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Photographic Sciences Corporation

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Sliustrent la

mithode.

maa

TO

nm

MISSION
TO

THE FUGITIVE SLAVES IN CANADA.

I^testbent.

THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF SHAFTESBURY.


T7lte-1Prestiicn<s.

OF MARCHIONESS THE CHOLMONDELEY. LADY MARY SAURIN. LADY ELIZABETH BOYLE.

THE HON. MRS. LADY HART.


MRS. TAIT.

A.

KINNAIRD.

Central Committee.
MRS. MRS. MISS MISS MISS MISS MISS
ATTRIOL. H. BRAMDRETH.

CLAY.

FERRIER.
HAICDANE.
J.

MARSTOy. M. MUFFATT.

MISS MRS. MISS MRS. MRS. MRS.

M. NOEt. STAGE.
E.

PAGE TURNER, WILKINSON. DAKIEL WII.80N. S. F. WILSON.


M.P,

CmSttm. THE HON.


assistant JTreasuter. MRS.

A.

KINNAIRD,

W. CARBONELL,
Secretaries.

182, Regent-street.

fEion.

MRS. CLARK,

49,

Milner-square, Islington.
21,

MRS.MESAC THOMAS,

Compton-road, Canonbury- square.

iJuidiarfi (Jtomm(ttes.

Cteasurer.

Mrs. D. Wilson,
9,

NOETH LONDON.
9, Barnsbury Park, Islington. Barnsbury Park.

Secrttarj. Miss Wilson,

treasurer, Mrs. C.
Secretatfi.

ITOETH-WEST LONDON, J. Fynes Clinton, 39,

Bedford-square.

WEST LONDON.
Crcasurer. Miss M. Noel, gecretarj?. Miss Haluane,
.36.

Westbourne-terrace.

118, Westbourne-terrace.

SOrOTH-WEST LONDON.
JITreasurer.-

Miss MoNCK Mason, 3, Cornwall-terrace, Pimlico. gecretarg. Mrs. Nugent, 1, Gloucester-terrace, Warwick-square.

Donations and Subfcrlptions will be thankfully received by the Treasurers and Secretaries by the Hon. A. Kinnaird, M.P., at Messrs. Ransom, Pouverie, and Co.'b, 1, Pall-mall East, to be paid to the account of the " Fugitive Slaves in Canada; " and by tha Rev. Mesac Thomas or William H.Hart, Esq., at the Offlce of the Colonial Church and School Society, 9, Seijeanis'-inn, Fleet-street. Post-office Orders on the General Post-ohice, London, are pa able
;

to

Mary Thomas.
OFFICES,
9,

SERJEANIS'-INN, FLEET-STREEX. 1859.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Page

Photographic Poi-traits of Colored School Children.


List of President

and

Officers

Introduction. Colored Population of Western Hemisphere Slave Mart


Slavery the Extinguisher of Parental Peelmgs

3 5
5

Great Slave Auction

Market Yalue of Slaves

Agency
London,
C.

7 10 10
13 17

W., Letters from,

Bev. T.Hughes

Miss Williams Miss Zing

E.Gordon Chatham, Eev. T. A. Pmckney Amheestburgh, Eev. J. Hurst


Bev.

26 29
31 33

Toeonto, Mr. Ormerod..; Vancouvee's Isl/.jtd, Mr. Moore Loyalty of Colored Eaoe New Version of National Anthem List of Contributions, Annual Subscriptions, &c, AuxiLiAElESEngland Wales
Chan.
I.

...

38 39 41 42 44 61 61 61 62 63 63

iWt

Islands

...

Scotland
Ireland

Cash Account

...

,
,

Supplemental Lists

Aclinowledgment of Clothing

64

,0t^^A^,

REPORT, ETC.
Introduction.
instances

As

misapprehensions

have,

in

some

prevailed respecting the true nature of the


it

Fugitive Slave Mission,

may be
w.ho had

well once

state that its object is simply of a spiritual

more to Thoukind.

sands of colored persons,

escaped from the

United
its

States,
;

formation

were located in Canada at the time of their numbers, their religious degradaSociety to

tion,

and their settlement in a British colony were the

motives which induced the

commence the

work.

The funds

of

tlue

Mission are expended entirely

for spiritual purposes.

poral relief altogether

The Committee deem mere temand alien from their special work
;

are anxious that


fully

all

the friends of the Society should be

aware of the purely missionary character of their


collectors

labors.

The

and subscribers
truth, into

will

thus have the

assurance that their kind co-operation cannot be interpreted, with


i-rn n.w!"!'
*??

any

an enticement to slaves to
;

from their mai5ters


for the

and that no portion of the


benefit of the colored

\ary contributions entrusted to the Society can be

expended

mere temporal

population in Canada.

The

following tabular statement exhibits an approx-

imate estimate of the numbers of colored persons, of the

African race, to be found on the Continent of America

and

in the

West

Indies

Slaves.

United States
Brazil

\
.

7,450,000

Spanish Colonies

/
.

In rnoCESS op Emancipation?

Free

......
4 2

250,000
2,695,000

10,395,000

Tlie colored populations are distributed in the dixTerent

countries in the following proportions

United States
Brazil

.....
.
.
.

3,650,000

2,250,000
1,470,000 1,130,000

Spanish Colonies
British Colonies

South American Republics

(West Indies)

750,000
50,000

Hayti

French Colonies

Dutch
Danish

... ...
.
.

270,000
50,000

45,000
70,000 60,000

Mexico Canada.

....
Total

10,395,000

It thus appears that nearly three-fourths of the

whole

African population, in the Western hemisphere, are still ground down, as beasts ci burden, under the galling yoke
of slavery
!

May the efforts of the Fugitive


system
;

Slave Mission
against

contribute its full measure of moral influence


this accursed

and, under God,

may

it

be made

instrumental in some degree in hastening the time, when all men shall be recognised as being entitled to that free-

dom which is their birthright and their just inheritance The evils of slavery, in some of its worst features, con!

tinue to oppress, with

inhuman

severity, the children of


It is

Africa on the American Continent.

deemed a duty,

IVom which the Committee

may

not shrink, notwithstand-

ing the repulsive nature of the details, to present from time to time evidences of the revolting treatment to

which men and women possessors of immortal souls are exposed, as though they were mere chattels, to be bought and sold, simply because of the hue of their skin
or the accident of birth.

The

following account of a slave sale has been pub-

lished in a

Canadian paper, as the testimony of an eyewitness just returned from Tenessee, in February, 1859
:

SL^VE MABT. " Whilst there, accompanied by my wife, I visited out of curiosity a slave mart a large shed, around which were ranged a number of colored persons of all ages and seres about to bo struck off' at an auction to the highest bidder one, a beautiful girl, whose complexion and appearance betrayed a largo participation of white blood, and hardlj any traces of African origin. Her age might be about twenty years. A private room was allotted for the express purpose of a thorough examination as to the soundness of the human flesh

there exposed

fcr sale.

This

girl

was, after

much

competition,
;

knocked down for a large sum. A darker-complexioned African mother, who had two children by her side, was next put up and sold then her youngest child, about two years and a-half old, who sold for a high price, and after this her othel* child. The husband of this poor creature had been previously sold and separated from her and her children and when her own desecrated human self had been thus |i>ncp>|4 of under the hammer of the auctioneer, she besought, with *V8,, iier purchaser to buy her children. They were, liowcver, i;irto other dealers iu human flesh. u'k The brirty tear fell from ey-i ;/ the thoughts of separation from her little ones, but the 'It' rablt! law of slavery, aa recognised and enforced in Southern otptes, constrained her to submit, under the cold and comfortless remark of the auctioneer Come, come, be oiflet's have none of this noufeiense.' In this way were the dearest ties of humanity ript plunder by this last act of the revolting di ama, C says this scene was too much for himself and better half. They left, their eyes
:
:

'

suffused with tears. "Will our brothers on the other side of the line 45 deg., reflecting on the demoralizing tendency of such a * domestic institution,' do nothing to accomplish the ultimate extinction of slavery within the American Confederacy, and wipe out the stain thus affixed to the escutcheon of our common race
!
;

In another journal is related the affecting incident of recent occurrence

following
:

deeply

SLAVEET, THE EXTINaUISHEB OF PAKEiN'TAL PEELINGS. " Near L, Ky., lives a planter of wealth and standmg. He was the possessor of a hundred negroes, and he was noted for his thrifty, money-making disposition. His house was managed by a young lady of about twenty, his daughter by a quadroon, whose complexion was lighter by half than his, and in whom the negro blood was scarcely visible. The mother died ten years ago, leaving her daughter with its father's solemn promise that she should be educated, and should live as a free woman rather than as a slave, and that she
should pass as his daughter, as she was. The planter gave this promise, because he had really loved the dying woman, and Tvas greatly attached to his beautiful ehild. And so she grew up, TOdiantly beautiful, receiving a remsonable education, ail that her

AiAi

r>

father could give,

and in time took tii manartemont; of his bousoliold. never knew that there was any negro blood in her veins, and She never dreamed that she -was a slave. IIis house * Last fall a series of misfortunes overtook the planter. that comwas burned down, and in it the notes, books, and papers to a great posed a large portion of his fortune. His crops failed

ho was engaged degree, and some heavy speculations in which Added to all this, he had lost heavily at play, resulted disastrously. had completely the besetting sin of Southern gentlemen, and situaexhausted all his ready means, and found himself in a terrible possibly raise in 4 tion of having more money to pay than he could
given time. . , , llie his extremity, ' He applied to his legal advisor for counsel his alliiirs, advised him to advisor, after examining the situation of list was uiado out, and evory sell oir a portion of his negroes. After all waa that could bo possibly spared was put down. head the aggregate done, and the most favorable prices set down for them, was a, tliousand dollars short of the sum. "The adviser remarked quietly that he had not included uU that

m
.

could be spared. " ' I have put down all I can dispense with,' replied the planter. " I do not SCO Mary the housekeeper's name in the list,' replied make up the the adviser. ' She, if offered to the right person, would I would give that lor her myself.' deficiency. " At any other time the planter would have taken the suggesti.m grasped at the as an insult, but necessity is a hard master, and he It troubled him idea, and before an hour the transaction was closed. not a little to disclose the matter to her, but the fear of bankruptcy and ruin drove him to it. The poor girl's horror and distress may now wa be imagined. She had known nothing but happiness, and misery. She had to be plunged into the deepest and most hopeless one who been sold, and wai then the property, soul and body, of purchased hev merely for the worst of purposes. The idea was too several days. horrible, and she swooned, remaining almost delirious for " There vas another upon whom the intelligence came with crushhad frejunior partner in a produce-house in L ing weight, with the quentlv visited the planter's house on business, and struck become beauty and intelligence of the supposed daughter, had enamored, and alter prosecuting his suit a proper time had declared had betrctnv>u his pasdon, and, unknown to the father, the two her themselves. As soon as possible after her father had told her the facts, and fate, she dispatched a messenger to him, stating imploring him to save her from the fate that awaited her. Though thunderstruck at the intelHgence that his affianced bride was a slave, and had just been sold to a fate worse than death, like a tvne man he determined to rescue her. That night he saw her, and a plan was possession for flight. The day she was to be transferred to the

formed

Cincinnati, of her purchaser they fled, and in due time arrived at where they were married. ' The adviser, as soon as he learned of the flight of the young woman, commenced active measures to recover her ; but through the pursuers, aid of watchful friends she and her husband foiled their __j : a . whcrO thSV +JY. .r>Q/.V,f>d riunorla nnrl spt.florl in T auu ^u are now residing.

From a
/

third publication is extracted

an account of

A GREAT BIAVB

ATTCTIOM'.

"Th3 largest, sale of human chattels that has been mudo in the United States for several years, took place on Wednesday and Thursday of last week, at the race-course near the city of S , Georgia. The lot consisted of four hundred and thirty-six men, women, and children. *' The negroes were brought to Savannah several days Before the sale, and remained at the race-course stable for the inspection of The anxiety of the negroes to secure what they concustomers. sidered good purchasers, and their painful earnestness to keep their families together by being bought by one party, led to many sad and sorrowful scenes. The following is a type of many others of a
had taken a fancy to a benevolent-looking middle-aged gentleman, who was inspecting the stock ; and thus used his powers of persuasion to induce the benevolent man to purchase him, with his wife, boy, and girl, Molly, Israel, and Sevanda, chattels Nob. 6, 7, and 8. He made no appeal to the feelings of the buyer ; he rested no hope on his charity and kindness, but only strove to show how well worth his dollars were the bone and blood he was entreating him to buy. " * Look at mo, Mas'r ; am prime rice planter ; sho' you won't find a better man den me ; no better on de whole plantation ; not a bit old yet; do mo' work den ever; do carpenter work, too, little; Molly, too, my better buy me, Mas'r ; I'se be good sarvant, IV'.as'r.
wife, Sa, fus rate rice

similar character : " Elisha, chattel No. 5 in the catalogue,

hand

most

as

good

as

me.

Stan' out yer,

Molly, and

the gen'lm'n see.' "Molly advances, with her hands crossed on her bosom, and makes a quick, short courtsey, and stands mute, looking appealingly in the benevolent man's face. But Ehsha talks all the faster. *" * Show Mas'r yer arm, Molly good arm dat, mas'r he do a heap of work mo' with dat arm yet. Let good mas'r see yer teeth, Molly. See dat, mas'r ; teeth all reg'lar, all good she'm young gal Come out yer, Israel ; walk aroun', an' let the gen'lm'n see yet.
let

how spry you

be.

" Then, pointing to the three-year- old girl, who stood with her chubby hand to her mouth, holding on to her mother's dress, and uncertain what to make of the strange scene, * Little Tandy's only a Better buy us- nas'r ; we'm chile yet ; make prime gal by and by. but the benevolent gentleman found fus' rate bargain and so on where he could drive a closer bargain, and so bought somebody else."
;

" Of the conduct and appearance of the * stock * while under examination we have minute accounts. The following statement is made in regard to the poor slave women j " ' The women never spoke to the white men unless spoken to, and *hen made the conference as short as possible. And not one o+' them ajJ, during the -^^hole time they were thus exposed to the rude questions of vulgar men, spoke the first unwomanly or indelicate word, op conducted herself in any regard otherwise than as a modest woman

mk.

ni^xaLKHn-mmt".

^
} thoiv convcMiation and demeanour -vero quite aa unexceptionable as they would have been had thoy been the highest ladies in the land ; and. through all the insults to which thoy were subjected, they conducted thomselves with the most perfect decorum

should do

and

self-reapect.'

" The reporter gives many incidents of the sale which are of much interest. \Ve copy the following story of Jeffrey and Dorcas " * .Toftrey, chattel No. 319, marked as a ** prime cotton hand," aged twenty-three years, was put up. Jeffrey bemg a likely lad, the competition was high. The first bid was 1,100 dols., rnd he was Jeffrey r/aa sold alone ; he had finally sold for 1,310 dols. (260Z.) no incumbrance in the sliape of an aged father or mother, who must necessarily be sold with him, nor had he any children, for Jeffrey was not married. But Jeffrey, chattel No. 319, being liuman in his affections, had dared to cherish a love for Dorcas, chattel No. 278 ; and Dorcas, not having the fear of her maeter befc-e her eyes, bad given her heart to Jeffrey. Whether what followed was a juc*- retribution on Jeffrey and Dorcas for daring to take such liberties with their master's property as to exchange hearts cannot now be told. Certain Jeffrey and it is that these two were not to realize their hopes. Dorcas had exchanged their simple vows, and were betrothed each to the other, as dear as though their skins had been of fairer color. And who shall say that, in the sight of Heaver and all the holy angels, these two humble hearvs were not as closely wedded as any two of the prouder race that call them slaves. " Be that as it may, Jeffrey was sold. He finds out his new master, and, ht in hand, the big tears standing in his eyes, and his voice trembling with emotion, he stands before that master, and Though his voice trembles, there is no tells his simple story. embarrassment in his manner ; hia fears have killed all the bashfulness that would naturally attend such a recital to a stranger and before unsympathizing witnesses ; he feels that he is pleading for the happiness of her he loves, as well as for his own, and- his talo is told in a frank and manly way. " ' " I loves Dorcas, young mas'r I loves her well and tmie ; she flays she loves me, and I know she does ; de good Lord knows I loves her better than I loves any one in de wide world never can love another woman half so well. Please buy Dorcas, mas'r. We're be good servants to you as long as we Uvc. We're be married right soon, young mas'r, and de chillun will be healthy ani5 strong, mas'r, and dey'll be good servants too. Please buy Dorcas, young mas'r. do, really, true, mas'r." loves each other a heap " * Jeffrey then remembers that no hopes cf his are to enter into the bargain at all, but in the earnestness of his love he has forgotten to base his plea on other ground till now ; when he bethinks him and continues, with his voice not trcmblin j now, save with eagerness to prove how worthy of many dollars is the maiden of his heart " " Young mas'rj Dorcas prime woman 1 woman, Sa. Tall gal, Sa; long arms, ?trong, healthy, and can do a heap of work in a day. She is one of de best rice hands on de whole plantation ; worth 1,200 dollars easy, mas'r, an' tus'-rate bargain at that." " ' The man seems touched by Jeffrey's last remarks, and bids liim " fetch out his gal, and let's see what she looks like."
:

We

9
" Jeffrey goes into the Iouk room, and pwsontly ctuni8 with Poroas, looking very sad and self-possesiacd, without a particlo wl.i;jh she is placed. She of embfrras3niont at the trj-ing position ir^kes the accustouxed courtesy, and stands meekly, with her hands chisned across her bosom, awaiting the result. The buyer regards her with a critical eye, and grov/ls in a low voice that the " gal has good p'ints." Then he goes on to a more minute and careful exaHe turns her round, makes her mination of her working abilities. stoop and walk, and then ho takes ofi' her turban to look at h'^r head, that PC wound or diseaoe '^ concealed by tbn gay handkerchief ; he looks at her teeth and feels her ai-ms, and nt last Announces himell pleased with the result of his observations ; whereat Jeffrey, who had stood near, trembling with eager hope, is overjoyed, and snules The buyer then c owns JelFrey'st happiness by for the first time. making a promise that ho will buy her, if the price isn't run up too high. And the two o'.-iV* aside and congratulate oach other on their ua is not to be sold till tlie next day, and good fortune. But T there are twenty-four g hours of f'jverish expectation. *' Early next morning i^: oofrrey alert, and, hat in hand, he begs the boon of a word to be spoken to his new master to encourage him io buy Dorcas. Ard all the long morning ho speaks in liis honely way with all who know him that they will intercede to nave his Porcas from being sold awny from him for ever. No one has a heart to deny a word of promise and encouragement to the r*.jr I'eUow, and, joyous with so much kindness, his hopes and rpV ,.- gradvially rise, until ho feels almost certain that the wish of his heart will bo accomplished. And Dorcas, too, is smiling, for is not Jeffrey's hap-

'

his

aud and

piness her

own ?
comes the trying moment, and Dorcas steps up on tha

"

At

last

stand.

" * Bat now a mo?t unexpected feature in the drama is for the first time unmasked Dorcas is not to be sold alone, but with a family of four others. Full of dismay Jeffrey looks to hie master, who shakes his head, for, although he might be induced to buy Dorcas alone, ho has no use for the rest cf the family. Jeffrey reads hip doom in his master's look, and turns away, the tears streaming down his honest face. " * So Dorcas is sold, and iier roihng life is to be spent in the cotton fields of South Carolina, while Jeff/ey goes to the
:

rice plantation of the vireat

Swamp,
and Dorcas are to say their tearful fareways in life, to meet no more as mortal

"
well,

'

And to-morrow
and go

Jeffrey

their separate

beings.
less as

Tn another hour I see Dorcas in the long room, sitting motiona statue, with hei* head covered with a shawl. And I see Jeffrey, who goes to his new master, pulls off his hat, and says, " I'ae very much obliged, mas'r, to you for trying to help me. I knows you would have done it if you could, mas'r thank you but its very-hard" and xiere the poor fellow breaks down entirely and walks away, covering his face with his battered hat, and sobbing like a very child. " ' He is soon surrounded by a group of his colored friends, who, with an instinctive delicacy most unlooked for, stand (juiet and with
'

"

iincovered heads about him.'

A 3

10
" The
total

resuli of

the

sale

amounted to 303,850

tlbls,

(60,700?.) ."

A.

fourth

journal

makes the

subjoined announce-

uent :
KAEKET VALUE OP SLAVES. The price of slaves is greatly declining in the Southern States. The Richmond (Virginia) despatches give the following prices, lately
**

obtained in that city, as about the standard rate at which slaves are sold, but which, however, is not much more than half what they would bring six months ago No. 1 field hand, black, 22 years old, 620dol8. Ko. 2, a woman, stout and healthy, a good cook, 475 dols. No. 3, a No. 1 brown, fancy woman, 26 years, good
:

seamstress, 530 dols. No. 4, man and wife, 40 and 30, man slightly unsound, taken in at 670 dols. for the pair. No. 6, a man, about 27, 416 dols. Little niggers, from 5 to 7 years, so low that they are
generally sold in lots

by the dozen."

Agency.
in

It

is

a great satisfaction to the Committee

to be enabled to report that the Mission to

Refugee Slaves

Canada

is still

progressing favorably.
staff,

The

following
:

agency constitutes the present

thus distributed

London
>

Rev. T, Hughes, Master of the School

and Missionary.

a
.

Rev.

R.

Gordon,

(Colored)

Mis-

sionary.

Miss Williams, Mistress of the School

and Missionary.

Miss King, Missionary (voluntary). Rev. T. A. Pinckney (Colored) Missionary.

Chatham

Amhektsburg Toronto
.

Rev. J. Hurst, Missionary.

Mr. Ormerod, Catechist.

Victoria, Vancouvek's Island.


Catechist.

Mr. Moore
by

(Colored)

It is proposed to strengthen the Mission

the appointsuit-

ment of other

clerical

and lay missionaries as soon as


;

able candidates have presented themselves transfer the teachers from the school to

and

also to

more

direct mis-

sionary work,

on the ground that admission

may

bo

11

obtained for colored children into the

common

schools.

The Committee have

acceded to this proposal, made by

the Corresponding Committee in London, C.W., and the

General Superintendent, the Rev. Dr. Hellniutli, on the


condition that the Scriptures are the basis of education in

such common schools.

The Bishop
success,

of

Huron

has,

from the commencement of


its

the Fugitive Slave Misi^ion, evinced a deep interest in

and has greatly contributed, by


it

his counsel

and

co-operation, to raise
efficiency.

to its present state of

growing

1st of

Nearly a quarter of a century has passed since, on the August, 1834, the entire slave population of the

British

West

Indies received their emancipation, by the


British

generosity of the English Parliament and the


nation.

The

condition of degradation into v/hich hun-

dreds of the emancipated have sunk, in consequence of


the absence of adequate religious instruction before and
after their manumission,
is

a warning

to the

present

generation to

make

a right use of the opportunity

now

offered for evangelizing the refugees in Canada,

and to

make amends for past indifference to the spiritual interests of the West Indies. The Rev. Dr. Hellmuth, General Superintendent of the
Society's various missions in British

North America, has

repeatedly inspected the work of the Fugitive Slave Mission in

Western Canada.

from

his

communications for

Without multiplying extracts this Report, the Committee


to his brief but

would confine themselves

satisfactory

testimony regarding some of the agents employed.

While
:

on his tour of examination, Dr. Hellmuth wrote thus


" London, Canada West,

Sept. 25, 1858. Thank Gl-od vtg have a respectable st*.!! of agents, of every variety and color. On the whole, we have great canse to rejoice and to look forward with hope that our labors and efforts in the Lord to cvangolizo this long-neglected people will not be in vain. Our friend, Mr. Pinckney, shall have every encouragement, and I will do nil in power to

now

my

strengthen his hand and heart in the work before him. *' Mr. Gordon is a young man of promise.

ttk

tk Mb

lEi

Sb

A flh

12

"Mr. Hughes is a sterling character, and esteemed in the community for his consistent Christian conduct; he has a real missionary spirit, single minded, and from the motive desires to preach Christ to colored and white. *' Miss King is most valuable as a visitor, gathering in young
recruits for the schools, distributing tracts, speaSing the people about Christ and their immortal souls. gained th** affections of the colored people.
field

and reading to She has quite

'Mr. Hurst, as an ordained minister, will, I trust, in the new he is to labor in, be additionally useful and prove himself an able minister of the New Testament. " Miss WilUams continues to be very useful in the school she never had so many colored children in her school as she now has."

The Rev,
mittee
writes
^^
:

J.

