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Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 118
NEW YEARS TRAGEDY
WORLD PAGE 8
STANFORD WINS
ROSE BOWL 20-14
SPORTS PAGE 11
POACHED EGGS
FOR ANY MEAL
FOOD PAGE 17
STAMPEDE AFTER FIREWORKS KILLS 61 IN IVORY COAST
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
652-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com 6505910301
By David Espo and Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Past its own
New Years deadline, a weary
Congress sent President Barack
Obama legislation to avoid a nation-
al scal cliff of middle class tax
increases and spending cuts late
Tuesday night in the culmination of
a struggle that strained Americas
divided government to the limit.
The bills passage on a bipartisan
257-167 vote in the House sealed a
hard-won political triumph for the
president less than two months after
he secured re-election while calling
Congress
staves off
tax hikes
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The countrys antiquated work visa
restrictions has sent a Sunnyvale-based
company on a radical mission to host
entrepreneurs from around the world in
international waters on either a convert-
ed cruise ship or barge by as early as the
rst quarter of 2014.
Blueseed has just secured $300,000 in
venture capital funding to help get the
project off the ground although the com-
pany anticipates needing up to $35 mil-
lion to make the offshore community a
reality.
It proposes to station a ship in interna-
tional waters off the coast of Half Moon
Bay and have residents commute to
Pillar Point Harbor via ferry.
The location will allow startup entre-
preneurs from anywhere in the world to
start or grow their company near Silicon
Valley, without the need for a U.S. work
visa, according to Blueseed.
The company was co-founded in 2011
by Max Marty and Dario Mutabdzija,
who had worked together at the
Seasteading Institute, which promotes
the concept of oating cities and con-
tends the ocean is the next frontier of
human civilization.
It is a rst-of-its-kind concept that
will basically house companies,
Mutabdzija said.
The company is also considering leas-
ing a cruise ship that could bring down
the cost of the venture substantially, he
told the Daily Journal.
Its the next evolution in the ship
industry, Mutabdzija said.
Ship residents will be charged from
$1,200 to $3,000 a month for living and
ofce space, according to Blueseed.
Ship amenities will include catering,
full-service gymnasium, medical servic-
Community at sea proposed off Half Moon Bay
Ship or barge could host international entrepreneurs who seek access to Silicon Valley
RENDERING COURTESY OF BLUESEED
A local company proposes to host international entrepreneurs
on a converted cruise ship off the coast of Half Moon Bay to
bypass international immigration laws.
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Jenny Yeh and Loren Lam hold their son Joshua Bernard Lam at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame
Tuesday afternoon.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Joshua Bernard Lam decided
2013 was too good to miss.
He was due Jan. 2 but instead was
born at 12:39 a.m. Jan. 1, making
Lam the rst baby born in San
Mateo County this year. Thankfully,
his parents hadnt made any other
plans for ringing in the New Year.
Parents Jenny Yeh, 38, and Loren
Lam, 45, had a lot of waiting to do
before welcoming their new, very
quiet bundle of joy. Yehs water
broke at 6:30 a.m. Monday, Dec. 31.
The Palo Alto family checked into
the Mills-Peninsula Medical Center
in Burlingame by 8 a.m. Thats
when the waiting began.
Labor was induced for the couple
and even that took some time. She
started really pushing at 9:15 p.m.
Joshua, the couples rst, was 7
pounds 14 ounces and 20.5 inches in
length. The couple wanted to use a
name from the bible.
Lam and Yeh a hardware engi-
neer and patent attorney, respective-
ly have known each other about
12 years and have been married
four. They plan to take the little one
home later this week. There were
lots of worries at rst but now that
Joshua is born theyre both pretty
calm, they said.
In Redwood City, the Clayton
family from Menlo Park welcomed
their third boy, James Owen, at 1:29
a.m. New Years Day.
Diana and Bill Clayton were
expecting the little one Dec. 28, the
due date. Instead, while celebrating
New Years Eve at home Monday
night, Diana Clayton realized it was
time. The family arrived at the
Kaiser Permanente Redwood City
Parents welcome first baby of 2013
See BABY Page 18
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo Countys economic
picture is a mixed bag of a lower
unemployment rates and increased
home prices and personal income
but also spiking commercial proper-
ty vacancy rates and uncertainty
over school funding, according to
the controllers evaluation of the last
scal year.
Controller Bob Adler released a
summary of his annual financial
Countys economic outlook released
See COUNTY, Page 20
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As the Senate voted 89-8 for a
deal Monday night to avert the
nations so-called fiscal cliff,
members of the House of
Representatives waited for a
chance to vote on the bipartisan-
brokered deal Tuesday as
Republican leadership resisted the
proposal by demanding more
Cliff deal points to
divide in Congress
See BLUESEED, Page 18
See DIVIDE Page 18
See CLIFF, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Dax Shepard
is 38.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1788
Georgia became the fourth state to rati-
fy the U.S. Constitution.
A clash of doctrines is not
a disaster it is an opportunity.
Alfred North Whitehead, mathematician (1861-1947)
Actor Cuba
Gooding Jr. is 45.
Actress Kate
Bosworth is 30.
Birthdays
REUTERS
People enter the water while taking part in the Coney Island Polar Bear Clubs annual New Years Day Polar Bear Swim in New
Yorks Coney Island.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Lows
near 40. East winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the upper 30s to mid 40s. North winds 5
to 10 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s.
Friday night through Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the 40s. Highs in the mid 50s.
Tuesday night: Clear except for frost. Lows around 30.
Northeast winds around 5 mph.
Wednesday: Sunny. Patchy frost in the morning. Highs in
the lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in rst place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place; and
Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race time was
clocked at 1:47.03.
(Answers tomorrow)
AWAIT RATIO PALACE THRASH
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: Even though he no longer had a use for his
comb, he wasnt going to PART WITH IT
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GAMIE
GREEV
GARDON
OUAARR
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
7 1 1
10 13 32 40 41 32
Mega number
Dec. 28 Mega Millions
8 21 22 37 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 4 3 9
Daily Four
7 6 2
Daily three evening
In 1893, the U.S. Postal Service issued its rst commemorative
stamp to honor the Worlds Columbian Expedition and the
quadricentennial of Christopher Columbus voyage.
In 1900, Secretary of State John Hay announced the Open
Door Policy to facilitate trade with China.
In 1921, the play that coined the term robot, R.U.R.
(Rossums Universal Robots) by Karel Capek, was rst per-
formed in Czechoslovakia.
In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in Flemington, N.J.,
on charges of kidnapping and murdering the 20-month-old son
of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was found guilty,
and executed.)
In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by
Japanese forces during World War II.
In 1959, the Soviet Union launched its space probe Luna 1, the
rst manmade object to y past the moon, its apparent intend-
ed target.
In 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his
successful bid for the presidency.
In 1971, 66 people were killed in a pileup of spectators leav-
ing a soccer match at Ibrox Stadium in Glasgow, Scotland.
In 1974, President Richard M. Nixon signed legislation requir-
ing states to limit highway speeds to 55 miles an hour. (Federal
speed limits were abolished in 1995).
In 1981, police in Shefeld, England, arrested Peter Sutcliffe,
who confessed to being the Yorkshire Ripper, the serial killer
of 13 women.
In 1983, the musical play Annie closed on Broadway after a
run of 2,377 performances.
In 2006, 12 miners died in a methane gas explosion at the Sago
Mine in West Virginia, W.Va., but one miner, Randal McCloy
Jr., was eventually rescued.
Country musician Harold Bradley is 87. Former House
Speaker Dennis Hastert is 71. TV host Jack Hanna is 66. Actress
Wendy Phillips is 61. Actress Gabrielle Carteris is 52. Movie
director Todd Haynes is 52. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher David
Cone is 50. Actress Tia Carrere is 46. Model Christy Turlington
is 44. Actor Taye Diggs is 42. Rock musician Scott Underwood
(Train) is 42. Rock singer Doug Robb (Hoobastank) is 38.
Actress Paz Vega is 37. Country musician Chris Hartman is 35.
Rock musician Jerry DePizzo Jr. (O.A.R.) is 34. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Kelton Kessee (IMX) is 32. Jazz singer-musician
Trombone Shorty is 27.
While creating the character of Nancy
Drew, some of the names considered for
the teenage girl detective were Diana
Dare, Stella Strong, Nell Cody and Nan
Nelson.
***
The Bobbsey Twins are two sets of frater-
nal twins. Bert and Nan are the older
twins, and Flossie and Freddie are the
younger set. The rst book in the series of
the twins adventures was published 1904.
In later years the stories focused on the
twins solving mysteries.
***
Parker Stevenson (born 1952) and Shaun
Cassidy (born 1958) starred as the
sleuthing teenage brothers in the televi-
sion show The Hardy Boys Mysteries
(1977-1979).
***
One person created the Hardy Boys, the
Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew. Edward
Stratemeyer (1863-1930) founded the
Stratemeyer Syndicate in 1926.
Stratemeyer conceived of the ideas for the
juvenile series characters, created the plot
outlines and hired ghostwriters to com-
plete the stories. Each series was pub-
lished under a pseudonym that
Stratemeyer owned.
***
The pseudonym for Nancy Drew was
Carolyn Keene. The Bobbsey Twins were
written by ctional Laura Lee Hope. The
Hardy Boys pseudonym was Franklin M.
Dixon.
***
Donald J. Sobol (born 1924) created the
crime solving 10-year-old character
Encyclopedia Brown. The rst book in the
long-running series was Encyclopedia
Brown, Boy Detective (1963).
***
Encyclopedia Brown has a detective
agency with his friend Sally Kimball. The
charge to solve a case is 25 cents per day
plus expenses.
***
Do you know what detective went up
against villains Flattop, Big Boy Caprice,
Pruneface and Shakey? See answer at end.
***
The Great Mouse Detective (1986) was
Disneys 26th animated feature lm. The
movie had 125 artists involved in its cre-
ation.
***
The gang in the cartoon Scooby-Doo
Where Are You? (1969-1972) traveled
around in their Mystery Machine van
solving mysteries that involved suspicious
ghosts. Along with their Great Dane
Scooby-Doo, the teenagers in the group
were Freddie Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma
Dinkley and Norville Shaggy Rogers.
***
In the carton Inspector Gadget (1983-
1986), Gadget is a cyborg detective that
has various gadgets built into his anatomy
that he uses while investigating crimes.
Gadgets nemesis is Dr. Claw, leader of an
evil organization called MAD.
***
Don Adams (1923-2005) did the voice of
Inspector Gadget. Adams is known as
Maxwell Smart from the TV show Get
Smart (1965-1970).
***
Detective Eddie Valiant, played by Bob
Hoskins (born 1942), in the movie Who
Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), hates
toons because his brother, also a detective,
was killed in Toontown by a falling piano.
***
Jim Carreys (born 1962) rst starring
movie role was in Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective (1994). He earned $350,000.
Two years later he earned $20 million for
The Cable Guy (1996).
***
Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), pro-
duced by Steven Spielberg (born 1946),
was the rst movie to have a computer
generated character. Pixar created the
three-dimensional armored knight that
leaps through a stained glass window.
***
Answer: Dick Tracy, police detective. The
Dick Tracy comic strip was created by
Chester Gould (1900-1985) and rst
appeared in the Detroit Mirror on Oct. 4,
1931. The strip reected the violence of
1930s Chicago. Flattop Jones is a free-
lance hitman. Flattop has villainous rela-
tives named Blowtop (brother) and
Angeltop (sister). Big Boy Caprice is a
gangster. Pruneface is a Nazi spy with a
scarred face introduced in 1942. Shakey,
named for his shaky hands, was frozen to
death in a cofn of ice in 1945.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
6 9 20 28 33 19
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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary. A briefcase containing a passport
was stolen from a vehicle at a hotel on
Gateway Boulevard before 9:22 a.m. on
Sunday, Dec. 16.
Burglary. Six purses and Christmas gifts were
stolen from a vehicle on Olive Avenue before
3:13 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16.
DUI. A person was arrested for driving while
intoxicated on Westborough and Gellert boule-
vards before 11:34 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15.
Disturbance. Two men threatened a hotel bar
manager on Gateway Boulevard before 10:48
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15.
Assault. Three men were in a ght outside a
liquor store on Hickey Boulevard before 6:34
p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15.
Burglary. Two vehicles were broken into in
the basement parking lot of a hotel on South
Airport Boulevard before 12:54 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 15.
Burglary. A vehicle was broken into and a
backpack was stolen on Woods Circle before
9:04 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 14.
HALF MOON BAY
DUI. A man was arrested for driving while
intoxicated on the rst block of North Cabrillo
Highway before 1:58 a.m. on Saturday, Dec.
15.
Lying to a police officer. Five juveniles
involved in a collision falsied information to
the police on the 100 block of Cypress Point
Road before 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 14.
Recovered vehicle. A car stolen out of San
Jose was found abandoned in a shopping cen-
ter parking lot on the rst block of North
Cabrillo Highway before 12:20 a.m. on Friday,
Dec. 14.
Police reports
Urine trouble
Juveniles having a loud party were seen
urinating outside on Taft Street in
Redwood City before 10:53 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 15.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A family in San Mateos Shoreview neigh-
borhood has been ordered to vacate their
home as the city is seeking the court to declare
the property on Lindbergh Street a continu-
ing public nuisance.
The city led a complaint in Superior Court
against Patricia Barnes and Mark and
Kimberly Klaiber Dec. 20 after the family
failed for years to clean up the property and
bring it up to code.
Mark Klaiber has even lived in a tent in the
front yard of the home to protect his property,
he told the city.
The family received its first abatement
notice for code problems way back in 1995 for
the Lindbergh property, according to the com-
plaint.
The Klaibers were issued a building permit
in 2001 to construct a rst-oor reduction and
a second-oor addition on the home but those
permits have been open for more than 10
years and a city building inspector determined
the work should have taken no more than two
years to complete, according to the claim.
Neighbors complained to the city for years
about the property since there was constant
debris and construction maintained on the
property, according to the complaint. The
family was asked to give the city a detailed
timeline in 2006 for when the project would
be complete and threatened to le a lawsuit
against the family to have it comply with the
citys municipal code. The family said at the
time the work would be completed in 190
days, but it never was.
Some of the most recent code enforcement
violations the family were hit with include use
of the property as a dumping ground; haz-
ardous or unsanitary premises, debris, junk,
garbage and vegetation accumulations on the
property; re hazard, excessive accumulation
of storage, junk and/or debris on the property;
inadequate exits, excessive accumulation of
storage, junk creating potential safe egress
hazard; and storage in public view, junk,
debris, construction materials stored in public
view.
Barnes is Kimberly Klaibers mother and
the family had a young child living on the
property, according to the complaint.
The city red-tagged the home in May and
ordered the family to vacate and make the
needed repairs.
The violations were found to be immediate-
ly dangerous, according to the complaint.
An inspection of the home in April revealed
sheetrock missing throughout, unsafe electri-
cal wiring, debris and combustibles piled up
excessively and blocking exits, no handrails
on the stairwell and holes in the stair landings
with unnished work, according to the com-
plaint.
