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HITO MAGAZINE / ISSUE 5 / JANUARY 2012

2011 HITO APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR WINNER, LAURA SIMPSON & HITO CEO, ERICA CUMMING

CONTENTS
COVER STORY
2011 Industry Awards PAGE 1

CAREER PATHWAYS
A Pathway to Apprenticeship PAGE 12

BARBERING
Lucinda Herlihy PAGE 14

BEAUTY
HITO Beauty Update PAGE 17

STRIVING TO BE NZS BEST


Frenz Hair Design PAGE 18

PROFILE
Salute Hair & Day Spa PAGE 20

AQUARIUS
Extra Study Skills Days & The Next Steps PAGE 24

CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES
The consultation is progressing well PAGE 26

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THE FUTURE OF NEW ZEALAND HAIRDRESSING RECOGNISED.


t a black tie ceremony on Sunday 20 November, over 300 stylish and well groomed people from industry gathered under the majestic dome of the Auckland War Museum to recognise the future of hairdressing.

our entrees and watch the premium urban dance group Prestige do some serious booty shaking. Then it was onto the serious business of the HITO awards with the winners of the Regional Apprentice of the Year, Training Salon of the Year, Tutor of the Year, Trainer of the Year and Jasmine McBeth Memorial Scholarship recipient all coming one after the other. It was amazing to see so many incredible people being recognised and made you proud to be part of HITO. You can read all about the winners later in the magazine. Then it was onto a very tasty dinner and some more chatting, congratulating and photo opportunities for the winners. After another round of some hilarious Prestige dancing was a short announcement to fix a mistake which was handled quickly and professionally. Well done to everyone for being so gracious it was lovely. Then the Kitomba/NZARH awards began. Again the awards came quickly with barely a breath between them. This was one of the best things about the awards, they were so professionally managed and delivered that it felt slick and quick but everyone got to have their place in the spotlight.

Finally another quick break for sweet and a final dance performance and it was onto the final big awards. Laura Simpson, from Scott Base in Dunedin, was named 2011 HITO Apprentice of the Year. The award recognised and identified the apprentice that stands out as the rising star of the New Zealand hairdressing industry. Natasha Lynskey from Rodney Wayne, Northlands in Christchurch was the runner-up. In presenting Laura with the award, Alison Murray, HITO Chair, said, Laura has shown huge commitment to the industry over the past 12 months and has trained relentlessly. She also represented New Zealand at the WorldSkills. The award recognises that effort and is just reward. On receiving the award, Laura Simpson said, After what feels like the hardest 12 months of my life, when Ive done so much training and so much travelling this is the greatest reward. With the awards over for another year, it was then time for us all to dance ourselves into the wee small hours to Dane Rumble (NZ DJ extraordinary). And that was it the evening was so enjoyable and done so well that it seemed to be over all too quickly. So I guess well just have to do it all over again in 2012. Come and join us.

The night was a great success, with salon owners, managers, trainers, stylists and apprentices all eagerly waiting for the winners to be announced. The evening kicked off with a social gathering over bubbles as colleagues and friends reconnected or made new connections. It was wonderful to see so many people from across the country chatting and having fun in the evening sun. The show started with an introduction from Ria Bond (NZARH), Tom Murphy (Kitomba) and Allison Murray (HITO) welcoming everyone to the event and then it was straight into the awards. Coming thick and fast, there was no time to be bored as Bianca Karam-Whalley was recognised for her achievement of winning the Oceanic Grand Master Competition. Then it was straight into the winner of the 2012 Protg competition with Kaleb Pritchard taking the overall prize. After a quick recognition of the regional WorldSkills winners, it was time to finish

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 1

REGIONAL APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 2011 APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 2011

Northern region winner: Auckland region winner: Midland region winner: Mid-Central region winner: Central region winner:

Sarah Manning (Abstraxt Hair Design) Laura Williams (Jan Waite Hairdressing) Lucy McCandlish (Synergy Hair) Bethany-Paige Woods (HQ Hair by Design) Bianca Wallace (Frenz Hair Design)

Northern South region winner: Natasha Lynskey (Rodney Wayne Northlands) Southern South region winner: Laura Simpson (Scott Base)

WINNER: LAURA SIMPSON (SCOTT BASE) RUNNER UP: NATASHA LYNSKEY (RODNEY WAYNE NORTHLANDS)

JASMINE MCBETH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP TRAINER OF THE YEAR FINALISTS 2011 TRAINING SALON OF THE YEAR FINALISTS 2011 TUTOR OF THE YEAR FINALISTS 2011

Marianna Brown (Penny Ainsley Auckland) James Jackson (Abstraxt Hair Design Orewa) Arna Ward (Surrender Hair Design and Beauty Invercargill)

RECIPIENT: MARIANNA BROWN

Niq James (Headspace Christchurch) Belinda Watson (Biba Auckland) Emma Spencer (KTIZO Hair & Spa Hamilton)

WINNER: NIQ JAMES (HEADSPACE CHRISTCHURCH)

HQ Hair by Design (New Plymouth) DOr Hairstylists (Arrowtown) Hair Scene (Whangaparaoa)

WINNER: HQ HAIR BY DESIGN (NEW PLYMOUTH) RUNNER UP: HAIR SCENE (WHANGAPAROA)

Claire Allen (Servilles Academy) Melissa Stemp (Premier Hairdressing College) Suzanne Stratford (Avonmore Academy)

WINNER: CLAIRE ALLEN (SERVILLES ACADEMY)

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 3

APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 1 2011

Laura Simpson - Winner


SCOTT BASE | SOUTHERN SOUTH REGION WINNER
Laura began her tertiary education studying a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Otago University. After one year she turned her attention towards hairdressing and hasnt looked back since! One of the things Laura loves about hairdressing is that the only limits are your attitude and commitment to achieve. Ultimately, there is limitless scope for expression of artistic impression. This year Laura represented New Zealand at the International WorldSkills Competition in London, and has devoted hundreds of hours of practice to ensure her skills are at International standard.

Laura says WorldSkills training has helped her develop her skills and character, and has enabled her to stretch herself beyond her expectations. She says that she has been able to harness the artistry of WorldSkills styling to broaden her clients vision of what can be done with their hair. Laura would love to see WorldSkills techniques become part of all young stylists learning and development. Another highlight for Laura this year was being named overall senior champion at the Otago NZARH Regional Awards. Lauras boss Scott Buckingham says that Laura has all the attributes needed to be a leader in the hairdressing industry, including passion, motivation, and initiative. Scott says he regards Laura as one of his seniors as her work ethic and skills are so high. In the future Laura would like to broaden her skills to include make-up artistry, become a WorldSkills ambassador, and eventually, own her own salon.