M'Lean, Assistant Minister of


Correspondent
of

St. Paul's,

London, C.W.,

acts as the Secretary of the Local

Com-

and

the

the

Society.

He

London, Canada West, Jan. 3, 1859. I consider it a great blessing to be placed near so devoted a servant of Christ as the Bishop of Huron, from whom I have experienced every kindness. " I have every reason to be thankful at finding myself in so extensive and interesting a field of labor, and I pray that God's blessing may be with me in the work ; and that the Holy Spirit may apply
the

Word

preached with power and efficiency to the hearts of the

hearers."

statements of the missionaries themselves will be submitted under the heads of the stations where they are
respectively laboring.

The

LONDON, C.W.Into this city, which is the capital of the western portion of Canada, and the appointed See of the Bishop of Huron, the efforts of the Mission were
first

introduced five years ago.

at the time to lead to its selection


fully justified the choice.

reasons combined and the results have Schools were opened " for the
;

Many

religious

and secular instruction, particularly of the


slaves, but free to all

chilfit

dren of fugitive
to profit

who might

see

These schools have continued in operation, and have elTectually proved the feasibility of edi eating together white and colored children without reference to their origin or complexion.

by

their advantages."

The Rev. T. Hughes, Master of the Boys' School, has been admitted to Holy Orders since the publication of the
last

Report, but has remained at his post.


:

His

letters

supply the annexed statements

INSTABIIITT OP CHABACTEE OF '"HE COLOEED EACB.

In all our efforts for the instruction of the 1, 1858. colored children we have > contend with the natural instability of the negro character. While they, almost invariably in your presence, express themselves thankful for what is done for them, and generally their intention of attending the classes open for their instruction, the difficulty is to get them to do so after they have promised ; and, having succeeded so fa;', to induce them to continue to come. This fickleness on their part is a great discouragement to us ; but still I am persuaded that your agents exercise a salutary influence over all who come within reach of their labors ; though, it is true, we have not yet been permitted to experience he joy (sweet when vouchsafed, but often, perhaps, too ardently coveted) of witnessing many outward results of our labors."
CLAIMS UPON" BEITISH CHUECHMEN. " I continue to take the service on Sunday afternoons at the Junction, or Lambeth, as the place is now called ; and you will be interested to hear that the attendance on those services is steadily increasing. On fine days the room is full. As few who attend profess to have been brought up Churchmen it is gratifying to obsene a growing interest in the prayers. This is shown by a larger number being in earlier time ; indeed the room is frequently half filled before I get there. And a few Sundays ago I noticed that a respectable farmer, who has always been very rcgvdar, had provided himself with a large new Prayer-book. I know it is of immeasurably more importance to lead souls to Christ than to bring them into outward communion with our Church, and trust that such will ever be my chief object in my humble labors in the Lord's vineyard. Yet I cannot help thinking r' EngUsh Churchmen could witness the spiritual destitution of this part of Canada, and were fully aware of the absolute dearth of laborers belonging to our own beloved Zion, the Colonial Church and School Society would receive a large accession to its funds to enable it to send forth men to cultivate this dreary spiritual waste. Surely Canada, which afibrds a home to so many of our countrymen, has no slight claims upon the liberality of English Churchmen
!

"Jfay

EMIGEATION TO THE GOLD-EIEIDS OP BEITISH COLUMBIA, " August 2, 1858. The newly-discovered gold-fields in the British

possessions, on the Western Coast of this continent, are the allabsorbing topic of conversation at the present time. considerable number of colo I people from this place will shortly take their departure for those regions. Amongst them is a very amiable young

man, who

ance at school.

ment

for

within a few weeks past, been in regular attendHis attainments are but humble, but his deportsome months has been such as to lead mc to hope that the
has,
till

.Ail

14
Holy .Spirit has begun a good worlc in his hearfc. I tremble for him now, as the scenes through which he will probably have to pass will be calculated to remove the serious impressions that have been made upon his heart. God, however, is able to preserve him from con. tamination, and to his Almighty protection we would prayerfully commend him. I had a few days ago a serious conversation with him, and he has promised to see me again before ho leaves."

EEFUGEB HOTHBE AND TWO OHILDEEN.


colored population here remains about stationary, and, from the great scarcity of employment, is not Hkely to increase. solitary family now and then arrives and another leaves. Occasionally a few ffesh fugitives come, stay a few days, r^nd then pass on to other localities in search of work. About two months ago a

"The

wretched-looking woman, with two miserably-clad children, a boy girl, called to see if we could do anything for her. Hers, like that of every other fugitive, was a sad story, and adds another testimony, if one were needed, to the iniquity of slavery. She told UP ^nat she escaped from Alexandria, Virginia, in November last, and had been six months in making her way to Canada. She came via New York and Philadelphia, and was helped along by the Quakers. Her poor children had suffered much from cold by the way ; the feet of her Uttle girl had been dreadfully frostbitten, and still remained very sore and tender. She said her husband died some twelve months ago, and that she has four children altogether. The two eldest girls, one aged twenty-one and the other eighteen years, were unable to get away ; and, consequently, she was compelled lo leave them behind. This, as well it might, was now her greatest trouble. Her owner, who, she said, possessed about 150 slaves, was of a very utful and uncertain temper. Sometimes he treated them with moderate kindness, and at others most unmercifully. His own daughter having conceived a partiality to one of this poor woman's eldest girls, taught her to read and write, under a strict promise that she should not tell her father. According to the poor woman's account, who seemed to dote on this girl, she made rapid progress, and soon became a ' smai't scholar.' Her master, however, one day discovered her writing, and at once demanded who had given her instructions. She, mindful of her promise not to compromise her young mistress, refused to tell. He became enraged, had her stripped, and flogged most severely j but, notwithstanding this, she kept her secret."

and a

INCREASE OP COLORED CHILDREN IN THE SCHOOL.


Sept. 28, 1858. (To Dr. Hellmuth.)It is pleasing for me to state, and I doubt not it will be equally gratifying to you to know, that the number of colored children has been for some time past steadily increasing. You will remember at your last visit that you suggested a systematic looking-up of absentees. Miss King has prseveringly carried nut ynv.r suggestion and her efforts have been followed with the best results. Not only have those children, whose names were previously on our books, been more regular in their attendance, but many fresh names have been added to our list.
;

u
" Our visits among tho coloifed people have enabled us to become acquainted with nearly all the colo'-ed children capable of attending Bchocl ; and it is a matter of great satisfaction to be able to state, that of those who do so at all by far the larger number come to us. This is a cheering fact, and a great encouragement to us, inasmuch aa it shows that the schools are doing as great a work amongst those for whose special benefit they were estabhshed, as can reasonably be pe(!ted in the present state of the colored population here."
VISITS OF

THE GBNEEAL SUPEBINTENDENT.

for the kind and fatherly counsel and advice which invanably received from you, and which makes your visits always so cheering to usj and also pray that God would vouchsafe his especiel blessing upon our Mission at this important juncture, when it is about to extend the sphere of its usefulness by sending the message of reconciliation to the illused children of
ip^ou

" I thank
all

we have

Africa in other localities."

SCHOOLS HEIiD IN THE BAEKACKS.


1858. The close of another quarter finds ns still at the buildings are getting sadly out of repair, and are consequently rather comfortless ; but from the uncertainty of our tenure it would be very injudicious to expend anything ia repairs. Though I have nothing of striking interest to report, it will be gratifying to you to know that the attendance of colored cliildren has been good during the quarter. But now that winter has set in it has become more irregular, and many of the smaller children have ceased coming altogether."
7,

"Dec.

barracks.

The

DIFEIOUITIES

AKD ENCOUEAGiJMENTS.

" With regard to the improvement of the children and their progress in knowledge, especially in that best of all knowledge, the knowledge of the way of salvation, as revealed to us in the Word of God, though far from vehat we could desii-e, it is, I thmk, aa satisfactory as could be expected when the difiicultics we have to contend with are borne in mind.
" Great as are the ignorance and degradation with which we have we could, with the blessing of God, struggle clieerfullv, and I believe successfully, against these ; but the uncertainty and irregularity of the attendance of by far the larger number ia very discouraging, ana baflles all our efibiis to do them good. Those, however, who have been any considerable time in the snliool, and have been tolerably punctual, have made creditable progress, and would compare favorably with children of their own age and condition anywhere. There has been a continual diminution in the attendance of white diildren. This T ^rscv.tionod in my last as being very probably owing to the depression that still exists in Canada. Employment continues very scarce; and the present winter will doubtless bu a period of much want and sufft'ring."
to contend

iaia

.A^

16
COLbltED MISSI0NAKIE3.
*'

"

The

aiTival of the

Eev. T. A. Pinckney and Mr. Gordon (sine*

ordained) has opened brighter prospects for the Mission. New ground, which we have all long desired to see occupied, will now be broken up. Mr. Pinckney has been located at Chatlmra, which affords a fine field for his labors, there being in that place a much larger colored population than is to be found in acy other town in Canada. His color, experience, and thorough knowledge of the peopl i among whom he is appointed to labor peculiarly fit him for the yost. " May the Lord bless and prosper him in his work Until arrangements could be made for placing Mr. Gordon in a suitable sphere of labor, it was decided that he should stay with me in London, He was to assist in the school, and employ himself generally among the people. Ho fias been most wararly received by them, and his desire and love for purely missionary vvork was so intense that I at once released him from all attendance at the school, in order that he might devote himself entirely to the work upon which his heart was set. He has commenced a Bible-class and Cottage Lecture, both of which are at present well attended. On Sunday afternoons he also holds a service in Miss WilUams's Sunday-school."
!

HOSPITAL VISITATIOK. " Having heard that there was a colored young man sick in the Hospital, I went to see him, which has led to my visiting that institution weekly. I found him suffering from an abscess in the back, which was slowly, but surely, undermining his constitution,

and bringing him down to the grave. He is a fugitive, and, as far as he knows, all his relations are still in slavery. It is sad to witness, week after week, the quiet sufferings of this young man, and to think, owing to the cruel system of slavery, he must die in a land
of straiigers, deprived of the sympathy and consoling attentions of those near and dear to him. He is always most pleased to see me ; and I am thankful to say that he has learned to look to his Saviour for comfort. I cannot forbear mentioning, as an illustration of the kindness with which the colored people treat each other, what a patient in the same ward told me with respect to this young man. He told me that they had been in the habit of bringing him so many nice things that the Doctor was at last obhged positively to forbid them bringing more, as they were injurious to him."

DISTRESSED CONDITION OF TUB COLORED PEOPLE. " February 23, 1859. There is more thar^ an ordinary amount of distress prevaiUng in Canada at the present time ; and the failure of last year's '?rops has caused a considerable rise in the price of provisions. In this city the poor, both white and colored, are suffering severely ; so much so, that the City Council have found it necessary to establish soup-kitchens, and numbers are relieved daily with a supply of soup."

From the many of them


'

general improvident habits of the colored people, are in a truly wretched condition, both with regard

17
to food and clothmg. Tho two boxes just received will enable ns to miaiBter to the wants of many in the latter respect, and, to some extent, alleviate their suifenngB. I am sure the benevolent Christian friends who have placed it in our power to do so would feel themselves more than repaid could they witness the looks of gratitude, and listen to the expressions of thankfulness given utterance to by the recipients of their bounty ; and I am also sure that they will not be deterred in their good work by the knowledge of the fact that some of the fugitives are careless and improvident."

EFFECTS OF SLATEET. " Great allowances must be made for them. When they were in slavery everything was provided for them, and habits of self-

Though it grieves me to say that exhibit a total want of forethought, it must not be supposed that all are alike ; there are many exceptions, and, even in these hard times, not a few will be able to get through the winter without asking or receiving assistance from any quarter."
dependance arc not soon formed.
too

many

Miss

J.

Williams has been Mistress of the


zeal

Girls*

School for four years,


of untiring

peculiar fitness

and has given abundant proof and interest in her Mission, and of for the work to which, in the good provicalled.

dence of God, she has been


tency as a teacher.
rejoice
if

Her

success as a

female missionary has been as encouraging as her compe-

The Committee
the
to,

will,

therefore,

the recommendation of

Corresponding

Committee, already adverted


eflPect,

can be carried into

and will gladly sanction the employment of Miss

Williams in direct missionary labors among the adult


female population of the refugee slaves.

From

her varied communications the following selection

will serve to justify the confidence with

which she has

been regarded by the Society, and to increase the interest


excited at

home

in behalf of the Mission.

To

a lady in Londonderry,

who had forwarded a box

of clothing:
PEOUIIAE CLAIMS OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE MISSION.
I thank you for tha kind interest which you have 8, 1858. manifested in my work, and I am truly thankful to find that you have been able to interest other Christian ladies in behalf of the Colored Mission, which, as it is yet in its infancy, has comparatively few friends ; and I feel sure that those who so kindly provide clothing

" May

18

and toil, of the poor Zto in ft! Alton I iT' '"'' '""i^'' *= .0 that their I '"^T'i'""'''"?"'' cortainlv the Cobrcd.Mi.,ion'Tn-C,ld:ts pc ^po^i;,'!

det

1 arw J

uZ d"

to

the poor slave

rwfnT'-"'

"^

r respects,

superior

X
gratelul

ii

S " ~;. ir- jr ' "

ii.

~E,

SWd VZTf ' y- ity I have always


chSn\:fuir:\t
chemises

awakened to make them good members of

o^^^^ in tl e" "o said their better feehngs onlv need tnhl ^' ^ society?'

.ing Tdo

CLOTHING FOK THE EEFTTGEES

of thio^ tbtfeLd'^^li ^bC^^^^^^^^ flannel petticoats, frocks of almost any mater al,
^i

Ide

mSlTlg^^

"^Se Tosf'

-^^^t f-

^f

occasbnJ drIS

"The
course,

greatest want, after


siifficiently to

you cannot help us

shoemakers
expensive,

King has

here, lasting I 7.ry short time established a 'Parochial Sh?e Fund,' or littLsaviW

and very poor

good strong shoes which of some ladies coud interest their induce them to give a pa'r they a e very
all,

is

to, ur^less

3 S
in

^"'^ working-men of England are very generous T have thought If I L^^^i^'^'^l?^-'? an appeal could bo made to tliem^hTy would

ask' I

fe

f AomS^^^^^
kTnk
a

'^'"^

".^ ^"^^^^ ^ shoemaker rTglry P"^^ '' ^*-"^ ^t --Id protecf som^
5

Ikin^^h \ '5''i

"* * ^^^" '^^d *^^

but, after

your kindness

Ihe kindness of some Christian

friends in

England enabled us to

"*

4!

i?

^ ^

"^

19
olothe or help motiy poor colored families last winter, which, though not severely cold, as is uaual in this country, was exceedingly trying, owing to the stagnation of trade and the great monetary pressure. I know many families who were glad to work for ilour, potatoes, and fuel, and have not received any money ; to such the clothing was a

great boon."

DOCIIilTY

01'

COIOEED PEHSOKS.

The two colored men who have assisted me 10, 1858. are very regular and consistent, and seem much interested in their work. They are intelligent, and, I hope, Chiistian men. Some of the scholars have made great progress in learning to read, and, I The last person whom trust, have received some spiritual benefit. I mentioned in one of my letters as a candidate for baptism learned the creed in an intelligent manner before he could read a word now he reads in the Testament, and I purpose giving him the Bible sent as a reward by a lady, in the little box from B ''t'>l. *' B -, a midatto, whom I have mentioned ''eforc elsewhere as being very dark and ignorant of spiritual things, but exceedingly anxious for instruction, has been obliged to leave London, and seek work on the Grrand Trunk Railway now being constructed between here and St. Mary's. StUl, he is making progress, and as often as possible returns home on Saturday night that he may enjoy the privilege of coming to school. week or two ago I sent him a few tracts, and was delighted to see him on Sunday, and to receive his warm expression of gratitude for them. He assured me they had all been read and distributed, anc" begged me to send him some more by the post. I am so pleased to nold any influence over them so far away, tliat I shall endeavour not only to send, but, before my school reopens, go myself. At present, I believe, about 1,500 are employed on that railway, and probably one-sixth of them are colored."
:

" August

To a lady at Hadley,

Barnet,
:

who has rendered

valuable

assistance to the Mission

CASE OV DA EEatTGEE. I had expressed a wish to visit the little settlement where Mr. D wa&, and he fetched me in his waggon. As we rode along, he told me of his conversion and escape from slavery, which was in substance as follows ' * I was bom a slave. My father escaped on board an English vessel from Baltimore to England I know nothing of him. When one of my master's sons became of age, I was given to him, just as you might give a horse or a pig. He was very kind to mo. I travelled with him to New Orleans and other parts ; but I shall never forget the dreadful sights I saw there, the very air seemed rent with the cries and screams of the tortured slave. All this time I did not swear, nor steal, nor keep bad company ; but I was an unconverted man. However, there came a great preaching some distance from us ; mistress and all the iamily went. I drove them, and we went
" Octoher
2,

1858.

along jovial as possible, I thinking of nothing but the frolic. When we got there the man was preaching. I listened, and for the life of me I could not get to unhitch my horses. I thought I'll get

* m^mmikak^

20
n hiile fartlier away, but I could not. At last it soemed to mo that the v/hole world had been tied to mo it could not have been bo heavy as my load of sins. Oh, how I did cry for mercy At last I found it, and I felt ns light as a feather. I loved to pray, and * through grace, I have continued till now. " Well, after this my master wanted me to go south, but I could
if
!

so he let it pass, and said no I was plowing in the field, I heard a long low whistle, looked about, and saw a man crawling along on the ground towards me. Ho said, Do promise not to tell of me." I promised ; and ho said, the master had got a lot of fellows rp at the house to tako me and sell me down south, but, said ho, "Clear off as quick as you can get up to our place," he loft me. ' Presently the young master came and told me to go up to the house. I took in the horses and went up, saw mistress crying, and presently afterwards saw men with pistols in the porch. I shouldered a pitchfork and walked to the stable, heard one of the men say, '* He suspects nothing," went round the stable and ran off. Soon they saw me and set off in pursuit they had a hound with them, and he started a squirrel which gave them a long chase, leading them away from the place I was seeking. Fearing their return and tne dog findmg the scent, I took to the water and waded for nearly two miles. I had some money at the house, but dared not fetch it and thinkmg that probably I should want some, I concluded to go to a woman, to whom I had been hired to cut oats, and ask for the money. She could not have heard of my escape yet so I went up
;

not, and told him I would die first more about it. But ono day, whilst

'

to the door, received the money, and made my way to the house of the Quaker who had told me of the danger. He and his brother were helping to hunt for me when he came home, ho said, " Well, the master thinks you'll come back in a week or two, but if you do not he will advertise for you, and offe a re.card ; but before this you must be safe in Canada." So after giving me directions, and food, and a suit of clothes, they sent me away. Oh! how I trembled and prayed. Just at dark I came to the Black Swamp, and met a minister on horseback, who asked me if I thought of going through there, and tried to dissuade me, saying, he had been all day crossing it, often up to his horse's body in water. "Besides," said ho, " there are panthers and wild cats there and no house ; " but on I went.
:

It grew pitch dark I was up to the middle in water heard such horrid unearthly screeches all around me, but I prayed all the time. After walking nine miles I saw a light, and thanked God j found the people were sitting up with a sick person. When they opened the door a good fire was blazing on the hearth. "'They said some unearthly power must have brought me through the Black Swamp ; " for," said the man, I would not go through It now for all the land in the state of Ohio." They were kind to me ; said if I was not free, I had better be going, for they had seen a poor fellow, but '. few days before, retaken and carried
' ; ;

'

_
set off

.,!.,..

!i

.giti-T-iivU jjue

=u

rtiiur urjilig

my

ciuwica, x

again and soon found myself on the high-road. At night I lodged at a colored man's house went off next morning, but had not gone far before, on looking back, I gaw thvoe men coming after
;

21
myaclf among the long grass they paBsed talking. They concluded that I muafc have taken another road and returned to the town. I was greatly frightened, and walked all that day and part of the night without speaking to any one ; at last, when it was pitch dark, I heard some one behind, and was afraid to breathe, when a voice said "Art traveUing?" I said, "Yes." "Well friend," he returned, and wnen I heard the Quaker tongue I felt better, thou hadst better not go farther to-night, I have a brother not far off, I'll lead thee to his house." I was very tu^d, so I followed him ; but fearing all the time I knew not what. I went to bed, was afraid to sleep, but next morning ho came to mo with a free pass, gave mo food, and advised me t j be going. By his direction I was passed to the captain of a boat pc Cleveland, who kept an hotel, in the cellar of which ho stowed away fugitives, till he could pass them to Canada. I lived on his boat, went with him to Lang Island, and up into the Georgian Bay. When we returned to Cleveland the captain saw the advertisement and the reward; so ho just turned his boat and lauded me in Canada, paid me twenty dollars, and, said he, " As soon as you step there you mav tell your master you are free, for you are under the British flag.^' No one knows what I had gone through 80 nobody can know what I felt. Since that time I havo served the Lord, and He has been a good Master.' " This is but one of a multitude of narratives which might be given ; showing the difficulties and dangers which attend their flight and their perseverance in surmounting them. Would to God we might see so much perse /erance and earnestness manifested i i seeking to escape from the thraldom of sm I am sure yourself and friends will unite with me in earnest prayer, now that special efforts are being made for them, that the Gospel preached may be indeed the power of God unto salvation;' and that his servants now going amongst them may point them successfully to the spiritual freedom wherewith Christ makes his people free."
Jiid
;

me.

I laid

down and

80 near that I heard

them

To

a lady at Chipping Norton, in acknowledgment of


:

a parcel of tracts and clothing

THE WORK OP THE MISSIONAEY FACIXITATED BY THE KIJfDNESS OF ENGLISH PBIENBS.


''Oaoler 2, 1858. Could you but peep into my school, vou might see many articles of clothing, with the history of which you are acquainted. The wants of the poor woman shall bo attended to as you desu-e ; and you may be sure we shall find many particularly during winter, whose hearts will be gladdened Lv vour

kind

liberality.

^ ^

" The distribution, however, will not be confined to London for misaionaries about to bo sent westward will take a portion of the T-iui....jj ..i.ii Mit^iii, ai.vi ii Ttiu ciiauic Lucui tu prove that tiiey seek only the good, temporal and spiritual, of those to whom they go Thus your kindness is the means, not only of clofcliing the destitute* but of giving to the missionary an amount of influence, enabling him

"

22
to open ot>o of the avenues to their confidence,
tlioir spiritual interest."

and thus advance

THE MISSIONAEY STAFl' STllENOTHENED. " If I could only convey to you a scene wliich passed before my own eyes on Wednesday last, your hearts would bound with gratitude to th'j Disposer of events for thus opening the way for the Miasion. Three gentlemen were ordained by our excellent Bishop. Impi'CHsing and interesting as such occasions always arc } thi., was rendered doubly so, from the fact that tliey wore set apart for a special work amongst a poor despised and down-trodden raco, to whom they go, 1 believe, with the holy determination of St. Paul, to

'know nothing among them but Jesus Christ and him crucified.' One of them loaves imniRdiatel; for Amherstburgh, a placo *. ng since immortalized by Mrs. Stowo."
CITIES OP REPUGE.

on the map, they will see Amherstburgh on the south-westein ex+^^rcmity of Lpper Canada, just where the Detroit river (wliloh connects Lakes Huron and Erie) merges in Lake Erie. In this place and the adjoining township of Colchester there are great number of fugitives; indeed those western towns arc cities of refuge, whore the escaped are safe from the hounds of the slave-hunter, and the lash of his hard master. Per* haps we, who have been cradled in a land of liberty, cannot enter into the feelings of one, who breathes the air of freedom fc- +^6 first time and you will therefore allow me to quote from the writings of a young colored lady, herself never a slave, but deeply sympathizing with her oppressed people. She says, ' I have gazed for the first time upon a land of freedom and would you believe it, tears sprang to my eyes and I wept. Oh it was a glorious sight to gaze for the first time upon a land where a poor slave flying from our glorious land of liberty would in a moment find his fetters broken, his shackles loosed. And whatever he was in the land of Washington, beneath thD shadow of Bunker's Hill, or even Plymouth Eock, here he becomes a man and a brother. And yet even liere it is too true that the fugitive finds that he has only exc}ianged the iron yoke of oppression for the galling fetters of a vitiated public opinion. They came here of course exceedingly ignorant and debased but who can wrndei' at it ? For, as the writer I have just quoted well expressed 11,' Aovn to n-i inheritance of misery, nurtured in degradation, and cradled 11. opp/ession, w'th the scorn of the white men upon then' soulri, hJM fettoiH upon their limbs, his scourge upon their flesh, what can be expected from their ofispring, but a mournful reaction of that cursed system, which spreads its baneful influence over body r.nd soul; which dwarfs the intellect, stunts its development, debases the spirit, and degrades the soul.'
; !