A nonprot agency, Rebuilding Together,
even had a slew of volunteers come to the
property in August to help clean up the prop-
erty but were told by the Klaibers in
September that their assistance was no longer
desired, according to the complaint.
The city, depending on court action, may
actually hire a contractor to perform the need-
ed repairs to the home and clean up the yard at
the familys expense.
A hearing on the preliminary injunction is
scheduled for Feb. 14.
Neither the Klaibers nor Barnes could be
reached for comment.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
City sues family for excessive code violations
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A San Mateo family has been ordered to vacate its home after the city determined excessive
code enforcement violations made the property a danger.
4
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Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
over 40 exhibitors!
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Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
5
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
advertisement
By Jeff Burbank
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A man with an assault rie in his car removed
his clothes and brandished a Samurai sword at
police in west San Jose for more than two hours
yesterday before he was arrested while trying to
ee, a San Jose police spokesman said.
Coco Bennett, 29, of unknown residence,
was arrested on suspicion of brandishing a
weapon and possession of an assault rie, San
Jose police spokesman Ofcer Albert Morales
said.
Police recovered an AR-15-type assault rie,
with a magazine and live ammunition, from
Bennetts car during the standoff at the Santa
Clara Valley Transportation Authority light rail
station on Bascom Avenue and Southwest
Expressway, Morales said.
The incident began several miles to the east
at 8:05 a.m. when police answered a report that
a person was armed with an assault rie in front
of a residence near Ezie Street and Cas Drive in
east San Jose, Morales said.
When police reached the residence, the sus-
pect was not there but, based on a description
by witnesses of the suspects pickup truck,
patrol ofcers spotted the vehicle near the VTA
station at about 8:30 a.m., Morales said.
The suspect drove into the stations
parking lot, began to take off his clothing
and emerged from the truck naked while
brandishing an unsheathed Samurai sword
at officers, Morales said.
He said, Youre going to have to kill me
to the ofcers, Morales said.
Ofcers closed the rail station, secured the
immediate area and recovered the assault rie,
magazine and bullets from the pickup truck,
Morales said. Police notied the departments
Crisis Intervention Team, which sent members
over to talk to the suspect into giving up,
Morales said.
The thing we have on our side is time,
Morales said of the more than two-hour negoti-
ation that that followed.
There is no sense in rushing it, Morales
said. Ultimately, we wanted him to drop the
sword.
The crisis team attempted to cajole the nude
suspect into standing down as a crowd of
bystanders and a lot of media gathered at the
scene, Morales said.
Finally at 11 a.m., the suspect, still carrying
the sword, bolted toward a fence and tried to
scale it, fell down, dropped the weapon, was
taken into custody and transported to a hospital
for treatment for minor injuries, Morales said.
Police were trying to determine what may
have prompted the suspect to act the way he
did, including his state of mental health and
whether drugs or alcohol were factors, Morales
said.
Some people in the neighborhood of Ezie
Street and Cas Drive, where the original call
came from, knew Bennett, Morales said.
Police arrest naked man
armed with Samurai sword
By John Christoffersen
and Pat Eaton-Robb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWTOWN, Conn. Since escaping a
gunmans rampage at their elementary school,
the 8-year-old Connors triplets have suffered
nightmares, jumped at noises and clung to
their parents a little more than usual.
Now parents like David Connors are brac-
ing to send their children back to school, near-
ly three weeks after the shooting rampage at
Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown.
It wont be easy for the parents or the chil-
dren, who heard the gunshots that killed 20 of
their classmates and six educators.
Im nervous about it, Connors said. Its
unchartered waters for us. I know its going to
be difcult.
Classes are starting Thursday at a repur-
posed school in the neighboring town of
Monroe, where the students desks have been
taken along with backpacks and other belong-
ings that were left behind in the chaos follow-
ing the shooting on Dec. 14. Families have
been coming in to see the new school, and an
open house is scheduled for Wednesday.
An army of workers has been getting the
school ready, painting, moving furniture and
even raising the oors in the bathrooms of the
former middle school so the smaller elemen-
tary school students can reach the toilets.
Connors, a 40-year-old engineer, felt reas-
sured after recently visiting the new setup at
the former Chalk Hill school in Monroe. He
said his children were excited to see their
backpacks and coats, and that the family was
greeted by a police ofcer at the door and
grief counselors in the hallways.
Teachers will try to make it as normal a
school day as possible for the children,
schools Superintendent Janet Robinson said.
We want to get back to teaching and learn-
ing, she said.
Sandy Hook students, teachers head back to school
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to recover in
a New York hospital where shes being treated
for a blood clot in her head.
Her doctors say blood thinners are being used
to dissolve the clot and they are condent she
will make a full recovery. Clinton didnt suffer
a stroke or neurological damage from the clot
that formed after she suffered a concussion dur-
ing a fainting spell at her home in early
December, doctors said in a statement Monday.
Clinton, 65, was admitted to New York-
Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday when the clot
turned up on a follow-up exam on the concus-
sion, Clinton spokesman
Phillipe Reines said. The
clot is located in the vein in
the space between the brain
and the skull behind the
right ear. She will be
released once the medica-
tion dose for the blood
thinners has been estab-
lished, the doctors said.
In their statement, Dr.
Lisa Bardack of the Mount
Kisco Medical Group and Dr. Gigi El-Bayoumi
of George Washington University said Clinton
was making excellent progress and was in good
spirits.
Clinton receiving blood
thinners to dissolve clot
Hillary Clinton
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
People hug at a makeshift memorial at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
6
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY CITY OF FOSTER CITY GILEAD SCIENCES INTEGRATED
CORPORATE CAMPUS MASTER PLAN DRAFT SUBSEQUENT ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACT REPORT AND PUBLIC HEARING - January 17,2013
State Clearinghouse # 2008122064
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Foster City, as Lead Agency, has completed a Draft Subsequent
Environmental Impact Report (Subsequent EIR) for the Gilead Sciences Integrated Corporate Campus Master Plan (2012
Master Plan). The 2012 Master Plan would amend the Vintage Park General Development Plan, under which the 20 I
0 Corporate Campus Master Plan (20 I 0 Master Plan) was approved. The amendments would increase the amount of
building space and land area beyond that identied in the 2010 Master Plan. The 2010 Master Plan was examined in the
Gilead Sciences Corporate Campus Master Plan EIR, which was certied on February 16, 20 I O.
PUBLIC HEARING: The Planning Commission is schedu led to receive public comments on the Subsequent EIR on
January 17,2013, at 7:00 p.m. at roster City Council Chambers, located at 620 Foster City Boulevard.
PUBLIC REVIEW TlMELlNE: The public review period for the Subsequent EIR begins December 14,2012 and ends
January 28, 2013. The City must receive all written comments regarding the adequacy of the Subsequent ErR wit hin this
time period. Written comments may be submitted in person, by mail, bye-mail, or by fax. The mailing address is 610 roster
City Boulevard, Foster City, Californ ia 94404, the email address is kkojayan@fostercity.org and the fax number is (650)
286-3589. Direct all comments to the attention of Kohar Kojayan, Senior Planner.
DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Copies of the Subsequent EIR are ava ilable for review Monday through Friday,
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., at the City of Foster City City Hail, Community Development Department,
610 Foster City Boulevard, Foster City, California, 94404, except on specied holidays. The Subsequent EIR is also
available at the Foster City Public Library, at 1000 East Hillsdale Boulevard, and online, at http://www.fostercity.org!.
PROJECT LOCATlON: Vintage Park - 300-368 Lakeside Drive; 301 Velocity Way - (APNs: 094-901-290; 094- 901-
300; 094-90 1-3 10; 094-901-340; 094-901-370; 094-901-380; 094-901-390; 094-901-400; 094-901-410; 094-904- 290:
094-904-300; 094-904-3 I 0: 094-904-320; 094-904-330; 094-904-340; 094-122-050; 094-122-060; 094-122-070; 094-
122-080; 094-122-1 10; 094-122-120; 094-122-130; 094-122-150), 72 acres of a portion of the Vintage Park business
park owned by Gilead Sciences. The project site is bounded by East Third Avenue to the north, Vintage Park Drive/Marsh
Drive to the east, Bridgepointe Shopping Center/Home Depot in San Mateo to the south, and Mariners Island Boulevard
in San Mateo to the west. Figure I depicts the location of the project site.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed project would amend the 2010 Master Plan and the Vintage Park General
Development Plan to incorporate and develop an additional approximately 32 acres acquired from Electronics for Imaging
(EFI) adjacent to the 40-acre site comprising the 20 I 0 Master Plan. The 2012 Master Plan would redevelop a portion of
the approximately 73-acre project site, including demolition of up to 12 of the exi sting ofce and laboratory buildings,
and construction of up to 17 new build ings. Buildout of the 2012 Master Plan would result in a total of up to 22 ofce and
laboratory buildings (comprising approximately 2,500,600 square feet of interior space) and 6,050 parking sta ils on the
project site. Development envisioned under the proposed 2012 Master Plan would require an amendmcnt to the Vi ntage
Park General Development Plan/Rezoning, an amended and restated Development Agreement, and various other City
entitlements, including demolition, construction, and building permits.
SIGNIFICANT ANTlCIPA TED ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: The Subsequent EIR provides an evaluation
of the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project and recommends mitigation measures to reduce impacts to
a less-than-signicant level. With the implementation of the proposed mitigation measures, no signicant impacts would
resu!t with implementation of the proposed project, except for the following impacts:
The project would confict with General Plan noise policies
adopted to avoid or mitigate an environmental impact.
Project-related traffc would create a clearly noticeable
permanent change in the noise environment.
Operation of the project would result in a signifcant
project-level and cumulative net increase in criteria pollutant
emissions, resulting in a confict with the Bay Area Air
Quality Management District 2010 CleanAir Plan.
These impacts would remain signicant and unavoidable,
since the mitigation measures identied in the Subsequent
EIR would not reduce these impacts to a less-than-
signicant level. The project site is not listed on any of the
lists of hazardous materials sites enumerated under Section
65962.5 of the Government Code.
QUESTIONS: If you have any questions about this
project, please contact Kohar Kojayan, Senior Planner at
(650) 286-3237 or t kojayan@fostercit y.org.
CITY GOVERNMENT
In December, the San Bruno City
Council held its annual reorganization.
Irene OConnell is now the Vice
Mayor.
Do gays need a church
of their own anymore?
By Rachel Zoll
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
On that Sunday in 1968 when Troy Perry borrowed a minis-
ters robe and started a church for gays in his living room, the
world was a very different place.
Perrys Metropolitan Community Churches was then a lone
spiritual refuge for openly gay Christians, an idea so far from
the mainstream that the founders were often chased from
places where they tried to worship. Four decades later, some of
the most historically important American denominations,
which had routinely expelled gays and lesbians, are welcom-
ing them instead.
MCC now has a presence in dozens of U.S. states as well as
overseas, reporting a total membership of more than 240 con-
gregations and ministries. But as acceptance of same-sex rela-
tionships grows gay and lesbian clergy in many Protestant
traditions no longer have to hide their partners or lose their
careers, and Christians can often worship openly with their
same-gender spouses in the mainline Protestant churches
where they were raised the fellowship is at a crossroads.
Is a gay-centered Christian church needed anymore?
There are many more options than there used to be, said
the Rev. Nancy Wilson, moderator, or leader, of the
Metropolitan Community Churches. But there is not a mass
exodus.
The denomination has never been gays-only. But for a long
time, straight allies were scarce.
The founding congregation, MCC of Los Angeles, opened a
year before the Stonewall riots in New York. Few people had
ever heard the argument that the Bible sanctioned same-gender
relationships and no one of any inuence in the religious world
was saying it. MCC congregations became targets of arson,
violence, pickets and, in at least one case, a vice squad.
Al Smithson, a founder in 1969 of the fellowships San
Diego church, said his pastor would point to Orange Countys
famous Crystal Cathedral and joke that he was praying for a
bulletproof version.
The church today is a bit more diverse. MCC pastors say
they see a growing number of straight friends and relatives of
gays and lesbians among their new congregants, along with
heterosexual parents who want their children raised in a gay-
afrming environment.
By Marilynn Marchione
and Mike Stobbe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is your brain on sugar for real.
Scientists have used imaging tests to show for
the rst time that fructose, a sugar that saturates
the American diet, can trigger brain changes
that may lead to overeating.
After drinking a fructose beverage, the brain
doesnt register the feeling of being full as it
does when simple glucose is consumed,
researchers found.
Its a small study and does not prove that
fructose or its relative, high-fructose corn syrup,
can cause obesity, but experts say it adds evi-
dence they may play a role. These sugars often
are added to processed foods and beverages,
and consumption has risen dramatically since
the 1970s along with obesity. A third of U.S.
children and teens and more than two-thirds of
adults are obese or overweight.
All sugars are not equal even though they
contain the same amount of calories because
they are metabolized differently in the body.
Table sugar is sucrose, which is half fructose,
half glucose. High-fructose corn syrup is 55
percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. Some
nutrition experts say this sweetener may pose
special risks, but others and the industry reject
that claim. And doctors say we eat too much
sugar in all forms.
For the study, scientists used magnetic reso-
nance imaging, or MRI, scans to track blood
ow in the brain in 20 young, normal-weight
people before and after they had drinks contain-
ing glucose or fructose in two sessions several
weeks apart.
Scans showed that drinking glucose turns
off or suppresses the activity of areas of the
brain that are critical for reward and desire for
food, said one study leader, Yale University
endocrinologist Dr. Robert Sherwin. With fruc-
tose, we dont see those changes, he said. As
a result, the desire to eat continues it isnt
turned off.
Whats convincing, said Dr. Jonathan Purnell,
an endocrinologist at Oregon Health & Science
University, is that the imaging results mirrored
how hungry the people said they felt, as well as
what earlier studies found in animals.
It implies that fructose, at least with regards
to promoting food intake and weight gain, is a
bad actor compared to glucose, said Purnell.
He wrote a commentary that appears with the
federally funded study in Wednesdays Journal
of the American Medical Association.
Researchers now are testing obese people to
see if they react the same way to fructose and
glucose as the normal-weight people in this
study did.
What to do? Cook more at home and limit
processed foods containing fructose and high-
fructose corn syrup, Purnell suggested. Try to
avoid the sugar-sweetened beverages. It doesnt
mean you cant ever have them, but control
their size and how often they are consumed, he
said.
Brain image study: Fructose may spur overeating
It implies that fructose, at least with regards to promoting
food intake and weight gain, is a bad actor compared to glucose.
Jonathan Purnell, an endocrinologist at Oregon Health & Science University
NATION/WORLD 7
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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(Between Brittan & Holly)
652-388-8836
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www.cinnabarhome.com
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All other times by appointment
By Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Clashes between govern-
ment troops and rebels on Tuesday
forced the international airport in
Aleppo to stop all ights in and out of
Syrias largest city, while erce battles
also raged in the suburbs of the capital
Damascus.
The rebels have been making inroad
in the civil war recently, capturing a
string of military bases and posing a
stiff challenge to the regime in Syrias
two major cities Damascus and
Aleppo.
The opposition trying to overthrow
authoritarian President Bashar Assad
has been ghting for control of Aleppo
since the summer, and they have cap-
tured large swathes of territory in
Aleppo province west and north of the
city up to the Turkish border.
