Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 107

CHAPTER-I

INTRODUCTION
Consumer is the most important person. The business revolves around the consumer. All of us are consumers. We consume things of daily use; we also consume and buy these products according to our needs, preferences and buying power. These can be consumable goods, durable goods, specialty goods or, industrial goods.

What we buy, how we buy, where and when we buy, in how much quantity we buy depends on our perception, self concept, social and cultural background and our age and family cycle, our attitudes, beliefs values, motivation, personality, social class and many other factors that are both internal and external to us. While buying, we also consider whether to buy or not to buy and, from which source or seller to buy. In some societies there is a lot of affluence and, these societies can afford to buy in greater quantities and at shorter intervals. In poor societies, the consumer can barely meet his barest needs.

The marketers there fore try to understand the needs of different consumers and having understood his different behaviors which require an in-depth study of their internal and external environment, they formulate their plans for marketing.

Management is the youngest of sciences and oldest of arts and consumer behavior in management is a very young discipline. Various scholars and academicians concentrated on it at a much later stage. It was during the 1950s, that marketing concept developed, and thus the need to study the behavior of consumers was recognized. Marketing starts with the needs of the customer and ends with his satisfaction. When everything revolves round the customer, then the study of consumer behavior becomes a necessity. It starts with the buying of goods. Goods can be bought individually, or in groups. Goods can be bought under stress (to satisfy an immediate need), for comfort and luxury in small quantities or in bulk. For all this, exchange is required. This exchange is usually between the seller and the buyer. It can also be between consumers.

Consumer behavior can be defined as the decision-making process and physical activity involved in acquiring, evaluating, using and disposing of goods and services.

This definition clearly brings out that it is not just the buying of goods/services that receives attention in consumer behavior but, the process starts much before the goods have been acquired or bought. A process of buying starts in the minds of the consumer, which leads to the finding of alternatives between products that can be acquired with their relative advantages and disadvantages. This leads to internal and external research. Then follows a process of decision-making for purchase and using the goods, and then the post purchase behavior which is also very important, because it gives a clue to the marketers whether his product has been a success or not. To understand the likes and dislikes of the consumer, extensive consumer research studies are being conducted. These researches try to find out: What the consumer thinks of the company services and those of its competitors? How can the service be improved in their opinion? How the customers use the services? What is the customers attitude towards the service and its advertising? What is the role of the customer in his family?

Consumer behavior is a complex, dynamic, multidimensional process, and all marketing decisions are based on assumptions about consumer behavior.

Marketing strategy is the game plan which the firms must adhere to, in order to outdo the competitor or the plans to achieve the desired objective. In formulating the marketing strategy, to sell the product effectively, cost-benefit analysis must be undertaken.

There can be many benefits of a product, for example, for owning a motor bike one can be looking for ease of transportation, status, pleasure, comfort and feeling of ownership. The cost is the amount of money paid for the bike, the cost of maintenance, gasoline, parking, risk of injury in case of an accident, pollution and frustration such as traffic jams. The difference between this total benefit and total cost constitutes the customer value. The idea is to provide superior customer value and this requires the formulation of a marketing strategy.

The entire process consists of market analysis, which leads to target market selection, and then to the formulation of strategy by juggling the product, price, promotion and distribution, so that a total product (a set of entire characteristics) is offered. The total product creates an image in the mind of the consumer, who undergoes a decision process

This leads to the outcome in terms of satisfaction or dissatisfaction, which reflects on the sales and image of the product or brand

The process of decision-making varies with the value of the product, the involvement of the buyer and the risk that is involved in deciding the product/ service. The consumer and his life style is influenced by a number of factors shown all around the consumer. These are culture, subculture, values, demographic factors, social status, reference groups, household and also the internal make up of the consumer, which are consumers. Emotions, personality motives of buying, perception and learning.

Consumer is also influenced by the marketing activities and efforts of the marketer.

All these factors lead to the formation of attitudes and needs of the consumer.

Research Methodology
Research is an art of scientific investigation through search for new facts in any branch of knowledge. It is a moment from known to unknown. Research always starts with a question or a problem. Its purpose is to find answers to questions through the application of the scientific method. It is a systematic and intensive study directed towards a more complete knowledge of the subject studied

As marketing does not address itself to basic or fundamental question, it does not qualify as basic research. On the contrary, it tackles problems, which seem to have immediate commercial potential. In view of the major consideration, marketing research should be regarded as applied research. We may also say that marketing research is of both types problem solving and problem oriented.

Marketing research is as systematic and objectives study of the problems pertaining to the marketing of the goods and services. It may be emphasized that it is not restricted to any particular area of marketing, but is applied to all the phases and aspects.

NEED FOR THE STUDY


Customer satisfaction survey can help the management the cause that affects the productivity like poor quality services at the work. Another reason for conducting the study is to know the effectiveness of various benefit programs towards fulfillment of the customer satisfaction. The satisfaction survey can identify specify group of the customers for which special programs maybe advised for redressing their dissatisfaction. Today marketing plays a very important role to carry business operations, effective presentation of company and companys product in connection with the competitive world. I am very much interested to do a project on marketing because its very challenging task.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY


This study includes direct interaction with the customer and helps us to know market potentials and customer satisfaction levels to great accuracy. The study is of great importance to the company which will know about the customer performance. The company will gain information about the customers performance depending on the following factors: cleanliness price factors Entertiment Shoping Resorts Mechinical rides Water rides Restaurents

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

To determine the present position and satisfaction of customers in Haailand To know the satisfaction and perception of the customers. To ascertain the satisfaction level and its influences. To study the whether the satisfied with their services. To provide suggestions, in improving the customers satisfaction on Haailand services.

METHODOLOGY SOURCES OF DATA


PRIMARY DATA
It is the information collected direct from the field. The main source of information is collected through direct communication with officers, customers and respondents by asking about required information.

SECONDARY DATA
The data of Haailand is been taken from its website, company reports, which are been collected from the above mentioned sources have been as per requirement of study.

IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY


This study helps me to know whether the company has satisfied its customers or not This study helps me to analyze the practical applicability of Sales Promotion. To know the effectiveness of Sales. To analyze the factors that influences the Sales Promotion and also channels member and their attitude towards the organization. Any large organization is supposed to carry out market researches and any market research is important as all the future actions are based on the result from these researches study.

SAMPLING
Sampling is the process of the learning about the population on the Basis of a sample. Sample is that part of the universe which we select for the Purpose of investigation. A sample should exhibit the characteristics of the Universe. It should be micro some a word which literally means small universe.

SAMPLE SIZE
It was decided to choose 100 samples of the consumes through Convenient sampling and administer the questionnaire for the respondents.

TOOLS FOR COLLECTION OF DATA


Tests, cumulative record cards, schedule, questionnaire, pre-Testing the questionnaire and pilot study are different tools to help for collection of data .

QUESTIONNARIE
Questionnaire construction is an art. A good questionnaire is the Product of long and painstaking work. Questionnaires are used primarily in making status studies of current practices and in conducting opinion polls and Surveying attitudes. The questionnaire is by far the most common Instrument In collecting primary data: broadly speaking a questionnaire consists of set Questions presented to respondents for their answers.

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDTY


The study is made with the following limitations:

Due to the scarcity of time only limited data is been presented to form the dissertation work.

Because of transport difficulty only limited areas were selected for circulating the questionnaire.

The study which is presented in the dissertation is useful for the similar nature of purpose.

Most of the information presented in the dissertation is gathered from the limits which does not cover rural back ground people opinion which the decision that were included in the dissertation.

city may vary

HISTORY OF THEME PARKS AND HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY.

The hospitality industry consists of broad category of fields within the service industry that includes lodging, restaurants, event planning, theme parks, transportation, cruise line, and additional fields within the tourism industry. The hospitality industry is a several billion dollar industry that mostly depends on the availability of leisure time and disposable income. A hospitality unit such as a restaurant, hotel, or even an amusement park consists of multiple groups such as facility maintenance, direct operations (servers, housekeepers, porters, kitchen workers, bartenders, etc.), management, marketing, and human resources.

The hospitality industry covers a wide range of organizations offering food service and accommodation. The industry is divided into sectors according to the skill-sets required for the work involved. Sectors include accommodation, food and beverage, meeting and events, gaming, entertainment and recreation, tourism services, and visitor information. Amusement park and theme park are terms for a group of entertainment attractions and rides and other events in a location for the enjoyment of large numbers of people. An amusement park is more elaborate than a simple city park or playground, usually providing attractions meant to cater to children, teenagers, and adults. Amusement parks evolved in Europe from fairs and pleasure gardens which were created for peoples recreation. The oldest amusement park in the world (opened 1583) is Bakken, at Klampenborg, north of Copenhagen, Denmark. In the United States, world's fairs and expositions were another influence on development of the amusement park industry.

In common language, theme park is often used as a synonym for the term 'amusement park'. A 'theme park' is actually a distinct style of amusement park, for a theme park has landscaping, buildings, and attractions that are based on one or more specific or central themes. A plurality of themes is not required to be considered a 'Theme' park. Despite the long history of amusement parks, where many parks have traditionally incorporated themes into the evolving design and operation of the park, qualifying a park as a theme park, the first park built with the original intension of promoting a specific (or exclusive set of) theme(s), Santa Claus Land (currently known as Holiday World &Splashing' Safari) located in Santa Claus, Indiana, did not open until 1946. Disneyland, located in Anaheim, California, built around the concept of encapsulating multiple theme parks into a single amusement park is often mistakenly noted as the first themed amusement park.

Thrill rides There is a core set of thrill rides which most amusement parks have, including the enterprise, tilt-a-whirl, the gravitron, chair swing, swinging inverter ship, twister, and the top spin. However, there is constant innovation, with new variations on ways to spin and throw passengers around appearing in an effort to keep attracting customers. Water rides Amusement parks with water resources generally feature a few water rides, such as the log flume, bumper boats, rapids and rowing boats. Such rides are usually gentler and shorter than roller coasters and many are suitable for all ages. Water rides are especially popular on hot days.

Since the 1980s, the amusement park industry has become larger than ever before with everything from large, worldwide type theme parks such as Disneyworld and Universal Studios Hollywood to smaller and medium-sized theme parks such as the Six Flags parks and countless smaller ventures in many of the states of the U.S. and in countries around the world. Even simpler theme parks directly aimed at smaller children have emerged, including Lego land opened in 1999 in Carlsbad, California (the first Lego land opened in 1968 in Billund, Denmark). The only limit to future theme park ventures is one's imagination. Amusement parks in shopping malls began in the 1990s[blending traditional amusement park entertainmentsroller coasters, water parks, carousels, and live entertainmentwith hotels, movie theaters, and shopping facilities. Examples of giant mall parks are West Edmonton Mall, Alberta, Canada; Pier 39, San Francisco; Mall of America, Bloomington, Minnesota.

Amusement park owners are also aware [of the need to satisfy their aging baby boomer customer base with more restaurants, landscaping, and gardens and live entertainment. Kenny wood has created in 1995 the "Lost Kenny wood" area with classic rides that recall the possibly more tranquil times of the early twentieth century[In 2001, Disney opened the Disneys which includes Paradise Pier, a recreation of the traditional seaside amusement park of yesteryear.

Family fun parks starting as miniature golf courses have begun to grow to include batting cages, go-karts, bumper cars, bumper boats and water slides. Some of these parks have grown to include even roller coasters, and traditional amusement parks now also have these competition areas in addition to their thrill rides. The popularity of theme parks has led to the increase of theming -- "the use of an overarching theme, such as western, to create a holistic and integrated spatial organization of a consumer venue" -- in non-theme park venues. While theme restaurants, casinos, and other themed spaces lack the rides and other features of theme parks, they owe much to the legacy of the theme lands and spatial organization that became popular in theme parks.

GLOBAL SCENARIO

US theme parks and attractions will see a decline in business, as their counterparts in emerging destinations, such as the Middle East, Africa and even Asia, are expected to grow, a top executive in this sector of travel and tourism has said.Majority of the growth will take place in the Middle East particularly in the booming markets of Dubai and everywhere in the United Arab Emirates, said Charlie Bray, president & CEO, International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions.

Within this expanding sector, the amusement and attractions segment is expected to contribute its own steady increase. Fueled by vibrant expansion in nations throughout the Middle East, Asia, and elsewhere, the global attractions and leisure business is expected to grow significantly.According to PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), the UAE has major projects planned in Ras Al Kamiah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Dubai land is expected to be the largest tourist destination in the Middle East with 22 different multi-million dollar projects planned, including theme parks from industry leaders like Six Flags, Universal and Anheuser Busch, the first golf course designed by Tiger Woods and the Dubai Snow dome which offers year-round skiing.

On top of revenue increases, PwC forecasts visitations will grow by 3.9 percent on a compounded annual basis, reaching 2012 by 2012. Elsewhere in the Middle East, the World Gardens theme complex in Qatar is poised to host new family recreation centers in Saudi Arabia.Further, Bray said upward trend in industry growth is to follow the economic boom in and around the Middle East At the broadest level, some regional analysts are projecting upwards of $3 trillion in spending on leisure and tourism projects and supporting infrastructure over the next twenty years, he said.

Within this overall tourism sector, current estimates put the regions attractions, entertainment, and leisure segment at $10 billion in annual revenues already, with yearly growth at 20-25 percent. These projections are bolstered by reports from our industry of 5-10 percent of all new retail space being dedicated to family entertainment and amusement offerings, and by the several billions of dollars in investment already committed to building Middle East parks and attractions, said Bray. In fact, the potential for more and more visitors to this regions attractions is so great that PricewaterhouseCoopers anticipates the $50 million in guest spending at parks and attractions in the Middle East in 2009 will swiftly quadruple to over $200 million a year by 2011. The reason, clearly, is the sheer number of exciting and incredible projects on the horizon, said the CEO of IAAPA.

In addition to Dubai land and all its dazzling elements, including Restless Planet and Universal Studios Dubai land, other parks and attractions soon to open in the coming years include Ferrari World in Abu Dhabi, Entertainment City in Qatar, Aqua venture Water park at Atlantis on The Palm in Dubai, a Warner Brothers-themed park in Abu Dhabi, the WOW RAK theme park complex in Ras Al Khaimah, a Paramount Picturesbranded theme park in Dubai. Recent openings in Arabia include the Lost Paradise of Dilmun Water Park in Bahrain, and the E-Zone entertainment center at the City Stars Cairo complex in Egypt.

Most, if not all, of these projects are part of super-destinations and mega-resorts, whose rise within our industry have taken themed immersion to a whole new level and will likely influence its development for years to come. Combining rides, shopping, water activities, entertainment, dining, and hotels all in one site is a great way to satisfy many vacationers desires for some variety in their stay, and thus extend that stay into a complete escape of 3, 4, 5, even 7 days, Bray added. Critics of these projects in Dubai however say the major challenge lies in operating the parks and traffic flow control.

Aside from major staffing issues in the region, the Arabian mentality of little or no control from the expat park staffers may pose problems and risk. Middle Easterners arent used to being controlled to stay in line or follow traffic flow systems imposed by overseas workers (say from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka or Philippines who will staff these park ride positions). It may be chaos, said some Dubai residents who requested anonymity. Another is the high cost of living in Dubai. These parks will require tens of thousands of workers who may have to contend with the low pay, cramped housing and exorbitant living conditions in Arabias most expensive cities. Infrastructure-wise, there may be no problem building up these investments vertically. However, running the attractions themselves is a different story.

INDIAN SCENARIO
Investments to the tune of Rs 10,000 crore are likely to flow into the domestic amusement park and leisure sector by 2020 with about 500 new amusement parks are expected to come up across the country by then, an industry body has said.

Currently the Indian Amusement industry is of Rs. 4,000-crore and the leisure industry expects fresh investment of Rs 10,000 crore by the year 2020. In terms of employment generation, the new amusement parks are likely to create jobs for six crore man-hours per month. Global leaders in entertainment parks and attractions like Universal Studios, Disney, Sony and Ripley Entertainment are mulling over investments of billions of dollars in India considering the vast potential in this region. Private equity funds are also aggressively dedicating resources towards this sector. The domestic amusement park industry is estimated to grow by 10% per cent per annum till 2009-10.Robert E Masterson, chairman of Ripley Entertainment Inc, who visited India for the 8th IAAPI Amusement Expo said the worlds leading players would set up bases in India within the next five years. The opportunities and challenges are probably the greatest here. All leading players are quietly planning to enter India, a market where the rate of growth is five times of that of North America. India is the fastest growing region in the world, Masterson said. The Indian Association of Amusement Parks and Industries (IAAPI) will be organizing its 9th Amusement Expo 2009 in Mumbai from February 21st to 23rd February, 2009. The three-day event would see participation of over 50 exhibitors from Argentina, Belgium, Canada, China, Dubai, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy.

IAAPI is the only platform in the country, which recognizes and facilitates the small and big players in the Amusement Industry looking at the tremendous growth potential of this industry in the next 5 years Since the 1980s, the amusement park industry has become larger than ever before with everything from large, worldwide type theme parks such as Disneyworld and Universal Studios Hollywood to smaller and medium-sized theme parks such as the Six Flags parks and countless smaller ventures in many of the states of the U.S. and in countries around the world. Even simpler theme parks directly aimed at smaller children have emerged, including Legoland opened in 1999 in Carlsbad, California (the first Legoland opened in 1968 in Billund, Denmark). The only limit to future theme park ventures is one's imagination.

Amusement parks in shopping malls began in the 1990s[blending traditional amusement park entertainmentsroller coasters, water parks, carousels, and live entertainmentwith hotels, movie theaters, and shopping facilities. Examples of giant mall parks are West Edmonton Mall, Alberta, Canada.Kenny wood has created in 1995 the "Lost Kenny wood" area with classic rides that recall the possibly more tranquil times of the early twentieth century[In 2001, Disney opened the Disneys which includes Paradise Pier, a recreation of the traditional seaside amusement park of yesteryear.

Family fun parks starting as miniature golf courses have begun to grow to include batting cages, go-karts, bumper cars, bumper boats and water slides. Some of these parks have grown to include even roller coasters, and traditional amusement parks now also have these competition areas in addition to their thrill rides.

The popularity of theme parks has led to the increase of theming --"the use of an overarching theme, such as western, to create a holistic and integrated spatial organization of a consumer venue" -- in non-theme park venues. While theme restaurants, casinos, and other themed spaces lack the rides and other features of theme parks, they owe much to the legacy of the theme lands and spatial organization that became popular in theme parks.

For several years, there have been the emergence of a new type of theme parks, in which roller coasters are replaced by shows such as MdinatAlzahra in Tunisia and Puy du Fou in France (dealing with History).

Although domestic visitors still make up around 80 percent of admissions to theme and amusement parks, an aging population in the U.S. and a slowing economy in 2008 are forcing The Walt Disney Company and its competitors to seek their fortunes in emerging tourist markets such as in the Middle East and in China. The Walt Disney Company, accounts for around half of the total industry's revenue in the US as a result of more than 50 million adventure seekers pouring through the gates of its U.S.-based attractions each year.

GOVERNMENT POLICIES

1. The Government has introduced some reform policies to trigger the growth of entertainment industry in India. They are: 2. Allowing 100% FDI on advertising and film industry through regular channels 3. Authorizing 49% foreign stake in DTH and cable TV 4. Allowing establishment of unlinking destinations to private TV broadcasters for satellite unlinking from India 5. Certifying the repute of an industry to the movie sector 6. It has given its consent on the guidelines for Head end-in-the-Sky (HITS) operators, an equipment that will offer electronic cable content to Indian viewers 7. Permitting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in FM radio industry with a 20% restriction 8. Paving way for FM Radio functioning to the private sector 9. Including development projects of film industry in its five-year plans and allocating US$ 50.13 million to it.

HISTORY OF PARENT COMPANY

Agri Gold Group in the last 15 years focused its industrious mission on generating opportunities and promoting prosperity in rural and semi urban areas. Creating earning opportunities at multi levels has been its business approach in the last 15 years. Power, Tourism, Infrastructure and Agri Business are the core segments of the Group. Thus the group is emerging as a conglomerate tower on a strong foundation of its principles and concepts. Thus the turnover of this company is 5000crores. The success dossier ''AGRI GOLD'' has added another leaf by unfolding the strategic diversification into Leisure and Entertainment Industries by establishing cultural and entertainment destinations. In these destinations, where Temple Tourism of India with Buddhism and Hinduism comes alive, culture and entertainment will have the central focus in the thrilling and natural environs. Architects from Australia, creating the theme, will adopt the Traditional Temples and Buddhism architecture to recreate the past glories that give you an insight into the rich legacy. Strategically these destinations of Culture, Entertainment, Spirituality and Traditional Healing and Rejuvenation will be developed closer to the heritage places. Agri Gold Group of Companies, since 1995 has been making impressive forays into different sectors with its visionary approach.Team drive and conceptualized business. The success of the group is based on its ability to build on Forward and Backward Integration. Having the focus on providing Aaharam (Food), Aarogyam (Health and Wellness), Aavasam (Housing) and Aanandam (Entertainment) to the consumers, customers at large.Agri Gold Group in the last 15 years focused its industrious mission on generating opportunities and promoting prosperity in rural and semi urban areas. Creating earning opportunities at multi levels has been its business approach in the last 15 year. Agrigold Group since 1995, has had its corporate mission as the guiding principle, for all its planning. In seven years the company has grown into a diversified conglomerate and is steadily expanding into green field areas with that objective of investing into those sectors which promote ever green revolution in food, Nutrition and employment security.

The Group started its operations with the flagship company, AGRI GOLD FARMS LIMITED. Farming was the objective then but the activities expanded into every system of Agriculture, adopting scientific methods and the company gradually graduated into corporate cultivator.

Agri Gold is a blend of traditional knowledge with the latest technology Agri Gold opens up new avenues for multiple income generations.

The Agri Gold group has its firm faith in agriculture and agribased industries, which play a pivotal role in furthering and strengthening the economy of India. With the objectives clearly envisioned and defined, the group has begun its activities to promote corporate cultivation. In the words of Sri.V.R.RaoAvvas, CMD who has taken up the corporate objective as a mission to be fulfilled, My team and I will build this company as a dynamic and diversified conglomerate, which shall be ever growing empire, to promote evergreen revolution, in sectors, that are the catalysts for economic growth, which have multiplier effect on employment generation and socio-economic development of the rural and Semi-urban areas, adopting environment friendly technologies Agrigold Group expanded the activities into every system of agriculture and industry which sustain on another. Everything gets recycled and becomes a Valuable Product Somewhere.

The company with sustained growth as a strategic corporate plan diversified into businesses that keep up the Vibrancy of Expansion with credibility and quality as head and heart of the group.

PRODUCTS UNDER AGRIGOLD BRAND

Spices-whole & powders:- Turmeric powder, cumin powder, Black pepper powder, chili powder, coriander powder Dry curry leaves powder, Dry mango powder, Dry Methi leaves, Dry Pudina leaves, Garammasala, Sabji Masala, Chanamasala, Sambar powder, chicken masala, mutton masala, Biryani/pulav masala, Fishmasala, Rasam powder, Tea masala, Chat masala.

Instant chutney Mixes:- instant chutney mix (Fenugreek), Mint, Mango, Ginger, Amla, and Tomato. Instant Food Mixes:-Vadamix, Upmamix, RawaIdlli mix. RavvaDosa mix, Rice Idly, Dosamix. Instant mix Sweet Range: - Jilebi mix, Kesari Bath mix, Gulabjamun mix, vermicelli Kheermix. Magic Rice series: - Biryani Rice mix, TomatoRicemix, JeeraRicemix. Food Drink Additives:-Jaljeera, corn flour, Ragimillet Roasted & salted- Roasted Almonds, Roasted peanuts, roasted cashew nuts. Magic milk shake series- Banana milkshake mix, Elaichi, chocolate, Badam milk shake mixes. Custard powders- pineapple Flavor, Vanilla Flavor, strawberry Flavor. Pickles: - Mango Avakaipickle with Ginger & garlic (In oil) Mango Avakaipickle without Ginger (In oil) Gongura pickle (In oil), Mixed Vegetable pickle Amla pickle (In oil), Lemon pickle (In Juice).Tomato Pickle. Ready To Eat Indian Sweets:-Soanpapidi, Cashew Chikkie, Malailaddu, Badamchikkie, cashew burfie, BasinladduHalwa, cashew chikkie. Agri Gold Natures way:- Health and Body care products. Fair All Face packs Multhanimutti, Almonds, sandal, orange peal Face pack, Rose, cucumber. Agri Gold Fair n shine Herbal body pack. Agri Gold Hair care prodcts-shikakai products, soapnut Powder, moolika (Amla, HairoilBringaraja).

Heath care products: Diagold- For diabetie patients it is a boon Memogold- Promotes intellect and memory Femolix- For Effective stress management Ulciherb- Gas forgastric problems, lack of appetite and digestion it is a best solution. Emulikaoil - For external use only. It rubs off pain & inflammation.

And many wide varieties of herbal powders which promote good health. For Ex:-Aswagandha powder immunity builder, immuno-modulator Bringharaj powder Hepato protector and Hair Tonic etc., Organic Fertilizers:-Agri Gold Bioplus, Bioplus gold, Green shine, Agri Gold Lawn liner, Agri gold vermiplus, Holy cow dung etc., AgriGold Seeds:-Bhendiseeds, vegetable Seeds, Brinjal, Cucumber. Spiritual & Fragrance:-AgriGoldincensesticks, Poojasamagri, Rosewater Etc.

HAAILAND PROFILE

Arka Leisure and Entertainments Pvt. Ltd., is a subsidiary company of Agri Gold Estates and Entertainments Pvt. Ltd., an associate of Agri Gold Group. The well-reputed conglomerate is now promoting the proposed Cultural, Health and Family Entertainment Destination on the outskirts of Vijayawada. The brand name is HAAILAND. This was established on May 9th 2009, and founder of this organization was Mr.A.V.RAO. The main theme of this park is all about Buddhism and lot of Buddhism related architect. Haailand, named with the Telugu word 'Haai' meaning pleasure, will also provide to its visitors, physical and spiritual happiness in the ambience of the Buddhist theme; a place where one can be assured to get enchanted by the magical spells of probably the most wonderful amusement destination in South India.

They are 2 PHASES in this organization 1ST PHASE: ZONES WATER RIDES MECHANICAL RIDES FOOD COURTS SHOPPING VENDORS EVENTS BANQUETS

2ND PHASE: RESORTS SPA GYM CLUB HOUSE

ZONES

INDIA ZONE

Visitors to HAAILAND are greeted by the spectacular Sun Plaza with the centerpiece being the incredible Floating Buddha. This is an amazing engineering marvel with the figure of the Buddha suspended in midair by powerful jets of water from below. Along with this, the Bodhi Tree reaching for the sky in the middle of the Sun Plaza, is representative of the strong Buddhist theme That meanders through HAAILAND. Beautifully landscaped gardens, wide open areas and the serene ambience beckon you to experience the wonders within. Move further inside and walk down a cobbled pathway with shops on either side, offering arts and crafts from various countries across South East Asia as well as exquisite handicrafts sourced from different states

CHINA ZONE

This zone is themed upon the ancient Shaolin temples of China, which are Buddhist monasteries. Rail Chase Ride An indoor roller coaster set against the elaborate backdrop of the archaeological remains of the fabled 'Lost City', the thrilling ride takes visitors on a memorable trip through the legend of the last dragon in China and how Buddhist monks planned its end through their mystical powers.

CAMBODIA ZONE

The highlight of this zone is a monumental sunken Buddhist temple that forms the backdrop for a Wave Pool. You can access the roof by a spiral staircase located on either side of the entry tower, or by a suspension bridge over the wave pool. From here, you can either slide down to the pool or continue to explore the oriental features, including the misty jungles of Cambodia Wave Pool If you enjoy the beach, you'll love the Wave Pool with its artificially generated waves that are similar to the oceans. Surf a new wave of excitement!

THAILAND ZONE

The zone has the ambience of a traditional royal Thai palace and offers a glimpse of the majesty and splendor of the rich heritage of Thailand. The entire area is done up in colorful, caricature style making it an amusing and fun-filled sight. Family Train "All aboard" the multi-hued train as it chugs its way on a journey that runs through an impressive Thai palace.Frog Jump The only "Drop" ride at Haailand, it really takes your breath away. Go - Carting Experience the thrill of Formula One racing without the danger! Speed freaks can jump behind the wheel and get an adrenaline rush. Carousel The Merry-Go-Round with colorfully painted animals as seats is a perennial family favorite. Flying Elephant The vehicles in this ride are each shaped like the cute elephant and are mounted on articulated armatures connected to a rotating hub. Pirate Ship The amusement ride takes you on a breathtaking journey in an open, seated gondola which swings back and forth at an angle of 60 degrees either side. Swing Around An awesome combination of blazing colours and swirling motions, this ride lets passengers sit in chairs suspended by metal chains while it gently whirls them through the air in a fabulous flight of fun. Children Network Watch the kids have a screaming, squealing good time in a colorful environment with slides and a host of other activities. Bungy Jumping The 'jumper' is securely harnessed by mountaineering ropes to a unique elastic system.

TIBET ZONE

Ancient Buddhist monasteries and the beautiful mountains of Ladakh, come together to form an alluring backdrop in this zone. Visitors will be awe-struck by the replica of the Potala Palace, one of the world's most extraordinary buildings, and the brilliant thangkas, frescoes and images. Ghost Hunter For thrill seekers, this ride is an unforgettable experience. Ride in a classic steam train through an interior that is themed on a scientist's laboratory. The scientist has experimented with many new things, which result in his death. The pre-show is themed as a graveyard, while the post-show is themed as the coffin area of the scientist.Visionarium the pre-show is themed as Tibetan interiors. The post show is themed as a wild life area. Bumping Cars Deliberately dashing your car into another has never been so much fun! The electric powered cars are designed for absolute safety and give you the chance to indulge in 'road rage' with no risk. Its non-stop excitement all the way for the whole family! Magic Dancer The whirling, twirling attraction has the main platform turning even as the individual seats rotate in the opposite direction. With spectacular lighting, colours, music and action, the ride indeed gets you dizzy with fun! Crazy Jump Ready for 'heart in mouth' excitement? This intense thrill ride features individual seats that go up and down even as the entire ride rotates at a dizzying speed. Get your world to spin! Bull Fight See how long you can stay mounted on a bucking, tossing, turning, rotating mechanical bull. Come on cowboy; show 'em you're the king of the rodeo! Swing Around Feel the air in your hair as you begin to believe you can fly!

BURMA ZONE

In Burma you come across more Buddhist Stupas and temples than anywhere else in the world. This zone is themed on the elements of the famous Pagan Temples that are considered to be architectural marvels. Ladies Slide TowerScreened from the public and exclusively for ladies, this water slide allows the fairer sex to enjoy their share of fun and privacy. Children's Slide TowerThe gently sloping slide is perfect for kids who love to make a big splash in the water.

INDONESIA ZONE

The design of this zone is influenced by the ancient Buddhist architecture of temples and stupas found in Indonesia. It is predominantly based on the renowned Borobudur temple, considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the World. Men's Slide Tower One of the main attractions of the Water Park, this mammoth slide with its numerous twists and turns hurtles you into the water at top speed. Certainly a ride not for the faint hearted!

JAPAN ZONE

After all the fun and frolic, pause for a while to catch your breath. This zone has beautifully designed picnic-resting pavilions, themed after the famed teahouses of Japan, situated amidst a serenely peaceful Zen garden with tributaries of the Lazy River as the backdrop. The use of materials like bamboo, wood, rocks and pebbles complete the look and add to the ambience. Lazy River Take a relaxing raft ride on the gentle current of the meandering river, as it snakes its way through landscaped gardens and spraying fountains. Rain Dance When the days grow hot, sizzle with the moves of your favorite film star as the cool water sprinkles down. Rain Dance When the days grow hot, sizzle with the moves of your favorite film star as the cool water sprinkles down.

Amphitheatre Watch, admire and applaud the performances of renowned artistes from all over the world at the impressive Amphitheatre, with well-designed acoustics. The venue hosts cultural programmes, folk singing & dancing, puppet & magic shows, dance-dramas, troupes from abroad, traditional celebration of festivals etc.

BUTTERFLY ZONE It is of 3000 members capacity where functions can be taken place.

OBJECTIVES

The main business objective is to provide great entertainment to the entire family and corporate at economy prices. The ultimate goal of this project is to provide better entertainment to the customers and to create better employment for the talented people. Agri Gold Group's "Industrious Mission" is focused on Generating Opportunities and Promoting Prosperity in the Rural and Semi-Urban areas. Power, Tourism, Infrastructure and Agri business are the Core Segments of the Group. The Group is emerging as a 'Conglomerate Tower' on the Strong Foundation of achieving in Togetherness and celebrating the Success in Oneness. Agri Gold's Vision is to Promote Ever Green Revolution in these Sectors, that are the catalysts for Economic Growth, by involving in these areas of Endeavor which have the multiplier effect on Employment Generation and Socio- Economic Development of the Rural and Semi urban Areas by Generating opportunities and promoting prosperity while adopting Environmental friendly Technologies.

PRODUCTS OF HAAILAND
Water Rides Thrill rides Amphai theatre Food courts Shopping Museum Banquets halls Resorts Ayursukha

WATER RIDES

Wave Pool Rain Dance Lazy River Water Slides

THRILL RIDES OR MECHANICAL RIDES

GHOST HUNTER FAMILY TRAIN FLYING ELEPHANT FROG JUMP CAROUSEL RAIL CHASE RIDE PIRATE SHIP CRICKET SWING AROUND SUPER NET WORK CHILDREN NET WORK SPRING RIDES BUMPING CARS MAGIC DANCER BULL FIGHT GO-KARTING BUNGY JUMP

AMPHAI THEATRE

Watch, admire and applaud the performances of renowned artistes from all over the world at the impressive Amphitheatre, with well-designed acoustics. The venue hosts cultural programmes, folk singing & dancing, puppet & magic shows, dance-dramas, troupes from abroad, traditional celebration of festivals etc.

FOOD COURTS

At the heart of the park, you come across an awesome sight. Rising spectacularly from a water body is a huge domed structure thats an architectural tour de force. It houses the impressive food court that promises culinary nirvana, offering a melange of cuisines to satisfy the most hardcore foodie.To indulge the gourment in you, fine dining restaurants are located at various points across the park,where master chefs create wonders youll find impossible to resist. Whether your taste veers towards international fare-continental, Mexican, Italian, Chinese-or desiflavours-punjabi, chettinad, Andhra-you can be sure your appetite will be fully satiated and your taste-buds memorably tickled. FOOD COURTS Mamaiah Thinnai Monalisa Cleopatra Saanchi

SHOPPING

Take a break from the fun and excitement and indulge in a spot of retail therapy, the expansive shopping arcade, with shelf upon shelf of interesting gifts, souvenirs, handicrafts, accesorries, toys etc.lets you enjoy hours of pleasant browsing and bargain hunting. The best part is that you can shop at a leisurely pace, since the unique Night Bazaar is open till the early hours of the morning to extend the pleasure even more.The brand name given for the shopping mall is FREAKZ

MUSEUM
Haailand is not just about fun and games but is a destination that provides wholesome edutainmentValley of deluges-the museum, with its unique 3-d images manifesting life takes visitors on a memorable journey through key chapters of history, stretching from the hoary bygone era of satavahanas to the advent of Indias independence. The story board format traces the region history from 600 BC to the end of the British rule. The rich and glorious history interestingly portrayed and visually related is an enlightening experience that transports you to a wonderfully vivid path.

AYUR SUKHA

To keep you into pink of health and feeling rejuvenated, the ancient science of ayurveda has all the answers Just check-in at ayursukha at haailand,and surrender to the ethnic, age old therapies. Traditional doctors, expert masseurs and wellness trainers, through an effective blend of ayurveda, yoga and meditation, offer holistic cures for ailments from head to heel, while soothing and relaxing the mind. The salubrious envious contribute immeasurably to the feeling of well-being and making you feel like a whole new person

BANQUETS

When you have something special to celebrate,haailand is perfect venue. The well appointed banquet halls and conference rooms lend every occasion a sense of gracious style while the immaculate arrangements and catering help make the hosts work much easier. Haailand is the perfect destination for the smooth and impressive conduct of weddings, birthdays, product launches, annual dyas, conferences, company get-togethers, corporate retreats, outdoor parties etc.

Party Hall Name Rahula Koliya Sakhya Amrapali Asitha Yasodhara

Capacity 50 50 100 100 250 250

RESORTS

The Resort is set amidst 12 acres of beautifully landscaped gardens, incomparably designed with the architecture dating back to Buddhist era, seamlessly blending contemporary and traditional style while offering modern facilities. The resort lends itself very well to the twin cities I.e. Vijayawada & Guntur by offering the requisites suitable to a wide array of travellers with over 52 well appointed cottages, 9 boat houses located around a private island of sand.

The rooms are in three categories to suit the needs of discerning traveller whether it be business or pleasure. All the rooms and boat houses will have a bedroom and a private sitout with a tranquil view of the beautifully landscaped lawns, theme park, bird sanctuary. Skating rink,lawn Tennis court and the swimming pools. All the cottages are given individual names that are associated with the life of Gautama Buddha.

Rooms Deluxe: 32 well appointed deluxe rooms in 8 cottages. Over 250 Sft of living area with an additional 50 Sft of private sit out area. Business: 20 well appointed Business class rooms in 5 cottages. Over 300 Sift of living area and a spacious private setout of over 60 Sift. The bathrooms are equipped with a bath tub and a rain shower, Shaving mirror etc. Royal Suite: Shaped like a boat anchored around an island of sand with a well equipped pantry for the long staying guests, with an additional drawing room. The ceiling is also traditionally designed like a real boat and the bathrooms are fitted with a bathtub, shaving mirror. The rear deck of the boat will act as private setout area.

Room Tariff in Indian Rupees: Category Deluxe Business Class Royal Suit Single 3,000*/3,500*/5,000*/Double 3,500*/4,000*/5,000*/-

* Extra bed/Person Rs 700*/-. * 5% luxury tax & 5% Service charges applicable on the published tariff. * Our Check in / checkout time is 12 Noon

PRICES OF HAAILAND

General Packages: Ticket selling timings 6:30 P.M.-7:30 P.M. Price Rs.100/Valid For Entry (Visiting Only)

Water Rides @ Rs 250 /- : (Entry + Water Rides) (Timings-9:30 A.M.-6:30 P.M) Water Rides: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Wave Pool Lazy River Rain Dance Water Slides

Mega Fun Pack @ Rs 400 /- : (Entry + Water Rides + Dry Rides/Mechanical Rides) (Timings-9:30 A.M.-6:30 P.M) Royal Entry Pack @ Rs 600 /- : (Entry + All Rides) (Timings-9:30 A.M.-6:30 PM

School Package:

L.K.G. to 6th standard - Rs.300/- per head (Lunch + Mega fun Package + Tea & Snacks/Gift + Swim Suit)

7th to 10th standard Rs 350/-per head (Entry + Lunch +Water Rides + Mechanical Rides +Tea & Snacks/ Swim Suit)

College Package: Intermediate to Post Graduation - Rs.400/- per head (Entry + Mega fun Package + Tea & Snacks Swim Suit)

Group Members packages for park tickets: 25 to 100 Members - 10% Discount on park tickets only. 101 to 500 Members - 15% Discount on park tickets only. 501 & above - 20% Discount on park tickets only.

Banquet Package: Break Fast: Rs 75/- + Tax per head Lunch: Veg -Rs 350/- + Tax & Non-veg -Rs 450/- + Tax per head Hi-Tea: Rs 75/- + Tax per Head Dinner: Veg -Rs 350/- + Tax & Non-veg -Rs 450/- + Tax per head Tax @ 14.5% VAT

PROMOTION OF HAAILAND

Haailand is promoted by Arka Leisure and Entertainments, which is a subsidiary company of Agri Gold Estates and Entertainments, an associate of Agri Gold group. The group is a well-diversified conglomerate with business interests in tourism, power, infrastructure, Agri business, health & beauty care, media & publications, mining, chemicals and merchant exports. Promotional activities arte: Television News paper Pamphlets Posters / Flyers Radio

3-CET REPORT

CUSTOMERS
Customers are the KINGS of any organization. So they play a major role in success and improvement of the firm. Each and every individual is the customer to HAAILAND as they have different products with them to entertain people. Target customers of Haailand are all kind of age groups. Customers are mostly from different places mainly from Vijayawada, Guntur, and Tenali. Mangalgiri Corporate people Business people Children Men and women Students Organization

COMPETITORS

Haailand is theme park which does not have any competitors in AP. But it has competitors regard to the resorts.

Competitors for resorts are:

UMA HOLIDAY INN. MANASASAROVAR. BHAVANI ISLAND.

BUSINESS ENVINORNMENT

Every business is influenced by the environment surrounding it as it cannot be done in vacuum. The environment of any business can be divided into: Micro Environment Macro Environment

Business is an economic activity which includes organized efforts of enterprise in supply of goods & services to consumers for sake of profits for organization. It generates employment & improves the quality of life of people, society and contributes for economic development of country. Micro environment factors: Competitors Suppliers Customers Human Resources

Macro environment factors: Political Environment Legal Environment Technological Environment International Environment Socio Cultural Environment

Environmental factors influences the businesses of the haailand are Geographical factors: The place where the park is located definitely influences the business. So park is established in an area of 100 acres land near chinnakakani and it is between Vijayawada and Guntur cities.

Demographic factors: The population in and around Vijayawada and Guntur are target customers for the haailand.

POPULATION OF PEOPLE AROUND HAAILAND Vijayawada population:25lakhs Guntur population:15lakhs Tenali population: 5lakhs Mangalagiri population: 5lakhs So approximately 50lakhs people are the target customers.

TECHNOLOGY

Technology plays a key role in any business. It cannot view that technology replaces man power but reduces the effort of humans and increases the productivity and efficiency. Due to many technological changes the impact of technology increased and it began to stand as the winning edge for the companies and gives competitive advantage to the company. This is been using a varied technology for the benefit of organization Technologies used: Walky talkies are been used by the internal staff and invoice employees for the fast communication. Cameras are also been used for the checking of the working conditions and many more they are 42 cameras Soft ware used: In the accounts section they use Java soft and in computers they use .

SWOT
STRENGHTS

a. b. c. d. e. f.

No competition Thrill rides Located in Midst of Guntur & Vijayawada Maintain relationship with old customers Hospitality Australian architect

WEAKNESS

a. b. c. d.

Water pollution No proper shades for relaxing No transportation High prices

OPPURTUNITIES

a. Expansion of business b. Future this can be used as a studio c. Adopt Enivinornmet friendly Technology

THREATS

a. b. c. d.

No safety in water rides Natural calamities Ground water pollution Threat from snakes.

ORGANISATION STRUCTURE
CHAIRMAN A.V. KUMAR

HUMAN RESOURCE

MARKETING HOSPITALITY

FINANCE

M.D.VENKATESWARA RAO

E.D

UDAY DINKAR

DIRECTOR KALYAN

AGM KANTA RAO

MANAGERS KIRAN KUMAR RAVI KUMAR

SENIOR MANAGER RANGANADH

ASSISTANT MANAGERS T.NARENDER (BANQUETING) ANAND (FRANCHISING) VINAY BHARATH (SALES)

CHAPTER-III Theoretical frame work


Customer satisfaction, a term frequently used in marketing, is a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. Customer satisfaction is defined as "the number of customers, or percentage of total customers, whose reported experience with a firm, its products, or its services (ratings) exceeds specified satisfaction goals."[1] In a survey of nearly 200 senior marketing managers, 71 percent responded that they found a customer satisfaction metric very useful in managing and monitoring their businesses.[1] It is seen as a key performance indicator within business and is often part of a Balanced Scorecard. In a competitive marketplace where businesses compete for customers, customer satisfaction is seen as a key differentiator and increasingly has become a key element of business strategy.[2] "Within organizations, customer satisfaction ratings can have powerful effects. They focus employees on the importance of fulfilling customers expectations. Furthermore, when these ratings dip, they warn of problems that can affect sales and profitability. . . . These metrics quantify an important dynamic. When a brand has loyal customers, it gains positive word-of-mouth marketing, which is both free and highly effective."[1] Therefore, it is essential for businesses to effectively manage customer satisfaction. To be able do this, firms need reliable and representative measures of satisfaction. "In researching satisfaction, firms generally ask customers whether their product or service has met or exceeded expectations. Thus, expectations are a key factor behind satisfaction. When customers have high expectations and the reality falls short, they will be disappointed and will likely rate their experience as less than satisfying. For this reason, a luxury resort, for example, might receive a lower satisfaction rating than a budget moteleven though its facilities and service would be deemed superior in 'absolute' terms."[1] The importance of customer satisfaction diminishes when a firm has increased bargaining power. For example, cell phone plan providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, participate in an industry that is an oligopoly, where only a few suppliers of a certain product or service exist. As such, many cell phone plan contracts have a lot of fine print with provisions that they would never get away if there were, say, a hundred cell phone plan providers, because customer satisfaction would be way too low, and customers would easily have the option of leaving for a better contract offer. There is a substantial body of empirical literature that establishes the benefits of customer satisfaction for firms.

Perceptions
Perception is defined as the "process by which an individual receives, selects and interprets stimuli to form a meaningful and coherent picture of the world". In customer satisfaction and service quality literature, perceptions are defined as the consumer's judgment of the service organizations performance instrument, is defined as the difference between perceptions and expectations. Many researchers in their process model of service quality, conceptualize customers' perception of each of the dimensions of service quality as a cumulative construct. This means that the perception is updated each time a customer is exposed to the service. They argue, therefore, that customer perceptions are not only influenced by expectations of the service but also by the regency of the service encounter. in her

analysis of student perceptions of study outcomes, asserts that the length of experience with an educational service can influence student perceptions. If two customers enter the encounter with different expectations, they would have different cumulative perceptions of the service, even if both customers experience an identical service. The main argument is that a person's expectations can change the way he.

it is important to understand the type of expectation of the customer in order to manage the perception of service quality and satisfaction.

The customer perceptions of post consumption performance are appraisals and feelings about a chosen alternative and consumers react to it on an objective (product or service-attribute) level as well as on a subjective (emotional) level and Because of this, researchers acknowledge diversity of perceptions as one of the most fundamental concepts in intercultural communication .perception is unique to each person, it being a three-step process of selection, organization and interpretation. It has also been found that perceptions differ due to differences in gender . physical environment of the service settings and cultural background These findings indicate that a clear understanding of how perceptions are formed is critical to any service business as it facilitates formulation of strategies to manage customer perceptions of service Performance In this study student perceptions of the performance of universities are based on "ideal" or "desired" expectations. Under the paradigm of s e r v i c e - r e c i p i e n t w h i c h considers students as customers universities need to be highly student-focused in their service delivery. The evaluation of the quality and performance of a service such as university education can take place only after experiencing or consuming because customers have limited tangible pre-choice cues. The perceptions formed during this evaluative process are key indicators of customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction .

44

Consumer decision making process


Consumer decision-making has been studied for over two decades and researchers have advanced multi-disciplinary theoretical and conceptual frameworks over time to interpret the complex process. The resulting models provide somewhat different views of the consumer's decision-making process. This section will review some of

45

the key models of consumer decision-making to provide a background to the model developed in the present study. Some of the well known and those representative of the broader perspective of consumer decision making include the Economic model, Passive model, Cognitive model and Emotional model

Economists were the first to develop comprehensive consumer models of decisionmaking seeking to understand the general economic system. These include contributions by Simon .Micro and Macro economists developed alternative views of consumers, though the fundamental assumptions remained the same. The economic theory of consumer decision-making behavior was based on the basic assumption of maximizing satisfaction of wants and needs with the available scarce resources .The passive model of consumer decision-making is different from the economic viewpoint as it is based on the belief that consumers are submissive to the self-serving interests and promotional efforts of marketers. In this context, consumers are perceived as impulsive and irrational purchasers, ready to yield to the arms and aims of marketers .

The cognitive model views consumers as information processing systems, actively seeking products and services that fulfill their needs and enrich their lives. This model focuses on the processes by which consumers seek and evaluate information about selected products and services and accept that the consumer does not make economically rational decisions. This model is widely applied in the marketing literature.

The emotional model follows the concept of consumer decision-making based on deep feelings and emotions or impulses. Such emotional purchase decisions place less emphasis on the search for pre-purchase information. The cognitive or problem solving model of decision-making has been identified at three levels - extensive problem solving, limited problem solving and reutilized response behavior. This model borrows from learning-theory

concepts to explain "brand-choice behavior over time as learning takes place and the buyer moves from extensive to reutilized problem-solving behavior" .

A more specific model of significance in explaining the consumer decision-making process is one the incorporated both products and services for high involvement decisions. Explores the extended problem solving decision process of a high professional service applicable to the higher education service for international students. Proposes a model reflecting the process of selecting colleges (universities) by high school students within the US. He described the university selection process as being essentially funnel-like.

A similar but more restricted study undertaken by the University of Wollongong presented an extended decision-making model confirming university selection as a multi-faceted process, based on the EBM model.

The emphasis of the above models is on the pre-choice (pre-purchase) phase of the consumer decision-making process. Though the focus of the model developed for the present study is the post-choice (post-purchase) stage of the consumer decision process, it draws heavily on the above models in regard to the theoretical concept and framework. have become inputs as some of the key variables for post-choice satisfaction measures, among the other variables operationalised.

Post-choice (Post-purchase) stage


Post-choice behavior of customers is largely related to the evaluation of the choice made by the customer. Consumers tend to rethink their decisions in the light of the experience with the product and service during this stage because of the uncertainty of the wisdom of their decisions Satisfaction is an important element in this evaluation process.

Post-choice phase of the decision making process which forms the basis of the model developed for the thesis. The post-choice phase of the decision making process is in bold outline and shaded areas represent the outcomes.

Articulates the impact of choice criteria and satisfaction drivers during this phase. He argues that there is a difference between the choice criteria and the satisfaction drivers. Therefore, consumer's satisfaction response is not influenced solely by the choice criteria, which are the variables responsible for making a choice, but also by other factors not related to the pre-choice stage. One supporting argument is that satisfaction results from the experience of feature or service performance and some of these pre-choice criteria may not provide the experience required to create a satisfaction response.

Post Choice Decision Making


This view is empirically supported by However, it is also argued that satisfaction thoughts were similar to evaluation thoughts, but were more oriented to a comparison against standards, viewed as prior expectations. In this context does not discount the positive impact of the choice criteria with regard to satisfaction in addition to the other satisfaction drivers,

This figure indicates that some variables influence choice strongly and they also can have an influence on satisfaction some moderately and others with lesser impact. Similarly, there are factors (variables), which are termed as satisfaction drivers in view of their strong influence on satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and can have moderate or lesser influence on choice. In between, there are factors, which can influence choice as well as satisfaction/dissatisfaction strongly and hence are termed as `dual influence factors' (variables).

Choice Criteria versus Satisfaction Drivers


In developing a model for the present study, these influences were tested during the exploratory stage and selected choice criteria/variables were used as comparison standards in the form of prior expectations of students to measure satisfaction. The final model, .

. Expectations and Perceptions paradigm

One of the widely discussed and tested approaches in measuring customer satisfaction is expectancy-disconfirmation model or its variants. Expectancy disconfirmation is a derivative of adaptation-level theory and says that customers compare actual product and service performance with their prior expectations. The paradigm postulates that customer satisfaction is related to the size and direction of disconfirmation, which is defined as the difference between the individual's pre-purchase (pre-choice) expectations (or some other comparison standard) and post-purchase (post-choice) performance of the product or service perceived by the customer .If expectations are met or exceeded, the customer is satisfied.

The inferred approach involves computing the discrepancy between expectations of performance and the evaluation of outcomes. This technique entails developing separate data sets relating to customer-service expectations and perceived performance. The scores for performance are then subtracted from those of expectations to form the third variable: the confirmation - disconfirmation (or difference) score, which is used in subsequent analysis

The direct approach, however, requires the use of summary judgment scales to measure confirmation and disconfirmation type scale of `better than expected' to `worse than expected'). The researcher does not need to calculate the `difference scores' as the respondents can be asked directly the extent to which the service experience exceeded, met or fell short of expectations

Despite its growing popularity, the expectancy-disconfirmation paradigm has received a great deal of theoretical and operational criticism; in particular for including expectations and for using difference scores in assessing. Most criticism has been

focused on the measurement bias, for example if expectations were measured after or even simultaneously with the service experience, the expectations would be biased by such experience.The problem would be if the experience were positive, the expectations would be overstated and if negative, it would be understated. In view of the above contamination, researchers recommend that the expectations should be solicited before the service experience as the expectations will be contaminated by perceptions of the actual service provided Some others, however, argue that measuring expectations before service experience can be problematic as the customer is likely to modify expectations during the service encounter and use those modified (perhaps more realistic) expectations as the standard of comparison the likelihood of the customer revising expectations based on the experience of the previous encounter is common in the hospitality industry. points out events that are completely unanticipated prior to a service encounter may become significant contributors to the consumers' overall dissatisfaction or satisfaction. The revision of expectations and its effects on the perceptions of performance of service delivery appears to be part of the satisfaction formation process not confined to one particular industry.

Argues that a measurement of expectations can lead to consistently high ratings being given by customers while maintain that customers when asked to indicate an expected level and an existing level seldom rate expected level lower than the existing level - a tendency to proclaim high expectations. If this is true, it will be very difficult to satisfy customers, as expectations can never be met or exceeded whether or not it is worthwhile including expectations in an instrument, as they may not produce responses significantly different from using the perception scores alone. Contrary to these observations, the use of expectation 'as a comparison standard in the measurement of customer satisfaction has wide support in the academic literature. The basic assumption in the expectancydisconfirmation paradigm is that a customer must have pre-purchase expectations to be able to experience disconfirmation of those expectations. If customers do not have wellformed expectations, researchers contend that such a measurement of expectations and thus disconfirmation may not be valid In other words a lack of experience with a service or lack of familiarity with a destination may cause expectations to be tentative and uncertain

51

Developed more-realistic expectations regarding trips and gave greater satisfaction ratings than did people without previous experience. The same would apply to postgraduate students who have had prior exposure to university education and therefore would form realistic expectations of the service delivery of the university.

Despite many criticisms, the expectancy-disconfirmation paradigm remains a popular and accepted framework for measuring satisfaction. .in their research employing a variety of techniques concluded that though the inferred method of expectancydisconfirmation paradigm is intuitively appealing, the calculated difference scores do not provide adequate information in predicting behavioral intentions. It is held that the difference scores (difference between expectation and perception of performance) do not present complete information on the varying degrees of satisfaction levels of customers .Identifying the degree to which the customer is satisfied provides a greater insight into the understanding of satisfaction.

To this end, the present study uses satisfaction scores derived from a ratio method of calculation to complement the difference (gap) scores to measure. The measurements used in this study are therefore based on three different satisfaction scores: the raw difference (gap) score, the arithmetic average ratio score, and geometric average of the ratio score, following the weighted average concept of approach.

The measurement of service quality has attracted a significant interest among marketing practitioners and researches over the past two decades Liu and In their pioneering study on service quality developed the instrument to measure service quality. The construct of service quality is defined in terms of 'perceived' quality - a customers'

judgment about the entity's overall excellence or superiority - an attitude that comes from a comparison of expectations and perceived performance .

Since its introduction, has been widely acclaimed as a major contribution to academic and particularly marketing research literature was originally used to assess customer perceptions of service quality in service and retailing organizations .It was presented as a synthetic scale with a correct level of reliability and validity useful in many service situations. The scale comprised two matched scales of 22 items, each describing expectations for a particular service category and then perceptions of a particular service provider .The expectations are not viewed as predictions (what is likely to happen), but as desires or wants of consumers (what should happen). Both sets of items are operationalised using a 7-point bi-polar scale labeled, Strongly Nearly half of the items are worded negatively with negative working indicated by The scale produced scores, for the total scale and each factor, ranging between minus 6 and plus 7, where the positive scores are reflected as perceptions exceeding expectations. The quality of service is assessed through this score, called the gap score computed by taking the difference for 1 to -7 scales and then averaged over the number of items either in the total scale or for each subscale . 97 Q (Pi = -

Ei) Where: Q = Perceived service quality Pi = Performance level perceived on attributer for the delivered service, and Er = Expected performance level on attribute for the service generally. 22 represent the number of questions used.

personnel, and communication materials; reliability to the ability to perform the promised service accurately and dependably; responsiveness to willingness to assist customers and provide prompt service; assurance to the knowledge and courtesy of employees and their ability to convey trust and confidence; and empathy to the caring; and individualised attention given to customers. The authors assert that the dimensions can be adapted to different service settings, depending on the nature of inquiry. The practical application of the measurement approach has been identified as one of the major strengths of over other measures. The other strengths of have been identified as:

the reliability and validity of the scale in comparing customers' expectations and perceptions over time; the ability to compare own scores against competitors; the relative importance of the five dimensions in influencing service quality perceptions; the potential use of measure in segmenting customers into several perceived quality segments (eg. High, Medium and Low, and the ability to analyse on the basis of (a) demographic (b) psychographic, and (c) other profiles; and the practical implications for companies to improve the global perception of its service quality

The growing popularity of the instrument among marketing practitioners and researchers is seen by the diversity of its application in research pursuits ranging from competitor analysis, segmentation, to customer profiling and covering the services, and manufacturing industries The major applications, however, were in the service industry.

Despite its popularity, is criticised on its operational and measurement problems. These include the use of P-E difference score as a measurement of perceived quality as opposed to performance based the type of expectations eg. desired or adequate, which would provide different satisfaction

responses .the link between satisfaction and service quality and the number and nature of the dimensions being inappropriate for some service industries such as product services and "pure" services . Responded to criticisms by some adjustments to the scale and its operation. On the issue of a performance based measure in preference to the disconfirmation based measure, argued that although the practice of measuring only perceptions to determine service quality is widespread, such a practice does not necessarily support the superiority of a performance based measure. This is because measurements that incorporate customer expectations provide richer information and have more diagnostic value. Conceding that there is a confusion with regard to the causal relationship between customer satisfaction and service quality, .acknowledge that recent research evidence support the view that service quality is an antecedent of customer satisfaction. Further, in regard to this type of comparison standard for measuring service quality, it is argued that the issue of comparison norms and their interpretation still remains unresolved and is being examined by many researchers.

The instrument used in the present study is an adaptation with refinements addressing the criticisms in the literature.

Model of Post-choice satisfaction


In developing a model for post-choice satisfaction among international students, this study treats post-consumption evaluation as a function of the initial choice decision, pre-choice variables (such as expectations), and post-choice responses (such as perceived performance and the gap between performance and expectations).

The two types of post-consumption evaluations that have received much attention in the consumer behaviour literature are overall evaluations of product or service quality and satisfaction judgement .In this thesis the focus is on the satisfaction in relation to the university as a study destination.

Post consumption evaluations are of interest because they influence consumers' repeat purchases, as well as the purchases of other potential consumers, through . The

satisfied students are likely to engage in positive ,recommend the institution to their friends and relatives, and enrol for additional courses or return as graduate students.

The universities are facing the challenge of rising student expectations of quality, service and value for money, and the need to increase the satisfaction level of their students to retain and improve international student numbers. Post-consumption evaluations assist universities to identify genuine student concerns regarding the performance of educational services and to develop strategic responses through programs that satisfy the exact needs of students. On the basis that post consumption evaluations are influenced by pre-choice expectations, perceived performance and disconfirmation.

It is based on the confirmation/disconfirmation of perceptions of service quality variables that influence the satisfaction of the international postgraduate students from China, India, Indonesia and Thailand. The first phase involves the identification Of the variables, while the second phase examines the correlation and co-efficiency of these variables, leading to factors of importance that result in. The third phase accounts for the final outcome of through the process of confirmation/disconfirmation of perceptions of service performance of the university, measuring the gap between expectations and perceptions.

Hypotheses
Several hypotheses are developed to address the main research question and are tested using the above model. The rationale and the purpose of the hypotheses are outlined below.

Halstead and Hartman propose that the higher education setting is comprised of a variety of service inputs to produce the entire education process. The ability of university students to form pre-experience comparison standard for an unfamiliar, complex service that contains multiple sources of satisfaction can vary. Moreover, the effect of cultural differences in the evaluation of service encounters and levels of satisfaction have been reported and Given that the sample of student groups come from different cultural backgrounds, it is likely that the evaluation of the university
56

services will vary among the postgraduate international students from China, India, Indonesia and Thailand and thus the likelihood of differences in the rating of and the importance placed on individual variables, and consequently in the level of satisfaction, is high. This is the justification for the first three hypotheses, which are presented below.

The fourth hypothesis is developed to explain the relationship between the level of satisfaction and different universities. Many satisfaction studies in international education have acknowledged several factors to influence the choice of a particular university by international students (Townley, 2001; Guolla, 1999; Kwan, 1999). These factors range from the reputation of the university, academic quality, computer and Library facilities, diversity and appropriateness of study programs, tuition fees and overall customer value provided by the institution, supported by positive found that factors like the possession of international strategic alliances or coalitions and offshore teaching programs, among others, provide universities with a competitive edge to become more attractive and marketable to international students. He also reported that there were variances in the delivery of services by universities depending on their size, capacity, customer orientation, which would have an impact on student satisfaction.

Given the likely variances in the delivery of services by the five Victorian universities chosen for this study, and the variances in the post-choice evaluation of students from the target countries, it is presupposed that the satisfaction levels of students in the universities will differ according to the nature of services provided by each university. Hence the following hypothesis:

The present study examines the relationship between the age and the duration (length) of enrolment (measured by the number of semesters completed) and the level of satisfaction of students. The following age categories were operationalised: between. Rautopuro and Vaisanen in their study of non-traditional students at a Scandinavian university, found that the university experience differs between age groups, in particular between the non-traditional age (older or mature) students and their younger counterparts. Mature students tend to be more attentive in their studies and

57

moderate in their behaviour. Married students are believed to share these characteristics.

The length of the university experience is a contributory factor to the variance in the level of satisfaction as it is accepted that satisfaction formation is a cumulative experience Bounding and Thus, the following three hypotheses are constructed.

58

The present study also investigates the impact of the gender of the postgraduate international students on the level of satisfaction. Deux and Major argued that the behaviour of men and women differ widely as a function of personal choice, although they are relatively equal in their potentialities for most behaviours. Bern also acknowledged the differences in the behaviour of men and women in many situations. In light of the foregoing explanation, the following hypothesis is put forth:

Examined the effects of course characteristics and the level of course (degree) on student evaluations. The results indicated that there were substantive differences in the academic discipline groups and the levels of the courses in terms of the ratings given on service quality. The present study examines the relationship between the field of study and the type (or level) of degree and student satisfaction. The categories of fields of study are based on classifications, while the level of study (or type of degree) was based on five recognised classifications. The investigation is aimed at identifying the potential differences in student satisfaction between these classifications. Hence the following two hypotheses are advanced.

International postgraduate students finance their studies from two major sources. The first source is private funding either from the family or from personal finances. The second source is third party funding, either from an employer sponsorship or a government scholarship. The present study aims to identify the relationship between these sources of funds and student satisfaction. Accordingly, the following hypothesis is submitted.

Customer Satisfaction in 7 Steps:


It's a well-known fact that no business can exist without customers. In the business of Website design, it's important to work closely with your customers to make sure the site or system you create for them is as close to their requirements as you can manage. Because it's critical that you form a close working relationship with your client, customer service is of vital importance. What follows are a selection of tips that will make your clients feel valued, wanted and loved. 1. Encourage Face-to-Face Dealings This is the most daunting and downright scary part of interacting with a customer. If you're not used to this sort of thing it can be a pretty nerve-wracking experience. Rest assured, though, it does get easier over time. It's important to meet your customers face to face at least once or even twice during the course of a project. My experience has shown that a client finds it easier to relate to and work with someone they've actually met in person, rather than a voice on the phone or someone typing into an email or messenger program. When you do meet them, be calm, confident and above all, take time to ask them what they need. I believe that if a potential client spends over half the meeting doing the talking, you're well on your way to a sale.

2. Respond to Messages Promptly & Keep Your Clients Informed:


This goes without saying really. We all know how annoying it is to wait days for a response to an email or phone call. It might not always be practical to deal with all customers' queries within the space of a few hours, but at least email or call them back and let them know you've received their message and you'll contact them about it as soon as possible. Even if you're not able to solve a problem right away, let the customer know you're working on it.

A good example of this is my Web host. They've had some trouble with server hardware which has caused a fair bit of downtime lately. At every step along the way I was emailed and told exactly what was going on, why things were going wrong, and how long it would be before they were working again. They also apologies repeatedly, which was nice. Now if they server had just gone down with no explanation I think I'd have been pretty annoyed and may have moved my business elsewhere. But because they took time to keep me informed, it didn't seem so bad, and I at least knew they were doing something about the problems. That to me is a prime example of customer service.

3. Be Friendly and Approachable:


A fellow Site Pointer once told me that you can hear a smile through the phone. This is very true. It's very important to be friendly, courteous and to make your clients feel like you're their friend and you're there to help them out. There will be times when you want to beat your clients over the head repeatedly with a blunt object - it happens to all of us. It's vital that you keep a clear head, respond to your clients' wishes as best you can, and at all times remain polite and courteous.

4. Have a Clearly Defined Customer Service Policy:


This may not be too important when you're just starting out, but a clearly defined customer service policy is going to save you a lot of time and effort in the long run. If a customer has a problem, what should they do? If the first option doesn't work, then what? Should they contact different people for billing and technical enquiries? If they're not satisfied with any aspect of your customer service, whom should they tell? There's nothing more annoying for a client than being passed from person to person, or not knowing who to turn to. Making sure they know exactly what to do at each stage of their enquiry should be of utmost importance. So make sure your customer service policy is present on your site -- and anywhere else it may be useful.

5. Attention to Detail (also known as 'The Little Niceties'):


Have you ever received a Happy Birthday email or card from a company you were a client of? Have you ever had a personalized sign-up confirmation email for a service that you could tell was typed

from scratch? These little niceties can be time consuming and aren't always cost effective, but remember to do them. Even if it's as small as sending a Happy Holidays email to all your customers, it's something. It shows you care; it shows there are real people on the other end of that screen or telephone; and most importantly, it makes the customer feel welcomed, wanted and valued.

6. Anticipate Your Client's Needs & Go Out Of Your Way to Help Them Out:
Sometimes this is easier said than done! However, achieving this supreme level of understanding with your clients will do wonders for your working relationship. Take this as an example: you're working on the front-end for your client's exciting new ecommerce endeavor. You have all the images, originals and files backed up on your desktop computer and the site is going really well. During a meeting with your client he/she happens to mention a hardcopy brochure their internal marketing people are developing. As if by magic, a couple of weeks later a CD-ROM arrives on their doorstep complete with high-resolution versions of all the images you've used on the site. A note accompanies it, which reads: "Hi, you mentioned a hard-copy brochure you were working on and I wanted to provide you with large-scale copies of the graphics I've used on the site. Hopefully you'll be able to make use of some in your brochure." Your client is heartily impressed, and remarks to his colleagues and friends how very helpful and considerate his Web designers are. Meanwhile, in your office, you lay back in your chair drinking your 7th cup of coffee that morning, safe in the knowledge this happy customer will send several referrals your way.

7. Honor Your Promises:


It's possible this is the most important point in this article. The simple message: when you promise something, deliver. The most common example here is project delivery dates. Clients don't like to be disappointed. Sometimes, something may not get done, or you might miss a deadline through no fault of your own. Projects can be late, technology can fail and subcontractors don't always deliver on time. In this case a quick apology and assurance it'll be ready ASAP wouldn't go amiss.

Summary
This chapter has presented the theoretical and conceptual framework associated with the study based on past research. A preliminary model of post choice satisfaction was developed as a basis of analysis and dominant concepts surrounding the model were discussed. A detailed analysis of two dominant theoretical concepts - expectations and perceptions - were undertaken as part of an overview of the expectancy confirmation and disconfirmation paradigm, and the measure of service quality, which form the basis of this study. Eleven hypotheses were developed to address the research question and will be tested in the final model of post-choice satisfaction.

The following chapter will discuss the method employed for the study and the preliminary analysis of the data.

CHAPTER-V Data analysis & Interpretation


INTERPRETATION:
Interpretation means drawing inferences form the collected facts after The analytical study. According to C. William Emory interpretation has two major aspects namely establishing continuity in research through linking the results of a given study with those of another and the establishment of some Relationship with the collected data. Moreover, interpretation helps the target audience to understand the real significance of significance of his research findings.

Percentages, a technique of interpretation, have been used in my research. Percentages are used in making comparison between two or more series of data.

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS


TABLE 4.1: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SOURCES OF AWARWNESS

OPINION Media Pamphlets Word of mouth All Total

NO.OF RESPONDENT 65 9 18 8 100

% OF RESPONDENT 65% 9% 18% 8% 100%

Interpretation

1. 2. 3. 4.

65% of the customers knew about the Haailand through media 9% of the customers knew about the Haailand through pamphlets 18% of the customers knew about the Haailand through word of mouth 8% of the customers knew about the Haailand through All.

GRAPH 4.1 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SOURCES OF AWARWNESS
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Media Pamphlets Word of mouth All 9 18 8 65

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of above graph 4.1 that majority of the customers knew about Haailand through advertisements through Media.

TABLE 4.2:

OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE PACKAGES IN HAAILND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Water rides

48

48%

Mega fun

28

28%

Royal entry

24

24%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
48% of the customers feel that water rides package is best, 28% of the customers feels that mega fun package is best and 24% of the customers feels that royal entry package is best one.

GRAPH 4.2 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE PACKAGES IN HAAILAND

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Water rides Mega fun Royal entry 28 24 48

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the graph 4.2 that majority of the customers felt water rides package is best in Haailand

ABLE 4.3: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE MECHANICAL RIDES IN HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Excellent

55

55%

Very good

30

30%

Good

12

12%

Bad

3%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation

1. 2. 3. 4.

55% of the customer opined that the mechanical rides is excellent 30% of the customer opined that the mechanical rides is very good 12% of the customer opined that the mechanical rides is good 3% of the customer opined that the mechanical rides is bad

GRAPH 4.3 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF THE MECHANICAL RIDES IN HAAILAND CUSTOMERS REGARDING

60 50 40 30 20 30 10 12 0 Excellent Very good Good 3 Bad

55

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.3 that majority of the customers felt mechanical rides is excellent

TABLE 4.4: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE PREFERENCE ON MECHANICAL RIDES IN HAAILAND NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT % OF RESPONDENT

Pirate ship

35

35%

Rail chase ride

45

45%

Crazy jump

8%

Family train

12

12%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation 1. 35% of the customers are preferring pirate ship mechanical ride 2. 45% of the customers are preferring rail chase ride 3. 8% of the customers are preferring crazy jump 4. 12% of the customers are preferring family train

GRAPH 4.4 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE PREFERENCE ON MECHANICAL RIDES IN HAAILAND

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Pirate ship Rail chase ride Crazy jump Family train 8 12 35 45

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data graph 4.4 that majority of the customers preferred rail chase ride.

TABLE 4.5: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING SATISFACTION WITH THE WATER RIDES IN HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Yes

86

86%

No

14

14%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 86% of the customers satisfied with the water rides 2. 14% of the customers are not satisfied with the water rides

GRAPH 4.5 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING SATISFACTION WITH THE WATER RIDES IN HAAILAND

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Yes no 14 86

INTERPRETATION:
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.5 that majority of the customers satisfied with the water rides in Haailand

TABLE 4.6: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING PREFERRENCE ON WATER RIDES IN HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Wave pool

30

30%

Lazy river

16

16%

Rain dance

45

45%

Water slides

9%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation 1. 30% of the customers preferred wave pool in water park 2. 16% of the customers preferred lazy river in water park 3. 45% of the customers preferred rain dance in water park 4. 9% of the customers preferred water slides in water park

RAPH 4.6 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING PREFERRENCE ON WATER RIDES IN HAAILAND

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Wave pool Lazy river Rain dance Water slides 30 16 9 45

INTERPRETATION:
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.6 that majority of the customers preferred rain dance in Water Park.

TABLE 4.7: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDINGTHE RESTAURANTS IN HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Excellent

72

72%

Very good

17

17%

Good

7%

Poor

4%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 72% of the customers felt that Haailand restaurants are excellent 2. 17% of the customers felt that Haailand restaurants are very good 3. 7% of the customers felt that Haailand restaurants are good 4. 4% of the customers felt that Haailand restaurants are poor

GRAPH 4.7 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE RESTAURANTS IN HAAILAND
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Excellent Very good 17 7 Good 4 poor 72

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.7 that majority of the customers are felt Haailand restaurants are excellent

TABLE 4.8: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE FOOD QUALITY IN HAAILAND RESTAURANTS

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

High

80

80%

Good

15

15%

Satisfied

5%

Low

0%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 80% of the customers felt that food quality in Haailand restaurants are high 2. 15% of the customers felt that food quality in Haailand restaurants are good 3. 5% of the customers felt that food quality in Haailand restaurants are satisfied 4. 0% of the customers felt that food quality in Haailand restaurants are low

GRAPH 4.8 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE FOOD QUALITY IN HAAILAND RESTAURANTS

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 High Good 15 5 Satisfied 80

0 Low

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.8 that majority of the customers are felt food quality is high in Haailand restaurants

TABLE 4.9: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING PREFERENCE OF HAAILAND RESTAURANTS

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Mamaiah

16

16%

Saanchi

40

40%

Monalisa

22

22%

Cleopatra

22

22%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation

1. 2. 3. 4.

16% of the customers preferred mamaiah restaurant 40% of the customers preferred sannchi restaurants 22% of the customers preferred monalisa restaurant 22% of the customers preferred Cleopatra restauran

GRAPH 4.9 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING PREFERENCE OF HAAILAND RESTAURANTS

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 saanchi Mamaiah Monalisa Cleopatra 22 16 22 40

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.9 that majority of the customers preferred saanchi restaurants in Haailan

TABLE 4.10

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Yes

27

27%

No

73

73%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 27% of the customers satisfied with the prices of shopping 2. 73% of the customers not satisfied with the prices of shopping

GRAPH 4.10 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS ON

SATISFACTION WITH THE PRICES OF SHOPPING

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Yes no 27 73

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.10 that majority of the customers notsatisfied with the prices of shopping

TABLE 4.11: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING DISPLY OF ALL VARITIES OF SHOPPING IN HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

YES

88

88%

NO

22

22%

TOTAL

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 88% of the customers opined that all verities are displayed in shopping 2. 22% of the customers opined that all verities are not displayed in shopping

GRAPH 4.11 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING DISPLY OF ALL VERITIES OF SHOPPING IN HAAILAND

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 YES NO 22 88

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.11 that majority of the customers felt shopping at Haailand displaying all kinds of verities

1. 11% of the customers not satisfied with the resorts in Haailand

GRAPH 4.13 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF CUSTOMERS ON RESORTS IN HAAILAND

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 yes 11 No 89

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.13 that majority of the customers satisfied with the resorts in Haailand

TABLE 4.14:

OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS

PREFERENCE ON ROOMS IN HAAILAND RESORTS

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Deluxe

66

66%

Business class

22

22%

Royal suite

12

12%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation

1. 2.

66% of the customers preferred deluxe rooms 22% of the customers preferred business class

3. 12% of the customers preferred royal suite

GRAPH 4.14 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF CUSTOMERS PREFERENCE ON ROOMS IN HAAILAND RESORTS

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Deluxe Business class Royal suite 22 12 66

INTERPRETATION:
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.14 that majority of the customers preferred deluxe rooms

TABLE 4.15: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SATISFACTION WITH THE ROOM TARIFF IN HAAILAND RESORTS

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Yes

45

45%

No

55

55%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 45% of the customers satisfied with the room tariff in Haailand resorts 2. 55% of the customers not satisfied with the room tariff in Haailand resorts

GRAPH 4.15 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SATISFACTION WITH THE ROOM TARIFF IN HAAILAND RESORTS

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 yes No 45

55

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.15 that majority of the customers satisfied with the room tariffs in Haailand resorts

TABLE 4.16: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING IMPRESSION ON EMERGENCY SERVICES OF THE HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Pleasant

95

95%

Shabby

5%

Delight full

0%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 95% of the customers opined that the ambience of the Haailand to be pleasant 2. 5% of the customers opined that the ambience of the Haailand to be shabby 3. 0% of the customers opined that the ambience of the Haailand to be delight

GRAPH 4.16 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE IMPRESSION ON EMERGENCYSERVICES OF THE HAAILAND

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Pleasant 5 Shabby 0 Delight full 95

INTERPRETATION
It is an evident from the data of the above graph 4.16 that majority of the customers felt the ambience of the haailand to be pleasant

TABLE 4.17: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SATISFACTION WITH THE EVENTS TAKEN BY HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Yes

88

88%

No

12

12%

Total

100

100 %

Interpretation
1. 88% of the customers are satisfied with the events taken by the Haailand 2. 12% of the customers are not satisfied with the events taken by the Haailand

GRAPH 4.17 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING SATISFACTION WITH THE EVENTS TAKEN BY THE HAAILAND

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 yes no 12 88

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.17 that most of the customers are satisfied with the events taken by the Haailand

TABLE 4.18: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SOURCES OF MEDIA IN WHICH THEY REGULARLY SEE THE HAAILAND ADVERTISMENT

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Television

66

66%

News papers

20

20%

Hoardings

14

14%

Magazines

0%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 66% of the customers opined that they regularly see the Haailand advertisement in television 2. 20% of the customers opined that they regularly see the Haailand advertisement in News papers. 3. 14% of the customers opined that they regularly see the Haailand advertisement in Hoardings. 4. 0% of the customers opined that they regularly see the Haailand advertisement in Magazines

GRAPH 4.18 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE SOURCES OF MEDIA IN WHICH THEY REGULARLY SEE THE HAAILAND ADVERTISMENT

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Television News papers Hoardings 20 14 0 Magazines 66

INTERPRETATION:
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.18 that the majority of the customers opined they often see Haailand advertisements on television media.

TABLE 4.19 OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE EFFECTIVE MEDIA TO PROMOTE HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Print media

35

35%

web media

22

22%

Electronic media

35

35%

Word of mouth

8%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 35% of the customers opined that print media to be effective media to promote Haailand 2. 22% of the customers opined that web media to be effective media to promote Haailand 3. 35% the customers opined that electronic media to be effective media to promote Haailand 4. 8% the customers opined that word of mouth to be effective media to promote Haailand

GRAPH 4.19 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE EFFECTIVE MEDIA TO PROMOTE HAAILAND

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Print media web media Electronic media Word of mouth 35 22 8 35

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.19 that majority of the customers felt electronic media and print media to be the effective for promoting the Haailand

TABLE 4.20: OPINION OF THE CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE HOARDINGS OF THE HAAILAND

NO.OF OPINION RESPONDENT

% OF RESPONDENT

Attractive

76

76%

Pleasant

22

22%

Awkward

2%

Total

100

100%

Interpretation
1. 76% of the customers opined that the Haailand hoardings are attractive 2. 22% of the customers opined that the Haailand hoardings are pleasant 3. 2% of the customers opined that the Haailand hoardings are awkward

GRAPH 4.20 GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF OPINION OF CUSTOMERS REGARDING THE HOARDINGS OF THE HAAILAND

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Attractive pleasant 22 2 Awkward 76

INTERPRETATION
It is evident from the data of the above graph 4.20 that majority of the customers felt attractive to be the effective for promoting the Haailand

CHAPTER-VI
FINDINGS
From the above study, various findings that i found

1) 65% of the customers knew about Haailand through advertising. 2) 48% of the customers felt water rides package is best in Haailand 3) 55% of the customers felt mechanical rides is excellent 4) 45% of the customers preferred rail chase ride 5) 86% of the customers satisfied with the water rides in Haailand 6) 45% of the customers preferred rain dance in water park 7) 72% of the customers are felt Haailand restaurants are excellent 8) 80% of the customers are felt food quality is high in Haailand restaurants 9) 40% of the customers preferred saanchi restaurants in Haailand 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) 16) 17) 18) 19) 20)
73% of the customers not-satisfied with the prices of shopping 88% of the customers felt shopping at Haailand displaying all kinds of verities 29% of the customers liked Thai zone 89% of the customers satisfied with the resorts in Haailand 66% of the customers preferred deluxe rooms 55%of the customers satisfied with the room tariffs in Haailand resort 95% of the customers felt the ambience of the Haailand to be pleasant 88%of the customers are satisfied with the events taken by the Haailand 66%of the customers opined they often television media to see Haailand advertisements 70% of the customers felt electronic media and print media to be the effective for

promoting the Haailand 76% of the customers felt Haailand hoardings are attractive

CONCLUSION

Marketing plays an important role in order to introduce the product in the market. We need our own ideas and innovations to get succeed in market. Hard work and smart work both plays a vital role in marketing. Market changes from place to place. We need to find out the targeted customer to achieve the success. There are so many hurdles to overcome. Updating

ourselves with new marketing strategies gives an idea of marketing our product in a better way.

Haailand is a biggest resort and theme park in Andhra Pradesh. It is following so many marketing strategies to attract the customers. It is a unique park which is constructed based upon Buddhism and mystique of south East Asia. From the ambience to the architecture, to the facilities to the services, to the hospitality everything is in keeping with the same high standards. For an absolutely unforgettable experience for entire family. haaland offers a never-before blend of thrilling rides, fantastic entertainment, delightful ,ayrvedic centre, exciting retail venues, enlightening cultural areas, superb banquet halls, luxurious resort facilities.

People will get knowledge also by visiting Haailand because the theme is based upon Buddhism so people will know about Buddhas excavations and architecture of the buildings. They will able to know about the south East Asian countries cultures.

Learning about marketing strategies and understanding the customer behaviour is essential to a marketing person. In this we need more practical exposure than theoretical knowledge. We should be able to estimate the future and take correct decisions in time.

Forecasting is needed to implement the plan successfully

The concept behind is One Destination Many Sensation. Finally it discovers a magical Kingdom of excitement, Entertainment and Enrichment.

Suggestions

1. It is clear from the results of the survey most of the customers opined a perfect blend of promotional tools such as advertising, sales promotions & publicity would marketing efforts fruit full. 2. The organization should also concentrate on promotional issues on weekly magazines to create awareness among rural rich customers. 3. The management should concentrate on fixing the Prices of Food, Rents of Rooms as they are too costly for a common man to bear with. 4. The management should concentrate on fixing the prices of the things that are being sold in shopping areas. 5. The results of the survey clearly show that most of the customers are satisfied with the services of the Haailand.

QUESTIONNAIRE
1. How do you know about Haailand? a) Through media b) Through word of mouth b) Through pamphlets d) All

2. Which kind of package is best in Haailand? a) Water rides c) Mega fun d) Royal entry

3. How do you feel about mechanical rides in Haailand? a) Excellent b)Very good c)Good d) Bad

4. Which kind of mechanical ride do you prefer? a) Pirate ship b)Rail chase ride c) Crazy jump d) Family train

5. Are you satisfied with the water rides in Haailand? a) Yes b) No

6. Which kind of water ride do you prefer? a) Wave pool b) Lazy river c) Rain dance d) Water slides

7. How do you feel about Haailand restaurants? a) Excellent b)Very good c)Good d) Poor

8. Food quality in Haailand restaurants? a) High b) Good c)Satisfied d)Low

9. Which kind of restaurant do you prefer? a) Mamaiah b) Saanchi c) Monalisa d) Cleopatra

10. Are you satisfied with the prices of shopping?

a)

yes

b) No

11. Does shopping at Haailand display all kinds of varities? a) yes b) No

12. Which kind of zone you mostly liked? a) Thai zone b) China zone c)Tibet zone d)Japan zone

13. Are a) yes

you b) No

satisfied

with

the

Haailand

resorts?

14. Which kind of Room you preferred in Haailand resorts? a) Deluxe b) Business class c) Royal suite

15. Are you satisfied with the Room tariff in Haailand resort? a) Yes b) No

16. What is Your Opinion of Emergency Services of Haailan? a) Good b) Better c) Best d)Bad

17. Are you satisfied with the events taken by Haailand? a) Yes b) No

18. InWhich media do you often seen Haailand advertisements? a) Television b) Newspaper c)Hoardings d) Magazines

19. According to your opinion which is the effective media to promote Haailand? a)Print media b) Web media c) Electronic media d) Word of mouth

20. Your Suggetions for best Haailand Services? .?

BIBLIOGRAPHY
A.

REFERENCE BOOKS
Books Author : : : : : Philip kotler V.Kasturi Rangan Rajan saxena K.Douglar DR..lalth ramakrishnan

Marketing management Marketing management Marketing management Marketing management Marketing management

B.

WEB SITES
http://www.haailand.com/ http://www.agrigold.com/