"If your young

friends will look

HEAL OBJECT OE THE MISSION. " The Society aims at the moral and social as well as the religious elevation of these poor people, but unhappily the greatest difficuHies are caused by tlie people themselves. Time is reqiured to gain their confidence and uproot their suspicions, I am sure you wJU pray for us all, that wisdom from above naay bo vouchsafed to us."

'

Sd
MORE DIBECX MISSIONAET WOEE.

mentioned before, makes sixteen in one yoar-a veTy fair proportion trom sucli a small community and, y^ahmt attaching an- undue ^ "'^ baptized, such a result ii something
;

ms.-^ho liitle Sunday misnion stiU continuea, though, from the fact that several families have removed from the ncighbourhoo'K and that I have been unable to visit them during the week lately, it is not so well attended as at this time last year , but X hope soon to bo abl to bring them all out again, especially as we are now lavored with a regular Sunday afternoon Bervico. Tho people are suppLed with Prayer-books (places found), and, all thincs considc^red, they responC very well. It is pleasing to see a growing attachment to our form of worship. I trust thoy feel that it is not a mere form, but a spiritual worship. As a proof of the interest awakened, I may mention that the wifo of B , with whose name you pre famUiar, asked and obtained from me a Prayer-book to take with her to St. Mary's ; and, an that town is blessed with an Evangelical ministry, I hope to find that both shp and her husband attend the churcli tliore. ^ You will be gratified to hea that early October (just about twelve months from the commencement cf tho little mission) seven chddren were brought up for baptism, which, together with those
"Deosmhere,

thnlkfiC""'^^'

children w^cre for^varded to


fnToi-'^fT,

TUB criLDEEN OF ST. MATTHEW'b SCHOOL, BHI8T01. *'Felruaryl9, 1859.-Your kind presents for the poor colored
TO

me

last

r w'r^''^

o 'I have often regretted that people did not trv to enlist tho sym'^ ^^^^" r than they do aud I ?^ thankful to find that your kind i1,^'^"^^ am friends have interested Vou, by teaching you to make little gifts for children of diiTerent ra^es and ccmplexions from your own I dare say you have often been taught also to colleo^. money-to deny yourselves some little gratification that you may be able to give somothing-your mite-to help for ward tlie cause of Missions. This is good /and when you say tliat beautiful prayer wl-icli our Saviour has taught us, you 'vSl ber bat you aro pray ng for Missions. Is it not becaucl we arT the children of 'Our Father 'that wo feel bound to teU thosrwho are errov and ignorance, of the 'Father of onv Lord Jesus Christ yho so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, "hat

bitten

for

I 1^^ S'T"^^^ broathed m^ft^'^ the


*^''^

autumn by the Secretary of tho thought of you letter which was

r I'^f T

rLem

perish, VtlaveeveTbstng ^Ttfp^^T,^f^.^^^^^^^Hlf J. :vl f *^m\'^ ^^'"^ P'^*^^*^^"^ ">' t^at ame prayer, eve? "^^e"" i-" ?^"y lor tne " Vr> little '^^ ^T^' ; .r *""e^^ J jr od. ^uflZ rewards and gifts grve tlio * ?^y for thJcause of Your 1U+1, ""'- """ eui,a arvn the ^^i^o/i i.;ij. cause ot lour p fts i:, ^u tne colored children in coiorea m my nT,"l peat i ^nf pleasure school but I have something very -so strange that I doubt not angels vnndi strange to tell yol rvuZ Vaf ^>

^d

not

T-r
'

^OWT which
children,

13

so coutmually ofiered to
like

them

and colored chHdren, are

in the Gospel Black white children, ^ani grown

Ali.ii^<

24
Their hearts are naturally hard ; they think there is time enough to think about God, and heaven, and eternity not knowing, or forgetting, that fearful passage in Prov. i., ' Because I have called, and ye refused I have stretched out my hand, and no man regarded ; I also will laugh at your calamity, and I will mock when your fear cometh,' &c. Kead from the 24th verso to the 31st, and God grant such awful words may not be said to you. " When I look at the map and see how Canada is divided from the United States in some parts only by a narrow boundary, some of the States just over the boundary are free States ; yet if a fugitive be found there, let him be ever so near the boundary, he is taken back to his former owner, and his hard bondage made still harder. I have known cases where they have been almost whipped to death for attempting to escape bv let them be once over the boundary they are free they are safe, for they are under the protection of our gracious Queen. I say, when I look at this, I think how much it resembles the case of those who are the slaves of sin. They may break away from open sins and amend their lives, but so long as they neglect to flee for refuge to the hope set before them in the Gospel they are not safe ; their hard master may at any time overtake them, and drag them to hopeless, endless chains. There is no safety out of Christ, but in him there is perfect safety. The fugitive slave is not safer on Canadian soil- from the hounds, the lash and chains of slaveiy, than is the little child who believes in Jesus. (Read "^uom. viii.) *' I know your kind friends read to you the little books and papers about the Fugitive Slave Mission, and therefore I have not given you any account of fugitives. We all listen with pleasure to a thrilUng story, and such is the history of almost every escaped slave I know. But I wished to give you a higher motive to convince you that the cause of Missions is the cause of God and that you cannot engage in his cause, or render to Him acceptable service, unless your own heart be right with Him. I will now only pray that you may be happy recipients of God's free gifts, and that, passing from death unto life, at last may join with that great company of redeemed ones, who out of every kindred and tongue and people and nation sing, 'Worthy is the Lamb,' &c."
people, too.

PnOTOGEAPniC rOUTEATTS OV COLOEED SCHOOL CHILDEEN".


" March
in

my last,

many

With this I send you the portrait mentioned a short description of each. object in having so taken together was to show the varieties of color between the
3, 1859.

and

My

genuine African and the neax'cst approximation to Anglo-Saxon. " The boy on my right, James S , is of real African parentage, and although he had the happiness of being born free, his parents had been slaves. When I called to show them the pictiu-e the mother's hearty, ringing laugh, as slio looked at 'our Jim,' almost made me wish for the same lightheartedness, but it is characteristic of the race. And, though in groat distress, she could afford to laugh while alio ouid, ' Wall, raly I thought our Jim was a better lookin fellow then that ; but, 'deed, Misses Wilhams, I shouldn't a knowed you no how, you looks reel wecl,* Of course \ could appreciate the doubtful compliment.

25
"No. 2 shade, the little Lizzie L on my left (in front) was , born slavery. Her mother was owned by some wealthy people in Maryland, who were very kind to her, and, approving of her marriage with the slave of a neiglibouriug planter, purchased him, and settled them both comfortably upon a farm a few miles distant. Still they were slave?, and as thoy heard of one after another of the

people being sold, in consequence of their master's losses at the table, they began to fear lest they might share the same fate. So, collecting a good supply of food and what money they could they btarted for Canada. Walking by night, hiding in the bush by day, and carrying their provisions and little Lizzie, then three years old often going a considerable distar.ce out of the way, either from ignorance of the road, or fear of detection, they made slow progress Arrived at Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania ; they took the cars, reached Detroit, crossed the river, and were safe in Canada just three weeks after they started. '' No. 3 shade, Alice I have no particular in, on my left, tormation about ; her parents had been slaves,

gaming

Quadroon girl on my right of belonging to the proscribed race, and yet that girl was born in slavery. When I tell vou that her mother was an interesting Mulatto woman, you will read in that tair voun? lace the sad story of her motlu r's wrongs. Soon after little Fanny's birth the poor slave-mother was obliged to leave

^" ^-'^ ^^SK is a mixture of African, T 'a^^' and i^^^ -^TT' Indian, baxon. His grandi lother, a very interesting Quadroon, had been left free by her master's will; married and had seven daughters, two of whom, the mother and the aunt of John, were married ; but all were near the old lady. On a sudden she heard it wluspcrcd tliat the heirs of lior late master, having discovered scmo flaw the will, intended to claim herself, her chUdren and grandchildren, now seventeen in all. Greatly alarmed, she consulted a lawyer, who kuully told her that her only safety would be in flight Not even a shadow of protection would the ' star-spangled banner aflord this poor woman, whose only crime was tlie hue of her face Acting upon the lawyer's friendly advice, she took refuge in Canada' and now, whdc she lias the pleasure of seeing hor children's children and their cluldren- her daughters are all married but one, and the seventeen more than doubled, she has the satisfaction of knowing tliat tlioy never can be slaves. John is a boy of moderate abilities! much darker in color than his mother. No 5 the Mulatto, William L , tells his own story and you ; would almost iad to recognise in his open countenance any indication of his parentage ; still loss would you suspect the beautiful

liitL^

accompany her young mistress on her marriage

tour.

Cincinnati she found friends among somr. abohtionists, who assisted her to escape to Canada, where she obtained a respectable situation with good wages, and at last succeeded in purchasing her child then eighteen montlis old, for 250 dollars. Slic has since marrie.l a respectable mechanic, and, though another little one claims their anc<'(ion, I think tise little slave holds tlie highest juace. " So far I have given you only the bright iside of the picture, but there if. another and a s^adder phasu of fugitive liistoiy. The eireets ot the doinoralizing system under wliieli thoy June been 'raised'

her child and On reaching

.M

Ai*

nr*^

26
ai^ hot shaken oif with the yoke of slaveiy. They hard never teeu taught self-resr.act ; in fact, the effect of their raising ' has heen to destroy what tiiey had. Many of these unhappy women have children, some born before, some since, they came here. Could these be taken from the blighting influences of home, instructed in the fear of God and in a higher morality, and fitted for domestic serv nts, they might yet become useful and vh-tuoua memberfl of
society.

" When Dr, Hellmuth was here last he proposed a plan by which a few orphan or fugitive children might be taken and provided for. If this could only take effect, and a few of the poor children, whom I have spoken of, be rescued from the terrible future which opena before them it would be a great blessing. And surely no amount of labor- or self-denial need be thought too great, if it, by God's blessing, produced such results. I have written and spoken to Dr. Hellmuth relative to a desirable locality, and I have no doubt he will communicate with you on the subject."

Miss King, voluntary teacher and missionary in con* nexion with Ihe Society in London, has rendered valuabje
services,

which the Committee desire gratefully to acknowTheir prayer


is that she may be made a true many souls among the colored people.

ledge.

spiritual blessing to

From

various quarters the Committee have received

strong testimony to the zeal and success with which Mis9

King has devoted

herself to promote the eternal interests

of the fugitive slaves.

She writes

CASES OP HEftraEES.
1858. short time bock I mot a man, a carpenter by Ho had heard trade, who arrived here recently from New Orleans. that lie was to be sold down South, and that his master was to have 25,000 dols. for him, and, dreading the prospect, the poor fellow came away and got here in safety. Finding he couid read a little I gave him a New Testament, with which he was much pleased. " Another man I met, who had been injured by cruel usage, and has not been well since ; he was two years in getting here, being twice captured and taken back. He came away at last, armed with fire-arms, and subsisted for many days in the woods on anything ho could get, sometimes only frogs and buds of trees. He cannot
1,

"

May

read."

THE SCHOOL.
" The scliool children have received the book-markers, bags, &c.f iuiulo fur tlicm by tho cliilurcn of tiic Uuv. J. KaUiblctOu's Buhuul and other friends, and were much pleased with their little presents. And wo purpose on Whit Tuesday to have them all to tea by way of a treat.

27
"Julff 30, 1858.--YOU mu&, havo been expecting aome littk account of our school treat, which took place on Monday, tlie 26th May, instead bf Tuesday, as at first proposed. Monday beinc the Queens birthday and a general hoUday by appomtment of the ^^ thought it a better day. Everything went

leastntT

off

doors, the Captain Eesident at the barracks kindly aUowing the free use ot the barrack-square for the occasion, and also rendering us any assistance his power. The children appeared to enjoy themselves very much, and behaved exceedingly

" We were favoured with the best day we could have had for such an occasion, though it rained for a day or two before, and for a day or two alter, the treat ; and the chUdren were enabled to be out of

well.

more than
*'

" They all assembled at three o'clock and amused themselves in tne playground tiU five, when they met in the green-equare in front ot the barracks, where we had previously arranged benches for them on the grass. They then sang, When his salvation bringing,' &o. i and, alter smgmg a grace, were abundantly regaled with tea and cake ; alter which they sang another grace, and the Bishop of Huron, who kindly honored us with his presence, addressed a few appropriate words to the children on the privUeges they were enioy. mg receiving a scriptural education. They then sang ' Godlave the Queen, lou wiU be glad to hear that there is still an increase ot colored chUdren the schools, the ettendance of late has been

upon to stand sponsors for two wished to have them baptized, and who could get no one to stand for them. They were the children, whom I mentioned in a former letter, as having been brought away last year from slavery by their mother to save them from being sold, and who are now amongst the most regular of our attendants at Day and Sunday schools!"
DISTRIBUTION OF TBACTS. by the poor fu.<?itives who can read i t ley arc sometimes returned to be changed with such expressions as the following That's a nice book,' 'it is so sweet and comforting.' i thought the last my daughter read to
The
tracts are still valued

ever was before. The other Sunday we were caUed colored children, whose mother
it

Heard in my life, said a poor fugitive the other day, when retui-nin her tract for another, but this, if anything, is stiU better ; I think set seems better than the one before.' Another said, f mT^,?'' { lliat tract you lent me was so good and so beautiful I lent it to a Iriend of mine, and that friend lent it to another friend, and so it has^gone through twenty people's hands, and it has not got home yet. It is encouragmg to find that they are reaUy read and valued. o]^ZJ'%l '""/^r'^' ^^"^^'^^ ^''"^^^ ^^0^^ ^^^ states; and the
cliildren of

me was

the best I ever

two of these come to the school."


DISTRESS
""^

AND DESTITUTIOV.

mite

"'^^'' ^''^^ f'^l<> *^ I'adnesfl of the times it, the in fv'"'^^^''i"^ u'''''/\'^^." difficulty of obtaming work for the last six months; but to
all

these incidents to

ihis circumstance doea not appear, in tbo

you would make

my

letter

too long,

least,

to haye

mde them

AiAii.

28
regret tho step they have taken in coming to Canada. The other day a man told me he had been troubled to get work this winter and spring, to obtain bread for himself and family he said, * Last week he was out three days in succession seeking something to do, and only had one meal in three days, and that one not at home.' I immediately said, And then you began to think of the good things you had in the States with but little trouble.' He said, *No, not once ; hberty is such a much sweeter thing than anything else, that I had rather put up with this or worse and have my freedom.' '*
;

I have been enabled to continue visiting and class-teaching as usual ; and you will be glad to hear that there continues to be a large number of colored children in the schools. Our colored brothers (Mes^ra. Pinckney and C^ordon), who have lately arrived from England, are a great acquif-ition to the Mission, they strengthen our hands wonderfully and I think Iheir influence for good wiQ be very great, both in benefiting the colored people and in destroying the prejudice of the whites, which I am sorry to say is much greater here than it ought to be, even among those from whom wc have a right to expect better things. The truth that * God is no respecter of persons, but in every nation he that feareth Him and worketh righteousness is accepted with liim;' and that *He hath made of one blood all nations of men,' appears to be too much lost sight of; but I attribute this to our being so near the States. This place is quite unlike England, where a colored clergyman would create universal interest. Sureljr where God is pleased to give his Holy S'pirit, and we see a hving ' temple of the Holy Ghost,' it is man's duty to disregard altogether so trifling a matter as the color of a person's skin. As to other charges sometimes brought against the people, the high intellectual attainments and gentlemanly manners of our colored missionaries must completely give tho He to all that, when they see what education will do for them, and what the people may yet

" Nov.

1,

COIOKED MISSIONAEI"SS. 1858. I am thankful to say that

become."

ADUIT
"

CLASS.

adult class is growing into a Sunday-school of men, women, and children. I now receive all who come on Sunday, though hitherto I have only had an adult-class of such as could not read ; still, when x found that several came who could read, because, as they expressed it, 'they wanted things explained,' I gave an invitation to all who liked to come. Last Sunday sixteen came. " have had more baptisms since my last letter to you, and have still been obhged to stand sponsors ourselves. The Eev. A. Pinckney has baptized eight children who could not be brought to the church ; and, since he has left for Chatham, the Eev. E. Gordon has baptized one female adult at the church. She belongs to my Sunday-school 1 I had the pleasure last Sunday of seeing her at the Lord's tabk. This is a little encouraging fruit ; she is the first communicant we have liad, and I feel mucii interested in her. God has been pleased to call her to the knowledge of himself through much aflliction; and we believe her to bo perfectly eincerv. and single-minded."

My Sunday

Wc

'.

'.

29
SUNDAT-SCHOOL.

my own work amongst the colored not much of fresh interesting news to communicate. My little Sunday-school, for the benefit "of those colored people who live on the opposite side of London to Miss Williams's Sunday-school, continuos to be attended, and more have joined it. But the irregularity with which the people attend to everything one of the greatest difficulties we have to contend with in laboring amongst them leaves the number in regular attendance only shghtly on the increase."
"Feb. 24, 1859.As
IS

far as
is

people

concerned, there

CIOTHIKG FOE THE POOE. " The attendance of colored children in the Day-schools has been small during the winter, though we have the same number on the books. The distress during the winter, arising from, the scai-city of food, has partly caused tliis ; and here I may add, thr.c the clothing so kmdly and Uberally sent out from England has been most useful. From the last that came we filled a box and sent it to Chatham, so that it 18 now distributed in three different places London, Araherstburgh, and Chatham."

The Rev. R. Gordon, of African descent and of unmixed color, arrived in Canada from the West Indies at the close of last year. He has been admitted to Holy Orders by the Bishop of Huron, and located in London under the direction of the Bishop and the Corresponding Committee. Mr. Gordon is almost self-educated, but is an instance of the progress which may be made in mental improvement by the children of Africa. He reports :
at tiuebec on Thursday evening, the 9th Sept. About four hours after I was seated in one of the coaches of the Grand Trunk Kailway, purposing to proceed forthwith to my destination. I arrived hero (London; at two o'clock on Saturday evening, after a land journey of nearly 800 miles, and received Holy Orders from his Lordship the Bishop of Huron about a fortnight after. Tha. I have

" Dec. Si, 1858.I embarked on board the North American from Liverpool on the morning of the 25th of August, and arrived

met with some amount of success, as the blessed result of the Holy on my humble, yet fervent, efforts to spend and be spent in the prosecution of the benevolent object of
Spirit's gracious snules

the

Society, the following facts will doubtless aftbrd proof. I have had lO" the last thirteen weeks, on Tuesday nights, a Bible-class at the

barracks."

CONPIEMATION-CLASS.
I have under faithful drilling in the Cliui-ch Catecliism twentytwo candidates for confirmation, who are also members of the Bible*'

class.

*i4i

80

"A few evenings befow the Conflrmation-claas was regularly organized I leotured before a large number on Confirmation, ahowing, in simple language, the institution of the rite in apostolic times, its practice in the primitive ages of the Church, and the object intended in requiring those who have come to years of discretion to submit to it. I have a class of male and female adults who are candidates for baptism ; five have already been baptized, fortnight ago I bpti;5ed four of the members pf a Rpmau Catholio

family."

CASE OF CHAEIES GOEDON.

"A very interesting African lad,


a month ago, from

and brought papers from several kmd persons who facilitated his fugitive object. He came to London in quest of his mother, who, it appears, had, by flight, breathed the pure atmosphere of freedom before he did. He can read and write a little, 13 possessed of superior natm'al abilities, is a member
Orleans,

New

aged about twenty, escaped here,

of

Bible-class, a candidate for confirmation, and is, I think, worthy of the personal interest which is taken in him. If he were in a position to come to school, his teacher, from his remarkable facility for retammg instruction, would never labour in vain. I baptized him last week by the name he desired, namely, Charles Gordon, in qomphment to his new frjend."

my

SFMMAEY OF
1

DUTIES.

regret exceedingly that as yet I have but a-week, three being the number I proposed to

two stated

services

With regard to the duty of house to house visitation, I beg to report that, as a rule, I daUy employ four hours of my time in its pertormance, so that I can say that I have visited very many colored tamUies London. From the circumstance of their being so widely scattered over a very large area, the visitation of half-a-dozen tamiUes, of course such between whom a long length of gi-ound intervenes, eoneumes the whole of the time allotted to it The tracts which the Religious Tract Society, and Prayer-book and Homily Society, kindly gave me when I was in England, have doubtless been instrumental in effecting much good, and I have great pleasure stating that the people read them with avidity. Feeling convinoed that a salutary influence would result from the practice, I have invariably had full evening service whenever my Bible and Conlirmation-classes meet. Those who come regularly are being initiated the sober and chaste mpde of worship of which it is our inestimable privilege to be the possessors. And because of thoir hitherto fntire Ignorance of that mode, and want of sympathy with it, the repugnance which they manifested to come to church must gradually become weaker and weaker."

ihe one is kept upon a Sunday evening, a mile and a-half from residence, whilst the distance to the place wherp the other is held on a Thursday night, is the same. I have, for the last three months and ft-half, been attending to a class at the Sunday-schopl of the Cathedral ; and, for a half-hour on the mornings of Mondays and Jfridays, give religious instruction in Mr. Hughes's school.

myself to maintain,

my

81
PEBIEB FOE INSTEUCTION.
*'I cannot but fay that they receive me with open arms, and evidence in their deportment deference and civility, Xhey are, doubtless, eager to obtain religious instruction, and always express

themselves as being grateful for the kind and Christian feelings which the people of England entertain towards them, and which I never pretermit a favourable opportunity of making known to them. rather remarkable and exemplary negro, distinguished for his fisty predilections in seconding the force of his warmly-conceived opinions, was some time ago rapturously giving vent to the gratitude which found a place in his affectionate heart, on account of the love which the Queen cherishes for his race. With stentorian lungs he gave out the following assertion : * That she had sent all kinds of men to elevate them and do them good ; but now she sends Moses himself (meaning myself, your negro missionary) to lead we into de land o' Canaan.' " It would certainly be unworthy of me were I to clof o this first Eeport, which I have the honor to make to the Committee, without stating that the very exemplary and zealous co-operatic u of their voluntary agent. Miss King, has been of immense service to jne, so that it has considerably feciHtated my labors,"

CHATHAM. This is a considerable city on the river Thames, with a population of 4,000 or 5,000. The
colored people resident here and in the immediate vicinity
c?ianot

be

less

than 2,000.
for the zeal

There

is,

consequently,
faithful

abundant scope
missionary.

and energies of a

The Rev. T. A. Pinckney, a colored native of Carolina, and formerly a missionary in Liberia, has been located at Chatham. Though never himself in slavery, he takes the warmest interest in the highest welfare of his race,
and
is

anxious to spend and be spent in promoting their

and in leading them to the Lord Mr. Pinckney remained time in England, and has the sympathy and prayers feme of the Committee, to whom he became fully known, that the Lord may prosper his work and labor of love. He
religious instruction,

Jesus Christ for salvation.

has furnished the subjoined Report

" December 7, ISoS.l arrived in London, Canada West, from England, on the 27th August, preached several times, and read the
pervioe in St. Paul's

Church

boase to house, and dietributed

also visited the colored people from ft large number of tracts. After

A'flllMlBrt*^- 'H'

32
y "f'"' Su October ^PP^^"*^^^ to tl^i3 ^ltl (Chatham). Arrived hero on tlio 8th ''i commenced next day visiting and conversini^ with ; the colored people from house to house, and also distributing tracts and lending books as at Loudon, It was nearly three weeks before I could get a suitable place to hold service in. Afterwards I obtained from the Council the use of the Town-hall, where I am now holding service on every Lord's-day tw.'co, when my health, which is not
'^'^'^

^^^"'*^

loraewhat'"^^^"'^*^*

^^'**'' '^ *^^'"^ ""^ constitution

BIBLE-CLASS AND STTND4T-S0HOOL. " I am also about forming a Biblo-clase and Sunday-schools, am prevented from completing them from want of books suitable but for the purpose. I have already written to his Lordship, the Bishop of the Diocese, on the subject, and he has promised to send me a few such as ho may be able to find. But T would respectfully request the Committee to furnish mo with a fidl supply, as his Lordship may ^ not be able to provide." ^

GEEAT NEEB OP BOOKS. "Indeed, I may truly say that my hands have been completely tied up ior want of books and funds to carry on the work But T hope and trust that the blessing of God may rest on my labors in the next quarter, and that matters connected with the Mission will progress more smoothly and prosperously than it was possible they cculd do tlie first, considering the disadvantages under which I labored in coming for the first time into this strange place."

