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Table of Contents 1. Quality Levels 3 2. My Nutrition Profile4 3. Perfect Plan Analysis.12 4. Super Foods.15 5. Farm-to-Table.19 6. My Plate21 7. Water24 8. Fiber.26 9. My Wellness Life28 10. Appendix31 11. Bibliography106

1. Quality Levels

DRI QUANTIFIED
DRI GOALS NUTRIENT Unit RDA/AI A GOOD SOURCE 10-19% (COLUMN=10 %) B=A*.1
0.27 160.9 4.463 18 2.5 SKIP 16 12 1.1 1.2 0.11 0.11 0.11 1.4 0.13 0.24 40 7.5 1.5 70 1.5 100 1.8 31 470 0.8 SKIP SKIP 2.4 0.22 0.22 0.22 2.8 0.26 0.48 80 15 3 140 3 200 3.6 62 940 1.6

EXCELLENT SOURCE 20% (COLUMN=20 %) C=A*.2


0.54 321.8 8.926 36 5

Water Kcals PROTEIN CHO Fiber LIPIDS Saturated EFA: n-6 EFA: n-3
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin B6 B12 Folate Vitamin C Vitamin D Vitamin A
(RAE)

L Kcal

2.7 1609 44.63 180 25

MACRONUTRIENTS
g g
g g g

g
g mg mg mg mg mcg mcg mg mcg mcg

VITAMINS
1.1 1.1 14 1.3 2.4 400 75 15 700 15

Vitamin E

mcg
mg mg mg mg mg mg

MINERALS
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium Zinc Sodium
1000 18 310 4700 8 1500

2. My Nutrition Profile 3

For complete nutrition profile, refer to Appendix A.

Deficient Nutrients: 1. a. b. c. d. Omega-6 Linoleic Brain and heart function, and in normal growth and development Brain and heart problems Vegetable oils, salad dressing, nuts, whole wheat bread and chicken http://elkhorn.unl.edu/epublic/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

2. a.

Omega -3 Linoleic Brain and eye development of growing fetus during pregnancy and for

maintaining and promoting health throughout life 5

b. c.

Problems with brain and the eye development Fatty fish such as salmon, white tuna mackerel, rainbow trout, herring, halibut,

and sardines. Also, canola or soybean oil, walnuts, and flaxseed. d. 3. a. Water Maintains homeostasis in the body and allows for transport of nutrients to cells http://elkhorn.unl.edu/epublic/live/g2032/build/g2032.pdf

and removal and excretion of waste products of metabolism b. Dehydration, dry mouth, sunken eyes, poor skin turgor, cold hands and feet, weak

and rapid pulse, rapid and shallow breathing, confusion, exhaustion and coma. c. All beverages, including water, as well as moisture in foods (i.e. watermelon,

meats, soups, etc) d. 4. a. Folate Folic acid works with vitamin B12 and vitamin C to help the body break down, http://ods.od.nih.gov/Health_Information/Dietary_Reference_Intakes.aspx

use, and make new proteins. The vitamin helps form red blood cells. It also helps produce DNA, the building block of the human body, which carries genetic information. b. Anemia (low red blood cell count), Low levels of white blood cells and platelets

(in severe cases) c. Beans and legumes, citrus fruits and juices, dark leafy vegetables, liver, poultry,

pork, shellfish, wheat bran, and other whole grains d. 5. a. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000354.htm Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A is essential for normal growth, bone development, reproduction, and

vision. It is used to help maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes, like the ones that line the nose and mouth. This helps protect against infections in the respiratory, digestive, and urinary tracts. 6

b.

Vitamin A deficiency can cause low resistance to infection, poor night vision,

blindness due to ulcers on the cornea, poor growth in children, weak bones and teeth, inflamed eyes, diarrhea, and poor appetite. Vitamin A deficiency can lead to death, mainly in children from developing countries. It is rare in developed countries. c. As vitamin A from animal sources such as liver, fish oils, egg yolks, and dairy

products; As pro-vitamin A carotenoids (such as beta carotene, alpha carotene, and others) from many colorful fruits and vegetables, like carrots, squash, broccoli, sweet potatoes, apricots, and leafy greens. The body converts these compounds to retinol (a type of vitamin A) in the small intestine d. http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalter

nativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/vitamin-a-and-beta-carotene 6. a. Alpha-Tocopherol (Vitamin E) Some proponents claim vitamin E plays a role in protecting the body against

cancer by bolstering the immune system and by preventing damage to DNA and other important parts of cells. Vitamin E supplements protect against heart attacks by preventing a build-up of harmful cholesterol and blood clots in the blood. There are also claims that vitamin E eases the inflammation associated with arthritis, speeds wound healing in people who have suffered burns or have had surgery, and slows the progress of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Some say that it may help prevent or treat eye problems like cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Vitamin E is also used to protect against the effects of pollution and overexposure to the sun. b. Vitamin E deficiency is rare and occurs almost exclusively in people with an

inherited or acquired condition that impairs their ability to absorb this vitamin. Symptoms of vitamin E deficiency include muscle weakness, visual problems (especially at night), immune system changes, and a poor sense of balance. Over a long time, vitamin E deficiency may progress to blindness, heart disease, nerve damage, and impaired thinking. Supplements are 7

usually only necessary or recommended for people with vitamin E deficiency or a condition that puts them at risk for this deficiency. c. The main sources of vitamin E in the diet are vegetable oils (especially safflower

oil, sunflower oil, and cottonseed oil), green leafy vegetables, nuts, cereals, meats, egg yolks, wheat germ, and whole-wheat products. d. http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalter

nativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/vitamin-e 7. a. Calcium Calcium is a mineral found in many foods. The body needs calcium to maintain

strong bones and to carry out many important functions. Almost all calcium is stored in bones and teeth, where it supports their structure and hardness. The body also needs calcium for muscles to move and for nerves to carry messages between the brain and every body part. In addition, calcium is used to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body. b. Insufficient intakes of calcium do not produce obvious symptoms in the short

term because the body maintains calcium levels in the blood by taking it from bone. Over the long term, intakes of calcium below recommended levels have health consequences, such as causing low bone mass (osteopenia) and increasing the risks ofosteoporosis and bone fractures. c. Milk, yogurt, and cheese are the main food sources of calcium for the majority of

people in the United States. Kale, broccoli, and Chinese cabbage are fine vegetable sources of calcium. Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and salmon, are fine animal sources of calcium. Most grains (such as breads, pastas, and unfortified cereals), while not rich in calcium, add significant amounts of calcium to the diet because people eat them often or in large amounts. Calcium is added to some breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice beverages, and tofu. To find out whether these foods have calcium, check the product labels. d. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Calcium-QuickFacts/ 8

8. a.

Iron Carries oxygen from our lungs throughout our bodies. Having too little

hemoglobin is called anemia. Iron also helps our muscles store and use oxygen. It is a part of many enzymes and is used in many cell functions. Enzymes help our bodies digest foods and also help with many other important reactions that occur within our bodies. When our bodies don't have enough iron, many parts of our bodies are affected. b. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause

of anemia in the United States, can delay normal infant motor function, can cause fatigue that impairs the ability to do physical work in adults., effect memory and other mental functions. Iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can increase risk for small or early (preterm) babies. c. From (heme iron) clams, oyster, fortified cereal, liver, meat, poultry, fish, or (non-

heme iron) plant foods such as soybeans. d. 9. a. http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/vitamins/iron.html#Iron Sources Potassium Plays a crucial role in water balance and the maintenance of blood pressure.

Potassium is also important for normal muscle and nerve function as well as conduction of the electrical impulses that control the heart b. Fatigue, muscle weakness, blistering, dryness of skin, temporary memory loss,

heart deterioration, anxiety c. d. 10. a. Zinc Helps the immune system fight off invading bacteria and viruses; the body also bananas, beans, dates, apricots, meat, grapes and milk http://www.livestrong.com/article/92806-symptoms-potassium-deficiency/

needs zinc to make proteins and DNA. During pregnancy, infancy and childhood, the body needs zinc to grow and develop properly. It also helps wounds heal and is important for proper senses of taste and smell. 9

b.

Causes slow growth in infants and children, delayed sexual development in

adolescents and impotence in men. Zinc deficiency also causes hair loss, diarrhea, eye and skin sores and loss of appetite. Weight loss, problems with wound healing, decreased ability to taste food, and lower alertness levels can also occur. c. Oyster, red meat, poultry, seafood such as crab and lobsters, beans, nuts, whole

grains and dairy products. d. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-HealthProfessional/

Excess Nutrients: 1. a. Protein Function as building blocks for bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. They

are also building blocks for enzymes, hormones, and vitamins. Proteins are one of three nutrients that provide calories (the others are fat and carbohydrates). b. Comprises the bulk of your muscle tissue, and it functions in immune health,

blood cell formation and hormone synthesis. c. d. 2. a. Niacin Niacin helps the digestive system, skin, and nerves to function. It is also important Meat, poultry, fish, dry beans and peas, eggs, nuts and seeds. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/protein-foods-why.html

for converting food to energy. b. c. d. Increased blood sugar, liver damages, peptic ulcers, skin rashes Dairy products, eggs, fish, lean meats, legumes, nuts, poultry http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/nutrition/niacin/overview.html#Function

3. a.

Vitamin B12 Important for metabolism. It helps in the formation of red blood cells and in the

maintenance of the central nervous system. 10

b. c. d.

Cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal problems, skin rashes, hypersensitivity Eggs, meat, milk, liver, kidney, poultry, fish http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/nutrition/vitamin-

b12/overview.html#Function 4. a. Sodium The body needs a small amount of sodium to help maintain normal blood

pressure and normal function of muscles and nerves. b. c. Fluid retention, kidney disease, hypernatremia table salt, baking soda, monosodium glutamate (MSG), various seasonings,

additives, condiments, meat, fish, poultry, dairy foods, eggs, smoked meats, olives, and pickled foods. d. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/dietarysodium.html

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3. Perfect Plan Analysis

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*For complete nutrition profile, refer to Appendix B

Having a tool like diet analysis gives me the access to compare what I macronutrients I am deficient or have too much of. I also learned how to better portion my meals, such as switching out more protein for vegetables. I also have to be cautious in portioning healthy food as well. The concept of UL surprised me when I saw how much vitamin I was getting from a single food source. For example, I had to portion my intake of sweet potatoes when I saw how close to the UL I was in vitamin A levels. When I recorded my 3-day meal plan, I thought I would have a lot of trouble overcoming the multiple deficiencies that were reflected in my first 3-day plan. I also thought that in order to overcome these deficiencies, it would be really difficult in having a well-balanced meal that is not too high in calories. However, by simply eating more 13

nutrient dense foods, such as fruits, I was able to overcome my deficiencies. By incorporating what I learned in class, in regard to eating more fish as a protein source, and including foods that are high in good fats, I was able to overcome my deficiency across different fields; I studied my chart and saw how salmon and avocado serves as such a great super food in helping me to overcome my deficiency in both EFA n-6 and n-3, potassium, as well as thiamin. Specifically, just my including oyster in my diet, I was able to overcome 3 deficient categories: iron, B12 and zinc. At breakfast, to make sure that I am getting enough fluid intake as well as calcium, I simply added a glass of soymilk to my breakfast. By cooking with olive oil and having a handful of nuts instead of pita chips, I was able to overcome my deficiency in vitamin E. In small changes, like moderating my sandwich portion and adding a few carrots instead, help me to increase my average intake of 9% Vitamin A to over 100%! D.A.S.H. calls for reducing sodium intake to 1,500 mg a day. Originally, my intake of sodium was at 1995 mg, but after being more careful in my food selection process, and making decisions to lower my sodium intake, I was able to lower my intake to 1,557mg by WB4. In order to do so, I had to make a conscious effort of eating less processed foods and eating more whole foods. Even when I thought I was making health-conscious choices by snacking on Stacys Pita Chips and salted peanuts, as opposed to hot Cheetos, I overlooked how much sodium these snacks contain. I could further lower my sodium intake levels by switching out salted peanuts for unsalted nuts instead, and eating hummus with carrots or unsalted pretzels instead of Stacys Pita Chips. The other 3 minerals that the D.A.S.H. diet focuses on are potassium, calcium and magnesium. The recommended levels for these 3 minerals are 4,700 mg, 1,000 mg, and 310 mg, respectively. My top 3 food sources for these three minerals include soymilk, almonds and butternut squash. D.A.S.H. is a dietary approach aimed at reducing hypertension by NIH (National Institutes of Health).

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4. Super Foods

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1. a. b.

Avocado Twice Good source of Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin C, EFA n-6 and n-3. Excellent source

of fiber, B6 and Folate. c. Learning the difference between bad fats and good fats, and how to

incorporate good fats to a well-balanced diet to reduce risk of heart diseases. 2. a. b. c. Greek Yogurt and Honey Twice Good source of Water. Excellent source of Protein, Niacin and Calcium. I love yogurt, but during this project, found that many yogurt actually contains

high sugar levels. Greek yogurt, however, is a healthier alternative with lower sugar levels and

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is versatile so I could add my own fruits and jams to it! It is also a good source of protein and low in sodium levels. 3. a. b. Mixed Nuts Twice Good source of Protein, Magnesium, Potassium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, and

Selenium. Excellent source of EFA n-3, Vitamin E, Riboflavin, Niacin, Thiamin, Vitamin B-6 and Folate. c. I have always loved eating nuts! To find out that it has so many health benefits,

including its high content in omega-3, made it an easy choice to include nuts as one of my top superfoods. 4. a. b. Acai Bowl Once Good source of Protein, Fiber, Vitamin E, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium,

Copper, and Zinc. Excellent source of EFA N-3, N-6, Vitamin A and C. c. Acai is a fruit that is high in fiber, good fats and many other nutrients. After a

good workout, instead of opting for a meal, I like to order an Acai Bowl, topped with bananas, flaxseeds, hemp seed and granola instead. It is highly nutritious and also tastes great. 5. a. b. Apple and Brie Once Good source of Protein, Carbohydrates, Fiber, EFA n-3, B-6, B-12, Vitamin C,

Zinc. Excellent source of Riboflavin and Niacin. c. Cheese is a great source of calcium. I personally love cheese, and to know that

brie is versatile enough to be paired with fruits, such as apples, grapes, and even pretzels makes it an easy decision to incorporate as part of my super food. 6. a. Blueberries Once 17

b.

Good source of Carbohydrates, Vitamin E, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, and

Vitamin B6. Excellent source of Vitamin C and Fiber. c. belly fat! 7. a. b. Edamame Once Good source of Calcium, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Thiamin, Vitamin A and High in antioxidants and research also shows a correlation in its ability to reduce

Vitamin C. Excellent source of Protein and Fiber. c. It tastes good, is easy to prepare and carry around, making it serve as a good

source of snack. Edamame is also an excellent source of fiber. This allows me to feel full longer. 8. a. b. Oatmeal and Walnuts Once Good source of Fiber, Magnesium, Potassium, Calcium, and Zinc. Excellent

source of EFA N-6, N-3, Vitamin E, and Niacin. c. Coming from a family with heart issues, including oatmeal and walnuts as a super

food is almost mandatory. There are such great heart-health benefits as they reduce heart diseases and also keeps me full, due to the high fiber content. 9. a. b. Pretzels and Hummus Once Good source of Protein, Carbohydrates, Fiber, EFA N-6, Thiamin, Riboflavin,

Niacin, Folate, Iron, and Zinc. Excellent source of Vitamin B6. c. As opposed to reaching over for a bag of chips, I could get more nutrients and less

calories from opting for pretzels and hummus instead. Hummus is also a good substitution to sandwich spreads, instead of using mayonnaise. 10. Quinoa 18

a. b.

Once Good source of Protein, Carbohydrates, Fiber, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6,

Folate and Iron. Excellent source of Niacin, Magnesium and Zinc. c. Having recently tried quinoa for the first time, I fell in love with it. I started to do

research on it and found that it is easy to prepare and also really nutrient-rich. Quinoa is also versatile and can be prepared with salads or eaten in substitution of rice and pasta. It also has a variety of health benefits including anti-inflammatory phytonutrients and antioxidants.

5. Farm-to-Table The growers association that really gave me a clear understanding of Quinoa is Organic Planet. From their website, I was able to obtain information on the origin of Quinoa and their harvest season. Quinoa is actually native to South America regions, specifically Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. The harvest season is between May and June. Within the States, Quinoa is grown predominately in the Andes, where the harvest starts late March. Quinoa has to be grown mainly in cool mountain ranges because it is sensitive to high heat, which causes its pollen to be unsterile. Quinoa originated as a sacred food source to the Incas, who referred to it as Chisaya Mama, or the mother of all grains. It is said that the Incan emporer would sow the first quinoa seeds. However, even though quinoa was planted with a solemn ceremony in the 1500s, when Spanish explorer took over Inca, they have also destroyed the quinoa field. With that, quinoa was subsequently banished due to its role in non-Christian religious ceremonies. Consequently, only a small number of wild quinoa survived the conquest and it was not until the 1970s when quinoa was reintroduced, this time, to the outside world. In fact, quinoa has made such a big comeback in the recent years that it was named the Grain of the Month this

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past March by the Whole Grains Council. Although production has been attempted in California, the biggest barrier to the attempt is the climate. Quinoa is also prevalent in other sources as well, including Fox news, promoting quinoa as nutritious, and even including recipes as well as ways to incorporate quinoa into your meals. Quinoa and its health benefits are also reported in articles through the Huffington Post, Syracuse New Times, and the Chicago Tribune. Across sources and articles, quinoa has been praised as being a nutritious super food, containing all nine essential amino acids, and being protein-packed. It is also high in fibers, and minerals including but not limited to, magnesium, phosphorus, and folate. Interestingly, quinoa is technically not a grain. This is important because of its substitution for wheat for population of people who cannot have gluten in their diet. As discussed in class, the importance of having a gluten-free diet is imperative, especially for those who have celiac disease. Consequently, quinoa is an ideal gluten-free alternative. Quinoa is easy to cook, and could be served hot or cold. Having just recently prepared a Southwestern Quinoa Salad for a Thanksgiving potluck, I was able to purchase a 16 oz. bag of quinoa for under $4! And like rice, quinoa comes in varieties; the most common is white, but you can also try red, black and multicolored. Depending on the kind that you buy, you could generally buy quinoa for between $4-$5 per pound.