In the past few weeks, the rebels have
stepped up their attacks on airports
around Aleppo province, trying to chip
away at the governments air power,
which poses the biggest obstacle to their
advances.
The air force has been bombing and
strang rebel positions and attacking
towns under opposition control for
months. But the rebels have no planes or
effective anti-aircraft weapons to count-
er the attacks.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory
for Human Rights, an anti-regime
activist group, said the ghting around
the base of Syrian army Brigade 80, part
of a force protecting Aleppo
International Airport, led to the closure
of the airport late Monday.
Heavy fighting is taking place
around Brigade 80, said Rami Abdul-
Rahman, who heads the Observatory.
The Observatory relies on a network of
activists around Syria.
The airport has been closed since
yesterday, he said.
The Syrian government had no com-
ment on the closing of the airport. On
Saturday, Syrias national airline can-
celed a ight to Aleppo because of ght-
ing nearby.
Rebels have warned that they would
target civilian as well as military planes
using the Aleppo airport, saying the
regime is using civilian planes to bring
in supplies and weapons.
The rebels have been attacking three
other airports in the Aleppo area,
including a military helicopter base near
the Turkish border. They have posted
dozens of videos online that appear to
show ghters shooting mortars, home-
made rockets and sniper ries at targets
inside the bases.
There was also heavy ghting in the
Damascus suburb of Daraya, southwest
of the capital. Daraya is one of the clos-
est suburbs to the capital and is on the
edge of two important neighborhoods
that are home to a strategic air base and
government headquarters.
The ghting in Daraya was so erce
that the explosions echoed in some parts
of the capital.
Although the regime still tightly con-
trols much of Damascus, its seat of
power, rebels have been posing a stiffer
challenge in the suburbs.
Clashes in Syria shut
down Aleppo airport
Ayman al-Sahili, a Reuters cameraman who was shot in the leg by a sniper loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad is carried
away in Syrias north city of Aleppo.
Gunmen kill seven teachers
and aid workers in Pakistan
By Rebecca Santana and Zarar Khan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD Gunmen on motorcycles sprayed a van
carrying employees from a community center with bullets
Tuesday, killing ve female teachers and two aid workers, but
sparing a child they took out of the vehicle before opening re.
The director of the group that the seven worked for says he
suspects it may have been the latest in a series of attacks tar-
geting anti-polio efforts in Pakistan. Some militants oppose
the vaccination campaigns, accusing health workers of acting
as spies for the U.S. and alleging the vaccine is intended to
make Muslim children sterile.
Last month, nine people working on an anti-polio vaccina-
tion campaign were shot and killed. Four of those shootings
were in the northwest where Tuesdays attack took place.
The attack was another reminder of the risks to women edu-
cators and aid workers from Islamic militants who oppose
their work. It was in the same conservative province where
militants shot and seriously wounded 15-year-old Malala
Yousufzai, an outspoken young activist for girls education, in
October.
There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the lat-
est shootings.
The teachers and health workers one man and one
woman were killed in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province on
their way home from a community center in the town of Swabi
where they were employed at a medical clinic and primary
school. Their driver was also injured.
Many weddings in Maryland
as gay unions become legal
By Brian Witte
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TILGHMAN ISLAND, Md. Same-sex couples in
Maryland were greeted with cheers and noisemakers held over
from New Years Eve parties, as gay marriage became legal in
the rst state south of the Mason-Dixon Line on New Years
Day.
James Scales, 68, was married to William Tasker, 60, on
Tuesday shortly after midnight by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake inside City Hall.
Its just so hard to believe its happening, Scales said
shortly before marrying his partner of 35 years.
Six other same-sex couples also were being married at City
Hall. Ceremonies were taking place in other parts of the state
as well.
The ceremonies follow a legislative ght that pitted Gov.
Martin OMalley against leaders of his Catholic faith. Voters
in the state, founded by Catholics in the 17th century, sealed
the change by approving a November ballot question.
WORLD 8
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Inza Bakayoko
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast A crowd stam-
peded after leaving a New Years reworks
show early Tuesday in Ivory Coasts commer-
cial center, killing 61 people many of them
youths and injuring more than 200, rescue
workers said.
The death toll was expected to rise, the of-
cials said.
Thousands had gathered at the Felix
Houphouet Boigny Stadium in Abidjans
Plateau district to see the reworks. After the
show, the crowds poured onto the Boulevard
de la Republic by the Hotel Tiama at about 1
a.m., said Col. Issa Sako of the re depart-
ment rescue team.
The ood of people leaving the stadium
became a stampede which led to the deaths of
more than 60 and injured more than 200,
Sako told Ivory Coast state TV.
Most of those killed were between 8 and 15
years old, he said.
Desperate parents went to the city morgue,
the hospital and to the stadium to try to nd
children who are still missing.
Mamadou Sanogo was searching for his 9-
year-old son, Sayed.
I have just seen all the bodies, but I cannot
nd my son, said a tearful Sanogo. I dont
know what to do.
President Alassane Ouattara and his wife
visited some of those hospitalized and he
pledged that the government would pay for
their treatment, his ofce said.
The government organized the reworks to
celebrate Ivory Coasts peace, after several
months of political violence in early 2011 fol-
lowing disputed elections. It was the second
year that Abidjan had a New Years reworks
display.
Hours after the stampede, soldiers patrolled
the site, where victims clothes, shoes and
other debris littered the street.
State TV showed traumatic scenes: a
woman sobbed in the back of an ambulance;
another was bent over on the side of the street,
apparently in pain; and another, barely con-
scious and wearing only a bra on her upper
body, was hoisted up by rescuers.
There were also scenes of small children
being treated in a hospital; one boy grimaced
in pain and a girl with colored braids in her
hair lay under a blanket, with one hand band-
aged.
This is not Ivory Coasts first stadium
tragedy. In 2009, 22 people died and over 130
were injured in a stampede at a World Cup
qualifying match at the Houphouet Boigny
stadium, prompting FIFA, soccers global
governing body, to impose a ne of tens of
thousands of dollars on Ivory Coasts soccer
federation. The stadium, which officially
holds 35,000, was overcrowded at the time of
the disaster.
A year later, two people were killed and 30
wounded in a stampede at a municipal stadi-
um during a reggae concert in Bouake, the
countrys second-largest city. The concert was
organized in the city, held by rebels at the
time, to promote peace and reconciliation.
Ivory Coast is the worlds largest cocoa pro-
ducer, growing more than 37 percent of the
worlds annual crop of cocoa beans, which are
used to make chocolate.
Stampede after fireworks kills 61 in Ivory Coast
By Jorge Rueda and Ian James
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CARACAS, Venezuela Supporters and
opponents of President Hugo Chavez alike
nervously welcomed the new year Tuesday,
left on edge by shifting signals from the gov-
ernment about the Venezuelan leaders health
three weeks after cancer surgery in Cuba.
Chavez has not been seen or heard from
since the Dec. 11 operation, and ofcials have
reported a series of ups and downs in his
recovery the most recent, late Sunday,
announcing that a respiratory infection had
put the president in a delicate state.
Jorge Rodriguez, a Chavez ally and mayor
of a Caracas district, reiterated on Tuesday
that the president is going through a complex
post-operative process.
He told reporters that
Venezuelans have shown
an outpouring of compas-
sion and support for a
leader who has been
planted in the hearts of
millions. Rodriguez
urged Venezuelans to
keep Chavez in their
prayers and expressed
hope the president would
recover.
Chavezs son-in-law Jorge Arreaza, who is
the governments science minister and has
been with the president in Cuba, urged
Venezuelans in a Twitter message Monday
night not to believe bad-intentioned rumors
circulating online. President Chavez has
spent the day calm and stable, accompanied
by his children, Arreaza said in the message.
His tweet came a day after Vice President
Nicolas Maduros grim statement from
Havana that Chavez had suffered new compli-
cations due to a respiratory infection. Maduro
had said last week, before seeing Chavez, that
the president had been up and walking.
Political opponents of the socialist Chavez
have complained that the government hasnt
told the country enough about his health, and
even some of his supporters said Tuesday that
they wished they knew more.
Were distressed by El Comandantes
health, said Francisca Fuentes, who was
walking through a downtown square with her
grandchildren. I think they arent telling us
the whole truth. Its time for them to speak
clearly. Its like when you have a sick relative
and the doctor lies to you every once in a
while.
Chavez has been ghting an undisclosed
type of pelvic cancer since June 2011. He has
declined to reveal the precise location of the
tumors that have been surgically removed.
The president announced on Dec. 8 that his
cancer had come back despite previous sur-
geries, chemotherapy and radiation treatment.
The Venezuelan government has not given
details about Chavezs latest complications
beyond saying that they arose from the respi-
ratory infection.
Theres nothing we can do except wait for
the government to deign to say how he is real-
ly, said Daniel Jimenez, an opposition sup-
porter who was in a square in an afuent
Caracas neighborhood.
Jimenez and many other Venezuelans say it
seems increasingly unlikely that Chavez can
be sworn in as scheduled Jan. 10 for his new
term.
Venezuelans rang in 2013 as usual with re-
works raining down all over the capital of
Caracas. But some of Chavezs supporters had
long faces as they gathered in Bolivar Plaza
on Monday night holding pictures of the pres-
ident.
Venezuelans on edge amid shifting news on Chavez
REUTERS
People wounded from a stampede that occurred after a New Years Eve reworks display are
seen in Cocodys Hospital in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.
Hugo Chavez
OPINION 9
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
What air quality?
Editor,
Particulate pollution from wood
smoke in Burlingame and San Mateo
was above acceptable levels on two
recent evenings. The air outside was
truly toxic.
According the Bay Area Air Quality
Management District, during the win-
ter months, residential wood smoke
from fireplaces and wood stoves is the
largest source of dangerous particulate
pollution in the Bay Area. This source
of pollution negatively affects the
largest number of residents in the nine
counties, especially in densely popu-
lated cities.
The BAAQMD acknowledges that
there is a significant increase in wood
burning during the holidays. Yet, in
2012, theyve not taken any meaning-
ful, proactive action to curtail wood
smoke pollution. Though it should be
expanded, the existing wood burning
code, if enforced, will improve urban
air quality.
So why isnt the BAAQMD doing
more enforcement? I suspect its
because they gain little political capi-
tal or positive media attention for
dealing with this large, but mundane,
problem. They also seem reluctant to
defend their actions to the wood burn-
ing industry, and the many people who
burn frequently.
Definitive action to curtail wood
burning in densely populated Bay
Area cities is decades overdue.
Nothing less than the health of your
family, children and neighbors is at
stake.
J. Focaracci
San Mateo
Appeal to Dwight Schwab
Editor,
I really enjoy reading the letters to
the editor as well as the editorials, but
I have to agree with the letter writers
in the Dec. 22 weekend edition of the
Daily Journal.
It is disappointing to read Mr.
Schwabs opinions, especially after
having lost Keith Krietmans wonder-
ful columns, mostly because Mr.
Schwab is so negative. If he offered
any discourse that would allow for a
good debate besides inciting others to
anger, he may prove he is a journalist.
He reminds me of the manned table in
Millbrae by the post office with the
life-size picture of President Obama
disfigured by a Hitler mustache.
It would be interesting to hear Mr.
Schwabs opinions on:
Tax cuts in effect for about 10
years that have not produced any jobs;
debt crisis was not discussed
when the Republicans were in charge;
vacations taken by President Bush
never mentioned; and
weapons of mass destruction and
causing the debt crisis due to the wars.
Please, Mr. Schwab, prove to the
readers of the Daily Journal that you
can offer unbiased journalism and
allow for views unfettered by your
seeming anger.
It will be interesting to see where he
goes with his views on gun control.
Donna Eghbal
Millbrae
Letters to the editor
M
ost New Years resolutions
pertain to quick fixes like
getting in shape, losing
weight, being better with finances or
keeping in touch with loved ones. Its
easy to imagine that our political lead-
ers have similar resolutions, but we
suggest a few more that would help us
all throughout the year.
First, for our national politicians:
Enough with the crises. For the past
several years, we have been victim to
these ongoing crises of varying levels.
If it wasnt the debt ceiling debate that
torpedoed the stock market and low-
ered the nations credit rating in sum-
mer 2011, it was the 2010 Tax Relief
Act which simply kicked the nations
tax and spending debate down the road
another year to the Budget Control Act
of 2011, which simply kicked the
kicked the same debate down the road
to this years arduous and sickly fiscal
cliff debate. The whole idea was to
create a scenario so unpalatable that
both sides would have no choice but to
ease up on their ideologies and come
up with a deal. The Grand Bargain
of 2011 never was, and may have
never been meant to be, but it suppos-
edly set some common ground
between the president and House
Speaker John Boehner. Or it simply
proved that both did not have what it
took to corral support for such a com-
promise. Either way, it was down to
the wire with Monday nights dead-
line, and still, the deal that was struck
was a weak one to simply kick a por-
tion of the can down the road just a bit
further. So would it be unfair, or per-
haps even way too optimistic, to ask
that the people we elect to do such
work, to actually do it? How about a
simple resolution to be politicians and
work across the aisle for the greater
good, rather than sticking with a
trenched ideology (on both sides) that
whipsaws the nation every few
months? And a federal budget would
be nice too.
On the state side, we suggest
California legislators resolve to resist
the temptation to author every piece of
legislation that comes their way or is
conjured up in their mind. Last year,
Gov. Jerry Brown signed 876 bills and
vetoed 120 many in a flurry of
signings and vetoes just before the
Sept. 30 deadline. For someone who
once said not every human problem
deserves a law, thats a lot of new leg-
islation signed by the governor. With
120 members of the California
Legislature (80 in the Assembly and
40 in the Senate), thats approximately
eight bills per member that made it to
the governors desk. Add to that the
number of bills that didnt make it out
of committee or landed in the suspense
file, and thats a lot of legislation. How
about legislators resolve to pick a total
of 10 bills, good ones, and move for-
ward with those? That may get the
number down to five per member that
make it to the governors desk for a
total of 600. Its a start. Maybe the rest
of the time could be spent on matters
such as constituent assistance and
hmm, lets see, the budget?
At the local level, it would be nice if
our Board of Supervisors and members
of our city councils spent more time
on the budget and the ongoing finan-
cial obligations within. That includes
employee pay, jurisdictional consolida-
tion and pension obligations and poli-
cy. Its not as sexy as say, climate
change policy, but there is always
room at the inn for financial-minded
political leaders who ask questions and
require fiscal accountability of staff. In
San Francisco, outgoing supervisor
Sean Elsbernd has been lauded for his
eye on the bottom line and that will be
missed. San Mateo County is not with-
out financial-minded elected officials,
but might we suggest all our local
leaders resolve to have a similar mind-
set moving forward into 2013?
Suggested resolutions for our political leaders Our tears and our fears
D
o they become the lasting image on the
American psyche that makes the political
obstacles dividing us go away and shakes us
into meaningful action to prevent further mass shootings?
Or do these faces of unspeakable tragedy fade without real
change just as other faces ... have before them.
Mark Emmons, San Jose
Mercury News, Dec. 23.
