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Humanity First Medical January 2013 Update. Humanity First Medical Course.

Mr. Kalpesh Diyar (Fire & Rescue) teaches ABC techniques and demonstrating basic principles of resuscitation on manikins on one of the Humanity First teaching modules in Uganda

January 2013
(Vol 4, Issue 1)

Welcome to the Humanity First Medical update. A New Year Message from With these updates, we aim to keep you informed about Humanity First medical activities and talk about the latest in news and controversies, in relation to our line of work with these updates.

Mr Shahnawaz Rasheed
Medical Director Humanity First & Consultant at The Royal Marsden, London

Dear all,
Please visit our website Humanity First Medical for more about our activities, contribution to this newsletter or to contact members of the Humanity First Medical team. I wish our readership a very happy 2013.

2012 has been a good year for HF Medical in which we have run two Disaster Response Courses in the UK and one in Toronto for HF Canada and USA combined. To date, we have run 10 Courses and trained over 200 people. We were also asked by UK-Med to help run DR Courses for the UK International Trauma Register on behalf of the Department for International Development (DfID). We set up and ran the first of these in July with excellent feedback and our template is being used

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on subsequent courses to train clinicians to be deployed on behalf of the British Government. We will continue to be involved with these courses but will also continue to run HF Courses in the UK and North America. We are hoping to establish our HF Field Hospital for deployment to disasters and aim to have the first part of this completed by the middle of 2013. If we continue on the same trajectory as we are on at present, we should be placed among the best disaster response teams in the world before long. This depends on keeping our personnel engaged and active as well as improving our operating systems and procedures. Also in 2013, we are planning to have four trips deployed to The Gambia and two to Uganda. The Gambia development project that we are launching is really exciting there is a relatively small population in a country where HF has been established for a number of years and has excellent contacts. We are hoping that we can combine clinical treatment with training to improve the health of the country significantly by our intervention. We will need clinicians to volunteer in 2013 and beyond if we can work here with clearly defined objectives in a structured way, we can improve child and adult mortality and morbidity in a really effective way. I would like to thank our Team who have continued to work tirelessly for HF over the last year. We must continue with our efforts as there is still much to be done both in disaster response and also in long-term projects to improve the lives

Disaster Response Course; A world away from medical school manikins Dr Fiona Bailey Dr Anna Poon Dr Nathalie Courtois Dr Justine Lowe St Marys Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS trust

Introduction Humanity First (HF) is a charity that promotes human life and dignity. It runs multiple programmes to improve the lives of the worlds poorest and most vulnerable people. Responding to international disasters, providing medical aid through relief projects and more recently developing several sustainable initiatives around the world. It was first established in 1991 and in 2006 it acquired special consultative status of the United Nations Education and Social Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) as a non- governmental organization (NGO). Humanity First Medical Team have developed a unique international disaster response course, which now runs in the UK, USA and Canada. The Course

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Run over three days, it aims to prepare both medics and non-medics to participate in a disaster response team essentially bringing together a range of individuals to provide expertise from various backgrounds. The wide variety of non-medics ranged from business people; IT technicians; Quantity Surveyors; international health students and a retired Major from the Pakistan Army. Run by a variety of professionals with vast experience of providing medical aid to disaster zones; it combines engaging lectures with simulation to produce a very interactive roller-coaster program! The faculty includes inspirational specialists in the NHS and members of the UK branch of ISAR (International Search and Rescue Team) with support provided by fist aid volunteers and experienced actors. This course provides delegates with the closest experience to providing care in a disaster environment, encouraging leadership, managerial and communication skills essential to a disaster response team. Medical aspects as well as team building and public speaking skills were assessed. Following successful completion participants are added to a database, from which a response team of volunteer medical staff, logisticians and engineers can be assembled. The length of deployment is usually two weeks, to ensure resilience in such intense environments. This makes it more accessible for hospital doctors, as extended leave would difficult to arrange and may affect training.

