300
180

532
333

186

153

339

339
117
66
176
68

333
178
28
206
102

672
295
94
382
170

427

Page 941
115
514

9516 9708 19224 6831 6855 13686 16347 16563 32910 6198 7294 13491

Annex 6. Enrolment details by Dzongkhag, Category and Level


Dzo Name
Jakar

CatPP
Level egory
G B
HSS

I
G

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

G B

VIII

B G

IX

XI

Bumthang

Teachers
Bht
T:P
Both Other ZLT NBht Total

Total

75

67

69

64

49

80

40

50

233

261

494

26

32

15

30

28

56

64

86

92

178

12

15

275

259

534

22

28

19

144

130

274

15

18

15

200

220

420

13

16

26

Sonam Kuenphen PvtHSS SR


Chhumey

MSS

10

10

15

15

16

19

16

18

10

14

11

15

15

34

40

36

34

40

46

Tang

MSS

40

26

33

38

34

27

Ura

MSS

SR

10

11

12

12

15

16

12

14

13

17

13

20

25

34

34

24

27

26

Gyetsa

LSS

SR

10

17

10

12

17

15

10

15

12

14

14

17

12

10

117

99

216

12

18

Wangdicholing

LSS

27

32

50

54

47

57

41

38

56

49

47

43

47

29

82

83

88

59

485

444

929

29

36

26

Chhoekhor Toe

PS

VR

11

44

48

92

18

Chungphel

PS

VR

14

13

27

Dur

PS

10

11

11

11

52

43

95

24

Gangrithang

PS

14

18

32

33

16

21

28

28

28

21

26

15

26

24

170

160

330

12

15

22

Jigmeling

PS

31

27

58

Khangrab

PS

11

Kharsat

PS

Shingkhar

PS

Shingnyer

PS

10

Tangsibi

PS

Zangtherpo

PS

SR

Zungnye

PS

SR

Bebzur

ECR

SR

Tendigang

ECR

Total

Page

XII

116

61

32

50

38

12

10

17

12

62

60

122

17

37

27

64

11

13

12

25

32

33

65

22

25

21

46

19

14

13

20

16

11

14

16

17

98

87

185

21

13

11

18

71

40

111

12

11

15

14

29

29

10

14

14

148

209

191

177

4308

184

46

235

18

141

200 191 187 202 171 198 163

176

145

Annual Education Statistics

198 190 203 165 176 166 162 152

Annual Education Statistics

79 108

96

114 2208 2100

Page

117

Chukha

Dzo

Name

CatLevel egory

Chukha

HSS

SR

Gedu

HSS

SU

29

28

43

39

49

29

44

41

40

32

57

43

46

33

40

45

55

Phuentsholing

HSS

33

30

33

58

60

57

52

35

48

41

42

45

48

37

22

16

41

Reldri

PvtHSS

Chapcha

MSS

SR

Darla

MSS

U6

46

40

41

54

31

39

54

35

76

64

49

61

45

Kamji

MSS

17

16

16

12

16

19

14

21

25

14

17

Pakshika

MSS

SR

Phuentsholing

MSS

17

22

49

39

27

19

Wangchu

MSS

SR

40

52

41

53

58

52

27

34

45

Dungna

LSS

19

12

19

14

13

12

Logchina

LSS

28

26

15

27

16

24

28

Pasakha

LSS

SU

47

44

56

51

64

74

72

Phuentsholing

LSS

84

89

149

134

Tsimalakha

LSS

SR

19

31

23

Phajoding

PvtLSS

25

19

Alaykha

PS

SR

11

Arekha

PS

SR

Baikunza

PS

Bongo

PS

Chapcha

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

VIII
B

IX

X
G

XI
B

XII

Teachers

Total

Bht
Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

95

71 109 120

84

84

56

101

344

376

720

23

36

20

52

52

48

62

54

20

36

21

20

558

500

1058

34

50

21

32

86

79 118

99

63

48

55

51

701

628

1329

29

15

53

25

103 104 103

95

206

199

405

10

19

21

46

29

28

12

56

56

61

57

191

154

345

10

15

23

52

36

52

57

64

49

51

52

48

536

560

1096

31

42

26

16

26

75

64

57

74

59

67

306

328

634

17

25

25

65

49

77

86

78

74

41

59

261

268

529

13

20

26

18

28

40

38

48

37

44

41

157 144 91

79

491

447

938

18

13

37

25

38

54

62

54

49

54

51

59

57

43

30

514

518

1032

27

42

25

27

19

21

26

17

29

20

23

16

19

161

162

323

13

15

22

14

18

23

17

22

21

18

17

31

20

17

180

202

382

42

63

98

92

81

80

55

68

44

56

56

53

573

581

1154

23

34

34

159

164 132 113 118

142

129

143 125

113

114 104 143 107

1153

1109

2262

65

11

79

29

31

25

31

42

30

34

39

33

25

41

31

53

58

52

45

322

321

643

27

32

20

21

24

20

17

16

12

12

10

116

107

223

15

21

11

13

10

12

11

11

13

63

62

125

18

52

49

22

18

30

36

24

35

40

36

28

32

14

19

210

225

435

13

16

27

13

27

45

72

14

10

38

44

82

14

PS

SR

11

12

10

12

10

10

13

12

72

56

128

14

Chimuna

PS

19

11

12

10

15

16

13

20

22

16

77

94

171

24

Chongaykha

PS

20

18

37

34

19

27

24

21

25

17

25

25

16

25

166

167

333

10

11

30

Chungkha

PS

13

14

11

14

10

14

19

17

20

17

20

24

98

105

203

23

Getena

PS

13

11

46

41

87

22

Kesari

PS

SR

12

13

15

14

21

13

32

55

88

143

36

Ketokha

PS

15

40

31

71

18

Khatekha

PS

16

17

16

49

38

87

44

Lingden

PS

11

16

15

25

38

63

21

Lobnekha

PS

30

32

62

16

Mebesa

PS

23

20

19

16

13

15

23

22

13

14

22

13

11

124

109

233

29

Meretsemo

PS

15

13

10

12

43

51

94

13

Metakha

PS

17

12

10

14

12

16

10

83

52

135

27

Pachu

PS

VR

10

18

19

17

17

18

20

12

12

11

14

106

88

194

32

Paga

PS

21

25

Rangaytong

PS

11

13

11

10

17

16

55

32

87

22

Rinchenling

PS

10

23

27

50

17

Shemagangkha PS

10

10

41

38

79

13

18

30

20

22

132

158

290

32

69

59

128

43

40

39

Sinchula

PS

VR

10

10

11

19

20

18

28

33

25

26

Tashilakha

PS

SU

11

10

16

14

19

16

13

16

Tsimakha

PS

15

16

14

12

18

15

17

15

10

14

10

89

92

181

10

18

Wangdigatshel PS

SR

31

30

33

24

15

24

28

22

40

41

34

32

23

13

204

186

390

12

14

28

Agoan

ECR

SR

12

21

21

Chanachen

ECR

VR

Pakchina

ECR

VR

Sakhu

ECR

VR

Samarchen

ECR

VR

Toktogom

ECR

Total
Page

PP

118

10

14

21

21

11

14

14

14

31

39

70

70

10

13

12

25

25

10

17

21

38

38

12

8693

8515

17208

518

103

706

24

3
704 728

818

2
816

820

834 856 769 881

861

787

820 724 690

Annual Education Statistics

637 619 713 663 675 630 573 546 270 272 235 267

Annual Education Statistics

85

Page

119

Name

Dagana

Dzo

Gasa

Total

Haa

Total

Total
Page

Daga
Drujeygang
Dagapela
Lhamoy Zingkha
Daga
Daleythang
Gesarling
Namchela
Tashiding
Tshangkha
Balaygang
Dogag
Gangzor
Gumla
Karmaling
Lhaling
Lungtengang
Nimtola
Pangna
Phekoma
Phuensemgang
Samey
Zinchella
Bichgaon
Devitar
Lhaling
Lower Tsendagang
Namshigang
Pangserpo
Samachu

Level

Category

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII

VIII

32
54

40
82
60

IX
G

X
B

XI

XII

31 109 113
70 75 79
57 44 33

52
40
45

61
82
50

29
20

32
19

28 37

16

39

Teachers

Total

Bht
Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

258
284
473

274
282
455

532
566
928

21
20
27

4
5
6

5
4

30
29
33

18
20
28

389

432

821

19

25

33

195
125
243
165
165
159
81
52
90
25
74
89
45
97
205
107
81
60
110
33
31
14

207
145
222
172
167
174
78
56
93
45
82
90
48
109
229
73
82
47
125
34
32
18

402
270
465
337
332
333
159
108
183
70
156
179
93
206
434
180
163
107
235
67
63
32