Sarah Manning
ABSTRAXT HAIR DESIGN | NORTHERN REGION WINNER
Sarah is motivated by setting challenges outside her comfort zone and achieving them. I always make sure I am in activities outside of the salon - things like photo shoots for my portfolio, charity events, competitions, and courses. Being in the fashion industry there are always new techniques coming out that I can learn, says Sarah. Sarah also recently completed the Spirit of Adventure 10 day youth development voyage. This reinforced to her the importance of teamwork, team building, co-operation, communication, tolerance and leadership. Charity events Sarah has taken part in include a hospice fashion show and teaching young girls with Mayer Rokitansky Kuster Hauser Syndrome about hair care. In March Sarah was involved in a fatal multi vehicle car crash on her way home from a colour course. Two of the girls in the car were killed and Sarah and her colleague Terri-lea were transported by rescue helicopter to Auckland Hospital. Sarah was off work for 10 weeks after surgery on her wrist, and during this time she set herself the goal of organising a fundraising event for the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Trust. She successfully organised a Girls Day Out and raised $4,500. Sarah says that she has had a few obstacles this year as a result of her accident, but instead of looking at it as a bad year, she has learned to look at it as a great year for her development. She is now more willing to take any opportunities and give everything a go. Sarahs employer Leslie Treadaway says that Sarah is enthusiastic, has a thirst for knowledge, is a real team player, and a great role model for others.

Natasha Lynskey
RODNEY WAYNE NORTHLANDS | NORTHERN SOUTH REGION WINNER S & RUNNER UP - NATIONAL APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR APP
Natasha is highly committed to her chosen career, and describes herself as enthusiastic, talkative, and easy to relate to. She is always striving to know more and learn from others. Natasha says her greatest lesson has been that the industry and apprenticeships are all about learning if a hairdresser stops learning then they will not succeed. Natasha is truly committed to hairdressing and her apprenticeship. She is one of the first people to get to work each morning and one of the last people to leave. Natashas commitment to learning is evidence by the priority she gave to rescuing her green HITO training book when Northlands Mall was evacuated after Christchurchs earthquakes. After the September quake she begged her boss to retrieve her green book regardless of the risks (other staff requested their purses and iphones!). After the February earthquake, once she realised everyone was safe, she ran back into the salon to retrieve her green book, leaving her phone and bag behind! Natashas employer CJ Wylie says that Tash is a model employee and a model apprentice, going on to say that she is incredibly motivated, driven, has exceptional technical ability and is impressively motivated. CJ says that Natasha is the best apprentice she has worked with in her 14 years at Rodney Wayne.

Laura Williams
J JAN WAITE HAIRDRESSING |A AUCKLAND REGION WINNER
Laura ha been working in salons since she was has 13 years old. After leaving school she went to university but after 2 years decided to follow her true passion and train to be a hairdresser. Laura prides herself on taking every opportunity she can to learn and further her career. Laura was the only apprentice to be a finalist in the Patrick Cameron Photographic Competition and won this years SMG Urban Fashion Cut at the Auckland Regional Hairdressing Competition. Pushing yourself to learn means you get the most out of your career, and instead of hairdressing just being a job, it becomes a career, says Laura. Laura would like to see all salons owned and operated by qualified and registered hairdressers. She believes this would raise the standard of training and skills to a much higher level, and provide clients with confidence that their hairdresser will provide a highly professional service. Lauras boss Jan describes Laura as exceptional, talented and professional, and says that she would be an asset to any salon. Her motivation and self discipline are truly an example to everyone apprentices and seniors, says Jan.

Lucy McCandlish
SYNERGY HAIR | MIDLAND REGION WINNER NER
After leaving school Lucy took up a job in business administration and although she was forging a good career, she bit the bullet and enrolled in a hairdressing course. Following her passion has allowed her to work in an industry that is rewarding, creative, and provides an opportunity to make people look and feel fantastic. I think positively as I start work each day and try to give the client a truly great salon experience. Great motivation for me is making someones day, says Lucy. Lucys biggest learning as an apprentice has been the importance of great customer service at all times. She says that without great customer service there would be no business and no job! Lucy believes that salons need to become more environmentally friendly and reduce their carbon foot print. This can be done by recycling, monitoring water consumption, limiting product wastage, and focusing on energy efficiency. Lucys tutor at Wintec, Penni Warner, says that Lucy is always polite, helpful, and constantly works to improve her knowledge and practical skills.

B Bethany-Paige Woods
HQ HAIR BY DESIGN | MID-CENTRAL REGION WINNER
B Bethany-Paige is an 18 year old third year app apprentice who is absolutely in love with what shes doing and passionate about hairdressing. The thing she loves mos about her work is making people look most and feel amazing. Bethany-Paige sees everyday as a new challenge, and looks to re-invent herself every day. This year her goals were to complete her off job training in just two years, and get heavily involved in competition work. She has achieved both. As a second year apprentice she came third overall at the Jessie Roebuck Challenge, and won the Urban Day Style and Top Apprentice Styling Awards at Regional Awards. This year she came second overall at the Jessie Roebuck Challenge, got second in Taranaki in the NZARH Editorial Photographic Competition, and won the Apprentice Directional Haircut and the Oceanic Cut and Conversion at the Regional Hair Design Awards. Bethany-Paige recently competed in Melbourne where at the Oceanic double event. Bethany-Paige says she gets a real buzz out of competitions - the adrenaline rush, working under pressure, and getting lots of support. Bethany-Paiges boss Lyndsay Loveridge says that she is born to dress hair, and that she eats, sleeps and breathes the industry. Lyndsay says Bethany has a unique sense of style, and people cant wait to see her look everyday. Bethany-Paige is Lyndsays stylist.

Bianca Wallace
FRENZ HAIR DESIGN | CENTRAL REGION WINNER
Bianca prides herself on always going the extra mile to ensure her clients walk away feeling amazing. I always want my work to be 100%! Clients motivate me with their comments theres nothing better than giving a client exactly what they want, says Bianca. Bianca is passionate about hairdressing and loves the learning opportunities that are available. Once she completes her apprenticeship she is interested in undertaking an Advanced Hairdressing qualification. This is my career, and not just a day job! I love what I do every day, and only want to learn more! says Bianca. One of Biancas greatest lessons during her apprenticeship has been that hairdressing is not all about one aspect (such as cutting), but is a complete customer experience. Biancas boss Ivan Shew says that she always shows a positive attitude, is highly professional, and has contributed in many ulture. ways to Frenzs great team culture. Biancas tutor Wanda Menchi says that her enthusiasm and motivation are highly contiguous, and it is a pleasure to have Bianca in the classroom.