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5. MyPlate Generally, I do not eat too unhealthy on a day-to-ay basis. I incorporate fruits to my diet daily and naturally enjoy food groups including yogurt, grains and other dairy products. However, it was not until comparison between my average three day analysis and a perfect 3 day that I noticed how lacking I was in some macronutrients, minerals and vitamins and at the same time excessive in others. An overview of my goal and intake is provided below: Intake vs. Goals for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012
Nutrient DRI 100% Intake 0% 25% 50% 75%

Energy
Kilocalories Protein Carbohydrate Fat, Total 1609 kcal 120% 44.63 g 194% 1,923.67 kcal 86.67 g

180.0 - 260.0 221.35 g g 35.0 - 62.0 g 85.53 g

Fat
Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Cholesterol < 16 g * * * < 300 mg 14.1 g 37.81 g 16.95 g 0.01 g 184.81 mg 62% 88%

Essential Fatty Acids


Omega-6 Linoleic Omega-3 Linolenic 12 g 1.1 g 14 g 1.17 g 117% 106%

Carbohydrates
Dietary Fiber, Total Sugar, Total 25 g * 30.54 g 77.89 g 122%

Other
Water Alcohol 2.7 L * 1.71 L 0g 63%

Vitamins
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Folate (DFE) Vitamin C 1.1 mg 1.1 mg 14 mg 1.3 mg 2.4 g 400 g 75 mg 1.08 mg 1.43 mg 14.46 mg 1.13 mg 1.68 g 463.72 g 80.75 mg 70% 116% 108% 98% 129% 101% 118%

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Vitamin D (ug) Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A (IU) Alpha-Tocopherol

15 g 700 g 2333 IU 15 mg

1.24 g 1,223.98 g 23,685.73 IU 16.18 mg

8% 175% 1,015% 108%

Minerals
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium 1000 mg 18 mg 310 mg 4700 mg 809.76 mg 15.28 mg 430.53 mg 3,140.11 mg 67% 81% 85% 139%

DA Plus 10 Page:

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average
Nutrient Zinc DRI 8 mg Intake 8.32 mg 0% 25% 50% 75% 100%

104% Sodium 1500 mg 1,557.09 mg 104%

Comparing the tools MyPlate and DRI, I think that MyPlate is a great tool to help you get started. ChooseMyPlate.org has great recommendations for healthy and nutrient-dense meal-planning ideas. However, in terms of getting a more in-depth breakdown, I believe that DRI does a better job. MyPlate, in essence, has broken down daily nutritional guidelines and simplified it for the general audience. It is a good reminder of what our meals should be in proportion to servings. However, I noticed that MyPlate does not provide much assistance in terms of macronutrients and vitamins, including omega-3 and omega6 (good fats). It does not leave room for desserts. When first recording my diet on MyPlate, I was not sure how much servings of dessert I should aim for. Granted, I am probably supposed to stay away from dessert as often as possible, but always opting for healthier choices is not realistic. One last major issue that I had with MyPlate was my inability to calculate Asian food with their tool. DRI allows me to customize my own recipe and measure portions. In a house where I eat a lot of Chinese food, our dishes do not come simple divided between meat, carbohydrates or vegetables. A lot of our dishes are stir-fried and mixed together. To me, DRI does a better job at letting me customize my own recipe and intake. I also love that with DRI, not only could I see the breakdown of macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals with each food that I eat, but seeing it also allows me to make adjustments accordingly. Overall, the simplicity and idea behind MyPlate is great for the general public, helping us to balance our overall diet in a more healthy way. However, for a more detailed and more personalized understanding, I think that the DRI tool serves us better and more realistically.

7. Water As humans, we are highly dependent on liquids and need a sufficient amount in order to have our bodies function properly. After all, water makes up about 60% of our bodys weight. As discussed in class, water plays a role in acting as a solvent, a cleansing agent, for lubrication and cushioning purposes, as well as a coolant. Drinking water between meals and with meals has so many benefits that are often easily overlooked. As a solvent, water dissolves many substances, aiding in formation of our body tissue and in making sure that our blood is able to carry substances throughout our body. Water also works hard as a cleansing agent, constantly working to remove wastes to prevent build-up to toxic concentrations. Even outwardly, drinking water between meals and with meals serves the function of keeping us alert. According to fitday, for example, water keeps our body fully hydrated, and we are less prone to fatigue and will feel more alert. By hydrating between meals, we are actually maintaining a level of liquid in our body and making sure that we do not feel tired of lose focus throughout the day. Water aids us physically also by acting as a lubricant and cushion for our joints to protect sensitive tissues, such as our spinal cord from shock. Lastly, to stay hydrated by drinking between meals and with meals, we are helping our body to maintain its body temperature. These are just the few roles that water has in wellness when we keep our body hydrated by drinking during and between meals. The Rethink Your Drink campaign has brought to my personal awareness the simplicity of making minor changes in my own life to help manage my weight, as well as help combat obesity, maintain satiation and prevent diseases. In a country where obesity is highly prevalent and a huge risk-factor for many diseases, we are a nation who is constantly trying to look for the latest diet fad. However, as Rethink Your Drink has pointed out, just by being more aware and cautious of the beverages we drink could make a big difference! In the examples provided by CDC, simple by switching out sugar-sweetened beverages to no- or low-calories drinks could cut an average of about 650 calories in a day. This replacement translates into substantial reduction in daily calorie intake daily. Over a longer period of time, there is an even more significant difference. With 3,500 calories equating to a pound of fat gained, vice

versa, cutting that same amount could help manage weight and combat obesity overtime. Not to mention, many drinks, especially fruit juices, could be deceptively unhealthy. It is important to read the nutrition labels with caution to differentiate drinks that have added sugars versus those with natural sugar from fruits. Some of the more common added sugars include high-fructose corn syrup, and sucrose. Eliminating these beverages could cut sugar intake overall, preventing diseases such as diabetes. I think it is great to include juices in meal plans. However, this must be done consciously, watching out for ingredients in the juice. First and foremost, juice could be included, as long as it does not replace a meal. Secondly, my family has been huge avid juicers for years and we have always made an effort to make juices without adding sugars. However, I have noticed that it is important to be cautious even with drinking juice that is purely made of fruit. Drinking too much fruit juice can still lead to weight gain if it is not portioned correctly. Drinking fruit juices is essentially consuming more amounts of fruits that one would normally. For example, I was craving fruits one night during a break at school. Since there were no fruits left in the school cafe, I opted for a bottle of Naked Juice; even though the Probiotic Machine Tropical Mango juice that I grabbed was made from all natural fruits and no sugar was added, a small 15 ounce bottle contains 180 calories, with an apple, one and one-third mangoes, half of an orange, one-fourth of a banana, and pineapple. Normally, I would not consume such a large amount of fruit in one sitting, but by drinking my fruit in a juice form altered my perception of how much was actually going into my body. Ultimately, juices that are natural would be great for individuals who need help in meeting their fruit group requirement. However, it should be purchased with a keen eye on the nutrition label, consumed with caution in proportion, and not used to substitute a meal. When looking at my WB1 and WB4, I noticed that drinking water is not a major problem in my daily diet. I am not a big fan of carbonated drinks so there is never a desire to drink soda or sugar beverages with my meals or in between meals. However, what I have noticed is that in order to meet my DRI goal, I had to incorporate soymilk into my diet. Another area that I have to be more cautious about when it comes to beverage consumption is my love for smoothies. I used to order smoothies from Jamba Juice or Robeks between meals. However, after studying a comparison chart in a magazine, it was brought to my attention the average number of calories I was consuming just by drinking a smoothie. A 24 ounce drink could

range from 400 calories on up. This is when I started to consciously limit the amount of smoothies I was consuming and when I do purchase them, I will opt for a 16-ounce drink as opposed to the 24 or 32-ounce. Conclusively, whether it is drinking natural juices, smoothes, or even tea, the best source of keeping my body hydrated so that it can perform its normal function, is water.

8. Fiber While going through the benefits of dietary fiber, I became more aware of its contribution to a healthy diet. Making adjustments such as whole grain as opposed to simple carbohydrates, not only is it a more nutrient-dense choice, but affects nutrients across the board; As I am looking out for my fiber levels, I see how healthy decisions are reflected with the alternation of a healthier choice. These decisions are translated from small changes such as choosing fruits as a side, instead of French bread. In positive correlation to these choices, not only does fiber-dense food usually are good sources of other nutrients, it also have health benefits, such as adding bulk to my diet. This allows me to feel full for longer periods of time, as well as helping me with digestion. I noticed how fiber can be easily incorporated. Things that I love, such as nuts and fruits, are also excellent sources of fiber, making selection of foods that provide fiber a simple task. While making conscious decisions in my WB4, I saw how fiber levels were high in foods that I enjoy, such as oatmeal, edamame, hummus, avocado, and apples. Conveniently, these all happen to fall under my super food group as well! Fiber plays an important role in wellness and meal plans as they provide health benefits that includes, but is not limited to, preventing constipation, maintaining a healthy weight, and even lowering the risk of diabetes and health diseases. Consequently, it plays a role in weight management, obesity, disease prevention, satiation, and empty Kcals in many ways. Some of these include, normalizing bowel movements, helping maintain bowel health by lowering risk of hemorrhoids and diverticular disease. Soluble fiber, or fiber that dissolves in water, that is found is oats and beans, helps to lower the lowdensity lipoprotein. This also means that fiber provides heart-health benefits, including lowering blood pressure. Personally, I come from a family where diabetes is prevalent; soluble fibers help to control blood sugar levels by slowing down the absorption of sugar. Ultimately, in a nation where obesity is so

prevalent, fiber is a great source that aids in achieving healthy weight. A high-fiber diet, as previously mentioned, allows us to feel full longer. Juicing helps to absorb nutrients from vegetables and allows me to add a wider variety of fruits and vegetables in my diet. Specifically with fiber, there are many fibrous fruits that could be incorporated in my diet through juices that I would not otherwise consume. Typically, I am not a big fan of fibrous vegetables such as kale or celery. However, when my brother juices kale or celery with other fruits and vegetables, I could barely even taste them! In this example, juicing is a great way to include minerals and vitamins that are otherwise harder to consume. However, even with all the benefits, I believe that it is essential, as with other nutrients, to make sure that you do not surpass the UL levels. Juicing should ultimately not be used to substitute meals for fiber benefits, but instead supplement your meal to help reach DRI goals for fiber. When comparing the amount of fiber in my WB1 to WB4, I noticed that there was a significant increase. Without really purposely trying, I noticed how decisions to making more nutrient-dense choices oftentimes translated to having a diet that is higher in fiber. Even though the average of 20 grams of fiber from my WB1 recordings was a sufficient amount, I saw how even more fiber could be easily incorporated by making small changes. For example, when I switched out French bread for whole-wheat French bread, that automatically added over 3 grams of fiber to my diet. Also, by trying to meet my DRI goals for omega-3, I incorporated avocados to my diet plan. This translated to increasing my fiber intake by 6 grams as well. I think comparing the fiber intake between WB1 and WB4 really reflects how making smarter, more nutrient-dense choices has affects to your health that is not limited to just one area but to your overall diet plan.