My Dec. 12 column, Gifts
That Last described how we
need to take our responsibili-
ties to our children seriously.
On Dec. 14, the horrible
tragedy in Newtown, Conn.
startled and shocked us
greatly when we turned on
the television or radio. Ive
been trying to write about
the tragedy in Connecticut,
but just thinking about it has
been traumatic. It really hit
home since we have two
granddaughters in first grade, and to think.
Those who have been able to conquer their tears long
enough to advocate the need for gun control, better mental
health services, etc. have offered a great memorial to those
who will no longer be with us because of a culture that
allowed a mentally ill 20-year-old to become a mass mur-
derer. All of those who have written about it or commented
in the newspaper, on radio or television (Bill Moyers was
especially touching), offer us much to think about.
Then, with pictures of all 20 of the deceased children on
the front page of the Mercury News, Mr. Emmons depicted
the insanity of it all (not just the killer, but of this culture).
It knocked us for a loop again, bringing tears, dismay,
anger, frustration and outright rage especially since we, by
then, had read and heard the responses of those who are
hell-bent on preserving their right to bear arms even
assault weapons and threatening our nation with anar-
chy. How about an armed guard at every school? It has
come to this!
Consider the many who ran out to purchase more guns
to add to the plethora already out there for fear that they
may be outlawed. Are they proud of themselves? Is this
what it means to be human distancing ourselves from
one another, arming ourselves to the teeth and suspecting
everyone we see as being out to do us in? Or is being
human reaching out to each other, helping out those less
fortunate, willing to give part of what we have to make life
easier and safer for others, contributing to programs that
help children grow into educated, healthy and empathetic
adults? Will this horror wake us up to the way we devalue
our children how our selfish concerns (personally and
nationally) have been depriving them of so much of what
they need to grow into healthy, productive and compas-
sionate adults?
If we truly valued our children, we would provide them
with what they need for good health and a happy and pro-
ductive future. First, we would strengthen gun laws (and
enforce them) so most firearms would be outlawed and
those who use them investigated thoroughly. Our schools,
preschools, after-school programs, child care, family serv-
ices, recreation services would be well funded.
Environmental chemicals that affect children (and adults)
in any negative way would be outlawed. Mental health
care would be taken seriously. Ultra-violent, crude, lascivi-
ous television, movies, video games, etc. wouldnt be pro-
duced. No child would go hungry and the food they eat
would be nutritious. Every child would not be expected to
qualify for college when many would be much better off
and happier learning a trade instead of dropping out and
inhabiting the streets. Instead of ADHD being overdiag-
nosed and overmedicated, active young boys would be
helped to direct their energy to productive purposes and
mentored by men who have their best interests at heart.
But, as Robert Reich wrote in his poignant column on
Dec. 23, Whether its fighting for reasonable gun regula-
tion, child health and safety overall, or good schools and
family services, we cant have a fair fight as long as spe-
cial interest money continues to poison our politics.
The attitude among many of those in Washington is
apparently, Ive got mine. Its up to you to get yours.
Damned if Ill part with any of it to make things better for
those slackers. And, by the way, Id better arm myself with
an automatic rifle so they dont try to take it away from
me. As the greedy, narcissistic, self-righteous gain more
power, maybe this is what occurs when a nation is on its
way to oblivion. Good people lose hope of being able to
change things. Our shocked nation still is grappling to
comprehend. And we are left to wonder if these victims of
horrifying violence will be the faces of change.
Emmons.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 650
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Wiseman
and Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Even if U.S.
lawmakers avoid the so-called scal
cliff, higher taxes and brinksman-
ship in Washington are likely to
continue damaging the fragile econ-
omy well into 2013.
In the early hours of the new year,
the Senate passed emergency legis-
lation to prevent deep spending cuts
and even bigger tax hikes from tak-
ing effect. But the measure ran into
fierce opposition Tuesday from
House Republicans, leaving unclear
whether a nal agreement could be
reached before the current Congress
ends Thursday.
The Senate version would raise
taxes on individual incomes over
$400,000 and household incomes
over $450,000 and on the portion of
estates that exceeds $5 million.
House Republicans are reluctant to
sign on to those tax hikes which
would deliver some $600 billion in
revenue over 10 years at least
without more cuts in government
spending.
The higher taxes on the wealthy
would likely slow the economy a lit-
tle bit. But a bigger drag would
come from a tax hike Democrats
and Republicans arent even bother-
ing to ght over: the end of a two-
year Social Security tax cut. The so-
called payroll tax is scheduled to
bounce back up to 6.2 percent this
year from 4.2 percent in 2011 and
2012, amounting to a $1,000 tax
increase for someone earning
$50,000 a year.
Its a huge hit, says Joel Naroff,
president of Naroff Economic
Advisors. It hits people whether
theyre making $10,000 or theyre
making $2 million. It doesnt matter
who you are ... The lower your
income, the more of your income
youre (spending). So if youre
taxes go up, its going to come out
of your spending. And that is bad
news for an economy that is 70 per-
cent consumer spending.
Mark Zandi, chief economist at
Moodys Analytics, calculates that
the higher payroll tax will reduce
economic growth by 0.6 percentage
points in 2013. The other possible
tax increases including higher
taxes on household incomes above
$450,000 a year will slice just
0.15 percentage points off annual
growth, Zandi said.
The economy doesnt have much
growth to give. Mark Vitner, senior
economist at Wells Fargo, predicts it
will expand just 1.5 percent in 2013,
down from a lackluster 2.2 percent
in 2012. Unemployment stands at
7.7 percent.
A months-long political standoff
over scal policy has already taken
its toll, adding uncertainty that has
discouraged consumers from spend-
ing and businesses from hiring and
investing.
The squabbling seems sure to per-
sist even if the House goes along
with the Senates partial x.
Senators postponed tough deci-
sions on government spending, giv-
ing themselves a reprieve from cuts
that were scheduled to begin taking
effect automatically Jan. 1. That just
sets the stage for more hard-bar-
gaining later, even if the House
approves the Senates version.
And another standoff is likely to
arrive as early as February when
Congress will need to raise the
$16.4 trillion federal borrowing
limit so the government can keep
paying its bills. House Republicans
probably wont agree to raise the
debt limit without offsetting spend-
ing cuts that Democrats are sure to
resist.
Even if they cut some small deal,
the process and what is left undone
still means theres a lot of uncer-
tainty, says Stuart Hoffman, chief
economist at PNC Financial
Services Group.
After Jan. 1, asks Ethan Harris,
co-head of global economics at
Bank of America Merrill Lynch,
what induces the two sides to stop
ghting and start compromising?
The scal cliff itself was created
to force Democrats and Republicans
to compromise.
To end a 2011 standoff over rais-
ing the federal debt limit, they
agreed to a Jan. 1, 2013 deadline to
reach a deal over taxes and spend-
ing. If they didnt, more than $500
billion in tax increases would hit the
economy in 2013 alone, along with
$109 billion in cuts from the mili-
tary and domestic spending pro-
grams. The sharp tax hikes and
spending cut would threaten to send
the economy over the cliff and back
into recession.
But negotiations to avert catastro-
phe have highlighted once again
how far apart the two parties are on
taxes (Republicans dont want to
raise them) and spending
(Democrats are reluctant to cut gov-
ernment programs).
Were learning about how deep
the impasse is, Harris says. Both
sides have decided that they were
willing to go to the last minute.
Political gridlock has been rat-
tling nancial markets and shaking
consumer and business condence
the past two years.
After a ght over raising the debt
limit last year, the credit rating
agency Standard & Poors yanked
the U.S. governments blue-chip
AAA bond rating because it feared
that Americas dysfunctional politi-
cal system couldnt deliver a credi-
ble plan to reduce the federal gov-
ernments debt. S&P cited an over-
abundance of political brinksman-
ship and warned that the differ-
ences between political parties have
proven to be extraordinarily difcult
to bridge.
The Dow Jones industrials
dropped 635 points in panicked sell-
ing the rst day of trading after the
S&P announcement.
Outside Washington the economy
has been getting some good news.
Europes nancial crisis appears to
have eased, reducing the threat of a
renewed nancial crisis.
Fiscal cliff, taxes weigh heavy on economy
REUTERS
Speaker of the House John Boehner, front, walks with Congressman Dave Camp, right, after a meeting with
House Republicans about a scal cliff deal on Capitol Hill.
California newspaper
defies trend to shrink
By Elliot Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA ANA New and expanded sections to cover busi-
ness, automobiles and food. A nearly ve-fold increase in
community news pages and more investigative reporting. Even
daily color comics.
It feels like a throwback to an earlier era at the Orange
County Register, where a rst-time newspaper owner is defy-
ing conventional wisdom by spending heavily to expand the
printed edition and playing down digital formats.
Aaron Kushner added about 75 journalists and, with 25
more coming, will have expanded the newsroom by half since
his investment group bought the nations 20th-largest newspa-
per by circulation in July.
Changes also include thicker pages with triple the number of
colors to produce razor-sharp photos and graphics. By the end
of March, the newspaper will have 40 percent more space than
under previous owners, Freedom Communications Inc.
Kushner, 39, believes people will pay for high-quality news.
His bet is remarkable in an industry where newspapers have
shrunk their way to prots for years, slashing costs while seek-
ing clicks on often-free websites to attract online advertising.
As more newspapers begin charging for online access,
Kushners spending spree is drawing close attention.
If hes successful, its going to show the way for other
papers to follow, said Walter E. Hussman Jr., publisher of the
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and an early advocate of charging
readers for online access.
Seated behind his large, clutter-free desk near shelves
stacked with newspapers, the former Stanford University gym-
nast said his lack of industry experience may be a plus because
he hasnt been through the tough times in newspapering.
So when we sit down and look at whats possible, our view
of the world is different, Kushner said. Were a little crazy in
that we really do believe that we can grow this particular news-
paper.
<< Niners sign kicker Cundiff, page 12
Warriors led by their defense, page 14
Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013
GONE BOWLING: A FULL SLATE OF NCAA BOWL GAMES PLAYED ON NEW YEARS DAY >>> PAGE 15
Scots accomplish goals at Surf and Slam
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Before heading to Southern
California and the Surf and Slam
tournament, Carlmont High School
basketball head coach Dave Low
said he was looking for a couple of
things from his team.
One, he wanted to track down a
third, consistent scorer to compli-
ment Yash Malik and Michael
Costello.
And two, he wanted to see his
teams defense continue to improve.
So in three games at the Surf and
Slam, the Scots accomplished the
latter of Lows goals and Mduduzi
Hlatshwayo might be the answer to
the coachs second wish.
Carlmont won the Surf and Slam
in San Diego, taking down
Piedmont High School 60-48 in the
nal. Malik led the Scots in scoring
with 19 and Costello added 14.
But it was Hlatshwayo who
scored 10 in the nal that opened
a lot of eyes. The point guard in
known for his defense. But in the
win, Hlatshwayo proved he could
put the ball in the basket.
Still, the star of the Carlmonts
10-1 preseason has been its defense.
At the Surf and Slam Tournament,
the Scots held Sentinal High School
to 37 points. No Scot was in double-
gure scoring but that didnt
matter in a the win. They followed
that defensive clinic by limiting
Scripps Ranch to 31 points in a 15-
point win. Malik scored 11 points in
that win and Costello led the scoring
charge with 18 points.
Elsewhere around the county,
Sacred Heart Preps 11-point win
over Mountain View was highlight-
ed by Matt Galliani, who scored 20
points, hitting a pair of 3-pointers in
the process. He followed that with a
14-point day againt St. Stephens of
Texas. Corbin Koch added 10 points
in that 55-45 win for the Gators.
At the Sobrato Bulldog Chase
Holiday Tournament, Hillsdale beat
Burton of San Francisco 60-42.
Angelo Bautista led the way for the
Knights with 11 points and Dante
Fonetnot added 10. But Hillsdale
See ROLL, Page 14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PASADENA Although Stanford didnt
score many style points in the 99th Rose
Bowl, the Cardinal could celebrate because
they didnt let Wisconsin score any points at
all after halftime.
Stepfan Taylor rushed for 89 yards and an
early touchdown, Kevin Hogan passed for
123 yards, and No. 8 Stanford won its rst
Rose Bowl since 1972, beating the Badgers
20-14 on Tuesday night.
Usua Amanam made the decisive inter-
ception near mideld with 2:30 to play as
the Pac-12 champion Cardinal (12-2) ended
their four-decade drought in the
Granddaddy of Them All with arguably the
biggest bowl win yet during the long-strug-
gling programs recent renaissance.
We knew this was going to be a battle,
and we wouldnt expect it any other way,
Stanford coach David Shaw said. We know
See ROSE, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO The San Francisco
49ers signed kicker Billy Cundiff on Tuesday
to compete with struggling veteran David
Akers.
Hes thrilled with the opportunity to be in
a position to help the team in any way he can
this postseason, said Cundiffs agent, Paul
Sheehy. Its a great opportunity, with a great
organization.
The team announced the move a day after
coach Jim Harbaugh said that the NFC West
champion Niners (11-4-1) off this week as
the NFCs No. 2 seed planned to try out
kickers because of Akers prolonged funk.
Cundiff was released by the Washington
Redskins on Oct. 9 after missing 5 of his 12
eld goal attempts. He had already worked
out once for the Niners on Nov. 27 before they
invited him back this time, as Harbaugh ini-
tially chose to stick with Akers.
Now, Akers and Cundiff will compete to see
who kicks in the teams NFC divisional play-
off game in prime time Jan. 12 at Candlestick
Park. San Francisco will play Green Bay,
Seattle or Washington.
The 49ers cleared a spot on the 53-man ros-
ter for Cundiff by waiving linebacker Eric
Bakhtiari. Players had Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday off before returning to practice
Thursday so that will be the rst look at
both kickers together.
Cundiff spent the 2009-11 seasons with the
Baltimore Ravens, who are coached by
Harbaughs big brother, John. But Cundiff
was cut after last season, when he missed a
potential tying 32-yard eld goal in the clos-
ing seconds of the AFC championship game
that sent New England to the Super Bowl.
Jim Harbaugh said Monday he might keep
two kickers on the roster and open up a com-
petition.
If we had two on the roster at the same
time, then they can kick in practice,
Harbaugh said. And thats an option. Thats a
possibility. I think there are three options. We
go forward with David. We bring in a new
kicker. Or, we have two and let them compete
for the job. Well make that decision as we
go.
Akers, who made 44 of 52 attempts in his
sensational 2011 season and rst year with
San Francisco, is just 29 for 42 this year. He is
only 7 for 13 from 40-49 yards and missed
wide left twice from that range in Sundays
27-13 victory against Arizona in the regular-
season nale.
The 38-year-old Akers signed a three-year
contract as arguably the 49ers biggest offsea-
son acquisition ahead of the 2011 season,
aside from the hiring of Harbaugh. And he
delivered at nearly every opportunity until
recently.
He had a 21-yard attempt blocked by Red
Bryant in a 42-13 loss at Seattle on Dec. 23,
and Richard Sherman returned it 90 yards for
a touchdown.
The 32-year-old Cundiff joins his sixth
team in 10 NFL seasons. He has also played
for Dallas, New Orleans and Cleveland.
