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The History of

The Craycroft Family

from 1297 to 1946

or

A Genealogist’s Nightmare

Researched and
Retranscribed by

Robert L. Craycroft

© December, 2003
©December, 2005
Robert L. Craycroft

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I wish that I could acknowledge the authors of this record, but all I can be sure of is John
Henry Craycroft. But more importantly I would like to thank Geoffrey Durward Clayton
Craycroft for allowing me to take the original document back to Chicago to be copied.
Without him my branch of the Craycroft family would never have seen the record.

I would also like to thank Dan Craycraft and Holly Pace for jogging a 35-year-old
memory that led me to the location of the Great Craycroft Book, as this record is
frequently referred to. I also thank Holly Pace and Dianne Hume for proofreading my
work on this new transcription of the History of The Craycroft Family.

Thanks are also due to Denise Miller and Nancy Stull for taking time from their busy
lives to do research in Virginia and Rhode Island respectively.

I also extend my thanks to the group known as the Craycraft/Craycroft Group for their
support and assistance in compiling information regarding our common heritage. I have
probably learned more about my family in the last two years than I have learned in the
last 20 years.

Lastly, I wish to thank Peter Burr Craycroft and his brother John Shaver Craycroft for
their contribution. Peter and John contacted me in August, 2005, with the last piece of the
puzzle. They were in possession of letters written by Franke and William Wert Craycroft,
children of John Wesley and Mary Alice Valpey Craycroft, and John Henry Craycroft,
son of Benjamin and Elizabeth Ann Breese Craycroft, and the author of the 1946 version
of this history. These letters refute many statements made by John Henry in this history
as I will point out as they appear. I doubt very much that the original author of the early
part of this history will ever be known. That identity is almost certainly lost in the mists
of time. But through these letters I am at least able to present a more accurate depiction of
the facts of our family. The letters, in their original form, can be seen in Appendix A.

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FOREWORD

I first became interested in genealogy about the time I was sixteen years old. I am now
(December, 2005) fifty-seven years old. So, off and on, for 41 years I have been
searching out my ancestors. It never has been just a search for them however. I have
also tried to understand them as people and as participants in history, in England, Ireland,
and across the United States.

The first copy of a family history that I saw was given to me by two of my father’s aunts
at my wedding to my first wife, Emily Ruth Bruington (June 10, 1972). In the narration
on the first page, written by John Henry Craycroft on January 1, 1942, there was mention
made of The Craycroft Family Record. This was supposed to be a continuous record of
the Craycroft Family, beginning with the marriage of James Cray and Susan Croft in
1297 A.D. These people were said to have combined their names to create the new
family name, Craycroft. I had reason to think that there was a comprehensive Family
History in existence somewhere, but I never really gave much thought to locating it until
December 1999.

At that time I joined a group of amateur genealogists who had one thing in common.
They were members of the Craycroft/Craycraft family who were working together to
further their research and share the results of their efforts. One night I was chatting
online with Dan Craycraft, of Rocky River, Ohio, and Holly Pace, of Parowan, Utah, and
we started to talk about what they referred to as The Great Craycroft Book. As we talked
I remembered the history I had obtained 27 years earlier and told them that perhaps this
Family History was the fabled Great Book. We agreed that this could be the missing
Book for which they had been searching for many years. I told them that I had an idea
where the Book was and that I would try to locate and contact the people who I thought
had the Book.

I searched on the Internet for any Craycrofts in the area of Vandalia, Illinois, which is
where I thought the Book had last been reported. I got lucky on the second phone call
and reached Geoffrey Durward Craycroft. During our conversation, Geoff told me that
he in fact did have The Craycroft Family History, which was transcribed by John Henry
Craycroft (my 2nd cousin three times removed) from the previous “edition” which had
been transcribed and typewritten in about 1883.

At the end of January 2000, I traveled to Vandalia, Illinois, and spent three days with
Geoff and his family, talking about The Book and the family and comparing notes.
When I left, Geoff was kind enough to loan The Book to me so that I could make copies.
I have a copy of The Book and I have distributed about a dozen copies to other family
members ranging from North Carolina to Hawaii.

My goal now is to present the full record as it was written. I am reasonably certain that
the portion of the document up to about 1800 is a fiction. I have primary and secondary
evidence confirming the existence of Benjamin Joseph Craycroft. He was born July 10,
1780. But I’ve disproved most or all of the events prior to that time. I am now certain that

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John Henry Craycroft was the writer of at least a large portion. There are comments made
that indicate the writer was familiar with the events around 1780 but has no direct
knowledge of that time. It is obvious that some of the information that John Henry relates
regarding people who he knew personally was drawn from his own mistaken memory
instead of from public records. Some of the dates he attributes to certain people are
inaccurate.

In new appendices at the end of this book I have included scans of letters written by
people directly involved in some of these events which prove conclusively that John
Henry Craycroft created many parts of this history from his own imagination or faulty
memory. The portions dealing with the supposed marriage of James Cray and Susan
Croft were undoubtedly included by John Henry as they were related to him or learned by
him from an unknown source. The large portion of events related by him from that time
to about 1800 are also fabricated. From the great detail and apparent knowledge of
general American history it seems to me that John Henry was possibly repeating
something that had been passed to him.

I’ve seen three transcripts of parts of this history. There are probably more in circulation.
So I feel it is important that I present the full record along with the evidence refuting this
fiction so that future generations will know the truth.

This will be a complete transcription of the document prepared by John Henry Craycroft.
But in addition to this I will also include documents that I have gathered that will either
confirm or dispute statements made in the History, and my own comments regarding the
statements made in the History. Any comments that I make will be presented as
footnotes except where the comments are too extensive. Then I will present these
comments in italics to set them apart. I will transcribe the document exactly as it appears
with the exception of the Solemnization (or transcript) of Matrimony between James
Cray and Susan Croft and of capitalization. The reason for this is to make it easier to
read. All dialectic spellings and misspellings will be recreated to present this
transcription as accurately as possible. I will include all maps and diagrams that are
included in the copy in my possession.

Following the text in a major portion of the Book is extremely difficult. The “voice” of
the text changes without warning and with no indication of who is making the comments.
This change even happens in the middle of a paragraph. The narrative changes from third
person to first person and back again in the same paragraph. I think that the person(s)
that wrote this history got so caught up in the writing they forgot “where they were”
chronologically.

One thing that I find telling is that the portion of the record dealing with the English
progenitors refers to the name as “Craycroft” when from the first appearance of the
family name in the early 1100’s to the current time the family name in England is
Cracroft.

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The family crest shown above the Explanation is very similar to the one that was in John
Henry’s book, but I was not able to duplicate it so I have used one that I had. The only
difference is that my crest shows the name spelled “Cracroft”, the common spelling in
England, instead of “Craycroft”. It should be remembered that according to the heraldic
tradition only the eldest child has right to the coat of arms, not the family as a whole.

This record is an example of one of the things that professional genealogists warn about.
After so many years and retellings it is all but impossible to tell why the writer(s) have
decided to embellish or fictionalize the family history. I can only guess that one possible
explanation is that they wanted to make themselves and their family more interesting or
intriguing than they considered it to be.

It is a shame because after digging around in history for four decades I’ve uncovered
some rather interesting facts and theories about the Craycroft Family. But let the History
of the Craycroft Family be a lesson for all family researchers or genealogists. There
really is no need to fabricate a family history. In the end, as the old adage says, truth is
stranger than fiction.

I wish that I could be more supportive of what follows but I have to be faithful to history.
I present the History in its “original” form along with my conclusions and research to set
the record straight. A large portion of what is recorded for the period after 1780 appears
to be accurate as far as I’ve been able to determine at this point.

Also, at the end of the book I have inserted a descendant chart beginning with Benjamin
Joseph Craycroft showing all his descendants up to this time.

Robert Lynn Craycroft


Arlington Heights, Illinois
December 1, 2005

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EXPLANATION
The heavy green lines on the map on the other side of this sheet are the routes taken by
the several original Craycrofts who were the first Craycrofts as shown in this family
record.

This by no means represents all the Craycrofts but only shows those who are the ones
who were the ones who had or stood in line to have possession of this record.

It shows where they landed in the United States and their gradual trip to the west until
they reached the Mexican border and into that Republic. Then to the West coast of the
United States where they have remained since 1863.

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The territory in and around Maryland and Delaware was very popular with the
Craycrofts. Several of the families traveled in and around Baltimore and what is now the
City of Washington, D.C.

They lived mostly in covered wagons with teams of oxen. The Indians were very
friendly and very few Indian raids were made. But the heavy taxes imposed by the local
English Officials put such a heavy burden on the permanent residents that many moved
from place to place to avoid establishing permanent homes thus becoming liable for the
taxes.1

The map shows much of the territory traveled by the Craycrofts. Later some of them
become permanent residents and some became very wealthy. The public records in both
states have been searched to trace titles to the lands formerly owned by the family, but as
all were perfectly legal there was no legal opportunity to make any claim to any of the
lands by those who thought they had been cheated out of the lands by land sharks. These
records were examined as late as 1882 with the above result that is they could establish
no legal claim to any of the lands.

1
This is highly improbable in the case of the early Craycrofts since the first Craycroft families are known
to own considerable land holdings in Maryland as proven by land records in the Maryland State Archives.
In the 1990’s the State of Maryland conducted an archeological dig on the plantation of Ignatius Craycroft,
son of John and Anne Craycroft. John was known to have owned a home he called Hackthorn Heath,
commemorating the Cracroft home in Lincolnshire, Hackthorn Hall.

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INTRODUCTION
BY
J.H. CRAYCROFT
By careful investigation and on expert advise from different authorities on paper decay, I
have come to the conclusion that the paper and ink in the family record of the Craycroft
Family must be renewed. The paper and inks have become badly decayed, faded, torn,
and worn by use and as time goes on they will continue to fade, and shortly it will be an
impossibility to renew them as was the case many times before especially in the year of
1882, when much difficulty was encountered.

Therefore, I, John Henry Craycroft, the seventh child of Benjamin Craycroft, and
Elizabeth Ann Breese Craycroft, who were married in Salem Illinois, January 3rd, 1861,
hereby state, I am the only remaining living descendant of the above marriage, and I am
the rightful owner of the record, and I feel it is my duty to do all I can to preserve the
record, and as I find the records in such a badly decomposed, and badly faded condition, I
deem it is absolutely necessary to renew the whole record for the safe preservation at this
time by personally typewriting it on new paper furnishing new maps as near like those
now in the record, which some are very badly faded and very shortly will be
decomposed so badly that it would be impossible to renew them, thereby becoming
absolutely worthless as a record.

I am at this time also furnishing at my own expense an iron-clad-binder, with key


attached, so that the pages of the record may be kep(t) in book-form, and protected from
decay, which has never before been done. This binder is guaranteed to last indefinitely
and should with ordinary use last many generations or perhaps more than one-hundred-
years, before renewal will be necessary again.2

The last time it was renewed was in the year of 1882 in Illinois and if the records had
been kept in the form that I am now starting and placing them in I firmly believe they
would not now have to be renewed.

Some of the records are hand-written, and the ink is so badly faded that I have decided it
would be by far most lasting to typewrite the whole record. Also in the past the records
have been kept in a small paper box, and as the pages were not numbered I found it quite
a task to get them straightened out into consecutive order, as they were loosely laid into
the box and become mixed when used. But after much time I have been able to get them
into order, which I assure you I have consciously done to the best of my ability.

Most of the records from (1840 my fathers birth year) I have verified and traced by both
family records and various State and County Records, besides many are from my own
personal memory and knowledge. Many English words which were spelled different

2
John Henry was right. When I saw the binder it was in very good condition after 57 years, as was the
heavy paper stock he used.

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than we now spell them, I have purposely spelled them as they are spelled today.3 For
instance (you was spelled ye) (king-kyng) (day—dae) (honorably—honourably) (either—
eyether) and many others. It will also be noticed that the last time in 1882 when this
record was renewed, almost all English phrases and words were changed to the up-to-
date-type, with few exceptions, and most of those exceptions are purposely being
changed today. In some cases the change was made because our typewriters does not
have some of the correct letters or characters to spell the words as they were spelled in
the Old English Language used in 1297 and for many years thereafter.

This family record of Craycroft Family was personally typewritten by me.

January 1st A.D. 1942 The seventh child of Benjamin Craycroft,


at Richmond California and Elizabeth Ann Breese Craycroft. I am
seventy years of age at this time, and the last
survivor of the above named parents

3
I wish that John Henry had left the spelling as it was originally as it would have helped to confirm the
authenticity of some of the passages.

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COURT OF LONDON
June 2nd, 1297 A.D.

PUBLIC NOTICE No. 15794


*******************

NOTICE TO THE MAYORS SECRETARY, SHERIFF, AND ALL OTHERS.

Notify the General Public that this Court will hold a Special Session on the 6th day of
June 1297 A.D. at which time James Cray, and Susan Croft, will be given a hearing on
their application to the matter of adopting and combining and joining the two family
names of Cray and Croft together and forming an entirely new family and estate name to
be known as Craycroft.

The hearing shall take place in this Court at the hour of 10.00 in the morning of the above
named day. The application seeks permission to use this new name on and after the
marriage of James Cray and Susan Croft which is to take place in the Church of England5
under the direction of the Priest Father John Daly on June 10th, 1297 A.D.

Notice is hereby given that any and all who may have any objection to these parties
combinding, adopting, and joining these two old family names into one new family and
estate names together, and having the exclusive right to use that name forever shall at that
time appear and given evidence and reason for their objection. If none appear judgment
shall and will be given to the above named persons.

PETER YORK LORD MAYOR BRUNSWICK6


Secretary

4
According to a letter from the Corporation of London (page 18), it is highly unlikely that Public Notices
were issued in 1297.
5
According to the World Book Encyclopedia, the Christians in England were followers of Catholicism.
There was not a Church of England until Henry VIII in 1534.
6
According to a letter from the Public Records office of the City of London (page 17) Sir John Breton or
Briton was the Lord Mayor of London in 1297.

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COURT OF LONDON7
June 6th, 1297 A.D.
Statement of facts—court convened at 10.00 o’clock this morning. After seven witnesses
were examined amoung which were William Cray and June Cray husband and wife,
Father and Mother of James Cray the pertitioner, and John Croft, and Mary Croft,
husband and wife, Father and Mother of Susan Croft, who each and every one testified
that they freely give their full consent to the combinding, adopting, and joining the two
family names together into one family and estate name of Craycroft8, and there being no
other witnesses to appear, and no objections were offered it is hereby ordered by this
Court of London that beginning at the completion of the wedding of James Cray and
Susan Croft they shall forever be and are to be known as James and Susan Craycroft, and
shall be known by that name only and their combinded estate shall be known only by that
name, and that their children shall be born and bear that name.

ENTER THE ORDER ON THE RECORDS OF THIS COURT ON THIS DATE JUNE
6TH, 1297 A.D.

PETER YORK LORD MAYOR BRUNSWICK


SECRETARY

PALACE OF KING EDWARD I


LONDON, ENGLAND
The King has had the above court Order read to him on this 7th day of June 1297 A.D. in
his chambers and herewith gives his approval and sets aside the following property for
the estate of this newly wedded couples estate. 10 Full-blooded French Cows. 5 Full-
blooded male horses. 1 Full-blooded Stallion (French) 1 Full-blooded Bull French. 20
Female goats with 2 Billies. The tax on all of the above property shall be free for five
years starting on June 11th, 1297. All of the property shall be of joint ownership by both
parties James and Susan Craycroft, and shall be added to their joint estate

SAMUEL SCOTT KING EDWARD 1 (The First)


Secretary to the King9

7
According to the Corporation of London (letter, page 18) there has never been a “Court of London”.
8
Here is the first major error in this “history”. The family name in England has always been “Cracroft”
since its first appearance with Walter de Cracroft in the late 1100’s.
9
Again, according to the Corporation of London, in 1297 there was no office known as “Secretary to the
King”.

18
In the spring of 1973 I
wrote to the Public
Records Office of the
City of London, England
in the hope of finding
verification of the Public
Notice, the Court Order
and the Proclamation of
King Edward I.

In response I received
these two letters, one
from the Public Record
Office and the second
from Corporation of
London Records Office.

Both letters irrevocably


refute these documents.
The men named in the
Family History did not
hold the offices
attributed to them.

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This letter from the
Records Office goes on
to point out that there
was never a “Court of
London” and that
Public Notices were not
issued in the time
period.

But the last paragraph


states that according to
P.H. Reaney’s
Dictionary of British
Surnames there is no
entry for the name
Craycroft. This is a
contradiction unless the
writer is only referring
strictly to the spelling
“Craycroft” and
disregarding the
spelling “Cracroft” or
“de Cracroft” as it was
used in the 13th century.

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1296 A.D. (MCCXCVI)

SOLEMNIZATION OF MATRIMONIE
OF
JAMES CRAY, AGE TWENTY-THREE YEARS
AND
SUSAN CROFT, AGE TWENTY-TWO YEARS
JUNE TENTH 1297A.D.
Dearly beloved friends, we are gathered together here in the sight of God, and in the face
of his congregation and relatives, to join together this man and this woman in Holy
Matrimony, which is an honorable estate instituted of God in paradise, in the time of
man’s innocence, signifying unto us the mystical union that is betwixt chaste and His
church; which holy estate, Christ adorned and beautified with his presence, and first
miracle that he wrought in Canaan of Galilee, and is commended of Saint Paul to be
honorable among all men; and therefore is not be enterprised, nor taken in hand
unadvisedly, lightly, or wantonly to satisfy men’s carnal lusts and appetites, like brute
beasts that have no understanding but reverently, discretely, advisedly, soberly, and in the
fear of God.

Duly considering the cause for which matrimony was ordained, one cause and the most
important was and is the procreation of children, to be brought up in the fear and nurture
of the Lord, and praise of God.

Secondly, it was ordained for a remedy against sin, and to avoid fornication, that such
persons as be married, might live chaste in matrimony, and keep themselves undefiled
members of Christ’ body.

Thirdly, for the mutual help and comfort that the one ought to have the other, both in
prosperity and adversity. Into which holy estate these two persons present; come now to
be joined.

Therefore if any men can show any just cause why they may not lawfully be joined, let
him now speak or else hereafter forever hold his peace.

I now require and charge you (as you will answer at the dreadful day of judgment, when
the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed) that either of you do know any impediments,
why ye may not be lawfully joined together in matrimony that ye confess it now. For be
ye assured that so many as be coupled together otherwise than God’s word doth allow are
not joined of God, neither is their matrimony lawful.

Concentrate your minds on what I say to you and answer my words honestly. Wilt thou,
James Cray take and have this woman to thy wedded wife, to live together after God’s
ordinance in the Holy Estate of matrimony?

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Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honor, and keep her in sickness and health? And
forsaking all others, keep thee only to her, so long as ye both shall live? Ye shall from
now on be known as James Craycroft a family name ye have legally adopted by the
consent of the court and of our King? What is your answer?

I will, and I accept my adopted name and my entire estate shall be known by the name of
Craycroft forever, to this I solemnly agree and solemnize at this moment.

Susan Croft, wilt thou have this man and take him to thy wedded husband, to live
together after God’s ordinance in the Holy Estate of matrimony? Wilt thou obey him,
and serve him, love honor and keep him in sickness and in health? And forsaking all
others and keep thee only to him so long as ye both shall live? Ye shall from now on be
known as Susan Craycroft a family name ye and your husband have legally adopted by
the consent of the Court and of our King? What is your answer?

I will, and I wholeheartedly accept my adopted name, and my entire estate shall be joined
to that of my husband and become his estate and that my name shall be Susan Craycroft
forever, to this I solemnly agree and solemnize at this moment.

I, Father Daley, now demand and ask, who grivet this woman to be married to this man?

I, John Croft, give her to be married. I am her father, and my wife, Susan’s mother, also
give her consent. We also give our consent to them to adopt and retain forever the
combined name of Craycroft as their family and estate name.

In view of there being no objections from anyone, I, Father Daley, a priest of this
congregation now proceed with the marriage.

I command ye both to join your right hands together, and James Cray (old name) or
James Craycroft (new name) repeat these solemn words after me. I, James Craycroft,
take this woman Susan Croft, now Susan Craycroft to be my wedded wife, to have and
hold from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in health, to
love and cherish, till death do us depart, according to God’s holy ordinance, and thereto I
plight thee my troth. Also I now create and establish and adopt as our own a new and
sacred family name, by joining my family name of Cray to that of my wife of Croft using
the two names as one and shall be spelled Craycroft as allowed and permitted by special
permission of the Court and of our King, Edward I.

My family name being Cray I now adopt your family name of Croft as part of mine, and
give to you my wife my family name of Cray and here and now accept your family name
of Croft, and ours and that of our children’s name shall be forever Craycroft also all of
our descendants shall bear that name forever.

I, Father John Daley now ask you Susan Croft Craycroft to repeat these words and
answer my questions.

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I Susan Croft Craycroft now take my husband’s name and of my own free will give him
my family name of Croft and agree that we shall be hereafter known as Craycroft. I now
take James Craycroft to be my wedded husband, to have and hold from this day forward,
for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness or in health, to love, cherish
and to obey, and to serve to the best of my strength and ability, till death do us depart,
according to God’s holy ordinance, and thereto I gave thee my troth. Also I now repeat, I
give you my family name of Croft so that we may create our new family name, as
allowed by the Court and of our King, Edward I.

I, John Daly, with this ring I ask both of you to repeat after me, as I place it on your
wife’s finger.

I, James Craycroft. I, Susan Craycroft, with this ring I thee wed, this gold and this silver
and our two families names interchanged and combined as Craycroft I thee give and with
all my body and soul thee I worship, and with all my worldly goods I thee endow. In the
name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, Amen. I now place the sacred
ring on the fourth finger of your wife’s right hand, thus binding together forever you as
man and wife.

Father John Daley says Let Us Pray.

O, eternal God, creator and preserver of all mankind, giver of all spiritual grace, the
author of everlasting life, send thy blessings upon these servants, this man and this
woman, whom we bless in thy name, that they may live faithfully together. So these
persons may surely and faithfully perform and kept the vows and covenant betwixt them
made on this June 10th, 1296 A.D. whereof this ring given, and received, is token and a
lifetime pledge. And may ever remain in perfect love and peace together for their entire
life, and live according to the laws, through Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen.

I, Father John Daly, command you both to join your right hands together again. I now
announce to the world and al those that are in it, thou whom God hath joined together, let
no man put asunder, punishment awaits those who violate this command.

Now, you my beloved have taken a solemn oath and pledge to become and are now man
and wife, and by this pledge, and by joining hands have assumed that honorable
responsibility. I therefore now and forever pronounce you man and wife and your family
name and estate Craycroft. In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy
Ghost. Amen.

I, Father John Daley, now bless both of you, and if you live correctly God will bless you
and keep you, God the Holy Ghost lights your undertakings and maketh it a success. The
favor look upon you and so fill you with spiritual benediction and grace that you may
have remission of your sins in this life, and in the heavenly world to come, and life
everlasting. Amen.

The witnesses will now march to the aisle near the altar and sing ye register as witnesses.

23
(Note: there were more than 300 witnesses to the wedding but some could not be made
out in making this copy).

These are some of the names of people acting as lawful witnesses of the wedding of
James Craycroft and Susan Craycroft, June 10th, 1297 A.D.:

John Croft, Mary Croft, father and mother of the new wife, William Cray and June Cray,
father and mother of the new husband, William Abbott, Ruth Abbott, Jule Morris, Jane
Conley, Mary Frye.10

At this time the War between the Catholics and those of Protestant11 Beliefs was exacting
untold deaths. Protestants had to be very careful to whom they talked and never dared to
express any sympathies for the Protestants under penalties of death, if not legally, they
were liable to be assassinated by those unknown.

This map was replaced in 1803 the first time because it was so badly decayed that it was
almost impossible to distinguish places. It was again replaced in 1882 when the record
was first typewritten. Now it is being replaced by the above (shown on next page) map
which is as near like the one shown before, but this one shows the different locations
much better than the old one although this one is as near like the old one as it was
possible to obtain from a Chicago map maker. This map was placed in the record
January 1st, 1942, by J.H. Craycroft, Richmond, California, who is also providing an iron-
bound binder locked with a key and will be a much better protector than has been
provided in the past centuries.

10
This passage strikes me as unusual. I find it difficult to accept that someone recorded the marriage vows
verbatim, or that there would be so many references to Father Daley. What makes it more conspicuous is
that the text of this passage in the typescript written by John Henry Craycroft was in what was represented
to be the original dialect, despite John Henry’s statement that he corrected the original spelling to reflect
“modern” spelling.
11
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word Protestant was first given to those who dissented
from the decision of the Diet of Spires in 1529, in Germany. There wasn’t any sort of “organized” dissent
from the Catholic Church until the mid-1300’s. Later passages in the history state or intimate that James
Cray Craycroft was a Protestant, but this was impossible.

24
25
At this point in the Book there apparently was a map of the world that did not survive the
ages, and John Henry did not attempt to replace it. But he did include the note that
followed the map in the book.

This is a map just like one in the record, but the old one is so badly soiled, torn, and faded
out so that it can hardly be read any longer. This notation is handwritten on the old one.

This map shows the Old World and the New World, and the City of London, England
where the Craycroft Family originated12 in the year of 1297 .A.D. There are many
Craycrofts in London, England up to this day.

12
Actually the family originated in what was known in the 900’s as Mercia, modern Lincolnshire.

26
FAMILY RECORD OF THE OLD

FAMILY OF CRAYCROFT FROM ITS ORIGINAL

ORIGIN AND CREATION IN THE

YEAR OF A.D. 1297


Recorded continuously from its origin and adoption in the year of
A.D. 1297 in London, England.
Recorded from family records, and from official
Government and Catholic and Protestant church records in
England, Scotland, Ireland, Germany, France, Spain, and in the
United States Of America.

These records have been kept and handed down from father to son for over
Seven hundred and forty years
In an unbroken chain.

Preface and Instructions to the actual


Descendants by birthright and holding the family name of
Craycroft
This record and history of the family of Craycroft dates from its legal and lawful
adoption by special court action and permission of our King, Edward the First, King of
England, son of King Henry III in the year of A.D. 1297 and recorded in the records of
the Church of England and the community records of that year.

Some of the original records have in many instances had to be renewed as early as the
year of 1350 A.D. by making new copies, all being as near like the originals as was
possible. This was made necessary by the fading of inks, rotting paper, and other causes.
It appears that they have had to be renewed about every 70 to 100 years. Therefore, at
this late date there is no original record left. But each of the renewals claim they were
duplicated as near like the originals as was possible.

Almost the entire record had to be totally renewed in the year of 1882 for many of the old
records, maps and original hand drawings were falling to pieces from old age, and in
order to save the original subject matter therein contained this action was taken after a
family consultation was had, at the home of Thomas B. Craycroft, in Salem, Illinois, and
all agree that all matters should be preserved at all cost.