9. My Wellness Life

I am a 24-year-old female who stands at 5 foot 4 inches and weigh 123 pounds. My BMI is 21.1 and I am currently not pregnant, nor am I smoking or a vegetarian. I have a history of high LDL-cholesterol levels, and am anemic. I am currently not active and do not exercise consistently. There are several family members that have diabetes and others who have cancer. With these factors, I am at a high risk for many cardiovascular diseases as well as diabetes. Currently, I am not meeting my activity requirements. However, I believe that it would help if I actively schedule exercising into my itinerary. I am someone who operates heavily off of schedules and checklists so to take the step in setting time aside to exercise would really serve as a good catalyst. Another step to take towards becoming more active is to waking up earlier to exercise in the morning. I find that it is hard to get myself to exercise at the end of the day because I am tired and am more prone to make excuses. Other practical steps would be to get up from my desks more often when I am at work. It is easy to become situated and comfortable when I am at my desk at work. However, it would be really

helpful to just get up every few minutes and take a walk, even if it is just across the office and back. What I find to be most helpful is to have an exercising partner to keep you accountable and help motivate each other. My partner and I could serve to motivate each other positively, and also makes exercising more fun. Other ways to make exercising more appealing and enjoyable is to simply find activities that I enjoy. I personally love hiking, so perhaps, I could incorporate hiking into a Saturday morning routine, exploring different hiking trails. Lastly, I have come to realize that when I make healthy eating decisions, I am also more likely to want to exercise. Just as diet affects my overall health, it also makes me more inclined to make healthy decisions throughout the day. Wellness is something that I personally know to be important, but have not placed as a priority. Since I currently do not physically feel unwell, I have not felt the personal conviction to eat particularly healthy or exercise. However, having learned about all the side effects of bad diet decisions, translating to malnutrition, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or obesity, just to name a few, I am starting to open my eyes to the importance of having a well-balanced diet with exercise. During Thanksgiving, I had the privilege of delivering food to seniors and disabled people in low-income areas of Los Angeles. While talking to the people in the houses I was visiting, I was able to witness the lack of access they had to nutrient-dense food. A gentleman was so grateful for a simple turkey and vegetable meal that we delivered, explaining that he has been having frozen dinners and canned soup because of monetary limitations and lack of access to affordable fruits and vegetables. Many of these households have people with diabetes, stroke, cardiovascular diseases and most of them, if not all, are overweight and obese. My friends and I got to debrief about this experience and it helped us to realize the importance of taking care of our body now for better health in the future. It is obvious that what we choose to include in our diet and exercise plan today affects our health 20 years from now. However, it is hard to really carry the weight of that importance until we personally witness someone get affected by their bad health decisions. Still, why wait when you could start now? I am gradually starting to make changes so that I make wise choices for optimal health in the future. For example, making healthy snacking choices, not eating right before bedtime, drinking more water, drinking less alcohol, making sure that I do not smoke, like my dad. A lot of the choices and decisions become compromised in social settings or when I am not as alert, however, to

slowly develop self-discipline and motivation to achieve my health goals is not impossible with the support of friends and family members. I also much consciously recognize that these changes cannot happen overnight but must be taken in small steps so that I could slowly conquer each area of bad healthhabits that I have in order to conquer the ultimate goal of making wise decisions holistically. Among the many things that I have learned in this course, I think the one that that I really could take away from it is the importance of low LDL levels and high HDL levels. Something that I am more cautious about after this course is my risk for cardiovascular diseases. Having learned about atherosclerosis and seeing the visuals from the video, I am more cautious about what goes into my body. Before this course, I had a mentality that I need to limit foods that are high in fat. However, I did not know the important role of foods that are high in good fats as well as the role of fiber in lowering my LDLlevels. I have had high LDL-levels since I was 16 and having had the doctor warn me about my diet and lifestyle, this has always been an area in my life where I knew I needed to watch out for. However, this course really just drove me to feel personally responsible in embracing healthy choices for the sake of a better health and thinking in terms of long-term goals. Overall, I think this class has set a foundation in helping me be more aware of my diet and exercise decisions, to really foster a health-conscious mindset. I am also more experienced at reading nutrition labels, whereas before, the only ingredients I would look for is the fat-content of the product that I am buying. I thoroughly enjoyed this 16-week journey and learning about preparing for the future in my decisions today.

Appendix A.
Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Profile Active Profile: Height: Weight: Age: BMI: Gender: Pregnancy: Activity Level: Smoker: Strict Vegetarian/Vegan: Elsie Yao 5 ft. 4 inches 123.0 lbs. 24 years 21.1 Female Not Pregnant Sedentary No No

DRI Goals Nutrient DRI

Energy
Kilocalories Protein Carbohydrate Fat, Total 1609 kcal 44.63 g 180.0 - 260.0 g 35.0 - 62.0 g No recommendation Daily requirement based on grams per kilogram of body weight

Fat
Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Cholesterol < 16 g * * * < 300 mg Less than 10% of calories No recommendation No recommendation No recommendation Less than 300mg recommended

Essential Fatty Acids


Omega-6 Linoleic Omega-3 Linolenic 12 g 1.1 g

Carbohydrate s

DA Plus 10 Page: 1

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Nutrient Dietary Fiber, Total Sugar, Total DRI 25 g * No recommendation

Other
Water Alcohol 2.7 L * No recommendation

Vitamins
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Folate (DFE) Vitamin C Vitamin D (ug) Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A (IU) Alpha-Tocopherol 1.1 mg 1.1 mg 14 mg 1.3 mg 2.4 g 400 g 75 mg 15 g 700 g 2333 IU 15 mg DRI Adequate Intake

Minerals
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium Zinc Sodium 1000 mg 18 mg 310 mg 4700 mg 8 mg 1500 mg DRI Adequate Intake DRI Adequate Intake DRI Adequate Intake

DA Plus 10 Page: 2

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Macronutrient Ranges for Oct 18, 2012, Oct 21, 2012

Macronutrient Ranges
1,100 1,000 900 800

Calories

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Carbs Protein Recommended
Carbs Protei n 10%-35% Fats 20%-35% Alcoho l 0% Recommended 45%-65% 724-1,046 kCal 161-563 kCal 322-563 kCal 0 kCal

Fat Actual Intake


Yours 58% 18% 29% 0% 1,083 kCal 333 kCal 536 kCal 0 kCal

Alcohol

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Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Fat Breakdown for Oct 18, 2012, Oct 21, 2012


Source of Fat Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Unspecified 0% 9% 3% 2% 0% 14 % 25% 50% 75% 100%

* Transfat data is not yet reported by all sources and therefore may be under-represented.

DA Plus 10 Page: 4

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake vs. Goals for Oct 18, 2012, Oct 21, 2012
Nutrient DRI Intake 0 % 25% 50% 75% 100%

Energy
Kilocalories Protein Carbohydrate Fat, Total 1609 kcal 44.63 g 180.0 260.0 g 35.0 - 62.0 g 1,882.73 kcal 83.23 g 270.83 g 59.6 g 117% 186%

Fat
Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Cholesterol < 16 g * * * < 300 mg 17.98 g 7.03 g 4.51 g 0.5 g 135.72 mg 112%

45%

Essential Fatty Acids


Omega-6 Linoleic Omega-3 Linolenic 12 g 1.1 g 1.17 g 0.46 g 10% 42%

Carbohydrates
Dietary Fiber, Total Sugar, Total 25 g * 20.64 g 137.94 g 83%

Other
Water Alcohol 2.7 L * 1.71 L 0g 63 %

Vitamins
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Folate (DFE) Vitamin C Vitamin D (ug) Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A (IU) Alpha-Tocopherol 1.1 mg 1.1 mg 14 mg 1.3 mg 2.4 g 400 g 75 mg 15 g 700 g 2333 IU 15 mg 0.86 mg 0.99 mg 18.08 mg 1.3 mg 4.65 g 84.07 g 75.48 mg 14.17 g 65.34 g 2,898.01 IU 4.32 mg 29% 9% 124% 21% 101% 94% 78 % 90% 129% 100% 194%

Minerals
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium 1000 mg 18 mg 310 mg 4700 mg 745.63 mg 9.86 mg 254.04 mg 2,375.29 mg 55% 82% 51% 75%

DA Plus 10 Page: 5

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average
Nutrient Zinc Sodium DRI 8 mg 1500 mg Intake 4.95 mg 1,995.8 mg 0% 25% 50% 62% 133% 75% 100%

DA Plus 10 Page: 6

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

MyPlate Analysis for Oct 18, 2012, Oct 21, 2012 Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein Foods Empty Calorie s
Your results are based on a 1609 Goal* 6.0 oz. eq. 2.5 cup eq. 1.5 cup eq. 3.0 cup eq. 5.0 oz. eq. 195.0

tips tips tips tips tips

Actual 5.8 oz. eq. 1 cup eq. 2.1 cup eq. 1 cup eq. 6.4 oz. eq. 457

% Goal 97.1% 40% 140.7% 34.5% 128.5% 234.4%

calorie pattern. whole

Make Half Your Grains Whole! Aim for at least 3.0 oz. eq.

grains.
Vary Your Veggies!