Cardinals interview
Horton, could meet with Reid
PHOENIX The Arizona Cardinals have
interviewed their defensive coordinator Ray
Horton for the head coaching job.
The interview, conducted on Tuesday by
team president Michael Bidwill, was the rst
in the teams search for a replacement for Ken
Whisenhunt, who was red on Monday after
six seasons on the job.
The team has reached out to Andy Reid but
had not scheduled an interview. Reid was red
on Monday after 14 seasons as head coach in
Philadelphia.
Bidwill plans to y to Denver over the
weekend to interview Denver Broncos offen-
sive coordinator Mike McCoy.
Horton, Reid and McCoy are the only can-
didates thus far identied by the Cardinals.
49ers sign kicker Cundiff tocompete withAkers
REUTERS
San Francisco kicker David Akers, right, reacts to missing a eld goal in Sundays win against
the Arizona Cardinals. Akers has missed 13 eld goals this season.
Sports brief
Storm hosts Rose Parade show after fiery accident
Hannah Storm was back on the air Tuesday, hosting the Rose
Parade telecast three weeks after a propane gas grill accident
left the ESPN anchor with rst- and second-degree burns to her
face, hands, chest and neck.
Storm lost roughly half her hair in the accident Dec. 11 out-
side her home in Connecticut. She wore extensions for the ABC
telecast and her left hand was bandaged.
Storms eyebrows and eyelashes were burned off. A makeup
artist drew on eyebrows for the telecast.
This was the fth time Storm has hosted the Rose Parade in
Pasadena, Calif. She says it was a familiar and comforting set-
ting to make her return.
SPORTS 13
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Since Tim Hardaway, Mitch
Richmond and Chris Mullin captivated the
Bay Area in the Run TMC days of the early
1990s, the Golden State Warriors have been
known for scoring a lot of points and giving
up even more.
Not anymore.
In Mark Jacksons second season as coach,
the Warriors nally have started to change
their focus. Golden State (21-10) is off to its
best start in more than 20 years entering
Wednesday nights home game against the
NBA-best Los Angeles Clippers (25-6), a sur-
prising turnaround that has been propelled
largely by defense.
So much so that the Warriors-Clippers
matchup both long-time losers in the
Pacic Division suddenly pits two of the
best teams in the Western Conference. The
Clippers, who lost 114-110 to Golden State in
Los Angeles on Nov. 3, have won 17 straight
heading into their game Tuesday night at
Denver.
Its 2013, forward Carl Landry said with a
smile after Tuesdays practice on New Years
Day. Its a different time.
In the bold and boisterous tone of a former
broadcaster and Brooklyn native, Jackson
declared in downtown San Francisco on the
day the Warriors hired him that defensive de-
ciency would no longer be tolerated. He said
he was well aware of the fan fascination with
the run-and-fun teams of Don Nelson and
Keith Smart, though he promised his style
would be different.
Things gone be a changing, Jackson said
on June 10, 2011.
The former New York Knicks and Indiana
Pacers point guard never really had a chance
to implement his system in his rookie year on
the sidelines, not with a roster ravaged by
injuries and the season shortened to 66 games
because of the labor lockout. Over the sum-
mer, new Warriors general manager Bob
Myers acquired veterans such as Carl Landry
and Jarrett Jack along with a trio of rookies
Harrison Barnes, Festus Ezeli and Draymond
Green who have highlighted the kind of
heart and hustle Jackson has long preached.
More than a third of the way through the
season, the results are starting to show.
The Warriors rank third in the league in
rebounding differential (plus-4.19) and fourth
in average opponents eld-goal percentage
(42.9 percent) per game. They were 28th and
20th, respectively, in those categories while
nishing 23-43 last season.
You cant just wake up and be an elite
defensive team. But the more you preach it,
the more you hear that message, it shows in
how we practice in training camp, how we
watch lm and study the game, said point
guard Stephen Curry, who has become a sur-
prising pest on defense. All that comes into
the process of becoming a better team. We
still have more ways we can improve. But we
are a hundred times better defensively than we
were last year, and thats why our record
reects that. We just have to stick to it.
Jackson believes players started to embrace
his approach once they realized the previous
ways didnt translate into wins.
Golden State is 19-2 when outrebounding
an opponent, and 6-1 when holding teams
below 40 percent shooting this season. Only
two teams Oklahoma City and Sacramento
have shot more than 50 percent against the
Warriors, who lost both of those games.
Golden State nished December with a 12-
4 record, including a 6-1 road trip highlighted
by a win at the defending champion Miami
Heat, and won at least 20 games before New
Years Day for the rst time since 1980. The
Warriors also tied the 1961-62 team when
the franchise was still in Philadelphia with
12 wins in December.
They are 11-6 on the road, already equaling
the amount of wins away from home during
last seasons shortened schedule. Only San
Antonio, with 12 roads wins, has more this
season.
Not bad for a franchise that has made the
playoffs just once since 1994.
They witnessed where relying on the
offensive end got them, Jackson said. Thats
with all due respect. There was some success,
but it wasnt success that was able to be sus-
tained. Preaching to them, defensively, if you
get it done, people are going to have to deal
with you. And not just this year, but for a long
time to come.
Perhaps the most surprising part of the new
Warriors way is that theyre doing it with two
of the teams best defensive players out with
injuries.
Andrew Bogut, expected to be the new fran-
chise center, has played in only four games
and is out indenitely while he recovers from
the lingering effects of surgery on his left
ankle. Small forward Brandon Rush, who
Jackson had called his best perimeter defend-
er, was lost for the season after tearing two
ligaments in his left knee the second game of
the year.
Warriors turnaround sparked by defense
REUTERS
The Warriors Klay Thompson steals the basketball for Golden State in a game against the
Nets. The Warriors rank third in the NBA in rebouding differential and fourth in average
opponents eld goald percentage per game.
could not overcome a ve-point rst
quarter against Santa Teresa and,
despite 14 from Bautista and 11 by
Fonetnot, the Knights lost.
Something about that loss must
have angered Bautista though.
In the third place game against
Christopher High School, Bautista
hadr 41 points, hitting six from the
Land of Three in a 67-36 win.
For Serra, the two-headed scoring
machine that is Jacqui Biggins and
Henry Caruso continues to lead the
Padres as they get closer to the
WCAL part of the schedule.
Against, Dougherty Valley at the
American Tournament, Caruso
scored 23 and Biggins added 16.
Then against Pittsburgh High
School, Biggins was held in check,
but not Caruso, who led the Padres
with 15 points. Eddie Stansberry
picked up the slack with 14 points.
The Menlo boys basketball team
took a 56-50 victory over Diamond
Ranch of Pomona on the third day
of Desert Holiday Classic on Friday
night in Palm Springs.
Ryan Young again had a big per-
formance for the Knights with 17
points.
Mikey Diekroeger provided a
boost off the bench, nishing with
12 points and six big-time
rebounds in trafc.
The Knights put together their
best half of basketball early.
Diamond Ranch started with a 5-0
run before Menlo recovered and
took a 32-19 halftime lead. In the
third quarter the pace picked up as
both teams found offensive rhythm,
and Menlo held 46-35 to start the
fourth quarter.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
San Mateo had an off-day offen-
sively against Westmont High
School in a 61-33 loss. Only four
players found the score sheet with
Ofa Tuipulotu leading the way with
13 points and Nicole Chenoweth
contributed with 10.
But the Bearcats regained their
form against Castilleja with Alana
Simon scoring 16 points in a four-
point win.
Sacred Heart Prep had no difcul-
ties with Valley Christian of
Roseville in a 55-30 win. Helen
Gannon paced the Gators with 10
points. And while it might have been
a rare off-day for the Holland sis-
ters, Meghan and Melissa got right
back on track against Monta Vista
Christian albeit in a 55-50 loss.
The Hollands scored 15 points each.
Melissa Holland stayed hot in the
third round of the Mountain View
tournament. She scored 17 points.
Gannon got back into double gures
in the 22-point victory. She scored
11.
There were plenty of highlights
out of the Steve Geramoni
Invitational last week. In a 44-point
beatdown of Waldorf High School,
Becca Grigg of Notre Dame-
Belmont scored 26 points, had 10
steals and ve assists.
The new era in Menlo-Atherton
girls basketball is moving forward
steadily. The Bears took down
Fremont High School of Oakland
44-39. Erin LaPorte led the way
with 13 points including three 3-
pointers.
SPORTS 14
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
ROLL
MENLO SPORTS
Mikey Diekroeger had 12 points and six rebounds off the bench for the
Menlo Knights in a 56-50 win over Diamond Ranch High School.
Sports brief
NHL, union dig in
for a long day of talks
NEW YORK The NHL and the
union are back at the bargaining
table and seem determined to work
toward a deal to save the hockey
season
A full day of talks was planned for
Tuesday, one day after negotiations
resumed following nearly three
weeks apart. On Monday, the play-
ers association presented a counter-
proposal to an offer made by the
league late last week.
The NHL spent Monday night
reviewing the document, then got
together again with the union
Tuesday.
Small groups from each side met
and conferred by conference calls
all afternoon about provisions of a
potential collective bargaining
agreement.
A full meeting of the negotiating
teams wasnt expected at the league
ofce before 6:30 or 7 p.m. EST, a
union spokesman said. The NHL
then requested that the meeting be
pushed back to 9 p.m.
What is clear is that time has
become a real factor.
Weve said we need to drop the
puck by Jan. 19 if were going to
play a 48-game season,
Commissioner Gary Bettman said.
We dont think it makes sense to
play a season any shorter than that.
That leaves a little less than two
weeks to reach an agreement and
hold one week of training camp
before starting the season.
All games through Jan. 14 have
been canceled, claiming more than
50 percent of the original schedule.
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NFLNFC
PLAYOFFS
TBD
vs.
Memphis
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/9
@Clippers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/5
vs. Clippers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/2
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/11
@Denver
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/13
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 21 9 .700
Brooklyn 16 14 .533 5
Boston 14 16 .467 7
Philadelphia 14 17 .452 7 1/2
Toronto 11 20 .355 10 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 20 8 .714
Atlanta 19 9 .679 1
Orlando 12 18 .400 9
Charlotte 7 23 .233 14
Washington 4 24 .143 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 16 12 .571
Indiana 17 13 .567
Milwaukee 16 13 .552 1/2
Detroit 11 22 .333 7 1/2
Cleveland 7 25 .219 11
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 24 8 .750
Memphis 19 8 .704 2 1/2
Houston 16 14 .533 7
Dallas 12 19 .387 11 1/2
New Orleans 7 23 .233 16
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 23 6 .793
Denver 17 15 .531 7 1/2
Minnesota 14 13 .519 8
Portland 15 14 .517 8
Utah 15 16 .484 9
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 24 6 .800
Golden State 21 10 .677 3 1/2
L.A. Lakers 15 15 .500 9
Sacramento 11 19 .367 13
Phoenix 11 20 .355 13 1/2
TuesdaysGames
Dallas 103,Washington 94
Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
WednesdaysGames
Sacramento at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Portland at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Washington at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
San Antonio at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 6 p.m.
Scoring
G FG FT PTS AVG
Bryant, LAL 30 309 220 903 30.1
Anthony, NYK 24 235 152 684 28.5
Durant, OKC 30 277 249 854 28.5
James, MIA 29 295 132 762 26.3
Harden, HOU 30 229 266 783 26.1
Westbrook, OKC 30 224 156 646 21.5
Aldridge, POR 27 229 112 570 21.1
Wade, MIA 25 194 114 509 20.4
Lee, GOL 31 260 102 622 20.1
Curry, GOL 31 21599 621 20.0
Pierce, BOS 30 197 148 598 19.9
Ellis, MIL 29 211 122 570 19.7
Parker, SAN 31 234 114 597 19.3
Holiday, PHL 27 201 71 502 18.6
Lillard, POR 29 184 97 532 18.3
Mayo, DAL 31 200 97 568 18.3
DeRozan,TOR 31 210 129 565 18.2
Walker, CHA 31 206 111 560 18.1
Bosh, MIA 28 191 117 505 18.0
Gay, MEM 27 185 87 485 18.0
Rebounds
G OFFDEF TOT AVG
Varejao, CLE 25 138 223 361 14.4
Randolph, MEM 28 132 218 350 12.5
Howard, LAL 30 111 244 355 11.8
Asik, HOU 31 95 271 366 11.8
Hickson, POR 28 116 193 309 11.0
Lee, GOL 31 94 247341 11.0
Vucevic, ORL 31 99 225 324 10.5
Noah, CHI 29 102 198 300 10.3
Chandler, NYK 30 128 179 307 10.2
Faried, DEN 32 130 194 324 10.1
NBA STANDINGS
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 45, Nebraska 31
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 33, Michigan 28
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 20,Wisconsin 14
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), Late
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Texas A&M (10-2) vs.Oklahoma (10-2),5 p.m.(FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 5
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 10 a.m. (ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic
At Montgomery, Ala.
Stars vs. Stripes, noon (CBSSN)
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs.West, 1 p.m. (NFLN)
BOWL GLANCE
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLSPromoted Russ Brandon to
president and chief executive ofcer.
CINCINNATI BENGALSSigned WR Justin Hilton
to the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTSSigned DL Tracy
Robertson to the practice squad.
SANFRANCISCO49ERSSigned K Billy Cundiff.
HOCKEY
AmericanHockeyLeague
HAMILTON BULLDOGSRecalled F Philippe
Lefebvre from Wheeling (ECHL).
NORFOLK ADMIRALSAnnounced F Corey
Elkins was reassigned to Fort Wayne (ECHL). An-
nounced F Luca Caputi and D Nick Schaus were
returned to Fort Wayne. Signed G Jeff Deslauriers
and F Dan Sexton to professional tryout contracts.
TRANSACTIONS
NBA LEADERS
Bowl season white hot
CAPITAL ONE BOWL
GEORGIA 45, NEBRASKA 31
ORLANDO Aaron Murray
threw ve touchdown passes to set a
Georgia bowl record, including two
in the fourth quarter, and the
Bulldogs beat Nebraska in the
Capital One Bowl.
Murray shook off a pair of rst-
half interceptions, including one
returned for a touchdown, and
passed for 427 yards also a
Bulldogs bowl record against the
nations top-ranked passing defense.
He was named the games most
valuable player.
Georgia (12-2) reached 12 wins
for the third time in school history.
Nebraska (10-4) lost its third con-
secutive bowl game, and nished
the season with two straight woeful
defensive performances. The
Cornhuskers lost the Big Ten cham-
pionship game 70-31.
The Cornhuskers led 24-23 at the
half, but committed two of their
three turnovers in the nal 30 min-
utes. Taylor Martinez had two inter-
ceptions and two touchdown passes
for Nebraska and Rex Burkhead
rushed for 140 yards in his nal col-
lege game.
Nebraskas offense nished with
443 total yards, but the Bulldogs
defense was stingy when it needed
to be. They sacked Martinez ve
times, with All-American linebacker
Jarvis Jones notching two. Damian
Swann had both Georgia intercep-
tions.