DIFFICULTIES.

2,000 colored persons, it of them are Metliodists and Baptists, as they Many of them do not pi=oless any religion at aU. It is upon these last that I hope, by aod 8 blessmg, to make some impression. There are also a very few who have been in the habit of attending service in the Episcopal Church the States. These are following with me now. " few whites also attend occasionaUy ; indeed, * I may say, every J> '^^y J time I hold service."

IS

'''.'"'^ ?''mf majority*^"* Chatham some said. The


'^

"

are generally

wherever they are found.

ENCOTTRAGEMENTS.
the whole, I have to say, in conclusion, very respectfuUy to the Committee, that, though I have met with some discouiBgements, yet, on the other hand, I have been encouraged to go on in the performance of my duties to the utmost of my poor abilities. '' ^^^ *^^ ^^^^"""^ ^'^'""^ '" promised to the finally

"Upon

rS""
^

AMHERSTBURGH.-Thi.. city, also called Malden,


situate

is

on the Detroit River, and has a population

exceeding 2,000 persons, of


colored refugees.

whom

several hundreds are


for colored childrea

A separt^tq school

33
has been established here, at the request of the African
race, while the

mixed plan

is

carried out in the other

settlements, excepting Chatham.

The Rev. J. Hurst, who has been recently ordained, and has now had considerable experience among the
colored people, has been appointed to establish the Society's

Mission in this

city,

which was

originally

marked out

as

a place to be occupied when the plans of the Society were more fully developed. Mr. Hurst has been successful as an agent of the Society, and has been much blessed

hb labors for He is the oldest


in

the spiritual benefit of the colored race. Fugitive Slave Missionary in respect of

length of service.
following details
" peeember
6,
:

His reports and

letters present

the

ministry of the

and

Its

extremity of the province, where the Eiver Detroit merges into JjaJre i!.rie. This is an old settlement, partly ocqupied by Frencli Canadians, and, hke some other places, not much improved."

1858. Immediately after my ordination to the Word, I waF, appointed missionary to Amherstburgli vicmity. Amherstburgh is a small town at the south-west

COLOEED BAPTIST CHAPEL.


obtained permission from the School Trustees to occupy, for an evening lecture, the school-room set apart for the colored peoplebut it being founii too small, or, at aU events, not having conveni' ence to seat above forty persons, who assembled the first evening, the colored Bpptists invited me to hold the meeting in their chapel which will comfortably accommodate 200 persons. Last

"I

Wednesday

^"^ ^^^^""^^ assembled,

mudd^"^
"During the

though the roads were very

THANKEiriNESS FOE THE MISSION.


service, as well as in visits to their houses, it i,* easy to see that a lively interest has been awakened in the Mission and they hail with joy coming amongst them. this grow'

my

my

be mentioned, but that their souls may bo saved, and the people of God buUt up in their most holv faith. Colored people have a peculiar way of expressing then- rchgious sentiments ; but here, as in every place where I have been, there may be found some of the Israel of God, who, though despised of ^ men, are beloved of the Lord."

not that

my name may

May

BIBLE-CIA SS
addition to the lecture mentioned, I have already commenced a liible-class in their school-room, held on Satm-day afternoons.

"In

B 3

A AAiKiAf^^^^i?^

34
elder soholnrs form this at presont, but i confldently hope very to Bee a large attondauoo. Some Testaments from the Rev J. Hambletons school-chUdren will be used in this class. May it please God to make their HberaUty a blessing! Bibles, however. Wouid be more suitable for reference."

The

oon

DOMICILIAET VISITATION.
have already viaited a considerable portion of the colored people, but not systematically, judging it best to become acquainted with the leachng persons unmechately, and to learn what I can
all

from

quarters."

CHOICE OP lOCiMTT.

"7^V^ fell in with ment quite f^^^^^y.^V^

my judgment,
,

excellent place for the Mission; theappoint^ and I hope it will appear so

^^^ ^^'^"'^^ ^ several settlements, -.1'' \'^^* *''"'' It,.1 with a horse, not where, only could I hold service in the school' rooms on Sunday afternoons, but I should have time to return to town for evening service. There is also a large settlement ten miles
weekdays.
_

tlu8 place IS suited for a centre of operations."

Ihese things I mention merely to show -o-; how well

aSd S

Tract q^.w 8 small gift-books, for Society the children who learn a few verses of Scripture every week. I like to entice young minds in this
.

"' *^^^ t^'^e^ ^^ have theGrand Tv^ni P -f ^""^^"J^^ ^^ ?'^r ^* ^^' "' '-^^^^'^ ^1 ^^-e ^'^'^ wanted. 1,^ Ti""' There has not been any J^""'^"tract distribution here, and tracts are anxiously sought after. It is pleasant to sow seed in this way. I ^ " ^7 P^^yer-books, at a price as low as can be ?h!f1 may sell them Forgive me if I ask for some of the

nLT^'VT S?w i^AVll^^^'ZV

one box of clothing from than in any other place >^ of it whore she thinks^it mos? n^irr"ri,^r- go about^^^P^^"S with needed. Children^""'V' the streets apparently nothing on but an old cotton frock. No wonder they get sick and die. A woman told me yesterday, she had lost ten ohUdren by consumption. Ihere is a box of clothing on its way for London, but really it ^^ ^'''!- ^^y ^"^ "* ^^P^ * o^ i for the next ?P^"' anything may come from Quebec,
_

" Ifecemher 16 London, and fmd

Ol-OTHING-

rOK THE POOR.

1858.-We brought it needed much more

?W

PEAY POE

US.

lish friends,

was duly rece^Ved last week ; '"""^V'^X.^VVOvtunitj of answering it. I have no 3nlf that this special doubt fS'fl! -ou awakens the sympathy of our

J^^Ti
snow

2 1859.--Your kind

letter

M
it

and indeed

.ght to do so.

^o;:

to

wo"1d -e

--i-l.

our way, and give us the necessary wisdom to take advantage thereof "

m their prayers for us,

then- sympatliy

by contributing- to its funds only but also ; that the Lord will continually open

Engthem

S5
DifPioumiaa of jhk woek.
a difficult ono in whatever light it is viewed. have to contend with the prejudice of the whites agninst thu colored, and of the colored against the whites ; with their attaclijnent to their own habits of worship and uneducated preachers, and oven the shjness of assembling in the same house of prayer with the
is

"This Mission

We

O^r STiTIONS.
" There are three stations around the town, not more than four miles distant, where nervices can be held. I have already occupied ono of these, and have a jgood congregation of apparently devout
people ; but the roads are in such a wretched state that travelling ia next to impossible. On Sunday I ventured out, but could only get to the place by climbing the fences, and crossing the fields and bush lands ; and even then it is too bad to be repeated, until we have im-

on

n
^

proved roads. A horse and light vehicle are indispensable, if my must be pushed into the countr;; ; and I think the white people will give me one of the two in a little time for services helil amongst them. Last night I preached to about one hundred colored persons in a Methodist chapel, and if they were deUghted I certainly was also. Their singing made me quite cheerful. I saw two ooloiwd ministers and a white one present, with a small sprinkling of white people. This evening (d.v.) I am to preach in the Baptist chapel, and doubtless 150 will be present. Our Enghsh fricnus would be dehghted to see the earnestness of these poor persons thev seem tp (Jrink in the word and feel that Jesus is precious, and I have good hope that the Gospel is not preached in vain. By the way, the Bishop advises me to preach to the colored people wherever I can
labors
;

a^d most of the


the
*

gain admittance. In addition to preaching I catechise the children in the colored school once a week, when there are present from thirty to fifty. Some adults come regukrly to listen to this class. great part of the Testaments sent out to me are here used. The children are Vi.jy inteUigent, many o" them can read well and write a fair hand, and their answers to my questions are not inferior to those of the white children of the same age. In Toronto, Loudon,

cities east

common

schools,'

of Chatham, all colors are admitted into re there is a white school and a colored

school,

and the same

tunu.., tion is

country."

observed in the surroundin"*

COLOBED SCHOOLS.
" The three preaching stations I have mentioned are in colored schools. Some of these are very fairly taught, and in almost every case by colored persons. In the town we have a male teacher of good attainments, and really a hardworking man, but laboring under great disadvantages for want of su;'.able maps, &c. I have often thought it would be desirable to send out a few of tlie Christian Knowledge Society's cheap maps of Palestine, to give each school one; these would br of great use in our Scripture instruction.

Many of the schools are entirely secular, but in tliese the teacher reaas a ehaptw out of the Bible, and opens with prayer every
morning."

i.PPOINTED SUPERINTENDENT OP

COMMON

SCHOOLS.

" y ^sterday I received an

official

notice of

my

appointment to the

AlAIIBiA^*^'-'ll'

omco of local BUiwiutondent of the "common schools" in this township. This will bring mo into immediato connexion wi^h all the tcac)ier8 unci schools, liy this appointment I shall have opportunities of visiting the surrouiuling country iVeo of expense, aa the Allowance for my trouble wiU pay the hire of a vehicle for the iieccf-sary journeys so you seo the way keeps opening. You ask nic particuLirly for narratives of fugitive.. 1 sliall be happy to furnish you with them from tiiao to time, as I become more acquainted with the people."
;

CASE OF MES.

H.,

A KEFUOEB.

'This woman, now about eighty years of ago, sp. at the greater part ot her life in slavery, and was the mother of twelve children One of these died in infancy, and the rest came with their parents to Canada. very rarely find families so largo as this making their cycap 'l together. Her statement was much as follows :

Wo

main
tlicn

'I

When my
ill

slavery,

increasing in

certainly have boon sold down the river. a great burden to me, master was very kind, and wo liberty. I had charge of the hogs and sheep, the

we should

boys began to grow up they were unwilling to reand determined to ^o to Canada. I saw this spirit them, and was afraid it might become known for

This was

my

had much

smoke-house and We had plenty of clothes, a good house for the family, comfortably furnished, and a good feather-bed to sleep on ' and the thought of running away was very hard to bear

some other things

" What would aencral T. think of mo after took these things to God in prayer, and asked
as

all his

kindness

wo

Fim

were,

to let us remain

lint six of m;,

boys

who had

With us. ' This was veiy hard (putting her hand to her breast), I felt mighty bad here; for ... could only get away by deceiving our master On Saturday we left the place, while master was away, telling those at the house that we were going to a meeting at a httle distance ; but mst.ud of that set off for Canada, first cu foot th'^.i on a steamboat as far as wo could, and in a waggon the rest of the way. J3ut how frightened I was the whole time! Yet the Lord brought us through. On the foUowing Saturday we reached the whart at Amherstburgh, and feeling my feet

against me, and how could I succeed when six prayed against me? Thru the boys came and said, " Mother, we are going to Canada ?"' "^^ "''''* SO without you, and perhaps you *"i7 wi be^'""n 7'^l"P*when wo are gone,-you lU-treated had better go along

got rehgion prayed

you preach

now a widow, and, like Anna, ' serves God conversation is only about her Saviour, with whom slie appears to hold the ^osest communion. few days aso when I V3sited her, she said,-' Are you the brother that preaches in our chapel?' I said. Yes. 'Thev tnld me ^op ^^^^v- -i^^n- -a-t the other day, and I could not see you -but i said, NeveVminl I shall see him in the next world if not here. They tell me
day and night.

has given us freedom." ' This poor woman is

on free soil, I shoute'' out-Victory victory Bless the Lord, He has given us victory The boys came around me and said, "Mother, you must not make aU this noise "but I said, ' Go away, I will shout, for the Lord
!

Her

to

them

different

from the other preachers^

I told

37
hop that to teach the simple truths of the Gospel was my object in those tilings which immediately concern her salvation is well instructed. If I say, How did you learn these things ? She answers,* The Lord Jesus taught mo by

She cannot read a word, and yet


'

and bo to me.' I have often felt assured that Gtod has ways of communicating a saving knowledge of himself to persons who have very little opportunity of attending the means of grace. There will doubtless be many at the last day at the right hand of God, whose religion has been despised by other Christians when on earth."
said so

his Spirit.

Ho

CASH OP MES. B-

-T.

brain was laid bare. By the help of some friends my mother escaped with five children; I saw my father when he was wounded leanW agamst a stump, and that was my last look at him. Both he and our wounded sister were taken back. afterwards hoard that our father was sold to New Oricans, but of r^^ siscer we know nothing After pursuing our way some time, my brother being persuaded by a man who was trdvelhng with us to return with him, went away, and we never heard anything of him. ^n another part of ou.journev one of my sisters went into the wood to find a stream of water and got lost. were then wandering in a strange place, and not knowing the way, found at night that we had come round the ^untry to a place we had seen before, wo hud returned six miles. Here we found a house, and asking for .shelter were shown into a barn, which we lay down to sleep. Presently a sound of breathing was heard, which raised suspicion in our minds as to .whether w) were in company with friends or foes. But my mother, summoning courage to speak in the darkness, was ans^^ ered by her own dear lost daughter, who had wandered through tho wood to the same place At this time we had no money, for my brother and the man with whom he returned had taken aU with them, so we lived upon what mends gave us on the way. ,"'/.^"^% we got on board a vessel, and were landed on a small island Lake Erie, where my mother, from exposure and

1 was brought to this country when young. My father and mother loft Virginia with six children intending to bring us all to Canada. But on the way, while in a free State, we wem overtaken by persons who had been hired for the purpose. My father offered resistance, and in the affray was wounded and one of my sisters had her skuU broken by a blow with the barrel of a gun, so that her
;

Wo

We

etory
;

make
Lord

became sick and remained a little time, but we wf>re sent to the mainland opposite, on the Canadian shore. We wandered on foot to Amlierstburgh, crying as we went. There our mother joined us
ness,

unhappi-

8
',

God
with
ago,

1
hi

when she

recovered.'

^s

hea in past

mind,
11
[

me
told

Wm

Wk

" In no place have I seen people so ragged as those are in tho count, ry places, and what clothes they have -^ould never be put or y any person unacquainted with their peculiar shape. They seem to be rather hung upon their backs than otherwise; but there is a """ -'C.e. ^x-,.ck;.tjf lu niuiiy ui lacso people, ihuy wiU not always teh us what they want. A few kind friends gave me some money Rt the begmning of the winter to relieve distressed cases, .^hese ooth Mrs. Ilurst and myself have hunted up, and actuaUy
!

38
offered the relief before it has been asted for. This is a pleasing trait in their character, and leads one to trust them "

VALUE OF THE CLOTHING SENT. " March 11, 1859. Our winter has been exceedingly mild. Surely God has tempered it tc the distressed state of the inhabitants. Last year's crops of wheat and oats were destroyed ; the former by a small insect, tne latter by the rust ; so that \7e depend for these necessaries on other plaoes. To see the joy in the countenances of the colored people for the clothing they receive would repay our kind English

friends for their trouble. They cannot procure food, much lees clothing. Some of the scenes Mvs. Huret meets with are too wretched for me to describe. She generally visits after me, and attends to the clothing, and sometimes finds out families who have

not come in

my way.'*

the

In former publications, the Society has made known name and character of the colored man, Abraham

Copeland.

He

has,

like

many

others,

emigrated from

Canada to the new British colony in the North-West. His letter from thence to Mr. Hurst will be read with
interest
is
:

"Vancouver's Island, Dec. 11, 1858. Christian Friend,--It with pleasure that I write these few lines to you to inform you that I am well, hoping this may find you enjoying the same blessing. My wife wrote me word that you were in London, and had called to see her. I was highly pleased to hear from you indeed. I often think of the times we used to havn at Brother Gibbs's and other places in praising God and I hope, if we never meet in such meetings again on earth, we shall in heaven, where all our partings are no more. I am well pleased with this country indeed, and intend to make Victoria my ho: I have found more true hearts towards Christ here than any p^ m x have found since I left home. Victoria is a small place, consequently there are only two churchesthe EngUsh and the Catholic. I attend the English twice every Sabbath. The Bfiv. Mr. Cridge is our minister. I expect my wife to this country in the spring. Please remember me to Mr. O'Neil, and excuse tlxis
;

short

letter,

and write to me soon."

Toronto.
missionary

The

special report of the labors of

Committee have not received any Mr. Ormerod iis a" city

are glad to
fidelity,

among the colored people of Toronto. They know that he is pu-suing his labors with
trust,

and

on a future occasion, to be able to

publish an account of them.

Amidst

population of

nearly 50,000,
refugees.

it is

believed that at least 1,000 are colored

M*

39

Vancouver's Island. The Rev. E. Cridge, Colonial Chaplain of Victoria, Vancouver's Island, feeling the
importance of early
efforts for the spiritual instruction of

a considerable number of colored persons who had arrived in the colonj from the United States and the Canadas, in consequence of the gold discoveries on the Mainland, British Columbia, at once applied to the Society for the required co-operation.

The

following

is

his statement
"Oct.

4, 1858. The colored people are still an object of great and interest to me. There are, perhaps, 300 of this class here .ftt present, and when a favorable juncture arrives, tliere is every probability of their immigrating in large numbers. They have mostly bought land and built on it, or are engaged in various useful oicupations. They seem to be decidedly rooting in the sail. Whoever goes

anxiety

away, these, I am convinced, will, as a body, be permanent (unless they are greatly disappointed in their hopes). So far, their conduct as a class has been excellent. They feel their position, and know that they arc on their trial, and that thoy have a character to establish. They are anxious to enjoy British liberty and the good will of the white people, but they have a great ordeal to go through. Most of the Americans and Americanized popidation are affected with a deeply-rooted prejudice against the colored race, and we liavo bad great difficulty in so ordering our church arrangements as not to drive away either the one party or the other. Sometimes wliito people will leave the church outright, wlien they find themselves in contact with a man of color ; at others, a white man will watch his opportunity, and dart from his scat as if he had been stung, and sc/c another place. How the matter will end I know not. I can only act on the broad principle of knowing no distinction, at the same time that we (the churchwardens and myself) carry it out with such modifications as circumstances require and wisdom dictates. In tliis wo have been greatly assisted by the colored ministi^r, Mr. Moore, who fully appreciates the position, and knows how to restrain and modify the forwardness of some of his people. I send you a ' Victoria Gazette,' containing a correspondence which arose in consequence of a sermon which I preached on this subject. 1 think, on the whole, the prejudice is less marked. I should be glad if you could send me any papers to show how this thing works in Canada. "My chief anxiety at present, however, is to provide some more
mteresting race. I gradually lose those religious influences with which many of them were imbued when they first came here. The church is not large enough to contain them all without driving away the white people, for- which reason I cannot use so great and general urgency witli regard to their corauig to church as I could wish. There seems to be an opportunity of setting such agency on foot in the person of Mr. Moore. I should first say that, in consequence
fear they
specific agency, if possible, for the benefit of this

may

AAJiii

40
of some remarks
place, intimating his ministrations

made by some of his people who preceded him to this


some

among them here

expcctatioi, of his being permitted to carry on in connexion with the Episcopal

Church (I think I told you that he was ordained in the American Methodist Episcopal Church), I was purposing to write to him, lest he should form expectations which could not be realized. I was prevented from domg this by his coming earlier than was expected. Immediately on his aiTival he sought an interview with me, and said ho wished, if it were practicable, to make his services here directly
beneficial to the spiritual welfare of his race, and, if possible, in con-

nexion with the Established Church. He readily understood (what, indeed, he did not seem to expect) that he could not labour as an ordained mini3ter in connexion with our Church. But I said it was quite consistent with my own wishes that his people shoiild enjoy the benefit of his labours, if satisfactory arrangements could be made, and prom'sed to write to your Society on the subject, at the same time that I fully made him to understand the contingency of the proceeding. Now, I think he might be very useful as a Scripture-reader or catechist. He might hold a service once on the Lord'sday, and perhaps once in the week, in a room in another part of the

town, provided ^e can in due time get a suitable one built. I do not know whether your Society is in a position at the present time to iake him into your service in this capacity. I mentioned the subject to the Bishop of Oregon (Bishop Scott), who paid us a visit a
short time ago, and he fully approved of the plan, provided I was previously satisfied as to Mr. Moore's character. In reference to this, I can only say that everything I have seen and heard of him has given

opinion highly favourable to his soundness of doctrine and consistency of life. He has considerable natural ability, and is, at the same time, of gentle and unaffected manixars. And what enhances my opinion of him still more is the affection with which all his people have spoken of him to me from the first, both those who came as a deputation at an early stage of the movement, as well as those who followed, as many as I have spoken with. He is at present keeping a store as a means of livelihood, and this perhaps he might continue to do, unless he could be provided with such an income as would set him above the necessity of doing so. He has a wife, but no children. I should say he is about thirty-five or forty years of age. I commend this matter to the favorable consideration of your Society, and beg an early answer."

me an

The Committee
appeal,

at once responded ftivorably to this


to employ Mr. Moore upon a grant from the Society.

and authorized Mr. C .dge

for a time, as catechist,

And

as soon as he

spiritual qualifications

had gathered adequate evidence of the and competency of Mr. Moore for

the duties

he was further instructed to appoint him permanently to that office under the Society,
to place

of catechist,

and

him on the

list

of

its

agents.

41

The
Canada
I

hearty loyalty of the free colored por>uIatIon in


is

attested

contact with them.


their feelings of

all who have been brought into They sometimes give utterance to attachment to the Crown of England in

by

colored gentleman of Chatham, C.W., has composed an anthem for his fello'vcountrymen, which is happily expressed, and in the

a style peculiarly their own.

prayer of which every true British Christian must cordially join:

AiE " " Bless the Queen

Home Again."
!

England's Queeu Ileaven protect and save Oh, may the space be wide between Her cradle and the grave Ever may her land i-omain Asylum of the free ; spell to break each galling chain

Of liuman

slavery.

Chorus.Bless

the Queen, &c.

" 'Neath her sway, equal rights Extend to rich and poor From halls of dukes and gallant knights,
;

the iiumble peasant's door Hence, ever from the peasant's cot, And domes of wealth and sheen.

To

One prayer ascends

0od

save,

God

of word and thought, save the Queeu

Chobus.
" O'er her may angels spread Their all-protecting wing Oh, may they shield her heart and head

From each delusive thing ; Shield her from the gloom and care By mortal eye unseen, That she may live long live to wear The crown God save tho Queen

Choeus.
" Wlien her long, peaceful roign
Shall here have been complete, she for brighter realms would fain
terrestrial seat.

And

Leave this

May

her deathless spirit soar To that blest world of I'ght,


ills

Where

And

there's

and cares disturb no more. nor day nor night." Chobps. J. M. Bexl, Chatham^ C.W,

.--=^

42

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS, DONATIONS,


WHICH APPEAB
London, the Lord Bishop of ... 1 1 Llandaff, the Lord Bishop of ... 1 1 o 10 C^shel, the Lord Bishop of Kilmore, the Lord Bishop of.d jn. 5 Melbourne, The Bishop of, don. 1 1 Argyle, Tlie Duke of, don 2 Argyle, The Duchess of 2 2 Amherst, Dowager Lady, don... 5 Arbuthnot, Hon. Mrs 1 Alcock, W. N. Esq., and Mrs., don 10
Allen, Mrs Arniitage, Rev, F Armitage, Miss, don
,.

I
ETC.,

IN THE SUBSEQTTENT LIST, OE IN THE EEPORTS OF PEECEBINO- TEAES.


Courthope, Miss, don. Cropper, Mrs. J. ...,
f

Cunningham, Rev. Dundas, Lady C Dunsany, Ladv


Dalton, Rev. S.

P.,

dons.

...

2 3 13 2
I

N
10

10 10

Ci

Deacon, Mrs., don Deck, Rev. H., don

De De

Jersey, Miss Quetteville, Rev.

1
1

Bandon, The Countess of, don. Barrington, Lady C, Mrs. Abel Smith, Miss Smith, and other
friends

a 5 5

Dickinson, Mis Dickson, Miss Du Pre, Misses Exeter, tlie Marchioness of Edwards, Rev. W. J., don

1
1 1

1
1

Edwards, L. F., Esq Erskine, Miss C,


4 17
1

sale

of
84 C

work
Evans, Miss A. E., don Evans, T., Esq., don Evans, Rev. K Ewart, Mrs Finch, Lady Louisa Ferrier, Miss ffolliott, Rev.