Aim for this much every week:

Dark Green Vegetables = 2.0 cups weekly Orange Vegetables = 1.5 cups weekly Dry Beans &Peas = 2.5 cups weekly Starchy Vegetables = 2.5 cups weekly Other Vegetables = 5.5 cups weekly
Oils: Aim for 5.0

teaspoons of oil a day.

*MyPlate contains recommendations only for calorie levels up to 3,200 per day. If Diet Analysis Plus recommends more than 3,200 calories per day for you, talk to your instructor for guidance on how to use MyPlate. **CAUTION!Recipes are not included on the MyPlate Report, as plate values for these cannot be calculated.

DA Plus 10 Page: 7

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake Spreadsheet for Oct 18, 2012


Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Meal Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Lunch Lunch Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Snacks Snacks Protein(g) 5 0.2 3 0 21 0 30.6 13.62 5.03 0 4.49 0.28 83.23 Mono Fat(g) 0 0.02 0 0 0 0 3.05 2.68 0.64 0 7.03 Quantity 4 ounce(s) - 4 oz is 1 container 1 item(s) - 1 fruit without refuse 1 item(s) - 1 item is 1 bar 8 fluid ounce(s) 1 item(s) 8 fluid ounce(s) 4 ounce(s) 1 cup(s) 1 cup(s) 8 fluid ounce(s) 2 cup(s) 8 fluid ounce(s) Carb(g) 19 8.38 25 0 43 0 0 15.31 44.77 0 115.37 0 270.83 Poly Fat(g) 0 0.02 0 0 0 0 3.11 0.47 0.63 0 4.51 Wt(g) 113 25 35 237 243 237 113.4 198 195 237 479.31 237 2,349.71 Fat(g) 2 0.1 4 0 31 0 8.39 9.52 1.75 0 2.79 0.05 59.6 Trans Fat(g) 0 0 0 0 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 Kcal(kcal) 110 31.75 140 0 520 0 206.27 194.04 216.45 0 461.86 2.37 1,882.73 Sat Fat(g) 1 0.01 0.5 0 7.5 0 1.54 5.76 0.35 0 1.31 0 17.98 Chol(mg) 5 0 0 0 45 0 53.27 25.74 0 0 135.72

DA Plus 10 Page: 8

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Mono Fat(g) 0.6 0.04 7.03 Omega-6(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.37 0.6 0 0.19 0 1.17 Water(L) 0 0.02 0 0.24 0 0.24 0.07 0.16 0.14 0.24 0.38 0.24 1.71 Niacin(mg) 0 0 0 0 0 0 11.11 1.23 2.98 18.08 Poly Fat(g) 0.28 0 4.51 Omega-3(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.27 0.09 0.03 0 0.08 0 0.46 Alcohol(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vit B6(mg) 0.04 0 0 0 0 0 0.25 0.18 0.28 1.3 Trans Fat(g) 0 0 0.5 Diet Fiber(g) 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 3.56 3.51 0 9.57 0 20.64 Thiamin(mg) 0.06 0 0 0 0 0 0.18 0.13 0.19 0 0.26 0.03 0.86 Vit B12(g) 0.6 0 0 0 0 0 3.07 0.95 0 4.65 Chol(mg) 6.71 0 135.72 Sugar(g) 17 0 14 0 7 0 0 6.1 0.68 0 93.16 0 137.94 Ribo(mg) 0.25 0 0 0 0 0 0.07 0.21 0.05 0 0.22 0.18 0.99 Fol (DFE)(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23.76 7.8 84.07

DA Plus 10 Page: 9

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Item Name DANNON Activia, Yogurt, Strawberry, Low Fat Persimmon NATURE VALLEY TRAIL MIX, Bar, Fruit 'n Nut Water, Tap SUBWAY Sandwich, Tuna, White, 6 Inch Water, Tap Salmon, with Butter, Broiled or Baked Eggplant with Cheese and Tomato Sauce Niacin(mg) 0 2.31 0.45 18.08 Vit C(mg) 0 16.5 0 0 16.8 0 2.45 5.15 0 0 34.58 0 75.48 Alpha-T(mg) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.53 1.68 0.06 0 1.03 0.02 4.32 Potas(mg) 220 77.5 0 2.37 0 2.37 502.07 352.44 2,375.29 Vit B6(mg) 0 0.54 0 1.3 Vit D (ug)(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 14.17 0 0 0 0 0 14.17 Calcium(mg) 150 6.75 0 7.11 100 7.11 19.95 354.42 19.5 7.11 68.94 4.74 745.63 Zinc(mg) 0.6 0 0 0 0 0 0.75 1.6 4.95 Vit B12(g) Fol (DFE)(g) 0 0 0.03 47.77 0 4.74 4.65 84.07 Vit A (RAE)(g) Vit A (IU)(IU) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 65.34 0 0 0 0 65.34 Iron(mg) 0 0.62 0.36 0 3.6 0 1.36 0.99 0.82 0 2.09 0.02 9.86 Sodium(mg) 75 0.25 100 7.11 1010 7.11 131.47 592.02 1,995.8 542 0 0 500 0 181.31 867.18 0 0 807.52 0 2,898.01 Magn(mg) 16 0 0 2.37 0 2.37 35.81 33.66 83.85 2.37 70.49 7.11 254.04

DA Plus 10 Page: 10

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Rice, Brown, Long Grain, Cooked Water, Tap Fruit Salad Coffee, Brewed Potas(mg) 83.85 2.37 1016.2 116.13 2,375.29 Zinc(mg) 1.23 0 0.72 0.05 4.95 Sodium(mg) 9.75 7.11 51.24 4.74 1,995.8

DA Plus 10 Page: 11

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake Spreadsheet for Oct 21, 2012

DA Plus 10 Page: 12

Oct 28, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Energy Balance for Oct 18, 2012, Oct 21, 2012


Date Oct 18, 2012 Total: kCal Consumed 1882 1882 kCal 1609 1882 1472 410 kCal Burned 1472 1472 Net kCal 410 410

Daily Caloric Summary Recommended: Average Intake: Average Expenditure: Average Net Gain/Loss:

DA Plus 10 Page: 13

B.
Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Profile Active Profile: Height: Weight: Age: BMI: Gender: Pregnancy: Activity Level: Smoker: Strict Vegetarian/Vegan: Elsie Yao 5 ft. 4 inches 123.0 lbs. 24 years 21.1 Female Not Pregnant Sedentary No No

DRI Goals Nutrient DRI

Energy
Kilocalories Protein Carbohydrate Fat, Total 1609 kcal 44.63 g 180.0 - 260.0 g 35.0 - 62.0 g No recommendation Daily requirement based on grams per kilogram of body weight

Fat
Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Cholesterol < 16 g * * * < 300 mg Less than 10% of calories No recommendation No recommendation No recommendation Less than 300mg recommended

Essential Fatty Acids


Omega-6 Linoleic Omega-3 Linolenic 12 g 1.1 g

Carbohydrates

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Nutrient Dietary Fiber, Total Sugar, Total DRI 25 g * No recommendation

Other
Water Alcohol 2.7 L * No recommendation

Vitamins
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Folate (DFE) Vitamin C Vitamin D (ug) Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A (IU) Alpha-Tocopherol 1.1 mg 1.1 mg 14 mg

1.3 mg 2.4 g

400 g 75 mg 15 g 700 g 2333 IU 15 mg DRI Adequate Intake

Minerals
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium Zinc Sodium 1000 mg 18 mg 310 mg 4700 mg 8 mg 1500 mg DRI Adequate Intake DRI Adequate Intake DRI Adequate Intake

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Macronutrient Ranges for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012

Macronutrient Ranges
900 800 700

500 400 300 200 100 0 Carbs Recommended


Recommended Carbs Protein Fats Alcoho l 45%-65% 10%-35% 20%-35% 0% 724-1,046 kCal 161-563 kCal 322-563 kCal 0 kCal

Calories

600

Protein

Fat Actual Intake


Yours 46% 18% 40% 0% 885 kCal 347 kCal 770 kCal 0 kCal

Alcohol

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Fat Breakdown for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012


Source of Fat Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Unspecified 0% 8% 8% 0% 7% 18% 25% 50% 75% 100%

* Transfat data is not yet reported by all sources and therefore may be under-represented.