OUTBACK BOWL
NO. 11 SOUTH CAROLINA 33,
NO. 19 MICHIGAN 28
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) Connor
Shaw led South Carolina to the
brink of victory and Dylan
Thompson carried the Gamecocks
over the hump in the Outback Bowl.
Thompson came off the bench to
throw a 32-yard touchdown pass
with 11 seconds left Tuesday,
enabling South Carolina to tie a
school record for victories with a
33-28 win over No. 19 Michigan.
Thompson replaced Shaw during
the winning drive, covering the nal
43 yards after Shaw began the
march from his own 30. Devin
Gardners third TD pass of the game
had given Michigan a 28-27 lead.
Shaw threw for 227 yards and two
touchdowns after missing South
Carolinas regular season nale with
a left foot sprain. Thompson led the
Gamecocks (11-2) to a victory over
their archrival, and threw for 117
yards and two TDs.
Gardner threw for 214 yards in his
fth start for Michigan (8-5) since
Denard Robinson injured his right
elbow late in the season. Robinson
took some snaps at quarterback and
attempted his rst passes since Oct.
27, but lined up mostly at running
back and rushed for 100 yards on 23
carries.
Ace Sanders caught TD passes of
4 yards from Thompson and 31
yards from Shaw, who completed 18
of 26 passes before limping off on
the nal drive.
GATOR BOWL
NO. 21 NORTHWESTERN 34,
MISSISSIPPI ST. 20
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP)
Behind huge interceptions early and
late, Northwestern beat Mississippi
State 34-20 in the Gator Bowl and
snapped college footballs longest
postseason losing streak.
The Wildcats (10-3) earned their
rst bowl win since 1949, ending a
nine-game losing skid that was tied
for the longest in NCAA history.
They also celebrated double-digit
victories for the rst time since the
1995 Rose Bowl season.
Quentin Williams returned an
interception 29 yards for a touch-
down on the third play of the game
and Nick Vanhoose set up a late
touchdown with a 39-yard intercep-
tion return.
16
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
its going to be tight, its going to be
close, and were going to nd a way
to win. Thats the way its been all
year.
Stanford clamped down on the
Big Ten champion Badgers (8-6),
who lost the Rose Bowl in heart-
breaking fashion for the third con-
secutive season. Montee Ball rushed
for 100 yards and his FBS-record
83rd touchdown, but Wisconsin
managed only 82 yards in that
scoreless second half.
With impressive defense of its
own, Wisconsin still stayed in posi-
tion for an upset in the one-game
return of Hall of Fame coach Barry
Alvarez, who was back on the
Badgers sideline in his red sweater-
vest seven years after hanging up his
whistle.
This group of kids has been
through a lot, and they competed
extremely hard against a very high-
quality team, Alvarez said. Weve
played three very good football
games (at the Rose Bowl). These
guys played hard. In fact, most peo-
ple would like to get here once. But
we just didnt get it done.
Kelsey Young rushed for a score
on Stanfords opening possession,
and Taylor scored on the second.
Wisconsin kept the Cardinal out of
the end zone for the nal 51 min-
utes, holding them to three points in
the second half, but Stanfords
defense didnt need any more help
in the Cardinals eighth straight vic-
tory.
We knew coming in, it was going
to be a physical game, Taylor said.
We knew they know how to play
against power as well as us. They
did a great job. It was our defense
keeping us in the game that enabled
us to get this win.
After winning the Orange Bowl
two years ago and losing the Fiesta
Bowl last season, Stanford earned
its rst conference title and its rst
Rose Bowl berth in 13 years. The
Cardinal nished with 12 victories
for just the second time in school
history and the second time in
the last three years.
The Cardinal ousted top-ranked
Oregon on the way to the biggest
season yet in the improbable surge
of success started by Jim Harbaugh
and Andrew Luck. Many Pac-12
observers expected a sharp decline
at Stanford this season but Shaw
and Hogan, who took over as the
starting quarterback in November,
have accomplished something even
Harbaugh and Luck couldnt man-
age.
I think it served as some motiva-
tion for us throughout the year,
Amanam said. I think its just a tes-
tament to our program and how we
train and prepare every season.
When Bret Bielema abruptly left
Wisconsin for Arkansas after win-
ning the Big Ten title game, Alvarez
agreed to coach his fourth Rose
Bowl before handing off his pro-
gram to new coach Gary Andersen,
who met with Alvarez on the eld
before the game.
But the Badgers third straight
Rose Bowl appearance ended in
much the same way as the last two:
With the offense failing to get the
late score the Badgers desperately
needed.
This stings just as much, because
we fell extremely short when we
had the opportunity to win, Ball
said. We had numerous opportuni-
ties to capitalize on big plays, and
we fell short. ... This is not the way
we want to be remembered.
Speaking for the entire senior
group, this is not the way we want-
ed to go out.
Curt Phillips went 10 for 16 for
83 yards passing and that crucial
interception for Wisconsin, doing
more with 64 yards on the ground.
Jordan Fredrick caught a short TD
pass right before halftime, but no
Badgers receiver had more than
Jared Abbrederis three catches.
And though Ball became the rst
player to score touchdowns in three
Rose Bowls, the powerful back fell
short of Ron Daynes career Rose
Bowl rushing record, swarmed
under by waves of tacklers from one
of the toughest defenses in the
nation a defense that shut down
the top-ranked Ducks in mid-
November to pave Stanfords path
to Pasadena.
Wisconsin returned to Pasadena
in a much more roundabout way as
the rst ve-loss team to make it,
losing three overtime games and
making the Big Ten title game only
because Ohio State and Penn State
were ineligible. The Badgers then
steamrolled Nebraska to become the
rst Big Ten team in three straight
Rose Bowls since Michigan in the
late 1970s.
With the Rose Bowl lled with
fans wearing the schools near-iden-
tical cardinal-and-white gear,
Stanford went up 14-0 on Taylors
3-yard TD run just 8 1/2 minutes in.
Wisconsin briey got rolling behind
Ball, who rushed for 296 yards in
his rst two Rose Bowls.
Stanford stopped James White
inside the 1 on fourth down early in
the second quarter after a touch-
down run by Ball was wiped out by
a holding penalty, but Ball scored on
the next drive. The Badgers then
mounted an 85-yard drive in the
waning 2 1/2 minutes of the rst
half, with Phillips 38-yard run set-
ting up Fredricks short TD catch to
trim Stanfords halftime lead to 17-
14.
After halftime adjustments, both
defenses dominated the scoreless
third quarter, allowing just three
combined rst downs.
Wisconsins personal foul on a
fair-catch punt return finally
sparked Stanford early in the fourth
quarter.
Continued from page 11
ROSE
REUTERS
Stanford QB Kevin Hogan leaps over a diving Chris Borland of the
Wisconsin Badgers during the 99th Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena.
FOOD 17
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
You can get a jump on this recipe by poaching the eggs ahead of time. Just cool them off after youre done by transferring
them with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice water.Then store them in the refrigerator on a plate covered with plastic wrap until
youre ready to reheat them.
Poached eggs good
choice for any meal
T
he beauty of poached eggs is their versatility.
Depending on what you pair them with, they can be
breakfast, lunch or even dinner.
So for this quick and easy weekday
meal, I serve them with a bed of arugula,
a scoop of ricotta cheese one of the
most overlooked cheeses in the dairy
case (its good for more than just lasagna
and stuffed shells!) and a bit of but-
tered multigrain toast. Its simple. Its
lling. And it could be breakfast, lunch
or dinner.
Want it to be a bit more robust? Just
about any cooked and cooled vegetables
could be added to the arugula. Leftover
roasted winter vegetables, such as butter-
nut squash or carrots, would be great.
POACHED EGGS OVER RICOTTA
Start to nish: 20 minutes
Servings: 4
4 cups arugula
2 cups ricotta cheese
Zest of 1 lemon
Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
Leftover roasted winter vegetables,such as butternut squash
or carrots, would be great in this recipe.
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Everybody loves French onion soup,
and with good reason. Caramelized
onions swimming in a rich beef broth a-
vored with a splash of red wine or brandy
and topped with broiled Gruyere cheese?
Every warm, gooey mouthful lights up
your taste buds like a pinball machine.
Its exactly what you want on a cold win-
ters night.
But it is not light. In my quest to slim
down this French classic I turned to Italy.
I caramelized the onions in olive oil,
rather than butter, swapped out the
Gruyere in favor of Parmigiano-
Reggiano (less fat and bigger avor, so
you can use less of it), and moved the
croutons and cheese off the top to make
room for a poached egg. Finally, I added
some pancetta for avor, because we
have to have at least a little fun.
I took much of my inspiration for this
recipe from Cesare Casella, a brilliant
Tuscan chef who used to hold court at
Beppe, a wonderful restaurant within
walking distance of my home in New
York years ago, now long gone. I thought
Casellas soup really improved the
French original. I especially like the
addition of the egg. The yolk makes up
for at least some of the richness lost
when the Gruyere goes bye-bye.
ITALIAN-STYLE ONION SOUP
TOPPED WITH A POACHED EGG
Start to nish: 1 1/2 hours (20 minutes
active)
Servings: 4
2 ounces chopped pancetta
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 pounds yellow onions, thinly-sliced
1 cup red wine
5 cups low-sodium beef or chicken
broth
Kosher salt
1 tablespoon white or cider vinegar
4 large eggs
1 1/2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano
cheese, nely grated (about 1/2 cup)
Ground black pepper
Eight 1/2-inch-thick baguette slices,
toasted
In a large saucepan over medium heat,
cook the pancetta until it is golden.
Transfer it to a plate using a slotted
spoon.
Return the saucepan to medium heat.
Add the olive oil and onions, then cook,
covered but stirring occasionally, until
very soft, about 20 minutes. Remove the
cover and cook, stirring frequently, for
another 35 to 45 minutes, or until the
onions are golden brown and
caramelized. Add the wine and boil until
it is reduced by half. Add the broth and
simmer for another 20 minutes.
Bring a large saucepan of salted water
to a low simmer. Add the vinegar.
Crack each egg into a small glass. One
at a time, gently and slowly pour each egg
into the simmering water, bringing the lip
of the glass right down to the water so
that the egg slides in. Depending on the
size of your pan, you may need to cook
them in 2 batches. Cook for 4 minutes,
then use a slotted spoon to lift each egg
out (letting excess water drip away).
To serve, ladle the soup into 4 bowls.
Top each with a poached egg, sprinkle
with some of the cheese, some of the
pancetta and pepper to taste. Serve each
portion with 2 toasts on the side.
Lighter take on French onion soup
See EGGS, Page 18
J.M. HIRSCH
18
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
EXPIRES: January 31, 2013
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covered but stirring occasionally, until very
soft, about 20 minutes. Remove the cover and
cook, stirring frequently, for another 35 to 45
minutes, or until the onions are golden brown
and caramelized. Add the wine and boil until
it is reduced by half. Add the broth and sim-
mer for another 20 minutes.
Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a
low simmer. Add the vinegar.
Crack each egg into a small glass. One at a
time, gently and slowly pour each egg into the
simmering water, bringing the lip of the glass
right down to the water so that the egg slides
in. Depending on the size of your pan, you
may need to cook them in 2 batches. Cook for
4 minutes, then use a slotted spoon to lift each
egg out (letting excess water drip away).
To serve, ladle the soup into 4 bowls. Top
each with a poached egg, sprinkle with some
of the cheese, some of the pancetta and pepper
to taste. Serve each portion with 2 toasts on
the side.
Nutrition information per serving: 710 calo-
ries; 250 calories from fat (35 percent of total
calories); 28 g fat (8 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 200 mg cholesterol; 73 g carbohydrate;
8 g ber; 19 g sugar; 31 g protein; 1200 mg
sodium.
Continued from page 17
EGGS
es, high-speed Internet access and a post
ofce.
Blueseed proposes to host up to 1,000 resi-
dents at a time on the ship with a crew of up to
300.
Since U.S. immigration laws will not apply,
tenants would work and live on the ship, and
can get temporary visas to take a ferry to the
mainland via Pillar Point Harbor, according to
Blueseed.
Blueseed secured about $300,000 in venture
capital investments last month from Floodgate
Fund, Correlation Ventures and Zhenfund.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
BLUESEED
30 minutes before the baby, who is doing well,
was born.
At 1:31 a.m., baby Raphael Ong was born at
Lucile Packard Hospital in Palo Alto. She
weighed 8 pounds, 4 ounces, according to a
hospital spokesman.
In the East Bay, two babies were born at
exactly midnight at the Alta Bates Summit
Medical Center in Berkeley and the Sutter
Delta Medical Center in Antioch, according to
Bay City News.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
BABY
spending cuts.
But even after the House voted 257 to 167
last night on the current scal cliff deal, there
are still three so-called scal cliffs looming,
U.S. Rep Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, told the
Daily Journal yesterday.
We cant keep lurching from one crisis to
another and its being set up that way, Speier
said.
The problem, she said, is that Congress is
deeply divided.
Weve got to nd a way to work together,
she said about Republicans and Democrats.
Set up as a crisis of incredible magnitude
that could negatively impact Wall Street and
world markets while increasing taxes on near-
ly all Americans, the Senate deal reached on
New Years Eve pushed back across-the-board
spending cuts by two months which will lead
to another round of negotiations with the
White House and Republicans on government
benet programs such as Medicare.
While Speier and U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-
Palo Alto, were both ready to vote in favor of
the deal in the House early in the morning,
they both had to wait for hours and hours and
hours yesterday as Republicans decried the
lack of spending cuts in the Senate deal
reached by Vice President Joe Biden and
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-
Ky., late Monday night.
Both Speier and Eshoo said the deal was not
perfect for all, however, but they did say the
Senate-brokered deal will be good for their
respective districts as unemployment benets
will be extended for another year and tax cred-
its will be extended for child care, tuition and
companies that do research and development.
Income taxes will rise for individuals who
make $400,000 a year and couples who make
$450,000 a year, the rst time in 20 years the
tax will rise. President Barack Obama was
seeking a $250,000 threshold for the tax hike.
The deal guarantees, however, that 98 per-
cent of Americans will not see their taxes
increase permanently, Eshoo wrote in a state-
ment yesterday as she urged a quick vote on
the deal.
While the legislation is not a grand bar-
gain and leaves critical issues to be dealt with
in the near future, I will vote for it precisely
because it is a bipartisan compromise. I urge
the speaker to bring the Senate-passed bill to
the oor of the House immediately for an up-
down vote, Eshoo wrote in the statement.
The American people have been dragged
through enough and our fragile economy can-
not sustain congressional failure to act. A
great country does not jump off a scal cliff.
Continued from page 1
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Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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650-548-1085
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VINA Monks in a small Northern
California town are rebuilding a cen-
turies-old Spanish monastery with help
from what may seem an unlikely source:
beer.
The first phase of the buildings
decades-long restoration project in the
Sacramento Valley town of Vina has
been completed, with the Chapter House
of Ovila now standing.
In the 1930s, newspaper magnate
William Randolph Hearst bought the
former Trappist monastery the Santa
Maria de Ovila and imported it from
Spain for an estate that was never real-
ized. He had planned to use parts of the
church for an indoor swimming pool
changing room.