Bristowe, Lady A., don Buxton, Sir E. N., Bart, (the

3
2
1
1

late) dons 30 Buxton, TheDowagerLady.dons. 14 Buxton, Lady 5 Buxton, Mrs. Fowell, don 5 Barker, Miss Raymond 1 Bathurst, Rev. W. H., don 1 Battersby, Rev. J. D. H Baynes, Captain, don 1 Benson, Mrs. R 2 Bevan, R. C. L., Esq 75 Bevan, Rev. F. S 2

1
1

10
1 1 1 1
1

Fielde,
10 10

Mrs

Forbes, IL, Esq., and Mrs France, Rev. T., don Frere, J. H., Esq "riend, per Mrs. D. Wilson,

2
5

don

Mrs Binjham, Colonel Blackden, Mrs Blake, Miss Jex


Beva.i,

1
,

1
1

Friend, by Miss Marston, don. 25 Friend, per Rev. W. De (Juette1

ville,

don

2 10 6

Boyer, Rev. R Boyle, the Ladies C. and E Breay, Mrs., don Breay, Rev. H. T. and Mrs Brook, Rev. J Brook, Mrs. C Brooke, Sir W, de Capel, Bart.
Ditto,

2 5
10
1 1
1

don

10
1 1

Brooke, Mrs. T Brown, Miss Brown, the Misses Burgess, Rev. R., don Burns, G., Esq., and Mrs., don. Buttemer, Rev. A. and Mrs. ... Campbell, Lady, don
Carlisle, the Earl of

1 1

10

a 5
1

2 2 Ditto, don ,. 10 Carnegie, Lady, and the Misies 2 Chase, Rev. J. C, don 10 Ditto, for the purchase of clothing 12 10

Friend to the Fugitive Slaves, per A. H 25 Gort, The Dowager Lady, don. 3 Grey, Hon. Lady (the late) 1 Gedge, Rev. Sydney 10 Garbett, Rev. E. and Mrs 1 Gay, G., Esq., and Mrs. Gay ... 2 Gibljs, Misses 1 Gillesp'e, Mrs. 2 Green, J., Esq., don 1 Gurney, Rev. J. H., don 15 Gurney, Miss 2 Gurney, D., Esq 3 3 Gurney, Russell, Esq., don. ... 5 Harcourt, Lady 1 Hart, Lady 10 Hadden, Misses 1 Hamilton, Rev. James 1 Hamilton, Mrs. J., coll 5
,

Ditto, sale of

work

28 10
5
5 3

Cholmondeley, Marchioness of
Carbonell, W. C, Esq Clark, Rev. A., don Clay, Rev. E. and Mrs Clay, Miss Clinton, Rev. C. J. Fynes Cobb, Rev. T. F. and Mrs Courthope, G. C, Esq., don. Courthope, Mrs. C. E

8
1 1

Harcourt, Miss P Harrison, Misses Heywood, Mrs. R Hill, Rev. A. B., coll

8
1

6
1

(J

2
2
1 1

10
...

Holcombe, Mrs Huish, Capt., and Mrs Morsfalj, Mrs., don Johnston, Rev. Andrew, Johnston, Rev. J.

10
don...,
3
1 1

5
1

Jones, F. R.,
Kinnairci,

Esq

Hon. Arthur, M.P....

43
Kinnaird, Hon. A., M.P,, don. 10 Klntorc, The Earl of 2 Ditto, don 10 Kinnersley, The Hon. Mrs 2
.. ..

..
..

2 3 13 2
1

Kennaway, Lady..... Kenworthy, J., Esq King, Rev. R. C


Kinfe,

o
1

Reeve, Rev. J. W., don Richings, Rev. B Riland. Rev. J Oj Roberts, Miss Ditto, don Robinson, Mrs., don
6

1
1 1

1
1

2
1

o 10
10

Rev. Isaac, don


2

Rowe, W.,Esq
Ryder, Hon. G. D., and Lady G. Russell, David, Esq
Si.:irin,

10

..
..

10
10

.. ..

10
1
1

..
,.

.. ..
.
.

1
1 1

1 o Lascelles, Lady Caroline, don... 5 Littleton, Hon. C 10 Jjabouchere, J., Esq 2 2 Ditto, don lo Labouchere, Mrs. J 2 2 Lambert, Miss 2

Kitchjng, Rev. W. V., don Kitton, Rev. J., dons

2
1
1

Shaftesbury,

Lady Mary The Earl

of

Ditto, don Scott, Lady John

2 10
1

1
1

.. ..

f
..

84

Langdon, Mrs. and Miss, Langton, Rev. C Langton, Mrs. C Laycock, Miss ., Lucas, Mrs Lumsden, Mrs., don Macdonald, Lady, don

don...

2
i i
l

2
5

Smith, Lady, don Sparrow, Lady Olivia, don Smith, Elliott, Esq i'<aunders. Rev. J. T. C F;avile, Rev. P Sawyer, Miss Sh.w, Mrs. B Smith, Mrs. Abel Snepp, Rev. C
Sperling, Mrs. II. G Sperling, Miss E., don

10

12
1

1
1 1 1
1

2
10
1
1

..
.
.
.

3
2
1
1

Mayo, Rev. R., don, Meade, Larly iviaitland, Miss, don Mackie, Rev. Dr Magee, Rev. W. and Mrs

2 10 o 10 1 o
l 1

2
1
1
1
1
]

1
1

Malcolm, W., Est,


Marriott,
10
1
1

.
.

Mrs
,.,
,

o o
01

Marston, Miss
Ditto, don.

1 1 1

.
.

Esq., don Maxwell, Rev. E.,part of a loan repaid from West Canada, don. 2 McKerrill, Mrs ] i Mee, Rev. J. and Mrs., don 10 Member of Congregation of Rev. J. Bolton, Kilburn 10
8.,

Martin,

5 10 10

Rev. F. J Spottiswoode, Colonel Spottiswoode, John, Esq Spottiswoode, Miss St. John, Rev. H. St. Andrew... Stock, J., Esq Swindells, Mrs. G
Spitta,

10
1

2
1

2
1

Thomas, Rev. Mesac

Merry, Rev.

S.

W., and Mrs,

...

2
3
5

25 3
1

Miller, Mrs. Boyd, dons Mills, Mrs. Arthur Mjlne, T., Esq., and Mrs Milne, the Misses 10

Thorpe, Rev. R. O. T 10 Turner, Misses Page 1 11 Turner, Rev. W. T 1 \ T. C, to be especially devoted to the education and advancement of the colored population ot Canada Fugitives and their descendants 25 Upcher, Hon. Mrs 1 1
Valiant,

Lady

2
,

3
i
1
\

Midford, Mrs
6

Vincent, Rev. W., don Williams, Lady Sarah, don

10

5
1

2
1

Needham, Lady G., don Newdegate, Mrs


Newton, Miss Noel, Hon. Mrs. B
Noel, Hon. Noel, Hon. Noel, Rev. Old Dalby,
, ,

,..,...

1 l

2
1

, ,

15 2 3
5
1

Mrs. F and Rev. Leland ... Horace, don Christmas Tree, per

2
5

Mr. A. Hodges Osborne, Rev. J. F


10

15

010
3
1
1
I

Owen, Mrs
Portman, Hon. Mrs
Paton, Miss, don Peek, \V., Esq. (5 years)
Ditto, don Perceval, Hon. and Rev. G.

5
5

28 10
5
5 3

C,
1 1 1

don
Peroival, Rev. T.
c
1

C, don

S
1

Watson, Lady F Walker, Fountaine, Esq., Watkins, Rev. H. G. and Warner, Rev. G Wason, Rev. J Wastell, Rev. J. D Watson, Mrs. J Wauchope, Rev. D., and Webb, Rev. Wedgwood, Miss L. E., Mrs, C. Langton Wedgwood, Miss L. E Wedgwood, Miss E. S White, Mrs ; Whitaker, - Esq Wickes, Rev. Wildman, Mrs. E Wildman, Miss Wilson, Rev. J
,

don.

Mrs.

2
1 1 1 1 1 1

Mrs.

10

and
10 8

2
5
1

2
1

10 10 2 10

Phillips,

Mrs

Plumptre, Rev. C.
Portal, Miss, dons. Portal, J., Esq

Wilson, Mrs. Danl. ., Wingfield-Digby, Mrs


i l

1
1
1

1 1

,.....,,,

eO
1

10
3
1 1

Powell, W.,
1

Esq

Raban, Rev. J. (the late) Rabett, Rev. R., and Mrs


Recorder, the, of London..,

10

i 5

Wright, Mrs , Wright, Misses, don Yate, Rev. G. L Yeatman, Misses, don...... Young, Mrs. C. Baring, don.

1
.I

20

.AiiiAi

44

SUBSCIIIPTIONS, DONATIONS, AND COLLECTIONS, Foe the Year endint^ 31st Makoh, 1859.
Jennings, R. Esq.,
Scrivener, Mrs. A.
5
...
...

2
1

Sandy.
Receiver,

don May, Geo., Esq. May, Jno., Esq.

Smith, Maria
6

2
5
5

Thomas, Mrs Thompson, Mrs.,..


Travers,Wm.,Esq. Travers, Miss O...

Mrs. H. Brandreth. By Mrs. H. Brandreth,


Collector.

Netherclift, Mr. ... Smith, C. \V. Esq.

5
2

10 5 5
1

Smith, Mr. Jno.

...

Webb, Reuben

...

Brandreth, Mrs. H. Friend, a

House-box Perowne, Rev. J.J. Primrose, Lady L.

10 5 9 4

Windsor.
4

By Miss

By Mrs.
10 10 10

Wall, Collects.
1

Bagster, Collector.

4
5

Pym, Mrs. Pym, Miss


of
Searle,

10

Bagster, Mrs Bagster, Miss Gerding, Mrs

Friend, a Friend, a Friend, a

2
1

Rosebery, Countess

Kingston, Mrs Wall, Mrs

5 5

Mrs Thompson, Lady, don

4 4
10
5

WiNKriELD.
ByMrs.W.Rawes,Coec/or. Barker, Miss 2 6
Bruce, Misses E.

Small sums

High Wycombe.
King, Rev. Isaac, don
10

Tufnell, LadyA....

By Lady Henrietta Pelham,


Collector.

and L Rawes, Mrs Rawes, Mrs. W.


White, Miss

...

2 3 2
2

6 6

C. E. C. G.

A. P

5
1

Cambridge.
ISudtiiigfjamsSirc.
Thorpe,
T.
10

E.
F.

10
5

Rev. R.
10

H. H.

D
J.

Slough.
Chase, Rev. J.

4 4

C,

M. C
S. A. P S. E. S

4 4 4
10

don

By

Elliott Smith, Esq., Collector,

Stony Strateord.
Receiver,

Browne, Mrs

4
10

Wickes, Miss

Mrs.

llabett.

Mrs Gotobed, Mrs


Eldridge,

By

Miss

Searle,

By Mrs.
9
6

Rabett, Collector

Gotobed, Miss LiUey, Mrs. W. E.


Piper, Miss

4 4 4

Collector

(for 1857.)

WOBURN.

By Miss Ferrier. Trevor, Miss Treves, Miss E. ... 1 Trevor, Miss C. ... I

10

Aldred, John Barnaby, Mrs Herrington, H. ... Perceval, Hon. and Rev. G. C, don. 1 Rabett, Rev. R. ... 1 Rabett, Mn. 1 Richards, Mrs. ..,0 Smith,

10 10
1

4
6
10 10

Sharp, Mrs Smith, Elliott,E8q. Smith, John, Esq.

QLfitifiitt.

4
1

Altrincham.
"3y

Miss Potter, Collector.

Farkingdon.
J.'s,

Carlisle,

By Mrs.
8
7

Mrs

4
1

Rabett, Collector
(for 1858).

Mr., School,

per E.W.Moore,

Esq
Reading.

ByMajorPapillon,Coec<or.
Calvert, Mrs Crockett, J., Esq. Davies, Miss

2
2

6
ii

Aldred, John Barnaby, Mrs Begbie, Miss Binney, Mrs Druce, Mrs Johnson, Mrs Rabett, Rev. R....
ilabett,

10 10
10 10
1

GHes, Miss Greaves, Miss J.... Greaves, Miss A.

10
1

Harwar, Mrs Hayes. Mrs Hunt, Mrs Jackson, Miss


Neild,

4
1

10
4 4 4
4
1

Mrs

Mrs

10
5

Robinson, Mrs
Starkey, Mrs Thistlethwaite.MlssO

Dupre, Mrs
Friend, a,
coll.

6
]

by 4 19

Reeve, Mrs. W. ... Richards, Mrs. ... Richardson, Fanny

10

Wood, Mrs

45
Conifeall.
Mosley, Mosley, Mosley, Mosluy, Mosley,

Lady
...

Altabnum.

By

Mrs.

R.

H.
8

Tripp, Collector.

Miss Miss L, Miss I. Miss E. Stone, Miss


Wilson, Mrs

2 4
.
...

6
fi

Wright,

H
G
G

Mr.

F.
3 7

2 5
1

Wright, Mr. P.

By Mr,

?,

Wright,

Collector.

V,
..
..
..

2
1

Buiy, Mrs., family


Carr,

and
10 2 2 5 17
1

By Miss
Keswick.

Stevens, Collector.

H.

10 5 q. ..0 5
..

By Miss Langton, Collector.


Battersby, Rev. J. D. Bernard, Miss

Foley, Mrs Foley, Miss

4 4
I

Dalton,

Fowler, Miss, don,


10
7 5

10
1

Donations Friends
Gladstone, Jenkins, A

6
6

lollector
..

Denton, Miss Dover, Miss Dunlop, Miss


6
Favell,
Hill,

S.

...

G,W,, don J, H.,don Stevens, Mrs


Steveno, Miss

M
G

13
111

4^
7J

Lomax, E
Overton, T. Wright, C

4
5
1

..0
..
.

2
1

Mrs

OSMASTON.
Receiver,

,.0 ..0

5 5

Rev. H. D. and Mrs Hornby, Mrs. J. ... Hornby, Miss M.

110
10
2 5

Miss Judith Wright,

By Miss Dewe, ColC


lector
15 S.

10

Kennedy, Esq. Langton, Mrs Langton, IV'sses... Learmouth,Mis8... Lightfoot, Mrs. ... Rookin, Mrs
,

Exeter. By Rev. W. G, Heathman,


Collector.

By Miss

K. Jowett, ColLady, a
2 5 6 5

10
4
10
5

lector.

10

4 4

Batho, Miss C, G. Edwards, W., Esq.

Stanger,
.

Ecq.,

and Mrs

Stanger, Mrs. J.... Tayler, Esq....

Edwards, Mrs.W. Hankinson,Mrs,R. Jowett, Miss S, ... Pratt, Miss

Loscombe, Miss ,.. 10 Ruse, Mrs 2 Sillifant, J., Esq. 5 Small sums 10

4
1

Plymouth.
Receiver,

10

By Miss Emily
10

Ravenhill,
2
...

Collector,

Miss J. Prideaux. By Miss Gennys,


Collector 1857)
(for

Archer,

Mrs

Debby.
..0
,.
.

4
10

Receiver,

.
. . .

4 4 4

By

Mrs, E. W. Foley. Miss Flower, Collector,


,

Chapman, Mrs. Ditto, don Chisman, Mrs Ditto, don

2
2 2

13
Collector

10
6 C

By Miss Gennys,
(for 1S58),

Cheethain, Esq.
Flower, Mrs Flower, Mrs Flower, Mrs. H. ... Flower, Miss From a bridge Marten, Mrs. G.,

4
6 10 10

10 5

Ravenhill, Mrs, ... 10 Ravenhill, Miss .,.0 2 Ravenhill, MissM, 4 Ravenhill, Miss E. 4

Boger, Mrs Bcger, Mrs. Boger, Miss


Coles,

10
1

Miss

4
4

Devonshire, Miss,,

10 10
1

t.
.

4
2 10 2
5

By Miss Judith Wright,


Collector.

Flight,

Mrs
Gennys,

Henn
Misses

don
Marten, Miss, don. Mee, Rev. J,, don, Mee, Mrs Smith, Miss Spurgeon, Mrs
Stevens, Mrs

. . .
.

4
1
1 1

10 10

4 Mosley, Col-

.
.

4
1
1
1

By

Miss

I.

Boothby,Mi3S,don, Box, a Cupiss, P., Esq, .,. Donations Farr, Mrs., don, . Robarts, Miss Tannelander, Miss Tomlinson, Miss, don Wilkinson, Miss . Wilkinson, Miss

10
7 11 2 6 4 3
1

8
1

Paull, Miss

By Miss Holberton,Co//ec/or(for 1857)


12

2
2

By Miss
6 2

Holberion, Col1

lector (for 1858).

Babb, Mrs
Edlin, Mrs Fdlin, Miss

lector.

.
.

Barber, Mrs Bott, Mrs


Bott, Miss Cotton, Miss

10
2 2 2
i

H., don 10 Wright, F.B., Esq. 10 Wright, F,, Esq.,..;o 5

4 4 4
4
1

3S0

Miss E... Fletcher, Miss L. Lyons, Mrs Mosley, Sir


Fletciier,

4
2

Wright, Wright, Wright, Wright, Wright, Wright,

Mrs

Miss Miss S. ... Miss F,.,. Miss M.,.,0 Miss J....

Holberton, Esq. Holberton, Mrs. J. Holberton, Miss ...


,

10 10
1

TolhertriT!, Mis?.

4
8

0,010
1

Square, Miss Square, Miss

4 4

10

4d
By Mrs. Admiral
Pearsonby,
Col1

By Miss

E.

Collector.

lector (for 1837)

M. Cafpendale, Byl'issMack Atld Mi 8 Gravely,

ByMissPrideauXj Collector. Forster, Mrs. (for


2 years) 3
(for

Carpendale, Mrs... Carpendale, Miss

Greenwood, Mrs...

.040
5

Collectors

15

Fox,

Mrs.

Mission-box, per Misses Cox Ditto, per Miss

15
14 10
1

3
7

years) Harris, Mrs

2
(for

10

Watson
Penny, Miss Miss L. Tuoner, Miss L. ...
Phillipps,

Kingston, Miss
2 years)

Chalburt. By Mrs. Harington,


lector.

ColA

Hunt, Miss

10

Mapowder,
(for

Mrs.
2
3 2
2

2 years)

By Miss
Conway, Conway, Conway, Conway,

E. A. Conway,
fl

Price,

Miss M. R.
(for 2 years)

Collector.

M.

Prideaux, W. W., Esq. (for 2 years) Prideaux, Miss


(for 2 years)

Miss ... Miss E.A. Masters. Master T.

Adye, Mrs Bridges, Rot. C. and Mrs, Linthom, Mrs. ...


6 6

d^

2
2 5

Reeves, Mrs

l)dRCHE8T^R. Yeatman, Miss J,

10
'

Prideaux, Miss E.
(for 2 years)

III

2
6 2
1 1
1

By Miss

it

C. H. Mackenzie,
Collector.

Stone, Sarah

FORDIHGTON,

Tracey, Esq.... Tracey, Mrs Tracey, Master C. Tracey, Miss M.... Tracey, Miss (for 2 years)
,

Fisher, Mrs Friend, a Friend, a


F.

10 10
6

By Rev, A.

B. Handley,
6 5

(Collector.

2 2

Warren, Miss
2 years)

Landon, Mrs Mackenzie, Mrs.,

10
4
2 6
6

(for

and family Trimby, Mrs

Cume, Mrs, G. ... Handley, Rev. A. Ludlow, Mrs Palmer, Mrs Smith, Mrs. R. ... Yeatman, Miss J...
Hilton.

d
6 S
6

By Miss

J.

Prideaux, Col10 5 10

TORQUAT.
Receiver,

lector (for 1857).

By Mrs.

St.

John, Collector.
4 4
5
1

Prideaux, J., Esq. Prideaux, Miss ... Prideaux, Miss J,

By

Miss Dyott. Miss F. Douglas, Collector.

Abbott, Rev. Geo. Anderson, , Esq.,

By Miss

J.

Prideaux, Col10 5 10

lector (for 1858).

Prideaux, J., Esq. Prideaux, Miss ... Prideaux, Miss J.

Aplir, Miss Bore, Mrs ... Bure, Miss Bere, Miss A Carrington, Mrs.

..050 10 ..080
8 2
1

and Mrs Bt.l'^her, Miss .... Bingham, Colonel Cotter, Rev. J. R. St. John, Rev. H.
St. St. John,

4
10

By

Miss

E.

W.
Col10

Prideaux,

lector (for 1857)

don Dixon, Miss Douglas,P.H.,Esq. Douglas, Miss Douglas, Miss F. Edwards, C, Esq. Edwards, Mrs. ...
Friend, a, don. ... Friend, a Garratt, Miss Garratt, Miss E....

Mrs

4
6

4
4

Woodhouse, Mrs., collected by

4
2

Digby, Mrs.

Sherbourne. W. ... 1
Stafford.

fTOKE.

2 6
2

By Miss

Greaves, Collector.
4
2
5

4
4 10

Noel, Rev, Horace

10

Badcock, Miss Easto, Captain ... Gardner, Rev. R.


don. Greaves, Mrs Greaves, Mrs. C... Lees, D., Esq

Smith, Mrs
Stanley,

Mrs
...

4
2

Stuart Provost.
Receiver,

Wilson, Mrs. J.

4 4
10
2
2

By Miss
D. O. don D. O. don

Dyott, Collector.
5

By

Mrs. Wauchope. Mrs. Fenwick, Collector,


4
4

Mary
Rpinsey, Miss
Snell,

10
6

2
1 1
')

Miss

Dyott, Miss Mansfield, Miss H.

Tiverton,
Receiver,

Maynard, Mrs. .. Savile, Rev. F...


Steer, Miss, don...

10 10
1
1

Dixon, Mrs. P. ... Dixon, Mrs. T. ... Fenwick, Mrs Hodgson, Rev. J. Murray, Mrs Murray, Mrs. A.... Shepherd, Mrs. ...

4 4
4

4 i

Miss Carpendale.

47
By
Mrs. Wauchope, Coi
lector.

Haberileld,

Ldy,
1

don
4

Finlay, Miss

AWRE.
Malpaa,Rev.J. H.
10

Lamb, Miss
Spottiswood,
T.,
1

Ladlei, two don... Leman, Miss, don.

10

10 10

Esq
Spottiswood,

Mrs.

Bristol and Cliftok


10 10

By

Mlsg Monckton, Collector.

(^

Wauchope, Rev.D. Wauchope, Mrs. D. Wauchope, Mrs. J. Wauchope, Mrs. R. Wauchope, Miss A. E

AtJXILIARY. By Miss Beecher, Collector, Beecher, Miss Walker, Miss 6


.I

Mrs., don. Wright, Mri., don.


Salter,

By Miss M. Sherwood,
1

By Miss Chapman,
Collector
.........

Collector.

Parkhurst, Mr.

..060
.

Thomas, MissM

10

Hutljam.

By Miss Cooke,
\

Collector,

By Mr.
Eiq

Dari.ikgtok. Rhodes, Collector


(for 1857).

Seymour, Captain, R.N. .,

By
6

Miss Townsend, Coiieolor.

Kington, Miss C.
d 10 10 10
5

Backhouse,

J.

C,

By

Miss Corfe, Collector.

Backhouse, A., Esq. Backliouse.Mrs.K. Charj'aon, Miis . 1 Harris, J., Esq. ..0 PeasBi J., Esq. .. 1 Pease, J. B., Esq. Pease, John, Esq.
Pease,

Corfe,

Mrs

Esq., and
15 2 5
6

iiy Miss Willianis, Collector.

Drake, Mrs, Thos. Drake, Mrs. R. ... Mirrless, Mrs. W.

Ballenger, Mrs- Bowen, J., Esq., and Mrs., don.

10

Bowen, Miss
Fargus,

....

2
2 2
6

10 10 5

Misses,

H.,

Esq.,

ByMiss Gathorne, CoKec/or.


Armstrong,
H.,

don
Griffin, Miss,

M.P
Pease, Mrs. J.

don.

6
6

W.

Esq
6

10
2

Proctor, Miss ....

Holman,Mrs.,dOn. Tryan, Mrs. R. ...

6 6

By
4
5
I

Mr. Rhodes, Collector


(for 1858).

By
10

Miss Hall, Collector.


2 2
6

Hooper, Mrs Johnson, Miss.... Marriott, Mrs. Morgan, Miss .... Williams, Miss Williams, Miss M.

4
2

..100 2 6 ..026
14

Backhouse,A.,Esq. Backhouse, Mrs.J.


Barclay, Mrs Charletou, Miss ... Harris, J., Esq. ... Middleton, Miss... Oxley, Mrs Pease, J,, E;.,. Pease, J. B., Esq. Pease, John, Esq. Pease, H., Esq. ... Pease, Mrs. J. W. Proctor, Miss

4
10

4 6

10 10 10 6 10 2
1

Gen. Chapman, Mrs. ... 2 Fitzherbert, Miss


Barry, Mrs.
Forsyth, Mrs Hall, Miss
1

Work

sold

Small sums

2 2 12

6
7

10
2 2

Hawson, Miss E.
6

ClIfton. Hony, Miss, don.

10

Livius, Mrs. B.

...

2
6

Worthington, Mrs.
10 10
5 5

PORTISHEAD.
Armitage, Rev. F. J
I

By Miss
6

A. Harley, ColI

'.dor,
...

Southby,

Mr

2 2

Longmire, Miss

Wotton-under-Edge.
ByMr8.Hinckley,Co/<ec<or.

By Mrs.
Austin, Austin, Austin, Betton, Betton, Cooper,
Hill, Hill,

L. S. Austin, Col*
lector.

Gateshead.
ByS.F.Longstaffe,
'Esq., Collector...

Godwin, Mrs. C...


8
6

Rev.

J. S.

By Miss

Hinton, Collector.
...

Mrs. J. S. Mrs. L. S.

4
4

Forster, Miss Forster, Miss F.

4
4

Csscv. Bhkntwood.
Luard, Miss
F0B.D11AM.
Herring, Rev.
5

Gascolgne, Miss

...

5 5 2

Mrs
Miss ..,.0 Mrs. S. ..
.

Mrs

....

By Miss
don

Martin, Collector.
Mrs.,
10
5 7

4 4
4

Allen,Rev.H.,don. 2
Ijcrcsford,

4 4

W.
10

Braithwaite, Mrs. G. F., don Friend, a, don

Master Long, Mrs., sen... Long, Mrs Long, Mrs. P Long, Miss Small sums

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 10
tf

48
Pectroll, Mrs.,

don
F.
1

James, Mrs.

Bishop's

W^ltham.
2

Watson,

Lady

Boswell, Miss, \>eT Rev. W. Brock,

By
C

Mrs. Williams, Collector.

Underwood,MissH.0 Washhourne, Mrs. Wood, Miss, don. Wood, Miss F


6

2 6

8 6 6

2
5

don

East Stratton.
Receiver,

Kempthorn, Mrs. White, Mrs Williams, Mrs....

2
5

Leominster.

By Miss
A. T.
3.,

Vale, Collector. 3
1

By

Mrs. A. Buttemer. Mrs. A. Buttemer, Collector.


1
1

don

Portsmouth.
Boswell, Rev. M...
5

Buttemer, Rev. A. Buttemer, Mrs. A. Dallas, Mrs. C. ,. Famgeton, Miss.. Hall, Sarah, don..

5 2 2

Shirley.
6
6
J.

Davis, Mrs .0 Gode, Miss, don... H. T. S., do Jones, Mrs., do....

10
2
5
1

M. A.

Receiver,

Hunt, Esq.
7

do Mainwaring, Miss M., do ...


J.,

4
1

Hog, the late J., Esq., don Hog, Mrs., don. .. Hog, Miss, don. Hog, Capt.,don...
Maitland.Miss, do.
Percy, Miss
Scott, Miss Shilling found.... Spearman, Mrs. J. Work sold

By Miss Andrews,
Collector 3

Philpotts,Mr

...

5
5

..026 10
5
5
I

2 3

Hunt, Esq.,Collector. Danson, Mrs 10 Mission-box, by Miss Wilkinson 2 5 Sale of Work by Miss Waite 15
J.

By

Woodhouse, Mrs. G.,do Woolley, Miss 8. Vald, Miss


Vale, Miss H., don.

5
1

2 2

6 6

|^ertf0rtjSl^tre.

Christ Church, Barnet.


Collection
after
5

Southampton.

By Miss A. Wainwright, Collector


7

Receiver,
6

Meeting
Receiver,
15

By
Fareham.
Part of Collection after Meeting, Rev. W. Wickes,

Miss Bridges. Miss BrackenCollector


1

ridge,

By

Miss E. Breay. Miss Bond,


3

Collector

By Miss

Bridges, Collector.
5 5 5

dep

15

Bridges, Mrs. L....

By

Mrs. H. T. Breay,
Collector. 5

Bridge3,MissH.M.
Osborn, Lady Osborn, Miss
Vignoles, Mrs.,

Winchester.

Hyde.

Breay, Rev. H. T. Breay, Mrs. H. T. Hasluck, D. E.,


Esq., don Stock, Mrs Stock, Miss Stock, Miss

5 10

Receiver,

Lady F. Watson. By Miss M. E. A. BiggWither, Collector. A. F. B. W., don. 2 Blackstone, Miss,

don

10

Mt
W. H.

of 21t0f)t.

10
4
2

Ryde.
C 6 6

don BiggWither, Miss,

2
5

Receiver, Gillson, Esq.

don
F. Y.,do L. Y., do

2 2

By Miss A.
Lovell,

GoflTe, Collector.
1

A. S. T. L., don.. Goffe, Miss A., do.


do. Marsh, Miss .... Marsh, Miss M., do.

By Miss S. Brown,Co//cc/or, Brown, Miss .... 10 Brown, Miss S.... 1 Reed, Mrs 1 Watson, Miss .... 10 Young, Mrs 10

Bteay, Collector. Breay, Mrs., don. 1 Breay, Miss C. ... 5 Budgett, Miss 5 Dorran, Miss 5 Forbes, Capt 10 Gibbs, Misses Gough, Miss, don. 10

By Miss E.

10
5 5
5

3
5

Miss,

By Miss

Gillson, Collector.
5 10

2
7

Hornbuckle, Mrs. Hornbuckle, Miss Hornbuckle, Miss

Mjirsh,

Miss

H.,

Friend, a, don Goodacre,Miss, do.


6

E
J. S.

L
.., ...

do

2
Col4

Lawrence, Mrs. Lawrence, Miss


Mills,

5 10
5

By Lady F. Watson,
lector.

Mrs

Burfnot,

Mrs

HEREFORn,

Joanna, don Tulia, do Moody, Miss, do..

2
2 2

By Miss Underwood,
lector.

Col5

Milner, Miss Perry, Miss, don. Robaiis, Miss Robarts, Miss M.

5 5 10
5

Darby, Miss

Robarts,MissM.A. Robarts, Miss E...

5
5

4y
.

[.0
.

2 2
5

6
6

Walker, Miss \Vood, Miss


Wrinlit, Miss
1

5 2
(i

Ponnefather, Mrs. Small sums

10 3

Treht.
Receiver,

.
.

2 6
5

Wyatt, Miss

HEMEt Hempstead.
Ryder, Hon. G. D., and Ryder, Lady Georgiana

By

Miss Rowe. Miss Barton,

By Miss
!R.

Greene,
1

Collector 4 12 Clarke, Mrs., don. 3


2

Collector

)Ueclor
.

By
6

Miss

2
1

By Miss Lambert, Collector


Lamljert, Miss, don. 2 Laml)ert, Miss ... 10 Lainboit, Miss II. 2 Gates, Miss 2
>.'

Rowe,
2 10

Hertford.

Collector

By Miss Lowther,
Collector.

6 6

4
1

By

Miss H. Lawrei.ce,
Collector.

5
I

2 2

Lawrence, Mrs. G., don Lawrence, Miss, do. Lawrence, Miss H., do Wright, Miss H., do Small sums
,

Gay, O Esq Gay, Mrs Lowther, C, Esq. Lowther, Mrs Lowther, Miss Nixon, Miss
,

1
1

Wattok. By Lady C. Barrington,


Collector.

10 10
7

6 6

Smith, Mrs. Abel 2 Smith, Miss, and other friends ... 2

5 5

Potter's Bar. Watkins, Rev. H.

SlCltt.

I
1

Hadlow.
Bible
Class, by Miss A. Mony18

Watkins, Mrs
13 2 4

RoYsTOy.

penny

By

Miss M. E.

J.

Parker,
10
7

Receiver,

Collector.

Mrs. Whiting.

Maidstone.
Friend, a, per Rev. R. Glover, don.
1

Hilton, Mrs., don. Parker, Miss M.,

By Miss

Trudgett,

Collector,

10

do
Parker, Miss E. J., do

M.

U^ack, Mr., don.... Trudgett, Miss,


3

TCMBRIDQE WelIS.
2
^

Small sums
Receiver,

13

don Whitehead, don

Mrs.,
1

Langton, Rev. C. 2
Receiver,

Miss Williams.

By Mrs. Whiting,
lector, for 1857.

Col-

By Miss Buttanshaw,
Collector,

Miss M. White.
5 5 10
5
1

By Miss
Cobb, do Cobb, do Cobb, Cobb, don
Sale of

S.

Cobb, Collector.

Brown, Mrs. R.

...

4
10 10
7

Chippindell, Esq., don

2%.
F.,

Rev. T.
Mrs. T.

Mrs Wedd, Mrs Wliiting, Mrs Wortham, Mrs.


Phillips,

Buttanshaw, Esq Buttanshaw, Mrs.,


tlon

...

5
F., 5

By
2 2 6 6 3

Mrs. Whiting, Collector, for 1858.


...

Miss Miss M. E.,

Brown, Mrs. K.
Friend,

4
10

Buttanshaw, Miss H. E. W., don. ... Hunter, Mrs Sawyer, Mrs. S. ...
T. C., don

2
'
i

G 6

2
1

A
10
7
...

Work

Small sums

Mrs Wedd, Mrs


Phillips,

4
Slade, 10

By Miss
G.
L.

Englehart,
1

Whiting, Mrs Wortham, Mrs.

Collector.

E
and

By
By

Miss

H. B., don
6

Collector

St.

Albans.
Hall, Collector.

3
1

T. D.

Miss

Wyke
10
6

By Mrs.
Hall,

Smitli, Collector

Mrs
...

4
4
5
|

By Miss

Lydekker, Miss

Tatton, Collector.
4 4
4

Bv Miss

E. Streat...

'tiiild,Collector

Olive, Mrs Olive, Miss Pattrick, Miss

R
1

By Miss M.
Cockle, Miss

White,
5
.i

Colleclor.
.......

Stevens, Mrs Stevens, Miss To'vnsor.rt, Eii.'i. Williams, Miss ... WooUam, Mrs. ...
,

4
1

Harrison, Mrs. ... 0, Hawley, Mrs liaygarth. Miss ... Leycester, Miss E.
i

4
1

Miss 0* NicoUs, Miss O. Tatton, Miss Tatton, Miss A.


Nicolls,
;

...

4 4 4
4 2

...

Maylicw, Mias
5

60
By
Mlfn Wllliamii,
Cnlli-cUr.

Le Mare, E.

R.,

Bercsford, Mrs. ... Borte. Mis CharriJiKton, Miss


Cliristnias.

10
3 10
2

Mrs.

...

Colly, Mrs Coiirthope, Miss...

Dunbar, Lady Dyne, Hon. Mrs... Edwards, Mrs. ... Meade, Lady Maria
Penfold, Mrs Pluniptre, Miss
...

5 10 5 3

Esq Le Mare, Mrs Le Mare, Miss.... Le Mare, Miss J. Shaw, Mrs Shaw, Miss Symonds, Mrs.

10
5

Friend, Friend,

a, a,

don. don.

...
...

1
1

Lowe, ,Esq., don.


Smith, Mrs., don. Westhead, Miss E.,

10
3 5

3 2 2

..040

don Westhead, MlssC, don Small sumi

2 6 14 OJ

Plumptre, Miss E. Phunptre, Miss 0. Waitman, Miss ... "Willianvi, 11., Esq. "Williams, Miss ... Wollaston, Miss ...

9 10 5 10 iO

By Mi Long, Collector. Adus, Miss S., don.


,'J

Beaconsfield.
Lace, Misa
10

6 6

Davies, Mrs., don. Dorrington, W.,

Esq
Dorrington,
Mrs.,

10
10 5 5 10

10
3

CONISTON.

By Miss Beevor,
Collector

don
Friend, a, den. ... Kersey, Miss, don. Lees, A., Esq., don.

4 12

5
5

HUTTON.
Kitten, Rev. J.
...

10
1

10

Walmer. By Miss Samler,


Collector
1

Long, Mra Long, Miss, don... Long, Miss S. .,

Lancaster.
2
1

don
5

Receiver.

Pollard, S., don.... Scholey, J., Esq.,

Mrs. A. Page.
,By Miss Gamack,
Collector.

don Scholey,Miss,don. Shaw, Mrs. C, don. 2

10
1

ALDERtET Edge.
Receiver.

By Miss

Miss Le Mare.

S. J. Lowe, Collector.

Chippendall, Misses Clayton, Miss Edmonsons, Mrs. Fearenside, Mrs.

3
1

.020 .026
5

Gamack,
Juveniles Lee, Mrs

Misses...

4
3

By Master
Consterdine,

Consterdine,
1

Collector,

Campbell, Miss ..0

B. P., don Ball, Mrs., don. ... Consterdine, Mrs.


T.,

2 6i 2 6

Rev.
6

don

4
5 5

Macervan, Miis ... Mansergh, ,E8q. Noon, Mrs

2
5

J
Consterdine, Mrs. Consterdine, Miss Consterdine, Miss

4 4 4

Earwaker, Mrs., don Fowden,Mrs.,don. Friend, a, don. ...


Friend, a, don. ... Hole, Miss S., don. Lowe,Mrs. A., don. Lowe, Mrs. J., don. Lowe, Miss, don...

Paget, Mrs Paget, Misa


Prith,

Mrs

2 2 5

10 2
1

Roper, Mrs
6

S
Constevdine,

Ross,

Miss
4
4
j

Rossall,

Mrs Mrs

10 5 10
5

E
Consterdine, Mr... Consterdine, Mr. J. Consterdine, Master

5
1
1

4
4

DeNairac, Madame Evans, Mr. M. F.


F. J. Hateley, Miss.... Moule, Rev, H.,

4
1
I

0! Lowe, Miss S. J., don Martin, Miss, don. Martin, Miss M.

Sherson, Mrs Swainson, Mrs. J. Threlfall, Miss E.


6

2
1

6 6
6

10
1

Wane, Mrs Wi'lan, Mrs

2 2

E.,don
G
fi

By Miss Page,

Colhctor.
1
1

Tootal, Mrs., don. Whitelegge, Mrs.,

10
2 6

don Moule, Mr. H. C.

don
2

Campbell, Miss ... Johnson, Mrs. M.


Page, Mrs Page, Mrs. A.
S....

6 4
6

Whiteridge,

Mrs.,
5

G
Moule, Mr. A.
S.,

don
4
Wingfield,
2
1

Small sums

2 5 2

6 6
6

Miss,
1

C...

Mr.W., don...

don

Sattersfield,

Smith, Mr.

Mr.

J.

4
1

Ll^'BRPOOL.

By Mrs.
By Miss Westhead,
Collector,

Grocott,
2
1

Collector.

By Miss Le
Burton, Mrs

Mare,
5

Chappell,

Collector.

Dewhurst, Mrs.
'>

...

Esq.
2
5
1

don
3
5 5

Frazer, Mrs Grocott, Mrs


o

Crewdson, Mrs. K. Foster, Miss

Dillon, Mrs., don. Friend, a, don. ...


FrieTid, a, Jon. Friend, a, don.
... ...

LadVi a
Pearson, Mrs Pearson, Miss Pearson,Master8...

5 2

5
1

Heugh, Mrs

CM.

2 2
2

51

..010 ..010
1.
1.

Tanner, Mrs

By Miss K.
Blnyon,

Turner.
2 2
(5

3 2 2

By
6 e

HdtcoTusffjCrc.
Spilsby.
Hare, Miss
5
6

Esq....

Mi.i8 Hodgson, Cullfclor.

Cullender,

W.
,

R.,

Esq
5

Blckersteth, Mrs.,

.!

don
C. E. B.
B.,

Kipping, Nadin, Mrs

Esq.
...

2
1

and C. D. don

Nield, A., Esq.


2

By Mrs.
6

2
1
I

Cheales,
...

E. K.
F.LD.
..

B.andE.S.
3
P.,
I

Ransome, T., Esq. Taylor, Mrs


,

Collector

E.
10

B., don P. and L.

don
Eyre, Misg F. P. and L.
o
P.,

3
5

Turner, Esq.... Turner, Mrs Turner, Misg K. ...


,

5 2

Edmonton.
Prestov. By Rev. J. Shaw,
Collector,

N.
r,
..

don
4 12 4
Highfleld.MissM.,

By Mrs.
Frost,

Hartley, Collector.
5

2
1

Cobbett. Mrs.

..

10

don Hodgson, llev. T. E., don Hodgson, Mrs. A don Hodgson, Mr-*. Hodgson, Misf

Mrs

6
5

Hartley, Capt
6

2 2

'02
1

5 Isherwood, Mrs.... 2 Levy, Mrs o 10 Miller, Mrs 5

Haslam, Mrs

Hucker, Mrs M.icmurdo, Mrs....

Q., don. ,...,,. Lister, Miss, don.

Shaw, Rev. J Todd, Mrs

6 6

Mann, Mrs Todd, Mrs Wood, W., Esq. Wood, Mrs

...

2 5 5 10 5 5

Hampton Wick.
By Rev.
esO
,,
,

R. C. King.
E.,

3
1

Cowgill, Miss
6

BlTTESWELL.
10
5

don
E. P., Mrs Friend, a, per A. H., don 25

Mrs. Lack, Collector. DeCrespigny,Rev.

By
F

Receiver.

2
2 5

Mrs. Harper.

6 6

By Mrs.
1

,,

Harper, Collector.
10

,,
,,

4
3
1

.,

Kenworthy, J., Esq King, Rev. R. C.


Martin,
S.,

10

1-

2
5

fi

Esq.,
10
...

don

,, ,.

,,

2 2 5
1

Rowe, W., Esq.


d

Bernays, Pr Cockin, Mrs Draycott, Mrs Goodacre, Miss Harper, Rev. H. Harper, Mrs
Lidvre,

DeCrespigny, Mrs. Fisher, Mist Gifford, Mrs. deL.

4 4

10
4 4
10

4
1
...

Mrs Lack, Mrs Lack, Miss


,

...

4
6 5

Stewart, J., Esq.... Stewart, Mrs

4
4

Sleight, R., Esq...

Mrs

Monnington, Mrs.
Noble, Mrs Overton, Mrs
Scotton,

,. ,,
,,

Manchester.
Receiver.
6

4 4

Harrow.
Lang, Mrs
Receiver.

5
1

10
Sweeting,

Mrs

J.

2
1

Miss K. Turner. By Miss Cliffe.


A. Barber, \V., Esq...
Cliffe,

10
4
4

K
,,

2
2

..

6 6

Twining, Miss Watson, T.H., Esq. Watson, Miss Small suras

Mrs. Sweeting.

4
2
6

By Mrs.
J

Collect>r.

1
I

Mrs

Cunningham, Rev.

Froggatt, J,, Esq. Froggatt,Jnv'.,Esq. Greenhalfe, R.,

1
1

By Miss
Craig,

arper, Collector.

10

Hastings,

R, H.,
5
5
a... a...

Bernays, Mrs

Esq
Neville,

Esq
il. ... ... ...
1

Mis

Howwyd,

O., Esq.
...

1
I

6
6

5 2

Lowe, J., Esq. Mayor, Mrs

Nemo
Sutton,

Eady, Mrs Eady, Miss E Harper, Miss Harper, Miss E,


Stokes,

4 4
1

Lady

Thankoffering, Thankoffering,

4
...

Small sums

10 5 19

4
2

1 1

Esq.

Mrs

...

By Miss Tappin,
Collector
2

Market Harborough.
3y Miss
C. Stowell.
1

10

A
2
1

Brooke, Sir Capel

W. de
5

IsIiE-WORTH.

E.

P
,

By Miss Wickes,

Collector.

Frier,.

Friend, a

5
2
1

Old Dalby.
Proceeds of Christmas Tree, per Mr. A. Hodges. ..15

2 2
2

Goulden, Mrs H. S Habbam,Mrs.,don.


Riley, - , Esq.
...

5 2

For redeem ing w ife and children of a slave Neale, Miss Produce of a Pear Tree

12 2
10

C 2

52
Thanksgiving from
a laborer's vi'ife for temporal mercies received ...
Mills, Mrs. 1 Portal, Miss, don. 20
3

By
5

Mrs. Guydickens,
Collector.

Smith, Mrs. Philip Sperling, Miss E.,


6 6

Guydickens, Mrs.

Wiokes, Rev.W.... Wickes, Miss

10
2

don

c
2

in

Wedgwood,

Hill,

Kensington.
Evans, Miss A. E.
3

Miss L. E. and Mrs. C. Langton 10


10
10

Mrs

10

By Miss
Sale

E. Hoare,
7

Wilkinscji.Mrs.E., don. Woods, Mrs. E.


(for 2 years)

Collector.

KiLBURN.
Receiver,

PoorPeople'sPence of "British

Workman " and "Band of Hope


Review
" 8 S|
1

Miss Watson.

ByMiss Baker.Cn/.
!

lector

17

By Mrs. Auriol, ( Auriol, Rev. E. ... Spitta, Rev. F. J. By Miss

lector.
j
1

10
1

School Children of

Blatherwycke ..0

3jJ

By Miss Garwood,
Collec'or
3
I

A, Clay, Collector.

By Mrs.

Hollond,
2 10

^
I

Collector

Clay, Miss

By Miss
Collector

Ro'per,
5
f)

Friend, a Green, Mrs. S

5
1

By Mrs.
Barnes, Mrs Bate, Mrs

Kingsford,
2 4
2

Janson, Mrs. R. ..,0

Collector.

By

""'rs.

Spencer,
1

By Miss
7

Ferrier,
1

Collector

Collector

17

Chambers, Mrs. ..0 Faibness, Miss ..0


Fielding, Miss.... Fielding, Mr

4
2

Bv Miss

Wardell,
9
I

By Miss

Goslett, Collector.
2
7
1
(i

'Collcclnr

By Mrs. Watson,
Collector
1

Friend, a Goslett, Miss, and Friends

Garraway, Mrs. Giraud, Mrs Giraud, Miss ....

..030
2
2

6 6 6 6

By
'

ditto

Higham, Mrs
Holt, Miss Jones, Mrs Kingiford, Mrs. Kingsford, W. B.,

4
2

By

Watson,
ior

By Miss Hakes,
A. H. E. D.
J.

Collector.
1

..050
1

Coll,

10

Esq
Mares, Mrs

...

Honlion.
10 Attwood,Mrs.,don. Baiter, Miss 10 Benson, Mrs. R.... 2 2 Bevan, R. C. L., Esq., don 75 10 Bevan, Rd., Esq. Bridges, Miss M... 1 1

H. M. H.

M.H.
M. J. M. T. R. M.
S. S.

Neame, Mrs Neame, Mrs. E. Palmer, Mrs

4 4
..

4
2 2
1

Phipps, Miss .... Shepherd, Mrs.


Swotfer, Miss ....

..040
5
2

W. D. don

Waring, Mrs Watson, Mrs

C. D Carbonell,

By Miss
Moffat, Miss Moifat, Miss

MolTat,
5
.'i

By Hon. Mr'
Argyle,

A. Kinnaird,

W. C,
1 1 1 1

Collector.

Collector.

Esq
Carl in, the late T. B., Esq

Hussey,Rev.J.M'C
I.
...

Duchess

Friend, a, per Rev. 11. Bolland, don. 2


Gift,

10

of (lur 1857) .... 2 Ditto (for 1858)

..200
5
1

Bandon, Dowager Countess of .. ..


Blackden, Mrs.
Brassey, Mrs
6
..

Gentleman, a a

......

1 1

By Miss Swanborough,
1

for Hart, Lady, Tracts Harper, Miss Jesson, T., Esq.,

Collector.

2
.,

10 5 5 2
I

Dransficld, Miss E. L. A
v..

...

10 4
4 5

Burns, Mrs. G.
Carlisle, Earl of

S
S S

Douglas, Mrs
Gasset, Miss
,. ..

don
Lasceltes, L.idy C. I.oehner, C, P.,

K.
F.

Labouchere.Mrs.,!. 2

^f. S...,,

4 5

Kinnaird, Hon. A.,

MP

Esq
London, the Lord Bishop of
1

Midford, R., Esq. Noel, Hon. and

10

Rev. Leland....
Bcceher,
Noel, Hon. Mrs.F.
Paris,

2
1

Hon. Mrs. A. Kiunaird.