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake vs. Goals for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012
Nutrient DRI Intake 0% 25% 50% 75% 100%

Energy
Kilocalories Protein Carbohydrate g Fat, Total 1609 kcal 44.63 g 180.0 - 260.0 35.0 - 62.0 g 1,923.67 kcal 86.67 g 221.35 g 85.53 g 120% 194%

Fat
Saturated Fat Monounsaturated Fat Polyunsaturated Fat Trans Fatty Acid Cholesterol < 16 g * * * < 300 mg 14.1 g 37.81 g 16.95 g 0.01 g 184.81 mg 62% 88%

Essential Fatty Acids


Omega-6 Linoleic Omega-3 Linolenic 12 g 1.1 g 14 g 1.17 g 117% 106%

Carbohydrates
Dietary Fiber, Total Sugar, Total 25 g * 30.54 g 77.89 g 122%

Other
Water Alcohol 2.7 L * 1.71 L 0g 63%

Vitamins
Thiamin Riboflavin Niacin Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Folate (DFE) Vitamin C Vitamin D (ug) Vitamin A (RAE) Vitamin A (IU) Alpha-Tocopherol 1.1 mg 1.1 mg 14 mg 1.3 mg 2.4 g 400 g 75 mg 15 g 700 g 2333 IU 15 mg 1.08 mg 1.43 mg 14.46 mg 1.13 mg 1.68 g 463.72 g 80.75 mg 1.24 g 1,223.98 g 23,685.73 IU 16.18 mg 8% 175% 1,015% 108% 70% 116% 108% 98% 129% 101% 118%

Minerals
Calcium Iron Magnesium Potassium 1000 mg 18 mg 310 mg 4700 mg 809.76 mg 15.28 mg 430.53 mg 3,140.11 mg 67% 81% 85% 139%

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average
Nutrient Zinc Sodium DRI 8 mg 1500 mg Intake 8.32 mg 1,557.09 mg 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 104% 104%

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

MyPlate Analysis for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012


Goal*

Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein Foods Empty Calories

6.0 oz. eq. 2.5 cup eq. 1.5 cup eq. 3.0 cup eq. 5.0 oz. eq. 195.0

s s s s s

Actual 4.7 oz. eq. 3.1 cup eq. 2.1 cup eq. 0.8 cup eq. 11 oz. eq. 163.8

% Goal 78.6% 123.6% 139.4% 26.4% 220.7% 84%

Your results are based on a 1609 calorie

pattern. grains.

Make Half Your Grains Whole! Aim for at least 3.0 oz. eq. whole Vary Your Veggies! Aim

for this much every week: Dark

Green Vegetables = 2.0 cups weekly Orange Vegetables = 1.5 cups weekly Dry Beans &Peas = 2.5 cups weekly Starchy Vegetables = 2.5 cups weekly Other Vegetables = 5.5 cups weekly
Oils: Aim for 5.0 teaspoons

of oil a day.

*MyPlate contains recommendations only for calorie levels up to 3,200 per day. If Diet Analysis Plus recommends more than 3,200 calories per day for you, talk to your instructor for guidance on how to use MyPlate. **CAUTION!Recipes are not included on the MyPlate Report, as plate values for these cannot be calculated.

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake Spreadsheet for Nov 02, 2012


Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Meal Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Quantity 6 ounce(s) - 1 Serving Per Container 1 tablespoon(s) 0.35 cup(s) 1 slice(s) 1 item(s) - Large egg 10 fluid ounce(s) 0.2 teaspoon(s) 0.2 cup(s) - 1 cup (not packed) 8 fluid ounce(s) 0.85 item(s) fruit without skin and seeds 0.5 cup(s) 0.25 cup(s) 2 piece(s) - 1 cubic inch 0.5 cup(s) shredded 0.5 item(s) Medium whole (2 3/5 in. diameter) 0.25 cup(s) slices 1 ounce(s) 1 serving(s) 0.5 serving(s) 8 fluid ounce(s) 0.5 tablespoon(s) 0.9 cup(s) 0.3 cup(s) 2 tablespoon(s) 1 tablespoon(s) 0.2 tablespoon(s) 0.2 tablespoon(s) 1 item(s) - 1 clove 0.2 cup(s) 2 ounce(s) Wt(g) 170 21 50.75 23 46 300 1.2 29 237 113.63 15 28.61 40 23.5 61.5 Kcal(kcal) 100 63.84 28.93 71.99 90.16 162 0.64 86.71 0 189.76 3.45 12.01 49.6 3.99 11.07

Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat

Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner

26 28.35 14 61.44 237 10.5 166.5 46.8 27 15 3 2.72 3 24.24 56.7 2,250.44

3.9 5.1 35 109.62 0 31.92 199.8 16.85 238.68 35 0 24.04 4.47 74.67 103.19 2,066.4

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Meal Dinner Snacks Snacks Snacks Quantity 8 fluid ounce(s) 1 ounce(s) 1 serving(s) 1 item(s) - 1 item is 1 bar Carb(g) 7 17.3 7.35 12.83 0.38 18.84 0.1 22.96 0 9.82 0.54 2.89 1.17 0.77 2.39 0.94 1.17 2 22.85 0 8.65 35.46 3.32 0 6 0.2 0 0.99 19.97 0 0 5 5 20 235.92 Poly Fat(g) 0 13.89 Wt(g) 237 28 75 28 2,250.44 Fat(g) 0 0 0.17 0.98 6.83 5.25 0 0.13 0 17.51 0.06 0.02 1.52 0.07 0.12 0.03 0.05 3 0.62 0 0 3.2 0.23 27 0.5 0 2.72 0.01 0.33 4.61 0 15 0.2 3 93.18 Trans Fat(g) 0 0.02 Kcal(kcal) 0 170 20 120 2,066.4 Sat Fat(g) 0 0 0.01 0.23 1.99 0.62 0 0.02 0 2.42 0.01 0.01 0.44 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.5 0.1 0 0 0 0.05 3.73 0 0 0.39 0 0.02 0.71 0 2 0 1 14.29 Chol(mg) 0 251.52

Protein(g) 18 0.06 0.38 2.98 6.26 9.81 0.06 0.89 0 2.23 0.43 0.26 7.84 0.29 0.54 0.17 0.18 0 4.41 0 0.03 7.33 1.19 0 1 0 0 0.19 0.02 14.42 0 6 1 2 87.97 Mono Fat(g) 0 38.3

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Mono Fat(g) 0 0.02 0.23 2.84 1.2 0 0.01 0 11.13 0 0.01 0.35 0 0.02 0 0 0 0.1 0 0 0 0.02 19.7 0 0 1.08 0 0.05 1.53 0 0 0 0 38.3 Omega-6(g) 0 0 0.04 0.36 1.28 1.75 0 0.01 0 10.1 Poly Fat(g) 0 0.07 0.4 1.5 2.88 0 0.01 0 2.06 0.02 0.02 0.46 0.04 0.05 0.01 0.02 0 0.24 0 0 0 0.12 2.84 0 0 1.13 0.01 0.16 1.85 0 0 0 0 13.89 Omega-3(g) 0 0 0.03 0.04 0.06 0.23 0 0 0 1.11 Trans Fat(g) 0 0 0 0.02 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.02 Diet Fiber(g) 0 0.04 1.22 1.08 0 1.8 0.01 1.07 0 31.38 Chol(mg) 0 0 0 184.46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26.8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40.26 0 0 0 0 251.52 Sugar(g) 7 17.25 5.05 1.48 0.18 11.97 0.02 17.17 0 102.96

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium 1.58 Omega-6(g) 1.9 0 0 0.37 0.01 0.05 0.01 0.01 0 0.22 0 0 0 0.04 2.64 0 0 1.12 0.01 0.15 0.12 0 0 0 0 10.1 Water(L) 0 0 0.04 0.01 0.03 0.26 0 0 0.24 0.08 0.01 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.06 0.02 0.03 Omega-3(g) 0.14 0.02 0 0.01 0.03 0 0 0.01 0 0.01 0 0 0 0.08 0.21 0 0 0.01 0 0.01 0.21 0 0 0 0 1.11 Alcohol(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Diet Fiber(g) 7.73 0.33 0.4 0 0.49 0.74 0.13 0.34 0 3.15 0 0.02 4.66 1.22 0 0.5 0 0 0.06 1.38 0 0 2 2 1 31.38 Thiamin(mg) 0 0 0.02 0.1 0.02 0.18 0 0.03 0 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01 0 1.18 Sugar(g) 0.34 0.06 1.22 0 0.28 1.62 0.43 0.54 0 0.12 0 8.62 0 0.81 0 3 0 0 0.03 15.76 0 0 1 3 6 102.96 Ribo(mg) 0 0.01 0.02 0.09 0.23 0.21 0 0.04 0 0.16 0.03 0.01 0.1 0.02 0.01 0.01 0 1.55

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive 17.05 Water(L) 0 0.03 0.24 0 0.12 0.04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.03 0.24 0 0 0 1.58 Niacin(mg) 0 0.03 0.21 1.44 0.04 1.54 0.04 0.22 0 2.17 0.11 0.02 1.41 0.07 0.37 0.03 0.02 0 2.38 0 0.01 0.69 0.28 0 Alcohol(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vit B6(mg) 0 0.01 0.03 0.04 0.08 0.23 0 0.05 0 0.33 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.02 0.05 0.01 0 0 0.09 0 0 0.2 0.08 0 1.97 Thiamin(mg) 0 0.25 0 0 0.18 0.05 0 0 0 0 0.01 0 0.16 0 0 0 0 1.18 Vit B12(g) 0 0 0 0 0.45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.28 Ribo(mg) 0 0.12 0 0 0.18 0.04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.28 0 0 0 0 1.55 Fol (DFE)(g) 0 0.42 3.04 23 23.46 54 0.19 1.45 0 101.13 29.1 5.44 2.4 31.96 9.23 1.82 0.28 0 52.11 0 0.21 69.93 28.08 0 453.78