Once that project was scrapped,
Hearst donated the monasterys pieces to
the city of San Francisco, but the dis-
mantled building sat forgotten in Golden
Gate Park for more than 60 years.
The Vina monks credit the founder of
their abbey, Father Thomas X. Davis,
with the idea of restoring the remains to
the Trappist community. Davis saw the
stones at Golden Gate Park when he
arrived in San Francisco in 1955 and
began a campaign to bring them to Vina.
The city eventually agreed to turn over
the stones to the abbey. The Chapter
House was rebuilt with the help of mil-
lions of dollars raised by the Sierra
Nevada Brewing Co. in nearby Chico.
The brewers created a series of Ovila
Abbey ales inspired by Belgian Trappist
monks, an order that to this day makes
some of the nest beers in the world.
Monasteries in Europe still use brew-
ing as a way to keep them nancially
self-sufcient, so Sierra Nevadas part-
nership with the Vina monastery is keep-
ing with a tradition that began in the
Middle Ages.
Sierra Nevada Brewing and the monks
have raised $7 million over the past 12
years to help with the historic and
painstaking reconstruction.
The gothic, limestone building that
housed Cistercian monks for hundreds
of years is nally erect again.
Still, Father Paul Mark Schwan said
another $2 million is needed to nish the
project: the building is still without the
proper window glass, oors and electric-
ity needed to nish it.
Will it take another 12 years?
Schwan told the paper. I prefer it not.
Beer sales help rebuild monastery
Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.created a series of Ovila Abbey ales inspired by Belgian
Trappist monks, an order that to this day makes some of the nest beers in the
world.
New dilemma
in Russia: Can
you buy beer?
By Jim Heintz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW A big question in Russia in 2013 may be
How do I get a beer around here?
Under a law that took effect on New Years Day, selling
beer at the ubiquitous kiosks that mushroomed along
Russian sidewalks and roadsides after the collapse of the
Soviet Union has been banned. Though the tiny makeshift
shops lost their importance as conventional stores got more
of a foothold, new laws could deal a finishing blow to a
symbol of the countrys lively and disorderly post-commu-
nist free market.
In a measure meant to address Russias high rate of prob-
lem drinking, beer now can be purchased only at restau-
rants, cafes and stores of at least 50 square meters (about
500 square feet). The law also changes beers classification
from a food to an alcoholic beverage, meaning it cant be
sold in any store from 11 p.m. to 8 a.m. It also cracks down
on casual consumption of alcohol, forbidding it in public
spaces.
With the growing presence of supermarkets and sizable
neighborhood food stores, the ban on beer sales at kiosks
may mean no more than a couple blocks extra walking for
someone seized by a sudden thirst. But it may harshly dry
up income for kiosk operators.
Experts estimate that beer accounted for about 40 percent
of the revenue of kiosks that sold it, according to the
Interfax news agency.
It appears that all this volume will be nicely absorbed by
stores. I think that more than a third of the small retail
establishments in Russia unequivocally will close, Vadim
Drobiz, director of the Research Center for Federal
and?Regional Alcohol Markets, was quoted as saying by
the news.mail.ru news website.
More trouble for kiosk operators appears to be on the
way. The lower house of parliament has given preliminary
approval to a bill that would ban the sale of cigarettes at
kiosks and small stands.
If the cigarette sales ban comes into effect on top of the
beer sales prohibition, about 175,000 kiosks across the
country could be forced to close, at the cost of some
500,000 jobs, the Ministry for Economic Development esti-
mates, according to Interfax.
Heavy drinking and smoking are cited as two of the main
factors in Russias high mortality rate - average life
expectancy for males born in 2006 was 60-61, according to
a UN Development Program report.
Russia has already banned smoking in most enclosed
public spaces and the government has increased the mini-
mum prices for vodka.
On New Years Day, the bottom price for a half-liter of
vodka was raised by 36 percent, to 170 rubles ($5.50).
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 2
Burnin Down the House: a benet
for Garth Webber. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
The Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $10 donation at the
door. This benefit is an effort by the
Bay Area music community to join
together and help fellow musician,
Garth Webber, after his home was
burned down. For more information
go to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
FRIDAY, JAN. 4
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
Old Courthouse, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. At 11 a.m., preschool
children will be invited to learn about
transportation and will make their
own clothespin airplane to take
home. There will also be a Journey to
Work exhibit gallery and at 2 p.m.,
there will be a docent lead tour for
adults. Free. For more information call
299-0104 or go to historysmc.org.
San Mateo History Museum Free
Friday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free
admission for the entire day. 11 a.m.,
preschool children are invited to learn
about aviation. 2 p.m., museum
docents will lead tours of the museum
for adults. For more information call
299-0104.
SATURDAY, JAN. 5
Quest for Flight: John J.
Montgomery and the Dawn of
Aviation in the West. 11 a.m. Menlo
Park Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Bay Area author Craig S.
Harwood discusses his best-selling
biography of John J. Montgomery,
early aerodynamicist and yer before
the Wright Brothers. Free. For more
information call 330-2525.
Double-digging and bed
preparation. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Common Ground Organic Garden
Supply and Education Center, 559
College Ave., Palo Alto. Ryan Batjiaka
will lead the class. $31. For more
information and to register call 493-
6072 or go to
doubldiggingandbedpreparation.eve
ntbrite.com.
A Victorian 12th Night Ball with
special guest Charles Dickens. 7
p.m. The San Mateo Masonic Lodge
Ballroom, 100 N. Ellsworth Ave., San
Mateo. Enjoy a vintage dance lesson
followed by Bangers & Mash playing
an evening of Victorian ballroom
dance music. Light snack buffet and
performances by the Peerless Music
Hall and Mr. Dickens included.
Victorian costume or modern evening
dress is admired, but not required.
Tickets purchased before Dec. 29 are
$15. Tickets at the door are $20. For
more information call (510) 522-1731.
Beginner Ballroom Dance Class. 8
p.m. Dance Vita, 85 W. 43rd Ave., San
Mateo. $10. Friendly dance teachers
will teach you how to take the first
dance steps. There will be dance
practice for an hour after the class. For
more information contact
info@dancevita.com.
SUNDAY, JAN. 6
First Sunday Line Dance with Tine
Beare and JeanetteFeinberg. 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
MONDAY, JAN. 7
Lecture: What You Dont Know
About Long-Term Care Can Cost
You. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. City of San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. Meet
Robert Giorgetti, of Pioneer Insurance
Services, who will explain how you
can minimize your out of pocket
expenses by maximizing government
programs to help pay for long-term
care. To register and for more
information call 522-7490.
The Hearing Association of the
Peninsula Chapter Meeting. 1 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Free.The program for this meeting will
be an Assistive Listening Device
Demonstration given by Shannon
Simonson, Director of Counseling and
Community Outreach at the Hearing
and Speech Center of Northern
California. Refreshments will be
served. For more information call 345-
4551.
TUESDAY, JAN. 8
Forty Years of Title IX: There Is Still
Much to Be Done. 10:30 a.m. Menlo
Park City Council Chambers, 701
Laurel St., Menlo Park. The Menlo-
Atherton Branch of the American
Association of University Women will
host. Doors open at 10 a.m. For more
information visit www.aauw.org.
New Films from New Kazakhstan:
Shiza. 7 p.m. Building 370, Stanford
University, Stanford. Free. For more
information call 725-2563.
Beginner Square Dance Class. 7:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Beresford Rec Center,
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Free. For more information go
to www.smroadrunners.org.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9
RSVP Deadline for San Mateo
County Newcomers Club Luncheon
at noon on Tuesday, Jan. 15.
Ristorante Buon Gusto, 224 Grand
Ave., South San Francisco. Speaker
Cynthia Schreurs, Attorney at Law, will
focus on estate planning, wills, trusts
and probate law. Checks must be
received by Wednesday, Jan. 9. $25.
For more information call 286-0688.
Newyear, newwork. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The Main Gallery, 1018 Main St.,
Redwood City. The artists are excited
to ring in the new year and share
some of their newest work. Reception
on Jan. 12 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Exhibit
runs through Feb. 10. Gallery opens
Wednesday through Sunday during
same hours. For more information go
to www.themaingallery.org.
Canadian WomensClub January
luncheon event. 11 a.m. Basque
Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Ave.,
South San Francisco. Joycee Wong,
curator at the Wells Fargo History
Museum in San Francisco, will speak
about the role of women when the
bank was first established during
Californias Gold Rush. The social will
be at 11 a.m. and the lunch will start
at noon. $30. Reservations required.
For more information and to register
go to canadianwomensclub.org.
Sons In Retirement (SIRs) Branch 1
Monthly Luncheon. Noon. The Elks
Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
Lunch will be followed by a guest
speaker. All retired men welcome. For
more information or to attend call
341-8298. Call 24 hours before event
in order to attend.
Peninsula CommunityConnections
LGBT Group. Noon to 1 p.m.
Peninsula Family Service, 24 Second
Ave., San Mateo. PFS will host a
friendly, supportive discussion group
for LGBT adults over 55 who live in
San Mateo County. Meetings are held
the second Wednesday of every
month. Free. For more information call
403-4300, ext. 4325.
Knife Fight: Special Pre-Release
Film Screening with lmmaker Bill
Guttentag. 7:30 p.m. Cemex
Auditorium, Stanford University,
Stanford. Free. For more information
call 725-2650.
Organ Concert Featuring Stephen
Tharpe. 8 p.m. Stanford Memorial
Church, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford. Free.
For more information call 723-1762.
THURSDAY, JAN. 10
Employment Roundtable. 10 a.m. to
noon. Foster City Community Center,
1000 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Presented by Phase2Careers. Meet
with five to six Bay Area employers.
Free. For more information go to
http://www.phase2careers.org.
Retired Public Employees
Association Meeting. 10:30 a.m. San
Mateo Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. Guest speaker David Belk,
M.D. will discuss The True Cost of
Health care. The discussion will
include where the problems are and
what you can do about lowering your
costs. Lunch will follow. $14. For more
information and to make reservations
call 207-6401.
City of Rivers: A Book Launch with
Zubair Ahmed. 6 p.m. Stanford
Bookstore, Stanford University,
Stanford. Free. For more information
call 329-1217.
Concurrent Enrollment Night. 6 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. CSM College Center,
Building 10, Room 193, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Orientation
program for students enrolling at
College of San Mateo while in high
school. Free parking in the Beethoven
Lot 2 student parking area. For more
information go to
collegeofsanmateo.edu/highschool.
Community Educators Book
Signing. 7:30 p.m. Keplers Books,
1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park.
Becky Cooper and Dr. Pat Harbour will
discuss their new book Community
Educators. For more information call
482-2867.
HR as Business Partner: A Talent,
Not a Title. Sequoia, 1850 Gateway
Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo. The
Northern California Human Resources
Association will host presenter Danika
Davis who has held HR positions to
the senior/management ofcer level
in a variety of industries. $35 for non-
members and free for members. For
more information and to register go
to nchra.org.
FRIDAY, JAN. 11
Spanish and Latin Festival. 7:30 p.m.
The Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo.The concert
will feature solo and ensemble
performances by 15 outstanding
musicians. The works of several
composers including Albeniz,
Debussy, Infante and more will be
performed. Free. For more information
call 574-4633.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
for higher taxes on the wealthy.
Moments later, Obama strode into the
White House briefing room and
declared, Thanks to the votes of
Republicans and Democrats in Congress
I will sign a law that raises taxes on the
wealthiest 2 percent of Americans while
presenting tax hikes that could have sent
the economy back into recession.
He spoke with Vice President Joe
Biden at his side, a recognition of the
former senators role as the lead
Democratic negotiator in nal compro-
mise talks with Senate Republican
Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.
In addition to neutralizing middle
class tax increases and spending cuts
taking effect with the new year, the leg-
islation will raise tax rates on incomes
over $400,000 for individuals and
$450,000 for couples. That was higher
than the thresholds of $200,000 and
$250,000 that Obama campaigned for.
But remarkably, in a party that swore off
tax increases two decades ago, dozens of
Republicans supported the bill at both
ends of the Capitol.
The Senate approved the measure on a
vote of 89-8 less than 24 hours earlier,
and in the interim, rebellious House con-
servatives demanded a vote to add sig-
nicant spending cuts to the measure.
But in the end they retreated.
The measure split the upper ranks of
the Republican leadership in the House.
Speaker John Boehner of Ohio voted
in favor, while Majority Leader Eric
Cantor of Virginia and California Rep.
Kevin McCarthy, the partys whip,
opposed the bill.
Supporters of the bill in both parties
expressed regret that it was narrowly
drawn, and fell far short of a sweeping
plan that combined tax changes and
spending cuts to reduce federal decits.
That proved to be a step too far in the
two months since Obama called con-
gressional leaders to the White House
for a postelection stab at compromise.
Majority Republicans did their best to
minimize the bills tax increases, just as
they abandoned their demand from earli-
er in the day to add spending cuts to the
package.
By making Republican tax cuts per-
manent, we are one step closer to com-
prehensive tax reform that will help
strengthen our economy and create more
and higher paychecks for American
workers, said Rep. Dave Camp of
Michigan, chairman of the tax-writing
House Ways and Means Committee.
He urged a vote for passage to get us
one step closer to tax reform in 2013 as
well as attempts to control spending.
House Democratic Leader Nancy
Pelosi also said the legislation
included permanent tax relief for the
middle class, and she summoned
lawmakers to provide bipartisan sup-
port as the Senate did.
The bill would also prevent an expira-
tion of extended unemployment benets
for an estimated two million jobless,
block a 27 percent cut in fees for doctors
who treat Medicare patients, stop a $900
pay increase for lawmakers from taking
effect in March and head off a threatened
spike in milk prices.
It would stop $24 billion in across-the-
board spending cuts set to take effect
over the next two months, although only
about half of that total would be offset
with savings elsewhere in the budget.
The economic as well as political
stakes were considerable.
Economists have warned that without
action by Congress, the tax increases
and spending cuts that technically took
effect with the turn of the new year at
midnight could send the economy into
recession.
Even with enactment of the legisla-
tion, taxes are on the rise for millions.
A 2 percentage point temporary cut in
the Social Security payroll tax, original-
ly enacted two years ago to stimulate the
economy, expired with the end of 2012.
Neither Obama nor Republicans made a
signicant effort to extend it.
House Republicans spent much of the
day struggling to escape a political cor-
ner they found themselves in.
I personally hate it, Rep. John
Campbell of California, said of the
measure, giving voice to the concern of
many Republicans that it did little or
nothing to cut spending.
Continued from page 1
CLIFF
report which sums up how the county is
making ends meet and where it may
need to improve. The 10-page report
looked at statistics through the end of
June 30, 2012.
On the good side, the county is in bet-
ter shape than the state in regards to pen-
sions and other benet liabilities. The
countys funded ratio of 73.3 percent is
higher than the states ration of 59.4 per-
cent and works out to a per capita liabil-
ity of $1,285 compared to the states
$4,349.
The newly passed state pension
reform act will primarily affect workers
hired after Jan. 1, 2013 which, Adler
notes in the report, means the number of
employees in more expensive retirement
plans will diminish over time.
However, the county despite having
frozen its workforce and salaries will
still face higher annual employer contri-
bution rates for benet obligations in the
foreseeable future.