JASMINE Marianna Brown MCBETH - Recipient MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Mariannas salon was in the Red Zone following the February 22nd 2011 earthquake meaning she had no source of income and no access to training facilities. She made the tough decision to move to Auckland to keep her apprenticeship going and receive the all important training she needed. She worked at Bettjemens for ten days, an experience she says opened her eyes. I soaked up everything around me like a sponge. Being treated so well and provided with such great guidance and training made Marianna realise how much she wanted to be a trainer herself one day. This is why I would use part of the scholarship to participate in the Train-the-Trainer course. Everyone learns differently and I want to be equipped with the tools and skills needed to relate to all trainees.

Although the devastating events in Christchurch forced me to relocate in order to follow my career and passion, it has also inspired me to apply for this scholarship. One day, I hope to return to my home and pour back into the hairdressing community my experience and knowledge. Grant Bettjeman says he was amazed by how strong and brave Marianna was, and that she fitted into the team immediately with her passion for the craft. Penny Ainsley, Mariannas present employer says that from the moment Marianna walked into the salon with her vibrant attitude, she fitted into the team. Marianna has an hour bus ride each way to get into work, but is always the first in the door with a smile. Marianna says that if she won the scholarship, she would use the money to pursue extra training opportunities, including WorldSkills and doing the HITO Advanced Cutting and Colouring qualifications. Marianna has a German mother and is currently working on improving her German language skills. She intends to obtain her internationally recognised ISPN qualification, and one day work in Europe. he The scholarship is not just a sum of money; it is the gateway to a better future and career.

James Jackson
ABSTRAXT HAIR DESIGN | AUCKLAND
James says that hairdressing has always been the thing he has wanted to do. He says the best and scariest day of his life was the day he called his now boss Leslie Treadaway to talk to her about how to go about getting an apprenticeship. I met up with her the next day and she interviewed me. I was a volunteer for a few days up until Christmas, and I had never been so busy in my life. I loved it! says James. James believes that the best thing about the industry is the feeling that you are learning new things all the time. James recently volunteered to help out the De Lorenzo team doing a national Creative tour. They were so impressed with his work he was asked to apply for the De Lorenzo Creative team, to be announced in 2012. International guest artist Richard Kownacki was complimentary about James abilities, and even offered to be a remote mentor for him. James came from an all-boys school and found it hard to get information on the hairdressing industry. He would like to see more done to see hairdressing apprenticeships promoted to boys. He says that if he won the scholarship, he would enter every competition and course that was available so that he could m learn more skills to pass on to other apprentices who may not have been as fortunate as himself. Ja James boss Leslie Treadaway (Abstraxt) says t that James is an incredibly hard worker who trains at least four nights a week on top of his usual hours. He is dedicated to the i industry and an inspiration to all our staff.

Arna Ward
SURRENDER HAIR DESIGN | INVERCARGILL
Arna studied at Art School and then tried her hand as an insurance salesperson before finding her home in hairdressing. At the age of 21 she enrolled at Elementary Hair Design and within the first week she knew she found somewhere where she fitted in. She passed her first year with flying colours, picking up top student in her class at SIT and top overall first year student. For the last 2 years she has been the student representative. In 2010 Arna won the HITO Photographic Competition. Arna says that participating in fashion shows with her salon has been a great way to boost her confidence in dealing with large groups of people. Her new found belief has allowed her to stand up on stage in front of large groups of people and do live makeovers and speeches. Arna also undertakes community work at schools and local disability organisations. She has involved herself in the Cycling Southland Fashion Show and the St Thomas Aquinas Wearable Art Show. Two of Arnas regular models have cerebral palsy, and one of these is also profoundly deaf. She always sets herself goals each day, and has a 10 year goal of running her own salon. Arnas boss Bernie ONeill that she shines and is always willing to put in that extra effort and push herself. Bernie says it is a delight to have someone like Arna in the industry who wants to give back as much as she puts into learning.

TRAINER OF THE YEAR 2011

Niq James - Winner


HEADSPACE HAIR DESIGN | CHRISTCHURCH
Niq is the Artistic Director of Headspace (previously known as Niq James Hairdressing), a long established inner-city salon in Christchurch. Prior to the February 22nd earthquake, the salon was located in the heart of the city. Niq was forced to move following the earthquake as the salon is in the Red Zone. All the stylists at Headspace are either qualified, or are in training towards gaining their National Certificate in Hairdressing.

Niqs CV of training related achievements and activities is impressive. He is New Zealands national WorldSkills expert, was a WorldSkills Judge in 2003 and 2011 in Switzerland and London, and is a Wella New Zealand Ambassador for System Professional. He is currently studying towards the National Certificates in Advanced Cutting and Salon Management. He is heavily involved in both NZARH and HITO, as an NZARH Regional President, competition Judge and HITO Board Member and industry assessor. Niq also has Pivot Point teacher accreditation in Mens sculpture, Ladies sculpture and colour design. I believe in taking a hands-on approach to training. I find that this opens the way for trainees to ask questions, and encourages a safe environment for them to try something and not be afraid of failing. Most of Niqs training is with WorldSkills. These skills are not taught on a daily basis in salons around the country, and Niq has needed to demonstrate their relevance. He has travelled the country and taught people how to incorporate WorldSkills techniques into the work they are doing in their salons and their work on the competition floor.

Belinda Watson

BIBA BOUTIQUE SALON | AUCKLAND


Belinda is the Trainer in her salon, Biba Boutique, is a creative ambassador for LOreal Professionnel, and a business educator for Matrix. It is her personal quest to make a quality mark on the industry though education. I take enormous pride in the contribution I made towards developing quality talent for the future of our industry. I believe that training is the single most important activity in our industry. It is the key to creating a sustainable salon business model, and is more important than ever for survival in the current economic climate. Training and education lie at the heart of Belindas business strategy. She is passionate about the apprenticeship system, and views breeding talent as a strategic investment in the future of her salon. It is essential to success in an industry short of qualified labour. It is both a privilege and a pleasure training the next generation of hairdressers in every aspect of our ge trade. Nothing beats the satisfaction of coaching t and mentoring an apprentice through their journey to the completion of their National Certificate in Hairdressing! Belindas underpinning approach to training is that of a high performance coach/mentor. She strives to offer holistic training programme for her team, balancing ah emphasis across all technical aspects of the craft itself, emph with communication skills and service culture development. In training situations I often allow my students to make mistakes, believing this too can be a valuable learning experience. As a trainer, Belinda embraces the use of creative and visual tools, as well as applied learning techniques such as mind maps, mood board, scrapbooks and role-playing into the training she provides. She finds these techniques particularly successful in educating and inspiring trainees who have literacy challenges.

NZ WorldSkills Hairdressing representative in 2011 Laura Simpson says that Niqs passion for hairdressing and growth of the industry is obvious. He only ever just a phone call or text away and he will always go out of his way to answer any little question I have, says Laura.