Therefore, on December 21st, 1882, the records were renewed as above stated, and were
for the first time typewritten. All of the records before that time were handwritten, but
were very badly faded. In some instances the inks that had been used had become very
dim and could hardly be made out, and made it necessary to use acids to help bring them

27
out sufficiently in color and brightness so that they could be read and properly copied.
There only were a very few words that could not be made out, but by carefully reading
the missing words could and were added and made complete. But every word that could
be made out was copied accurately. All dates and births, deaths were brought out and
properly copied.13

Up to and before the year of 1882 all records had apparently been handed down from
father to son, but at this time a family reunion was held and it was decided that as John
Wesley Craycroft was a Minister of the Gospel, and as he was the second son of four
brothers, he would be the proper one of the family to have possession, to keep and hold
the Great Family Record. He was given possession of the records and he took them to his
home in Warm Springs, California, where it remained until his death in Modesto,
California, some fifty years afterward. His father died while he was only a very young
boy in Missouri and his mother had preserved the records up to 1882 when at the family
reunion he had full possession of them for over fifty years. It seems he “stored” them
with some relative of his wife’s name Valpy or Valpie, this he claimed was necessary on
account of the objection of his wife, who was never very friendly with any of his
relatives. At his death he left a paper or letter to John Henry Craycroft, the son of his
older brother Benjamin Craycroft, who was named after John W. Craycroft, then living at
Richmond, California, telling him, John Henry Craycroft, where he could get the records.

John Henry Craycroft followed his directions and found the records in very poor shape.
They were in a paper box, were all moldy from age and many were faded out badly, but
by expert advice they were all put together and were renewed and put into their present
shape for future generations. It might be stated here that the records were in such a
mixed up shape it was almost impossible to get them into shape so that they were in
rotation. But with much hard work and a lot of patience covering a period of several
months success was at last obtained, and now the records will continue to be kept, but in
a much better manner.

I must state here that the preceding two paragraphs are in direct contradiction to a passage that
comes nearly at the end of the record. In that passage John Henry states that he had completely
forgotten about the family history. He did not know where it was until a passenger on a Santa Fe
passenger train, on which he was working as conductor, talked with him about his name and
later revealed that he, the passenger, was a relative of Mrs. John Wesley Craycroft (Alice
Valpey). The man then told John Henry that he had the family history and wanted him to have it.

As is stated by Franke Craycroft in notes she made on May 21, 1946, John Henry gave three
different accounts of how he came into possession of the family history. He first told Franke that
her father had left him a note or letter describing where he could find the family records. Then in
February, 1946, he told Franke and their cousin Blanche Bayly Smith that he was given the
records by a Valpey man he met on the train.

Then in early 1946, according to Franke’s notes, John Henry told another cousin, Mae Craycroft,
that Franke’s brother William Wert Craycroft had given him the records. Will later wrote Franke

13
It is interesting to note here that John Henry Craycroft was one of the last people to actually see the last
alleged handwritten copy of the family history in 1883.

28
denying that he had given John Henry any records. In fact, from the tone of Will’s letter there
were strained relations between Franke and Will, and John Henry, as is evidence from later
comments John Henry makes.

As stated above, at the time of the family reunion in Salem, Illinois14, the records were all
handwritten and were quite bulky, and there were nearly 300 pages of closely written
matter15. But also as stated above after being typewritten when renewed much space was
saved, although no matter was left out. These copies were written on a very good quality
of paper with a special typewriter ink, which was guaranteed to last almost indefinitely,
but 54 years afterward, in 1936, it was found that some of these copies were also losing
their color and many were so badly faded that they could scarcely be read, therefore at
the earnest request and at the expense of John Henry Craycroft new copies have been
made, and as the whole record has been put into book form with a metal bound cover no
doubt it will last for at least a century. This copy is being made by and under the strict
supervision of him, and he is taking much personal interest that the descendants can rest
assured that everything will be finished in strictly first-class shape. He being the legal
and direct descendant and is the legal and rightful owner of the record he will spare no
expense to make it a real family record.

The continuous system that has been followed form the beginning in the year of 1297
A.D. is to hand down the records from father to son upon the death of the father. This
method will continue from him for he has four sons and one of them will carry on. He
also has now three grandsons who stand in a direct line to carry on. The records show in
many places where it was handed down to the oldest son, and after a few years this son
died leaving no son for it to go to, therefore the record rightfully must and did go to
another brother who had a son who carried on. This method should be faithfully carried
on in the future. In the past this system has been carried on faithfully, which was and is
the will and plan of the originator, James Cray Craycroft the First, and his faithful wife
Susan Croft Craycroft, the First, from 1297 A.D.

It was hoped by all the descendants heretofore that all future descendants would carry out
the original plan and it is now hoped by the present generation that the future descendants
will continue to carry out the plan and faithfully comply with the will and command of
our ancestors father and mother, who intended that this record should be carried on to the
end of civilization or to the end of the world, for the perpetuation of the family name he
gave to our family so many years ago. For many reasons herein explained the record
does not show all of the records of marriages, births16. History dates back and starts in
the year of 1297 A.D. in London, England, for it was there, as the records show, that
James Cray with his sweetheart Sarah Croft17 talked it over and decided it would be a
wonderful thing to start an entirely new family name and estate to combine their family

14
According to the minutes of the meeting held at this reunion the meeting was actually held in the home of
Benjamin Richard Craycroft in Vandalia, Illinois
15
It is peculiar that records supposed to date from 1297 to 1883, a period of almost 600 years would only
take up 300 handwritten pages.
16
I dearly wish that the reasons really were presented. There are many holes in the record of births, deaths
and marriages.
17
Is her name Susan or Sarah?

29
names together and make it one name only, and to secure the consent of the Court and of
the King to help them. It was then decided they would be married and call their name
Craycroft, thus they originated and created the name as his own for his future family and
estate. The name was originated, created, and adopted on June 10th, 1297 A.D. by
combining their two names which were highly respected Anglo-Saxon, then Catholics in
religion but were discontented by some of the rulings and decisions of the Pope in Rome
and while the Protestant religion was unknown at that time there were many people who
resented these unjust decisions, and were about to rebel against their Pope but were afraid
under the present conditions.

This was accomplished upon the marriage of the two young members of the two
respective families, both of high standing and honor in their communities near London,
England. They had the full consent of both of their families, but to make it perfectly
legal they invoked the help of the Court and that of their King Edward I.

BIRTH OF THE FAMILY NAME


At the close of the marriage ceremony of James Cray and Susan Croft, and when they
were joined in Holy Matrimony under two distinct ceremonies, the family name of
Craycroft was born and has lived ever since. The first ceremony was under their old
family name of James Cray and Susan Croft. Then the second ceremony was performed
immediately afterward, was by their new and adopted family name of Craycroft which in
a combination of their old family names became a name which had never been used
before that time18, in which the Court and the King and all other government offices
sanctioned. By combining the two highly honored family names into one common name
under the true English Catholic faith, in Holy Matrimony, abiding by the laws of
England and its King Edward the First, they were married and forever since the name of
Craycroft has flourished in many different countries of the world.

DATE AND NAMES OF MARRIAGE RECORDED


James Cray aged 23 years, of London, England, and Susan Croft, of London, England,
aged 22 years were married on this Tenth day of June in the year 1297 A.D. at 12
O’clock Noon in the City of London, England, by the priest of the Church of England
John Doyle19, according to the laws of the Church and sanctioned by our beloved King
Edward ye First, and witnessed by nearly three hundred members of the family in the
community of London and nearby countryside. The family name of Craycroft now
becomes a living fact at this moment, and they own exclusive rights for its use forever
hereafter.

The original application and request for this special permit and this important marriage to
combine and merger of the two honored family names for a new family and estate name
to become the property of the two persons thereto, was properly signed and requested by
both parents of the principals, by many other witnesses therefore the permit was
18
Actually the name Cracroft, the English spelling, had been in use for almost 200 years by 1297.
19
The priest’s name was given as John Daley in the record of the marriage ceremony, given earlier

30
immediately granted, and immediately after the marriage ceremony it was recorded in the
Great Record and Register of the City of London. The marriage was conducted by the
Priest John Doyle, M.P. of the Catholic Parsonage20. Therefore on and after June 10th,
1297 A.D. the names of the two shall be and are Craycroft.

Therefore, be it known by all people that by the authority granted by this special permit
signed and sanctioned by his majesty King Edward ye First of England the marriage and
estate herein described becomes a fact at high noon on the 10th day of June, 1297 A.D.
and was in the chapel of the Church of England in London and the two persons are now
to be and are husband and wife, and their estates are combined and shall be known only
as Craycroft Estate forever hereafter, and may the blessings of the Lord, and of our King
and all other peoples be with you always, Amen.

20
Here again the record contradicts itself. In the record of the marriage ceremony the minister is named
Daley and he is a minister of the Church of England. This is also stated in the following paragraph.

31
ORIGIN OF THE FAMILY NAMES OF
CRAY AND THAT OF CROFT
In the year of 1323 A.D. I, James Craycroft, now having children of my own and may
have more, and wishing to establish a family, the birth of my parents. Then that of
myself and that of my wife, then that of our first child, and next will come the record of
our other children. When we the original Craycrofts have reached our span of life and
pass on the great hereafter, we both command and wish that our descendants will carry on
this family record indefinitely and to the end of time, no matter how many years that may
be. Therefore our descendants hark ye.

Harke ye, in the name of God, Amen, we, James Cray Craycroft, and Sarah Croft
Craycroft, Husband and Wife, ye first for both, ye creator of ye family and estate name of
Craycroft, ye first. Make this our last command and wish to be fulfilled after our passing
to the beyond. We command, and direct all of my, and our, descendants their
descendants, and their descendants forever, and all ye heirs and descendants to the end of
time forever, to the end of this world, to maintain, and keep this family record by ye
recording the births and deaths of all ye children, born in direct rotation in the name of
Craycroft, and at ye death ye must leave this family record to ye most direct son and
descendant, by him to maintain during his lifetime a correct record of his direct
descendants. Will ye do so?

We both command ye our heirs and descendants, their descendants, and their heirs, and
their descendants to keep up ye record forever by handing this record completely of all
the Craycrofts born under that great name, and to hand down the record from father to
son forever as we will do and we charge each and everyone of our descendants to see that
this record is faithfully kept as directed in an unbroken record forever. Thus preserving
our name in all its glory.

We, whose names are signed hereunder are loyal subjects of our King Edward ye Second,
son of King Edward ye First of England, by ye grace of God Amen, declare that this be
our last command and wish, and must be obeyed forever. He who disobeys this
command shall be in disgrace and will be found out by his descendants before his passing
to the great beyond.

Having undertaken to and have created ye family and estate name of Craycroft, I and we
hereby claim as our own, myself and wife and our descendants, as our exclusive property
and no person or persons has any rights to use it for any purpose whatever, except by
birth or marriage, to a direct male descendant of we two. This we do in the name of God,
and King Edward ye Second, and for ye glory of God Amen. Also for ye advancement of
ye Christian Faith, and our descendants and in honor for our departed King Edward ye
First who died in ye year of 1307 to our sorrow, and also declare in ye name our country
do by these declarations solemnly and mutually in ye presence of god, and twenty-three
witnesses did combine and create ye new family name and estate by combining my
family name of Cray to that of my beloved wife’s family name of Croft by our holy
marriage on ye 10th day of June in ye year of 1297 A.D. and we two unite and combined

32
ourselves together with our estates into one name and estate for our family forever,
Amen.

We sign this command in the presence of ye many witnesses this 4th day of May in ye
year of 1320 A.D. May all our ancestors take heed and willfully comply Amen21.

James Cray Craycroft ye first, by adoption


Sarah Croft Craycroft ye first, by adoption

We the many witnesses to the commands of our beloved friends James Cray Craycroft
and his beloved wife Sarah Croft Craycroft sign our different names as witnesses of our
own free will and accord.

John Winslow, Samuel Turner, Peter Warren, Gilbert Brown, George Murray, Frederick
Hogan, Charles Hay, James Overton, John Wilson, Thomas Arnold.

Recorded in London, England, in ye House of Records, May 11th, 1320 A.D. by Edward
Hamilton, Public Recorder for the District.22

The Craycroft Family Record and History,


As given and shown in the
Records of the Family
From the year of 1297 A.D.
The foundation and beginning of this old family record and the direct line of blood father
to son descendants. Copies may be made only for those who are by birth a Craycroft.
They may be male or female if they are born under the name of Craycroft and they are
the son or daughter of the holder of this record. But this original must positively remain
with the direct member of the male sex and carried on down the line of descendants for
all time to come with no exception.

In adding valuable material to the record, it must be understood that no variation or false
material can be entered at any time, and should be brief, and to the point, for to enter a lot
of useless material will in time make it very bulky, and would be of little value to
survivors23.

21
Note that the syntax of this paragraph is obviously false. The frequent use of the word “ye” in place
“the”, I think, is an effort to make the passage sound “medieval”. Ye was never used in this manner in
actual usage.
22
In this previous passage supposedly written by James Cray Craycroft the writer repeatedly refers to
James’ wife as Sarah. Is this a mistake or was her name given incorrectly earlier. Most of the records
regarding this family line have called her Susan, but here we are being told her name is Sarah. These
inconsistencies raise some doubt about this passage.
23
This paragraph is quite ironic considering that at least a major portion of the record transpiring before
1800 is pure fabrication. Additionally, most family historians would want to record as much as possible for
a complete record. This just reinforces my belief that this is a fiction. It just offers an excuse for the writer
to create less fiction.

33
The record very plainly shows that two brothers landed on our Eastern coast in 1641 and
their descendants up to this time have played a very prominent part in the building up of
this great nation from time to time. They have held many prominent positions, both civil
and politically, both in peace time and in war. However most of them seem to have been
quiet, home loving individuals, attending to their own affairs and not caring to meddle
with the affairs of other people’s business, troubles or desires. It will also be notice(d)
that there were many ministers of the Gospel, farmers, lawyers, doctors, carpenters, brick
masons, and other important positions in life, among the descendants. It will also be
noticed that there are many names the same in former ancestors. The names of William,
John, Thomas, Benjamin, Franklin, Henry and Richard are most prominent through the
record, even down to this late date. Especially are the names of Benjamin, John and
Franklin most prominent.

The maps and some of the pictures herein are some as near like the originals as is
possible to obtain. They are not placed herein as original for they are not. All of the
original maps and pictures were hand drawn and only small fragments of some of the
originals wee left at the time the record was for the first time renewed, long before the
records were ever brought to the United States of American in 1641 A.D.

We now appeal to you descendants to continue this record as has been in the long past,
and enable your and our descendants to carry on forever. From here on is given a true
and exact copy of the original will and command of our ancestors James Cray Craycroft
and Sarah Croft Craycroft, husband and wife, the originals and creators of the name and
estate of the Craycroft family in 1297 A.D.

UNDER THE REIGN OF OUR BELOVED KING EDWARD SECOND


IN THE YEAR OF 1320 A.D.

London, England, May 4th, 1320

KNOW YE BY THIS COMMAND, YE SHALL BE GOVERNED BY


YE COMMAND AND HEED THESE COMMANDS FOREVER

BEAR YE IN MIND OUR DESCENDANTS AND FOREVER


HEED THESE OUR LAST WISHES AND COMMANDS
That, This is my and my beloved wife’s last wish and commands, will, and wish.

FIRST, we, my wife and myself, originally created the family name of Craycroft, by
uniting both of our family names of Cray and that of Croft into one family name of
Craycroft, which before that had never been used by anyone. And by Court Order and
the Order of our King (Edward) 1st, became the owner of that name as our family and
estate name legally and lawfully, on June 10th, 1297 A.D.

34
SECOND, Our first child has born June 24th, 1298 A.D. just one year and 14 days after
our marriage on June 10th, 1297. He was named after his father James Cray Craycroft.
He is the first person to ever be born by the name of Craycroft, his parents having by
proper Court Order and by proper action of the King Edward First, adopted the name of
Craycroft.24 Therefore, for future preservation and my desire and that of my beloved
wife we both hereby declare that we wish to preserve this family name forever and
hereby establish a family record the beginning of which I shall record deaths, &c. of all
the Craycrofts, for that would be too much of a burden, for it would require many
thousands of pages of records25. The record contains only the records of the most direct
descendants of the closest related family, such as father to son and son to his son and so
on down the line, so that the family name may be permanently perpetuated in closest
direct line. Also it carries very few names of the females, for upon their marriage they
usually drop their family name of Craycroft, and adopt that of their husbands, thereby
their identity becomes lost so far as Craycroft is concerned. Therefore it would only
result in great confusion and accumulate a mass of almost useless records that would
have little or no real value to the surviving descendants, or perpetuating the family name.

At the time the renewal of the record December 21st, 1882, the four brothers, Benjamin
W., Thomas B. and Columbus J. Craycroft, investigated every clue and they found that
there was and are many, many more descendants of this original Craycroft family
residing in England, Scotland, France, Spain and Germany, than there is in these United
States and their origin can be easily traced back to these two originals of 1297. At this
time, 1882, so far as we are able to ascertain all Craycrofts here in the United States,
Canada and Mexico are the descendants of the two brothers and their families who landed
on our Eastern coast in the year of 1641, just twenty-one years after the landing of the
Pilgrims in 1620.

In reading this record it will be noticed that there has been several attempts to start
several branches of the original Craycroft family by some of the boys by spelling their
name different, that is by changing a letter in the spelling of the name or even by entirely
dropping a letter thus attempting to start their own branch of the old original family
name. For instance one spelled the name with a K instead of a C, another left off the T,
another left off the Y.

Those names all of which are branches of the original Craycroft family, which was
started in 1297 A.D., are Craycraft, Cracroft, Cracraft, Bycroft, Bycraft, Kraykroft,
Krakroft, Krakraft, Crawcroft, Crawcrof, Craycrof, Cracrof, Kracroft and Gracroft. All
of these attempts were made in England, long before the first family arrived in America.
There are a few in the United States who spell their names Craycraft, Cracroft, Bycroft
and Bycroft but so far as any of the Craycroft family know none of the others have ever

24
So far all the writer has done is keep repeating the “fact” of the creation of the name and little else, as if
trying to convince the reader (or himself) of the truth of this statement.
25
It seems that the “voice” of the writer changes here from James Cray Craycroft to someone later. If this
were truly James Cray Craycroft there would have been no deaths to records and precious few births.

35
been known in these United States. But the old original Craycroft has many prominent
families in this country26.

Therefore, this record is and should be considered the original basis and foundation of all
the other substitutes spelled differently as given above, many of which still exist in
England, Germany, France and Spain, unless they have died out since 1882 when the
investigation was carried on by the original Craycroft family at some considerable
expense. Quite recently investigations have been made of the one name (Craycraft) of
which there are quite a large number here in the United States, and it was definitely found
that it was really and truly a branch of the original Craycroft family and was started by a
boy who had become estranged from his family and wishes to show his contempt by
spelling his name with A instead of O. This is shown in the record later. Therefore all
Craycrofts should consider this record as the basis for the rightful right to the title and
holder of this valuable family heirloom, and each and every one of the sons of the father
into whose legal and rightful possession this record is to go to at the time of his death
meet and decide who is the rightful heir and there and then deliver this original copy to
him. He must be one of the direct sons of the holder. Copies may be made and given to
other direct heir’s sons, but this original must go to the one who will promise on his
honor to preserve it, keep it, intact and add to the record any valuable material that will
preserve the tradition of the original family name directly in line from father to son. It
should never be left with one who will not promise to keep it all his life and keep it up-to-
date as to births, deaths &c. &c.27

Each and every one of the descendants should bear in mind that this record must be
surrendered to the rightful direct heir to whom it belongs by virtue of these instructions
issued by the original founders of the family and name. If one should have it in his
possession at the time of his death and he has no son for it to go to, then this record must
be turned over to one of his brothers who has a son, and this son must assume the
responsibility of preserving the record as if he had had the record in the first instance, so
there will be no broken line in record. So my descendants may look back and learn many
of the facts regarding their ancestors, I am hereby tracing my ancestors as far back as I
can. First I can only trace my family back to my father’s birth, which was September 5th,
1245 A.D. He and my mother were married when he was twenty years old, on May 25th,
1275 A.D. They had several children, but I was the youngest being born in 1275. We
then had only the name of Cray. This is my old family name under which I grew up until
I was married, then and ever since I have had the new name of Craycroft which name I
and my wife created.

At the same time we tried to trace the family name of my wife, but we found all of the
records were destroyed in the great fire of London in 1282 A.D28., in the War and most of
26
The second sentence from the last contradicts itself and is also incorrect. Even in the late 1880’s there
were hundreds of Craycraft’s in the United States, mostly in the Ohio River Valley. Today, in 2000, there
are hundreds if not thousands of Craycraft’s in the United States.
27
The previous four paragraphs were written, it seems, by John Henry Craycroft, but in the next paragraph
we return to James Cray Craycroft
28
The Great Fire of London actually took place September 2 – 5, 1666. There was an earlier fire which
destroyed a large part of London in 1212.

36
the records in London were destroyed so we could not get anything on her record but that
from the memory of her parents. Her father was born December 20th, 1247 A.D. Her
father and mother were married in London October 6th, 1257 A.D. There is no record of
their deaths, and my wife does not remember but thinks they both died in 1298 or 129929.
This is about all the records we have of our parents, and most if that is guess work. But
our record is correct and authentic, and we hope it always will be kept so by our
descendants.

We can say authoritatively here that family records at that time were almost all destroyed
by the many religious wars, and little is known of their origin and history and although
they were always highly respected and wealthy, having large estates, part of which were
given to us when we were married, which with other gifts gave us a good start in life.
There was one member of the family that became an Earl, but as the records were
destroyed we cannot trace its origin at this time.30

BEGINNING OF THIS FAMILY RECORD


In this year of 1325 A.D. I again tried to get some facts to establish the origin of our
original family names of Cray and that of Croft, but have failed, for I soon found that
very few records of a dependable nature were available for recently there had been more
furious and bloody wars had destroyed more records that we had traced up two years ago.
England and in fact all of Europe was at war almost constantly, and I could find very few
records, most of all records of any kind had been destroyed by warring factions. Upon
this finding my good wife and I decided we would try to keep records of our own family
and to request our descendants to do likewise, and add to this record from time to time as
conditions and events warranted, and to perpetuate the record and name forever, by
handing down the records from father to son indefinitely, which I shall do at my death.

These useless wars were almost always caused by one religious sect or faction warring on
each other. The Pope was constantly demanding the abolishment of all Protestant
religious property, such as churches, residences of its members, and that all its members
be jailed and tortured, especially those who insisted in preaching any of the Protestant
beliefs and that all must pay tribute in high taxes and worship only in Catholic
institutions and that the Pope was a higher personage than the King. To this all
Protestants vigorously opposed and refused to do, with the result that many Protestants
were put to death, and many others were placed in prison. This action on the part of the
Pope caused great suffering and the Protestants rebelled against the Pope, and declared
war rather than submit to such suffering. However records were available that proved
that over five million people had lost their lives in these useless wars. I secured enough
reliable records to prove to me that both our parents were pure Anglo-Saxon blood and
had even leaned heavily toward the Protestant belief but had never taken a stand against

29
This passage seems to have been written by James Cray Craycroft. It seems strange that his wife would
not know when her own parents died, especially if it was within 2 years or their marriage. This casts more
doubt on the veracity of this “history”.
30
There were no religious wars in England prior to this time. To the best of my knowledge, there has never
been an Earl in the Craycroft line.

37
the Pope. So in order to avoid trouble I contented myself to accept the marriage
ceremony in the Catholic religion although I at that time was not wholly in accord with
the unjust rulings of the Pope. But now at this time after many years I have abandoned
the Catholic religion and am now a Protestant, although I do not make an issue of it but
keep my mouth shut and avoid arguments.31

Therefore, I James Craycroft the First and my beloved wife Sarah Craycroft the First,
now have four boys and one girl by our marriage. The first boy was born June 24th, 1298,
and we named him after me, his father (James Cray Craycroft the Second). John, the
next, was born October 10th, 1299 A.D. Our next child, a boy, was born August 10th,
1301, making our third boy born to us. The fourth boy was born December 24th, 1303
and we named him Frederick. Mary, our only girl, came September 14th, 1307.

Mary married Samuel Wycliffe at the age of 17 and became the mother of John Wycliffe,
June 19th, 1324 .A.D. in Yorkshire, England32.

They were strong healthy children and all were well raised by their good mother who
educated them to the highest degree. She taught each to be able to read and write. This
was an accomplishment that only the very rich could afford, and many of the richest
children could not read or write. My oldest son James the Second and John became
eminent Ministers of the Gospel (Protestant). The third boy became a Doctor of
Medicine, although he attended Oxford for two years he graduated with high honors, and
practiced many years in and around London. The fourth boy Frederick early in his life
secured special education and spent much time teaching others to read and write for
which he received some liberal compensation from those who could afford to pay. To
this the Catholic bishops and the Pope objected for it was their desire to keep the people
in ignorance, especially the poor. By so doing it was an easy matter for them to lead the
poor into their traps. Frederick went right ahead and taught the poorer classes to read and
write, and allowed them to pay when they could afford to. Many could not afford to pay
anything, but he kept them in his classes just the same. In many cases many years after
Frederick was unable to teach any more some of his former students who had profited by
his teachings came to him and paid him large sums of wealth for the help he had in
former years given them. The Catholic authorities at last succeeded in having laws
passed especially to prevent him from teaching any longer. One of these unjust laws was
he had to secure a permit from the local bishop to teach which of course was absolutely
impossible, for the Pope instructed the Bishop not to issue any permits to any person or
persons who had Protestant beliefs. Of course this prevented him from ever being able to
teach again without being subject to arrest and jail.

James and John, the Ministers, found it very difficult to secure parchments (books on
Protestant church work) all of which were barred by order of the Catholic priests and
bishops and destroyed whenever or wherever found. These were all hand written, for

31
Again “James” talks about Protestants 200 years before they existed.
32
After searching many sources I can find no information regarding who John Wycliffe’s parents were.
There is not even any certainty about his date of birth. Best guesses only place it between 1320 and 1330,
probably closer to 1320.

38
printing with type had not been invented. These parchments were very costly, so they
could not supply but a very few among those few persons that could read.33
When the boys were quite young, being at the age of twelve and fourteen years of age
they could be frequently found talking and teaching small children their Protestant
beliefs. Many times we, their parents, were warned by Catholics to stop our boys form
this foolish teachings and talk of Protestant religious beliefs and wild ideas of the
hereafter under penalties of arrest and sometimes under a threat of death. As the boys
grew older Protestant scriptures could not be taught openly and it became necessary to
even hold all meetings secretly. Their parchments (books) had to be secretly secured at
great cost, and even then they were often discovered and arrested and their parchments
destroyed, for sneaking Catholic spies were abroad and seemed to be everywhere. The
two boys had earned and had become a great authority on the then small bible for only a
very few parchments (books) of the New Testament had then been translated into
readable English, which at that time was spoken much differently than now. These so-
called books were all handwritten were studied and learned thoroughly by each boy as
fast as they were secured, and taught to others, thus the Protestant beliefs spread fast for
many people were growing tired of the heavy taxes and tributes being forced on them by
the Catholic authorities.