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed Niacin(mg) 0 0 0 0.02 0.24 5.71 0 0 0 0 17.05 Vit C(mg) 0 0.1 4.92 0.05 0 0 0 0.67 0 10 4.22 1.83 0 0.94 8.43 0.73 0.54 0 0 0 0.05 0 29.02 0 0 0 0 0.94 0.05 0 0 0 62.47 Vit B6(mg) 0 0 0 0.04 0.01 0.54 0 0 0 0 Vit B12(g) 0 0 0 0 0 1.73 0 0 0 0 Fol (DFE)(g) 0 0 0 0.09 0 16.44 0 0 0 0 453.78 Vit A (IU)(IU) 0 0 27.41 0 362.02 9 0 0 0 167.04 1406.55 0 0 2046.85 512.29 27.3 76.26 30 2.2 0 0 8.33 362.7 0 0 0 0 0.27 0 24.95 0 0 5,063.16

1.97 2.28 Vit D (ug)(g) Vit A (RAE)(g) 0 0 0 0 0 1.52 0 0 1.01 100.74 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7.95 0 70.35 0 0 0.02 0 0 102.46 0 25.83 0 1.3 0 3.69 0 1.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.03 0 0 0 0 18.25 0 0 0 0 0 0 7.37 0 0 340.97

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Vit C(mg) 0 0 Vit D (ug)(g) Vit A (RAE)(g) 0 0 0 0 1.03 Calcium(mg) 200 1.26 3.04 37.95 28.52 75 0.2 14.5 7.11 14.77 14.85 6.29 2 7.75 6.15 4.16 2.55 13 10.05 7.11 0.63 28.31 16.85 0.27 0 0 0 5.43 2.42 8.5 7.11 40 0 20 585.8 Zinc(mg) 0 0.05 0.08 6.94 340.97 Iron(mg) 0 0.09 0.14 0.94 0.87 1.92 0.02 0.55 0 0.69 0.41 0.05 0.54 0.23 0.17 0.07 0.15 0.65 1.27 0 0.04 2.48 0.56 0.15 0 0 0 0.05 0.13 0.58 0 1.08 0 0.72 14.56 Sodium(mg) 80 0.84 0.51 1,921.19 Vit A (IU)(IU) 0 0 5,063.16 Magn(mg) 0 0.42 3.04 13.57 5.98 75 0.41 9.28 2.37 32.95 11.85 2.86 8 3.29 6.76 3.38 3.12 0 33.89 2.37 0.21 106.56 9.36 0 0 0 0 0.75 1.21 20.98 2.37 0 0 0 359.99

62.47 Item Name Alpha-T(mg) CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain 0 Honey 0 Blueberries 0.29 Bread, Wheat, Toasted 0.06 Eggs, Fried 0.6 Soymilk 0.33 Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium 0 Raisins, Seedless 0.03 Water, Tap 0 Avocado, California 2.24 Spinach, Chopped, Raw 0.3 Onions, Red, Sliced 0.01 Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced 0.16 Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded 0.03 Tomatoes, Red 0.33 Cucumber, Sliced 0.01 Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium 0 MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, 0 Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat 0.22 Water, Tap 0 Honey 0 Quinoa, Cooked 1.05 Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained 0.2 Oil, Olive 3.87 COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste 0 ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain 0 Oil, Sesame 0.04 Garlic Clove 0 Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened 0.26 Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat 0 Water, Tap 0 PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed 0 KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks 0 0 ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Item Name CHOBANI Yogurt, Greek, Plain Honey Blueberries 10.03 Potas(mg) 0 10.92 39.08 2,772.6

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Bread, Wheat, Toasted Eggs, Fried Soymilk Sauce, Soy (Shoyu), Low Sodium Raisins, Seedless Water, Tap Avocado, California Spinach, Chopped, Raw Onions, Red, Sliced Turkey Ham, Extra Lean, Sliced Lettuce, Romaine, Shredded Tomatoes, Red Cucumber, Sliced Pickle, Dill, Low Sodium MEGA WRAPS Topping, Regular, Olives, Black, Sliced Bread, French, Whole Wheat Water, Tap Honey Quinoa, Cooked Brussels Sprouts, Boiled, Drained Oil, Olive COLD MOUNTAIN Mellow White Miso Paste ROLAND FOODS Rice Wine Vinegar, Plain Oil, Sesame Garlic Clove Cranberries, Dried, Sweetened Salmon, Atlantic, Wild, Cooked, Dry Heat Water, Tap PLANTERS Nuts, Mixed KELSEY'S Celery and Carrot Sticks ANNIE'S HOMEGROWN Granola Bar, Berry Berry, Organic Potas(mg) 51.29 69.92 354 2.16 217.21 2.37 576.1 83.7 41.19 119.6 58.04 145.76 38.22 32.89 0 107.15 2.37 5.46 286.38 148.36 0.27 0 0 0 12.03 9.7 356.07 2.37 0 0 0 2,772.6 Zinc(mg) 0.34 0.64 0.36 0 0.06 0 0.77 0.08 0.05 0.94 0.05 0.1 0.05 0.04 0 0.79 0 0.02 1.81 0.15 0 0 0 0 0.03 0.03 0.46 0 0 0 0 6.94 Sodium(mg) 140.53 95.22 153 40 3.19 7.11 9.09 11.85 0.86 415.2 1.88 3.08 0.52 5.1 240 2.57 7.11 0.42 11.65 9.83 0.54 470 6 0 0.51 0.73 31.75 7.11 110 55 0 1,921.19

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Intake Spreadsheet for Nov 03, 2012


Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Meal Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Lunch Lunch Lunch Quantity 1 item(s) - small (6" to 6-7/8" long) 0.5 cup(s) 0.25 ounce(s) 0.5 cup(s) 8 fluid ounce(s) 1 item(s) 1 ounce(s) 1 item(s) - 1 item is 1 medium apple (3 in. diameter) 1.5 ounce(s) 1 cup(s) 0.5 item(s) Medium whole (2 3/5 in. diameter) 0.25 cup(s) 0.2 cup(s) 0.7 item(s) - fruit without skin and seeds 8 fluid ounce(s) 0.5 tablespoon(s) 0.25 cup(s) chopped 1 item(s) - 1 clove 1 teaspoon(s) 1 cup is 96g (1 in. diameter slices) 2 ounce(s) 0.1 teaspoon(s) 1 teaspoon(s) 1 teaspoon(s) crumbled 5 ounce(s) 0.2 cup(s) Chopped or diced 0.35 cup(s) Wt(g) 101 117 7.09 121.5 237 64 28.35 182 Kcal(kcal) 89.89 83.07 46.35 41.31 0 170.24 94.69 94.64

Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red

Lunch Lunch Lunch

42.52 30 61.5

83.77 6.9 11.07

Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root

Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner

61.5 22.89 93.58 237 6.8 40 3 2

108.86 9.61 156.27 0 60.11 16 4.47 1.6

Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled

Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner

56.7 0.19 0.8 0.6 141.75 20.8 57.4 2,278.73

93.55 0.5 0.81 1.88 56.7 6.45 94.14 1,780.94

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Meal Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Snacks Snacks Quantity 0.3 cup(s) 0.5 fluid ounce(s) 1 ounce(s) 1 cup(s) 0.75 cup(s) slices 8 fluid ounce(s) 0.35 cup(s) 3 item(s) - 1 item is 1 sheet Carb(g) 23.07 14.04 0.97 4.68 0 35.2 0.13 25.13 0 1.09 2.39 12.37 2.31 8.09 0 0 3.74 0.99 0.36 0 0.14 0.2 0.45 14.87 1.58 15.74 10.5 1.05 1.83 206.78 Wt(g) 49.2 15.25 37.69 28.33 117 237 48.3 9 2,278.73 Fat(g) 0.33 1.78 4.62 1.03 0 1.66 7.85 0.31 3.31 0.12 0.12 5.28 0.02 14.42 0 6.8 0.04 0.01 0.01 2.02 0.02 0.01 0.05 0.13 0.04 1.49 0.17 0.04 0.83 77.87 Kcal(kcal) 49.69 3.36 25.01 11.67 40.95 0 287.38 30 1,780.94 Sat Fat(g) 0.11 0.36 0.43 0.09 0 0.26 4.94 0.05 0.93 0.02 0.02 0.7 0.01 1.99 0 0.69 0.02 0 0 0.57 0 0 0.01 0.03 0.01 0.15 0.02 0.01 0.5 13.92

Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain

Protein(g) 1.1 2.97 1.08 3.18 0 6.27 5.88 0.47 12.67 0.86 0.54 2.99 0.21 1.83 0 0 0.44 0.19 0.04 17.59 0.01 0.04 0.05 1.28 0.17 5.09 1.96 0.05 3.67 85.37

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted Protein(g) 0.67 0.89 0 10.17 3 85.37 Mono Fat(g) 0.03 0.51 0.63 0.32 0 0.22 2.27 0.01 1.29 0 0.02 2.99 0 9.17 0 3.09 0.01 0 0 0.7 0 0 0.01 0.01 0 0.33 0.02 0 0 0 0.01 0 15.64 37.31 Carb(g) 3 9.62 0 10.24 3 206.78 Poly Fat(g) 0.07 0.65 3.34 0.68 0 0.68 0.23 0.09 0.71 0.05 0.05 1.3 0.01 1.7 0 2.73 0.01 0.01 0 0.44 0 0 0.01 0.05 0.02 0.66 0.1 0 0 0 0.1 0 6.28 20 Fat(g) 0 0.21 0 25.14 0 77.87 Trans Fat(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.01 Sat Fat(g) 0 0.04 0 1.95 0 13.92 Chol(mg) 0 0 0 0 0 0 28.35 0 35.72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48.19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5.84 0 0 0 0 118.1