Emma Spencer
KTIZO HAIR AND SPA | WAIKATO
Emma is a Master Stylist at KTIZO Hair and Spa in Hamilton, and has been in the ven role of Salon Training Educator for the seven years she has been with KTIZO. As part of her role as Salon Training Educator, Emma has introduced the use of specialists for some training sessions. She has developed in-salon incentives to reward apprentices for passing assessments and gaining knowledge. These have included working at Fashion Week, participating in fashion shoots, and being able to attend makeup courses. As well as regular training sessions, Emma spends one-on-one time with apprentices to provide extra assistance where needed, and creates partnerships with stylists working in an area the apprentice is interested in specialising in. Emma invests much work into preparing apprentices to sit their final units, to ensure that apprentices complete on their first attempt. An apprentice who trained under Emma, Megan Derbyshire, says that Emma made training stress-free and successful. She attributes coming first in her off-job training to the help and guidance provided by Emma, and says that Emma has moulded her into the hairdresser I am today, for which I am truly grateful.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 7

TRAINING SALON OF THE YEAR FINALISTS 2011


HQ Hair By Design
LYNDSAY LOVERIDGE EMPLOYER AND TRAINER | NEW PLYMOUTH
Lyndsay Loveridge of HQ Hair by Design says that the 21st century is the age of ideas, talent and creativity, which requires trainers to be current, fluid, frequent, relevant and present. At HQ training is for everyone on the team. It should always be fun and never a hardship. Those joining HQ begin a lifelong learning journey. It is about developing broad-base skills. Each person first acknowledges their strengths, then identifies their gaps. Together we then tailor the training to fill these gaps, says Lyndsay. HQ has developed an innovative in-salon training programme that compliments HITO off-job training. It focuses on naturally occurring evidence and contains timelines which ensure that trainees are assessment ready. Trainees have an allocated buddy who they meet with weekly. Each trainee is taught presentation skills and is required to deliver back to the team a five-minute presentation of their training each year. New staff begin their employment with HQ by being treated as a client, so they can get a feel of what is eventually expected of them. HQ Hair by Design has an impressive history with HITO apprentices; completing and qualifying more than 25 in a 40 year HQ history. HQ is also an enthusiastic provider of Gateway training. Lyndsey believes that their current apprentice Bethany, who began as a gateway student, is proof that getting the match right means getting a winner. Current HQ Senior Stylist Jeremy Scarle says that from his short time at HQ, it is very evident that all past and present staff of the salon have been trained at such a level they are a cut above other stylists in the region.

Hair Scene Hair & Beauty


LINLEY WADE OWNER, MANAGER, SENIOR STYLIST AND TRAINER | WHANGAPAROA
Linley began her apprenticeship at Hair Scene, and ended up purchasing the salon six years later. Since purchasing Hair Scene, training has become an even stronger focus, passion and interest for Linley. Her passion for training is the reason she will go the extra mile for training to help apprentices achieve their goals. I love the sense of fulfilment in passing on skills, knowledge and values which are fundamental and baseline for hairdressing. My personal philosophy is that if it is worth doing, it is worth doing well. Hair Scene has a policy of only employing qualified hairdressers or those in training to become qualified. She says that clients often comment that they enjoy seeing such positive growth and development in trainees. Every Monday at Hair Scene there is training from 4.307.30pm. Training is also discussed in weekly staff meetings. All staff are able to choose a minimum of one extra training course per year over and above those on offer from their product company. Linley also tailors individual learning plans for apprentices. The management task is always to identify the needs of employees, and tailor the workplace environment to meet . these and any other learning needs. Linley has developed a suite of innovative approaches for training delivery delivery. These include a ball game, which uses incentives in a fun way to teach how to ask the right question in the right way. In addition, Linley uses a spiky profile to identify training needs, and uses apprentices as trainers. The Hair Scene philosophy is never stop learning, and Linley always leads by example. 2010 Jasmine McBeth Scholarship recipient Moana Riddell, says that Linley has been a huge inspiration to her. Linley inspires me to be very motivated and be very excited to learn what is ahead of me. I never take for granted to have someone who puts 110% into all that they do.

Dor Hairstylists
ROSEMARY CHALMERS: OWNER, LEADER, STYLIST AND ALL THE OTHER STUFF | ARROWTOWN
Training at DOr involves the use of a variety of tools and activities including role playing, phone scripts, and most importantly, having fun. Rosemary spends three hours a week with each apprentice to discuss what is happening with their off-job training, skill development, and whatever else may be important for that apprentice. This year for the first time she has created a training manual, which helps both Rosemary and her apprentices structure the training. Rosemary says the training manual is a living document, which she adds to every week. Every six weeks, the team at DOr finish work early on a Friday and style each others hair. The apprentice gets to colour and cut their seniors hair, and each stylist has to plan and know exactly what they would like done. This is a very empowering method of training, which builds confidence, trust and belief. Rosemary encourages her apprentices to get involved in their local community, such as through participation in musicals, wearable art and fashion shows. This gives them the feeling of belonging to a team, and to their community. Rosemary carries out personal profile testing and occupational appraisal testing to identify the individual learning and literacy needs of each of her apprentices. This helps her to understand the strengths and weaknesses of her apprentices and her team as a whole. Emma, a 2nd year apprentice at DOr, says that Rosemary is the best trainer anyone could ask for. She challenges us to do our best at everything. She will excuse herself from her clients to help us with our training, and she constantly inspires us to reach our goals.

TUTOR OF Claire Allen - Winner THE YEAR OFF-JOB TRAINING MANAGER | SERVILLES AUCKLAND FINALISTS 2011

Claire had a difficult apprenticeship herself, but the support that she got from her off-job tutors was one of the main reasons she stuck it out. This experience has been the driving force behind her teaching. She is focused on providing as much knowledge as possible for her students. Avoiding surprises on assessment day is one of my key policies, and provides a sense of transparency for the students, says Claire. It is inspiring for me to see the professional and personal growth of my students as they journey through their training.

Last year, Claire spent a considerable amount of time reviewing her lesson plans and timetables. She subsequently adapted her Year 2 training so there was more emphasis on razor cutting and complex setting, two units which had been students had struggled with. She also incorporated more assessment days into Years 1 and 2, and as a result, had a higher number of early course completions. In 2011 Claire has implemented a tracking system to constantly monitor students progress both at Servilles and in their salons. As part of this she has developed a skills tracker and a theory tracker to help identify additional training needs. Developing literacy and numeracy skills has been a huge focus this year, and Claire has worked to embed these skills into her lesson plans. Claire completed her literacy and numeracy educators qualification this year, and has been astounded by the difference embedding literacy and numeracy tasks into her lessons plans has made. As a result, theory re-sits are becoming rarer as students have a greater understanding of what is being taught. An apprentice Claire has taught says that as a student with dyslexia, reading, writing, speaking and listening have been made easy. If I dont understand anything, Claire wont move on until all students of the class, including myself, have understood it completely.