That future also holds several
unknowns.
For instance, in the last scal year, the
county was not paid $203,960 of the
$125 million owed in vehicle license
fees because of insufcient funds. The
countys share of the shortfall was
$120,666. If more school districts
become basic aid when property taxes
are higher than state per-pupil funding,
the shortfall could grow signicantly
because there wont be sufcient money
from Education Revenue Augmentation
Funds and non-basic aid school districts
to pay the VLF due the county and cities.
In turn, the county and cities will have
less revenue available and feel a pro-
found, detrimental impact, Adler wrote
in the report.
Looking forward, the county will also
be required to make major changes in
health care delivery under the Affordable
Care Act. An estimated 47,000 more
uninsured residents will qualify
although a smaller number is expected to
actually participate. When all is said and
done, the county estimates 16,000 adults
and 4,500 children will continue to be
uninsured and therefore remain the
county responsibility; in comparison,
28,000 adults and 5,000 kids are current-
ly enrolled in county programs.
The county actually expects an overall
neutral nancial effect from the laws
implementation but there is much
nancial uncertainty, Adler wrote.
What is known is data from the last
fiscal year, including a 7.1 percent
unemployment rate which is below the
prior years average of 8.4 percent. The
county is the second lowest among
Californias 58 counties.
August 2012 was the strongest month
for Bay Area home sales in six years and
the number of homes sold increased 14
percent over the previous year. Adler
wrote that the countys median prices
continue to rise the single-family
home median rose 8.9 percent to
$826,250 and the improving real
estate market in the county should con-
tinue to increase assessed property values
and, in turn, future property tax revenue.
The property tax assessment roll is
also up 3.33 percent, or $4.75 billion,
which means an increase in property tax
revenue of about $47.5 million for
schools, cities, special districts and the
county. However, the future doesnt
include refunds, which are unpre-
dictable. For example, in scal year
2011-12, the county processed $26.3
million in refunds.
The report also noted that the com-
mercial property vacancy rate was up
14.1 percent and the per capita personal
income increased to $67,964 which is an
ongoing increase.
Air traffic at San Francisco
International Airport continues as a
major economic impact on the region,
providing tens of thousands of jobs and
seeing total passenger volume up 7.7
percent to 43.1 million people.
The full report is available online at
www. c o . s a n ma t e o . c a . u s / c o n -
troller/2012pafr.
Continued from page 1
COUNTY
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2013
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- The possibilities
for personal accumulation are trending in your
favor. You wont have to do anything unusual -- you
should be able to reap rewards through traditional
channels.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You should be rather
fortunate, even in situations that involve elements
of chance. This is especially true when engaged in a
matter of pride, not necessarily proft.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Hanging out with
some of your favorite friends could prove to be
especially gratifying. If their plans dont include
coming to you, then you should go to them.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Since you havent
been in touch with an old chum for a very long time,
take a moment to get connect. There could be some
wonderful news awaiting you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Tunnel vision can be
a wonderful asset when used properly. Itll pay to
focus your energies on a current situation that has
much proftable potential.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Its quite possible that
you could be exposed to an important, inspirational
message. Should this occur, pay special attention
to it, because it could have a profound, wonderful
effect.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- The possibility for
further material acquisition is still active, even if
you werent expecting anything in that realm. Itll be
Dame Fortunes surprise.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Both family and friends
will be receptive and pleased with your cooperative
spirit. It will encourage them to do things for you
that they wouldnt be inclined to do for others.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Dont put off urgent
tasks or chores, even if you crave a day off.
Procrastination will only hurt you at this juncture.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Youre not the type of
person who throws his or her weight around just
to get what you want, yet if you require help from
others today, you might have to do so.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Time is your ally, with
victory being gained through perseverance. Even
if you have to work long into the day to accomplish
your aims, you wont mind a bit.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you fnd
yourself to be somewaht fdgety, engaging in a fun,
short excursion could satisfy your restlessness.
Getting out in the open air for a while should help.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
1-2-13
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Furious
6 Soft breeze
12 Betrayed boredom
14 Reverberated
15 Make certain
16 Sautees
17 Eur. country
18 Regret
19 Compost
21 Finance grad
23 Catch a crook
26 Puppy plaint
27 Continent divider
28 Swing around
30 Monsieurs summer
31 Oklahoma town
32 Napoleons fate
33 Type of eclipse
35 Nettle
37 Stock ending
38 Abdul or Prentiss
39 Bridal notice word
40 Speaker pro --
41 CD preceders
42 Army off.
43 Donnes above
44 Feedbag morsel
46 Suffx for hero
48 Meager
51 Vitamin B component
55 Tend the aquarium
56 Thunderstruck
57 Short snooze
58 Severe
DOWN
1 Caustic substance
2 Fleming or Woosnam
3 Beetles, e.g.
4 Mukluk wearer
5 Earl -- Biggers
6 Referee, slangily
7 Beige
8 Mythical bird
9 Practical question
10 Hankering
11 Rural rtes.
13 Judged
19 Ceremony
20 Be frank (2 wds.)
22 Chorus from the fock
24 Fly
25 More daring
26 Shrill bark
27 -- Lee cakes
28 Lap dog, briefy
29 Crawl with
34 Loser (hyph.)
36 Eye part
42 Not fat
43 Mutual of --
45 Whodunit terrier
47 Weary exhale
48 Cul-de- --
49 Tasty legume
50 Easel display
52 Caboose, for one
53 Soyuz dest.
54 Extreme degree
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE
GET fUZZY
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
BIOTECH -
Genentech in South San Francisco
seeks:
- Engineer. Provide technical sup-
port to commercial and non-commercial
drug product operations including bulk
preparation, filling, inspection, and pack-
aging at our company's manufacturing
facility. Reqs Bachelor or foreign equiv in
Chemical Engineering, Biochemical En-
gineering, Engineering or rel. & 18
months of exp. (88-00409790)
- Associate Director, Drug Product
Manufacturing Sciences and Technolo-
gy. Resp for leading a group of manufac-
turing technical specialists and engineers
in support of drug product operations.
Reqs Bachelor or foreign equiv in Micro-
biology, Life Sciences, Engineering or
rel. & 9 yrs of exp or a Master's degree &
7 yrs of exp. Travel required 6% of the
time, not a telecommuting position. (88-
00409942)
- Senior Clinical Trial Manager.
Provide leadership to global clinical study
team(s) within an early development pro-
gram. Reqs Bachelor or foreign equiv in
Science, Health, History or rel. & 5 yrs of
prog exp. (88-00410201)
Please mail your resume specifying the
position requisition number to Genen-
tech, c/o SB MS-829A, 1 DNA Way,
South San Francisco, CA 94080.
Genentech is an Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by
regular mail to
800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 518077
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Andrew Ho Yee Leung
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Andrew Ho Yee Leung filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Andrew Ho Yee Leung,
aka Ho Yee Leung
Proposed name: Andrew Ho-Yee Leung
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 30,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/13/2012
/s/ Beth Larson Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 12/07/2012
(Published, 12/19/12, 12/26/12,
01/02/13, 01/09/13)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253547
The following person is doing business
as: Rolling Motors Automotive Inc., 10
Rolling Road, Ste. 212B, MILLBRAE,
CA 94030 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Rolling Motors Automotive
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
04/01/2011.
/s/ Demyan Smilovitsky /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/12, 12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253401
The following person is doing business
as: The Bee Moving & Storage, 711 So.
Idaho St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Bee Moving, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/05/2012.
/s/ Moises Hernandez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/12, 12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253393
The following person is doing business
as: San Bruno Center for Dental Medi-
cine, 750 Kains Avenue, SAN BRUNO,
CA 94066 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Bradley L. Parker, DDS,
APC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 11/15/2012.
/s/ Bradley L. Parker, DDS /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/12, 12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253541
The following person is doing business
as: Modern Craft, 643 Dartmouth Ave-
nue, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mod-
ern Craft, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Derek Loh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/12/12, 12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253470
The following person is doing business
as: Bootcamps United, 1163 Mason Dr,
PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Les Chui,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Les Chui /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253563
The following person is doing business
as: Orion Stars Enterprise LLC, 1210
Tournament Drive, HILLSBOROUGH,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Orion Stars Enterprise
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/01/2010.
/s/ Jessica Kong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253602
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Acupuncture Center, 214
De Anza Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Angela Galatierra-Ganding, 330
Van Buren Ave., Apt. 9, Oakland, CA
94610. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Angela Galatierra-Ganding /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253626
The following person is doing business
as: Pit Stop Sedan Service, 580 Chest-
nut Street, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Aaron Jekelian, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Aaron Jekelian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253373
The following person is doing business
as: Teddys Cafe, 345 Middlefield Road,
#10, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hee
W. Choi, 539 North Lake Dr., #2, San
Jose, CA 95117. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Hee W. Choi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253631
The following person is doing business
as: Dailydealsbroker.com, 664 Ninth
Avenue, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Groupbuilt, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Patrick Boyle /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/12, 12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 248737
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Teddys Cafe, 345 Middlefield Road,
#10, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 02/02/2012. The
business was conducted by: Elizabeth R.
Kim & Sung Tae Kim, 19019 Dalmatia
Place, Castro Valley< CA 94546
/s/ Elizabeth R. Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 11/28/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/19/12,
12/26/12, 01/02/12, 01/09/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND CHIHUAHUA mix Terrier tan
male near West Lake shopping Center in
Daly City (415)254-5975
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST- DIGITAL Camera, Samtrans
Route 390, James st., and El Camino
Real 12/27/12, (650)454-7093 (reward)
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., (650)342-8436
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
23 Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., (650)342-8436
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $50 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
100 USED European (33) and U.S. (67)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $6.00, 650-787-
8600
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
298 Collectibles
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7 x 7
x 9, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
4 FREE dining room chair with wheels
(650)871-7200
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 SOLD!
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34W, 22D, 16H, modern, glass, $25.,
SOLD!
BLACK LEATHER love seat $50
(650)692-1618
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$99 (650)315-5902
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
304 Furniture
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON WITH NEW mattress $80 cash
(U haul away) (650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
306 Housewares
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2 polished glass
clear, (3) 10x30, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
GLASS SHELVES 1/2 polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor $99 (650)315-5902
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
1941 SAN Francisco News Dec. 22 to 31
Huge fifty pound black bounded book
$80 (650)873-4030
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
310 Misc. For Sale
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, Best Offer,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK unopened,
hard cover, Every Days a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOOD DEHYDRATOR made by
Damark, 5 trays, works good. $30.00
SOLD!
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
OLD WOODEN Gun case SOLD!
24
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Bears place
4 Mil. awards
8 Long-eared
pooch
14 Stat for Clayton
Kershaw
15 Nope
16 Rustler, e.g.
17 Emeril
interjection
18 Shortest way to
get there
20 Uintah and Ouray
Reservation
residents
22 Disneys __ &
Stitch
23 Key in
24 Good Samaritan
parable source
27 Quash
28 Sheeps hangout
29 They could
happen
32 Early gaming
name
34 Judges reprieve
36 Go __ great
length
37 Thats weird! (or
a comment about
whats hidden in
18-, 24-, 46- and
57-Across)
40 Tinged
41 Start the pot
42 Dodge
43 1776 and 2001,
e.g.: Abbr.
44 Forward pass
path
45 Cousteaus
workplace
46 Hot-rodders
add-on
52 American
competitor, as it
was once known
55 Chewy candy
brand
56 Memorable
golfing
Spaniard,
familiarly
57 Annual
Mexican
celebration
60 Trivial picking
point
61 Not exactly social
butterflies
62 I dont give __!
63 NFL snapper
64 Jaguar or impala
65 Tweeds
caricaturist
66 Hurrah!
DOWN
1 Fix, as a
computer
program
2 Muse with a lyre
3 Sings, so to
speak
4 Cracker that
doesnt crack
5 Carnival setup
man
6 Museum piece
7 Place for a 6-
Down
8 Plant sci.
9 I have it!
10 More than
apologize
11 Market surplus
12 After curfew
13 Decorative water
holder
19 Artistic potpourri
21 Like many
churches
25 Egress
26 One-eighties
29 Revolt
30 Saudi king, 1982-
2005
31 Eyelid trouble
32 Like a used
fireplace
33 Sequence of
gigs
34 Heartfelt
35 Volatile initials
36 Crude tankers
38 Instrument that
often sits on the
floor while played
39 Tornado
response gp.
44 Natural light show
46 Order to a boxer
47 Like some
numerals and
noses
48 The It Girl Bow
49 Georgetown
hoopsters
50 Musical set in
Buenos Aires
51 Have another go
at
52 Kareems alma
mater
53 Priory of __: The
Da Vinci Code
secret society
54 Caesarean cal.
periods
58 www connection
option
59 Go (for)
By Robert Cirillo
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
01/02/13
01/02/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, SOLD!
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
310 Misc. For Sale
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 (650)341-1728
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WHEELCHAIR - Used indoors only, 4
months old, $99., (650)345-5446
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$60., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
KENNEL - small size, good for small
size dog or cat, 23" long 14" wide &
141/2" high, $25. FIRM (650)871-7200
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
TOP PEDIGREE -yellow labs, extreme
hunters as well as loving house dogs
available 11/19/12 see at at www.mega-
nmccarty.com/duckdogs, (650)593-4594
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 SOLD!
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
316 Clothes
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
(650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
630 Trucks & SUVs
CHEVY 03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$19000. obo, (650)465-6056
25 Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
26
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
DONT PAINT
GO GREEN
Affordable, Natural,
Authentic Wall Finishes
to replace paint
888-391-2479
415-467-7009
www.sanfranciscoplaster.com
info@sanfranciscoplaster.com
Non-toxic/Hypoallergenic
Filters the air absorbing
carbon dioxide and odors
Eliminates mold and fungus
For both residential or commercial
80 selected colors
Please contact us
for custom color matches
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Fitness
THE COLLEGE of SAN MATEO
OFFERS
EVENING SOCIAL BALLROOM &
SWING DANCE CLASSES at the
BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE
LEVELS
Starting Jan. 14, 2013
fees average $4.70 per class
go to http://collegeofsanmateo.edu
or call (650) 574-6420 or Email
waltonj@smccd.edu for more info
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
27 Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAXING
MASSAGE
THERAPY
Enjoy a premium massage with
essential oils that relieves
stress and fatigue.
Come and pamper yourself.
Please call to book your session.
(408)796-9796 Sophia
Massage Therapy
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
THIS AD.
So are your customers.
And future customers.
And former customers.
We understand how cool and sexy those Google
keywords and Facebook ads and Groupon deals are
However...
Neglecting the selling power of newspaper
advertising is leaving a huge hole in your
marketing efforts.
The Daily Journal has a cost effective, extremely
focused method of bringing you customers you cannot
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If we received a dollar for every time someone said
Print is dead, well, we could afford to print this
newspaper in gold leaf.
So we understand, how unsexy and boring the
consistency of newspapers may seem.
If you feel a steady stream of business and your cash
register ringing is boring, then dont call us for a free
assessment of how the Daily Journal can help your
business succeed.
650-344-5200
YOURE READING
28
Wednesday Jan. 2, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL