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Group Campaign Project

Comms 235-Dr. Wilson December 6, 2011 Jessie Allen Bryce Lawrence McKay Perry Stephanie Rosenhan

Group Campaign
Situation Analysis

Bryce, Jessie, McKay & St ephanie

Salt Lake City was recently found to be the sixth most dangerous city in which to drive. This fact has caused concern that members of the BYU community also practice unsafe driving habits. The most prevalent poor and dangerous practices causing accidents are distractions while driving, speeding and inclement weather. Further, the failure to wear a seatbelt restraint causes reason for concern due to the fact that unrestrained crash occupants were 32 times more likely to die in a crash than restrained occupants. Distractions can be defined as, but not limited to cell phone use, stereo adjustment and passenger distractions. Driving while distracted accounts for 25 percent of all police reported accidents. In Utah 22 percent of crashes were related to speeding. Though 25 percent of accidents are caused by inclement weather, the number of accidents can be decreased with an appropriate change in driving attitude and behavior. Because 31 percent of BYU students own cars and the top nine represented states in the student population are within one days driving distance, BYUSA is most concerned for the students who drive home during the holiday season. The tendency for students to collaborate and carpool causes particular alarm with the handling of distractions, road conditions and passengers. Research shows that passengers are often at more risk in accidents than the driver. Only 42 percent of passengers in the presence of speeding drivers asked the driver to slow down. To decrease the number of accidents related to the commute of students during the holiday season, BYUSA must impose a premier campaign that will not only raise awareness and cause self-reflection of the problem, but will result in a lifelong change of driving and riding habits and attitude both for the current community and the additions to the BYU community in the future.

Group Campaign
Core Problem/ Challenge
Nearly three quaters of all accidents are related to distracted driving, speeding and inclement weather. If driving and riding behaviors are not changed, the life and saftey of the BYU community is severely threatened.

Bryce, Jessie, McKay & St ephanie

Goal

To raise awareness and understanding of safe driving and riding behaviors ulitmately creating lifelong safe driving and riding habits which will decrease the number of accidents related to the BYU community during the holiday season.

Group Campaign
Objectives

Bryce, Jessie, McKay & St ephanie

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Raise the understanding among the BYU community to 70 percent of what exactly constitutes life-long safe driving by June 2012. Decrease the percentage of accidents involving BYU students related to distracted driving to less than 10 percent within one year. Decrease the number of students who profess to drive while operating a cell phone from 59 percent to 30 percent in one years time. Decrease the number of students who profess to speed to 30 percent within one year. Increase from 68 percent to 80 percent the number of students, both passengers and drivers, who wear seat-belts in one calendar year. Increase driver preparedness for inclement weather situations so that 80 percent of students who own cars have in their possession the proper equipment and knowledge necessary to face emergencies in adverse weather conditions by October 2012. For the next calendar year, see zero fatal accidents. Increase awareness and understanding of what constitutes good riding behavior such that the reports of adolescents who have asked a speeding driver to slow down increases from 42 percent to 60 percent in one calendar year.

Group Campaign
Bryce, Jessie, McKay & St ephanie

Key Publics
Students with cars Students without cars Incoming Freshmen Faculty and Staff

Students WITH Cars


Public Profile
This is the public identified for the desired behavior change. These are the 31 percent of BYU students who own or have access to a car. These students will be influenced by their peers, family, professors, school officials and religious leaders. Because students with cars are affected by these groups of people, they are the ones who will most likely be able to influence behavior change in students. Thus, the channels used to contact the students will contain some of these influentials. Other channels may include on campus media, television, BYUSA activities and campus communication. Because these students attend BYU, they already have a relationship with BYUSA whether they know it or not. BYUSA will have to increase the student knowledge and participation in their organization. This public does know that unsafe driving habits may lead to financial, physical and emotional consequences, yet they may not recognize themselves as unsafe drivers. Potential messages for this public will appeal to their self-interests. The selfinterests of student drivers are the acceptance from their peers and families, their own personal well-being, and their financial and educational future. Their action is necessary for the accomplishment of all of our objectives.

Driving distracted is more common than you would think. Evaluate your own driving and commit to change.
Know and practice driving laws in Utah; these may be different than back home.

Students WITH Cars Messag es


Reading a text message while driving takes 4.6 seconds on average to read. At 55 mph that is like driving down a football field blindfolded. Talking on a cell phone, even hands free, takes away 39 percent of brain activity that would otherwise be used for driving. Using your cell phone while driving delays your reaction time to equal the reaction time of someone who is driving with a blood alcohol content of .08 80 percent of drivers involved in accidents believe that someone else is at fault. Alex Brown was a girl going to school in Texas. She crashed her truck on a rural road on her way there. She was texting when her truck rolled and she was killed. She thought it would never happen to her. Erica Forney was a 9 year old girl who was riding her bike when she was struck by an SUV. She was thrown 15 feet landing on her neck and died two days later. The driver did not see her because she was texting at the time of the accident.

Not driving safely will cost you money. Practice safe driving habits.
The average cost of an accident is $5,200, or almost one year of tuition. 22 percent of car accidents are related to speeding. Unrestrained car occupants are 32 times more likely to die in the car crash than those who were restrained. Each 5 mph you drive over 60 mph is like paying an additional $0.27 per gallon for gas. 50 percent of car accident fatalities are due to speed. More than 58 percent of passengers who were driving with someone who was speeding admit that they did not ask the driver to slow down. 80 percent of speeding situations involve a driver who is travelling 1-20 mph over the speed limit. 48 percent of drivers admit to exceeding the speed limit. Be sure to have the proper equipment before heading out (chains on tires, roadside kit). Get six to eight hours of sleep the night before travelling so you are prepared for the journey. 100,000 police reported crashes annually listed the cause as drowsy driving. Plan your route ahead of time. Be sure the mechanical features of your car are in good working order (brakes, windshield wipers, mirrors, headlights, tire quality, spare tire, oil and coolant)

16 percent of all fatal accidents are caused by driving distracted.

Safe driving takes preparation. Be prepared.

Motivate students to learn correct driving habits through opinion leaders.

Students WITH &Cars St eg rat ies Tacics t


Motivate safe driving and preparation through mass media.
Email from President Samuelson urging students to drive safely. Pre-recorded half-time announcement at basketball game from Coach Rose urging students not to text while driving, to wear seatbelts and to obey the speed limit. Pre-recorded half-time announcement at football game from Coach Mendenhall urging students not to text while driving, to wear seatbelts and to obey the speed limit. Forum address from University of Utah professor Frank Drews who conducted a distracted driving study. Have professors read a fact sheet about unsafe driving before the last class of the semester and have them share their sincere feelings about unsafe driving. Ask church leaders to take a moment to read and discuss Doctrine and Covenants 98:4-7 the last Sunday before leaving for the semester or holiday and emphasize the importance of obeying the laws of the land. Brochure on the impacts of unsafe driving as well as the costs of unsafe driving and how to be prepared before hitting the road. Feature story in the Daily Universe about distracted driving and what it is. Radio PSA about how to prepare for adverse weather conditions. A broadcast or short and funny informational video about distracted driving. Have a student texting in the middle of a crowded passageway--It looks ridiculous in an intersection too Crossword puzzle in the Daily Universe about safe driving Posters around campus about how ridiculous distracted driving is Story on BYU website home page Checklist on OneStop website BYUSA website and blog Video PSA showing how easy it is to be distracted by cell phones Facebook group with challenge; Tweet reminders to drive safe YouTube video contest promoting safe driving YouTube testimonials from distracteddriving.gov campaign Blog about safe driving tips that also has feature articles from influentials (police department, community leaders, department of transportation leaders) Create a blog for BYUSA that has reminders of upcoming safe driving events Demonstration using the jaws of life DJ in Brigham Square playing music and throwing out statistics between songs Obstacle course showing students what kinds of distractions exist Write a script for a mock accident to appeal to emotions BYUSA car pool party emphasizing safe driving. You wouldnt use your cell phone in the pool, dont use it in the car, Aware of safety in the pool, be aware of safety in the car. Have pledges available at all of the interactive events Hand out freebies at interactive events (bracelets, water-bottle stickers, t-shirts, magnets, bumbper-stickers) Safe driving raffle for those who sign pledges

Motivate safe driving and preparation through social media.

Motivate safe driving and preparation through interactive events.

Students WITHOUT Cars


Public Profile
This public will help to accomplish all objectives. Though they are rarely the driver they still have an effect on the driving behavior of their peers. This public constitutes 69% of the BYU population. The majority are Caucasian, 90% from the US and nearly entirely LDS. These are the students who walk, ride the bus, or bike to campus. They may also carpool with friends to school as well as home for holiday breaks. Their self interests include the safety of their lives, the lives of their friends, academic success, social acceptance, financial security and the assurance of a promising future. They are influenced by fellow students, parents and professors. Coaches, athletes, and other performers also influence this public. Effective channels to reach this public are social media, word of mouth, on campus media, campus communication, oncampus kick off events and giveaways. Most students recognize BYUSAs title and identify it as a service organization. However, they lack an expansive understanding of its functions and style of operation.

Students WITHOUT Cars


To save the lives of those in your community, promote safe driving by being a good pedestrian, cyclist and passenger.
Make eye contact with the driver when crossing the road. Look both ways before crossing the road. Use designated crosswalks. Observe bicycle laws.

Messag es

Help your friends drive safely by encouraging them. Be a good passenger.

More than 58 percent of passengers who were driving with someone who was speeding admit that they did not ask the driver to slow down. Unrestrained car occupants are 32 times more likely to die in the car crash than those who were restrained. 49 percent of adults have been passengers in a car with a driver who has been sending and receiving text messages. Teen passengers are more likely to die in car accidents.

Students WITHOUT Cars


Through opinion leaders, motivate students to practice good riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely.
YouTube video showing basketball players driving in a car encouraging fellow player (driver) to drive safely. Email from President Samuelson urging students to be good passengers and encourage their friends to drive safely. Pre-recorded half-time announcement at basketball game from Coach Rose urging students to practice good riding behavior; Pre-recorded half-time announcement at football game from Coach Mendenhall urging students to practice good riding behavior. Forum address from University of Utah professor Frank Drews who conducted a distracted driving study. Have professors read a fact sheet about unsafe driving before the last class of the semester and have them share their sincere feelings about unsafe driving.

St eg & Tacics rat ies t

Motivate students to practice good riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through mass media.
Brochure containing bicycle and pedestrian laws. Daily Universe sidebar contest How familiar are you with passenger and pedestrian laws? Posters around campus encouraging students to speak up when their friends are being unsafe drivers. Posters around campus relaying the information that passengers are more likely to die in accidents. You are at risk too. Feature story in the Daily Universe about a passengers role and responsibility in the car. Radio PSA about how to be a good passenger and pedestrian. A broadcast or short and funny informational video about speaking up when friends are driving unsafely. Crossword puzzle in the Daily Universe about being a safe passenger and pedestrian. Story on BYU website home page about being a good passenger.

Motivate students to practice good riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through social media.
Quiz on Facebook about passenger and pedestrian laws, the winner gets a new bike. Are you BYUs safest biker?; Facebook group with challenge. Tweet reminders to be good passengers and pedestrians. YouTube video contest promoting safe riding;YouTube testimonials from distracteddriving.gov campaign Blog about safe riding tips that also has feature articles from influentials (police department, community leaders, department of transportation leaders). Create a blog for BYUSA that has reminders of upcoming safe driving events.

Motivate students to practice good riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through interactive events.
Demonstration using the jaws of life. DJ in Brigham Square playing music and throwing out statistics between songs. Obstacle course showing students what kinds of distractions exist for passengers and pedestrians. Write a script for a mock accident to appeal to emotions. BYUSA car pool party emphasizing safe riding and pedestrian practices. Have pledges available at all of the interactive events. Hand out freebies at interactive events (bracelets, water-bottle stickers, magnets, bumper-stickers t-shirts) Safe pedestrian and rider raffle for those who sign pledges.

Faculty and Staff

Public Profile

Totaling nearly 4,000 members of the BYU community, this public will help to achieve all the objectives because they will be targeted primarily as an intervening public. This public sees the students on a daily basis, are in a position for rapid communication to students and are in a highly respected position such that they can be influential to the primary targets of the campaign. While most accidents involve adolescent drivers, this public is not immune to poor driving habits. This public will be targeted as examples of self-reflection of less than perfect driving habits, and also will be encouraged to set the examples of changed behavior. This public is influenced by their respective department heads, colleagues and President Samuelson. The self-interests of this public include: teaching and impacting students, maintaining a healthy learning environment, upholding the values of BYU and its Honor Code and exceeding in their fields of study. For the purposes of this campaign, the best channels by which to reach this public are: internal BYU emails, letters or addresses from President Samuelson, meetings both large and small scale, various forms of on campus media including the Daily Universe, BYU broadcasting, BYU magazine, etc and scholarly media. Potential messages targeted to this public will reflect the identified self-interests, especially those associated with impacting the lives of students, both in and out of the classroom. Though BYUSA is a student-run organization that targets students, fostering a relationship with this public would be beneficial due to the influence this public has over students.

Faculty and Staff Messag es


Your impact on students lives extends beyond the classroom.
Youre teaching more than just academic curriculum. Youre shaping lifestyles and forging character. Driving habits involve every part of the BYU Honor Code, it is your duty to the school to uphold such a standard of excellence. (honesty and integrity). Example of how an educator impacts their students The teaching mission is complex and difficult, and yet oh so vital. Teachers can never put up a Mission Accomplished banner, because they are a bridge, not an endpoint, for all the boys and girls and the young men and women who come into their lives.

Be the driver you want your students to be.

Even though you may not text while driving, drivers who use handhold devices are four times more likely to get into crashes that are serious enough to injure themselves. Quote from U.S. Transportation Secretary: Theres one message we hope everyone receives loud and clear: the safest way to get from one place to another is to hang up and drive. Powering down your cell phone when youre behind the wheel can save lives - maybe even your own. Speaking on a cell phone is still a cognitive distraction that can lead to car accidents. 73 percent of baby boomers have admitted to having a cell phone conversation while driving. Drivers with a college degree are more likely to look at their screens while driving when compared to those with only high school diplomas.

Faculty and ies & Tact Staff St eg rat ics


Motivate faculty and staff to encourage students to develop safe driving habits through internal campus communication tools.
An email from President Samuelson urging professors to speak with their students about safe driving and riding practices An email from BYUSA asking professors to become involved in the safe driving campaign Hand out an informational kit to professors that has the necessary materials so that they can be informed while speaking to students. This kit would include statistics and personal stories about distracted driving as well as a letter from the university urging professors to pass along the information Send out an email to professors containing the links to the BYUSA safe driving blog as well as other safe driving websites Email out the safe driving pledge and urge professors to sign the pledge along with their students. At department meetings have a BYUSA representative teach professors about the safe driving and riding campaign. Hang posters in department offices that encourage professors to teach their students the importance of being a safe driver. Your lessons carry far beyond the classroom

Incoming Freshmen
Public Profile
This public will be critical to accomplishing the desired behavioral change. Freshmen account for roughly 22% of the student body. This is an important public since the average age is 18.5 and the crash rate for 16 to 19-year-olds is 2.7 times higher than drivers of all ages. Research also shows that this public, because of its age, is more likely to text and drive than other age groups. Freshmen are driven by self interests of spending time with family, having a social life, and preparing for future career plans and missionary service. People in this group typically are away from home for the first time and they take advantage of the opportunities to visit home and receive pampering from the parents. They also are new to school and they want to make solid friends and to feel connected. In this public many of the males are preparing for missionary service in the near future and many females are looking forward to choosing a fulfilling career path. BYUSA has a strong relationship to this public as they sponsor many of the activities and events in which Freshmen are involved. This public can be influenced by family members as this is a main self interest. Their action is necessary to contribute to the accomplishment of all the objectives.

To safely get home to your family, practice good driving habits and be prepared.
54.4 percent of accidents involve a driver under 20 Nearly 67 percent of teens who died in a car accident were not wearing seatbelts Unrestrained car occupants are 32 times more likely to die in the car crash than those who were restrained. Be sure to have the proper equipment before heading out (chains on tires, roadside kit). Get six to eight hours of sleep before a long time so that you are prepared for the journey. Plan your route ahead of time Be sure that the mechanical features of your car are in good working order (brakes, windshield wipers, mirrors, headlights, tire quality, spare tire, oil and coolant) 100,000 police reported crashes annually listed the cause as drowsy driving.

Incoming Freshmen Messag es


In the last five years, 45,560 crashes involved passengers aged 8-17, of those, 9,870 in that age group died Keltson Blackburn was 19 years old when he died in a high speed accident. Just a few weeks before his mission and just days before entering the temple to be endowed, he was traveling home from a vacation in southern Utah. While on the freeway, he rolled his car and was killed.

The future holds a lot for you. Dont cut it short. Drive safely.

Incoming St egies & Tact Freshmen rat ices


Motivate students to practice good driving and riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through social media.
Quiz on Facebook about passenger and pedestrian laws, the winner gets a new bike. you BYUs safest biker? Are Facebook group with challenge to pledge to be both a safe driver and a safe passenger Tweet reminders to be good drivers, passengers and pedestrians YouTube video contest promoting safe driving and riding. YouTube testimonials from distracteddriving.gov campaign. Blog about safe driving and riding tips that also has feature articles from influentials (police department, community leaders, department of transportation leaders). Create a blog for BYUSA that has reminders of upcoming safe driving events.

Motivate students to practice good driving and riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through interactive events.
Demonstration using the jaws of life. DJ in Brigham Square playing music and throwing out statistics between songs Obstacle course showing students what kinds of distractions exist for passengers and pedestrians. Write a script for a mock accident to appeal to emotions. BYUSA car pool party emphasizing safe riding and pedestrian practices. Have pledges available at all of the interactive events. Hand out freebies at interactive events (bracelets, water-bottles, stickers, t-shirts, Frisbees.) Safe driver, pedestrian and rider raffle for those who sign pledges. Use on-campus housing scheduled events to encourage students to be good passengers and drivers. Safe driving week At freshmen kick off events have mentors speak about how safe driving affects the future of the students. You might not be able to walk across the stage at graduation unless you are a safe driver and a responsible passenger.

Incoming St egies & Tact Freshmen rat ices


Through opinion leaders, motivate students to practice good riding and driving behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely.
YouTube video showing basketball players driving in a car encouraging the driver (also a player) to drive safely. Email from President Samuelson urging students to be good drivers and passengers and to encourage their friends to drive safely. Pre-recorded half-time announcement at basketball game from Coach Rose urging students to practice good driving and riding behavior. Pre-recorded half-time announcement at football game from Coach Mendenhall urging students to practice good driving and riding behavior. Forum address from University of Utah professor Frank Drews who conducted a distracted driving study. Have professors read a fact sheet about unsafe driving before the last class of the semester and have them share their sincere feelings about unsafe driving. Have resident assistants speak with freshmen in their weekly meetings about the importance of safe riding and driving. Share statistics and real stories about the effects of poor/distracted driving. At freshmen orientation have the BYU police chief speak about the consequences of unsafe driving.

Motivate students to practice good driving and riding behavior and to encourage their friends to drive safely through mass media.
Brochure containing bicycle and pedestrian laws. Daily Universe sidebar contest How familiar are you with passenger and pedestrian laws? Posters around campus encouraging students to speak up when their friends are being unsafe drivers. Posters around campus relaying the information that passengers are more likely to die in accidents. You are at risk too. Posters around campus about how distracted driving is both unsafe and ridiculous. Feature story in the Daily Universe about passengers role and responsibility in the car. Feature story in the Daily Universe about the negative effects of distracted driving. Radio PSA about how to be a good driver, passenger and pedestrian. A broadcast or short and funny informational video about speaking up when friends are driving unsafely. Crossword puzzle in the Daily Universe about being a safe driver, passenger and pedestrian. Story on BYU website home page about being a good passenger and a good driver.

Strategies and Tactics


News Release Posters Brochure Radio PSA Scripts You ube video script T Email to professors Student pledge You ube PSA Video T

Examples

News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 30, 2011 BYUSA to Sponsor a Safe Driving Week Service organization will stage safe driving events across campus that will encourage students and faculty to be safe drivers and passengers. PROVO, UtahSalt Lake City has recently been named the 6th most dangerous city in which to drive according to the National Highway Safety Administration. In an effort to decrease the number of car accidents and protect the BYU community, BYUSA announced today that they will be holding a safe driving week across campus. The safe driving week will take place January 9, 2012 to January 15, 2012. During the week there will be a series of safe driving lectures, a release of informational video and radio PSAs, and daily activities in Brigham Square. Ryan Greenburg, President of BYUSA, said we want to teach the BYU community that unsafe driving not only affects them, but it affects those around them. Those without cars will also have the opportunity to learn safe riding habits through safety week, due to the fact that often times the passenger is more severely hurt than the driver. Passengers should speak up when the driver is doing something that they are uncomfortable with, said Greenburg. They have more of an influence than they would think. Safe driving week is a part of BYUSAs yearlong safe driving campaign. The goal of the campaign is to raise awareness and understanding of safe driving measures which will create lifelong safe driving and riding habits that will decrease the number of accidents related to BYU students. As part of a BYU education, the Student Service Associations vision is to be leaders centered on Jesus Christ, who contribute to the building of Zion communities which are united in heart and mind that there be no intellectually, spiritually, emotionally, or physically poor among us. For more information on the Student Service Association visit their website: byusa.byu.edu. ### Contact: Ryan Greenburg BYU Student Service Association (801) 422-3901 rgreenburg@gmail.com Wilkinson Center 3400 byusa@byu.edu (801) 422-3901

COST?
?

one year of tuition.

COST?

a life.
Large or small, crashes

cost. Save your money. Save your life. Drive safely.


BYU/SA

Wouldnt you want someone to tell you?

Tell your friends to put their phones away while driving.

DISTRACTED DRIVING

Dont text and drive. Futures depend on it.


IT COSTS TO DRIVE DISTRACTED.

When you drive distracted you endanger yourself and those around you. You may end up paying for your car to be repaired, someone elses car to be repaired or your family could end up paying for your funeral.

Take the pledge to never drive distracted. Go to our website at

Contact us:

BYUSA.byu.edu/safedriving

Distracted driving kills. Make your future brighter and put down the cell phone.
Address | Wilkinson Center 3400 Phone | (801) 422-3901 Email | byusa@byu.edu

FACT SHEET

BYU/SA
WHAT IS DISTRACTED DRIVING?
Distractions include: Texting Using a cell phone or Smartphone Eating and drinking Talking to passengers Grooming Reading, including maps Using a navigation system Watching a video Adjusting a radio, CD player, or MP3 player

3 Types of Distractions:
Cognitive This is when your mind zones out and you become engulfed in thinking about your problems and other challenges. Life is hard and overwhelming sometimes, but dont let it affect your driving. Visual You need your eyes on the road to drive safely. If youre not watching then what will you miss? Resist the urge to look at your cell phone. Manual You also need both hands on the wheel to operate the vehicle properly. Focus on the task at hand. Your friends will be there later.

16% of all fatal accidents in 2009 were reported from distracted driving (NHTSA)

Reading a text message while driving takes 4.6 seconds on average to read. At 55 mph that is like driving down a football field blindfolded.

Using your cell phone while driving delays your reaction time to equal the reaction time of someone who is driving with a blood alcohol content of .08

Radio PSA Script


BYU Student Service Association Speeding and Driving Distracted is Dangerous [0:55] SFX: The announcement begins with a live recording of a football crowd concluding the BYU fight song. SFX: Ra, ra! Ra ra ra! Gooooo Cougars! SFX: The drum line lays a beat and the music fades to the background. Coach Mendenhalls voice begins in the foreground. Coach Mendenhall: This is BYU head football coach, Bronco Mendenhall. I recently learned that the Salt Lake area was reported to be the sixth most dan gerous U.S. region in which to drive. Provo city alone had nearly 3,000 accidents last year. The majority of these accidents occur due to speeding and driving distracted. These reports cause me concern for the safety of BYU students and staff. I urge all members of our community to examine our driving habits and commit to improve. Please, while youre on the road wear a seat belt, obey the posted speed limit, and do not use your cell phone. Poor driving costs lives. Commit now to drive safely. SFX: End of drum line beat.

Radio PSA Script


U.S. Department of Transportation Texting and Driving Kills [0:60] SFX: SFX: Policeman: Dispatch: Policeman: Dispatch: SFX: Traffic accident-car hits kid on bike and telephone pole. radio scanner static Dispatch, requesting immediate assistance. Do you copy? Over. Whats the status? We have an 11-44. South 600 block-residential. Minor. Male. Critical trauma to the head. Suspect is on the scene-uninjured. Copy that. Sending assistance. radio scanner static

Voice over(sober voice): An 11-44 is a deceased person. That deceased person is a 5 year-old boy riding his bicycle. The impact of the car threw him 20 feet. He died on impact. His father taught him to ride without training wheels. Now how do you tell that boys father that texting your buddy was worth his sons life? Texting and driving is against the law. Put down the phone while you drive. Your future and the future of that little boy are not worth it. Dont wreck it. Voice over(softer voice): This message is brought to you by BYU/SA and the U.S. Department of Transportation. For more information on how you can make a difference visit byusa.byu.edu or distraction.gov

YouTube Video Script


, Don t T ext and Drive: T Your Friends! ell
Charles Abouo, Brandon Davies and Noah Hart , sock
Noah Hartsock: GOODBYE HONEY, THE GUYS ARE HERE TO TAKE ME TO PRACTICE He gets into the car with Brandon Davies and Charles Abouo Noah Hartsock: Charles Abouo and Brandon Davies: Noah Hartsock: WHATS GOIN ON GUYS? YOU READY FOR PRACTICE? YEAH MAN. WHATS UP WITH YOU? NOT MUCH

Charles Abouo starts driving away Noah Hartsock and Brandon Davies: Brandon Davies: Charles Abouo: WHOA! WHAT ARE YOU DOING?! YO CHUCK! DUDE! STOP TEXTING AND PAY ATTENTION TO THE ROAD. YOURE RIGHT. MY BAD, MAN.

They arrive at the Marriott center and a voice over from Coach Rose begins. SFX: sounds of basketballs bouncing and shoes squeaking on the floor Coach Rose: MAKE IT TO THE GAME SAFE. TELL YOUR FRIENDS TO DRIVE SMART. DONT TEXT AND DRIVE.

Email to Professors
Wilkinson Center 3400 byusa@byu.edu (801) 422-3901 December 1, 2011 Faculty and Staff of BYU: Salt Lake City has recently been named the 6th most dangerous city in which to drive according to the National Highway Safety Administration. This statistic disturbs us because our university is located near Salt Lake City. Many students and faculty members are frequent drivers on roads such as I-15 and I-80, and they are direct contributors to this alarming trend. As the BYU Service Association we find it is our responsibility to protect our university community. To do this we hope to encourage students and faculty to develop safe driving and riding habits they will keep for life. In order to do this we need your help. The holiday season is one that experiences high levels of traffic in and out of state. During this particular time of high travel and inclement weather, our students are more at risk. We want all students to travel with caution and arrive safely to their destinations and return ready to learn. In order for this to happen, we urge you to talk with students the week prior to holiday breaks about the importance of safe riding and driving. As faculty and staff you have a special relationship with BYU students. Your influence can impact their lives more than you know. Please share any personal stories you have with students about unsafe driving or other short, informative presentations that will illustrate the severity of the situation. We are asking our students to sign a safe driving pledge proving their commitment to change. We encourage you to do the same and set the example for students. For more information regarding this campaign, you can visit our website, byusa.byu.edu/safedriving. Thanks for your participation. Happy holidays. May they be safe. To sign the pledge and to get more information about the effects of unsafe driving please visit our website www.byusa.byu.edu/safedriving. Respectfully, Brigham Young University Service Association

Student Pledge

Dear Brothers and Sisters, I love you and I am concerned with your well being. You are some of the brightest young people around. How I enjoy learning of your wonderful achievements. You are future missionaries, church leaders, fathers, mothers, and community leaders. It has been brought to my attention that texting and driving has become a terrible habit among people in your peer group. Research has found that roughly 16% of all fatal accidents come from distracted driving. I understand the social pressures of making friends and the desire to instantly communicate, but I urge you to stop. It is too dangerous to text and drive. It draws your attention away from the road. Will you commit to change? Will you evaluate yourself and change your habits to be in line with safe driving practices? Passengers, will you encourage your friend driving to do so safely? Please pledge to never text and drive. Love, *insert signature of Thomas S. Monson

Evaluation
Due to the fact that the objectives of this campaign are measureable and time-bound, the evaluation portion should follow sequentially and logically. Below are listed the criteria and tools that will be used to evaluate the success of this campaign. Criteria: Raise the understanding among the BYU community to 70 percent of what exactly constitutes safe-driving habits. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned information to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months. Criteria: Decrease the percentage of accidents involving BYU students related to distracted driving to less than 10 percent. Tool: Information provided by UDOT and compared against years prior to campaign. Criteria: Decrease the number of students who profess to drive while operating a cell phone from 59 percent to 30 percent. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned data to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months. Criteria: Decrease the number of students who profess to speed to 30 percent. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned data to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months. Criteria: Increase from 68 percent to 80 percent the number of students, both passengers and drivers, who wear seat-belts. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned data to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months. Criteria: Increase driver preparedness for inclement weather situations so that 80 percent of students who own cars have in their possession the proper equipment and knowledge necessary to face emergencies in adverse weather conditions by October 2012. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned data to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months. Criteria: Zero fatal accidents in one year. Tool: Information provided by UDOT concerning accidents involving members of the BYU Community. Criteria: Increase awareness and understanding of what constitutes good riding behavior such that the reports of adolescents who have asked a speeding driver to slow down increases from 42 percent to 60 percent. Tool: Replication of survey that found the aforementioned data to be done at the end of the campaign and again in six months.