Suzanne Stratford
AVONMORE ACADEMY | CHRISTCHURCH
Suzanne was surprised to know that she had been nominated.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 9

M Melissa Stemp
PREMIER HAIRDRESSING COLLEGE C | WELLINGTON
Melis Melissa says that she gets a great seein thrill seeing her students pass all unit requirements and reaching their full potential. Melissa believes one of her key strengths is being empathetic to her students, and her caring and nurturing nature is something her students respond to. I am always looking to improve my teaching and learning practises, and value the feedback I receive, says Melissa. Gaining the National Certificate in Adult Literacy and Teaching has helped Melissa identify and implement a variety of teaching strategies that have assisted her students learning and retention. Melissa was asked by Literacy Aotearoa to tutor and mentor Year 1 off-job students with numeracy and literacy issues. Using her recently acquired qualification, she was able to implement learning strategies that resulted in all the students in the scheme achieving all their units in their year 1 off-job training programme. Melissa has also developed a literacy and numeracy resources folder containing teaching tools such as concept maps, mind mapping activities and activity sheets, which are all available to her peers. James Rooney, of Premier Hairdressing says that Melissas greatest attribute is the trust which she instills. Whatever is asked of her is done with enthusiasm and professionalism. She is always there for her students, and they respond well to her gentle and nurturing personality.

NEXT AWARDS UPDATE

It was great to see the industry at its best. I hope to see De Lorenzo salons amongst the winners and finalists again in 2012.
STEVEN (NATIONAL EDUCATION MANAGER, DE LORENZO NZ)

I am happy to say that I thought it was a delightful evening and great to catch up with clients and have clients who won major awards. I thoroughly enjoyed myself.
LESLEY SCHER (MANAGING DIRECTOR, THE INSURANCE BROKERS LIMITED)

As an event it just goes from strength to strength.


AUSTEN BANKS (BOARD CHAIR, COMPETENZ)

It was inspiring to see the leadership and business acumen within the hairdressing industry. There are so many talented and creative hairdressers running well marketed and savvy salons. It was heartening to see the leaders in w our industry so ready to share their ou knowledge and training systems. k
ARRON KARAM-WHALLEY (TEAM 7)

You are a class act and I love the way this evening has become such an important event in the s industry calendar. ind
G GRANT BETTJEMAN (BETTJEMANS)

WERE DOING IT ALL OVER AGAIN BUT EVEN BETTER AND MORE BEAUTIFUL... PUT THE DATE IN YOUR DIARY: P

* SUNDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2012 SUN IN WELLINGTON


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AWARDS GALLERY

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 11

CAREER PATHWAYS

MARY-ELLEN ORCHARD

12

TRY BEFORE YOU BUY.

A PATHWAY TO APPRENTICESHIP
FOR ANYONE MOVING FROM SCHOOL INTO A CAREER, THE CHANGE FROM THE CLASSROOM TO THE SALON CAN BE DIFFICULT.

he HITO Gateway programme has helped many potential stylists spend time in the salon before making the move into a full time apprenticeship. It has helped employers around the country to try before you buy and grow little mes.

(Petone), qualified as a Hairdressing Professional in 2010 and now trains her own Gateway student and is well on her way to owning her own salon. Mary-Ellen is now also taking part in the trial of the online Advanced Cutting qualification offered by HITO and has been involved in the Targeted Review of Qualifications. The video features Mary-Ellen, her employer, her parents, her Gateway student and even the school Gateway co-ordinator. Gateway students allow employers to grow their own apprentices and improve productivity. Contact your local school careers advisor now to find out how to support a young person and help your business grow. The video will also be available from the HITO website into 2012 one they have been delivered to schools and career advisors across New Zealand.

Influencing school career advisors and parents to support a young persons decision to enter into the hairdressing industry can be challenging for those young potential hairdressers. To help, in 2012, HITO will be working to bring more little mes into the hairdressing and barbering industries by launching a short video featuring one of HITOs 2009 Regional Apprentice of the Year and National Apprentice of the Year Runner Up Mary-Ellen Orchard. Mary-Ellen entered the industry as a HITO Gateway student, moved into a full-time apprenticeship with Yahzoo Hairdressing

STILLS FROM THE VIDEO FEATURING MARY-ELLEN

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 13

...because all my salon needs right now is a dedicated and exceptional salon support employee...

Great salon support staff deserve to be qualified too...

Telephone enquiries, stocktaking, customer service, salon maintenance, stylist support. These are just some of the everyday tasks that a dedicated salon support employee can do to free up valuable time and let you and your team focus on being productive, profitable and delivering a quality client service. This 1 year programme of study will bring your new or exisiting salon support employee up to speed and get them on the path to being qualified for only $110 (employee fee) and $435* (employer fee). If you are an employer or an employee keen to set a higher standard in your salon and want to know more, call your regional HITO representative: Northern Region : Auckland Region : Midland Region : Mid-Central Region : Central Region : Northern South Region : Southern South Region: 0274 700 169 0274 432 401 0274 806 550 0274 700 170 0274 455 758 0274 832 405 0274 700 171

* If the employer is a financial member of the Regional Association of Registered Hairdressers, the employer fee is only $217 All costs are as of 1 January 2012 and liable to change.

THE BEST PART OF MY CAREER IS MY CLIENTS, AND THAT THEY TRULY MAKE THE TRAINING AND HARD WORK WORTHWHILE.

LUCINDA HERLIHY

Lucinda Herlihy
IF YOU EVER WANTED INSPIRATION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN BARBERING THEN LOOK NO FURTHER THAN LUCINDA HERLIHY (LUCI).
or anyone that knows Luci, they know how passionate she is about her career and that she strives to succeed to a high standard. That high standard has recently seen Luci achieve her National Certificate in Barbering.

HITO had the opportunity recently to chat to Luci and find out about her career choice, her journey thus far, and her future direction. From the Taranaki, Luci started her career in hairdressing, but moved into barbering and after spending some time in a barbershop she realised that the laid back, but professional, atmosphere of a barbershop was for her. She loved the concept of no appointments, the specialised skills and clipper techniques really grabbed her attention, and she said to herself this is the career I want.