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Mono Fat(g) 0 37.31 Omega-6(g) 0.05 0.63 2.7 0 0 0.64 0.15 0.08 0.6 0.01 0.05 1.25 0 1.57 0 2.71 0.01 0.01 0 0.33 0 0 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.64 0.06 0 0 0 0.1 0 6.27 0 17.89 Water(L) 0.08 0.1 1.84 Poly Fat(g) 0 20 Omega-3(g) 0.03 0.02 0.64 0 0 0.03 0.09 0.02 0.03 0.04 0 0.05 0 0.12 0 0.01 0 0 0 0.02 0 0 0.01 0.03 0.01 0.02 0.05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.23 Alcohol(g) 0 0 0 Trans Fat(g) 0 0.01 Diet Fiber(g) 2.63 1.99 0.47 0.73 0 4.74 0 4.37 0 0.66 0.74 2.46 0.32 6.36 0 0 0.68 0.06 0.04 0 0.04 0.11 0.16 4.54 0.21 4.36 0.89 0.05 0 1.33 3.51 0 5.26 3 49.7 Thiamin(mg) 0.03 0.09 0.98 Chol(mg) 0 118.1 Sugar(g) 12.35 0.32 0.18 0.5 0 0.52 0.13 18.91 0 0.13 1.62 0.17 0.98 0.28 0 0 1.7 0.03 0.03 0 0 0 0 2.79 0.44 2.76 0.36 0.38 1.83 0 4.04 0 2.38 0 52.83 Ribo(mg) 0.07 0.02 1.5

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Water(L) 0 0.11 0.24 0.02 0.01 0.16 0.03 0.03 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.07 0.24 0 0.04 0 0 0.04 0 0 0 0.12 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.01 0 0 0.11 0.24 0 0 1.84 Niacin(mg) 0.67 0.26 0.08 0 0 23.87 Alcohol(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vit B6(mg) 0.37 0.01 0.04 0 0 2.65 Thiamin(mg) 0.02 0 0 0.22 0.02 0.03 0 0.02 0.02 0.05 0.01 0.07 0 0 0.02 0.01 0 0.04 0 0 0 0.1 0.01 0.07 0.03 0 0 0 0.08 0 0.04 0 0.98 Vit B12(g) 0 0 0 0.28 0 1.08 Ribo(mg) 0.01 0.21 0 0.05 0.15 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.01 0.03 0.01 0.13 0 0 0.01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.02 0 0.04 0.04 0 0 0 0.05 0 0.47 0 1.5 Fol (DFE)(g) 20.2 7.02 6.95 0 0 473.66

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Niacin(mg) 1.82 0.11 0.17 5.4 0.22 0.37 0.25 0.02 1.79 0 0 0.05 0.02 0.01 7.77 0.01 0.01 0.01 1.37 0.04 0.3 0.63 0.01 0 0 0.75 0 1.72 0 23.87 Vit C(mg) 8.79 0 0.09 0 0 0 0 8.37 0 99.03 Vit B6(mg) 0.17 0.07 0.08 0.24 0.06 0.05 0.25 0.03 0.27 0 0 0.05 0.04 0 0.34 0 0 0.01 0.18 0.02 0.08 0.07 0.01 0 0 0.18 0 0.06 0 Vit B12(g) 0 0.47 0 0.14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fol (DFE)(g) 22.4 18.43 5.46 1.7 58.2 9.23 36.28 4.35 83.28 0 0 7.6 0.09 0.22 2.27 0.07 0.36 1.08 26.93 4.99 98.73 12.79 3.05 0 0 16.38 0 25.6 0 473.66 Vit A (IU)(IU) 64.64 0 1.42 250.29 0 0 167.83 98.28 39.55 42,308.31

2.65 1.08 Vit D (ug)(g) Vit A (RAE)(g) 0 3.03 0 0 0 0.07 1.22 0 0 0 0.14 0 0.04 1.46 0 0 49.33 5.46 11.91 2,107

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Vit C(mg) 8.43 8.43 4.86 1.46 8.23 0 0 2.96 0.94 0.1 0 0.07 1.28 0.28 21.4 0.87 0.75 0 5.9 0.4 4 4.21 0 0 7.2 99.03 Alpha-T(mg) 0.1 0.09 0.05 0 0 0.39 0.07 0.33 0.11 0.61 0.33 0.46 0 1.84 22.33 Vit D (ug)(g) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.46 Calcium(mg) 5.05 10.53 6.95 149.45 7.11 9.6 52.16 10.92 5.95 29.7 6.15 30.14 5.03 12.17 733.72 Vit A (RAE)(g) 140.7 25.83 0 0 6.55 0 0 0 0 0 3.4 0.05 1.9 1.85 790.95 8.53 0.57 0 0 10.02 50 996.84 0 0 0 2,107 Iron(mg) 0.26 1.05 0.21 0.56 0 1.96 0.14 0.22 0.46 0.81 0.17 0.96 0.04 0.57 16.01 Vit A (IU)(IU) 2813.1 512.29 3.08 0 137.56 0 0 0.8 0.27 0 11.91 1.03 38.01 37.11 15811.98 168.9 15.5 1.48 0.92 33.35 1000 19928.55 0 0.48 1170 42,308.31 Magn(mg) 27.27 31.59 11.2 15.8 2.37 44.16 5.67 9.1 11.48 23.7 6.76 17.83 2.29 27.14 501.06

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Alpha-T(mg) Water, Tap 0 Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) 2.79 Onions, Chopped 0.01 Garlic Clove 0 Ginger Root 0.01 Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, 0.15 Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground 0 Thyme, Fresh 0 Bay Leaf 0 Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked 1.83 Leeks, Boiled, Drained 0.1 0.2 Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked 0.12 Juice, Lemon 0.02 CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain 0 0 FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained 1.21 Water, Tap 0 Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted 11.5 HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted 0 Item Name Banana Oatmeal, Cooked with Water Nuts, Walnut, English, Chopped Soymilk, Original and Vanilla, Light, Unsweetened, with Added Calcium, Vitamins A and D Water, Tap Bread, Pita, Whole Wheat Cheese, Brie Apple, Medium Chicken, Breast, Meat and Skin, Boneless, Roasted Spinach, Chopped, Raw Tomatoes, Red Hummus Onions, Red, Sliced Avocado, California Water, Tap Oil, Sunflower (< 60% Linoleic) Onions, Chopped Garlic Clove Ginger Root 22.33 Potas(mg) 361.58 81.9 31.26 142.15 2.37 108.8 43.09 194.74 104.18 167.4 145.76 106.39 32.96 474.44 2.37 0 58.4 12.03 8.3 3,507.61 Calcium(mg) 7.11 0 9.2 5.43 0.32 8.5 1.26 3.24 5 58.12 6.24 28.13 1.48 0.92 66.7 20 35.1 7.11 128.96 0 733.72 Zinc(mg) 0.15 1.17 0.22 0.12 0 0.97 0.67 0.07 0.43 0.16 0.1 0.67 0.04 0.64 0 0 0.07 0.03 0.01 9.71 Iron(mg) 0 0 0.08 0.05 0.01 0.59 0.01 0.14 0.26 0.85 0.23 1.66 0.3 0.01 0.18 0.9 0.4 0 1.85 1.08 16.01 Sodium(mg) 1.01 4.68 0.14 76.54 7.11 340.48 178.32 1.82 30.19 23.7 3.08 148.83 0.69 7.49 7.11 0 1.6 0.51 0.26 1,192.99 Magn(mg) 2.37 0 4 0.75 0.86 16.44 0.26 1.28 0.72 41.11 2.91 27.55 15.74 0.92 0 0 11.7 2.37 135.72 0 501.06

DA Plus 10 Page:

Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average Item Name Chicken, Breast, Meat Only, Boneless, Skinless, Roasted Allspice, Ground Thyme, Fresh Bay Leaf Squash, Winter, Butternut, Baked Leeks, Boiled, Drained Beans, Chickpeas, Garbanzo or Bengal Gram, Boiled Rice, Brown, Wild, Cooked Juice, Lemon CABOT Yogurt, Greek Style, Plain FRESH EXPRESS Salad, Organic, Baby Spinach Potas(mg) 145.15 1.98 4.87 3.17 402.56 18.1 167.03 49.69 15.71 0 0 Zinc(mg) 0.57 0 0.01 0.02 0.18 0.01 0.88 0.66 0.01 0 0 Sodium(mg) 41.96 0.15 0.07 0.14 5.67 2.08 4.02 1.48 0.15 20.01 45

Carrots, Sliced, Boiled, Drained Water, Tap Almonds, Dry Roasted, Salted HIME Seaweed Sheets, Sushi Nori, Roasted 3,507.61

274.95 2.37 343.9 0

0.23 0 1.59 0 9.71

67.86 7.11 163.74 0 1,192.99

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Nov 04, 2012 Elsie Yao, yao.elsie@gmail.com Profile: Elsie Yao, 3 Day Average

Energy Balance for Nov 02, 2012, Nov 03, 2012


Date Nov 02, 2012 Nov 03, 2012 Total: Daily Caloric Summary Recommended: Average Intake: Average Expenditure: Average Net Gain/Loss: kCal Consumed 2068 1781 3849 kCal 1609 1924 1472 452 kCal Burned 1472 1472 2944 Net kCal 596 309 905

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Bibliography http://www.choosemyplate.gov/ http://cengagebrain.com/ http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/new_dash.pdf. http://ods.od.nih.gov/Health_Information/Dietary_Reference_Intakes.aspx., http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all/ http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/atpiii/calculator.asp http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity %20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/5_Summary%20Table%20Tables%201-4.pdf

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