15
9
15
6
12
10
6
7
8
2
4
7
5
7
11
6
5
6
7
1
1
1

2
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
0

17
10
17
8
15
13
7
8
10
3
5
9
7
8
13
7
8
7
9
2
2
1

24
27
27
42
22
26
23
14
18
23
31
20
13
26
33
26
20
15
26
34
32
32

HSS
HSS
MSS

SR
SU
SR

30

31

18

30

28

41

33

43

40

27

67

32

53

57

67
55

MSS

SR

23

33

30

27

40

38

39

39

43

49

32

40

52

40

36

53

46

41

LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
ECR
ECR
ECR

SR
R
R
R
SR
D
R
R
R
R
SR
VR
VR
R
R
VR
D
R
R
VR
VR
R

12
11
13
10
13
17
3
3
4
4
14
8
6
13
29
15
8
11
12
7
2
6

10
10
16
23
18
12
6
6
9
5
20
9
4
7
26
9
11
6
19
5
3
8

20
7
23
20
14
8
12
2
10
0
12
12
4
7
37
6
12
8
10
5
12
4

21
20
10
19
20
11
7
2
6
7
11
12
11
19
29
7
21
2
11
10
13
4

16
15
24
17
10
11
12
6
14
6
18
5
7
15
25
14
10
7
17
8
4
4

22
13
22
23
14
21
7
5
12
11
16
9
5
11
33
11
10
8
17
9
3
6

22
10
21
24
22
16
9
7
17
9
30
12
8
12
39
19
10
7
17
13
13

25
14
25
20
16
17
11
3
15
13
35
11
5
15
42
8
16
7
17
10
13

25
15
31
25
20
22
14
9
18
6

22
24
23
18
19
18
12
11
21
9

22
20
23
16
17
16
14
10
16

24
16
26
18
23
22
19
16
15

21
18
32
10
24
32
17
15
11

28
21
27
16
10
20
16
13
15

38
29
51
17
19
26

26
27
44
19
27
35

19

29

25
26
26
11

29
16
20
18

16
6
18
22
20
16
10
20

18
7
17
32
12
5
7
22

21
6
12
25
22
9
9
17

17
5
23
26
11
13
11
17

15
8
20
28
11
16
8
17

14
11
17
41
15
6
6
22

ECR

11

19

16

35

35

ECR
ECR
ECR

VR
VR
D

SU
D
D
D
D
47

409
12
8
4
3
13

420
10
8
12
4
9

396
17
5
3
4

373 374
15
14
7
6
9
6
6
0

374
17
6
13
1

408
15
6
2
1

395
11
6
8
0

338 317 335 311 260 258 153 232 49


29 29 33 37 38 29 18 21

28 37

MSS
PS
PS
PS
ECR
ECR

4
384
6
7
13
5
5

51

Bjishong
Gasa
Laya
Lunana
Lungo
Mendrelthang

5
358
19
9
21
3
9

1
1
1
307
24
8
8
6
3

30
18
19
25
18
12
17
10
21

61

36

40

43

29

37

26

37

24

25

29

29

33

37

U
SR
U
SR
SR
SR
VR
R
D
D
VR
D

0
52

0
0
41 46

13
29
72

26
43
62

11
31
70

15
21
55

91

41
30
17
21
19
13
6
8
1
4
2
0
1
122

8
6
4
4
5
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
28

49
37
21
26
24
17
9
10
1
4
2
0
1
152

17
16
20
22
23
22
19
14
10
19
13

114 131 112

30
18
19
7523
437
99
137
61
62
15
811
591
424
559
549
373
169
144
10
77
26
50
22
2994

0
0
0
52
3
1
1
2
1

HSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
ECR
ECR
ECR

11
8
11
3817
210
50
79
42
26
6
413
298
227
291
267
177
86
67
5
32
21
32
12
1515

1
1
1
242
21
7
7
4
2

Ugyen Dorji
Damthang
Katsho
Tshaphel
Jyenkana
Jyensa
Rangtse
Shari
Sombekha
Bebji
Saktena
Shaba-Shebji

19
10
8
3706
227
49
58
19
36
9
398
293
197
268
282
196
83
77
5
45
5
18
10
1479

120

7
3
288
15
9
8
1
9
9
51
13
26
19
16
8
9
5
9
4
5
6
120

10
3

6
5
3
3
4
320 310 345
16 17 19
7
6
9
12 14 12
6
7
20
6
5
6
6
53 49 66
16
23
25
13
13
9
5
2
11

26
27
19
17
15
14

27
36
23
17
15
17

33
36
18
22
16
16

36
42
26
31
6
20

23
31
23
28
11
16

30
37
19
26
14
9

31
26
15
25
15
14

30
26
13
37
11
7

22
29
27
41
5
4

16
37
22
29
15
3

25
33
19
47
13
4

31
26
22
24
12
2

7
1
4

1
5
3

6
0
5
4
156

11
5
12
6
195

17

142

159

124

147

120

6
123 130 144

132

130 133

Annual Education Statistics

32

33

38 29 18
113 117 101

113 117 101

21
83

83

Annual Education Statistics

0
38

38

52

41 46

13

0
1
1

Page

22
20

121

Name

Lhuentse

Dzo

Category

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

12

14

10

15

12

12

13

14

18

12

VIII

IX

XI

XII

Teachers

Total

Bht
Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

35

14

21

10

58

48

60

57

26 58

36

208

223

431

24

30

14

47

37

45

68

38

34

17

14

230

232

462

18

23

20

37

61

47

49

59

32

37

42

180

184

364

18

22

17

Lhuentse

HSS

Autsho
Tangmachu
Khoma

MSS

MSS

SR

LSS

10

13

11

12

10

20

25

28

19

31

28

38

31

36

39

194

181

375

14

17

22

Thimyul

LSS

12

10

15

11

23

16

17

17

19

15

18

11

10

19

13

11

14

12

141

122

263

11

24

Baptong

PS

Chakzom

PS

VR

Dangling

PS

VR

Domkhar

15

16

16

17

13

30

30

49

49

98

16

PS

35

38

73

24

Dungkhar PS
GanPS
glakhema
Gortshom PS

11

26

18

11

19

15

16

71

86

157

22

VR

17

45

52

97

19

VR

11

10

11

10

17

14

22

14

13

74

87

161

23

Kupinyesa PS

11

38

38

76

15

Ladrong

PS

VR

13

10

13

12

46

46

92

13

Lhuentse

PS

13

19

20

14

19

13

21

30

13

17

20

21

27

22

133

136

269

11

24

Minjey

PS

11

14

21

13

10

10

14

13

11

73

80

153

19

Ney

PS

VR

13

19

32

Ongar

PS

10

18

Pangkhar

PS

13

11

18

289

41

Shawa
PS
TangmaPS
chu
Thuenpey PS

VR

13

16

17

25

17

26

28

VR

Tshochen

PS

VR

10

11

10

Wambur

PS

10

11

12

13

Zangkhar

PS

VR

Zham

PS

VR

Zhamling

PS

Jarey

ECR

Lingabee

ECR

SR

Pam

ECR

VR

Yumche

ECR

Total

Page

Level

122

130 142 199 199

208

21

18

26

28

21

20

13

141

148

10

15

15

14

11

12

22

66

75

141

24

12

11

11

12

53

77

130

19

10

12

42

50

92

12

17

17

34

17

10

12

12

10

17

17

11

11

10

10

12

20

20

1949

2020

3969

169

40

211

19

182 194 213 193 216 199

193 190 222

Annual Education Statistics

170 154 163 178 155 114 114 113 26 58

Annual Education Statistics

36

Page

123

Mongar

Dzo Name

Total

Page

Gyelpozhing
Mongar
Yadi
Sherub Reldri
Drametse
Kidheykhar
Chali
Chaskar
Kengkhar
Kurichhu
Mongar
Nagor
Serzhong
Baging
Bagla
Balam
Banjar
Broksar
Bumpazor
Chaskar Pam
Dhaksa
Ganglapong
Jaibab
Junmey
Kalapang
Konbar
Lingkhar
Lingmethang
Muhung
Narang
Ngatshang
Pangthang
Resa
Ridaza
Saling
Sengor
SherubCholing
Silambi
Soenakhar
Takhambi
Thangrong
Thrindangbi
Tsakaling
Tsamang
Udaric
Waichur
Wama
Woop
Yangbari
Yaragla
Zunglen
Chaligonpa
Khalong
Mangling
Sangkama
Tshenzibee
Werringla

124

Level
HSS
HSS
HSS
PvtHSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR

Category
U
U3
SR
R
SR
SR
R
R
D
U4
U5
D
VR
VR
R
VR
VR
VR
R
R
D
VR
R
D
R
VR
R
SR
VR
VR
SR
D
VR
SR
VR
R
R
D
R
VR
VR
R
VR
VR
D
VR
R
VR
D
D
VR
SR
R
R
VR
SU
VR

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

14

21

23

10

22

13

22

17

20

17

15

13

11
10
12
24
12
25
42
10
11
7
0
17
0
0
6
1
7
5
6
16

15
13
14
20
19
20
38
6
10
9
0
15
2
0
9
6
7
0
9
23

12
11
14
28
21
44
49
16
22
12
0
16
3
1
1
8
10
8
6
20
3
6
5
15
3
19
17
8
2
25
1
3
5
6
8
5
13
8
7
10
13
5
6
4
6
2
6

27
20
24
23
16
25
45
10
18
16
0
18
3
0
4
7
10
5
5
11
2
3
1
15
6
20
14
2
4
15
4
3
4
4
8
2
25
9
10
11
10
8

11
19
16
12
16
29
69
16
12
12
0
16
4
4
6
4
11
7
3
24
1
8
3
13
6
13
11
3
4
13
5
5
2
6
7
3
16
10
10
13
16
2
6
8
5
3
6