of the many people affected by poverty and disease. Happy New Year! All the best, Shahnawaz

Consultant prospective- Dr Justine Lowe and Dr Nathalie Courtois, Consultant Anaesthetists, St Marys Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust My colleagues call me a course-aholic. If there is a course to learn how to do a particular skill Im not good at, Ill sign up. As a consequence, I feel somewhat qualified to identify a good course compared to a bad one. A good course takes you on a journey of learning. It gives you that ahahh or light bulb moment and you leave feeling inspired to learn more. I first heard about the HF UK Disaster Management course through a surgical colleague I work with (also the HF deputy medical director). Across the operating table we were discussing the Trauma Education structure I had helped to organise at St Marys since we opened as one of 4 Major Trauma Centres in

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Trainees Prospective- Dr Bailey and Dr Poon FY2 We initially heard informally about the course through a senior at work, who was inspiring to listen to, especially as this coincided with the Japanese Tsunami. We saw first-hand how this organisation was able to mobilise a team of medical aid to help with the relief, whilst decisions and updates were considered round the clock back in the UK to ensure their safety. The more we heard the more questions we had, including how can we get involved? Therefore we jumped at the opportunity to participate in their Disaster Management Course. It sounded intriguing, intense and a little unimaginable regarding what was in store for us, but would provide the prospect of helping those in need at the most vulnerable time in their life. On enrolling we were expecting a challenging weekend that would push our boundaries and we were not disappointed. The course was devised to give participants a structure for disaster management response through an experience outside the box and their comfort zone! Personal highlights included incredible talks from international experts who shared their involvement and knowledge of disaster management; whilst the demanding scenarios provided invaluable one-toone assessment and feedback on medical management. It was an experience a world away from courses with manikins and drove each individual to think on their feet, under pressure in non-encountered, almost overwhelming situations. The prime lesson learnt was the importance of acting with humanity in such inconceivable environments and

London. I asked this colleague to do a lecture about Ocular trauma and in return I would attend this course he helped to run. I have to admit I was a little skeptical. I eat my words. My anaesthetic colleague and I were, from the beginning of Day 1 of the HF course, impressed by the dedication, absolute sincerity and enthusiasm of the faculty. It also ran with military-like precision and it was organised to the minute (definitely because of the presence of the ISAR team). The course itself ran a combination of novel workshops and lectures that involved teambuilding, vital elements of disaster response including logistics, security and communication. You are given a background as to how the well-known organisations like the WHO and UN and NGOs such as MSF and Red Cross (amongst others) fit together when a disaster happens in the world such as the Indonesian tsunami or Haiti earthquake. The course provides very real and overwhelming moulages run at the local fire station and in the field (literally). There are world experts lecturing from the British military and John Hopkins University with real experience. All the participating delegates left tired but excited, full of respect for those who volunteer to help others in times of literal disaster, but in my mind, most importantly, we walked away with skills that no other 3 day course offers. It is run like an ATLS course, but on steroids and with a twist, and yet at extremely reasonable cost. All proceeds go directly to the charity or the running costs of the course. HF also receives donations from generous industry sponsors and of course the valuable time of the volunteer faculty. For anyone interested in humanitarian

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we were humbled by the variety of professionals willing to participate and volunteer in Humanity First projects.

work or disaster relief, this course is a definite must. Conclusions In summary, the course was challenging across all medical levels and highly recommended from SHOs to consultants interested in participating in humanity aid work. Giving a real sense of achievement in understanding the disaster response team, confidence in managing chaos and building bonds with individuals sharing the same passion to provide help with humanity to those in need. Those who are interested to attend or wish to register interest for the Humanity First Disaster Response course please click the picture (link) below to take you to the course details and registration form

Don't worry! Vehicles follow left hand driving in Uganda.

Please visit our website Humanity First Medical for more about our activities, contribution to this newsletter or to contact members of the Humanity First Medical team.

All photographs in this newsletter are copyrighted by Humanity First International (UK)

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