King Edward the First, who was the son of King Henry III, died in 1307 and immediately
his son was crowned King Edward the Second. He was the first Prince of Wales. He was
very ambitious and tried repeatedly to annex Scotland but failed. Finally he was deposed
in 1326 when it was proven that he was very incompetent and after much trouble he was
finally dethroned in a plot in which his own wife was the instigator. This was in 1326 at
which time he was imprisoned and early in 1327 he was secretly murdered. This brought
his son to the throne and he was crowned under the title of King Edward the Third. His
mother the plotter was appointed Regent until he reached manhood in 1330. He tried to
seize the French throne but failed. All during these changes the country was in constant
turmoil and wars were fought almost daily.

My son James Jr. married Jane Morris at the age of 25 years. He like myself had four
sons and no girls34. John married Clara Jones at the age of 21 years and had two sons,
Benjamin and Luke. Benjamin married Mary Gordon at his age of 24 years and also had
four sons, three of which were killed in wars, not of their choosing.

It might be well to depart from the record for a few moments to mention a very peculiar
condition that existed at this time, and was very legal up to as late as the year of 1790
A.D. in England, but was considered very bad taste by all Protestants but was very
common among the middle and some of the upper classes. It was that of wife-selling.
The public records of England will show that wife-selling prevailed and was legal at this
33
These last two paragraphs seem to have been written by at least two different people. The beginning of
the first of these paragraphs would seem to be written by James the First, but the end part of the same
paragraph seems to be written another person because they mention things that are supposed to happen late
in Frederick’s life.
The second paragraph is obviously written by someone after even James and John are dead because of the
reference to type not being used in Europe at that time.
34
According to an earlier passage James had 4 sons and 1 daughter.

39
time and was very common among those who wished to avail themselves of the law. In a
London Review (a small paper) such sales were advertised under the inviting caption “A
Bargain to be Sold” and other such attractive headlines. The women were usually some
of those whom had been bought before and had become burdens on their husbands, who
wanted to get rid of them, at almost any price.35

They were usually led by their so-called husbands with a rope about the neck, to the
public market places, where they were sold along with cattle, with proper witnesses to
sanction and cinch the bargain and the Sheriff and Town Clerk to seal the bill of sale
upon the payment of the tax. The sale was not legal if this tax was not paid at the time of
the sale. One outstanding record in London: a peasant sold his wife without this
formality and was informed that the sale was illegal. He thereupon went several miles to
find his former wife. When found he tied her with a rope, took her back home and on the
next market day again sold her for half a crown, but this time he cautioned the purchaser
to be sure to pay the tax of four pence to the State. Many attended these sales, but there
were very few purchasers. Many sales were made privately by those who did not wish
any publicity.

An interesting sidelight on the attitude of some of the husbands in these sales was
demonstrated in a London Review. One day, a man advertised the loss of a horse, for
which he offered a reward of five guineas upon its return to him. The next day, by a
strange chance, his wife ran away. The reward he offered for her return was only four
shillings, an amount much less than for the return of the horse.

James and Benjamin spent much time trying to have this infamous law abolished with
very little success, but brought them much trouble from many of those natives who
profited by its continuance. In several instances they were badly beaten by being
waylaid. But finally in the year of 1790 the law was officially abolished.

Continuing with the direct record, Benjamin, my son, married Matilda Frazier when he
was only 19 years old and they had three sons. My son John faithfully carried forward
this family record and two of his sons, Edwin and Oliver, married and had five sons each.
Edwin married Linda Smith august 22nd, 1345, and had five sons and two girls. Samuel
was born May 1st, 1370, Albert was born July 4, 1372. Peter was born September 14th,
1374. George was born March 15th, 1377. Nelson was born October 15th, 1379. Then
the next two were the girls. Julia was born December 10th, 1381. Clara was born June
15th, 138436.

George was the one selected to take over these records and he kept them faithfully for
several years. He was a wonderful boy and was married to Melba Foster when he was
only 20 years old, and she was 19 years old. He divorced her when he was 25 years old,

35
Wife-selling was not practiced until the early 1700’s. So how did someone writing in the 1300’s know
about it? If the writer lived in the 1700’s why would they mention it when writing about life in the mid-
1300’s?
36
If this were written by James Cray Craycroft as it purports, he would have been 109 when Clara was
born. This would have been possible but highly unlikely.

40
and married again on June 5th, 1397, just 100 years after this record was started and
established in the year of 1297 A.D. By his first wife he had no children, for owing to a
deformity doctors told them about she could never have any children. This made both of
them very unhappy and both decided on a divorce. His wife Melba died in a short time
afterward.37

By his second wife he had four boys, Charles born June 1st, 1399, Thomas, born February
10th, 1401, Benjamin born November 1st, 1404, Lawrence born April 25th, 1406. Young
Benjamin fell heir to these records, and kept them up in very good order. Frederick born
December 30th, 1405, Willard born May 17th, 1407. Young Benjamin was married to
Lillie Snook June 15th, 1422 and was the father of twelve boys and two girls, all of the
same wife. He evidently was kept very busy supporting his many children and wife that
he never did devote any time to keeping this record. However he did state that he had
turned the record over to his oldest boy who was born November 1st, 1404 and that this
boy had kept the records in good shape and correctly his name was Benjamin Jr.

At some point in time there was a map of Europe as it was in 1360 in the Book.
Somewhere along the line it was removed or became lost. The next four paragraphs are
the explanation that accompanied the original map.

This map of Europe is inserted herein to make a record of Europe as shown in the year of
1360 A.D. Many changes have taken place since that time, although much of the map
still appears to be the same as at that time.

Many of the Craycroft family has traveled into many of the countries as shown but most
of them remained in England, their home country. The mode of travel at this time was
very slow and was mainly accomplished by foot, some by the lowly jackass (now known
as the burro) others used the horse. Up to this time many Craycrofts had been to the
countries of France, Castile, Portugal, Germany, Poland, Hungary, Denmark, Norway,
Sweden, Bulgaria, Turkey38 and in Morocco, Algeria in Africa.

They usually traveled in parties of fifteen or twenty, for it was usually unsafe for parties
of only one or two to travel alone on account of frequent robberies and even murders. In
later years some of the Craycrofts went to some of the countries and located permanently.
Some of them even changed their names by dropping a letter in their names or changing a
letter like this. One changed his spelling of the name thus, Kraykroft, instead of the
proper way of Craycroft, another spelled his name Craycraft and later several other ways
of spelling it was taken by some.

In later years a meeting was held in London, England, of all the Craycrofts and by a large
vote of all those assembled (one hundred and ten) it was unanimously decided by a secret

37
These paragraphs confirm the idea that this part of the history is fiction. It seems that James Cray
Craycroft is writing this passage, but he is writing about events that happen when he would be about 120
years old. Whoever did write this had great difficulty keeping the timeline straight.
38
In 1360 Turkey as known as the Byzantine Empire. The name Turkey was not used until the late 1800’s.

41
ballot that only those who spelled their names as Craycroft should become eligible to
have the right to the original Craycroft family record.

EDUCATED IN OXFORD UNIVERSITY


It will be noticed that many of the Craycroft children were wealthy enough to obtain their
education in the Oxford University, which was originally established in 1214 A.D. by the
Bishop of Lincoln39, but the first foundation of learned University dated from the year of
1187 A.D. This university is among the best known and originally it was a Catholic
institution but later it became Protestant. It has a long and interesting history in itself but
there is no use to dwell on it here, it is sufficient to say it was the leader in education
advantages from its first existence and has remained so forever afterward.

Resuming the record, Benjamin Jr. married Flora Dodge September 25th, 1441 A.D. and
had only 2 boys. Rufus born May 30th, 1443, and Martin born May 15th, 1444. Rufus
only lived to be four years old and died. Martin married May Smith January 25th, 1475.
He had 3 sons, their first son Alexander born March 10th, 1477, Morris born April 14th,
1479, Andrew born September 12th, 1481. It will be proper to mention here that many of
the sons born under the name of Craycroft are not mentioned in this record for they have
no direct bearing on the record40. That is to say they were born to some of the children’s
children and related far from the ones in a direct line from the ones that are keeping this
record. It is possible for all of those children born in the name of Craycroft or any of the
ones that are branches of that family name to trace it back to the original marriage and
establishment of the name in 1297 A.D. although it is a hard task it can and has been
done by several in late years. No doubt there are literally hundreds of Craycrofts now
living that do not know, and many do not care anything about their ancestors.41
It is also proper to say here that many of the Craycroft’s sons not mentioned herein grew
to manhood and developed into prominent men of their time. Many of them drifted to
other nearby countries among which are Germany, Spain, France, Belgium, Ireland,
Scotland, Italy and many others, especially some of them that were known to have gone
to Africa and even to China and Japan, but there is no dependable record that can be used
here that is authentic.

It is also proper to mention here that up to this time, 1822, the record shows only those
who are an immediate and direct descendant of immediate family in an unbroken chain
before them. It can be depended on that the record is complete and contains the records
of the last descendants alive for many generations, among them are members whose

39
According to Oxford University’s web site (http://www.ox.ac.uk/aboutoxford/history.shtml) “There is no
clear date of foundation, but teaching existed at Oxford in some form in 1096 and developed rapidly from
1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris.”
40
It is highly unlikely that this passage was written by an Englishman. Family history has been very
important in England for many centuries and a family history would have included all sons and daughters.
41
This sentiment does not ring true to me. I find it difficult to accept that the various writers would not list
all the names of the siblings in each generation. It makes sense that they would want the siblings to be
listed if for no other reason than that they were the writers’ own sisters or brothers. If, as it says in the next
paragraph, that many Craycrofts became “prominent men of their time” one would think that the writers
would want to at least mention them to illustrate the family’s participation in history.

42
descendants were in a direct line of those who came to America many years later. Up to
this time however America had not been heard of, for that was before Christopher
Columbus had discovered America, and it was many years afterward that Craycrofts
made their way to America.

We recently had a family gathering or reunion of the family of one of the distant
relatives, one who was not mentioned in the record. He was the son of one of the boys
whose father was a cousin of one of those who had kept the record. This man’s family
met at his home on his eighty-ninth birthday. His name is Oscar Craycroft. There were
seven sons, of the nine who were born to him. There were twenty-six grandchildren,
thirty-four great grandchildren, and five great-great grandchildren present. Making
seventy-four descendants present from this one person (Oscar Craycroft). He lived in
Gloucester, England and was quite wealthy and held a prominent position in the local
government for over fifty years. The above family did not include the wives of the
descendants. The above is related here just to show and impress on the later descendants
how impossible it would be to record all of the different branches of the family. It would
take thousands of pages to record them all. Therefore it has been the aim from the start
of the record to record only those who were in a direct line from those before him.

At this time Benjamin Jr. the 2nd fell heir to these records at the time he married Olive
Morris on May 8th, 149942. He had 3 sons. The first, George, was born September 20th,
1501. Albert was born October 17th, 1503, and James was born January 29th, 1505.
James later took possession of these records and carried them throughout his lifetime. He
was married to Ann Murdock June 25th, 1526, and one year later on May 15th, 1527, their
first child was born. They named him Hyrum. Their next child was born March 15th,
1529. Their next and last child was born August 5th, 1531. He was named John.

In 1521 Pope Leo X bestowed the title Defender of the Faith on King Henry III43 for his
(the King’s) defense of the sacraments against Luther the Protestant. The King at this
time was a strong Catholic, but he soon began to see the injustice of the decisions and
high taxes exacted by the Pope in England and he decided many highly far-reaching
decisions against the Pope, and soon he denounced the Pope in no uncertain terms, thus
breaking with the Pope44. In retaliation the Pope recalled the title Defender of the Faith.
In 15?? (date illegible in the record) the title was reconfirmed by Parliament and was
ordered placed on all English coins thereafter. James Craycroft, and many other leaders
in the Protestant faith worked and preached whenever possible to encourage the people to
lend all their help to the King in his fight against the Pope, and he was rewarded by the
King by being given the right to hold meetings and preach in any part of the kingdom
under the protection of government and often thereafter held meetings with soldiers under
arms on the platform for his and his followers protection.
42
Who is this Benjamin Jr.? The last named Benjamin Jr. had two sons, Rufus and Martin. Between
Benjamin Jr. the first and Benjamin Jr. the second there is no other Benjamin named in the record.
43
King Henry III reigned from 1216 –1272. King Henry VIII was sat on the throne in 1521.
44
Actually King Henry VIII broke from Rome and the Catholic Church because the Pope refused to
approve of Henry’s marriage to Anne Boleyn. This resulted in the Act of Supremacy being passed by
Parliament in 1534 which recognized that the king was 'the only supreme head of the Church of England
called Anglicana Ecclesia'.

43
The 100 Years War between England and France was in full sway at this time. This was
a war started in 1337 and did not end until 1453. There had been constant friction
between the two nations, but the immediate cause was King Edward III’s claim to the
French Throne. The conflict lasted during the reigns of five English Kings. They were
Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI and that of five French Kings, that
of Phillip VI, John II, Charles V, Charles VI, and that of Charles VII, and only ended in
the expulsion of the English from France in 1453 A.D. The war was carried on into what
may be called six periods. The English were holding their own alternately, until the last
or sixth period, which was from 1422 to 1453. The war took a new turn with the rise of
Joan of Arc who stirred her country (France) to a resistance which finally after her death
brought about the expulsion of the English from France, except from Calais, which we,
the English, held until 1557 A.D. Then by treaty the war was settled45. Many of the
Craycroft family volunteered in this war. One of the sons of Benjamin Jr. the second
named Hyrum was a captain in the English army in France. He served his full time in the
army and returned an old and broken man but lived to the ripe old age of 76 years and
died in London in the year of 1605 A.D.46 His body was buried in a plot in the London
Cemetery provided for by the King and for many years was taken care of by the English
army.

Returning to the record, John the son of Benjamin Jr. the 2nd was born August 5th, 1531
and took over these records at the death of his father on December 14th, 1556 A.D.47 He
had a great desire to become a Protestant Minister of the Gospel. He learned to read and
write at a very young age. His mother taught him and helped him in every way she could
and prepared him early in life to enter the ministry. At the age of 20 years he was
ordained a Minister of the Protestant church at Oxford. He also studied different
languages with the idea of being able to become an interpreter of three different
languages, the Jewish, the English, and the Anglo-Saxon languages. His good mother
had been very highly educated and was of very great help to him. She also was a fairly
good interpreter of the Jewish language and continued a great help to John until her
death. At the age of twenty-two years he had made quite a record as an interpreter and
was often called on to interpret passages in the old Jewish bible.

Spies of the Pope soon began spying on him, and in a short time he became mixed up in
religious controversies in which the Catholic King and all other Catholics were war on all
known Protestants. Many murders were charged up against the Catholics. The murdered
ones were always those who were Protestants. However he defied them and quietly
became the private secretary of a minister of the Protestant beliefs, named James
Mathews, and they together began translating some of the Jewish bible into English and
Anglo-Saxon tongues.

45
The treaty which ended the 100 Years War was signed in 1457.
46
This paragraph destroys another part of the history. How could a man born in 1529 serve as an officer in
a war that ended in1453?
47
According to the earlier passage this John was not the son of Benjamin Jr. the 2nd but rather the third son
of James, who was the third son of Benjamin Jr. the 2nd.

44
The Roman Catholics were firmly established now in London and were much stronger
now than ever because of their King Henry VIII being a devoted Catholic. King Henry
VIII hated all Protestants so intently that he had many of them placed in prison on the
least provocation. Many of them were cruelly murdered by mysterious methods, while
others were murdered by slow starvation and many other cruel methods. Many were
hanged publicly, stabbed, while others were burned at the stake and many other vicious
methods. Remember my descendants, these murdered people were all Protestants. Never
was there a Catholic treated thus. This cruel King Henry VIII was made king upon the
death of his brother, April 22nd, 1509 A.D. A short time afterward he was married and
within a few years, after two children had been born to them, he discovered that his wife
had only presented him with two girls, and only one of these lived. Later she had many
children all girls, all of whom mysteriously died shortly after birth. This aroused the
King’s wrath and hatred for his devoted wife, for he wanted a boy, so that he could leave
the throne to him. After much cruel treatment to his wife he divorced her and married
Anne Boleyn, but she too failed to bear him a son. Then he divorced her and married
Jane Seymour and she bore him a son, Edward V in 1537. She soon died. Then King
Henry VIII began a series of marriages in the interests of political standing. His favorite
pastime seemed to be divorce and executions of his unwanted wives. He died January
28th, 1547, and his sixth wife survived him. He was a disgrace to both the English people
and the Church he claimed to be in favor of.

These last three paragraphs require more than a footnote or two to refute. John was 22
in 1553. By this time Henry VIII was already feuding with the Pope over his marital
status and was not waging war on Protestants because there wouldn’t be any Protestants
until 1553 after the Act of Supremacy. Henry VIII would hardly have hated all
Protestants as stated above since he was the “head Protestant”. Although this unknown
writer recounts the marriages of Henry VIII with some accuracy he fails to point out that
this is what led to the formation of the Church of England. Henry VIII made sure that his
only son, Edward, was educated by Protestants. As a result, when Edward VI became
king he was a devote Protestant and actively promoted the Church of England.

Because of these facts these preceding paragraphs can only be taken as fiction.

I, John Craycroft, now aged thirty years have traced back some of my ancestors, and I
discovered that Mary Craycroft was the mother of the much loved and famous John
Wycliffe who translated the Bible both from Latin and Jewish tongues in 138248.
Although there had been many peoples who had deserted the Catholic faith before that
time and were called Protestants, this translation of the Bible was and is an accepted
authority as the first real translation of the Bible into the pure English tongue. My
investigations show conclusively that John Wycliffe had Craycroft blood in his veins.
For the benefit of my ancestors and those of the Craycroft family for the future I will give
here in this record the real history of the John Wycliffe’s life and his translation of our
Holy bible. There no doubt will be many more translations in the future. I am slowly
working on one myself, but it is extremely slow work for it must be carried on secretly.

48
Even today, little is known about John Wycliffe’s early life including the identity of his mother. So this
is, at best suspect.

45
For if any Catholics find out anyone is translating the Bible for use for the Protestants
they use every means they can to not only destroy the translations, but the person doing
the work as well.

The first English version of the whole bible was made by John Wycliffe and several
aides, who translated from both Latin and Jewish language, and published their work for
the first time in the year of 1382 A.D. This, understand, was for both the Old Testament,
and part of the Old Testament is in the years of 1525 to 1530 A.D. It was first printed in
1530. Miles Coverdale and his aids translated the New Testament from Greek but by
some unforeseen circumstances did not complete it and publish it until 1537 A.D. at
which time he issued the whole Bible in one volume.49

I will state here the full text of my investigations I made of my distant relative John
Wycliffe who was the son of my father’s uncle and John Wycliffe’s sister. This
investigation was completed by me, John Craycroft, in the year of 1353 A.D. At this
time I am in charge of my church and have some time I can give to investigations and
translation work.50

John Wycliffe I find was born in the year of 1324 A.D. in the parish bearing the name of
Wycliffe, in Yorkshire, England. Very little record is shown of his early childhood in
early youth. In the year of 1340 A.D. at the age of sixteen years he was admitted as a
student at Queens College Oxford, which then first founded. He was soon transferred
from this to Merton College of the University, which from having been longer
established, possessed superior advantages and at that time could boast of having
connected with it some of the most learned men of that age. The college students at that
time and period devoted most of their time to the study of scholastic theology and Civil
Law. Wycliffe took exceptionally high rank as a scholar.

Even the Roman Catholics’ historians confess that he was a very wise and subtle
disputant and second to none in philosophy. He did not confine himself to the prescribed
studies. He carefully read the writings of the Fathers and although the Sacred Scriptures

49
I don’t know at this point who is “speaking” here but I do know that they have their information wrong
about Miles Coverdale.

According to David Daiches in his book The King James Version of the English Bible, on page 174 he
states “Coverdale made no claim to originality in his translation. The title-page of the first edition states
that his Bible is ‘faithfully and truly translated out of Douche (Dutch) and Latyn into Englishe,’ and in the
dedication he speaks of “fyue (five) sundry interpreters” whom he followed in his rendering; and again,
further on in the dedication, he tells us that ‘I haue (have) had sondrye translacions, not onely in latyn, but
also of the Douche interpreters: whom (because of theyr synguler giftes (gifts) and speciall diligence in the
Bible) I haue ben (been) the more glad to folowe for the most parte, accordynge as I was required.’ The
“fyue sundry interpreters” followed by Coverdale were almost certainly the Vulgate, Pagninus’ Latin
version of 1528, Luther’s German Bible, the Zurich Bible of Leo Juda, Swingli, Pellican, and others, and
Tyndale’s New Testament and Pentateuch. For the Old Testament, except the Pentateuch, the Zurich Bible
is certainly Coverdale’s primary source, with occasional renderings of Pagninus and Luther preferred to
those of the Zurich version.”
50
If John did “investigate” Wycliffe’s parentage so vigorously and complete his investigations in 1353,
why didn’t he just as Wycliffe who his mother was? He did not die until 1384.

46
were then almost entirely neglected by the ecclesiastic, Wycliffe devoted much time to
their study. About the year of 1360 he appeared as a bold and successful asserter of the
rights of the University against Mendicant Friars, who had become so numerous and
powerful at Oxford as to almost threaten the entire ruin of the University. Their endeavor
was to lead young men who had entered Oxford to be educated to leave the University for
the monastery, and so powerful was their influence that it was said the number of
students was reduced from thirty thousand to six thousand. In testimony of their
gratitude for his services and in compliment to his talents, the University made him, in
1361 A.D. Master of Balliol college, and presented him to the living of Fillingham, which
afterwards exchanged for that of Ludgershall. Four years after, in 1365 A.D., he was
appointed warden of Canterbury Hall in Oxford by Archbishop Islip, its founder. The
diploma conferring this honor declares Wycliffe to be “a person in whom His Grace very
much confided, and on whom he had fixed his eyes for that place on account of the
honesty of his life, his laudable conversation and knowledge of letters.” Islip died the
next year, and Bishop Langham was raised to the See of Canterbury. He was a monk and
was strongly attached to the religious orders which Wycliffe had boldly censured. His
dislikes to the reformer Wycliffe was so great that he deprived him of the office which
the founder of the College had conferred on him. An appeal was made at the Court of
Rome: but after a delay of four years, the Pope confirmed the action of the Archbishop.

HISTORY OF THE MOTHER AND THE BIRTH OF


JOHN WYCLIFFE
THE FAMOUS TRANSLATOR OF THE ENGLISH BIBLE
BORN JUNE 19TH, 1324, DIED AUGUST 14TH, 1384 A.D.
I am giving here a short history of my investigations of the birth and life of John Wycliffe
my distant relative who was a branch of the Craycroft family. His mother was the first
Craycroft girl ever born under that name. She being the only female child born to the
original couple that formed that name by the combining of his and his wife’s family
names into one family name of Craycroft in the year of 1297 A.D.

This record is given here so that future generations may be able to trace their ancestors
back, for there has been no record kept of the female branches of the family but this being
an outstanding one I think it best to record it into the Craycroft record, only as a side
issue, that is independent of the original record.

John Wycliffe the great translator of the Bible was really and truly a part of the Craycroft
family as has been proven by my thorough investigations. He is the son of Mary Croft
Craycroft, the first girl ever born under the name of Craycroft.

She, Mary Craycroft, was born September 14th, 1307 A.D. and was married to Louis
Wycliffe at the age of 16 years, on March 14th, 1323 A.D. and John Wycliffe was born on
June 19th, 1324 just 15 months later, in Yorkshire, England.

John Wycliffe grew to manhood in this locality and was educated by his mother and
spent several terms in Oxford College and became the leading translator of the bible at

47
that time. He was looked upon as an authority as an interpreter of languages, and a
translator of Greek, Jewish, and Anglo-Saxon languages into English.

As he grew older he became a firm believer in the Protestant religion and became a leader
in opposing the oppressive attitude of the Pope and the Catholic Church. He suffered
many indignities and insults and personal injuries caused by unjust and unlawful means
to discredit him in his activities for the Protestant believers.

He suffered much and grew stronger in his work as he grew older and after his death was
awarded a diploma of high honor by the King for his outstanding work as an interpreter
and translator. He remained an ardent worker for Protestantism, and against the often
outrageous conduct of the Pope in levying heavy taxes on the poor Protestants and at his
death he left many writings that has been declared among the highest ever produced.

He was born June 19th, 1324 A.D. and died August 14th, 1384 A.D. at Lutterworth,
England.

I, John Craycroft, made the above investigation at my own instigation and expense and
all the statements made are strictly in accordance of the facts shown by the records in
London and Lutterworth, England, and other localities in which he lived and worked. I
am adding this to the Craycroft record now in my possession for the interests of all
descendants.

London, England, September 26th, 1386


John Craycroft, Descendant

Witnesses: Stanly Berk, Paul Willard, Henry Stanford, John Nelson, George Johnson,
Mary Morris, Laura Jones

We the witnesses of the investigations of John Craycroft as stated in this statement


herewith state we are convinced his investigation are correct and truthful in every detail.
Some of us accompanied him in his work and know it to be correct.51

In 1372 Wycliffe was appointed by the Chancellor and Regents of the University
Professor of Divinity. This was the greatest honor which they could offer him and it
shows conclusively the high estimation in which he was then held. He was soon called
upon to take part in the controversy, which was being waged between the Court of Rome
and the English Sovereign. The Pope had demanded annual payments of 1000 marks as
tribute money and an acknowledgement that the Sovereignty of England was under the
authority of the successor of Saint Peter. Edward the Third, the King, had for several
years declined to make these payments, and it was now threatened that His Majesty
would be cited to appear for trial before the Sovereign Pontiff.
51
It should be noted that John Craycroft presents no documentary evidence. I have not been able to find
any corroboration of the statement of John Wycliffe’s parentage. No Wycliffe researcher or expert has been
able to identify his mother.

48
Edward appealed to Parliament, who resolved to resist the charge by force if necessary,
and Wycliffe maintained and defended the rights of the King against the Pope. In 1374
Wycliffe was sent to the headquarters of the Pope in Rome, upon an embassy to the Pope
to treat concerning the liberties of the Church of England. He remained abroad for two
years, carefully studying the policy of the Pontiff and returned to England more
thoroughly convinced than ever of the gross corruption of the Romanish church while his
zeal in exposing her errors and vices was considerable increased, and his opportunities
for spreading his views were very great.

Wycliffe’s doctrines gave so much offense to the clergy of the Romish Church, that in
1377 he was summoned to appear before a convocation, which met in Saint Paul’s
Cathedral in London to answer for what they termed heresies, but the assembly broke up
in confusion without taking measures against him. But later in the same year the Pope
commanded that he should be arrested and kept in security till further orders. The
University was outraged and debated whether to receive the Pope’s messenger or dismiss
him disgracefully. But Wycliffe concluded to meet his accusers face to face at synod
appointed for the purpose at Lambeth in January 1378.

Whether they would have silenced the reformer or not is uncertain for during their
deliberations a mandate from the Queen Mother forbade their proceeding against him and
he was dismissed with the simple command to abstain from preaching his doctrines in the
future. About this time he was engaged in translating the Bible. His writings abound
with sound Protestant views on the supreme authority of the scriptures as a guide to faith
and practice, but his enemies took advantage of some disturbance which they unjustly
charged to his teaching, and he was banished from the University in 1382 A.D. He had
been mistreated so long and so unjustly and he now being an old man he retired to living
at Lutterworth and he soon died in 1384 A.D.

Almost his last words were that he felt his life had not been spent in vain and that he was
sure his works would live thousands of years after he died. The translation of the Bible
was the chief crowning glory of his life and the powerful lever by which the Papal power
in Great Britain was overthrown. Several of our family have kept close attention to this
investigation and all agree and are confident that an impartial investigation and
examination of our and his claims will confirm his right to be called the most important
agent in producing the Protestant Reformation. Wycliffe had planted the seeds of the
Reformation and with great boldness and perseverance had promulgated those principles
which were to shake the Romish Church to its very center.

He was the Morning Star of the Reformation, the pioneer and patriarch of Protestantism
and his name should have the highest place on the roll of its honored heroes. So much
for the history of our distant relative in the interests of our Protestant beliefs. I will now
proceed to give the direct history of our family history.

49
I had reached the age of about twenty-two years and am determined to have complete
control over my religious beliefs, and I do thoroughly believe as our distant relative
Wycliffe did that the Protestant belief is the one all we Britishers should believe in.

(Notice – This part of the record is being written into the record by my good wife)
So strong is my husband’s (John) belief that he often defied Catholics openly, sometimes
much to his peril. He preaches wherever he can secure an audience. He even preaches
on street corners and often missiles of different kinds are hurled at him. He spends much
of his time among the poor people although he has many staunch friends among the rich.
He could be found almost any day explaining the many complicated questions asked by
those who could not read or write, but they can readily see that the Pope was exacting
large unjust taxes from them for the support of Catholic institutions and the Roman
Empire in far-away Rome. Many hundreds have deserted the Catholic ranks and have
rebelled against both the Pope and the Catholic Church. (End of his wife’s contribution
to the record.)

John Craycroft the young but vigorous preacher has become so prominent that many
wealthy friends arranged to pay the cost of his higher education along Protestant
Christian beliefs and teachings, and have sent him to Oxford University where he is
taking a special course in the study of the Jewish and Greek languages to enable him to
quickly and correctly translate more of the Holy Bible on his own responsibility. His
idea is to be able to distribute these teachings among the poorer classes of people, and to
all Protestant peoples, both rich and poor.

He progressed rapidly and in a remarkable short time he aroused the attention of many
Catholic spies who made regular reports to the priests, bishops, and other Catholic
churchmen, who in turn kept the Pope well informed who at the proper time ordered all
his followers to keep an open eye on all the young preacher did as to his activities
especially to closely watch his every movement when he should return from Oxford.
This did even to the extent of making false reports and brought him constantly in conflict
with the Catholic followers and officers and their financial and moral supporters, which
were slowly dwindling by desertions to the cause of Protestantism.

They would often break up his meetings by riding swiftly running horses through the
crowds that were quietly listening to his preaching, claiming the horses had gotten
beyond their control. Many deaths resulted from these brutal raids, but it seemed nothing
could be done to prevent it. When he and his friends appealed to the King he pretended
to be very sorry and promised to see that it would be stopped and not happen again, but
within a few days something even worse would happen. But John seemed to have a
charmed life for a while he had many very narrow escapes. He was never seriously
injured. Many of these meetings were had during his enrollment in Oxford University.

At last his term was finished in Oxford and he returned to his home in London and to his
former position as private secretary to the Reverend James Mathews and they worked
together translating, preaching and distributing small bits of passages from their
translations of the scriptures from both the Jewish and Greek languages until Mathews’

50
death. This sad event left John Craycroft alone and being a poor man he was unable to
carry out his desires to furnish his poor friends with the handwritten Bibles and other
means of learning them how to read and write, which even in these early days was a
serious handicap. Less than ten percent of the people could read or write for the priests,
bishops, and other Catholic people used every means they could to prevent the poorer
classes from learning to read or write. Their desire to keep them in ignorance was to
enable the Catholic authorities to be better able to control them, and force them to abide
by their unjust demands.

Later help from a few wealthy friends enabled him to again enter Oxford for a special
course and instructions for a short period after the death of his friend and employer,
Mathews, and he finished his course in time to enter Cambridge where he studied and
remained for two years. When he returned to London he took up his residence at
Glouchestershire, at the request of many people residing there. This settlement had no
Papal or Catholic domain, it being wholly Protestant. But soon after his arrival the Pope
instructed his Archbishop to immediately establish as soon as was possible a Catholic
domain and to import as many Catholic families as they could maintain by these Catholic
families collecting a heavy tax on all of the Protestants only in the district. They
pretended to collect the tax from the Catholics but positive proof was easily supplied to
show no tax was being collected from Catholics. Among these Catholic families were
Catholic warriors, men who made it their life’s business to create trouble and war on
Protestant settlements then under the guise of maintaining the peace, they would rush in
and slay as many Protestants as they could. In a very short time these brutal abuses of the
Protestants became unbearable and nowhere in all England was the abuse of Catholics on
the law-abiding Protestants more prevalent. Protests to the King did no good. He would
pretend to be very sorry but took no action to prevent recurrences. In most cases where
the Protestants insisted that some action be taken, the Catholics only laughed and took
even more drastic action and inhuman action and treatment, showing positively that the
King was either afraid to take any active part to curb them or was in league with them.

This map (on the next page) is one that took the place of another one that was with the
Craycroft Family Record, but it was so old and dilapidated and soiled that it was
extremely hard to trace the information it contained, but we were able to locate the
different places that members of the Craycroft Family had lived. The map had only this
written on it in handwriting. The places marked are some of the places members of the
Craycrofts lived and raised their families.

51
52
Their minister, John Craycroft, seemed to be the target, for all Catholics started at once to
try and establish a more fortified belief and action against the Protestants especially
against Craycroft for he was their main leader. But their tasks and actions were not easy
for the open and defiant acts plainly branded them as the guilty ones whose brutality to
Protestants only resulted in much sympathy to those assaulted and helped to make many
converts to the Protestant beliefs.

Many of the Catholics who had been imported for the special purpose of building up the
Pope’s Catholic residents were classed as deserters and took up the Protestants fight with
the result that there were a great many outright murders committed by the Catholics.
However John Craycroft worked on and spent all of his time now in defense of the
Christian faith and his success was almost beyond belief. He was so sincere and was a
convincing talker that he succeeded in convincing hundreds of those who a short time
before were torturing those in his gatherings and in spite of the great disadvantage he was
laboring under he made great headway both among the Protestants and the Catholics,
which caused great alarm among the priests and bishops.

He soon incurred the intense hatred of the staunch Catholic leaders to such an extent that
he dared not venture outside of his own city or even outside his own home after dark
without having several friends as a bodyguard for he had repeatedly been threatened with
assassination at the hands of the many Catholic spies who were now spread all over the
cities and county districts and in fact were spread all over England, especially in the
thickly settled Protestant districts that the Pope and bishops in an endeavor to stop the
ever increasing number of sincere followers to the Protestant beliefs and churches.

John Craycroft was now the most unpopular man living among the revengeful Catholics
but he was also the most popular among the Protestants and almost any of the spies
would have been well rewarded had they murdered him in some mysterious manner that
could not be traced back to the Pope of Catholic authorities then administering the many
unjust laws.

At last, he was secretly charged with being endowed by the Devil and was arrested and
summoned before a bishop who had been appointed as a local official at the request of
the Pope and his followers. The bishop promptly pronounced him guilty and denounced
him severely and warned him to stop holding any meetings and especially to stop
teachings along these “Catholic forbidden lines” would result in his arrest and
imprisonment and tried officially to deprive him of the right to serve any religious
organization, except through the Pope or bishops, under threat of long imprisonment or
possible death52.

This is a map (on the next page) replacing one that was so old and soiled, torn and dim
that it was necessary to renew it for the Craycroft Family. The old map had this notation
on it written by hand. The heavy lines are the routes traveled by members of the
Craycroft Family. Not only one family but that route of several of the families looking

52
If John Craycroft was “endowed by the Devil” he would almost certainly been executed for this crime.

53
for a place where they could live in peace and happiness, but never found that place and
at last returned to their homes in England.

54
55
With this unjust sentence caused him to promptly left Glouchestershire and returned to
his former home in London and was not officially heard of for a long time, for he had
assumed another name (John Murray) to temporarily hide his identity to escape the wrath
of the Pope and comparatively safe from assassination. Through secret sources he
received regular financial contributions from many sincere friends and Protestant
believers. He carried on his work secretly for about a year, or until 1512 A.D. and part of
1513 A.D. using all the time he could spare to his regular work of translating more and
more of the New Testament.53 He had to write all of his work by his own hand for he
was too poor to pay anyone to help him for there were so few that could read and write
and almost all of them that could read and write were afraid of assassination if caught
doing this kind of work. The work of translation was very slow for he went over it
several times, checking it for possible mistakes. Long after his death some of his
translations were used among others in the King James version of the first issues of our
present Bible. Our present Bible now in common use by all Protestants was issued by
order of King James of England in the year of A.D. 1611 and many of the translations of
John Craycroft made by him almost one hundred years before were checked and found
absolutely correct and were adopted and used by King James’ Committee.54

In 1524 A.D. he was discovered by the Pope’s spies and was again in great danger of
assassination and became so dangerous that in May, 1524, he fled from London and in a
small rowboat crossed the dangerous English Channel and landed in France and slowly
made his way to Hamburg, Germany, taking all his life’s work of translations with him55,
thinking it would never be possible for him to again live safely in his beloved England.
Here he found the Catholics as strong or even stronger than in England, so he quietly but
persistently kept at his life’s work of translation of the Bible. He had spent long years of
translating the Bible and addition he had also translated many other works from the
Jewish language to both English and Anglo-Saxon. Some of his works found ready sale,
thus he was able to eke out a living, although he received some financial aid from some
friends in England, he would never use any of the funds for his own personal use, but
used all of it in the spreading of Protestantism.

When he fled from England he took all of his works with him, and as everything had to
be handwritten by him personally (as printing with type had not been invented yet) he
found his works were quite bulky and it was quite difficult task to move it around in
Germany, for no one was allowed to move from one locality to another without a permit
form the local police authorities. But he avoided this by locating one place for his home
and carried on his translating in another place.

53
Here we are presented with yet another mystery. The last John named in the record prior to this passage
was the son of the unknown Benjamin Jr. the 2nd, born in 1531, about 20 years after this John went into
hiding in London. Thus we have no idea where this John came from.
54
After consulting four different sources on the King James Version of the Bible I have found no mention
at all of any translations used in the KJV by anyone named Craycroft. So at this point I am very suspicious
about this entire passage of the Record.
55
I think it must have been very crowded in that rowboat laden with all of his handwritten translations,
which are described in the next paragraph as “quite bulky and . . .quite difficult task to move it around”.

56
He had not been in Hamburg long before the Pope’s spies located him again and after the
local authorities had caused him much trouble he again fled the police and arrived in
Cologne, where he arranged with two men also Protestants who could read and write, to
make copies of his translations. These copies of course had to be made by handwriting,
which was a very slow method. After a short time he was able to secure more help, and
was able to turn several copies each week, which he was able to successfully smuggle
into England through confederates, and were distributed among those who desired them,
and who later made substantial financial contributions to a fund to carry on the good
work.

His work had to be carried on with the utmost secrecy, both in making copies and the
smuggling of them to England, for there were paid spies almost everywhere. He finally
got bold enough to move his work to the basement in the house where he resided. This
soon proved to have been a mistake for careful as they were, the spies soon located their
plant in the basement of his home, and he and his partners were watched constantly and
secretly, day and night for several days, but they were not aware of this sneaking
procedure, but Bishop Cochlacus, a noted Catholic bishop, knocked at his door suddenly
and demanded to be admitted immediately without any ceremony, which was a very
uncommon thing to do among people of note and high standing. They never admitted
anyone until they knew positively who they were and what their business was, therefore
John Craycroft and his helpers refused to admit the Bishop, saying that this was his
private home and he was a law-abiding Protestant, and that the Bishop had no right or
authority to enter without permission, and that no good could come out of the Bishop
forcing an entrance. However the Bishop, with the help he had purposely brought along
to overcome any resistance, now forced their way into his home, where they secured
several copies of the translations that were hidden under the table but did not attempt to
enter the basement, where their workshop was located. With the evidence they thus
secured Bishop Cochlacus immediately sent a special messenger to the Pope, explaining
that the Protestant outlawed translations were being made and circulated by the
Englishman John Craycroft, who had caused so much trouble in England a short time
before that he had disappeared from sight and he was of the opinion that there was a big
reward for his capture. The Bishop asked for instructions as to what action he should
take in the matter. In a short time he received full and complete instructions, and
immediately made demands on the German government, who was ruled by the Pope in
all religious matters. The authorities were a little slow in taking action and were
promptly reprimanded by both the Pope and Bishop. It was later learned that there were
many employees in the government service who were strongly in favor of Protestant
beliefs, but did not dare to let it become know for fear of losing their positions or even
becoming targets for adverse demonstrations.

While awaiting instructions the Bishop prevailed upon the authorities to raid the place,
and stop any further distribution of the Protestant work until such time as the messenger
could reach the Pope and return, which would take several weeks at least under favorable
conditions of travel. The city authorities held this was a proper action for them to take as
they were all supposedly Catholics. The raid was made on the third day after the Bishop
had made his unjustified demand for admittance. This delay gave John Craycroft and his

57
aides time to stop all work and everything was secretly hidden in another place, for only a
very small amount of the work was ever kept at its original place of manufacture, for fear
of just such a raid.

The raid took place but nothing incriminating was found either in the house or basement
and absolutely nothing that would be of any help to the Bishop or Pope in the arrest of
Craycroft and his aides, but it frightened the workers so badly that all refused to continue
any more. The messenger returned in December, 1526 A.D. In the meantime John
Craycroft had smuggled every finished copy into London. He well knew if any of them
were found they would be burned, beside resulting in severe punishment by
imprisonment for him and any others in whose possession they might be found.

After the unsuccessful raid, the Bishop became very angry and in order to cause
Craycroft endless trouble he personally visited the King of England who was then a
strong Catholic, explaining in a very exaggerated manner the great harm that would result
should any of the Craycroft translations be released either in Germany or England, and
prevailing upon the King to issue an order that all of the Craycroft translations must be
captured and promptly and publicly destroyed in the public square. Long before this
order had been placed in effect all completed translations had been distributed among the
proper Protestant ministers, both in Germany and in England, and placed into proper
hands through them to his Church.

Shortly after the special messenger who had been sent to the Pope, John Craycroft had
disappeared again, and much fear was felt among his many friends that he had secretly
(been) murdered. But he had not, but had located in a small locality just on the outskirts
of Cologne, and was very successful in turning out hand-printed copies faster than ever
before, and was shipping them into England in an odd manner. They were on small boats
and landed in out of the way places on the England shores, and were not discovered by
the officials who were to “search” for and destroy them. He did not establish regular
routes, but used a different route each time, this being done so that if the Catholic
authorities did locate a shipment they most likely would stand guard for future shipments,
which would never come.

In this manner the copies were increasing in England at an alarming rate, but the
authorities were powerless for they could not locate where they were being
manufactured, for they were smuggled into England in the above manner, but they did
not know from what country they came from. For a long time it was thought they were
being made in England, in which or course they were badly mistaken, and it only caused
more careful and secret searching of everything that entered at all ports of entry.

Heavy demands for more copies in other countries grew heavier and heavier. Even in
Germany itself the demands were great, but almost impossible to fill, for fear of
detection, and of course these copies had to be issued in the German tongue which was
very hard to do for the Germans were afraid they may be caught and punished. The
German Catholic authorities were far more severe in their methods of punishment than
those in England, and in almost every case the punishment was barely short of death itself

58
for the sentence was to punish them all they could stand. But very often the punishment
was carried beyond that stage and the prisoner died from its effect. But the authorities
supposedly investigated the death and called it the result of an unavoidable accident.

Protestant Christianity was spreading both in England and many other European
countries at this time despite the Pope and his Catholic believers and many thousands of
converts were being made almost daily, and the Pope called a meeting in Rome to devise
ways and means to prevent it and restore the Pope’s losing his unjustified authority in the
government.

But in spite of this ill-advised meeting the Protestants gained fast and gradually were
successful in filling some of the higher offices of the authorities throughout England and
Germany. Many of the new officers were mysteriously murdered, but the drive
continued.

From time to time the Catholic authorities secured a few copies and promptly destroyed
them by fire with great celebrations, but soon discovered that where one copy was
destroyed more than fifty copies would take its place. At this time John Craycroft had
secured several trusted men who were as anxious as he to spread the good works
throughout the world and would help him carry on his work secretly without almost no
pay for their work, accepting only enough pay for their time to barely pay their actual
living expenses. They continued the manufacture and smuggling into England until John
decided he could do much more efficient work at less expense, by his returning to
England himself and leaving his present plant in charge of another Protestant name(d)
Frederick Post.

So he did return to England and assisted secretly in the distribution as well as writing
more and printing more of the Protestant beliefs. By this time there were hundreds of
preachers of the Protestant believers in England and it soon became safer to hold
meetings without fear of being arrested. All were careful for there were spies almost
everywhere. They carefully disposed of each and every days work every night by
making them ready to ship and transferring them to another place so if the place should
be discovered there would be nothing to show just what was being printed. But careful as
they were the spies at last located their plant, which was located in the basement of the
residence. The house was again surrounded and raided, but nothing was found except
presses and inks and some instruments used in the production of information that was
always distributed among both Protestant and Catholics alike, for when they seen they
were being watched they stopped making copies of their regular Protestant works and
burned what copies they had finished in the fireplace. However they did discover a trail
that led them to another place where there was a few copies that had not yet been
smuggled out to England.

These few copies they purposely let the authorities find, but not in their possession. The
authorities thought they had made a big discovery before and immediately decided that
they were original copies of John Craycroft’s translations and decided that he was in
Germany and set about to capture him. In a short time spies located him and brought him

59
before the ruler of Germany, who ordered him returned to the King of England for
punishment.

When he was returned to England56 he was thrown into prison, where he remained
several years when after much hard work and owing to the unsanitary condition of the
prison he was finally brought to trial on several trumped-up charges, some of which were
absolutely false. The trial was all one-sided that is he was not allowed to produce any
evidence in self-defense but was found guilty and condemned to death by the King’s
court on June 29th, 1540 A.D. but five days before his execution was to take place he was
released under a personal guard, who had to accompany him every place he went, and
should he violate any of the provisions of his release the guard was to return him to the
prison immediately. But he was very careful not to overstep the limitations of his
freedom. They thought by this method he might lead them to the location of some of his
helpers. But he never did much to their disappointment. His friends and followers were
now very busy both in Church and in official capacities, and within three months he was
given a full and complete pardon by the King upon the urgent request of the Queen, who
was a mild sympathizer of the Protestants57. The Queen cited many cases of unreliable
evidence, which upon its face it was shown to be prejudiced and unreliable and when
given the chance much of the evidence was proven to be absolutely false and also it was
shown all of this false evidence was provided by proven spies of the Pope.

The real reason for his release was for fear of an uprising among the Protestants whom
had now become very strong and rapidly growing stronger every day owing to the Pope’s
cruel orders and forced high taxes collected and used exclusively for the Catholics and
against the Protestants.

At this point in the Record it appears that there was another map of England and Wales
which was not replaced in later versions. The following note was an explanation for this
map.

The heavy green lines indicate the travels of the Craycroft family in England while the
religious wars and hatred were in progress. Many raids were made by the Bishops and
priests in their meetings.

At this time John Craycroft’s health was badly broken caused by his long imprisonment
in the unsanitary prison and was forced by his weakened condition to abandon almost all
of his Protestant work and spend the remainder of his long and useful life in the suburbs
of London, where he peacefully passed away September 20th, 1516 A.D.58

56
When had he returned to Germany? Two paragraphs before this it is said that John returned to England
and no mention is made about him returning to Germany.
57
Again I remind the reader that at this time Henry VIII was King of England and he was the leading
Protestant in the kingdom.
58
I assume that this is a typographical error. In a previous paragraph we see John being sentenced to death
in 1540. In a following sentence it is stated that his wife followed him in death in 1557, a year after John
passed away.

60
After his father was buried his son John Craycroft Jr. went to France and Germany to
finish his education as a physician. In France he graduated in the special study he had
taken up then went to Germany, where he also graduated in the special studies he wished.
Then he returned to London and became a practicing physician for many years. He took
special interests in the old folks of his family and especially he was much interested in
the old family home, where he lived for many years and continued his heavy practice as a
physician.

At the death of his father, John Craycroft Sr., he fell heir to this family record and is the
one who wrote and added to this record the long history of his father herein. His good
mother died just one year after his father which occurred on October 12th, 1557, and he
seen to it that she was buried beside his father which was her last request. His mother
and father were a devoted couple, more than the average. She often helped him with his
work in both translations and making copies of his works for distribution among the
Protestants and thoroughly believed in his work and helped in many ways to make
converts. She was 88 years of age at the time of her death. Then her son John Jr. seen to
it that his younger brother Charles secured a good education and seen to it that he was
well secured and settled in his life’s work59. Both of the boys could read their fathers
translations fluently at the age of ten years and of course adopted the Protestant doctrine
as they grew to manhood.

Charles studied much under the direction of John Jr. and was graduated as a physician in
1560 A.D. but at this time all physicians or doctors as they were called, as well as the
general public in general, believed that the practice of medicine was mixed with
astrology. That is the doctors were taught and believed that the position of the Moon and
movement of the different planets and stars as well as the Sun and even the hour of the
day affected the body.

It was even believed by many that the touching of relics of the saints brought more cures
than medicine and for this reason doctors had very poor success and questionable
reputations however before Charles died he was convinced and convinced many others
that the proper use of a proper medicine in most cases had by far more effect in securing
a permanent cure than did astrology or the touching of saints garments of relics.

He therefore experimented continuously and made many valuable discoveries in medical


profession and was famous at the time of his death. John Jr. was more like his father and
clung to the practice of the Protestant religion among his friends and neighbors.

He was a great friend of Martin Luther who was born in 1583 (should be 1483) and died
in 1546 A.D.60 Luther was the man who broke away from the Catholics and the Pope and
59
It is curious to note that after repeated references to how well educated the Craycrofts were Charles
would need his brother’s assistance to gain an education and career considering his mother was 88 when
she died. She would have to have given birth to Charles after she was 60 for Charles to need assistance
obtaining an education.
60
This seems to present a conflict. It is earlier stated that John Jr. went to France and Germany after the
death of his father in 1556 to finish his studies to become a physician. According to a later passage, John
Jr. was born in 1520. Now I make some conjectures. John Jr. was under 20 when his father was

61
established the Lutheran Churches of which many were established in England, Ireland,
Germany, Belgium, and later in the United States of America. As a teacher and public
speaker he was a very popular one, and owing to his very convincing attitude in his
manner, won many converts to his new Protestant churches. John Jr. attended his
meetings as often as was possible and the soon traveled together quite extensively
throughout England, Ireland, and Germany making many new converts as they went.

John Jr. was well qualified to interpret the Bible as he had been taught by his father how
to translate the words from the Hebrew and Greek tongues, and could tell the exact
meaning of any of the translations that had been made by others up to that time. Now
that printing by type and ink with hand-power presses and had at this time been in
common use for several years it was quite easy to get much of the Bible out among the
common people. It became very common for people who could read and write to hold
meetings at their homes and read to many who could not read who listened attentively
and were convinced to the Protestant beliefs.

Printing with type was invented by a German name(d) John Gutenberg who lived in
Mai(n)z Germany. He made this great discovery in the year of 1450 A.D. when he
printed several so-called books, which were very crude as compared with later issues in
his establishment at Mainz Germany and three issues of the famous Gutenberg Bible.
They created quite a sensation for they could be made about one-tenth the cost of the old
method of writing by hand and hundreds of copies could be made in less time than one
could be turned out by hand.

At this point in the Record there is reference to another map of Europe that is not present
in the current version. The following is the note that followed the map in the Record.

This is another map of Europe which shows the route traveled by the Craycrofts at the
time of their trip to print the translations of the Bible in Germany and other places. This
is a replaced copy. The original map was so dilapidated, soiled, and torn that it is now
being renewed to be able for descendants to preserve the record for future generations of
the Craycroft Family.

Printing with movable type, his invention, was introduced into Milan and Venice in 1469,
just nineteen years after Gutenberg’s wonderful discovery. It was introduced into
London in 1474 A.D. in which places was accepted and put into general use, by such
famous printers as William Caxton and Aldus Manutius, another inventor. All of the
early printers made or cast their own type, made their own ink rollers, and their own iron
frames or chases with which to hold the types in their proper places. All of these new
inventions were extremely crude as compared with those made just a few years later and
especially those of today for then everything was written by hand only.

imprisoned and 20 when he was sentenced to death in 1540. It seems unlikely that he would be traveling
abroad while his father was in prison. It also seem unlikely that he would have traveled abroad while his
father was in such poor health, so it follows that it is not likely that John Jr. traveled with Luther prior to
Luther’s death in 1546.

62
John Jr. went to Germany on one of his many trips of speech making and preaching and
secured a position in one of the printing houses. His object being to secure at first hand
how this wonderful work of printing was really accomplished. He was not specially
interested in the monetary value as he was to learn exactly how the work was carried on.
He worked very hard for three months then much to the surprise of his employer made
arrangements with the employer to publish some of his father’s translations of the Bible.
John Jr. by this time had been placed as foreman in the printing house, at an advance in
compensation and while he could and did superintend the printing of his own work or
order for his own books of the Bible, he never shirked in the least his work for his
employer but it did fit him perfectly for the establishment of a large printing firm in
England by the name of the Protestant Bibles and other religious papers.

He returned to England and was successful in securing enough capital and help to return
to Germany and secure enough type and printing presses to start turning out large
quantities of bibles, printed in pure English, which up to now were very scarce indeed
and also very expensive for all had to be imported from Germany now and all had to pay
a heavy import tax which the Catholic officials purposely placed on every book in an
endeavor to keep them out of England besided (?) they bought up many copies and
destroyed them.61

The poorer classes of the population both in England and Germany were not educated
above an ordinary conversation now, and only a very small number could read or write,
but when the Bibles were sold so cheaply as could be accomplished on account of the
printing being carried on within the boundaries of England the owners of the printing
office escaped having to pay the heavy import tax, thus could sell their books at about
one-tenth the cost of the German manufactured Bibles which had the immediate result of
almost every Protestant purchasing one or more copies of the Bible, whether they could
read or not.

The younger generation were eager to learn to read or write and private schools sprung
up in many homes and other places and within a year or two these Bibles were in almost
every Protestant home and in many Catholic homes obtained copies secretly for besides
having the Bible printed the books contained many articles exposing the rank misuse of
authority to many of the local and other officials including an expose of property and
created almost an immediate war. The Catholics obtained sanction from the Pope to raid
every place suspected of having any copies of the Bibles and thousands were destroyed.
Many people were murdered mysteriously. Of course it was commonly known that the
murders were the result of having guilty knowledge of having copies of the Bible or from
where they came.

In thousands of cases where the poorer classes could not afford to buy the books, the
Bibles were handed out free by the different Protestant societies of the churches. They
were very crude books to be sure as compared with our books of today, but they

61
What did John Jr. do while he was in Germany? Did he learn to operate printing presses then print his
father’s translation of the Bible? Or did he complete his studies to become a physician? If he did both he
would have been extremely busy.

63
contained the true translations of the Bible and that was what the Protestant people and
churches wanted.

Within a few years there was great improvement in the education ability of the people,
especially among those who that could read and write, and it was very noticeable that
among the Protestant populace there was a much larger number of individuals that could
read and write. This angered the Pope and the Bishops, Archbishops, and the priests of
the Catholic population to such an extent that they attempted to destroy the books by
passing a law outlawing them, but failed. The Protestant Churches were always very
much in favor of educating every person at least so they could read and write while the
Pope and all other Catholic officials worked to keep them uneducated, for when
uneducated the Catholics could be in a better position to control them, because of their
ignorance.

As the Protestants became more educated and took more interest in the running of the
government they were successful in placing many of their members in official positions.
This they were able to be or great help toward a general education of the masses. John
Craycroft Jr. always had an important place in these movements. He had preserved the
original copies of his father’s manuscripts of the translations of the Bible, and these were
the Bibles that were being sold and distributed in all England, Ireland, and many
thousands were smuggled into Germany, printed in the German language.

The Pope issued positive orders that no Catholic should ever read this Bible, or have it in
their possession at any time except to carry them to Catholic headquarters, for he claimed
they were inspired by the Devil and any Catholic caught reading it should suffer
expulsion from the Catholic Church and be stoned to death. With some of the people this
drastic order had a very telling effect, but with thousands it only drove them farther away
from Catholicism and the Pope.

For a long time the demand for copies of the bible and other Protestant books and
information were in extremely heavy demand, so heavy that is was very difficult to keep
up with the limited facilities for producing them, so an order was placed for more type
and presses in Germany and as soon as they arrived the printing plant was enlarged and
books and leaflets and other Protestant information almost flooded the streets much to the
discomfort of the Catholic leaders. It was a well known fact that thousands of Catholics
were secretly studying and reading the Protestant books and pamphlets now so common
on the streets, while other staunch Catholic believers were busily gathering up all the
Bibles and Protestant papers and destroying them for which they received payment from
the Catholic authorities in power.

The books printed created an awful outbreak among the officials both in the Catholic
Church and government and included thousands of copies of pamphlets. The titles were-

1. The Bible is the Only Foundation of the True Christian Faith


2. The Pope is Not The Rightful Head of the Church

64
3. All True Christians Should Practice What They Preach and Not Try To Deceive
All the People Like the Pope, Bishops, and the Priests Do, But Should Be Honest
and Tell the Truth Always
4. All Monasteries Should Be Abolished Immediately
5. All Taxes Collected by Catholic Officials and Used Exclusively By These
Officials For Unjust and Dishonest Purposes Should Be Immediately Stopped and
Such Taxes Paid in The Past Should Be Refunded In Full
All of these books were written by John Craycroft Jr. and his friend Luther and as each
came from the press and were distributed free on the streets they created a sensation
among the still few loyal Catholics. But was heralded as an entering wedge by the
Protestant Population to establish a more tolerant attitude for religious teachings among
the people and discard the forced teachings of the Catholics.

Here again, the evidence refuting this long passage about John Craycroft, Jr. being
involved in printing the English Bible and fighting oppression at the hands of the King of
England is far too lengthy for footnotes. After reading this passage numerous times and
then researching the history of the English Bible I’ve come to the conclusion that the
writer of this section has used an amalgamation of persons to create John Jr. from whole
cloth.

The persecution and hunting of John Craycroft, Jr. was actually carried out against John
Tyndale who, in 1525/6, printed the first English version of the New Testament in
Germany and had them smuggled into England. Although King Henry VIII was very
much in favor of every church in England having a bible it had to be in the Vulgate Latin
of the time. As a result, the Bishop of London with the authority of King Henry VIII
confiscated and burned thousands of Tyndale’s bibles. Eventually Tyndale was captured
and burned at the stake after 500 days imprisonment.

The second person who seems to have been a model for John Jr. was Myles Coverdale
who was one of Tyndale’s assistants in the last six years of his life and who continued
Tyndale’s work with John Rogers, another assistant of Tyndale’s. Coverdale finished the
translation of the Old Testament into English and on October 4, 1535 printed the first
complete English Bible, both Old and New Testaments.

As for John Jr.’s alleged association with Martin Luther this was all but impossible.
According to a later passage John was born in 1520. Martin Luther died in 1546 and
while it is possible that John knew him personally it is extremely unlikely.

The misunderstandings became so strong that at last Luther, up to now a leading Catholic
priest, withdrew from the Catholic Church entirely which he had always been a member,
but could no longer be a party to the dishonest and oppressive methods both of the Pope,
Bishops, and the priests as well as the government officials in many instances. Therefore
he served due notice on the Pope of his disapproval of many of the outstanding teachings
and orders issued by the Pope that in the future he would not consider any unjust orders
issued by the Pope as his duty to enforce and this is notice that my connection with the
Church is at an end and that he was sending all church property to the Bishop.

65
This is a map replacing one old map that was so old, soiled and torn that it would not be
read. But we were able to trace the routes said to have been taken by several English
Craycroft families at the time England assumed to govern Ireland. This notation was on
the map.

The heavy lines shows the routes taken by the several Craycroft families in traveling in
Ireland when England assumed to government of Ireland. Several Craycroft families
remained in that country, but most of them returned to England after several years of
suffering.

66
67
Being a monk and desiring a more high education he immediately application (applied)
to enter the University of Wittenberg in 1508 where he studied for a time and at length
became a teacher, and began teaching and preaching with great fervor.

One day the appearance of a friar selling indulgences under Papal authority aroused
Luther to a question of accepted doctrine as to the forgiveness of sin. He posted these
inviting academic discussion among other students. The question as to the views of the
Pope and other church authorities caused a great amount of excitement and Luther was
summoned to Rome before the Pope, where he failed to get satisfaction or even an honest
hearing.

He however made such a good showing in his arguments that he at once became a
German hero when he upheld the freedom of personal thought and belief, as against the
Papal tyranny. His heresy became a very wide and interesting issue all over Germany
and England, as did John Craycroft in England a few short months before. He, Luther,
was summoned to the Diet at Worms in 1521 A.D. where he attempted to convince those
present of his views without result. He left there under warning that if he persisted in his
present views he must be outlawed under strict orders from the Pope in Rome.

He still persisted and became the object of search of spies of the Pope and Bishops. He
was hidden by friends in the Castle of Wartburg in the Thuringian forest where he spent
almost a year writing his and John Craycroft’s translations of the Bible, and composing
some of the famous hymns. Unable to find peace in his retirement he at last boldly came
forward and to Wittenberg and for eight days delivered sermons to explain his absence
and beliefs. From then onward Luther kept continuous battle for his highly respected
reforms. He was accepted by the Protestants with open arms and with very high regard
as he was overrun with requests to address many mass meetings.

Immediately upon Luther’s decisive step to separate himself entirely and completely
forever from the Catholic Church and ignore the orders of the Pope and Bishops in the
future, of which he has been a devout adherent for so many years, for he now thoroughly
believed and insists that the Bible is the complete and sufficient source of Christian
inspiration and that there can be no intermediary between the believer and his Lord and
Master, Jesus Christ. He, Luther, taught and believed that true Christianity rests upon the
doctrine of justification by faith and accepting the holy scriptures as determining the
whole policy of the church, its liturgy and its formal statement of belief.

Luther was persecuted beyond all reason for the rest of his life but he paid absolutely no
attention to it and when cornered by some of his enemies he would by his kindly words
and manner always make them ashamed for their uncalled for actions and in many cases
would win many new converts. Finally his time came for him to depart this world and he
died peacefully in 1546 A.D. but his teachings still live and will survive him for ages.
The present day Lutheran Churches stand as a monument to Martin Luther, one of
Germany’s greatest Reformers.

68
John Craycroft Jr. is the third generation by that name in direct descendency of the first
or original John, and now becomes the direct descendant and the ancestor of the future
Craycrofts of this long line of family record.62 This John Craycroft the third was born
July 10th, 1520 A.D. and died June 27th, 1591 A.D. He was the father of eight sons and
one daughter. His first son he named Luther in honor of his good friend and co-worker
Luther. This son was born April 26th, 1542. James, born August 26th, 1544. Seth born
December 14th, 1548. George born January 20th, 1550. Louis born January 18th,1547.
Marion born October 14th, 1549. George born January 20th, 1554. Thomas born
February 26th, 1557, and Louise the only girl was born January 24th, 1559.

All of these children were well educated. They were taught mostly at home by their
highly educated mother, when possible they attended the regular schools, which were
conducted by the Protestant churches. The only girl Louise died at the age of twelve
years. All of the boys lived to be very old men, and each married and raised large
families. As they grew into manhood they seemed to scatter to different localities and to
many foreign countries. Some of them changing the way of spelling their family name in
an effort to establish the starting of an entirely new family estate and name. Thomas the
youngest of the eight boys preferred to remain close to home while most of the others
departed separately to France, Germany, Spain and Ireland, where special inducements
were held out to these highly educated men to enter many different businesses. Thomas
remained in London and (married) Jane Smith July 25th, 1576, when only twenty-two
years old.

Another of the boys married Amanda Jones, this was Robert63, their marriage took place
June 16th, 1569. The third boy Seth married Mary Crawford June 10th, 1570. This
marriage resulted very badly for the two principals. The Crawford girl was the only child
in the Crawford family and as the family wished to preserve the Crawford family name
they insisted that before they would consent to the marriage Seth must drop his name of
Craycroft and adopt the name of Crawford and be married by that name and always have
the family name of Crawford for his family name forever afterward.

After some delay he consented to this and was married and threw away his own name of
Craycroft and became a Crawford thereafter. They were always known by the name of
Crawford and in some manner later was able to attach to his name the worthless and
useless title of Sir. No Craycroft ever went to the trouble to ascertain how he attained the
title they were so disgusted. But we did know he was known by the name of Sir Seth
Crawford as a sad result for them, they were totally ignored by all the Craycrofts and lost
to the entire Craycroft family. Although they lived in London the entire Craycroft family
completely lost track of them and disowned them because he discarded the entire family
name of Craycroft when he married the Crawford girl.

Had he retained only part of the family name the balance of the family would not have
been so severe on him and sanctioned the marriage but as the Crawford’s insisted that the

62
John Craycroft Jr.’s father was John, and his grandfather was John, but the “original” John was 11
generations removed from John Jr. The original John Craycroft was the son of James Cray Craycroft.
63
According to the paragraph above there is no Robert.

69
total name of Craycroft be eliminated and the complete adoption of their name of
Crawford they unanimously decided the many Craycrofts that they all ignored them
forever. Therefore nothing is known of their family history for so far as Seth is
concerned his total existence ended on the day of his marriage to the Crawford girl.

Robert became the heir and direct ancestor of the Craycroft family record. He was
married in London to Elizabeth Sproat July 25th, 1576. His marriage was an exceedingly
happy one and very productive one, for he became the father of ten boys and two girls.
He too, like many of his forefathers, was of a religious turn of mind. He studied and
taught the Protestant Bible and did much for the advancement of the Protestant faith. He
continuously pointed out and taught the great difference between the Protestant Christian
faith and that of the oppressive teachings of the Catholic Church and of the Pope, bishops
and priests. He also pointed out to all that after all was said and done each and everyone,
both Protestant and Catholic individuals, were seeking the same objective, namely the
salvation of their souls. Really and truly the only great difference is in the different
methods used in which they hoped to accomplish the great tasks. One used force, the
other used persuasion. He dwelled continuously on these only differences:

1. Both believe in the Fatherhood of God and the Sonship of Jesus Christ.
2. Both believe in the Trinity in atonement of Christ.
3. Both believe in the founding of the church for the salvation of the people and the
guidance of their lives.

There are three and only three points of differences between the Protestant and the
Catholic faiths that may be deemed fundamental. These are:

1. The Protestants recognizes one and only one source of faith and that source is the
Bible and the Bible only. While the Catholics recognize three sources which are
the Bible, tradition, and the decrees of the Popes and councils.

2. The Protestants believe in justification by faith alone. They believe that salvation
is a gift of divine grace and that no man has the power to say he can forgive sins
or administer it. While the Catholics believe or at least are taught to believe that
the Church and the Pope can be and (are) a mediator between God and Man.
They believe that no individual has any right to private judgment or interpretation
of the Holy Scriptures and that he must accept only that which the Pope and
Church teaches, and that all prayers must be made to the Pope or Holy Father, as
he is known by all Catholics.64

3. The Protestant believes he is a free moral agent and can be saved by sincere
repentance and that a marriage conducted under the Protestant procedure is as
sacred a contract as anyone can make, and that the children of those marriages are
as sure of blessings as are those of any Catholic or any other kind of marriages.

64
I was born and raised in the Catholic religion and am slightly familiar with the history of the Church and
I was always taught that God was the only one to direct your prayers. This passage directly contradicts that
teaching.

70
These marriages do not have to have the permission of any Protestant minister or
any other church official, but must comply to the oawa (?) wherever the marriage
takes place. The Catholics must comply with these laws too just the same as
anyone else whether they secure permission from a priest, bishop or the Pope. In
this connection the Catholics believe that unless one is a Catholic, he or she or
both, are a total loss spiritually, and that a marriage made under the Protestant
proceedings is not recognized by God and that the parties thereto are simply
living together in adultery which no Protestant ever did believe and never will and
many Catholics don’t believe it either, but just comply with it because they do not
wish to be criticized by others.

Robert was in great demand in any locality where he happened to be for both Protestants
and Catholics listened almost spellbound at the flow of his words from his mouth which
seemed to fall out more like a machine than from a man. He was a large man and made
friends wherever he went, and was successful in the turning of many Catholics to the
Christian faith. He now became the owner of these now famous Craycroft translations of
the Bible that had been handed down to heirs in the Craycroft family now for over two
hundred years, also the family record which had its inception in the year of 1297 A.D.

Just a short time before he died on December 6th, 1603 A.D. he called to his bedside all of
his relatives that could be found and secured their unanimous consent to donate the
translations of the Bible of the original John Craycroft, his forefather, and his
descendants to a committee then being formed by famous men appointed by King James
for the purpose of investigating the different translations of the Bibles that are in use by
both Catholics and Protestants and decide upon their reliability and their sources and all
facts connected with their true facts.

At this time King James, a Protestant King of England, sought to preserve and perpetuate
the true books of the Bible and establish an accurate and true translation of the what is
now the New Testament or the King James version of the Holy Scriptures.65 The King
appointed a committee of learned men for this purpose which were among the brightest
and most highly educated Protestant minds of this day and age. Honest men whose
honesty and integrity is beyond reproach and gave them explicit orders and instructions
to investigate thoroughly at every angle the dependability of both Protestant or Catholic
sources the honest information in regard to him whether it be Protestant or Catholic he
wanted the information secured from a reliable historical source to be handed down to
future generations and above all it must be backed up by absolute facts that can be proven
by actual records or incidents. There was no prejudices in this committee but they went
to work with an open mind to really discover real records, data, and actual facts both
from the Protestant records and Catholic records.

King James was a devoted Protestant, was very kind-hearted, and true to his people when
they were right but when wrong he let it be known his convictions and gave them a
chance to correct any dishonest or mistaken idea they may have presented but when he

65
This is not an accurate statement. The King James Version of the Bible is composed of the Old and New
Testaments.

71
made a decision it was final and he seldom ever changed his mind but he always went to
the bottom of every matter brought before him before he finally made his decision.
He was a monarch of every strong and determined convictions and the progress of
England made under and during his administration and reign was wonderful and his
record will survive forever. Immediately after he was crowned King he made a great
speech in which he bade his people to obey the laws and orders and impressed upon them
his divine right to the throne, declaring it seditious for any subjects to dispute anything
that a King may do or say for as he advised them the King is always right for before he
decides any question he thoroughly investigates and secures the absolute facts then the
decision must stand as ordered.

He was noted for his kindly manner and decisions, but once made they became the law
and must be obeyed explicitly. When he made this his first speech, the Puritans were
very strong and growing class in England who contended that the Church of England
(Protestant) was not sufficiently reformed and had retained too many of the Pope’s and
Catholic practices to which they could not and would not adhere to. Many of the Puritans
openly and steadfastly refused to confirm (conform?) with the Church of England and
other of the Churches requirements and were called nonconfirmests (nonconformists?),
while others separated from it entirely and were called separatists. Later developments
plainly marked all of both factions as being extremely cruel in their punishments of those
who did not obey their teachings and orders. This attitude was taken advantage of by the
Catholics and used as an entering wedge to intimidate the new King, but he stood
steadfastly and ordered all cruelties on all sides including Protestants, Catholics and
Puritans to cease at once under heavy penalties. This order had immediate effect of a
very quieting effect among all classes and for a long time each faction did not openly
teach cruel punishment but in many cases it came to light that some cruel action had been
taken but as punishment by orders of the King the practice soon died out.

The Puritans demanded much of the new King. He listened to their every complaint and
remedied those which appeared to be unjust or punished those persons who insisted upon
violating the laws. While he was on his way to London to be crowned King a great
petition that had been signed by a great number of Ministers of the Gospel and common
people was presented to him praying for certain reforms in the Church of England, which
was now Protestant. The King promised to investigate each and every one of the
demands but asked patience and enough time to properly investigate and obtain facts
which he did later.

In consequence King James I arranged immediately for the Hampton Court Conference
which met the following January. The King himself presided. The Puritans made such
unreasonable demands and endeavored to force their demands so strongly that the King
soon lost almost all respect for them. They soon discovered that they could expect no
special favors from the King, but that their demands must be submitted along with the
others and the would receive the same attention and consideration as all others in their
regular order. The King made it plain that each and all would be heard and that none
would be overlooked.

72
The Puritans were so insistent that he ruled them out of order many times and at last told
them “You must conform yourselves to the laws or I will expel you from our lands”. It
was this what they termed harsh treatment of the Protestant King that late caused the
Pilgrim fathers to go to Holland and in later years to the shores of the United States. This
memorable meeting accomplished one great and lasting thing the result of which has
lived even to this day and will live forever. The main object of the meetings was to build
up and settle many questions of a religious nature and that was accomplished, and after
many years of investigation and earnest work and the members of the conference and the
King arranged to issue a truthful and reliable and exact translation of the true Bible
records and reliable translation in English for the English-speaking peoples of the World.

Therefore fifty-four leading scholars who at the time were the most highly educated and
learned men of England were selected, but after several short sessions seven were
dropped from membership of the conference and only forty-seven finished the work.
This great gathering of the brightest and brainiest men of that period of the times finally
completed their work and produced the present file that is known and accepted by the
world as the Authorized Version of the King James Bible. They finished their long and
worthy task in 1611 A.D. and our King James Version of our present Bible was
authorized, accepted and issued and immediately adopted by all Protestant Churches and
people and is being used today by hundreds of millions of people all over the world and
is accepted as authentic and inspired.

Robert Craycroft, having retained all of the original translations of the original John
Craycroft, Sr., his great, great grandfather, which the original John Sr. had spent many
years of translating and of hard work and real suffering to complete and pass down to an
unbroken (line) of descendants and they in the long run to pass on to the world.
Remember these translations were all made from the original material from the Jewish
and Greek tongues in the years of 1520 to 1525 A.D. When the committee to which
Robert Craycroft had offered the translations to submitted them to the Conference with
their history, the conference accepted them and later every one was investigated, checked
and rechecked and in the year of 1607 A.D. were officially accepted and filed with many
other records and translations to be used or discarded later. Later developments proved
that all of the Craycroft translations were used, and John Craycroft Sr. was honored by
this conference as one of the original translations of our present Bible, and indications are
such at this time in the year of 1607 A.D. this Bible will live forever.

The works he translated were original records and laws of the Jews and Greeks who had
handed these translations or laws down in their original forms from generation to
generation for thousands of years both before and after the birth of Jesus Christ. When
the King James version of our bible was completed and printed it was found that it
contained the following facts besides the inspired spiritual information. It has 66 books,
773,746 words, 31,173 verses. The word “reverend” appears but once. The word “Lord”
appears 1855 times, Ezra, Chapter seven Verse 22 contains all of the letters of the
alphabet but the letter J. The word “and” appears 46,227 times. The longest chapter is in
Chapter 8, Verse 9. The shortest verse is in St. John, Chapter 11, Verse 35.

73
NOTICE. There are several pages of the family record at this place that has faded out so
badly that it is almost impossible to make out correctly. However we are able to trace
many of the lines and are sure we have reproduced the more essential facts, although we
are confident that any matter left out was not of any great importance for it appears that
most it deals with was and misunderstandings with France, Italy and the Pope. This
notation is made here so that if any matter should be mentioned later in this record or if
something is mentioned that refer to some special passage it might be that these few
pages are the ones that is referred to.

It looks like some of the few lines that are invisible do not amount to very much but of
course it is impossible to state just how important they may be. But one thing we are sure
of and that is that it does not break the complete record of the unbroken line of
descendants of the family and that there has been no births or deaths in that time.

The cause of the record having such a bad place of being damaged seems to be it had
been very badly damaged by water, probably by rain, or possibly might have been in a
flood.

Continuing with the record.

Robert Craycroft’s son Marion, his youngest son, was the next to fall heir to these
important Craycroft family records. Marion married Jessie Townsend on June 5th, 1588.
Their first son was born May 15th, 1590, and had three brothers and one sister, but no
record was kept of their births, deaths or names. Therefore it is assumed they all
probably died early in life, for Marion the oldest son fell heir to these records. His name
was William. William was married to Josephine Harris on December 25th, 1611 A.D.
which was the same year our present Bible came into being.

William had four sons and one girl. The oldest boy was born December 10th, 1612 A.D.
and was named William Jr. Arthur was born October 31st, 1613. Christopher was born
April 4th, 1615 A.D. George was born September 23rd, 1617 A.D. and Benjamin was
born July 4th, 1619 A.D. Mary the only girl was born June 26th, 1621 A.D.

George and Benjamin were married the same day in a double marriage ceremony in
which both started their married life with their wives together. This ceremony was
celebrated on December 20th, 1640 A.D. in London, England. George married Jane
Morrow and Benjamin married Sally Frye, both boyhood friends living on adjoining
streets. Almost everyone was talking about the new country of the Colonies in America,
then called English colonies of the West, and the newly married brothers sought the
consent of their brides to sail for this new country, which was later called the United
States of America66.

In a short time after their marriage the two couples joined a large party of emigrants
bound for the new country, later called the United States, on a small sailing vessel called
66
This paragraph offers another mystery. Who wrote this passage? Obviously the American Colonies
wouldn’t be known as the United States of America for over 200 years. This would indicate that whoever
wrote this had to be far into the future of 1640.

74
the Sparton and after a long and dreary sailing of two months finally landed at
Jamestown, Virginia, on March 15th, 1641 A.D. and joined the local beliefs and the
Pilgrims who had been here for nearly twenty years seemed to have full control over
most of the few churches. They found the natives (which were called Indians) very
hostile with few exceptions, and most of them very treacherous to even talk to. They
seemed to resent the very presence of all white people and declared that the whole
country belonged to them (the Indians) and that all the whites must get out.67

Both families remained in Jamestown, Virginia, for almost three years, when they moved
to Providence, Rhode Island, where they resided many years, raising their family. So far
as any records that has ever been found these are the only Craycrofts that ever came to
these United States therefore there is absolutely no doubt that George and Benjamin
Craycroft and their wives are the only ones that established the Craycroft families in this
country, and are the original foundation and start of the many Craycroft families in these
United States of America, and Canada, and other American families.68

No doubt exists in the belief that these records establish an unbroken record that all
Craycrofts now living is a near or distant relative of each other, but as it is now more than
three hundred years since their arrival that it is a very hard task to trace all families. But
it is a fact that the original copy of this Family Record was brought over to this country
from England in the year of 1640-1641 A.D. by two brothers, George and Benjamin
Craycroft, that much has been verified many times by records in Virginia and Rhode
Island69, and from those two pioneers the Craycroft family has grown to many thousands
of families in the United States. One great fact seems well established and that is there
was never a Catholic known by the name of Craycroft in these United States up to the
present time. But in the beginning of the name in 1297 A.D. they were Catholics, but
soon thereafter changed to Protestants and have forever thereafter been Protestants and no
doubt all will forever remain so.

67
According www.britannica.com there was a relentless struggle between the Powhatan Indian confederacy
and early English settlers in the tidewater section of Virginia and southern Maryland. The conflict resulted
in the destruction of the Indian power. English colonists who had settled in Jamestown (1607) were at first
strongly motivated by their need of native corn (maize) to keep peace with the Powhatans, who inhabited
more than 100 surrounding villages. The emphasis on cooperation was strengthened by the efforts of the
Powhatan chief Powhatan and his daughter Pocahontas.

By the time of Powhatan's death (1618), settlers had discovered the highly profitable tobacco crop and
were pressing increasingly into Indian territory for rich new land to cultivate. In resistance to this incursion,
the confederacy's new chief, Opechancanough, Powhatan's elderly brother, in 1622 led his people in a
sudden attack against colonists throughout the area, massacring 347 of a total of about 1,200. Intermittent
warfare followed for 14 years; an uneasy calm was shattered in 1644 with a final Indian uprising in which
500 whites were slain. Determined British opposition, aided by Christianized Indians, broke the power of
the warring confederacy the same year, and Opechancanough was killed.
68
According to "The Early Settlers of Maryland, An Index to Names of Immigrants Compiled from
Records of Land Patents, 1633-1680, in the Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland" edited by Gust Skordas,
Assistant Archivist, State of Maryland, John and Ann Creacroft Immigrated to Maryland in 1665.
69
A search was conducted in 2000 in both Rhode Island and Virginia, particularly early records of
Jamestown, and no record was found confirming the presence of any Craycrofts in either area during this
time period.

75
Several of the Craycroft boys in England at different times wished to establish a family
clan of their own. Thus some of them spelled their names by dropping a letter or adding
a letter to their names. In the years of 1430 to 1497 then from 1526 to 1575, then from
1601 to 1624 no less than thirteen of the sons of Craycrofts decided to make this change,
thus creating the names of Craycraft, Cracroft, Cracraft, Crawcroft, Craycrof, Cravrof,
Bycroft, Bycrof, Kraykroft, Krakroft, Krakraft, Gracroft, Gracrof, Grakroft. Every one
was barred from the use of this family record except those who retained the original name
of Craycroft. Some of these deserters from the name have reached these United States
and some of these names are in use at this late date, 1941 A.D. and all of them are a
branch of the original name of Craycroft, created in the year of 1297 A.D. in London,
England.70

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT AND NOTICE

In the year of 1882 a diligent search of all available records both by State records in
England and these United States, and all records show conclusively and it was definitely
established from all records at hand that these two brothers, George and Benjamin
Craycroft, and their wives are the forefathers and foremothers of all the Craycroft’s in the
United States. Since that time several different families have seemed to spring up from
some remote localities who pronounce their family names about the same as the original
Craycroft but spell it the same as some of those names given above and no doubt they are
a branch of the original family but are also descendants of those Craycrofts who are
classed as deserters from the original family name and a are some of those who came to
the United States in later years after the original Craycrofts came in 1640 A.D.71

These two brothers, George and Benjamin, and their wives lived in Providence, Rhode
Island, for several years then became separated when George moved to Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. Benjamin remained in Providence for several years where most of his
children were born. Benjamin was the father of four boys and three girls. Benjamin Jr.
was born November 15th, 1642 A.D. and was the first Craycroft child ever born in the
United States. Richard, born March 5th, 1644 A.D., Franklin born August 10th, 1646
A.D., Horace born October 10th, 1647 A.D., Sarah born December 20th, 1648 A.D.,
Catherine born March 16th, 1650 A.D., Isabel born February 12th, 1651 A.D. Two of the
girls were murdered by Indians, their names Sarah and Catherine. The murders were the
result of a surprise raid by a band of about three hundred Indians on the outskirts of
Providence on April 18th, 1659 A.D. About one hundred of the settlers were killed and a
like number of the raiders also lost their lives. This raid had the result of the settlers
becoming better prepared to cope with any other raids that may accrue in the future by
securing more arms and erecting a large bell to be rung only when danger appeared. But
after several years it was deemed unnecessary to keep in repair and it was discontinued
for there were no more raids by Indians. The bell was then given to a Protestant church.

70
It is amazing that if this were a true family history, with so little information about individuals how do
they know how many men changed their surnames.
71
This is not an accurate statement at all. It is proven that many times the spelling of the name Craycroft
was changed to one of the previously mentioned spellings as a result of misunderstandings by civil officials
in recording the names or subsequent people incorrectly reading and/or transcribing the name in official
documents and the spelling change stuck.

76
The large family lived in Providence until September 1st, 1667 A.D. when they moved to
Boston, Massachusetts, where they lived until both parents died in 1672 A.D. of some
mysterious ailment thought to have been poisoned by the medicine of the cooking of
roots and herbs by a local doctor named Doctor Henry Davis. No investigation was ever
made so far as any of the Craycroft records show. Benjamin Jr. joined the local Army
when only seventeen years of age, where he remained until August 10th, 1663 A.D. Upon
his retirement from the Army he returned to Boston for a Christmas celebration
December 25th, 1663 A.D. where he was married to Louise Paterson after an
acquaintance of only six hours, it apparently being a rare case of love at first sight. It
proved to be a real love case for they lived together very happily and raised a large
family.

They had ten boys and three girls born as follows. Benjamin Jr. III their first child was
born June 10th, 1665 A.D., Edna born January 2nd, 1667 A.D., Thomas born January 6th,
1669 A.D., Jonathan born January 10th, 1670 A.D., Samuel born December 20th, 1672
A.D. Attention is directed to the births of Thomas and Jonathan for it is very unusual for
it will be noticed the two were born within only one year and four days of each other.72
They both were exceptionally strong and healthy children. Ralph born August 6th, 1674
A.D., Mathew born February 27th, 1676 A.D., Timothy born December 18th, 1676 A.D.,
George born September 2nd, 1687 A.D., Douglas born July 26th, 1680 A.D., Marie born
November 2nd, 1683 and Ida born May 16th, 1685 A.D. All of these children lived to an
old age and raised large families even the three girls married and imparted the family
name among well-known families of Adams, Burns and Johnson, by their marriage to
men of these names. Many of the Adams family became famous in later years by
occupying prominent positions in the service of the Army and government.

Benjamin Jr. III became the lawful owner and heir of this family record at the death of his
father in 1687 A.D. who was Benjamin II. In the course of a few years the record passed
into the hands of one of the sons of Benjamin III named Ralph, who was married to
Jennie Armstrong on June 5th, 1692 in Boston, Mass. He was the father of three sons and
two girls as is herein shown. Herbert born March 27th, 1693 A.D. just nine months and
twenty-two days after their marriage. James born November 10th, 1694. Albert born
October 5th, 1696 A.D. Arthur born October 15th, 1697. Martha born December 9th,
1699 A.D. and Cyntha born May 29th, 1702 A.D.

Herbert became the rightful owner and heir of these records at the death of his father on
August 30th, 1708. Herbert married very young he being only eighteen years of age when
he married Hattie Wilson on December 25th, 1710 A.D. Two other boys, James and
Albert, joined the Hudson Bay Company to go on an exploring and fur hunting
expedition in the far North. There were only a few native Americans among the fur
traders, most of them being French, who were very treacherous and dangerous men.
These two boys were never heard of directly after they left for the cold North. But
indirectly it was said that they had been shipwrecked and drifted back to civilization by
an overland and Lake Michigan route. This very likely was started by some of the
72
Consecutive children being born within 12 months of each other is really not that rare. This is commonly
referred to as “Irish twins”. Later in this same paragraph it would appear that two other brothers are born
with 10 months of each other.

77
Frenchmen who it is believed murdered them with others in order to get possession of
their furs. However nothing definite has ever been learned of or about them, but later
years there was several families who claimed the name of Craycroft located in different
parts of Canada and Northern Michigan and Wisconsin and it is possible that these were
children of the two brothers who had so mysteriously disappeared and supposed had been
shipwrecked and had been saved. This thought had been based mostly because many of
these people who carried the Craycroft in these parts were of mixed blood, they having
married or at least lived with some of the native women and had children by them. It
seems no further record has been kept of them in this family record, consequently so far
as this record is concerned that part of the family name has long since died out. At this
time all of the land laying west of Boston in 1709 and 1710 A.D. belonged to France and
was know as New France.

After waiting for several years for the return of the two brothers and they never did
return, then Herbert and wife and Arthur and wife decided to return to Maryland73 and
did return there for about a year to two then they decided to go farther west, as many of
the natives had did so and reported great prosperity, so they with their children and about
thirty other families started on this western trip which proved very disastrous one for all.
Herbert and his family turned back after having gone about seventy-five miles west in
this then wild Indian infested territory. With four other families who also turned back
they reached their old home near Baltimore, Maryland, where Herbert and his growing
family remained until the year of 1720 A.D. They now had four boys and two girls.
William born June 10th, 1712 A.D., Franklin born August 20th, 1714, George born
October 10th, 1716, Roger born December 24th, 1718, Ruth born November 30th, 1719,
and Olive born May 15th, 1721 A.D. Their father Herbert died August 10th, 1722 A.D.
leaving his wife with a large family of children to care for. She received some help from
other members of the Craycroft family, but even with this help she had a very hard time
to get along, for very often the Indians made raids and often made away with much of the
needed supplies on hand not only from her family but that of others in the vicinity.

Bad luck seemed to follow this faithful little mother for in a short time, only three
months, after the death of her husband she was taken ill and narrowly escaped death, but
she survived this illness, but was again stricken and died two years later in Baltimore,
Maryland, and was buried in the cemetery at that place. The youngest children were
taken care of by several neighbors until word could be sent by horseback to Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, to another brother of the father Herbert who immediately came to
Baltimore and took all of the children to his home in the little settlement now Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, and kept them and made them a good home until each one was able to take
care of themselves.

73
It is curious that the record says that Herbert and Arthur returned to Maryland when according to the
record the family came to Jamestown, Virginia, then to Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston, but no
mention of the family ever being in Maryland prior to this time. Why would the writer say this if the
family wasn’t there before? Could this be an indication that this line of the family is actually a branch of a
Maryland group of Craycroft’s?
Checking the Maryland State Archives I find no records of Herbert or any of his family. There are,
however, numerous records dating to 1687 naming John Craycroft and Ignatius Craycroft, his son.

78
In about two years the two oldest boys were old enough to help neighbor farmers with
their light work in driving ox teams in hauling logs and plowing. These were William
and Franklin. They were strong and each was exceptionally hard working boys and were
in great demand in the neighborhood by those who needed extra help and always received
the highest pay for their services. In 1729 William began learning the carpenter trade and
his brother Franklin started to learn the butcher’s trade, but after three days work resigned
and returned home for he said it was impossible for him to stand by and see the pitiful
look on the faces of sheep, lambs and hogs when they were standing with their throats cut
and slowly bleeding to death, which was a most cruel manner to kill them.

Soon a little later Franklin secured employment in a nearby sawmill and as he was still
near his home he worked hard and availed himself of every opportunity to study and
learn to read and write. He studied every book and paper he could secure and with the
help of some of the good neighbors he secured a fair education and with the help of his
uncle he was able to spend a year at a school in Baltimore. As he grew older he was able
to hold positions of trust that required the knowledge of figures. He soon returned to his
old home in Baltimore where he secured a position in the bank where he remained for
twelve years and became quite wealthy by securing much of the cheap land around
Baltimore.74

The constant talk of almost everybody was to go west. Then on June 15th, 1735 William
and Roger joined and signed up with an expedition of about fifty-five families consisting
of one hundred and ninety-four persons who were going as far west as it was safe to go.
The Indians resented the gradual influx of the whites and it was a dangerous proposition
to be seen alone almost anywhere. They were headed for what is now Indiana.75 The
two boys were hired specially to drive an eight-ox team and a six-ox team and after about
a week on the road they overtook another party of about seventy-five people who were
also bound for Indiana.

They all agreed to join up together as a protection against the Indians who were
constantly raiding all travelers. Just before they started from this point it was discovered
that an uncle by the name of Arthur Craycroft born October 15th, 1698 was in the crowd
overtaken and had his family of four children besides his wife and his wife’s brother’s
family. The Indians made several unsuccessful raids on the camp but were driven off but
never without a few of the party being killed or wounded. Often many of the Indians
were killed and left lying where they fell. It was learned afterwards that this was a
mistake for it left evidence of death to the Indians and many times it made the Indians so
angry that they attacked any and all whites whenever found. After many months of
weary traveling by this very slow method of traveling, at last they reached a small
settlement on the banks of the White River where Indianapolis now stands. Here they
lived for about two and a half years. During this time many other parties arrived and
departed, some going west, some south, some northwest.
74
I have not been able to find any land records in Maryland showing a Franklin Craycroft owned land in
the area of Baltimore.
75
At this time Indiana was still under French control and the French were very hostile towards English
incursions into their territory. For this reason it is extremely unlikely that any English colonists would have
been allowed to settle in Indiana.

79
About a year after the party in which William and Roger belonged it was discovered that
two other families name Craycroft had arrived and still another arrived and left their
original party and joined up with the one in which William and Roger belonged. This
party of Craycrofts proved to be the younger brother George whom had been left with the
uncle and had not been heard of for a long time. He was now a large, well-developed
man and had a wife and one child. All of the Craycrofts agreed to stick together and
while living here both of the older boys married. William married Jane McIntire August
15th, 1738 and Franklin married Mary Moore September 20th, 1738. Both were married
by the Reverend Silas Gilbert who was one of the party traveling together that had
arrived first at the Fort. In due time Roger fell heir to these records, because both of his
older brothers did not care to devote their time to keeping it up to date.

Roger made a long trip on horseback to the old home in Baltimore and secured some
financial assistance from his older brother in the bank there in the form of farm
machinery, horses, cows, hogs and other farm needs. He started west to Indianapolis with
these articles but was attacked by Indians on the way near where Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, now stands and lost everything and almost lost his life. But after much
trouble he at last reached Indianapolis and the rest of his family and relatives. While in
Baltimore he was able to verify much of the family records in that vicinity. He was able
to carry these verifications back to Indianapolis where he added them to the original
records.76

His main object in returning to Baltimore was to try to locate the records and the land
mentioned in some of the records he had secured when a small boy. These records show
that the lands did at one time belong to his father. He located some of the lands which
lies about fourteen miles from Washington D.C. The records plainly show that this
particular land had passed through several hands in the form of wills and sales to several
different persons, and had at last reached the Craycroft family to a George Craycroft of
Genosee Valley in Pennsylvania. At this time there were several Craycroft families
living in nearby settlements. He tried to trace relationship down to himself, but was
unsuccessful for very few of the person that carried the name of Craycroft had no record
of their origin beyond their father and mother, a few knew their grandfather and
grandmother, but beyond that all knew absolutely nothing.77

He did find records showing the graves of several Craycroft men who had been cruelly
murdered by roving bands of Indians. After spending several weeks in his investigations
he returned to Baltimore and secured the help above spoken of and started west again.
He visited Boston, Mass., while on this eastern trip and located several near relatives of
his father’s, but could (not) throw any light on the lands he was investigating, although
some of them claimed to have heard of some kind of a kidnapping by a pirate by name of
McKay many years before, who had some kind of a contract with Lord Baltimore for a

76
It seems strange that if Roger did in fact do these verifications he did not locate the other Craycrofts who
are known to have been in the Baltimore area at that time. There were at least two Craycroft families in
this area in the mid-1700’s.
77
This is difficult to believe. John Craycroft was a prominent citizen in the Baltimore area. Being born in
England he certainly would have known his ancestors pretty well.

80
large tract of land in that vicinity, but none could give any definite information as to its
location or where any records could be found about it.

There are many records about Craycroft lands in and around Baltimore but he could not
connect any lands with the records he held.78 Many of the records it was shown of
Craycroft lands but none could be found that to include this branch, the original branch of
the Craycroft family. There is absolutely no doubt but that all of these Craycrofts in and
around Baltimore are distant relatives for there is also absolute proof that all of the
Craycrofts are direct descendants of the two brothers that landed in this country in 1642
A.D.79

Roger located a Douglas Craycroft in Boston, Mass., and they were convinced that he
was a brother of Roger’s father80, consequently was Roger’s Uncle Douglas. The
convincing fact was that he, Douglas, had in his possession some of the copies of the
family records that read exactly as those he, Roger, had. It had been kept up from the
time of the landing of the two brothers in the year 1642 A.D. but had run in another
branch of the family, who was a brother of this Douglas Craycroft.

Roger took some of the copies or rather he took copies of the copies and returned to his
home in Indianapolis and compared the new copies to that of his and found them true
copies, therefore there is no doubt that these newly found copies true copies. At this time
it appeared that these family records were of vast importance to the existing Craycroft
families now living, and as they were now growing quite bulky, there being many hand
drawn maps and all were handwritten and contained about two hundred sheets of closely
handwritten large sheets, he, Roger, became worried that should they be accidentally
destroyed or burned in some of the many Indian raids. There was no place where he
could place them for safekeeping so he constructed a medium sized box of heavy oak
timber. One that the top would fit on as near waterproof as was possible.

In this box he placed his records after he had written instructions with them and at night
he went to bury them in the box he had constructed. He had selected a place on high
ground on a high bluff above the White River. There were many trees around but he
knew these trees might be cut into timber in later years, so therefore he must dig the
burial place at some place at some point where there was a permanent government
landmark so he or others could locate the burial place in later months or years, if it should
become necessary to leave it buried that long. He never did dig it up and it lay buried
there for many years. He made a will and in it he gave the location of this box as follows.

My heirs will find a wooden box buried in which there are some very valuable
and ancient historical papers and records of the original Craycroft family. These
are papers that have been carried down from father to son for many hundreds of
years, and it is my wish that these records be continued in an unbroken record of
my ancestors according to the instructions given in the buried papers. They are
buried in a wooden box near the outskirts of Indianapolis, Indiana. Starting at the
78
Around this time Hackthorn Heath, home of John Craycroft, would have been easily found.
79
Although no proof seems to be offered in the record.
80
There is no indication of Roger’s father having a brother named Douglas.

81
United States monument of government surveys for that district81. Go directly
north exactly 2150 feet where you will find a large stone about the size of mans
head, buried two feet under the surface. After finding this stone, then face
directly east 197 feet. Then face directly north 136 feet and the box will be found
buried under three feet of earth with 10 smaller stones about the size of a man’s
two fists folded together, laying on top of the box. The first large stone will be
identified by my having cut my initials on its surface deep into its surface. I have
watched this spot for more than five years and I do not think it ever will be
discovered without these instructions, therefore I am sure you will find it as
directed. Be exact in your measurements. If you do not find it I am sure you have
made a mistake in your starting point or your measurements. It is there. Find it.
Their real value lies in the ancient history of the Craycroft history and other
connected history.

These papers were left buried many, many years, when at last they were discovered by
the directions given in some of the old papers and wills were located in an old box trunk
by some of the direct heirs of William Roger Craycroft. These papers claimed title to
some land near Baltimore. This record is being copied word for word because some of
the old papers were very badly decayed, and the ink used is so dim that it will not be
strong enough to be seen very long. Some parts had to be brought out by chemicals to
make them visible.

Roger, as he was called by the family and friends he preferring to use that name instead
of his first that of William, had six boys and three girls, born as follows: Roger Jr., born
August 20th, 1739, Thomas, born August 14th, 1741, Franklin, born September 16th, 1743,
Thomas, born November 10th, 1746, Benjamin, born February 1st, 1748, Earl, born
August 30th, 1751, Ruth, born November 1st, 1752, Olive, born July 3rd, 1753, and Melba,
born September 17th, 1755. All were born in and near Indianapolis. The United States
government or rather the colonies were busy at this time surveying all the lands recently
acquired or claimed, and there was a great demand for experienced surveyors.82 Roger
Sr. was an excellent surveyor and he with some of his oldest boys made up a good crew
to do some of this surveying. New settlers were now arriving almost daily. The Indians
had been driven farther west, but many remained in sparsely settled districts, and still
continued to make a few raids about every so often. Many settlers continued their trip to
points farther west where the Indians told them of a great river, which later proved to be
the great Mississippi River. Roger Sr. and the boys assisted in surveying lands in Indiana,
both north and south of Indianapolis. Their surveys reached as far north as the coast of
Lake Michigan.

One of the sons married a girl named Amanda Collins on May 4th, 1765. He and his
bride moved to Vincennes, Indiana. Vincennes was only a few miles south of

81
This sentence casts serious doubt on the entire passage, leading me to think that this event never took
place. First, at the time that this event is supposed to have taken place the United States did not exist as it
was still an English colony. Second, there was no known survey taken of this area until after 1800.
82
As I’ve noted in the italicized notes on the next page, England would not gain control of Indiana until
1763.

82
Indianapolis83 and was the oldest settlement in that vicinity, as some of the older settlers
had settled there as far back as 1735 and they claimed a few had settled there even before
that, but the real bona fide settlers dated from 1735.

Looking at the history of Indiana and Indianapolis I have found the following:

In 1679 Robert Cavelier, Lord de La Salle, traveled by boat from Michigan down the St.
Joseph River. To the south, traders from the Carolinas and from Pennsylvania settled on
the Ohio and the Wabash river shores, threatening the French traders, to whom the
region was a means of connecting Canada and Louisiana. To protect the route to the
Mississippi, the French built Fort-Miami (1704); Fort-Ouiatanon (1719), near present-
day Lafayette; and Fort-Vincennes (1732), one of the first permanent white settlements
west of the Appalachians.

In 1763 the area, part of what came to be known as the Northwest Territory, was ceded
to England, which forbade further white settlement. The prohibition was largely ignored,
and in 1774 Parliament annexed the lands to Quebec. During the American Revolution
Virginia, Connecticut, and Massachusetts made claims on the land, and in 1779 George
Rogers Clark secured the area for the rebelling colonies by leading his troops on a
surprise march from Kaskaskia to Vincennes. (Encyclopedia Britannica)

It is highly unlikely that Roger Craycroft lived in Indianapolis or the land later to bear
that name, or that his children were born there. "The first white residents of the (Marion)
county, Mr. Duncan (before referred to) says, were Judge Fabius M. Finch, his father
and family, who came to the site of Noblesville or near it in the spring of 1819, "that
region being then a part of the county, but separated in a few years. In the fall of 1818
one Dr. Douglass came up the river from below to the Bluff and remained there a short
time, and in January, 1819 James Paxton came down the river from the upper waters to
the site of the city (Indianapolis), and came again a year later in 1820 The first settler in
the present area of the county will probably remain an unsettled question for all time, as
it was a disputed point in 1822, has been ever since and is more peremptorily disputed
now than ever. The prevailing tradition is that George Pogue, a blacksmith from the
White Water settlements, came here March 2, 1819, building a double log cabin on the
line of Michigan Street a little way east of the creek on the high ground bordering the
creek bottom, and lived there with his family the solitary occupants of Marion County
within its present limits till the 27th of the following February, when John and James
McCormick arrived with their families and built cabins on the river bank near the old
National road bridge.” (HISTORY OF INDIANAPOLIS, MARION COUNTY, INDIANA
By: B.R. Sulgrove, 1884)

So we see that the area of Indianapolis was not settled until almost 90 years after Roger
Craycroft supposedly came to the area.

This map of Indiana (missing from the record) shows the route the Craycroft family
traveled on their long tiresome and dangerous trip from Baltimore, Maryland, to
Indianapolis and Vincennes, Indiana and return. After several years of hardships and
83
Actually Vincennes is about 120 miles southwest of Indianapolis.

83
suffering they decided to return to Baltimore. The dark line is the old original road built
by the government and kept up along which almost all settlements were built and were
the safest to use as a protection against hostile Indian raids. The line from Indianapolis
north to Lake Michigan is along the territory that was surveyed, and the road that Henry
Roy Craycroft took on his trip north and never returned.

After William Roger Craycroft Sr. buried the family records at Indianapolis he continued
to keep records of the family, intending some day to return to Indianapolis and recover
those he had buried for safekeeping or if he did not he was killed by Indians, those
surviving could add his later records to those buried if and when they were recovered if
ever.

They were now making their home about eight miles from Vincennes and on account of
several other families and neighbors living at from half-mile to several miles, he felt
fairly safe from Indian raids. But this confidence did not prove any too safe as we will
relate presently.

Again speaking of the records, he was the only one so far as he knew that had any records
of the family and he felt they were safe in being buried as has been related above. Living
in Vincennes was the next oldest of the family was his brother Stephen Lawrence
Craycroft84 aged sixty-four years. One of the girls, Mary, married Jasper Ketchum when
she was twenty years old. He was twenty-four years old. They set up housekeeping in a
house he built on the same plot of ground as Stephen L. Craycroft. Here they had several
children, but on account of she being a female and married Ketchum, she did not carry
her family name of Craycroft but acquired the name of Ketchum the record did not keep
any of the records of the female Craycrofts and that prevailed in this case. But this much
is known to be true.

She lived to be one hundred and eight years old. And she died at the old family home
near Walnut Hill, Illinois, early in 1879 and was buried in the Walnut Hill Cemetery.
She was the oldest Craycroft ever known to pass the hundred-year mark. She is
mentioned in this record later, for she was making her home with one of the Craycroft
family at the time of her death.85

Franklin Roger Craycroft, Jr. is now the holder of the family record because his father
Franklin Roger Sr. felt that he would never be able to return to Indianapolis to get the
ones he had buried. In this he was mistaken for in about three years after he had buried
them he made a special trip up to Indianapolis and recovered all the papers and returned
to Vincennes with them. But upon his death later all of his other sons that on account of

84
According to the previous list of Roger’s siblings the next oldest brother was George, not Stephen.
85
According to the 1870 Illinois Census for Walnut Hill, Marion county, an Elizabeth Ketchum lived next
to John and Elizabeth Fouts (she being married to Benjamin Craycroft previously) and Thomas Benton and
Lydia Craycroft. Elizabeth Ketchum was 90 at the time of the census and was born in North Carolina, as
was John Fouts. I have a photo of Elizabeth Craycroft Fouts’ grave marker, which bears the inscription
“Mother” at the top. Below her name is that of Elizabeth Ketchum. Her date of death is listed as Feb. 27,
1879 and her age is given as 109 at the time of her death. Above her named the word “Grandmother” is
inscribed.

84
their father desiring that William Roger Craycroft Jr.86 have the records they consented to
his last desire, and the boy was given full right and possession of the records.

It will be remembered the family was at this time living about eight miles from
Vincennes and he was about fourteen years old. He often proved himself a very lively
and dependable boy and was constantly doing things that would be credit to one much
older than himself. One noticeable trait was he seemed to dwell on the tactics of Indian
fighting, and was often seen playing at fighting Indians. He had often seen Indians tricks
both in play fighting and in actual battles, and would play fighting with friendly Indian
boys and used their tricks in tracking wild animals. This would consist of crawling along
on their stomachs for long distances. Often very fast, then again creeping along in a
stooped crouching position depending on just how far he was from the intended victim.
The closer he came the slower he would go, until he was close enough to shoot or in
some cases he would jump up and outrun the victim and make a capture.

When there was an uprising or raid of the Indians, which occurred quite often, Roger
always begged his father to let him go with the posses or soldiers to fight and capture or
kill the Indian raiders and be beside his father, but his father would not let him go, much
to his disappointment. And of course his good mother would never consent either, also
resulting much more to his disappointment and anger. He never got a real chance to fight
Indians until one day when he was about fourteen years old his chance came very
suddenly.

As already stated the family home was on a clearing about eight miles from Vincennes.
After much hard work a place had been cleared of timber and brush consisting of about
possibly ten acres and put into cultivation. It was a warm day. His father had driven to
Vincennes on business leaving the boy, his mother and several other small children, when
suddenly there appeared a dozen raving Indians. They appeared out of the woods quietly
only a short distance from the house. When first seen by the boy they sere sitting still on
their ponies and apparently talking and making signs which seemed to be that some of
them were to follow the woods line and keep out of sight and get on the other side of the
house. The boy was quick to understand their signals and told his mother they were
planning to attack the house. After some little delay which of course was for the purpose
of allowing those who had returned into the woods to get concealed out of sight and to
reach the other side of the house. At a signal from those on the other side, those still
standing near the edge of the woods prodded their horses into as fast a run as possible
while those on the other side of the house also did the same. In a matter of seconds both
reached both sides. In the meantime the small family had barricaded the doors and made
every arrangement for their defense. The Indians had firing arms, although they seemed
to only have three or four, the majority having only spears and bows and arrows. Roger
had stopped up all peek-holes except to open those as it was necessary to peek out or to
poke a rifle out to fire.

86
According to earlier passages William roger buried the records and they were not recovered until long
after his death.

85
Hi picked up his father’s rifle and as the Indians got close to the house opened fire and
brought down the one in the lead, then passed the rifle to his mother to reload, and took
another rifle and fired again, keeping this up until he had downed five Indians. He then
crossed the room to the other side of the house, and repeated the shooting, with the same
result until he had four Indians lying on the ground. He realized that his time for really
fighting Indians had at last arrived he went to work with a vengeance. When his first shot
injured the first Indian, the others stopped and went back to him then whirled around and
started toward the house again. Then four more were shot and fell from their horses, with
a loud whoop they all turned and fled away to a safe distance and stopped. All five
Indians never got up again for Roger’s deadly aim struck them squarely and in a short
(time) all were dead.

When Roger started picking them out on the other side of the house they did almost like
the others did. That is they stopped and looked at their injured companions then jumped
on to their horses and started toward the house, but did not go far until they decided to
stop, turned around and returned to the edge of the woods.

The mother and children thought surely they were doomed for they could not see the
result of Roger’s aims as they were inside of the house and were too busy loading guns to
look out through peepholes. They had plenty of ammunition on hand, and several
muzzle-loading rifles. Two other rifles of extra-large bore were also there. These two
had been used specially for deer and other large game that was plentiful in that vicinity.
These were always kept loaded with buckshot about the size of small beans and were
very dangerous, for unlike the regular rifles the several buckshot would spread and as a
result some of them would strike whatever they were aimed at. While some of the
Indians were standing beside their wounded companions Roger had climbed up to the
attic or gable in the roof, which had purposely been provided with peepholes for just such
an emergency. He took the two big rifles with him. These peepholes were so constructed
so that they could be opened and let anyone inside of the attic to look out and also shoot,
but could not be seen by anyone outside the house, even at a short distance.

Roger lost no time, but promptly opened one of the peepholes and waited only until the
Indians got very close together then opened fire with one of the largest rifles and
immediately two Indians fell, and neither ever got up with their own help, but later they
were found a little ways inside of the woods and were dead. After that Roger never fired
a shot unless he was sure that his shot would reach its mark. About half an hour Roger
seen two Indians creeping along behind a small fence made of rails, which ran diagonally
across the open space that was in cultivation. He waited until they reached the end of the
fence when one of them stuck his head out to take a view of the situation that was his last
look, for Roger aimed at his head with one of the big rifles and afterward it proved that
he had shot the Indian almost through his ears and it was doubtful if the Indian ever knew
what hit him. The other Indian took one look at his companion and started to creep back
to his companions. When he reached them he apparently told them of the killing of the
other Indian, as they immediately began screaming their Indian war whoop, which they
were going to kill everyone in the house. They immediately threw the wounded Indian
on one of their ponies and started to run away, but the pony objected for he began to buck
and the dead or injured Indian fell off and they left him and raced away. Roger did not

86
shoot any more for they were now too far away to be sure of striking, and he preferred to
save his ammunition to be used at closer range. As the smoke cleared away and the
Indians disappeared down the road the small family, badly scared, did not open the doors
but remained inside. As the Indians went past the injured Indian with a broken leg, one
of them stopped and placing him on the horse jumped on behind and disappeared into the
woods with the others.

William Roger, the father, did not arrive until nearly dark, and they were afraid the
raiding Indians would return after dark, but they did not, although the father and Franklin
stood guard all night. Roger, the fourteen-year-old boy, had saved the family and his
good father and mother never lost an opportunity to praise him. The first news of the raid
the father had was when he was a short distance from the house he saw the dead Indians
close to the house. The family saw him and as he reached the house they opened the door
to let him in and was greatly surprised when they told him of the fight.

The father had for a long time been thinking of returning to their old home in Maryland
but had taken no real action in that direction, but this narrow escape of his family spurred
him on now to make a decision and put it in action as soon as possible.

There were no schools in that vicinity and both father and mother was anxious that all of
their children should have as much of an education as was possible. But there was
absolutely no possible opportunity for them to secure one in Vincennes or surrounding
country. Both the father and mother could read and write a little and fully realized the
advantages of an education so they had learned their children as they grew up to learn to
count up to one hundred and to learn the alphabet.

The entire family had been through much hardship and had had so much trouble with the
Indians that they took the lead in talking amoung other families the idea of forming a
caravan or train to return east. Had it not been that there was an abundant supply of wild
game such as wild pigeons, wild turkeys, deer, etc. they and others would have surely
perished. But by trapping and shooting and other means they were enabled to always
have a supply of meat on hand.

They soon discovered that many other persons were in the notion of returning east,
especially the women folk. Finally about February 1, 1741 A.D., Franklin and others
called a public meeting to be held on February 10th, for the purpose of organizing a train
of those who desired to return to New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and
Maryland and other places. They had left to settle in the west and were tired of the
hardships.

The meeting was attended by almost everyone within a radius of five to ten miles or more
around Vincennes. Some coming as far away as Indianapolis87 and several as far as 100
miles. A count was taken and it was found there was one hundred and thirty-five persons
(135). This of course included children. Seventy-two over the age of twenty years of age
and twenty-seven were heads of families.

87
Indianapolis was not settled until 1818.

87
The meeting was called to order by Mr. Sidney Wallace and was immediately nominated
for permanent chairman and unanimously elected by a voice vote. William Roger
Craycroft was unanimously elected secretary-treasurer. The meeting was immediately
opened by the chairman, who spoke along the lines of their hardships, Indian raids,
scarcely of food, and the government’s lack of furnishing protection from Indian raids.88

He made it very plain that he wanted every one present to have their say, no matter
whether they wanted to return east or stay. At first the only speakers to take the platform
were those who desired to return east, until about ten had spoken. The chairman then
spoke up and called their attention that he did not want this meeting to be a one-sided
affair and that up to now ten persons had spoken and all were in favor of returning east.
Surely there are some who wish to stay, let’s hear from them. He then ruled that he
would let ten of those who desired to stay speak and then would alternate and allow one
who desired to return and then one who desired to stay.

The meeting then enlivened up and many on both sides made elegant talks for and against
the idea of returning east. About four hours was spent in these talks, then the chairman
called for someone to make either a motion to return east or to remain here. There was
quite a long silence, as no one seemed to have a motion ready or was undecided just what
they wanted to do. Finally, Franklin Roger Craycroft asked for and got the floor and
made this motion.

MOTION MADE

I desire to make this motion to be voted on by this assembly—We the people of the
surrounding country of Vincennes hereby desire to bring the subject up before this
meeting. It seems that many of us desire to form a train of wagons for the purpose of
returning to several States from which we came and some do not wish to return.
Therefore those desiring to return east will vote Yes and those desiring to stay will vote
No. No one will be allowed to vote but those men with families, that is those who are
married and have a wife, and are at least twenty years of age. No women will vote.
(Second by John Taylor)

The vote taken and carefully counted with this result:

For returning east (31) thirty-one

Against returning east (104) one hundred and four

The secretary announced the result of the vote. After some argument the chairman
decided that the intent of the motion was to find out those who desired to return east
therefore those 31 who voted could proceed to organize a train of those who desired to
return east and those who desired to remain here could do so without any further
ceremony. The secretary then announced that he had prepared a paper which reads as
follows:

88
This is difficult, if not impossible, to accept. In 1752 this area was still under the control of the French
and there was in fact a French fort at Vincennes for just this purpose and had been since 1732.

88
AGREEMENT

The undersigned men and their families desiring to return to our old homes in New York,
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland and other eastern localities hereby agree to join up
with the several others in forming a caravan or train to travel together and protect each
other from Indian raids and other dangers until we reach our several destinations. Those
signing will state the number of persons in their families, and it is specially agreed that
after the parties signing this agreement no others will be allowed to sign or become a
party or parties of the train without first taking a vote of those that has signed and voted
to accept them, and that a majority of those voting will have to be secured and that all
heads of families must vote. This precaution is taken for our protection so that any
objectable persons can become a member and travel with us without being voted in
against our will.

SPECIAL RULES – any one accused can demand and get a trial. The captain will select
at random 10 members. These ten men will by a secret ballot select seven out of their
number. Then by a secret ballot select one of their number. The first selected will be the
chairman or judge. The second selected will be the prosecutor. The remaining five (5)
will be the jury and will hear all of the evidence and decide by a secret ballot on the guilt
or innocence of the accused. The penalty will be given by these five, whether if found
guilty or innocent. If guilty the penalty can be expulsion, a fine, which can be worked
out or paid otherwise. There will be no appeal from the decision.

By a majority vote of all members any objectable person or persons may be expelled and
denied further membership or benefits to travel with the train, and upon being expelled
hereby agrees to take his family and belongings and sever his connection with the train.

All of these desiring to join the train will sign now by gathering around the secretary’s
table and listen while I read the conditions and rules that will be our guiding rules, so that
all may know just what he is agreeing to, then all those who may sign, and we will begin
at once to prepare for the long trip and try to be ready within (10) ten days and not over
(15) fifteen days.

There being no further business to come before the meeting is permanently adjourned.
Immediately there was a loud cheer and many shouted We are ready to start tomorrow. It
was also agreed that nothing would be added to the agreement without a meeting of all
members and then only by a majority vote.

However, management meetings may be held by those persons elected to act as directory
or managers of the train.

The first to be elected will be a captain, the second will be his lieutenant and will be
second in command, and all orders issued by either will be obeyed by all, but the
Lieutenant will be junior in command to that of the Captain. The third to be elected will
be a secretary-treasurer. Should any orders be issued that is objectionable the objector
may demand a hearing as provided as stated above. Their decision will be final, and must
be held within (3) three days. They may call on any of the members as witnesses and all

89
witnesses will promptly be present at the hearing. No one will be allowed to testify that
is not a party belonging to the train.

We the undersigned agree to all of the Rules and Conditions herein.

Names # in family Names # in family


William Roger Craycroft, Sr. 5 B.W. Byer 2
Henry Roy Craycroft 1 B.M. Smith 3
G.S. Abbot (his mark) 2 P.W. Howard 3
C.T. Abernathy 4 J.M. Hibbard 2
G.L. Frost 2 W.T. Sanderson 2
B.P. Fuller 6 R.L. Savvage 4
F.W. Wright 3 Henry Rand 3
C.L. Gray 5 J.M. Reed 2
E.M. Yates (his mark) 2 C.T. Bailey 2
R.M. Yale 3 D.W. Tufts 2
G.G. Bennett 2 F.G. Van Buren 6
G.G. Bradley 2 L.M. Rowley 2
R.L. Campbell 2 N.P. Young 3
M.P. Cardwell 3 P.J. Peacock 3
H.W. Crump 3 S.M. Ketchum 2

Total persons including children – 91 (according to record, but actual total is 88)

The total number signing is (91) ninety-one (actually 88) persons including women and
children. A close check later proved that all combined had (16) sixteen wagons and (37)
thirty-seven horses and (1) team of oxen numbering (6) animals.

Preparations were begun almost at once which included the repair of wagons, schooners,
harness, tents, rifles and numerous other necessary articles to make the trip with. After
one week all were ready but two wagons and one schooner and they were delayed on
account of not being able to secure supplies to make the repairs. But they were secured
in two days and all was in readiness to start. A meeting was called and it was decided to
start at daylight, which was about 6 o’clock on the morning of March 16th, 1752 A.D.
That day and hour arrived and everybody and everything was all ready and the captain
blew his horn which was the signal to start and William Roger Craycroft was the leading
wagon and he and his family started, following the lieutenant who was on horseback.

They planned the entire trip to follow mostly the route they had came on their trip when
they came out from the east. Their first stop for their first night’s rest was about 35
miles, an extra long days travel for most of the horses and an extra heavy day’s travel for
the oxen. But everyone seemed to think that the animals could stand to start again about
eight o’clock next morning, which they did. They reached Indianapolis on the evening of
their third day out, and decided to stay there at least a couple of days to let the animals
rest for now they began to show the effect of their hard drive.

This staying two days to visit friends they had known when they lived in Indianapolis. It
also gave one of the party to decide to accept employment with an outfit that was going
to make a trip to the far north. This was one of the Craycrofts, Henry Roy Craycroft, the

90
only unmarried man in the train. He was a brother of William Roger Craycroft Sr.89 This
left only 90 in the train. He owned one of the heavy loaded wagons in the train but
turned it over to his brother and agreed that they would settle for it when he returned
from his ventureous trip to the far north. But he never returned, nothing was ever heard
from him or any of his party. It was naturally presumed that they had met death at the
hands of Indians. It was agreed that when he returned from his trip he would come to the
old home in Baltimore, Maryland, and that his brother would pay him for his team and
the wagon he gave his brother in Indianapolis. But he has never returned.

William Roger Sr. had always said that he wanted his son William Roger Craycroft, now
only about 14 years old to have the family record, and this wish was carried out after the
death of his father which will be related later when it occurs. It will be remembered that
William Roger Craycroft Jr. was born August 20th, 1739, and at this time was nearly
fourteen years old. His two other brothers were still with the train. Thomas was born
August 14th, 1728 A.D., George Benton, born September 10th, 1730 A.D.90

Their father spent much time as he could looking over the recovered papers and in
explaining how he wanted the records to be kept up as had been done in the past, making
sure that all understood, including his faithful wife. It left the impression with the boys
and his wife that he thought he might not live very long.

Among the old papers recovered was hand-drawn maps, old contracts for the purchase of
lands near Baltimore. All were handwritten and printed by hand. Many of them seemed
very valuable. But he had little or no memory of most of them. So he decided that as
soon as he reached Baltimore he would call on all of the Craycrofts in and around there to
see if he could locate some land that might belong to him. This he did on arrival.

I should record here that at Vincennes before he left on this trip he disposed of his
interests in the home and land he occupied by trading it to Oscar Dibble for a 4-horse
team and a heavy wagon. Exchanges and trades had to be made with exchange of
property, for there was no money there then.

Returning to Indianapolis, as that is where they were now, they left Indianapolis on the
morning of the fifth day out on the road from Vincennes. They met many large and small
trains, all headed west. Some had had fights with Indians and others had no trouble at all
and were very helpful. None of our party ever talked against their going west, although
many asked many questions, but our leaders cautioned all not to discourage any one from
going to the so-called promise land. About the only answer all would give these
westbound travelers was “we have property in parts of the east and are going back to
dispose of it.”91 Leaving the impression that we would all return west when that was
89
According to an earlier passage that listed the siblings of William Roger Craycroft Sr., he had no brother
named Henry Roy.
90
According to an earlier list of William Roger Jr.’s siblings there is a Thomas born August 14th, 1741, and
another Thomas born November 10th, 1746. He had no brother named George. William Roger Sr.,
according to an earlier list had no brother named Thomas, and had a brother George born October 10th,
1716.
91
It seems highly unlikely that anyone in this position would not warn travelers headed into unknown
territory of any dangers that they would have been aware of.

91
accomplished. But in fact none of us ever intended to return west for all had had enough
and were hopeful that we would reach our eastern destination safely and soon.

We met another lot of Craycrofts headed west, but we could not tell just how near or far
we were related. We were traveling almost every day now, sometimes making fifteen
miles a day and sometimes twenty miles a day. It all depended whether we could reach a
good camping place and security from Indian raids. These we located by inquiring of
those who were headed west.

HISTORICALLY

Special information is here given to the reader regarding the country in which the train is
now traveling so that the reader will be better able to understand where, how, when and
locality our party is using on the return trip east.

(Indianapolis, Indiana, and Ohio) Indiana originally was part of the New France, and
subsequently was the North(west) Territory. La Salle opened trade with the Indians in
1669 A.D. on the banks of the Wabash River near Vincennes.92 Later trade was opened
with the Indians at Indianapolis in 1702 A.D. Later French-Canadians established several
trading posts in the interior of both Indiana and Illinois.

In 1763 thirteen years after the first Craycroft family arrived93 in Indianapolis the country
was to the English. Then in 1778 A.D. Colonel Clark and his Virginians captured
Vincennes with several of the largest canons and much military supplies. Then the treaty
of 1783 with Great Britain included Indiana into the United States.

The Indians were very savage and resented the white people occupying their lands and
killing their game. This attitude greatly impeded the settlers, and as a result many deadly
raids were carried out and many white people lost their lives. Often they would descend
on large settlements of whites and exterminate all men and most women, but often
capturing some of the women, but often taking young women in captivity, never being
seen again by white men. Indian wars of 1788 to 1795 caused great distress among both
white settlers and the Indians caused by their inhuman raids. But luckily the Craycroft
family having the family records had made the entire trip and arrived in Baltimore,
Maryland and remained in that vicinity and took an active part in the Declaration of
Independence, July 4th, 1776 A.D.94

THE FOREGOING HISTORY WAS GIVEN FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE READER
SO THAT HE WILL NOT BECOME CONFUSED IN DATES, LOCATIONS AND
OTHER FACTS.

NOW WE WILL RETURN TO THE HISTORICAL TRIP AND RECORD IT AS IT


HAPPENED.

92
This did not happen until 1679.
93
According to the earlier passage they arrived in Indiana in 1735, 25 years before this time.
94
This statement is very hard to believe. None of the delegates to the Continental Congress were
Craycrofts. Also, the Continental Congress was held in Philadelphia not Baltimore.

92
In the meantime many other Craycrofts had left their eastern homes and settled both in
and around Indianapolis and Vincennes, and other localities, some had even settled in
Illinois. The returning train from Vincennes was well on their way to Baltimore and so
far has had no trouble with the Indians.

They had about one thousand, one hundred miles to travel yet before reaching their
destination, Baltimore, Maryland. The slow, hard and very dangerous trip actually took
them one hundred and twenty-five days. They thought when they first started out they
could reach their destination on about ninety days, but owing to the many delays from
various things over which they had no control, such as Indian raids, sickness, deaths,
rests, and swimming and fording of many rivers as there were no bridges. After two
hundred miles had been covered the one oxen team completely exhausted had to be
disposed of and a trade was made with two farmers for horses. But we got only two
horses for all of the oxen. But by changing our teams around we were able to place these
horses and wagons that they could pull and place other horses on the heavy supply
wagons that the oxen had been pulling.

They pulled into Baltimore August 2nd, 1840 A.D. very tired but happy. Next day the
news spread that a party had arrived back from the front of the great Western territory,
and immediately most of their time was taken up by visitors that wanted to know all
about the west. Now their attitude had changed from neutral to that of telling the exact
truth of the actual conditions and hardships out on the front and in between. Within a few
days they were visited by a military General who made it clear that they must not talk
against people deciding going out west toward the frontier, under penalty of
imprisonment if they did. For the government was doing all it could to induce them to
move the hostile Indians farther west.

The reader will have noticed the obvious error in the date of arrival back in Baltimore. I
don’t think that the arrival date is an error, but instead the date of departure is an
intentional error. The balance of this last paragraph goes towards confirming this
suspicion. If this party did leave Indiana in 1752, it is unlikely that they would have been
approached by anyone from any part of the government to warn them to tone down their
comments because in 1752 the colonies had no official presence in Indiana because this
land was still a part of the French empire.

Because of all the glaring inconsistencies in the commentary about the Craycroft trip to
Indiana and their experiences there I seriously doubt that any Craycrofts traveled to
Indiana before 1800. I have yet to identify, in any manner, who these Craycrofts were,
but I am certain that it was not a William Roger Craycroft. At this time (March,2000) the
earliest Craycroft of this supposed line that I am confident of is Edward Scott Craycroft,
born September 25, 1809, in Georgetown, Maryland.

In a few days after their arrival the Craycroft family living in and around Baltimore, and
there were many, arranged for the Craycroft family reunion to which those from the west
were the special guests, to be held on the old original homestead near Baltimore to which
there were 47 persons in attendance including children, all named Craycroft.

93
The trip was so long and hard that William Roger Craycroft was so busy with his duties
of secretary that he could not write anything about the trip in his family record, so now
that he had some spare time he devoted much of his time to the writing of incidents of the
trip.

He and his family settled on a strip of land set aside for him on the outer edge of the old
homestead or estate as it was then called. His father who now was about ninety years old
wanted to arrange his worldly affairs so that each of his relatives would get that part of
his large estate divided as he wanted it to be, for he expected death almost any time, so he
transferred this particular piece of land to William Roger Craycroft Sr. and a smaller
piece of land adjoining it to his son Roger as he was known, although his name was also
William Roger Craycroft Jr. The father only lived about eight months afterward and died
and was buried in the Craycroft family bur(y)ing plot which was located on the family
homestead. Here the family lived for many years, in fact for about twenty-six years. In
the meantime William Roger Craycroft Sr. and his wife died and were buried in the same
plot. But not until the Indian fighting Roger had grown to manhood and married.

He seen to it that his 15-year-old son Roger was appointed the one to have and keep this
family record and to attend school as much as possible. In fact he wanted all of his
children to attend school but he desired especially that Roger did so, for Roger was his
special child and he showered almost all his devotion and love on him. The instructor in
the school was his own sister and he often made her substantial presents so that she
would pay special attention to give Roger much attention in his studies.

While on their long trip from Vincennes and Indianapolis they had reached a point on the
Miami River near what is now Dayton, Ohio, they were attacked by a large drove of
savage Indians. This is his account of the attack when twenty-seven persons were
murdered.

We had retired for the night, when about eleven o’clock we were awakened by the
screaming of many of our women, and the shouts of men. When we started on the trip
we had arranged a danger signal that would be sounded only when real danger was at
hand and it was the signal for all men to grab their arms and begin protecting our train.
This signal was three blasts on a horn and to be repeated every 10 seconds until the whole
camp became aroused and on their feet. Our trumpeter was among the first to be aroused.
He promptly seized his horn and wildly sounded the alarm viciously. Within a few
seconds all were up and dressing, and within five minutes all were dressed and ready to
fight95. Someone kept repeating “Indians, Indians, Indians” and that was of course
promptly understood. It soon developed that a few Indians had already crept up inside
our camp and had killed several with their tomahawks. Our men did not waste
ammunition by shooting those close in but used their clubs and when one of our clubs
descended on the head of an Indian he was a dead Indian and it was the same with the
Indians, for when they got in a lick on our men, women or children that person was dead.
The moon was shining and shadows could be seen for quite a distance. It took our men
95
I find it unusual that anyone would take the time, five minutes, to dress when they were under attack by
Indians within their encampment. With enemies among them a five-minute delay would mean the
difference between life and death literally.

94
only a few minutes to kill every Indian within our circle. Then our captain should “Don’t
waste ammunition, but make every shot count, and kill as many as each of you can.”

Before starting on our long trip it was arranged and understood that every night when in
camp we would always arrange our camp by placing our wagons as near in a circle as
was possible by placing our schooners in the most dangerous places and heavy wagons in
the next positions and the lighter wagons in the least dangerous positions. The children
would be placed on one side of the camp, the men and wives on the other side. Those
that could make their beds in their wagons or schooners were to do so.

It did not take long to discover that we were entirely surrounded by a lot of murderous
Indians and our only salvation was to kill or wound as many of the Indians as was
possible and do it as quickly as possible. We soon discovered that the Indians did not
have much ammunition. We judged this because they did very little shooting, but
depended on hand to hand combat which proved much to our advantage, for as soon as an
Indian got within a short distance we would pick him off with one or two shots. We
saved our ammunition by picking each other to make a certain shot and after he had fired
and the Indian did not fall then the next to him that had fired would fire and they seldom
missed bringing down their Indian. Although the Indians had done almost all of their
killing when they first attacked us we were able to keep them at a distance because of our
being able to pick them off as they approached by shooting them before they could get
close enough to strike any of us with their tomahawks.

The Indians lost heavily and after about thirty minutes they mounted their horses and
rode away. We could not tell just how many had fled or how many had been killed or
wounded until daylight. Several of the wounded had crawled away toward the river so
they could wash the blood off their wounds, we found several that had died quite a ways
from our camp but they were dead. We adopted the Indian style of braining all those that
were wounded or captures (?), none were allowed to go free they would only be menace
to other travelers. So we slayed them with much pleasure.

The next day a detachment of English soldiers arrived and ordered us to bury all of the
slayed Indians. So we dug separate graves for each of our own dead, except in the case
of husband and wife and their children if any, but we dug one long trench about four or
five feet deep and dumped the Indians and their tomahawks into it and after all were in
we covered it over and dragged tree limbs over the trench to cover as near as possible that
it was a grave for when Indians discovered any graves it only had the effect of making
them all the more bloodthirsty against the whites.

The troops guarded us for two days and when we reached a distance of about thirty-five
miles from where the fight took place they stopped and made camp. We however kept on
forward alone. This was the only raid of Indians we had on the entire trip but had many
escapes. We kept meeting many trains all going west that told us of many raids having
taken place in territory that we yet had to pass through. After this raid and on the advice
of those we met we kept at least two men on guard all night long to guard against any
surprise attack, but none ever took place although we had many Indian visitors which we
thought was a forerunner of an attack, but were mistaken.

95
We met up with many people who wanted to join us on the trip but after a meeting and a
vote was taken none was accepted and we arrived in Baltimore with only those who
started with us only those that died or were killed in this Indian raid and except the one
Craycroft who deserted us at Indianapolis to join a northern expedition and was never
heard of again.

After getting settled in Baltimore as stated previously and the boy Roger, whose full
name was after his father and was in fact William Roger Craycroft, but went only by the
name of Roger, proved an excellent scholar studying under his aunt and learned very fast
and when he was about sixteen years old he began spending much time down at the
waterfront of Chesapeake Bay and was often picking up some wealth by checking out on
cargo for the vessels then in port. He was always in demand because he could read and
write, therefore was very valuable in checking and sorting freight at its being loaded and
unloaded. In this manner he was able to keep his father in acquiring more land adjoining
their home. He was often offered well paying jobs to become a permanent member of the
crew and sail to different parts of the world, but was a faithful son of his father and
mother he would not accept a place on their ships, especially because both would not give
their consent. It was not until he was past twenty years old (20) when he actually signed
up on one of the large ships for his first trip on the sea.

At this point in the book there is an indication that there was another map that is now
missing. It appears to have been a map of Ohio. The next paragraph is the caption for
that map.

The red line is the one taken by the first Craycroft’s on their trip west and return. This
map of Ohio shows the route the Craycroft family traveled on their long, tiresome and
dangerous trip from Baltimore, Maryland, to Indianapolis and Vincennes, Indiana, and
return. After several years of hardships and suffering they, with others, decided to return
to Baltimore, as is told in this family record. This map is not the original map, but is one
that was secured as near like the original. However, the making of the route is the one as
is shown on the original. The original was in such badly decayed condition that it was
absolutely necessary to be renewed by this substitute.

This ship was plying between Baltimore and New York to England, Scotland and then
returned to New York then on back to Baltimore and it usually took about sixty (60) days
to make the round trip. This first trip was a good and profitable for him and in due time
they returned and was welcomed home, and he brought home a lot of goods he had traded
for in both Scotland and England. These goods he sold in Baltimore at a large profit.
They were in port about two weeks when he signed up for another trip to Scotland and
England. In fact he made several trips on the same route with the same crew and captain
and because of his nice gentle manners became a favorite among the crew especially with
the captain. He did this for about a year. Then the owners of the ship decided to expand
their business and contracted to sail the ship to include landings in Belgium, France, and
Portugal then back home. On the first trip he met up with a beautiful English girl named
Ellen Moore and the immediately fell in love with each other and spent every minute of
their spare time with each other they could and when he had to sail they had agreed to
wait for each other, which they anxiously did.