Building a loyal clientele has been hugely rewarding for Luci. Whilst they have a no appointments needed system, Luci says that she has clients that travel and go out of their way to see her as their barber. Having their loyalty and trust in you, recommending their friends and family to you, and the relationships you build is amazing. Luci has had high profile sports personalities seek her out as their barber, which is a huge compliment to her and her skill. Seeing her cuts in magazines and on TV is pretty cool - even if there isnt a by-line saying hair styled by Luci. Luci attributes a lot of her success to the amazing support she has had from her employer, Kirsty McLay, and her trainer, Lindsay Franklin, of Brougham Street Barbers. Not only have they taught Luci to be the best barber she can possibly be, but they have

inspired her, motivated her and encouraged her along the way, giving her a strong sense of confidence in the work that she does. Luci said that the support of her UCOL tutors and the visits from HITO also helped keep her motivated and on track with her learning. Where to from here? Lucis vision is to have her own barbershop one day, once she has had the opportunity to travel the world a bit, expanding her barbering techniques, and bringing these skills back to New Zealand to share with others. She believes her future opportunities are endless and has no doubt that her National Certificate qualification is going to help her along the way. Luci said that for her the best part of my career is my clients, and that they truly make the training and hard work worthwhile.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 15

Unit Title Standard

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 17

clientele are regulars and training plays a big role in that, says Ivan We try to grow our own team as much as we can. Word gets around that we train our staff and treat them well. We have brilliant staff, and I cant remember the last time weve had to advertise, says Ivan. Ivan has been in hairdressing for over 30 years, and for seven of those he studied part time at university so he could complete a degree in business management and marketing. You can be the best plumber, but the crappiest manager. Its the same with hairdressers. I knew it was important to learn as much as I could about business and how to get the best out of my team, says Ivan. Ivan says that wherever possible training at Frenz is structured around the off job training the apprentices are doing at the time. Frenz is really geared up for training. Every fortnight on a Tuesday we have a training session in the salon. We also have one-on-one training sessions, and encourage apprentices to bring in models so they can practice for any upcoming assessments, says Ivan. I tap into everything I can. If its out there, we use it. Product companies help out a lot we have regular visits from Wella and they provide us with several training sessions each year, says Ivan. Ivan says he has picked up some great training and business tips from attending HITOs Employer Professional Development workshops. He says that these sessions have made him more aware of the importance of communicating clearly with Generation Y. Salon owners really need to be aware about generation differences, and how to get the best out of young staff. When I was training things were really hierarchical in salons and seniors would tell you what to do, it was like the army! Today the dynamics have changed, and its definitely for the better. Things are very collaborative, says Ivan. With Generation Y its really important to discuss everything with them and get them on board. You need to have a really planned approach to training, so its clear whats going to happen, how its going to happen, and why its important. You need to be clear about how you can get them to where they want to go, says Ivan.

THE FRENZ TEAM

STRIVING TO BE NZS BEST LITTLE SALON


>> Frenz Hair Design
HAIRDRESSER AND SALON OWNER IVAN SHEW IS A FIRM BELIEVER THAT YOU DONT HAVE TO BE BIG TO BE GREAT.

espite only having six staff, and being based in the small coastal settlement of Raumati Beach, Ivan wants to have the best little salon in New Zealand.

Ivan says that Frenzs point of difference is training. Frenz currently has three apprentices, and offers ongoing training opportunities to all his staff. All our staff are trained really well. I knew I had to up-skill my staff as I simply couldnt compete size-wise. Investing in my staff has helped create a really well skilled, professional team and that is my point of difference, says Ivan. Your staff are the greatest contributor to your salons success. I am only one of seven in our team and the other six staff are just as important to the customers experience. You need to support your staff and motivate them to excel, says Ivan.

SALON OWNERS REALLY NEED TO BE AWARE ABOUT GENERATION DIFFERENCES, AND HOW TO GET THE BEST OUT OF YOUNG STAFF.
Ivan believes every salon would benefit from good training and up-skilling. Training provides a real buzz in the salon, and helps you attract and retain great staff. Having a skilled and tight team is key to building a strong clientele - 95% of my

18

PROFILE

SALUTE HAIR & DAY SPA


NEW ZEALANDS 2011 SPA OF THE YEAR, SALUTE HAIR AND DAY SPA, OFFERS THE VERY BEST IN PROFESSIONAL HAIR AND BEAUTY SERVICES.

ased in Lower Hutt, Salutes services include facial therapy, microdermabrasion treatments, massage therapy, body treatments, hairdressing and tanning. Salute currently employs 22 staff. As well as specialist spa and salon staff, Salute employs a business manager, operations manager, and a business mentor. They also utilise the services of a nurse and a mobile IPL specialist who visits once every three weeks. Business Manager Catherine Gill believes Salute won Spa of the Year because they offer something a little bit special and unique. When clients arrive through the doors it is like stepping into another reality, where privacy, luxury and absolute attention to their every detail are our main priority. The attention to detail invariably leaves a lasting impression. While the luxurious surroundings make a big impact, its the service our clients receive that really makes the difference. Were passionate about keeping up with the latest spa and salon treatments and services, and that keeps us ahead in an ever changing industry, says Catherine.

Catherine says that another key to Salutes success is having all their staff on board with the companys ethos. It is so important that staff understand why we are doing what we do everyday, says Catherine. Salute has an established induction programme that all new staff undertake. Staff are also offered mentoring from those with more experience or who have specific skills. Suppliers play an important educational role at Salute, providing regular training sessions which focus on their products and services. These training sessions occur both in Salute and in off site locations. In 2011 Salute has held apprentice training sessions in their salon every Wednesday. These involved the apprentice working alongside a senior stylist to provide a hairdressing service to a client. This is also a dedicated time for beauty therapists to upskill on product or service treatment changes. Catherine believes that the review of beauty national qualifications represents a great opportunity to develop a future proof training pathway for beauty therapists. According to Catherine, the ideal training journey would include the following elements:

20

SCHOOL LEAVER GAINING WORK EXPERIENCE IN A SERVICE INDUSTRY PRIOR TO LEAVING SCHOOL WOULD BE HELPFUL AND GIVE YOU A HEAD START

ENTER A PROGRAMME/COURSE OF SPECIALISED TRAINING

LOOK TO GAIN THE EXPERTISE AND SUPPORT OF A MENTOR (SOMEBODY WHO INSPIRES YOU, THAT YOU ADMIRE)

BUILD OWN PERSONAL BUSINESS/CLIENTELE

REALISE YOUR OWN STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES ENGAGE THE SERVICES OF OTHERS THAT YOU WOULD BENEFIT FROM WORKING WITH (EG A BUSINESS MANAGER OR AN ACCOUNTANT)

FIND A BALANCE BETWEEN WORK AND PLAY HAVE AN OUTLET FOR YOUR CREATIVE PLAY

PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES TO SHARE YOUR OWN EXPERTISE AND PASSIONS WITH OTHERS

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 21

HAIRDRESSER UPDATE

22

MY TIME IN NEW YORK REALLY HAMMERED HOME THAT NEW ZEALAND IS DEFINITELY UP THERE IN TERMS OF TRAINING AND STANDARDS.

EMILY FREW
AWARD WINNING HAIRDRESSER EMILY FREW HONED HER CUTTING SKILLS AMONGST THE VERY BEST AT NEW YORKS FAMOUS REDKEN FIFTH AVENUE IN SEPTEMBER.
he 2010 HITO Apprentice of the Year had planned to use her prize money to attend Hair Expo in Sydney, but changed her plans when she discovered a good friend was getting married the same weekend. Emily and her husband had always planned to visit America in September, and when Emily found our about Redken Fifth Avenues Cut and Know Why course she knew it was the opportunity she had been looking for.

the USA. Emily says that there were a wide range of skills amongst participants at the course, including older people refreshing their skills as well as young stylists who have recently qualified. Over in the USA you can get qualified in less than a year, so for those who had recently graduated the course was a real step up. For me, with a three year apprenticeship under my belt, it was more of a refresher, says Emily. Emilys employer at Biba, Belinda Watson, shouted her a blow dry at New Yorks famous Cutler Salon, an experience Emily says was a real eye opener. It was a completely different type of salon than Im used to. They have 40 chairs, and do lots of things completely differently, like giving you a certain type of cape depending on the service youre getting, says Emily. My time in New York really hammered home that New Zealand is definitely up there in terms of training and standards. The service we provide is World class for sure says Emily. Emily says that clients love it when you tell them youve been on a course in New York!

New York was amazing. I had eleven days there and it was incredible being able to walk down streets that youve seen in the movies and on TV. The course lasted four days and walking there and back each day, just like a local, was pretty cool, says Emily. Emily believes the course has helped her become more confident with her cutting. The course helped me understand why you cut things the way you do. The first two days were a bit of revision for me, but the last two days were more challenging. Being able to learn different techniques from three of Redkens top trainers was awesome, says Emily. Of the thirty people in the class, only Emily and a girl from Denmark were from outside

EMILY FREW

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 23

AQUARIUS LAUNCH 2012


HITO IS PASSIONATE ABOUT MAKING SURE THAT EVERY APPRENTICE IS GIVEN EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN WITHOUT LITERACY OR NUMERACY GAPS STANDING IN THE WAY.

everal years ago, HITO paid to have each Off Job Training Provider to gain units all about working in adult education with literacy gaps and how to embed literacy and numeracy into lessons. In 2011, HITO decided to pay for an extra day for all Year 1 apprentices to attend Off Job Training to help anyone coming into an apprenticeship learn study skills and to help identify literacy gaps and what to do about them. This will continue into 2012 as the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. To really bring literacy into focus in 2012, HITO is launching a PC tool for salon employers and trainers to help them identify gaps and provide them with suggestions, exercises and tools to help the apprentice grow and fill those gaps.

I HAVE SEEN THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE


OVERALL SINCE EMBEDDING LITERACY AND NUMERACY TASKS INTO MY LESSONS. STUDENTS ARE COMPLETING KNOWLEDGE ELEMENTS THE FIRST TIME, RATHER THAN HAVING TO CONSTANTLY RESIT WHICH PROVES THAT THEIR VOCATIONAL LITERACY, NUMERACY AS WELL AS OVERALL UNDERSTANDING IS IMPROVING. THEY ALSO HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT THEY ARE DOING WHEN IT COMES TIME TO PRACTICALLY DEMONSTRATE THE TASK WHICH IS FANTASTIC.
Claire Allen (HITO Tutor of the Year 2011) Off Job Training Manager Servilles Academy

This new tool is called Aquarius and were excited to make this available in 2012 on the HITO website and also available on a USB stick from your friendly Sales & Liaison Manager. The importance of filling literacy gaps for the workplace is especially relevant and important in the hairdressing industry where ratios of dangerous chemicals can severely burn the skin of learners and clients.

24

Update 2
December 2011
A QUICK REMINDER
The purpose of the Hairdressing Qualification Review is to: 1. 2. 3. Reduce the number of hairdressing qualifications Make it easier for all to recognise standard qualifications Ensure each qualification is relevant for industry

The qualification review is progressing steadily through its all-party representative advisory panel.

WHATS BEEN AGREED SO FAR


Existing qualifications will continue to be recognised, and those learners who are part way through their qualifications will be protected. There will be clear transition arrangements established as we move to the new qualifications.

OUR NEXT STEPS


Agree on the structure of the qualifications Draft and agree the strategic purpose statements for each qualification Define what learners will know, be skilled at, and what will they be able to do, i.e. what industry role. Identify learners pathways Complete an industry consultation document and test a draft document with a small group of industry to make sure its clear Get industry feedback to refine the qualifications Complete and send the qualifications to NZQA

WHOS GOING TO BENEFIT?


1. Learners are pleased because there is a consistent qualification throughout New Zealand; there are clear and standardised educational and employment pathways, and the qualification is recognised by industry. Industry pleased because; of elimination of fewer qualifications, a more relevant graduate profile, higher completion rates, and higher industry engagement. Providers and ITO pleased because of the qualification and skill standardisation, recognised equivalence between pathways, and greater relevance of qualifications to industry.

WHAT WERE HEADING TOWARDS


1. Seeking to have a single set of qualifications that will cover both apprenticeship and full-time learning. Seeking to have a set of qualifications that start at a foundation level (Level 2), move through Salon Support equivalent (Level 3), to Hair skills/Stylist at Level 4, and then onwards to the Advanced qualifications at Level 5 (Training, Management and Advanced Stylist). Keeping the final units and possibly adding further units, possibly set up as a separate qualification (either Level 4 or Level 5). This qualification could link with professional membership of the Association, etc.

2.

3.

2.

WHAT WILL CHANGE?


The overall structure of qualifications and programmes will change with a single set of qualifications. Within each qualification, providers can develop programmes which reflect their particular (regional) focus.

3.

4. Sponsors and taxpayers pleased because learner funding will be directed to a more standard, and more suitable learner qualifications for industry, and more flexible educational and vocational pathways for learners. Also pleased because the industry has been able to self manage the rationalisation of the sectors qualifications.

There is still a lot to do. Your input is welcome at any time either through your representatives on the Advisory and Governance Group or through me as the independent facilitator. The contact details of the Advisory and Governance Group and Angeline Thornley from NZARH are attached to the bottom of this communication. * Not on TRoQ A&G

Aaron Karem Whalley Andrea Bullock Angeline Thornley * Brahm Soeteman Debbie Barron Denise Whyte Donna Bowman Erica Cumming Graeme Hall Jane Barton Jason Hare Julie Evans Mary Ellen Orchard Ria Bond Sharee Cawley

aaron@teamseven.co.nz A.Bullock@ucol.ac.nz Angeline@nzhairdressing.org.nz brahnkie-boy@live.com debbie@waikatohair.co.nz denisewhyte@xtra.co.nz donna.bowman@sit.ac.nz erica@hito.org.nz Graeme@rutherfordsloan.co.nz J.Barton@ucol.ac.nz jason@hito.org.nz julie@rodneywayne.co.nz yetti_chick_22@hotmail.com ria.bond@nzhairdressing.org.nz shareec@servilles.co.nz