18
21
22
19
18
32
43
13
16
9
0
16
4
3
5
5
8
5
6
14
3
6
2
20
5
16
12
6
3
15
7
3
3
7
5
3
21
6
12
11
7
4
4
1
8
3
6

23
18
23
17
24
34
43
6
9
20
4
13
2
2
8
11
2
5
6
17

15
19
19
18
14
28
45
19
14
10

26
11
17
25
20
18
47
25
16
3

17
0
3
8
2
5

3
0
14
3
9
17
2
2
13
0
2
9
2
4
3
17
5
6
3
11
9
3
3
10
3
8
4
4

18
19
12
27
33
19
45
12
13
14
3
21
2
2
4
9
8
4
7
12
4
4
8
25
8
21
7
5

21
19
19
17
28
31
45
8
9
11
2
20
3
2
5
12
5
7
5
18

2
0
11
6
10
10
5
2
17
0
3
2
0
5
2
13
5
4
7
6
6
1
1
4
9
9
10
2

16
15
17
37
22
32
46
5
13
11
3
9
2
3
2
5
7
5
9
17
4

5
6
16
5
16
7
5
0
16
2
3
2
6
5

5
4
14
1
22
12
1
0
21
4
1
4
4
12
4
18
6
15
11
11
14
5
2
8
2
6

3
14
2

5
3
556

5
2
536

2
8
411

2
23
3
9
8
18
3
5
3
5
6
2
23
8
8
3
6
7

18
2
2
5
1
5

2
3
7
7
9
2
6
4
10
9
4
5
5
460 523

7
4
7
3
12
7
4
13
4
1
564

23
18
7
8
8
6

5
6
3
8

17
3
2
18
6
5
4
3
8
5
3

VIII
B

50

68
85
80

37
34
11
39
21
27
73
8
17

54
29
19
11
30
17
44
18
16

45
14

37
14

22
11

44
13

46

18

63

43

19
25
13
16
9
29
60
24
22
7

23
22
12
25
27
34
40
28
9
10

45
39
20
19
33
33
74
24
24

49
51
17
21
32
16
55
37
17

12
0
4
10
9
11

15
0
0
6
7
15

7
0
0
5
15
14

6
18
4
12
10

7
21
4
10
6
9
3
17
14

6
10
10
3
6
21

5
12
5
6
6
14

9
12

16
12

1
10
7
3

3
16
2
2

15
3
3

12
3
2

6
8

4
8

8
8

7
9

14
6
23
14
9
8

11
5
16
11
8
6

18
10
15
7
6

13
7
10
12
4

6
1
7

4
2
5

10

Annual Education Statistics

XI

38

473

63 105 88 79
132 115 71
52 79 69 83

69

532 516 490 529 449 474 476

IX

45
42
10
104

443 376 363 353 375 323 266 290 201

Annual Education Statistics

XII
B

62
72
12
73

42
64
0
108

60
81
94

219 214 235

Total
G

386
309
406
212
254
216
141
210
176
278
503
130
144
70
5
110
12
13
34
39
60
32
38
119
20
24
28
117
27
88
75
21
9
114
21
25
14
37
47
12
114
50
69
72
62
33
17
18
38
27
40
19
4
6
12
22
8
5187

379
353
367
167
334
231
160
188
219
215
400
155
124
81
7
102
13
11
45
62
60
19
45
110
18
37
27
111
26
121
88
16
12
110
22
15
25
29
51
12
128
56
76
67
59
47
12
18
46
20
46
16
11
4
17
21
8
5219

Teachers
Bht
T:P
NBht Total
Both Other ZLT

765
662
773
379
588
447
301
398
395
493
903
285
268
151
12
212
25
24
79
101
120
51
83
229
38
61
55
228
53
209
163
37
21
224
43
40
39
66
98
24
242
106
145
139
121
80
29
36
84
47
86
35
15
10
29
43
16
10406

21
36
26
11
22
22
10
13
7
13
33
10
8
4
1
5
2
1
4
3
5
3
2
6
2
4
2
8
2
4
6
1
2
9
2
2
2
4
3
2
7
5
6
5
4
4
3
3
5
3
3
2
1
0
1
1
1
377

5
6
5
4
3
6
1
3
2
3
8
3
3
1
1
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
89

9
2
2
3

17

35
44
33
18
25
28
11
16
9
17
41
13
11
5
2
7
2
1
4
4
6
4
3
6
3
5
3
10
3
5
8
2
3
11
3
3
3
5
4
3
8
6
7
6
4
4
3
3
6
4
5
2
1
1
1
2
1
483

22
15
23
21
24
16
27
25
44
29
22
22
24
30
6
30
13
24
20
25
20
13
28
38
13
12
18
23
18
42
20
19
7
20
14
13
13
13
25
8
30
18
21
23
30
20
10
12
14
12
17
18
15
10
29
22
16
22

Page

125

Paro

Dzo

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

VIII

IX

XI

Level

Drukgyel

HSS

SU

Shari

HSS

Kuengaa

Pvt HSS

Tenzin

Pvt HSS

UTPAL Academy

Pvt HSS

Yoezerling

Pvt HSS

24

35

35

34

24

22

16

27

Betikha

MSS

13

13

15

17

17

27

23

34

32

23

25

28

26

15

28

31

41

21

41

38

17

12

Khangkhu

MSS

10

20

23

14

25

18

17

26

27

35

32

30

31

26

71

53

63

54

47

50

53

Lango

MSS

29

39

29

41

40

39

42

33

42

44

50

53

56

34

48

42

56

51

45

41

Shaba

MSS

44

57

41

40

81

66

Doteng

LSS

22

25

15

18

18

19

19

14

23

23

22

29

19

23

32

23

15

Drukgyel

LSS

40

39

30

26

44

24

42

43

39

38

41

38

39

32

65

53

Gaupey

LSS

14

27

36

37

27

45

46

40

33

40

40

47

60

62

53

Wanakha

LSS

SR

12

20

12

15

30

27

31

18

19

18

22

17

27

16

Woochhu

LSS

31

34

41

42

61

58

36

55

44

41

53

51

52

45

Dawakha

LSS

23

20

20

15

22

11

11

10

32

18

21

19

19

19

Gonyetsawa

PS

VR

11

Isuna

PS

SR

10

10

Nabesa

PS

VR

Ramchetsekha PS

10

10

12

115 106

97

94

109

76

91

97

412

373

785

21

11

39

20

79

65

62

57

58

63

47

264

218

482

19

29

17

SR

69

109 173 298

242

407

649

12

18

36

SU

138 172 244 244

382

416

798

12

10

28

29

134

153

153

15

10

118 105 138 92

355

315

670

21

31

22

278

259

537

17

21

26

32

399

358

757

28

35

22

34

26

471

443

914

36

47

19

55

60

221

223

444

17

24

19

20

185

194

379

15

18

21

52

26

392

319

711

31

37

19

69

65

54

374

421

795

27

36

22

25

14

11

192

148

340

10

12

28

56

48

43

35

417

409

826

31

39

21

26

37

25

21

199

170

369

12

15

25

49

43

92

13

36

34

70

12

10

10

61

66

127

18

23

22

45

23

13

51

VR

11

11

10

13

14

Shaba

PS

30

37

30

37

51

51

54

60

58

54

44

57

57

61

324

357

681

25

28

24

Taju

PS

SR

43

26

41

33

34

52

40

41

34

47

35

36

26

30

253

265

518

18

22

24

KulaGangri

PvtPS

12

11

16

27

Jishigang

ECR

15

15

19

19

Nemjo

ECR

11

15

22

32

46

78

39

387

94

45

526

21

Page

127

126

PS

15

11

Teachers
Bht
T:P
NBht Total
Both Other ZLT

Total

XII

Rashigang

Total

Page

Category

Name

355 394 372 392 425 428 411 412 405 404 404 431 427 383

Annual Education Statistics

456 419 418 333 416 352 321 286 625 520 709 778

Annual Education Statistics

5744

5532 11276

Dzo

Name

Level

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

VIII
B

IX

XI

XII

84

72

Total
G

Teachers
Bht
NBht Total
Both Other ZLT

T:P

HSS

97

74

66

93

32 74

279

313

592

24

31

19

Nganglam

HSS

SR

82

59 105 114 13

49

14 46

214

268

482

17

24

20

96

358

411

769

25

29

27

Dechheling

LSS

Gonpasingma LSS

20

17

20

20

23

20

24

23

22

33

21

17

13

20

29

24

24

23

84

78 118

VR

10

11

15

18

17

18

22

19

24

20

14

17

22

45

47

26

24

182

196

378

11

14

27

13

16

16

19

23

19

16

56

52

62

52

190

186

376

12

13

29

Nganglam

LSS

SR

25

18

36

43

51

50

54

53

59

60

34

36

55

46

76

82

84

73

474

461

935

22

25

37

Shumar

LSS

18

15

22

26

30

30

16

17

21

25

24

27

16

17

16

19

15

20

178

196

374

12

12

31

Tsebar

LSS

VR

16

17

11

14

13

42

36

50

37

154

144

298

11

11

27

Yurung

LSS

VR

10

11

14

13

10

37

40

43

33

153

137

290

14

14

21

Chimong

PS

11

13

31

37

68

11

VR

22

20

42

11

13

22

11

17

28

61

10

Choekhorling PS

Pemagatshel

PP

Nangkor

Pemagatshel MSS

Chongshing

PS

Dagor

PS

VR

Dungmin

PS

Kerong

PS

VR

Khangma

PS

Khar
Khenzore

11

PS

10

11

PS

VR

Kherigonpa

PS

SR

Khothakpa

PS

14

15

18

14

19

15

19

Laneri

PS

Mikuri

PS

10

Norbugang

PS

VR

15

12

Nyaskhar

PS

Rezimo

PS

VR

12

Shali

PS

VR

12

13

14

16

Thongsa

PS

Tshatse

PS

12

12

14

10

16

VR

10

14

10

10

11

11

13

Woongchiloo PS

11

33
6

11

41

42

83

14

12

10

12

12

12

59

68

127

18

11

40

35

75

11

26

28

54

16

13

21

18

16

12

16

113

113

226

38

13

25

38

12

17

10

16

61

57

118

17

11

10

18

57

62

119

17

17

33

24

57

15

10

59

79

138

23

35

43

78

20

11

72

64

136

19

45

53

98

14

13

57

57

114

29

24

31

55

Yelchen

PS

Gashari

ECR

VR

Kheri

ECR

Nangmalang ECR

17

16

33

Ngangshing

ECR

13

22

Pangthang

ECR

16

Resinang

ECR

VR

13

19

Waphi

ECR

10

26

24

50

25

Yomzor

ECR

11

Total

Page

Category

128

13

13

175 184 261 256 299 283 276 314 297 354 277 300 260

254

Annual Education Statistics

260

301 300 304 262 263 229 267 304 79 142 46 120 3105 3302 6407

Annual Education Statistics

258

46

15

11

319

20

Page

129

Name

Punakha

Dzo

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

VIII

IX

10

15

13

XI
G

XII

32

26

73

76

141 132

20

22

37

37

Total

Teachers
Bht
To- T:P
NBht
Othtal
Both
ZLT
er

97

119

343

353

696

25

37

19

168 175 256 262

500

519

1019

30

46

22

Punakha
UgyenAcademy
Drashiding

HSS

PvtHSS

MSS

12

14

29

24

35

21

90

58

148

12

14

11

Kabesa

MSS

19

25

28

25

40

24

33

26

37

32

31

25

39

22

36

26

28

14

24

12

23

338

240

578

22

28

21

Khuruthang

MSS

36

42

36

62

61

59

59

62

73

52

48

52

55

54

88

67

63

53

35

38

40

34

594

575

1169

35

49

24

Tashidingkha

MSS

SR

41

43

69

50

75

90

64

69

249

252

501

16

25

20

Dechentsemo MSS

SR

94

60

72

38

55

63

56

31

277

192

469

15

20

23

Bjibjokha

LSS

12

12

21

21

13

16

18

19

26

13

13

11

23

26

25

10

12

162

136

298

10

16

19

Lobesa

LSS

36

35

45

39

68

47

64

71

76

60

66

63

72

66

69

49

37

32

533

462

995

27

38

26

Shengana

LSS

12

10

13

11

16

14

13

13

19

13

33

39

14

124

129

253

12

17

15

Goenshari

PS

10

13

37

60

97

11

Lakhu

PS

SR

11

10

46

53

99

11

Lapsakha

PS

10

10

11

11

13

14

13

12

64

74

138

15

Logodama

PS

10

25

14

12

37

25

39

42

23

28

35

36

31

174

189

363

17

21

17

Mendhagang

PS

15

20

26

17

21

23

22

16

23

16

10

14

18

135

113

248

11

12

21

Nawakha

PS

10

13

12

10

12

12

13

73

55

128

18

Nobgang

PS

27

25

52

10

Phulusu

PS

SR

10

15

22

37

37

Tahogang

PS

16

19

35

12

Thinleygang

PS

SR

15

13

17

20

18

20

33

23

24

31

28

30

37

38

172

175

347

13

16

22

Tshochasa

PS

10

12

14

10

60

52

112

12

Walathang

PS

VR

11

10

11

12

49

50

99

14

Changchena

ECR

VR

16

16

Mendrelgang

ECR

VR

10

10

19

19

Tongshuna

ECR

VR

16

16

Tsetena

ECR

VR

14

10

19

29

29

Tseykha

ECR

VR

11

15

26

13

Yebesa

ECR

VR

10

18

26

26

8013

300

75

30

Total

Page

Level

Category

130

209 235 311 323 318 312 318 337 374 293 290 291 347 280

Annual Education Statistics

364 326 298 228 309 272 344 284 309 307 353 381 4144 3869

Annual Education Statistics

405 20

Page

131

Samdrupjongkhar

Dzo Name

Category

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

Orong

HSS

VR

Garpawoong
Jomotsangkha
Martshala
Phuntshothang
SamdrupJongkhar
Gomdar

MSS

MSS

SR

MSS

VR

MSS

MSS

LSS

VR

12

30

18

23

22

26

Menjiwoong

LSS

VR

Orong

LSS

15

19

22

15

20

12

Pemathang

LSS

VR

11

20

15

24

16

35

29

Barzor

PS

10

15

12

13

11

Deothang

PS

41

65

76

57

60

71

68

Dungmanma

PS

Golanti

PS

Khoya

PS

13

12

12

17

Lauri

PS

12

16

Martshala

PS

VR

24

20

19

Monmola

PS

Rikhey

PS

SU

12

SamdrupjongPS
khar

Sarjung

PS

Tsosalo

PS

Wangphu
Wooling

31
29

33

72

26
56

28

63

23

33

42

39

48

32

58

28

34

30

21

28

38

XI

XII

Total

Teachers
Bht
T:P
NBht Total
Both Other ZLT

104 83

39

33

39 64

27

99

209

279

488

13

21

23

50

27

32

27

188

114

302

11

20

15

22

21

25

26

15

307

310

617

16

26

24

25

20

54

76

48

85

155

219

374

16

20

19

45

39

57

47

46

41

596

561

1157

28

33

35

64

54

58

61

56

54

62

50

60

46

44

35

344

300

644

14

26

25

20

26

26

22

19

40

41

42

42

226

212

438

13

18

24

13

12

11

70

60

52

62

163

171

334

11

15

22

24

19

24

20

30

21

49

57

56

58

240

221

461

13

19

24

23

22

32

21

27

32

28

19

30

26

229

191

420

14

16

26

13

17

13

23

16

15

77

105

182

26

60

55

50

41

58

41

51

382

412

794

16

20

40

12

14

32

44

76

19

11

15

26

13

17

20

12

14

54

63

117

29

10

15

21

21

22

31

22

19

33

26

23

140

136

276

35

23

19

21

18

32

35

21

22

20

22

37

159

174

333

11

30

10

14

19

14

11

13

63

68

131

22

10

11

11

12

12

10

11

61

65

126

21

56

36

61

48

60

54

59

62

81

46

317

246

563

22

26

22

10

11

11

15

12

12

51

67

118

17

23

26

49

16

PS

VR

15

21

18

16

15

26

26

21

20

14

111

113

224

28

PS

VR

13

12

10

16

12

11

20

17

17

23

19

89

104

193

21

Yarphu

PS

VR

17

12

10

10

10

68

56

124

18

Zamtari

PS

13

14

60

51

111

22

Zangthey

PS

16

14

13

14

Dechen

PvtPS

42

30

52

40

19

14

Khamethang

ECR

Martang

ECR

Nainatal

ECR

Philuma

ECR

Samrang

ECR

Serchenmo

ECR

12

60

28

54

54

26

IX

60

49

28

VIII

55

10

45

29

VII

41

12

70

31

VI

59

12

48

26

67

Total

Page

Level

37

100

17

95

219

10

22

16

18

34

34

10

10

12

12

20

18

38

38

10

15

15

12

21

30

30

278

52

39

369

25

Page

133

352 370 499 434 507 476 459 472 480 435 427 449 438

132

63
124

452

Annual Education Statistics

413 385 391 347 346 304 235 236 39 64

Annual Education Statistics

27

99

4613

4523 9136

Dzo

Name

Level

Samtse

Samtse
Tendu
Dorokha
Gomtu
Peljorling
Yoeseltse
Bara
Chargharey
Norbugang
Denchukha
Samtse
Sengdhyen
Baseni
Bukey
Dzongsar
Gangthok
Gayshing Goan
Ghatia
Kirney
Mechetar
Mindruling
Namgeychoeling
Pagli
Panabari
Phensum
Soeltapsa
TabaDramtoe
Tachey
Ugentse
Bhoteykharka
Birutar
Buka
Changjuk
Choksa
Daragaon
Dipojona
Dumshi Dara
Fenchi
Jaringay
Kachin
Lamitar
Majuwa
Malbasey
Mandranay
Ngangladang
Nigurey
Noonpani
Pungtha
Rajaruk
Sangla
Sanglung
Sombek
Tading
Tashicholing
Thika
Triting

HSS
HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR
ECR

Total

Page

134

Category
U
SR
D
U
SU
SR
R
SR
SR
D
U
D
R
R
U
VR
R
SU
SU
U
D
SR
SU
R
SR
R
VR
R
SR
R
SU
R
R
R
R
R
R
VR
R
SU
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
VR
R
R
R
R
R
SR
R
R

