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Random Processes, Optimal Filtering and Model-based Signal Processing

Elena Punskaya
www-sigproc.eng.cam.ac.uk/~op205

Overview of the course

A good text for the course: Monson H. Hayes, Statistical Digital Signal Processing and Modeling, Willey, 1996

Discrete-time Random Processes

family of functions (a single function is identified by the outcome k and it is just a function of, for example, time, where t = nT, and T the sampling interval)

A random process is a rule that maps every outcome of an experiment to a function.


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Random Processes

Ensemble representation of a discrete-time random process


Random variable From pdf f()

Xn1 Xn2 Xn3

Random Vector

1 2 . . .

sample space
n1 n2 n3

where t = nT, and T the sampling interval


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Discrete-time and Continuous-time Random process

Example: the harmonic process

Example: the harmonic process


0=0T, where T sampling period
independent of T

o true frequency 0 normalised frequency

1/2

f()

A few members of the random phase sine ensemble

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Correlation functions- Autocorrelation

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Cross-Correlation function

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Stationarity

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Stationarity
Random vectors, see Fig.1

Joint pdf:

Xn1 Xn2 Xn3

Random Vector

n1

n2

n3

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Stationarity

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Strict-Sense Stationarity

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Wide-sense stationarity

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Wide-sense stationarity

WSS sometimes known as weakly stationary

This only applies for finite variance processes: a SSS process with infinite variance is not WSS

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Example: random phase sine-wave

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Example: random phase sine-wave


Take three WSS conditions in turn Condition 1 Ok
constant sum of angles constants

cos() f() d = cos()(1/2)d =0 sin() = 0, sin(-) = 0 sin() f() d = sin()(1/2)d =0 E[sin()]= odd function
E[cos()]=20

Example: random phase sine-wave


Condition 2 Ok
nth mth from the same member of ensemble

sinAsinB=0.5[cos(A-B)-cos(A+B)]

fixed constants

cos(A+B)=cosAcosB-sinAsinB, where B = 2 and A fixed constant simplify and show as before E[cos(2)] = E[sin(2)]

=0
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Example: random phase sine-wave


3. Check variance is finite x2 = E[(Xn-)2], = 0 x2 = E[Xn2] (autocorrelation) = rXX[0] = 0.5A2[cos(n-n)0] = 0.5A2 < Condition 3 Ok

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Power Spectra

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Autocorrelation function from power spectrum

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Power Spectra

contribution to the meansquare in a frequency interval

uT uT lT lT

2
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Example: Power Spectrum

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Example: Power Spectrum

cos as half sum of complex exp

Recall from Part 1B: Fourier series representation of a function of , C1m= exp(jm0) and C2m= exp(-jm0) E.g., C2m corresponds to impulse train of period 2 Sum of two impulse trains of period 2 C2m = (1/2)(-0)exp(-jm)d = = (1/2)exp(-jm0)
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Power spectrum of harmonic process

0 - 2

0 + 2

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White Noise

[m] m

=cXX[0]

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White Noise
rXX[m] = cXX[m] = X2[m]

[m]=1 only for m=0

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Example: white Gaussian noise (WGN)

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Example: white Gaussian noise (WGN)

fXn(xn) = N ( xn | = 0, X2)
Xn1 Xn2 Xn3
Random Vector

n1

n2

n3

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Example: white Gaussian noise

since all Xnis independent

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Example: white Gaussian noise

Statistical characteristics are the same irrespective of shifts along the time axis. An observer looking at the process from sampling time n1 would not be able to tell the difference in the statistical characteristics of the process if he moved to a different time n2

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Linear systems and random processes

e.g. Digital Filter


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Linear systems and random processes

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Linear systems and random processes

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Linear systems and random processes

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Linear systems and random processes

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Linear systems and random processes

Time reversed impulse response

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Linear systems and random processes

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Linear systems and random processes

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Example: Filtering white noise

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Example: Filtering white noise

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Example: Filtering white noise

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Example: Filtering white noise

m = -1,

m = 0, m =1

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Example: Filtering white noise


Maxima

Minima
H(z) has a zero at z = -b0/b1=-1/0.9 Hence |H(ej) | has a minimum at = +2n maximum at =0 + 2n

Periodic
=

z-plane

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Ergodic Random processes

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Ergodic Random processes

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Ergodic Random processes

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Ergodic Random processes

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Example

f
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Example

as we were supposed to obtain

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Example

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Ergodic processes

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Comment: Complex-valued processes

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Summary
Looked at discrete-time random processes (most results for continuous time random processes follow through almost directly) Defined Correlation functions (auto- and cross-) Stationarity (strict sense and wide sense 3 conditions) Power spectrum (and calculation of autocorrelation function using the inverse DTFT) White noise (in particular, white Gaussian noise) Ergodic processes Linear system and a wide-sense stationary process Revision: Continuous time random processes see handouts, not covered during lectures

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Optimal Filtering

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The general Wiener filtering problem

observed

Need to design this filter

+
unobserved

H(z)

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The general Wiener filtering problem

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The Discrete-time Wiener Filter

Need to design this filter

H(z)

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Filtering observed noisy signal

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Mean-squared error (MSE)

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Mean-squared error (MSE)


Error signal

Need to design this filter


+

error

H(z)

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The Discrete-time Wiener Filter

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Derivation of Wiener filter

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Derivation of Wiener filter

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Derivation of Wiener filter

rdx [-q] = rxd [q]


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Derivation of Wiener filter

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Derivation of Wiener filter

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Mean-squared error for the optimal filter

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Mean-squared error for the optimal filter


Thus, minimum error is:

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Important Special Case: Uncorrelated Signal and Noise Processes

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Important Special Case: Uncorrelated Signal and Noise Processes

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Important Special Case: Uncorrelated Signal and Noise Processes

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Important Special Case: Uncorrelated Signal and Noise Processes

leads to Wiener Filter

1
and are real and positive
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Important Special Case: Uncorrelated Signal and Noise Processes

1 1+

1 1 1+ SNR()

Signal-to-noise ratio

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Example: AR Process
A 1st order all-pole, also known as, autoregressive process (AR), is generated by passing a zero-mean white noise through a first-order all-pole IIR filter

H(z) =

1 1 - z-1
2

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Example: AR Process

This is our AR process

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Example: AR Process

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Example: Deconvolution
Consider the following process

xn =dn+ 0.8 dn-1 + vn


where vn is zero-mean unit variance white noise uncorrelated with dn Assume dn is a WSS AR(1) process with rdd[k] = (0.5)|k| Determine the optimal Wiener filter to estimate dn from xn

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Example: Deconvolution

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Example: Deconvolution

and take DTFT of rxd and rxx to obtain the Wiener filter

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The FIR Wiener filter

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The FIR Wiener filter

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The FIR Wiener filter

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The correlation matrix

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The FIR Wiener filter

Positive definite

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The FIR Wiener filter

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Example: AR process
Consider 1st order AR process which has autocorrelation function

rdd [k] = |k|, with -1 < < 1


The process is observed in zero mean white noise with variance is uncorrelated with : Design the 1st order FIR Wiener Filter for estimation of Now We need to find from , which

= |k| +v2 [k] 90

Example: AR process

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Example: AR process
-1 dd dd

1+v2

1+v2

-1

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Example: Noise cancellation


Signal Source dn vn Noise Source
Design a Wiener Filter to estimate dn

xn=dn+vn

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Example: Noise cancellation


First, assume dn and vn are stationary and ergodic so that we could estimate

large Also assume that a long segment of vn is available during a silent section of music/speech

vv

v v
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Example: Noise cancellation


For the FIR Wiener Filter

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Example: Noise cancellation


For the FIR Wiener Filter

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Example: Noise cancellation


In the above equation rxx and rvv were estimated as explained before and the equation below can be solved using, for example, Matlab

In fact, audio signals are non-stationary Thus, need to apply to short quasi-stationary batches of data, one by one Can also successfully implement a frequency domain version using FFT

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Model-based Signal Processing

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Autoregressive moving-average model

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Model-based Signal Processing

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ARMA modelling

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ARMA modelling

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ARMA modelling

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ARMA modelling

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ARMA modelling

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Autoregressive models

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AR model

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Autocorrelation function of AR model

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Autocorrelation function of AR model

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Autocorrelation function of AR model

The inverse ztransform of 1/A(z)

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Yule-Walker Equations

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Yule-Walker Equations

wn = [n] and for n = 0

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Yule-Walker Equations

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Yule-Walker Equations

r=0 r=1 r=P

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Yule-Walker Equations
`

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Yule-Walker Equations

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Solving for AR coefficients

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Example: AR coefficients estimation


Take p = 2 We have measured rXX[0] = 6.14 rXX[1] = 3.08 rXX[2] = -2.55 In practice this would be measured using ergodicity of the process

large

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Example: AR coefficients estimation


Yule-Walker Equations:

6.14 3.08

3.08 6.14

3.08 -2.55 -0.95 0.89


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Example: AR coefficients estimation

= 6.14 +3.08 x (-0.95) +(-2.55) x (0.89)

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Thank you!

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