Industry ITO NZARH Learner PTE Industry ITP HITO Facilitator Troq ref Group HITO Industry Learner NZARH PTE

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 25

CONSTITUTION CONSULT PROGRESSING WELL

hanks to all of you who have responded to the constitution recommendations and sent in a feedback form with your views. If you didnt get a chance to do so, feedback is open until the middle of January so just drop me an email or give me a call.

more sub-categories for membership such as training providers. We will be working through these over Xmas and the New Year, and will be presenting final recommendations to a meeting of the working group and regional Presidents in January. Sharon van Gulik E: sharon@svglimited.com M: 021 663 597

Most have been supportive of the proposed changes and approach, with everyone agreeing the overall principles. We need to work through a little bit of detail around voting rights, and providing

PLACE DE LA CONSTITUTION (LUXEMBOURG)

INCREASING REVENUE

26

stitutio H I TO C o n

the HITO changes to n proposed the clarificatio ation and ce around and taking pla vide inform ro ion ITO nd discuss ached to p utions to H sultation a ry contrib been appro of the con fees, indust ARH have hip As part O and NZ r members n, both HIT hanges fo constitutio rite this of these c ences greed to w e consequ rs. this and a ss on th employe et to discu ice fees to ecutive m HITO serv NZARH Ex and e of the ITO Board percentag onth, the H ibution is a ate last m tentions. L contr ur in the NZARH HITO. This to clarify o nnually at ibution to joint letter ich is set a ho are also contr s, wh embers w n industry ssociation H makes a ted HITO m Regional A n the NZAR has discou NZARH by Currently ution, HITO es paid to this contrib bership fe mem a result of g ice fees. e past, as stry trainin ceship serv AGM. In th tribution nd all indu r apprenti bers, fo dustry con es HITO (a RH mem nt requir ZARHs in by .N me NZA e received m industry the Govern ther incom income fro be aware, 30%). y already % of their tribution (o is on st 30 As you ma industry c ibuted to th eive at lea also contr f this 30% ons) to rec s etc , have e up part o organisati mad of HITO, source years has members sales of re is over many yers being ship fees, tice is change emplo as appren NZARH. Th individual HITO such ciations of based on d beauty an sso n is barbering Regional A constitutio n, such as bership of new HITO constitutio RH. ip or mem proposed NZA The lationsh in the HITO tures from e of their re er sectors onal struc irrespectiv o now on include oth organisati (as they d order to on and members cessary in t associati ne nd to ifferen recomme ich have d tention to both of wh rmed its in nfi r ITO. RH has co O membe ution to H tive of NZA ry contrib fee to HIT ing indust t has The Execu d service nte oun ngo e a discou 12 this disc basis) an o n to provid on. For 20 an annual l Associati its intentio iona confirmed ZARH Reg Board has ers of an N The HITO ntice. lso memb ITO, but ppre , who are a ip fees to H e fee per a employers d a HITO membersh e full servic % of th te from ill be waive n set at 50 are separa ements, w re es bee training ag service fe that these who are in ant to note r members loye Its import ever, please at all emp ntion is th ns whatso O ny questio HITOs inte ave a RH and HIT ip fee. er. If you h ort of NZA membersh n this matt oing supp no ong pment. our positio ll for your ank you a is clarifies and develo r of us. Th ry training ope that th st We h tact eithe ent to indu tate to con t commitm do not hesi tly our join importan and most

and Impli l Changes na

cations

e Yours sinc

rely

rray Allison Mu O Chair, HIT

Ria Bond NZARH President,

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 27

ROSE PALMER

PENE BURNS

PAM FEAGAN

HITO IS GOING THROUGH SOME CHANGES WHICH YOU SHOULD BE AWARE OF.
Rose Palmer (the HITO Sales and Liaison Manager for Auckland) left for new sales opportunities in November. The Auckland region is now well looked after by the lovely Loretta Thompson welcome Loretta! Pene Burns (the HITO Sales and Liaison Manager for Wellington Region) left HITO in December to open her own Salon. Very exciting for her. The position will be filled very soon so apprentices and employers in the Wellington region will be fully supported from early January 2012. Pam Fegan (the HITO Sales and Liaison Manager for Hamilton Region) has also decided that its time for a change after 15 years with HITO. She will be leaving HITO in February 2012 to follow a new career as a jewellery valuation expert. HITO will miss you all and we wish you all the very best for your future chosen pathways. We also have good news of 3 new members of the HITO team being delivered in June/July. Emily (The Wellington region administrator) will be having twins and Kristen (our Auckland administrator) will be having a single baby. Both will be on Maternity but will return. In the next issue of Forma, we will be profiling all of the new members of your HITO team.

CHANGE FOR HITO IN 2012

WED LIKE YOU TO JOIN US IN WISHING PENE, ROSE & PAM WELL!

28

JANUARY
9
HITO Office Officially Opens

WHATS HAPPENING IN

FEBRUARY
13-14 15 16-17
Industry Assessor Day(s) Auckland Industry Assessor Day(s) Hamilton HITO Off Job Training Days for OJT Providers Day(s) Christchurch

2012?
SEPTEMBER APRIL
2
Applications for HITO Industry Awards Open

1 13 15 16

Applications for HITO Industry Awards Close ITF Policy Forum NZ Expo NZARH Supremes

20-21 Industry Assessor 22 27 28


Industry Assessor Day(s) Nelson Industry Assessor Day(s) Dunedin Industry Assessor Day(s) Invercargill

MAY OCTOBER JUNE


3-4 6 9 12-13
Hair X Auckland NZ Literacy Forum Sydney Expo ipsn Forum and AGM

2 3

NZ Qualification Forum NZ Secondary Tertiary Forum

MARCH
1 6 7 12
Industry Assessor Day(s) Tauranga Industry Assessor Day(s) Wellington Industry Assessor Day(s) Wanganui Industry Assessor Day(s) Napier

NOVEMBER
11 14
2012 Industry Awards with NZARH/Kitomba ITF Policy Form

JULY
4-8
WorldSkills National Competition Christchurch

18 NZARH AGM 19 HITO AGM 25-26 WorldSkills Regional


Competition

DECEMBER
5 21
ITF Labour Market Forum HITO Office closes

AUGUST
2
ITF Annual Conference

ALSO HAPPENING IN 2012


Conclusion of the Targeted Review of Hairdressing Qualifications Conclusion of the Targeted Review of Barbering Qualifications. Changes to the Industry Training Act. Real positive change to the HITO constitution New Beauty qualifications and programmes New Advanced Colour qualification and programme New literacy tool for employers and trainers (Aquarius)

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 29

Great apprentices come from...

Salons can grow their own apprentices and improve productivity with a HITO Gateway Student. Contact you local school careers advisor now to find out how to support a young person and help your business grow.