PP

17
17
65
35
23
19
11
25
8
57
27
6
7
8
10
16
12
15
10
5
31
26
26
15
11
14
9
21
6
5
19
10
5
7
5
3
5
2
10
6
7
5
2
6

16
29
73
56
40
25
15
28
19
69
26
4
11
15
6
12
12
7
13
9
42
16
35
10
4
21
8
12
5
4
13
7
5
9
5
7
4
2
4
12
9
6
4
11

45
23
53
63
38
24
18
22
17
71
15
5
5
14
16
22
6
5
21
29
16
31
32
12
17
23
6
11
4
2
11
5
7
7
7
2
2
2
7
6
4
9
3
13
7
6

5
1
3
4
1
11
7
681

II
B

III
B

69 52 60
16 35 35
66 52 55
49 95 88
25 25 43
28 42 44
16 33 40
20 18 36
13 10 13
68 97 92
19 46 53
6
7
5
6
2
5
21 15 18
19
16 18 28
17
6
6
10
22 20 23
19 16 20
16 32 33
26 22 22
49 33 35
13 17 23
14
20 41 42
11 12 11
19 16 18
4
3
2
9
9
6
8
3
8
11 13 13
3
5
7
11
9
4
6
8
4
5
2
8
8
6
8
11
6
9
8
10
6
6
10
6
8
11
12
2
2
5
6
5
3
1
3
5
12
11
6
5
9
10 16
9
1
3
7
5
14
5
4
1
3
2
18
15
15
6
11
1
2
6
2
5
4
792 831 865 863 982

IV

59
32
91
61
41
50
35
21
20
97
44
7

56
29
71
81
41
57
40
32
19
86
38
7

17

22

11

17

12
19
16
32
25
49
23

15
14
27
43
20
52
32

18
2
13

23
14
18

11
11
13

14
19
9

10

8
5
13

13
9
13

10

15

10

892

V
B

VI

VII

VIII

IX

79 60
41 31
117 111
53 63
41 37
36 25
36 39
33 30
23 15
101 96
33 24
14 11

64
47
100
82
46
51
18
42
32
63
26

65
43
106
98
55
43
22
32
28
44
33

54
34
98
90
45
27
28
36
25
81
35

67
32
108
106
53
35
36
44
29
96
31

79
52
90
89
48
25
15
47
24
105
21

78
68
86
93
54
29
28
61
26
107
34

61
88
72
94
61
34
0
39
24
96
19

50
61
73
74
58
26

15

23

24

14

36
19
51

26
27
43

23
39
62

27
24
85

17
20
23

18
22
20

43
27

42
17

30
11

14
23

18
11
25

20
6
26

24

37

14

17

23

27

28

785

803

645

762

598

678

973 861 781

Annual Education Statistics

X
B

XI
B

XII

Total

136 125 106 106


40 64 57 62
106 100 65 79
53 66 66 38
84 69 75 76
52 54 37 42

45
21

49
22

43
41

53
53

588 532 471 478 406 403

66

71

84

30
31
88
41

Annual Education Statistics

330
669
540
857
821
457
308
194
283
183
768
266
39
14
93
26
67
18
38
146
144
247
104
213
105
28
130
40
130
13
27
44
41
12
14
23
15
7
21
17
20
11
30
16
40
9
11
9
15
19
27
6
11
26
18
11
106 7771

B
333
722
523
853
853
502
312
236
313
193
746
299
33
22
113
25
73
29
38
143
148
282
84
227
118
18
201
50
144
11
33
48
40
8
14
21
24
8
34
12
29
15
38
29
41
14
11
21
16
31
18
14
15
33
7
8
8226

Teachers
Bht
OthBoth
ZLT NBht Total
er

663
1391
1063
1710
1674
959
620
430
596
376
1514
565
72
36
206
51
140
47
76
289
292
529
188
440
223
46
331
90
274
24
60
92
81
20
28
44
39
15
55
29
49
26
68
45
81
23
22
30
31
50
45
20
26
59
25
19
15997

21
31
23
31
43
24
12
11
21
12
44
9
1
2
4
1
2
2
3
9
5
7
1
8
4
1
8
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
2
0
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
0
1
1
375

6
8
5
11
6
4
3
4
3
3
7
3
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
2
3
0
2
1
0
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
84

11
11
1
16
7
8
0
1
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
61

38
50
29
58
56
36
15
16
24
15
55
12
1
2
5
1
3
2
4
10
7
10
1
10
5
1
12
2
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
520

Page

T:P
17
28
37
29
30
27
41
27
25
25
28
47
72
18
41
51
47
24
19
29
42
53
188
44
45
46
28
45
30
24
60
92
81
20
28
44
39
15
28
29
25
26
68
23
81
23
22
30
31
50
23
20
26
59
25
19
31