Mrs

53
Recorder, the,
of
2
1

Maiden,
School,

Pearce, Miss

London Saiiiin, Lady M...


Shaftesbury,
of

Earl
2

Sunday, second class Southey, Miss Southey, Miss M. Stone, Miss

3 10 10
1

Miss Miss A. 1'ellatt, Miss F. Poynder, Miss


Price,

Pel' 'tt, Pellatt, Pellatt,

Mrs
...

4
1
1

...

Mrs

2
1

Receiver,

Miss Marston. By Miss Marston, Collector.


Clarkson, Mrs.

By Master

R. Clark,
5
1
1
'2

Collector,

..040
..0
4
10
6

Connor, Rev.

J.

Clark, Mrs Clark, Miss Clark, Master R...

Reuel, Miss Sams, Esq Sams, Mrs Sams, Misses

.,...

2 2
1

3y Mrs.

Partridge, Collector

By
2 in

WasliMrs. bourn, CollccUr

17

De Karp, Madlle Ewart, Miss Prver, Miss Hall, Miss Jackson, Miss Little, J., Esq. ...
M.

5 5 5 5

Spence, Mrs Sutton, Esq. Sutton, Mrs Williams, Miss

...

2
...
1

By Miss Pinhorn,
Collector
(i

4
2

North London Auxiliary.


2 4
2
fi

Sale of Booka, per Mrs. Clark .... Ditto, per Miss

5 Moucliet, Miss ... Sale of Ferns, &e. 2 10 Sanders, Miss 5 Stewart, Mrs 4 1 Whitaker.T., Esq. 1 6

Receiver.

Mrs. Thomas.

By Miss A. Brooke,
Collector.

6 3

Roake Mrs. (two


years)
1

10

4
2 2 3

Clay
Ditto,

By Miss
Carr,

Martin, Collector.

per Glutton

Miss
2 2
1

Mrs

Chambers, Mrs.
Cubisson, Mrs. Friend, a Friend, a Keall, A. H Keall, E. A Webster, Miss West, Rev. J Wheeler, Mr

2
2

6
(5

Ditto, per Miss Ferrier Ditto, per Rev. J.

...

2 3
I

By Maria Cross, Collector.


Batt, S
1

Boorer, H. Brock, Mrs


Clark, Cross,
6

1
1
1

1
i

4
2

Goodwin
6 6
Ditto,

per

Miss
1

Cox, M.

2
5
1

Greaves Ditto, per


Hall
Ditto,

Mrs.
1

2 2
1

1 1 1 I
(i

Highgason, C. A. Reach, A
Elizabeth Shuttle, S Wisedell, A
S.,

per

Miss
5

2
1

Hall
Ditto, per

4
4
2 2

Rev. H.
1

iteceiver.

James
Ditto,

Miss F. Burls.

per Miss M'Causland....


per

By Miss
8
1

F. Burls,

By Miss Doswell,
Collector
1

Collector.

4
1

Ditto,
Ditto,

Mrs.

Newton
per Nisbett

5 2

Miss
4

Ditto,

per

Mrs.
4
1

Rabett
Ditto, per Miss Rivint^ton per Miss Ditto,

Sherring Ditto, per

Mrs.
3

Ward
5
1

Burls, A., Esq. ...0 4 10 Cree, Mrs. J Friend, a 5 Friend, a I Hudson, Mrs 4 4 Kilner, Mrs Poole, Mrs 4 4 Poole, Miss II. ... Poole, Miss ):. ...0 4 4 Smith, Miss 4 Steele, Miss

By Miss Edwards, Co//ec/or.


<)

Barclay,

Esq...

Browne, Miss
Chaiim.iu,
J.,

Esq.
Es(i.

Edwards, W.,

5 4 4

Edwiirds, H., Es(i, Edwards, G. II,,

4
4
5

Esq
Edwards, Miss ... Edwards, Miss M.

Ditto,
Ditto,

per
per

Miss
4

Watson
Miss

A
By Miss
lector
1

Ede, Col-

2
1

Westhead
2
2 5

Oil
PeDiitt, Collector.

By Miss
E. H.

Green, Collector.
1

2
2

Ditto,

per

Miss
10
8

Yerbury
Receiver,

By Miss

Bishop, Mrs

G
2

2
'2

2
1
I

U
5

Miss Ihown. By Miss Brown, Collector. Haflden.Mrs.J.A.


r.

lliiddun. Misses

... ...

Lovelock, Mrs.

Alexander, Miss... Burton, Mrs. .. Butler, Misses Canipbell, Mrs. Campbell, Miss Fenn, Mrs Halliburton, Miss Lake, Miss

2
1

Fmson, J.G., Esq.


Green, J., Esq., don. Green, Airs Harrison, Mrs, ... J. A. G Mickley, Mrs

4 2
I

2
1

4
1

1
1

(1

Pearce, Mrs Poaice, Miss

54
Stcdman, Mrs. H. T., don

M. M. S
4

Krcpirer,

Mitchell, E. L.

By

Miss Heintz,
Collector.

Nelson, Palmer, Perry,


2 6 C

H
Mrs

...

1 1
1

Miss Wilson.
S. Burt, Burt, Miss Burt, Miss S. R.. Friend, a

By Miss

4
1

'Jollector.

Bodkin, Miss
Dalton, Rev. C. B. Heisch, Rev. J. G Heintz, Mis3 Heintz, Miss E. ...0 Heintz, Miss M.... Maurice, Miss

Thome, E
4
2

4
n
1

2
1 1

4
17

Timnis, S Walker, E

Small sums
6

Ward, M. A.

M....

4
4

By Miss
fi

S.

Warner.
2 5
1
]

Small sums

By Mrs. Thomas, Andre, Mrs


Coulstock, Cotton, Pupils

Collector,
Collector.
5
11

Brown, Miss, don.


Crosbie, Miss
o
i
1

By Miss
M.
A.

Ireland, Collector.

Campbell, Miss C. Chapman, Miss ...

Fanny

Carter, Misses Ireland, Miss

.010
13
1

4
2
2 2

Miss, of, per


6

Hare, Mrs Powell, W., Esq... Powell, Mrs. G. ... Warner, P., Esq.

5
5

Miss Alder
6

Walker, Mrs

De Quetteville, Rev. W
Fox, W., Esq Herring, Miss
coll.

By

Miss Mackenzie,
Collector.
1
...
1

1
;

E.,

Bond, Miss
Crutchley, Miss

oil
I

^ones, H. J. Esq... Lacy, Miss L

5
4
1
1

Mrs Miss Miss ,, L.... Miss S.".".'! Williams, Mrs. ... Williams, Miss .. Williams, Master Witherby, F., Esq.
.

Warner, Warner, Warner, _ Warner,


,

4 4 4
5
1
1

Davenport, Mrs.... Mackenzie, Rev.

5
1

Matthie,H.D.,Esq.
Matthie, Miss Morton, Mrs., coll. Powell, W., Esq.,

] .
o 8
1

W. B
Mackenzie, Mrs.... Mackenzie, Miss... Mackenzie, Mast. Weatherhead,Mrs. Small sums

\^V^^^&^^i^^on,
late

Collector.

6' Brown,
|

Miss, the
i

4
1
]

'lo Hivington.MissS. Reade, Miss, by


6
ditto

By
Burn,
Ellis, Ellis, Ellis,
Ellis,

Elizabeth Millar,
Collector.

Sale of Work ,, ., Mrs. Alford

by .
4
2
5

0! Bush, Mrs Cattley, Miss Cropper, Mrs. J. ... 6 Darby, Miss, by Mrs. Greenwood
j !
! :

o
o 3

2
10

Smith,
Siree,

Edmonstone, Miss
A. A Foljambe, the late
Fothergill,

Oi

Bennett,

H
E
J

H
o

2
1
]

Spry,
o

Mrs Mrs
1

Mrs.,
10

10

Davis, Jane

Taylor,W.G.,Esq., don

Miss,
1 1
]

M.

10
1 1

Ten y,

Eliza

4
10
1
1

n
o

Thankoffering from ^.Africa

'

Sarah

Millar, E Miliar, S Millar, Pyecroft, S

Thomas, Rev. M.

by Miss Yerbury ' Fowler, Mrs Friend, a, by Miss A. A. Edmonstone

10
1 l

4
2
2
1 l

Becciver,

Tewnian, H Small sums

Mrs. D. F. Wilson.
o 9

By Miss

S.

Mathews,
...

Collector.

Hony, Miss C Lewis, Mrs Vincent, Mrs Wilson, Miss Wormald, Mrs. Yerbury, Miss

5
5
...

10
1

By Ann
N. B.

Rendall, Collector.
... l

Mathews, Miss Mathews, Miss


Vnn, Mrs

10
5 5
5

S.

By

GoodlifTe, Mrs.

o 6

Richardson, Mrs...
Williams,

Master A. Wilson, Co^/cc/or

Lawen, Mrs

2
2

W. H.C

Mrs.

J.

4
Sherring, Co//c/or.
1

Receiver,

By Miss
K. A. E. K E.

By

Mrs. D. F. Wilson,
Collector.

Miss E. Wilson. By Miss Chapman,


Collector
1
1

F- M Friends, three

4
4
4
1

Bateman, Mrs Cunningham, Rev.

6 3 5
'

By Miss
I

Clare, Collector.
4
4

F
8

G-

Hull, S

J.H.

4 2
4
0.
I

Friend, a Jerniyn, Mrs

10

Cecil, Miss Cecil, Miss C Cecil, Miss L. E...

4
6

Clare,, Esq., and

Mrs

55
Clare, Clare,

Miss

10

J.

M.

R
...

Esq.,
1 ...

family of

S Laurence, Miss
J. P.

5 2
2

Receiver,

Cowland, Miss
Friend, a Friend, a Jeanncret, Mrs.

2 2
1

Lethbridge, Miss...
Stilwell,

Mrs

10

Miss E. Page Turner. By Miss R. J. Marsh, Collector 8

...

Knight, Mrs Lamb, Misses Pearse, Miss B. ... Royston, P., Esq., Mrs., and Misses
2 5 6

2 10 2 2

West London Auxiliary.


Babington,

By Miss H. Melvill,

Miss
...

Collector

...

(for 1857) Ditto (for 1858)

Spurling,

4
2 10

Esq.,
a...

and Mrs
Thankoffering,

By

Miss S. J. Pratt,
Collector.

Benson, Miss Deacon, Mrs. C. Ford, Mrs. Huish, Captain Huish, Mrs Vaughan, Miss Vau;;han, Miss White, Mrs. M.

10
5
1 1
1

10 10

By Miss
Collector

Taylor,
10

...

By Miss

E. Page Turner,
Collector.

...10
...

10

J.
...

10
1

Fryer, Mrs, C Hart, Lady Porcher, Rev. G.,

10 10 8 4 10 10
I 1

and Mrs
Porcher, Miss Turner, Lady, don. Turner, Miss P. ... Turner, Miss E. P. Turner, Capt., and Mrs. Polhill

Conner,

Esq.,
2
J.
...

and Mrs Lambe, Miss M. C

By Mrs. Brown,
Brown, Mrs Redhead, Mrs

Collector
4

10
5 2
2

(for 1857).

Pratt, Mrs Pratt, Miss Pratt, Miss S. J... Weston, J., Esq...

2
5 5 5 5

By Mrs. Brown,
Brown, Mrs Redhead, Mrs
Tee,

Collector

Weston, Mrs Weston, Miss Weston, MissH.E.

(for 1359).

South-West London Auxiliary.


Astley,

4 4
4

Lady
...

10
1

Dunsany, Lady

Mrs

Fairfield, Mrs., don.

5
1

By

Miss E. Wilson,
Collector.

By Miss Haldane,
5
5

Collector.

Bigg, Mrs Bigg, Mrs

Hayter, Mrs.W. G. Leighton, Lady ... Leycester, Miss ...

10
1

Campbell,

J.

T., 10
1

Buxton, Lady
Griffith,

5
... 1

Esq
Fitzgerald, J., Esq. Friend, a

Mason, Miss H.M. Moody, Mrs


Stace, Mrs,, don...

5
1

Misses

10
2

10
1

Hevington,Mr8.W. Johnston, Miss ...


Iiumsden, Mrs. ... Soames, Mrs. E....
Wagstaff",

10

4 10
1

Hope, Rev. J

Wildman, Mrs. E. 2 Wildman, Miss S.

M
By Miss Baxter,
Collector
1

10

By Miss
6

Noel, Collector.
1

Mrs

6
5

Wilson, Rev. D.... Small sums

Every, Sir H., don. Milne, Mrs Troubridge, Miss,

10 10

don

By Miss K. Hope,
Collector
1

Noiith-West Londok Auxiliary.


Atad, S
Bridges, J. Esq.... Clinton, Rev. C. F.
Collier,
1
1

10

By Miss Simson,
Collector
1

By Miss Nugent,
Collector
15

By Mrs.
Clark,

Taprell, Collector
(for 1857).

Mrs

Friend, a Friend, a Stillman, Mrs

10 10
1

Rev. J

ByMaster Nugent,
Collector
2

10

Evans, Miss Hitchcock,

4
H.,
1

Esq
Hodge, Mrs Molyneux, Lady.,,
Esq. Taprell, W., Esq.
Stephens,
Taprell,
J.,

1 1

By Miss Paske,
Alston, Miss
(i

Collector.
5 2 5
1

By
By C,

Miss

Gilpin,
1

Collector

10
10 10

Brenton,Miss,don.

Mrs
(for 1S58).

C 6

Brown,

Mis",

Miss Stilwell, Collector.


2
1 1

Miss Cooke, Miss Cowiard, A., Esq. Cowlard, Misses ...


Etceteras Friend, a
6

By Mrs.
u
(>

Taprell, Collector

Hitchcock, "'. H.,

Carnegie, Carnegie, Carnegie, Carnegie, Caniegie.

Lady

...

Miss ... Miss C... Miss J... Miss A.

5 5
.">

2
7

Esq
6

1 1

1
1 1

Stephens, J., Esq, Taprell, W., Esq.

H. S

ch. Mrs ClarK, Mrs,, don... llarington, Miss ,,. I'reeuiau, Mrs

C:

2
5

i^iniiiii^"^-"

.50
Jervaise, Mrs. E...

Wade, Mrs

Paske, Mrs Paske, Miss


Stack, Mrs Stewart, Mrs., don.

5 5

Weymouth,
C

Mrs...

4
4

6 2

Wilkinson, Rev.A. Wilkinson, Mrs....

Burleigh.
Miss Parez, Collector. Boyle, Miss M. ... 2 6 Cecil, Lord T 10 Cecil, Lord E 10
Cecil, Cecil, Cecil,

By

Yarborough, Miss

L
NoTTiNG Hill.
Receiver.

Koifolft. Attlkborough.
Bevan, Rev. F.
S.

Miss

J.

Fox.

Lady S Lady M Lady V Exeter, the Mar-

10 2 3

By Darwin
Barton, Miss

Fox, Esq.,
2 3
6

Collector.

GuEAT Snoring.
Gallaway, ]\rrs.,per Rev. R. C. King 2

chioness of Jackson, H., Esq.

10
10
5

Pakenham.LadyL.
Peteiiborough.

Evans, Rev. J Kemp, Miss Osborne, Mrs Roper, T., Esq. Roper, Mrs Thorburn, Mrs. Small sums

10
6 6 6
6

2
...

North Runcton.
By Miss Ferrier. Gumey, D., Esq.
Norwich.

Friend,
ville,

a,

per Rev.
5

2 2

W. De

...

.330
2 6

Quettedon

6 10

Nartljumijeilautf.

By Miss Fox,
Bristowe,
S.

Collector. B., 5

De

Vear, Miss

Hexham.
By Miss Hudson,
Cnileclor.

Esq
Bristowe,

By Rev.
6

Lady

A.,
1

J. F. Osborne, Collector.
1

don Fox, Rev. \V. D. Fox, D., Esq Fox, Miss J. M. A. Hughes, Mrs., don.

Friends, two H., Mrs

9
2

2
1

Day, Rev. E., don. Osborne, Master E. W., coll


Receiver,

Hedley, Miss

4
4
J.
...

Hudson, Miss
10
1

4
5
1

Shields, Mrs. (2 years)

Needham, Lady G.
Newton. Miss
H...

Stokoe, Mrs. J.

10 2

5
2 3 5 5 5
1

Pemberton.Rev.J., don
Servants, three ... Small, Miss, don. Small, Miss C Stock, Mrs., don. Woodd, .R.B.,Esq.

Mrs. Rigg.
6

By

Mrs. H. Blake.
Collector.
J.

Nottiiigj^amfiTjirc.
4 4
4 4

Blake, Mrs. W. Blake, Mrs. H Blake, Miss F

Brant Brompton. By Miss Shaw, Co/lector {for 1857).

10

Chapman, Rev. W.

A
Friend, a, Tliirning Friend, a, by Miss
19
(1

4
4

By Miss Shaw,
Gibson, Mrs Shaw, Miss Small sums

Collector
2 5 2

By Miss
Collector

Sharpe,

(for 1858).

P
Green, Mrs
Ileitland,

6 6

St. John's Wood. Ward, Mrs 1 1

A.

A.,

Esq
P., M:3s Postle, Miss C Small sums

4
4
5

Newark.
Receiver,

Teddington.

Rev.

J.

W. K.

Disney.

By Miss
Anne

C. Barton, Collector.

Collections

after

By
1

Mrs. Rigg, Collector.


3

Annand, Mrs Barton, Miss Barton, Miss C.


Cliff,

4 4
...

Cholmondeley, the Marchioness of...

M. C, Mrs., per
Mrs. A. Heasell Rigg, Mrs
o

Miss

4
5

10 10

Lecture in Christ Clmrc'i Infant Schools, Rev.W. de Qaetteville, deputation 2

Halliday,

Mrs
Miss
Q

Le

Clerc,

By
OVINGTON.
Simons, Rev. E., a benefaction ... 2
n

Mib.s Wingfiuld,

Orde, Lady E Porter, Mrs. W. ... Porter, Miss ,.,. Siinmonds, Mrs..,. Strachan, Mrs
Tozer,

Col! vtor.

5
1

1
1

4
4
I

Yarmouth.
Brightwen,T.,Esq.
5

Thomas, Miss Mrs


f

Venour, Mrs.

Esq. Pilton, S., Esq. ... Simpson, Miss Strachan, Jirs Win;j(iL'lU, Mrs. ...
,

Dressing, Friend, a l.iimmin,

Ivl.s

5
I

10 5 o 5 3

57
Ollektov.
Glutton, Miss
lor K.,
1

Reports

Walker, T.F., Esq. Walker, Mrs Wood, Mrs. H

10
1

By Mrs.
Brace,

Brace, Collector
5
5
5

(for 1858).

Mrs
E...
.1.

South Ccllingham.
Mayor, Rev. J Mayor, Mrs Ditto, coll. by
10
1
j
i

MONTACUTE.
ByMrs.Goodden, Collector. Fitzherbert, Rev.

Danks, Mrs Russell, Miss Russell, Miss

Wiudle, Mrs. C.

T
Fitzherbert, Mrs. T.

4
4

By Miss

SUITON BONNINGTON.

By Rev.

C. M'Causland, Collector.

Goodden, Mrs Goodden, Mrs. Neal, Miss Smith, Mrs

C...

4 4 10
5

E. Windle, Collector (for 1857).


...

Bingham, Mrs. Day, Mrs Grove, Mrs


Neele, Miss Neele, Miss

1
1
1

Bacon, Mrs M'Causland,


late

4
the
IG
...

SOMERTON.
4

Hardcastle, Mrs... Neele, Mrs

1
1 1

Mrs

Macqueen, Miss
Meeli, Mrs Stokes, C, Esq.
Stolces,

By Miss
Amicus

Valentine,
2 2
1
1

H
... ...

4
...

Collertor.

Mrs Small sums

4
2

Andrews, Miss Edwards, Miss


Friend, a

...0
...

Potter, Potter, Potter,

Mrs

Pyne, Miss Valentine, J., Esq. Valentine, Miss ...

1
1

Miss Miss S. Robinson, Mrs. Watkins, Miss Windle, Mrs Windle, Miss E.
6

10
1
1
1 1

...

Chipping Norton.
Rawlinson, A.
L.,

Esq

Welsh, P., Esq. Welsh, Mrs. E. Withers, Mrs Withers, Miss

... ...

2
1
1

By

6
C

Miss E. Windle, Collector ({OT 1858).


...
1

Bingham, Mrs.
Day, Mrs

Young, Miss

1 I
1

Weston -suPEP -Mare.


Bath.
Wilcox, Miss
5

Grove, Mrs Hardcastle, Mrs...


Neele, Mrs Neele, Miss Neele, Miss Potter, Mrs
Potter, Potter,

1
1

Collection

after
1

per Meeting, Rev. J.Hamilton

1 1
1

By
By

Miss

Cole,
2

Collector

Miss

Wyatt,
3

Walsall.
Receiver.

Collector

Mrs. J Miss Robinson, Mrs. ... Watkins, Miss ... Windle, Mrs Windle, Miss E....

1
1 1

1
1

Mrs. Brace.
Becehrr,

By
Bly,
Da--

Mrs. Blvth, Cot'cclor


(for
)

Miss Nisbtt.

By
Siiepp,

Miss M. Windle,
10 10 6

857).

Collector (for 1857).

By Miss
A. F. C

F.

Cam,

Collector.

Mrs
s .-s

8
4

4 4
1

Chavasse, Mrs. H.

Bampfylde, Miss Lane, Miss(2yrs.) Mrs. Matters, D'Oyly Southcouibe, Miss


T. G. S

Lofu,

10

Newman, Mrs
Windle, Miss

10
5

Kuv. C. B. Small sums

4
5

By Miss M. Windle,

By

4
'J

airs. Blyth, Collector (for 1858).

Collector (for 1858).

Chavasse, Mrs. H.

Small sums

By Miss

Nisbet, Collector.
10 10
1
(

Mrs Day, Mrs Lord, Mrs Newman, Mrs


Blyth,

4 4
1

Pugh, Mrs Snepp, Rev. C. B. Small sums

3 10 14

Broke, Miss Dobbs, Miss Eckersall, Mrs. F.


Eukersall, Miss C. Fitz|;erald, Misses

Windle, Miss

4
10
5 5

By Mrs.

Brace, Collector
5 5 5 5 5

Coddenham.
Receiver,

(for 1857).

Harrison, Miss

...

ileywood, Mrs. R. 2 Nisbet, Miss Seymour, Mrs. H. 1

Brace, Mrs Daiiks, Mrs Russell, Miss Russell, Miss K...

Mrs,

T.nni^e.

By Miss Brown, Allen, Rev. R


Brown, Mrs Urown, Rev. T.

Collector.
2
1

Taunton, Mrs
Vicaro,

4
8

Windle, Mrs. C.

J.

Mrs

...

58
Brown, Mrs Brown, Miss Cobbold.Mrs.R.H.
FiBg, Miss Pearson, Rev. H...
1
() i

n
()

1 1

Haward, Miss Highani.Mrs. S.S. Johnston, Esq.

By Miss
6

Stilwell,
17

2 6

Collector

Lay, Mrs Lock, S., Esq

o
o

1 1 1

By Mrs. Longe,

Collector.

Marsden, Esq. Simons, Rev. N....


,

TuLSE Hill. By Miss Kingsmill,


6
Collector.

Dunster.Rev.H.P. Durranf, Mrs Figg, Miss Longe, Rev. R. ... Longe, Mrs. R Longe, T., Esq. ... Longe, Mrs Mithold, Mrs Reddington, Mrs. Shorting, Rev. C...

'J'atlock,

2
5

AVild,

Mrs Mrs

10

Burt,

Mrs

o 10
10
2

10
5 5

By Mrs.
Flatt,

Keer, Collector.
4

Crampin, Mrs

Dobbs, Miss Evans, Mrs. J King, Miss Swinford, Mrs

10

10
2

5 2 2
5 5

Mrs

Swinford, Mrs. D.

Groom, Mrs
Hazel, Mrs Keer, Esq., and

10
1

Mrs
Marriott, Rev.C.H.

Wimbledon. By Rev. J. H. Gedge,


Collector.

Lowestoft.
Receiver,

Rev.

S.

W. Merry.
Collector.

M'Kean, Mrs Money, Rev. J. D. Money, Mrs


Southwell, J., Esq. Taylor, Miss Waller, Mrs Wayling, Mrs

4 4

4
4
4
1 1

Garrtom, Mrs Gedge, Rev. J. H.

By H.

S.,

Friends, don

oil

By

Rev.

S.

W.

Merry,

4
Bible

Chichester.
Class,
St.

Collector.

Buxton, Dowager Lady, don Davey, Miss


liverard. Miss

2
5
5
1

S>urrps.

Pancras Rectory, per Rev, C, P.

Balham.
Hooper, Mrs
10

Phinn

Merry, Rev.

S.

W.

Chiddingley.
Part of a Collection,

Playford.
Receiver,

Clapham,
Receiver,

after

Ser-

Mrs. Dickinson. By Mrs. Dickinson,


Collector.

By

Miss Scrivens, Miss Brown,

mon preached by
Bev. T. Pinckney

A.
10

Collector

18
Brighton,

Bidden, Misses
Carthfcw,

...

Mrs
n, Mrs,...

10 4
15
7

By Miss A.
10

Dickins
Miller,

Scrivens, Collector . 2 12

By Miss
Friend, a Friend, a

Etches, Collector.
2
1

Miss

Kew.

By Miss Drabble, Collector. Alderson, Miss ... 5 Armitage, Mrs. ... 5 Drabble, Mrs 2 Drabble, Miss 2 6 Radley, Mrs 5 Ramsden, Miss ... 5
Sutton,

Mission Box, per MissClaraAtkinson

St.
8

Margaret's Association.
Plate,
after

In

Annual Meeting

10
11

MiTCHAM.
Boyce,
Mrs.,

Quarterly
tions
1

Collec3 6

per

Mrs
RlSB
-,

Miss Ferrier

By Rev. Edmund

Clay,

Park Hill.
1 J

Collector.

Wastell, Rev. J. D.

Dennis, Miss

E.

M.
Tooting.
Miller,'

D D
Receiver.

Saxmundham.
Receiver,

Mrs. Boyd,
.'....

Mrs. Keer.

don

By Miss Haward, Co /;t't7or.


Bayley,
the
late

Miss Farnall, By Miss C. Cubitt,


Collector.

Receiver,

Mrs
Cattermull, Mrs.,.. Friend, a

4
2
1

Rev. R. W, Greaves. By Miss Seward,


Collector
]
I

Friends, Three

3
5

Johnson, Miss O. Lock, Mrs Ross, Miss

Haward, C,

10

Esq...

59
By Miss Dodson, E
Collector.
1

By Miss

Clay, Rev. Clay, Mrs.

F. Gregg, Collector

18 '0

E
...

Gilbert, Miss

10
1

White, Esq., , and Miss Winser, Esq.... Woods, Mrs


,

6
2

Neale, Mrs Sainsbury, Mrs.

By Miss
6

Orrick, Collector.
5

Smith, Mrs
10 10
2
(j

10

Baker, Miss Baring, Miss Bathcock, Mrs.


Cortis,

Hailsham.
Collection after Ser-

5
... 1

Chatlield.Missee...

By Mrs. H.

A. Farnall,
1

MissC

10 10 2

CdUector.
6

Elphinslone, Mrs.
1

Baker, Miss Barrymore, Mrs.... Farnall, Mrs. G.Il. Furbor, Miss

10 10
5

Fullerton, Miss ... Gainsford, G. B.,

10 5 10 10

mon preached by
Rev.T.A.Pinckney
Hastino',.
3

Esq
Gibbons, Miss E.
Huntingfield, Dowager Lady Lancaster, Miss ... Miss Lancaster,

2
1

Receiver,

HoUoway,

llev. F.
1
1

G
L. P Lord, Mrs. J.
11...,

10 5
3 10
7

10 5

Miss H. M. Lutwidge. By Miss Bevill,


Collector
5

Mission-box,

per

M.A
Lancaster,

Mrs. Barrymore Riciiardson, Miss Sandes, Mrs. W. G.


Scott, Mrs.

Miss
5
10

By Miss
Fish, Rev. Friend, a

Christophersfn,

Collector.

M. F
Nicolay, Mrs Orrick, Miss

5 10

Prendergast, Lady

Receiver,

Robinson, Miss B. Bobhison, Miss M.

10 10 5
1

4
2

Lady, a

M. A.C

4
F. Kinder, Collector. 2 2 2 2
11

Mrs. G. Lowdell.

Webb, Miss

By Miss

By Mrs. W, Lashmar,
Cullector.

Acton, Mrs. R. Aylen, Miss I-ashmar, Mrs. Neve, Mrs Smith, Mrs

...

5 2 5

Receiver,
C

Miss Waugh.

Arkcoll, C, Esq, Kinder, Miss F. ... Thorpe, A., G.

6
6 6 6

W.

ByMissCobham,
Cobham, Mrs Cobham, Miss
Friend, a Jenner, Mr

Collector.
1
1

10
1

Esq Waddelow,J.,Esq.
Small sums

Wilmer, Mrs

2 5

By Miss

By

Mrs. G. Lowdell,
Collector.

E. Langham, Collector,

By
6

Miss Hodgson,
Collector.

2 Cory, Miss Lowdell, Mrs. G... 10 Morris, Mrs 5 Staunton, Mrs. ...0 5

Langham, Mrs. ... Langham, Miss E.


2

4
2

Thompson,
Walton,

Mrs.... Esq,,,

Williams, Miss

...

Small sums

2 3

By.r. Willcs, Esq.,


Collector
10

By Miss Sneyd, Anonymous


Shelley, Miss

Collector.
1

By Miss H. M. Lutwidge,
Collector.

Alderton,
6 6

Esq.

4
10
5
1 1

Receiver,

Miss Orrick.

Sneyd, W. A.,Esq, Sneyd, Miss M. A. Sneyd, Miss P. R.


4

2 2
1

Carr, Mrs Collin, Mrs


Collin,

Miss

By

Miss

Everitt,

Blyth,

Collector

By Miss Waugh,
Clowes, Miss Dill, Mrs. R
Field,

Collector.
5

Foote, Harrison, Miss R.

Mrs Mrs

Cabrow, H., Esq...

By Miss M. Burnard, Collector...


1

Esq
...

5 5 5

Hawkes, Miss Hopkins, Mrs


Lutwidge,
Miss

2 2 2 5

6 6

6 6

M.
!

A
Miss

By Miss
Mrs

Ellis,

Collector.
10
1

Bellerby, Miss

Gates, G., Esq. Gates, Mrs.G Hill, Mrs. J


6

10
5
1

Lutwidge, H.

Bocker, Mrs
Ellis, Ellis,

Lam, MissM Pigg, -, Esq


Pocock,
Esq.... Silvertlionie,
,

2
2

Oi Perkins, Mrs 6! Rock, J., Esq


6 2

10

4
4

Small sums

Miss

2
1

Ellis,

MissE

2 10 2 10
5

Pocock, Mrs

10

Esq Tuppen,

By Miss
Friend, a

Stebbing,
2 5

Esq.

Collector,

Bv Miss

E. Ewart, Collector

14

Waugh, Miss Westroa, Mrs

Fym, Mrs. C

AiaiisiAi

60
Stebbing, Miss ...0 Small sums
5 2

Birmingham.
C

KiiiBY Lonsdale.

Lady,

a,

per Rev.

By Miss
1
1

T. A.

Pinckney
Gedge,

Clara Gibson, Collector ...

By Mrs.
Friends

Sutton, Colhvlor.
...

Anderson, Miss
Loft, Miss J Price, Miss

2
7

By

Miss

Collector

Sutton,

Mrs Small sums


Whistler,

5 5 10

Dfvizes.

By

Miss Martineau,
Collector.
1

Lucas, Miss F. M.

Watson, Mrs

By Miss

213aorceBtfrs6tre.
18

Collector

By Miss Moorsom,
Collector.

Receiver,

Mrs. Fisk.
5
."?

By

the Misses Wilmot,


Collectors.

Amoore, Mrs
Cope,

Mrs
Mrs. W....

4 10

Ilillier,

Mrs Lake, Mrs


Hillyer,

4 4
4

Crowley, Mrs Lane, Mrs., don.... Moorsom, Mrs. ... Moorsom, Miss ... Riland, Rev. J. ...

By
Fisk,
fi

Mrs. Fisk, Collector.

Mrs

2
1

10

Harkness, Rev. H. Nicholson, Miss... Vernon, Miss

10 10 2 2

Lawson, Miss
Lockhart,

By

Lady
10
4

Macdonald
Munda}', Miss
Wriffhtson, Miss...

Castle Bromwich. Mrs. Newton, Collector. Newton, Mrs 5


2 3

By Miss Palmer,
Collector 1857)
(for
1

13

Stone, Miss

4
4 4

Small sums

Wrightson,

Miss

By Miss Palmer,
(for 1868).

Collector
2

E
Yorke, Mrs

Chilveus Coton.
Mackie,theKev.Dr.
1

Carter, Miss

Cooper, Miss J. Palmer, Mrs

...

2 10
.0

Offham. By Miss Faulconer,


Collector.

LEAMINGTO>f.

Palmer, Miss M.... Smith, T..Esq Smith, Mrs

5 5

Child, a Little Daniel], Miss

By Miss
4
5

J.

Boucherett,

Collector.

Faulconer, Mrs. ... Faulconer, Miss... Friend, a


fiuy,

4 4
1

Boucherett, MissJ.

By Miss
10 10

Walford,
3

Norman, Mrs. C...

Collector

Miss

H. V. F Harnier, Mrs Parniett, Mrs. C.S. Payne, Rev. W. ...0


Phnner, Mrs
Shifther,

4 4
1 I

By

Miss Pearson,
1

Collector

YorfeBfjifc.

Borough bridge.

4 4

By

Capt. Talbot, Collector.


10

Goodale, Mrs

10

Sledge, Sledge,
v.,

Lady
,

Dilhvyn, Mrs

4
...

DONCASTER.

Esq.

1
1

Mrs

Mancetter.
Richings, Rev. B.
1

By Miss
1

Emma

Childers, Collector

4
1

12

W., Miss W., Miss C Ward, Miss "Wing, Miss Young, Rev. F.

10
By
Dr.

Rugby.
Duke,
Collector.
4

By

Mrs.

Green,
1

Collector

1
...

Harriott, Elizabetli

Elvington.
Clarke, Miss E.
...
1,'

Ore.
Turner, Rev.W. T.
1
l

Hay, Capt. J. B. Johnston, Mrs.


o

...

...

10 10

High Harro(;ate. By Rev. II. James,


21J!ilrstmorclnntf.
Collector.

5l2aartDtrttgf)trc.

Kendal.
Moser,
Mrs.,
J.
])er

Carter, M\ss Ellison, Miss

3
\

Ariujry. Newdegate, Jlrs.

Rev.
1

trobo,

A. Ladon

Evans, Miss
10
Field,

1 1

Mrs

Fletcher, Miss ... Fletcher, J., Esq.

6 2

61
Green wood,

.Esq.
...

By

Miss

Morris,
14

Bertram, F., Esq.,

Iloilpson, Mrs. Jacl<son, Mrs

4
2

Collector

don
Bull, Dr Bull, Mrs Cliarleton, Mrs. T.

James, Mrs
Miliier,

10
1

Mrs

Sheffield.
()

10 2 2

Sheepshanks, Mrs. Shutt, Miss M. ... Wrottesby, Miss...

5 2

For Reports, per Rev. R. C. KinK

H
4 10

2
Quetteville,
3

HUDDEllSFIELD,
fleceincr,

By Miss

De Mrs De De
Mi:is

Quetteville,

Harrison,
...

Mrs. J
Quetteville,

2
2 2

6 6
fl

Collector.

Miss Allen.

Chambers, Miss Farish, Miss

lo
10

Filleul.Miss
Geffrard,

By Miss

Allen, Collector.

Allen, Mrs'. 1 1 Allen, Mrs., don... 2 Allen, Miss 10

Greaves, H., Esq. 1 5 Harrison, Miss

Mrs

Brook, Brook, Brook, jun Brook, Brook, Brook,

Rev. J. W., Esq.

... ...

10

Newton, Miss Roberts, Miss Roberts, Miss M. Roberts, Miss E.


Ditto (ion

10
1

10
1

C,

Esq.,

110
1 1

Gosset, Miss Gosset, Miss H. ... Leigh, Rev. F. ... Lincy, Miss Liney, Miss E. ... Munro, Miss, don.
Nicolle, Miss Nicolle, Miss C.
...

2 2
1

10 10
1

Mrs. C. ... Mrs. C.J...

10
.5

Miss Browne, Miss

Miss E. Rowbotham, Mrs. Wilson, J.. Esq.... Wilson, Miss


Roberts,

15

5
1
1

iO 10 10

Winter, Misa

Cheerful Giver, a Eddison, Miss Friend, a Haigh, Miss


Ince, Rev. C Milne, Miss
1

2
5

York.
Receiver, Mrs. D. Russell.

SCOTLAND.
53umfrtes55ire.

5
5 5

By

Thankoffering, a... Westerman, Mrs.

10 10
5

Mrs. Charapney. Collector ...

Lanoholme.
15

Malcolm, W., Esq. 2

By Miss

Clutton
1

Collector

(1

eFUtiibtirgTjsIjiie.

By

Mrs. Hughes, Collector.


10
5 5 5
1

Edinburgh.

Firth, Mrs Hirst, Mrs Hirst, Miss Htif?hes, Mrs Liiycock, Miss

By

Mrs. D. RusCollector
...

By
5 14

Miss

sell,

thers,

CarruReceiver

17 10

By By Mrs. W.Warde,
Coller/or
3 19
C

ditto, for tracts

Tinker, Mrs

Wardroper, Rev.C. Small sums

5 5 5

By

Mrs.

Napier,
2

Collector

WALES.
By Miss Laycock, ddlertor.
Battye,
S.,

By Miss Campbell,
Collector
5

10

Esq.
...

5
1

Cardiff.
Llandaff, the Lord

Brooke, Mrs. T.

Hudson, Mrs
Jones, F. R., Esq.
1

By Miss M.
1

5
1

Bishop of

F. Macdonald, Collector.

Laycock, Mrs
SutclitTe, J., (the late)

Macdonald,
F.

Esq.
10
...

Mrs.
5
...

^3cm6rofeesf)ire.

Muir, Mrs. Dr.


St.

Wood, Miss E.

KlLOKKRAN.
Laseelles, F., Esq.,

Stavert, J., Esq....

10
14 3 2

By Mrs.

Meredith,
5

per Rev. J. Ha-

Collector.

milton
10
1
1

Me y's 6abbath Scholars ... Tait, Mrs. Admiral Tail, Miss

Charlesworth, Miss Ramsbothani, Dr. Worniald, Miss ...

(i

CHANNEL
By Miss de

By
ISLANDS.
Quetteville,

Mrs. Steele, Collector.

Hull.
Receiver,

Steele, Steele,

Mrs
Miss

(J

Bv

R. L. Cook, Esc]. Master I.umley


1

Collector.

Receiver,
5
2 2
(i

'C.CQok,Ciilli-clor 2 17

Atkinson, Mrs. ... Atkinson, ^liss ... Atkinson, Miss C.

Mrs. Willoughby.

By

Mrs.

F. Hunter, Collector.

"

^AJAtiiift

'"WSSi'tSi

62
Balfour,

Mrs

By Lady
Belfast.
Juvenile
tion,

Burnley,

W.

F.,

Elizabeth Boyle, Collector,


2 10

Esq
CoRan, R., Esq. ... CoRan, Miss Douglas, Lady W., don
Friend, a

(for 1858)

4 4
1
1

Associaper Rev.
...

Cork.
1

W. M'llwaine
4
1

Episcopal

1' tee Church Association.

Hunter, Mrs. F. ... Koch, Ml9 Mackenzie, Mrs. D.


Pole,

Beamish,

Lt.-Col.
I

10
1

Caliaii.

Caravahn.
Rrcfirpr,

Crawford, Miss ... Crawford, Miss M.

Mrs

4
4

Two

Friends,

Shane, W. F., Esq. Wilkinson, A. .Esq. Wilkinson, Mrs.... Wilkinson, Miss...

4
4

Mrs. C. Leslie.

By Miss

Griffith, Collector.

Blake, Mrs

5
fi

By Mrs. Willoughby,
Collector.

Anderson, Mrs. F. Elphinstone, Miss


PrinRle, Mrs Reilly, Mrs Reilly, Miss
Scott, Miss Seller, Miss
Still,

10
10 5 2
1

Dickenson, Miss... Miss Hogan, Esq., Mrs. and Miss Hunter, Mrs Lea, Miss
Griffith,

Clonlary. By Hon. Mrs. Skeffington,


Collector.

12

Anna
Chitty

4
5 5 5

Fanny
Flora
Friend, a

10
1

Orr,
C

Mrs

3
1

Smyly, Mrs. J Swan, Mrs Swan, Miss Whately, Mrs

4
5
1

Macdougall, Miss,
collected by

Miss

Strachan, Mrs. ... Willoughby, Mrs.

5 2

Dublin.
6

Young, Miss

C. Leslie, Collector. Leslie, Mrs. C. ... 10 Mease, Mrs 3

By Mrs.

Receiver, Miss Foot.

By

Miss Foot, Collector.


2
1

IPORTOBELLO.
Erskine, Miss, don. Maclaren, Colonel,

Anonymous
Callwell,Miss,don. Foot, Mrs
Foot, Miss
1

10
1

By Miss
Brougham, don
Lady

E. M'Carthy,
Mrs.,
1

Collector.

by ditto

5 2 5 10 10 5 5

jTtfcflTjt're.

Dufferin, Lord DutTerin, Dowager


Foster, Miss E. Gair, Mrs. T
...

4
5 2

Cupar.
Gillespie,

Mrs.

...2

4
5
1

Kerse Lesmahago. By Miss Greenshields,


Collector.

Houston, Mrs. B... James, Mrs., don. Kenny, M., Esq.... M'Carthy, Mrs. ... Mulholland, Miss Foe, Hon. Mrs. ... Rotheram, Mrs. ... Smith, A., Esq. ...

Geoghegan, Mrs. R., don Magee, Mrs Magee, Rev. W... Magee, Mrs. W.... Magee, Miss, don. Roe, Miss
Vicars, Mrs., don. Vicars, Miss, don.

10
6

2
1

Whitestone, Mrs.,

5
1

don

By Miss

C. Foot, Collector.

0-5
6
5

Greenshields,

J.,
1

Esq Mosman,

Thompson,
10

Mrs....
...

Turnly, Miss C.

Foot, Rev. Foot, Miss

F C

5 3

Misses...

Uniacke, Lady M.

12

By Miss
Cardrona.
Scott,

Traill, Collector.

Clare. KiNCORA.

Aldborough, Countess of

Miss

By
1

Mrs.

Lowe,
....

Madden, Mrs
1

5 5
...

Collector

Robinson, Mrs.

IRELAND,
By Rev. H. M.
Collector,

Corft.

aontrontierrB.

Finny,

Bandon.

Londonderry.

Dalton, Rev. E. ... Finny, Rev. H. M.

Lawson, Mr.s

10 10 10
1

By Lady
Boyle,

Elizabeth
Collector
2 10

By

Miss M'Causland,
Collector.
...

(for 1857)

Bond, Mrs. W. Bond, Mis*

2 2

68
Crookshanlc,
Heyfjate,

Mrs.
()

Lady

Jones, Mrs

2 2 5

Smyth, Mrs Smyth, Miss


Stewart, Mrs Verrl, MIgg, and Friends

Magee, Mrs. H. ...0 M'Causland, Rev.


A.
IT

5 4 2 14

Small sums
(i

lo

FUANCE.
Calais.
Fry, 8., Esq
4

4
5

M'Causland, Mrs. M'Clintock, Miss


Nicholson,
H.,

Walker, Mrs Warren, Esq.,

3 18

Esq

and Mrs Wilson, Mrs


6

12

Yelverton, Mrs.

...

2 2

IIyerks.
Clarke, Rev. W....
1

CASH ACCOUNT FROM APRIL TO FUGITIVE SLAVE MISSION.


Balance, April 1, 1858 Subscriptions and Donations Interest on Deposit

1,

1858,

TO MARCH
jE323

31,

185D.

lli

...*..'.".'.*.*..'..','

1032
'

14 5 lo

10 5

2
5

1,302

BY FUGITIVE SLAVE
Salaries of

MISSION.
s

Agents in Canada 4jc) j; Agents' Expenses in England '" 5313 Passage Money and Travelling Expenses of Agents""'.!! C7 17 Books, Stationery, and Printing (;s 17 Purchase of Clothing ...!..!..."' 6 10 Freight of Boxes and Carriage of ditto...!!!!!!!.!! 4 11 ". Postage and Charge on Draft 513 Paid to Reserve Fund !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 500 Balance at Bankers !!!!!!!!!!!!!! 174 13
1,302

9
II

g
ll

RECEIVED SINCE THE ACCOUNTS WERE CLOSED.


Cheltenham.

By Rev.

J.

Hamil...

By Miss Finny. Lombard, Mrs. J.


7

Sums under
2 6
6

Is.

..

ton, Collector

Robert Thompson's Collection.

Lombard,

Miss
2

Jersey.
Guille,

Mary
15

Mackenzie,?
Smith, W. H Sums under Is.
.,

1 1

Mrs

Lombard, Dora

Miss

Torquay.

AFriend
St.

Duulin.
Bultects,
coll.,

By

Mrs.

Luke's Association.
O'Neil's Collection.

Miss,
per

Fayle,
2

Collector

Hannah

Rev.
5
1

Clarke, Rev. R. F.

H.

Monsarratt

IRELAND.
Cavan. Webb,
Ballyheelan. Rev. M.,

Evanson, Ade .... Hobson, E M'Carthy, Rev.


Justin Richards, F Smith, W.

Newry.
Thompson,

N
Thompson, Thompson,

Mrs.

(don.)

10

H
Is.

Miss Miss
....

10 10 10

Tomkins, Mr.

K
..
;

Sums under
Cork.
Episcopal Free Church Association.

Sale of

Book

Eliza Farren's Collection. Ford, Mrs 1

Waterford.
Casliel,

Morris,

Mrs

M'Carthy, Rev. Smith, W. H

J.

1
1

the

Lord
2 10

Bishop of

4 MkAmmMbk*

S^l

64

from the following Conlrlbutlons of Clothing, Bibles, Prayer-books, Tracts, Src,


kind friends are most gratefully acknowledged
Breay, Mrs., Hadley House, Barnet.
Breay, Mlsg E. P., ditto (school children).

Mayor, Mrs., South ColUngham, Notts.

Bryans, Miss, Six Hills, Melton Mowbray (by Mrs. H. T. Breay, of Bir-

Moxon, Miss.Ciapham (schoolchildren). By Miss Moxon, Clothing made by


Farmers' Wives, in the parish of Kirk Bramwith, Doncaster. Nugent, Mrs., from Derby.
Orrlck, Miss, by friends in Brighton.

mingham).
Bucknlll, the Misses, Rugby.
Carbonell, Mrs., London.

Carpendale, Miss, Tiverton.


Carruthers, Miss, Edinburgh.

Page,

Mrs.

S.

A.,

Lancaster (working

party).

Chambers, Miss, Shtfficld. Chase, Rev. J. C, and Pupils. Clark, Mrs., Islington (working

Rlch.irdson, Mis., Newcastle (by Mrs.

D.

Wilson).
party).

Rowe, Miss, Trent Park, Barnct.


Stone, Mrs.
Stott,

De De

Quetteville, Rev.

W.

Wm., Dulwich.

Spaen, Lady Louisa.

Faulconer, Miss, Offham. near Lewes. Gaussen, Mrs., London (by Mrs. Fynes
Clinton).

Miss, by Misses Bucknill. (Juvenile Islington Mrs., Vincent,

working

party).

Walker, the Misses, Bath.

Hart, Lady.
Herring, Miss, Islington.

Lane, Mrs., Birmingham. Lowther, Mrs., Hertford. M'Causland, Miss, Londonderry. Marsden, Mrs. and Miss Evans, and
their Friends at Edgbaston.

Watton, Mrs., Birmingham. Wauchope, Mrs., Blandford. Wickes, Rev. W., London.
West, Mrs., Winchelsea. Wilson, Mrs. D., Islington.
Wilson,
Miss,
Brinkcliffe Tower, ncir
Sheffield.

Matthie, Miss, Penge.

Wood, Mrs. H. (by Miss Niabet, Bath).

and SubSole.The Treasurers and Secretaries hope that Receivers, Collectors, "Fugikindly favor them by kemitting all contributions for the " not later than the 20Tn March in each year. tive Slave Mission
.^cribers will

Macintosh, Printer, Great New-street, London.

Centres d'intérêt liés