135

Sarpang

Dzo Name

Category

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

VIII
B

IX
B

X
B

XI

XII

Total

Gelephu

HSS

126 127 117 94

61

80

50

63

354

364

Sarpang

HSS

124 111

63

83

49

58

24

50

260

Norbuling

MSS

21

27

19

29

27

28

25

19

24

26

28

31

35

29

75

55

78

70

83

68

65

74

Pelrithang

MSS

120 113

60

58

75

77

67

70

70

52

64

62

52

66

78

62

67

67

55

34

Kuendrup Early
Learning Centre

PvtHSS

16

10

14

12

Dekiling

LSS

SR

26

29

28

22

49

38

Gelephu

LSS

74

79

87

108

94

102 125 99 143 127 101 102 99 115

Jigmecholing

LSS

12

16

24

24

31

25

40

43

37

38

27

32

34

38

45

41

37

Jigmeling

LSS

SR

18

14

22

23

22

21

24

29

26

36

19

30

22

21

35

28

34

Sarpang

LSS

52

48

44

33

74

70

88

81

67

88

74

65

81

75

64

71

79

Umling

LSS

19

16

26

27

15

24

12

21

19

25

19

15

19

33

27

20

Chuzagang

PS

14

17

26

24

15

24

23

23

36

46

24

20

21

Dechen Perli

PS

SR

12

15

14

20

16

10

16

17

13

Gakiling

PS

15

18

15

28

16

Jangchubling

PS

16

12

15

14

15

22

20

26

26

10

Laring

PS

13

13

11

12

20

16

Lhayul

PS

15

13

18

19

14

Retey

PS

Samtenling

PS

15

22

14

25

18

23

14

16

22

Serzhong

PS

SR

13

15

10

14

19

10

17

Singye

PS

13

23

16

27

Tareythang

PS

10

Chungshing

ECR

Kencholing

ECR

SU

13

Kharpani

ECR

Samkhara

ECR

12

Total

Page

Level

14

41

39

23

32

22

302

562

18

14

36

16

480

456

936

32

42

22

715

668 1383

49

60

23

202 150 164 186 399

358

757

12

10

26

29

44

315

309

624

24

27

23

122 94 127 120

972

946 1918

50

59

33

35

287

292

579

16

20

29

26

222

228

450

15

18

25

66

623

597 1220

34

44

28

156

181

337

10

34

23

159

177

336

12

12

28

15

94

87

181

20

64

43

107

13

14

16

116

107

223

25

10

63

82

145

10

11

13

63

50

113

28

27

43

70

14

21

16

18

12

17

111

142

253

11

23

15

14

10

15

14

85

98

183

10

18

58

51

109

27

29

27

56

14

14

14

21

30

30

23

21

44

44

21

14

35

35

67

41

470

24

33

40

44

40

35

30

23

32

11

471 501 471 468 557 559 592 580 568 574 473 468 461 513

136

T:P

718

1
31

Teachers
Bht
OthBoth
ZLT NBht Total
er

Annual Education Statistics

476 394 454 428 388 340 252 258 312 288 238 299 5713 5670 11383 362

Annual Education Statistics

Page

137

Thim Throm

Dzo Name

Level

Category

Thimphu Dzongkhag

G B

I
G

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
G

B
535

1165

35

14

57

20

Yangchenphug

HSS

218 178 187 157 215 166 191

157

811

658

1469

23

27

57

26

Kelki

PvtHSS

221 156 196

163

417

319

736

21

36

20

Nima

PvtHSS

228 208 328

424

556

632

1188

19

36

33

Pelkhil

PvtHSS

25

26

44

74

123

197

11

12

26

Rinchen

PvtHSS

257 213 244

205

501

418

919

18

34

27

Babesa

MSS

49

42

37

43

51 60 80

58

217

203

420

12

19

22

Changangkha

MSS

10 18 19

24

24

22

43

48

45

50

43

41

41

74

90

97

155

99

84 65

554

538

1092

38

46

24

Dechencholing

MSS

81 72 101

91

87

108

82

88

90

89

91

86

82

91

100

81

85

84

83 69 79

50

961

909

1870

53

14

76

25

Loseling

MSS

37 41 33

26

73

58

46

56

70

76

66

58

69

44

49

61

80

52

53 70 29

48

605

590

1195

41

48

25

Lungtenzampa

MSS

105

88

99

78 186 169 223 196

613

531

1144

35

10

53

22

DrTobgyel

PvtMSS

27 25 27

31

40

38

30

36

40

30

40

32

28

29

26

17

11

13

12

10

12

291

270

561

28

41

14

Druk

PvtMSS

50 46 52

50

30

39

29

41

24

38

26

35

34

22

24

29

16

20

10

293

330

623

35

11

48

13

Chang Rigphel

LSS

16 22 25

19

35

36

36

45

47

67

47

47

31

49

42

31

38

29

317

345

662

31

35

19

Changzamtog

LSS

45 34 63

58

75

74

69

70

64

60

62

54

81

76

181 170 165 151

805

747

1552

51

60

26

Choden

LSS

47

44

107

105

212

12

18

Jigme Namgyel

LSS

34 39 39

42

65

54

57

60

68

67

64

45

76

80

152 131 123 106

678

624

1302

47

54

24

Zilukha

LSS

46 32 27

28

54

51

41

44

59

50

51

50

36

51

56

415

388

803

39

45

18

Babesa

PS

50 43 59

46

51

65

52

52

53

43

65

43

44

49

374

341

715

30

35

20

Changbandu

PS

27 27 20

22

45

39

30

17

41

32

37

36

29

24

229

197

426

17

21

20

Jigme Losel

PS

53 37 66

58

59

61

68

67

63

57

69

52

61

62

439

394

833

30

33

25

Lungtenphu

PS

64 67 61

70

62

87

80

85

90

84

92

75

76

70

525

538

1063

33

38

28

Rinchen Kuenphen PS

51 62 70

81

85

70

71

59

81

65

60

94

71

60

489

491

980

39

46

21

Zilnon Namgyeling
Early Learning
Centre
Little Dragon

PS

53 65 46

60

54

64

51

54

54

55

64

56

71

58

393

412

805

33

39

21

PvtPS

30 54 19

25

20

29

26

20

16

13

18

14

17

15

146

170

316

19

27

12

PvtPS

33 33 22

30

21

23

15

12

14

123

118

241

13

16

15

Phuensum

PvtPS

21 29 13

13

12

10

57

64

121

13

Rigsar

PvtPS

60 70 45

46

25

35

27

17

12

15

176

201

377

16

20

19

Sunshine

PvtPS

27 23 24

18

15

27

10

12

10

96

99

195

22

Thimphu

PvtPS

26 17 19

26

17

24

20

23

18

26

16

14

24

14

140

144

284

15

20

14

841 856 850 864 949 1014 881 905 962 930 932 862 899

896

927 866 918 754 877 770 797 693 1071 892 1128 1132 12032

175

120

1100

21

49

19

22

19

14

18

61
51

60
45

11

48

Teachers
Bht
T:P
NBht Total
Both Other ZLT

Total
630

XII
B

XI

139

179 131 183 164 125 101 143

IX

VIII

HSS

VII

Motithang

Total

31

11434 23466 805

Khasadrapchu

MSS

36 24 35

38

36

42

40

40

45

35

37

46

49

36

64

58

44

47

49 53 31

25

466

444

910

35

Kuzshugchen

MSS

SR

14 18 22

27

30

34

16

11

21

32

22

28

15

27

21

11

18

15 19 13

207

221

428

19

Genekha

LSS

10

13

16

11

12

10

12

12

14

11

22

14

18

26

19

17

128

127

255

10

Yangchen Gatshel

LSS

19

23

23

13

19

13

18

22

22

30

27

19

16

12

23

16

167

148

315

12

14

23

Hontsho

PS

SR

15 12 14

18

12

17

16

17

10

10

14

15

92

95

187

10

19

Jemina

PS

SR

10

10

12

17

13

19

13

26

13

16

12

77

102

179

10

18

Lingzhi

PS

30

26

56

Sisina

PS

SR

16 13 16

19

11

15

13

11

19

12

15

17

99

92

191

12

16

Tshaluna
Yum Thuji Zam
Charity
Barishong

PS

Soe

Total
Total Thimphu

Page

PP

138

PvtPS

SR

ECR

VR

ECR

10

28

30

58

13 19

17

14

21

15

16

64

84

148

11

13

11

11

1363

1380

2743

120

30

157

17

1046 973 1022 841 941 842 841 725 1071 892 1128 1132 13395 12814 26209 925

205

127

1257

21

Page

139

122 112 151 190 148 183 157 146 154 162 147 174 153

115

963 968 1001 1054 1097 1197 1038 1051 1116 1092 1079 1036 1052 1011

Annual Education Statistics

119 107 104

87

64 72 44

32

Annual Education Statistics

Trashigang

Dzo

Page

Name
Jigme Sherubling
Jampeling
Rangjung
Tashitse
Bartsham
Dungtse
Gongthung
Radi
Trashigang
Bidung
Bikhar
Kangpar
Khaling
Rangjung
Sakteng
Thungkhar
Uzorong
Wamrong
Yonphula
Barshong
Bartsham
Benshingmo
Bepan
Berdungma
Brekha
Chaling
Changmey
Chiya
Daliphangma
Dungmanma
Galing
Jangsheri
Jerelemi
Jomtshang
Jonkhar
Kanglung
Kurichilo
Lumang
Merak
Moshi
Pakaling
Pam
Pasaphu
Phegpari
Phongmey
Rangshikhar
Ritshangdung
Rongthung
Saling

140

Level
HSS
HSS
HSS
HSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
MSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
LSS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS
PS

Category
SR
U
U
SR
R
SR
SR
SR
U
R
R
R
SR
U
D
D
R
SR
SR
SR
SR
VR
D
D
VR
R
R
VR
VR
D
R
VR
VR
VR
VR
U
VR
VR
R
SR
R
SR
D
VR
R
R
VR
R
R

PP
G

I
B

II
B

8
8
17
10
7
15
12
15
25
5
22
11
15
4
11
4

15
13
20
10
12
8
13
9
17
9
15
22
12
9
14
7

19
14
41
12
9
12
14
13
18
9
16
13
15

20
13
32
18
15
7
26
18
15
14
22
12
12

14
7

15
6

8
1
10
3
4
6
7
11
2
6

7
4
13
10
6
9
6
7
5
6

4
6
15
7
7
4
3
8
2
7

4
15
7
17
9
7
7
1
3
2
13
3

3
3
11
6
6
7
5
7
4
5
3
3
29
10
10
12
10
5
5
3
7
6
4

4
8

10
6

22
6
11
8
7
5
6
2
8
10
8
9
9
6

21
12
11
8
9
13
7
5
6
9
4
6
6
5

10
18
47
9
20
11
19
17
16
6
15
30
15
10
19
4
6
13
2
14
11
16
12
4
9
2
5
7
5
38
10
6
14
13
8
4
6
6
9
6
9
8
6

III
B

17
15
47
11
16
9
28
28
28
10
22
20
16
3
12
9
6
2
12
12
10
13
4
3
7
4
7
7
4
24
6
4
19
12
5
3
6
11
12
1
6
5
12

IV
B

20
19
60
10
25
9
18
25
25
13
21
21
8
3
12
5
2
4
8
13
5
9
6
11
8
5
6
3
8
31
7
6
13
15
8
10

25
18
45
9
15
15
20
13
26
9
8
14
12
3
17
6
7
2
8
11
7
11
8
9
4
4
8
5
6
33
3
9
18
8
6
2

4
11
1
12
4
7

10
10
4
8
15
9

22
17
47
14
15
19
14
13
21
9
28
13
9
6
13
3
6
4
6
13
12
12
9
9
5
3
7
5
3
38
6
13
20
15
9
3
6
8
11
7
12
11
9

V
B

17
16
39
9
29
12
25
14
20
13
32
25
14
6
16
12
6
8
8
18
9
3
6
5
5
3
4
6
4
27
13
8
20
16
12
6
5
6
15
2
11
8
11

33
14
44
16
12
12
21
21
16
13
18
14
24
6
12
9
7
3
8
17
6
7
7
5
8
3
6
3
5
33
6
7
16
11
6
2
4
6
12
7
8
8
8

VI
B

15
12
38
12
16
11
27
17
27
9
22
25
16
8
12
4
2
6
9
15
9
6
16
4
7
4
5
4
11
41
15
8
14
16
10
3
3
7
12
4
9
14
2

VII

7
20
40
10
13
13
26
19
9
10
20
29
13
5
16
6
8

10
20
33
15
16
17
15
17
22
8
13
17
17
5
11
6
5

9
15
11
1
11
3
5
7
6
1
2
38
5
12
13
12
5
5
4
7
15

11
15
8
5
12
6
12
6
8
2
11
37
14
7
13
6
9
2

5
4

13
7

VIII

IX

39

39

45

40

29
58
31
11
34
50
40
19
22
31
15
23
38
59
14

16
59
19
15
29
60
32
27
23
16
13
31
31
80
16

27
68
40
20
47
52
19
20
21
22
9
17
25
64
15

25
50
40
14
43
33
24
28
28
23
16
34
36
76
10

XII

71
57
89
87
80
43

66
53
69
85
66
73

52
36
85
71
59
44

67
32
109
71
70
48

39
31
51
51

89
45
89
65

51
18
43
46

91
15
79
66

12
47

11
34

15
34

16
31

213
226
268
255
195
213
190
168
458
183
160
130
167
176
154
105
203
254
128
34
97
38
29
39
38
95
58
55
60
45
53
27
42
19
27
215
47
72
93
80
48
31
25
41
81
32
50
49
48

313
224
346
287
177
230
178
163
391
177
175
134
205
155
184
137
201
291
125
34
97
50
26
25
57
97
56
51
57
35
50
27
44
27
39
212
73
57
104
77
60
28
22
56
78
19
40
71
52

Annual Education Statistics

Teachers

Total

9
14

Annual Education Statistics

XI

Bht
Both Other
526
450
614
542
372
443
368
331
849
360
335
264
372
331
338
242
404
545
253
68
194
88
55
64
95
192
114
106
117
80
103
54
86
46
66
427
120
129
197
157
108
59
47
97
159
51
90
120
100

13
16
14
14
16
16
12
13
23
10
10
11
13
14
9
10
11
14
10
5
5
4
2
2
4
6
5
5
3
5
5
3
3
2
1
12
6
4
8
5
5
5
3
4
4
3
6
6
5

ZLT
4
4
3
4
4
3
3
2
6
3
3
2
3
2
1
2
3
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1

NBht Total
10
4
9
8
1
3
1
3
5
3
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

27
24
26
26
21
22
16
18
34
16
13
13
18
17
10
12
14
19
12
6
7
5
3
3
5
7
7
5
4
6
6
4
4
3
3
16
7
5
9
6
6
6
4
5
5
4
7
6
6

T:P
19
19
24
21
18
20
23
18
25
23
26
20
21
19
34
20
29
29
21
11
28
18
18
21
19
27
16
21
29
13
17
14
22
15
22
27
17
26
22
26
18
10
12
19
32
13
13
20
17

Page

141

Dzo

Name

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

VIII
B

IX
G

X
B

XI
B

XII
B

Teachers

Total
B

Bht
Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

Thrimshing

PS

VR

10

45

39

84

17

Tokshingmang

PS

10

19

13

17

21

17

13

18

14

17

15

18

89

110

199

25

Tongling

PS

10

12

30

38

68

17

Tsangpo

PS

VR

13

10

45

44

89

22

Tshogonpa

PS

VR

10

47

43

90

18

Yabrang

PS

15

16

14

10

76

45

121

20

Yangnyeer

PS

SR

11

22

10

14

13

12

13

18

13

10

87

79

166

24

Yin Gom

PS

VR

10

38

30

68

17

Yobinang

PS

VR

10

22

10

10

56

20

76

19

Zordung

PS

31

42

73

18

Thongrong

PS

SR

39

24

63

Gengkhar

ECR

17

26

13

Chengri

ECR

11

18

Kheri

ECR

Lem

ECR

Muktangkhar

ECR

Phoshing

ECR

Samkhar

ECR

VR

Thrakthrik

ECR

SR

Yenangbrangsa ECR

SR

Total

Page

CatLevel
egory

142

2
5

6
3

4
4

3
6
7

432 450 545 529 619 616 623 587 608 627 588 604

541

544

Annual Education Statistics

11

16

16

11

27

14

14

19

19

12

21

21

13

18

18

12

19

10

14

12

26

26

100

52

600

21

513 506 511 520 486 457 396 444 172 288 158 251 6192 6423 12615 448

Annual Education Statistics

Page

143

Trashiyangtse

Dzo

Name

Category

PP

II

III

IV

VI

VII

VIII

IX

10

11

10

19

17

10

13

15

13

14

11

14

29

32

26

23 104 104

XI

XII

77

65

62

51

55 70

Teachers

Total
B

Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

229

261

490

15

24

20

332

370

702

22

32

22

HSS

Tsenkharla

MSS

SR

Bumdeling

LSS

14

12

18

12

18

21

17

22

25

15

14

25

41

36

25

30

172

189

361

13

15

24

Khamdang

LSS

VR

19

21

21

18

22

20

18

21

16

16

18

17

17

15

31

16

17

12

179

156

335

42

Kheni

LSS

15

10

12

14

19

20

19

13

13

13

35

34

40

31

164

149

313

10

14

22

Ramjar

LSS

11

12

14

16

17

14

16

16

20

11

25

14

16

20

15

13

10

121

147

268

13

16

17

Thragom

LSS

VR

10

12

13

12

26

28

20

23

109

95

204

10

12

17

93 119

35 75

Bht

Baylling

Tongmijangsa LSS

13

10

16

14

10

17

14

20

58

59

33

38

165

170

335

12

14

24

Trashiyangtse LSS

U3

18

24

34

24

50

42

62

44

44

44

48

56

44

42

62

53

56

37

418

366

784

20

25

31

13

51

40

91

13

15

14

29

15

32

33

65

11

14

Chakedemi

PS

11

Dhalikha

PS

VR

Doksum

PS

SR

Dukti

PS

Jamkhar

PS

Jangphutse

PS

VR

Langmadung

PS

Lichen

PS

Manan

PS

VR

Melongkhar

PS

Pangthoka

PS

VR

Rabtey

PS

VR

Shali

PS

Shingkhar

PS

Shongring

PS

Tarphel

PS

Tokaphu

PS

Tsangphuchen PS
Tshaling

PS

Womanang
Yallang

Total

Page

Level

10

12

10

10

10

18

14

12

12

17

10

16

14

15

16

18

11

14

10

15

10

PS

PS

VR

10

11

31

43

74

12

28

30

58

15

12

37

51

88

15

26

27

53

11

10

15

37

31

68

11

37

28

65

29

19

48

12

39

46

85

12

55

46

101

14

22

27

49

12

64

63

127

21

10

43

34

77

15

79

71

150

19

47

41

88

13

36

33

69

12

33

31

64

164 161 240 215 256 252 265 248 279 264 251 277 231 248

144

Annual Education Statistics

302 273 230 204 181 169 155 170 55 70

Annual Education Statistics

35 75 2644 2626 5270

216

51

11

274

19

Page

145

Name

Trongsa

Dzo

Level

Category

Tsirang

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

VIII

IX

XI

23

48 22 39

HSS

25

32

33

24

53

53

59

35

Taktse

MSS

SU

18

27

28

21

64

61

41

73

Samcholing

MSS

16

15

Langthel

LSS

Tshangkha

LSS

SR

Baling

PS

Bemji

PS

VR

Bjeezam

PS

Chendebji

15

13

10

15

10

13

PS

Jangbi

PS

VR

Jongthang

PS

Karshong

PS

Kela

PS

VR

Korphu

PS

Kuengarabten

PS

SR

Nabji

PS

Namgaycholing

PS

Nimshong

PS

VR

Samcholing

PS

SU

13

Simphu

PS

VR

Tongtongphey

PS

SR

Trashidingkha

PS

Trongsa

PS

Yudrukcholing
Tashi Pokto

XII

Sherubling

G B

Teachers

Total

Bht

Both

Other ZLT

215

231

446

19

151

182

333

16

99

98

197

11

NBht Total
2

T:P

25

18

20

17

14

14

19

17

17

12

12

11

20

19

19

15

13

16

13

10

17

17

47

43

46

28

179

152

331

14

17

12

12

11

23

40

28

21

115

115

230

11

15

15

10

13

10

48

45

93

13

12

48

42

90

15

10

40

41

81

16

10

29

35

64

13

33

32

65

13

11

17

37

29

66

13

11

11

10

12

10

12

SU

24

PS

SR

ECR

SU

Total

84

11

11

13

11

14

19

33

17

23

24

47

12

49

52

101

20

26

37

63

16

18

13

31

11

35

49

84

28

15

24

14

43

58

101

20

14

22

22

10

40

49

89

15

12

16

18

18

23

11

14

12

14

87

89

176

20

25

32

33

30

36

36

43

44

42

54

37

32

28

252

244

496

21

24

21

11

35

47

82

21

13

48 22 39

1643

1708

3351

154

44

202

17

83 108 37 77

336

427

763

22

28

27

328

313

641

23

32

20

105 172 175 169 181 162 163 175 192 179 156 137

142

133 161 154 109 133 129 100 108 23

Damphu

HSS

SU

Mendregang

MSS

SR

Damphu

LSS

SU

61

46

81

78

77

92

72

82

70

92

85

86 102

105

125 110 105 127

778

818

1596

39

48

33

Tsirang toe

LSS

VR

14

15

13

20

19

22

27

24

29

16

24

23

33

44

232

254

486

14

18

27

Barshong

PS

11

18

21

18

19

16

10

23

13

21

84

100

184

26

Beteni

PS

12

14

13

11

13

15

14

18

18

18

91

95

186

23

Daunthrey

PS

VR

11

12

16

32

32

64

32

Gopini

PS

15

15

14

17

11

12

26

13

24

16

18

19

17

15

125

107

232

26

Gosaling

PS

SU

11

17

11

13

12

20

18

16

18

23

14

29

17

15

101

133

234

10

23

Mendrelgang

PS

SU

27

25

23

30

29

30

28

32

31

36

37

25

24

28

199

206

405

12

15

27

Sergithang

PS

VR

17

15

32

16

16

21

12

24

24

23

21

19

17

24

139

142

281

31

Phuentenchu

PS

SU

10

15

17

14

20

20

22

22

29

17

12

13

110

101

211

35

Semjong

PS

11

12

17

21

21

28

21

21

26

15

20

112

124

236

26

Silami

PS

12

17

17

14

20

19

20

23

25

25

19

17

17

18

130

133

263

29

Tsholingkhar

PS

VR

13

11

16

21

18

30

26

33

11

15

84

110

194

24

Nimazor

ECR

SU

13

14

12

14

30

47

77

39

Toisang

ECR

VR

15

15

2917

3151

6068

176

38

221

27

Total

Page

PP

146

127 151 89
70
28
16

223 223 279 285 294 347 310 342 306 325 287 285 246

82
42

89
34

74 105 77

64

91
80

59

266

Annual Education Statistics

239 234 228 260 232 228 153 171 83 108 37 77

Annual Education Statistics

Page

147

Name

Wangduephodrang

Dzo

Category

Bajo

HSS

Gaselo

HSS

Phobjikha

MSS

Samtengang

MSS

SR

Gaselo

LSS

Nobding

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII
B

12

18

17

30

30

27

26

15

44

14

14

18

17

17

20

26

30

15

20

19

27

20

24

15

LSS

13

15

15

18

16

15

16

24

15

22

16

13

Wangdi

LSS

54

55

86

90

78

61

88

85

56

87

88

89

110 101

Bayta

PS

13

16

14

18

16

12

15

13

11

15

12

15

Bjena

PS

11

Dangchu

PS

VR

16

14

11

10

10

Hebesa

PS

20

17

17

16

12

15

11

15

12

12

Jala

PS

VR

14

10

Kazhi

PS

VR

12

11

10

13

12

15

11

Khotokha

PS

VR

13

15

21

18

16

17

17

18

11

16

Nahi

PS

10

12

12

10

Phuensum Deki

PS

VR

11

12

Rameychen

PS

VR

17

17

15

19

13

19

12

10

19

Rinchengang

PS

18

16

12

18

16

16

10

11

20

Rubesa

PS

11

11

12

Rukubji

PS

VR

11

10

10

14

10

Samtengang

PS

SR

25

25

17

28

22

30

19

13

34

26

22

19

Sephu

PS

14

16

13

Sha Tasha

PS

18

15

15

12

23

15

Singay Namgay

PS

SR

14

13

15

16

14

12

11

Tencholing

PS

SU

72

79

80

96

81

73

63

72

61

59

Uma

PS

VR

Athang

ECR

Domchoethang

ECR

VR

Dongkobji

ECR

VR

12

Dranghal

ECR

VR

Gangphel

ECR

VR

12

14

Gogona

ECR

VR

Matalungchu

ECR

VR

Ridha

ECR

148

VIII

IX
G

X
B

Teachers

Total

49

46

63

42 115 116 122 91 30 28 19 41


44

XII

74

XI

70
14

Total

Page

Level

46 36 46 34 39

Bht

T:P

NBht

Total

42

18

22

18

16

19

23

Both

Other

ZLT

398

364

762

33

184

205

389

12

252

184

436

47

30

64

33

32

40

52

40 106 105 92

282

255

537

24

29

19

37

31

82

43

271

204

475

15

21

23

62

47

33

29

193

192

385

11

12

32

115 102 124 91

799

761

1560

38

47

33

101

84

185

46

41

43

84

14

61

50

111

19

13

92

91

183

37

47

45

92

15

11

67

76

143

20

100

90

190

32

10

68

51

119

17

10

44

48

92

13

11

12

99

83

182

36

67

79

146

21

59

46

105

13

56

60

116

29

19

19

158

160

318

10

14

23

10

12

52

71

123

21

14

12

13

86

87

173

35

12

70

75

145

29

78

78

75

66

510

523

1033

27

35

30

46

39

85

17

10

10

20

10

15

14

29

15

13

20

33

17

16

28

44

44

23

19

42

21

12

20

10

11

13

24

12

10

386 408 431 481 432 428 435 401 391 420 385 376 416 343

Annual Education Statistics

70

342 296 418 278 291 295 258 207 66 74 53 80 4304 4087 8391

Annual Education Statistics

10

278

64

12

354

24

Page

149

Zhemgang

Dzo

Name

Category

PP
G

I
B

II
B

III
B

IV
B

V
B

VI
B

VII

Zhemgang
Prince
Namgay
Wangchuk
Buli
Sonam
Thang
Yebilaptsa

HSS

MSS

Gomphu

LSS

SR

10

11

11

11

Tingtibi

LSS

16

17

21

16

14

17

12

20

26

25

28

17

Zhemgang

LSS

SU

24

26

34

28

35

28

38

28

39

39

37

49

Bardo

PS

Barpong

PS

VR

Bjokha

PS

10

10

16

13

21

13

14

Budashi

PS

VR

15

20

10

11

17

Digala

PS

Dunmang

PS

VR

10

Goling

PS

Goshing

PS

13

11

11

11

10

12

10

13

10

11

14

17

Kaktong

PS

12

11

11

Khomsher

PS

12

13

10

12

17

11

17

20

18

18

15

Kikhar

PS

SR

Langdurbi

PS

10

10

Nimshong

PS

Panbang

PS

VR

24

27

24

18

24

12

28

26

24

29

27

36

23

Pantang

PS

10

10

Repati

PS

Shingkhar

PS

10

10

12

10

11

10

Tali

PS

Tashibi

PS

VR

13

Thrisa

PS

Tradijong

PS

VR

Tshaidang

PS

12

Tshanglajong PS

10

VR

Tama

Total
Grand Total

Page

Level

150

PvtHSS

IX
B

XI

MSS

SU

11

190 199 208

12

228

21

18

20

19

218 188 226 199 268 255 279

11

Bht
Both Other ZLT

NBht Total

T:P

33

34

87

65

43

76

35

77

198

252

450

16

27

17

29

43

27

35

56

78

134

10

13

281

196

477

16

19

25

42

54

49

70

31

73

66

76

53

62

80

45

78

256

277

533

18

20

27

44

53

34

29

48

69

42

68

168

219

387

12

21

18

14

19

24

26

90

101

191

10

11

17

21

22

20

16

19

158

177

335

14

17

20

34

24

42

29

36

34

319

285

604

20

25

24

42

35

77

13

19

25

44

15

21

85

82

167

21

81

67

148

25

18

17

35

12

27

25

52

26

37

33

70

14

14

84

82

166

24

42

53

95

12

18

100

97

197

25

14

20

10

53

41

94

24

26

24

50

13

25

174

173

347

12

12

29

11

60

47

107

15

15

24

24

72

69

141

24

12

16

28

43

35

78

13

22

26

48

10

29

31

60

20

37

37

74

12

34

22

56

14

14

23

12

5312

217

40

15

272

20

7369 6990 7178 6350 6462 5946 5289 5244 3635 3751 3574 4284 88458 88189 176647 6027 1326 579

7932

22

Page

151

15

14

Teachers

Total

62

25

XII

VR

MSS

ECR

VIII

13

13

267 246 228

6517 6947 7836 8007 8377 8589 8355 8366 8436 8315 7856 7917 7574 7483

Annual Education Statistics

257 229

240 210 213 214 174

Annual Education Statistics

211

72

119

62

112 2653 2659

Annex 6.1. Enrolment in Continuing Education program and NIVI, 2012


Name of the
Dzongkhag School and
Institute

Level

PP

II

III

IV

VI

Both

PvtHSS

Chukha

HSS

13

11

19

14

32

25

57

Chukha

Gedu

HSS

13

11

13

11

24

Chukha

Reldri

PvtHSS

17

12

29

19

46

31

77

Lhuentse

Lhuentse

HSS

19

19

23

11

17

Bumthang
Chukha

Total
B

XII
G

XI

IX

VIII

Sonam Kuenphen

VII

Mongar

Sherab Reldri

PvtHSS

11

Paro

Tenzin

PvtHSS

13

13

20

Paro

Yoezerling

PvtHSS

11

11

34

22

45

33

78

Pgatshel

Nangkhor

HSS

19

19

27

Samtse

Peljorling

HSS

14

Samtse

Samtse

HSS

13

14

59

52

72

66

138

Sarpang

Kuendrup

PvtHSS

21

12

52

34

73

46

119

Thimphu

Kelki

PvtHSS

120

65

143

80

263

145

408

Thimphu

Nima

PvtHSS

37

37

37

37

74

Thimphu

Rinchen

PvtHSS

65

52

81

61

146

113

259

HSS

17

12

17

12

29

Trashiyangtse Bayling

HSS

17

20

19

26

45

Trongsa

Sherubling

HSS

22

22

24

26

50

Tsirang

Damphu

HSS

30

13

39

16

55

Wangdue

Bajo

HSS

36

25

37

41

73

66

139

Zhemgang

Zhemgang

HSS

13

Trashigang

National Institute
for Visually
Impaired

22

20

42

970

742

1712

Trashigang

Jampeling

Total
Grand Total including school enrolment

Page

152

6,520 6,952 7,842 8,009 8,379 8,590 8,356 8,366 8,441 8,320 7,858 7,921

Annual Education Statistics

332

250

616

7,577 7,486 7,369 6,990 7,178 6,350 6,462 5,946 5,289 5,244 3,967 4,001 4,190

Annual Education Statistics

472

4,756 89,428 88,931 178,359

Page

153