96
Both kept very silent about their interest in each other, but each were anxious to see the
other the very minute the ship landed in about two months later. In the meantime the
father of the girl had promised her in marriage to a young Englishman in London, the son
of a wealthy business partner. He was a fine man and well liked by his associates but the
girl did not love him like she did her American boy, and the boy (Roger) had never met a
girl that he had paid the slightest attention to except her. Roger wanted to marry her in
London, but she knew her father would never give his consent, and as a daughter she did
not dare to even think of marriage without his consent. So they plotted against the father
to marry anyway.

It was the regular custom for the captain of all ships to entertain the most prominent
residents of the port just before sailing on each trip. Usually this took place either the day
of sailing. The custom was faithfully carried out on this trip. At the appointed time
many of the citizens including the father, mother, and a brother and sister of the girl was
on the boat just a few minutes before it was cleared for sailing. The girl made a point to
spend almost all of her time with her sister away from her father and mother and when
the captain called out “All Ashore” she made some excuse to her sister and told her to go
ahead to shore with their parents and she would soon follow as she wanted to bid Roger
good-bye. The sister gladly complied never suspecting that she was giving aid to their
plot. No attention was paid about the girl until the ship was well out on Chesapeake
Bay96 and on its way to crossing the Atlantic Ocean with the girl still on board. Those on
board the ship could see there was great commotion on the wharf they had just left, but
none but the captain, the girl and Roger knew what it was all about. The ship kept on its
way and paid no attention to the wild waving and running up and down the shores. The
girl was a beautiful girl, full of life and only nineteen years of age and a willing party to
the plot of marrying Roger even if she had to elope in doing so.

When she left her sister she secreted herself in the women’s room under some bed
clothing and did not show herself until they were well out and on their way to America.
The captain had previously entered the plot with Roger as he had entered her correct
name as a passenger on the ship’s passenger list but this was not discovered until they
had been out to sea for over an hour. All went well the entire trip back to America. The
captain performed the marriage ceremony when they were well out on the Atlantic Ocean
and made them man and wife. But the couple wanted a church marriage ceremony and
immediately upon arriving in Baltimore they looked up a minister and were married by
him, after a little delay in securing the necessary papers. This was done before Roger
went to his home and his parents, and when he did arrive there he sprung the greatest
surprise of their lives by introducing the girl as his lovely wife.

Her father and mother on shore in England raved when he discovered the girl was still on
the vessel and of course thought she had accidentally stayed on and made a big fuss at the
landing and demanded that the port officials secure the fastest sailing vessel in the port
and chase the vessel the girl was on and rescue her, for now he began to think she had
been kidnapped by the sailors. They told him there was no vessel fast enough to overtake
the vessel and besides they had no right to do so. Of course all vessels were the flow

96
Chesapeake Bay is a long way from London, England. Is this a typographical error or a slip up?

97
sailors of that time. As the captain had properly signed all papers correctly there was
nothing anyone could legally do anything.

There is supposed to be a map of Pennsylvania at this point in the record, but it is


missing. The following three paragraphs are apparently the caption for this missing
map.

The map of Pennsylvania as is shown on the other side of this sheet is not the original
map that was with this record when recovered, but is one that was the nearest like the
original that could be secured. The original map was in such a badly decomposed
condition that it had to be replaced in order to preserve the record route.

The zigzag route is exactly the same as is shown on the original and is the original route
built and maintained by the government, along which the most prominent settlements
were built. This road was the safest and the best-kept road at that time in Ohio and very
few Indian raids were ever made on it. There were a few and one of the worst was the
one just related in this family record and is expected to be kept in the Craycroft family
and can be verified by government records.

It was written by William Roger Craycroft shortly after the raid by him and added to the
family record. He was one of the leaders in the travelers and he thinks he killed at least
two of the raiders and he also thinks his young son (Roger) killed at least two of the
Indians.

The father not be outdone arranged passage on the next ship that would come to
Baltimore but it would not sail for at least two weeks but he was on hand when the ship
(Standard) sailed, and in due time arrived in Baltimore. He was sure in his own mind that
the girl had been kidnapped by the ship’s crew and he had many wild imaginations as to
what her fate might be. But he also hoped that by following the ship to Baltimore he
might be able to locate the ship, her crew and the girl. He was not long in locating all of
the objects of his search. Much to his great surprise he located his daughter and was in
an exceedingly happy frame of mind and very muchly married having been married twice
since he had seen and talked with her in England. He was not at all pleased when he
learned that she was married, for remembering he had promised her to his partner in
business son in marriage, he flew into a rage and threatened all kinds of dreaded things of
destruction. But soon calmed down when the authorities took a hand and informed him
that he was in America and not in England, and that we here in America do not permit
any such threats and that no matter what his authority was in England, his authority in
America was just as much as any other American. No more, no less, and it would be
much better for his personal advantages if he would look at the situation in a different
light.

He looked at his daughter and then at her husband (Roger) both smiled at him and Roger
offered to shake hands with him, but he backed away screaming “No, no, never.” The
daughter jumped forward, threw her arms around his neck and kissed him many times,
and with tears streaming down her beautiful cheeks said, “Father, I’m married. I married
the only man I love. Please forgive us but we love each other and please forgive us.”

98
The old man also had tears in his eyes and after a moment’s hesitation kissed her and
held out his hand and gave Roger a hearty handshake and when he could get loose from
the girl stepped over and also kissed Roger. There were several people present and they
set up a big hearty cheer, and everyone there stepped forward and shook the father’s hand
vigorously, then turned to Roger and his beautiful wife and shook their hands and wished
them a long and happy life, and the officials made it very plain that they welcomed her as
an American citizen with open arms and said they hoped many more like her would come
to our shores permanently.97

The three, that is the father, Roger and his wife, were then ushered to the home of
Roger’s father and mother, where they were the guests of honor and of course they told
the old man all about their plot as was carried out just before sailing from England. They
made it plain that they were afraid to take him into their confidence for fear he would
object and prevent their marriage, so they decided on the elopement, intending to let him
know at the earliest possible moment what had happened. But when he showed up in
Baltimore much to their surprise they almost had heart failure. At first both Roger and
the girl were afraid to venture back to England for fear her father might do something
rash once he got them on English shores, so Roger gave up his job on the ship and
decided he would take no chances, but would stay in America.

But finally they were convinced that the old man was sincere in his promises to accept
the situation as it was, but wanted both of them to return to England with him and see the
rest of the family who he knew would be anxiously waiting to know the facts and what
actually became of the girl. He was so insistent that he missed the first three ships that
sailed for England but when the fourth ship sailed all three were on it on their way to
England for a visit to the family and the girl’s many friends in London. After much
explaining and with the help of her father the family accepted their explanations and
received them with open arms into the family. They spent three months on this visit, and
then set sail back to America. During their visit in London her father offered several
excellent propositions to get into business with him in London, but Roger would accept
none of them and his wife upheld his decisions. Several months later her mother, the
other daughter and son came to Baltimore on a visit and stayed two months. Several
visits were made by both to each other’s homes both in America and in England.

Soon after this eventful happening Roger’s father died and his large estate was divided up
among his several children and other near relatives. His estate was large for his father
had passed on before leaving practically all of his vast land holdings to be divided up
among only three survivors.

On their long trip from Vincennes all of the Craycrofts as well as all others in the train
met much extreme hardships, often running very short of foodstuffs. Several days after
the Indian raid they came upon a surveying party that was in charge of a very young man,
he being only eighteen (18) years of age. He had a small detachment of military men for
97
It is strange that the writer keeps referring to America, and authority in America versus England. When
this episode is supposed to have taken place (1749, stated in later passage) America was still an English
colony and not really America. If Ellen’s father had any authority in England it would be just as effective
in the colony.

99
their protection from vicious Indians. We learned that this young man’s name was
George Washington and he was being paid by the government to survey the lands in that
locality. At first about the only important thing that we took notice of was the extremely
young age of this young man. They had never seen such a young individual youngster
the head of such important post as that of Chief Surveyor. However, he was approached
and informed of our shortage of provisions. He listened to our appeal and then turning to
another man said, “You go ahead of them and inform the officials at the fort that they will
arrive there about noon tomorrow and that they will be very short on their provisions and
must be stocked up before they can proceed on the trip home.” He then issued an order
to check over our provisions and to provide us with the necessary provisions to reach the
fort. We thanked him and left about 9 a.m. and thought no more of it for several years
later when our own Roger Craycroft met George Washington to check up on some
surveying he had finished some time before.

This time Washington had been appointed County Surveyor of Culpepper County,
Virginia. It was learned that the influence of his good friend Lord Fairfax had been used
to secure this good position, but his unexcelled ability also figured much in his
appointment.

This is where the narration falls apart again. According to an earlier passage the
Craycroft family left Indiana to return to Baltimore in 1752. In 1752 George Washington
was 20 years old, not 18. George Washington was appointed Chief Surveyor of
Culpepper County, Virginia, in 1749. In the winter of 1751 George went to Barbados
with his brother Lawrence, who was quite ill at the time. They returned in December of
1751. In the spring of 1752, when the Craycrofts were fighting the Indians and later
supposedly met George Washington in Ohio, George was in fact at Mount Vernon
settling his deceased brother’s estate and taking possession of Mount Vernon. So it is
impossible for the Craycrofts to have met George Washington in Ohio in the spring of
1752. This is confirmed by the Encyclopedia Britannica and “Washington – A
Biography” by Noemie Emery. It can only be concluded that this passage is a
fabrication.

At this time money was very scarce and land was often offered for sale at very low
prices, as taxes had to be paid on time or the land would be taken away from the owners.
Washington was an expert in land values, which he had obtained by his employment as
surveyor, which made it possible for him to purchase many valuable tracts at low prices.
He never bartered with owners in trying to get the land cheap. When an owner came to
him and offered to sell Washington would always say, “Set your price for your land, then
I will go look at it, and if the price is acceptable I will pay you spot cash in full for it. If it
is too high, then I do not want it.” In this manner he invested practically all his cash in
land and in some special cases he borrowed money temporarily to finish the deal. In later
years he was able to sell some of these lands at prices several times higher than what he
paid. In selling he used the same tactics he had used in buying, that is he would set a
price and tell the prospective purchaser and if it suited the purchaser’s idea the deal was
made, if it did not, then the sale was off. He would not try to get any of the prospective
purchasers to change his offered price, nor would he offer to sell at a lower price.

100
Later he became a Major in the English troops, at a salary of about $750.00 a year. At
this time he was loyal British subject. The surveying work had just about played out for
all or at least most of the land had been surveyed except far out to the west and he did not
care to go very far from his home at Mount Vernon. For many years after this we did not
hear directly from him. But only heard indirectly of his many battles with opposing
soldiers from other countries, who was trying to obtain and control lands that did not
belong to them or their country. Our home was only a few miles from his but we had to
cross Chesapeake Bay to get to his home and that alone was quite an expense, besides we
were always kept busy at our own tasks and work. We knew his attitude toward the
Mother country (England) was always of real affection and ties that bound the colonies of
the Old World were not to be lightly broken. He appreciated the service that the British
government that had been rendered to the provincials in the French and Indians Wars. He
always advised patience until patience ceased to be a virtue. The extremely high taxes
kept creeping higher and higher until it appeared to him and thousands of others that
there was no hope to overcome the steady drain on them, and a committee was sent to
England to investigate. This committee did investigate thoroughly and found that
nothing could be done. But one thing they did find out was that hundreds of useless
family dependents such as Dukes and lesser individuals and their families were drawing
very high incomes from the government and did not render absolutely any service for it,
and that all of this income to them came from high taxes collected from those settlers in
the United States. This committee made their report against the advise of the officials in
England.

George Washington advised patience and to go slow, until they could see if they would
secure at least a small reduction in taxes when they had to pay taxes again. When the
Assessments Lists were again issued in 1774 A.D. it was promptly decided by practically
all that the limit of forbearance had been reached. Washington was a leader and he
advised that further submission seemed like folly for the heavy taxes had now become so
heavy it was absolutely impossible for thousands to pay them and shortly the regular
proceedings was invoked to take their property away from them, which included both
land and personal property. Even George Washington who was now among the richest
family in the land had to dispose of some of his most valuable holdings to be able to pay
his taxes. While he was very slow to make a decision he finally made up his mind to
rebel, and once he made up his mind he seldom if ever changed his mind. So he threw
his lot with the other colonists that the time had at last arrived that they must fight for
their rights or basely yield to lose not only their property but to lose their self respect too.

In the years 1775 to 1780 A.D. were years of testing, and some of the seemingly
strongest revolutionists were tried and found wanting. Washington proved to made of
different stuff. He had the qualities of a great leader and his inspiring example as well as
his leadership carried the day. There were moments of fearful anxiety and dark hours
when failure stared them in the face. Though many despaired Washington never lost
courage. He never wavered in his confidence of the ultimate success of the colonists’
cause. He reasoned that if the worst came and they should be driven from their homes, as
many had been, on the seacoast he knew that they could retire to the interior of the
continent and there found an empire in the west, where they would be safe and free from
British interference.

101
The time now had arrived for help from all sources and all of the Craycroft family that
had made the trip west for over 1200 miles many years before suddenly was in great
demand to make speeches and inform all revolutionists all they knew about the western
country between Maryland, Virginia, New York, Pennsylvania and further west.
Therefore July 4th, 1776 A.D. must always be regarded as one of the principal dates in the
world’s history for it was the real beginning of a new era in the annals of mankind.
Americans do well to celebrate and honor the day when the Declaration of Independence
was signed and also to honor those who signed it. National independence was not won in
a single day nor was it the work of one or two men. Our country at this time stood in
need of all of its patriots, heroes and sages. Franklin’s shrewdness, Henry’s eloquence,
Jefferson’s learning, Samuel Adams’ impassioned logic and George Washington’s
foresight, sagacity and generalship were all leading matters to our final independence.
These gifts were all needed and fully utilized and carefully guarded. To extol only the
part Washington did in the long and hard-fought struggle for independence is not to
depreciate the share of the other colonial generals and statesmen. Nor should the deeds
of valor and patience and sacrifices of the rank and file be forgotten; and praise is due to
the loyal workers at home who sacrificed much to supply the hard-earned sinews of war,
and helped achieve the victories of the armies in the field. Also the cooperation of the
foreign nations too must be remembered for the contributed much to the success of
American arms in this war. Yet when all this is borne in mind it is not too much to say
that our leader Washington was the presiding spirit without whom all might have failed.

It is a matter of record at this time that many of the Craycroft family was serving either
directly in the armed forces or on the supply lines, but as this is strictly a Craycroft family
record I will only record those who will be the direct heirs of this record.98

Roger Craycroft was closely associated with Colonel Washington in the army of 1774 to
1780. I held different places under his direct command. I was his orderly, his lieutenant,
his personal bodyguard, his doorkeeper, and several other minor places I will mention
later as time progresses.99 My good wife has been very anxious for me to try to sever my
relations with the army and come home, which I will do as soon as we have reached the
point where it is safe

In May 1775 A.D. when we met in the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia we
took a vote and unanimously decided by that vote that the time had now past for petitions
and united action should be taken immediately and immediate preparations for war must
be made, for blood had already been shed a Lexington, where the New England militia
met the fire of British regulars. On June 15th, 1775 A.D. Col. George Washington one of
the delegates from Virginia was unanimously elected commander of the colonial army.
Later Washington’s great success with his armies are memorable incidents as is shown by
U.S. army records that were kept in Washington D.C., some of which are Saratoga,
Brooklyn, Yorktown and many other localities in and around that vicinity, in the summer
98
In reality, over the course of more than 200 years only two Craycrofts have been identified as serving in
the Continental Army. The first was Major Charles Craycroft. The second was George Craycroft who
served with the North Carolina Militia at the Battle of Camden, 16 Aug 1780, at Camden, South Carolina.
99
Searching many biographies of George Washington I’ve never found any mention of a Craycroft serving
on Washington’s staff.

102
of 1776 and 1777 A.D. such as Boston March 17th, 1776 and 1777, Trenton December
26th, 1776, Princeton January 3rd, 1777, and Yorktown October 19th, 1781 A.D.

On May 17th, 1759, George Washington was married to a charming young widow by
name of Martha Custis, a daughter of Mr. John Dandridge. She is known in United
States history as Martha Washington. He spent nearly 15 years in the quiet of his
peaceful and happy home, engaged in agricultural pursuits and performing many acts of
kindness for his many friends and neighbors. Then at the age of forty-three years, he was
called to begin his career of honor and glory, and render those inestimable services to his
country and to mankind, which have made his name immortal and never to be forgotten.

One of the most dramatic incidents I can recall to my mind in closing history of my
personal knowledge of George Washington is the attempted betrayal of the fortress of
West Point to the British by the traitor of Benedict Arnold. By the taking of Major
Andre, the spy, with Arnold’s letter in his possession the plan was frustrated. Arnold fled
in time to save his life, September 25th. Arnold received a big reward for his treachery
amounting to ₤6,300 but was immediately detested forever after. Andre, the British
officer who arranged the affair with Arnold, was captured and hanged as a spy.

Washington took final leave from the Army November 2nd, 1783 A.D. and by General
Orders he had an affectionate farewell interview with his principal officers on December
4th, 1783 A.D., resigned his commission to Congress then assembled in Annapolis,
Maryland.100 He then returned to private life at the age of fifty-two (52) years101 to
resume his favorite occupation, that of a farmer and planter, at Mount Vernon. But he
was always considered such valuable public servant that he was not allowed to live a
secluded life, for shortly the country seemed to be fast verging towards anarchy and
confusion through its inadequate government and badly needed his services. Then on
April 6th, 1789 A.D. in the presence of the two houses, having received every vote from
the ten states took party in the election and was declared the President of the United
States. On April 30th, 1789 A.D. he was inaugurated President of the United States in
New York City.

On August 25th, 1789, Washington’s mother passed away from her long and useful life.
When the sad news passed on to him although it was not unexpected he was deeply
moved by it. He served the full term as President, but looked with pleasure to his
retirement and return to his home at Mount Vernon. But on the repeated entreaties of his
many friends after a long and painful hesitation he finally consented to be a candidate for
re-election, and he received the unanimous vote of the electors, which reflected the very
popular vote, and entered upon his second term of the office of President on March 4th,
1793 A.D.

He served this second term amid much trouble and anxiety and when the term was
nearing its end he was again approached and urged, and almost begged, by all to accept a
third term, but no amount of appeal would he retire from his stand on his refusal to serve.
100
Just as a point of information, Washington actually resigned his commission on December 23, 1783.
101
Washington was actually 51. He would have been 52 the following February. It is a minor detail but it
serves to indicate the poor attention to detail exhibited by the original writer.

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He issued a farewell address to the people of the United States, full of wise councils and
warning, and I was one of his very interested listeners. Both Houses of Congress adopted
replies to the farewell address expressing their unshaken confidence in the wisdom and
integrity of Washington and during the winter of 1796 and 1797 nearly all of the State
legislatures adopted similar resolutions. On the evening of December 14th, 1799, George
Washington breathed his last at his home in Mount Vernon in the presence of his good
wife and some intimate friends. He died as General Washington for he was still at his
death the Commander-in-Chief of the American Army. On the 18th day of December,
1799, he was laid to rest at Mount Vernon. The news of his death was received with
expressions of deep regret and profound sorrow, not only from the people of the United
States, but from those of other lands and nations.

George Washington was born February 22nd, 1732 A.D. and died December 14th, 1799
A.D. and was 67 years old and was buried with much honor and with great sorrow and
will go down in history as one of the greatest men of his time.

George Washington was not a relative of any of the Craycroft family, but this reference is
being inserted in our family record purposely by W. Roger Craycroft because many of
the Craycroft family were in exceptionally close association with him personally and took
a very active part in government, army and many other important positions, and at least
two members sacrificed their lives in active service directly under the supervision of
Washington.102 Many of us, in fact all of us, took a very active part in the elections, both
first and second elections, that elected him the first and second President of the United
States, and I will state here that if this record is as faithfully carried forward by our
descendants for the next five hundred and over years as it has been for the past five
hundred years it will I believe be honored with pride by them to be able to claim and
prove that the name of Craycroft served with such an honorable and distinguished place
in the independence of the United States in 1774 A.D. with and for the first and second
President of the United States. Washington was truly one of the most distinguished
leaders of his time.

It is hoped by me that my true story of Washington will always remain in this record and
that the record will be carried forward by my descendants as long as there are any direct
descendants left.

Signed: William Roger Craycroft (The Second)

This special letter was wrote and given to William Roger Craycroft as a news article July
30th, 1791----

Beginning March 21st, 1791, I, George Washington, President, left the city of
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on a Presidential tour of general inspection that took me as
far south as Savannah, Georgia. I did not reach Philadelphia on my return trip until the
middle of the month of July the same year.

102
Both Craycroft men who served in the Revolutionary War survived the war, although both were
wounded.

104
The journey was a very tiresome and wearing one and I was very glad when it was over
with. I was accompanied by seven persons the entire trip one of which was you William
Roger Craycroft, my Secretary, the other six persons were servants. My equipage
consisted of a “chariot, and four horses, and drove in hand, a light baggage wagon pulled
by two horses, five saddled horses and the fifth bay horse for my personal use”. In the
north, many roads were equipped, fords across many other rivers were ill-equipped and
actually very dangerous to use. In the south, I was so distressed on one occasion I arose
at five in the morning to avoid these well wishers, thus avoiding of much discomfort by
the dust. This letter is given you my faithful Secretary in writing at your request so that
you can preserve it as a personal memento from me.

GEORGE WASHINGTON, PRESIDENT, signed personally

Because of the following quote from “All Cloudless Glory, Volume II, The Life of George
Washington, Making a Nation” by Harrison Clark, published by Regnery Publishing,
Inc., Washington, D.C., page 201, and the following sources I must conclude that the
letter above is a forgery.

“The President left Philadelphia on March 20 (1791) for a planned absence of about
three-and-a-half months in the southern states, a trip which would include his work on
the national capitol. Accompanying him were his secretary, Major Jackson; five
servants; eleven horses; and a chariot and baggage wagon.”

I have deleted a paragraph from the history here that has no bearing on the history itself.
It is merely an editorial aside by a previous writer. If I had left it in it would only serve
to confuse the reader.

Also, according to the University of Virginia and their collection of The Papers of
Washington (http://gwpapers.virginia.edu/project/links.html) in 1786 Tobias Lear, of
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, became George Washington’s secretary and friend and
remained in that post until Washington’s death. There were periods when Washington
had two secretaries which explains the presence of Major Jackson, his secretary named
above.

According to the UV web site again, in August to October, 1776, Robert Hanson
Harrison served as secretary to Washington. Alexander Hamilton was also known to
serve as secretary to Washington during the War.

On 3 Sep 2005 I received the following response from Mr. Philander D. Chase, Senior
Editor, The Papers of George Washington, University of Virginia:

Dear Mr. Craycroft:

I regret to say that in my thirty-two years of editing the Washington Papers, I do


not remember encountering anyone named Craycroft among George Washington's body
servants or secretaries. To check my memory I did a general search of people identified
in the 54 volumes that we have published to date as well as the old Fitzpatrick edition of
Washington's Writings which we are replacing and some of the unpublished Washington

105
financial accounts, but could not find the name Craycroft. This not to say that there is
absolutely no mention of any Craycroft anywhere in Washington's papers, because the
papers are so voluminous and we are still working on our edition. I will certainly keep
an eye out for the name, and if I find anything that would be of interest to you, I will
certainly forward it without delay.

I regret that I cannot be of more help in answering your inquiry. If I or any of my


colleagues can be of assistance in other ways, please let us know.

It will be remembered that the boy, young William Roger Craycroft, born about 1728 or
1729 A.D. and was about 15 years old when they arrived back in Baltimore, Maryland
from their long weary and dangerous trip from Indianapolis and Vincennes, Indiana and
that he started to a school, and at about 18 years old he secured a position on a sailing
vessel that plied between Baltimore and London, England, also Belgian ports. On one of
these trips when he was twenty years old May 10th, 1749, he was married to a beautiful
English girl, she willingly eloping with him to America on the vessel he was employed
on.103 They was married just one year and two months July 15th, 1750 A.D. when their
first child was born, a boy, and they named him Roger Mason Craycroft. This boy grew
up to manhood and was a well-educated man. Then September 19th, 1752, another child
was born to them and he was named Clarence Miller Craycroft. Then December 19th,
1754 another child was born and they named her Susan Molly. Another child was born
April 25th, 1756. He was named Charles Mosher Craycroft. Their 5th child was born
March 30th, 1758, and they named him Joseph Walton Craycroft. Their last child was
born August 21st, 1760, which was their sixth child. He was named Oliver Washington
Craycroft. All of the children were given all the advantages of education prevailing then.
All of them were living well and in good health at this time, September 25th, 1760 A.D.
Later we record here that all of the children grew up to maturity and married at early
ages, but the large Craycroft estate near Baltimore, Maryland, had met with financial
reverse and much of it had to be sold to be able to pay the very high taxes. The estate had
to be cut up several times now and sold until in 1765 it consisted only of about 100 acres.
Even this had to be sold in 1768 A.D.

Most of the family had scattered some going north to New York, some to Pennsylvania,
some to Boston, and other places. Joseph Walton Craycroft though only a boy of about
eleven years old, born March 30th, 1758, was the only rightful heir to what was left of the
once large estate. He also fell heir to the Craycroft family record. He was raised by other
relatives who also preserved the family record until he was married, then turned it over to
him. He moved to Georgetown, Maryland, and married Jessie Freeman April 15th, 1778,
and their first child was born July 10th, 1779, and was named Benjamin Joseph, his father
being quite young, only about twenty-one years old when his first child was born. He
had taken up the trade of carpentering and made a specialty of building homes and made

103
Again the writer has confused the timeline of his narration. It was earlier reported that it was 1752 when
the Craycrofts returned to Baltimore. But if William Roger was born in 1728 or 1729 and 15 when this trip
was made then the trip would have been in 1743 or 1744. If this is true then the family could not have met
Washington in Ohio while on the trip, as Washington would have been only 11 or 12 years old. But if the
trip was in fact made in 1752 then William Roger could not have married his wife in 1749. Either way,
large parts, if not all, of this story are untrue.

106
a very comfortable living. His second child was born December 2nd, 1781, and was
named Samuel Moore Craycroft. His third child was born about two years later,
February 15th, 1783, and their fourth child was born August 25th, 1785, and was named
Sarah Phoebe Craycroft. Their fifth child was born October 10th, 1788, and was named
Bladen Craycroft, was twenty years old he had moved to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1811
and was a student in a law school there. He graduated from the school in 1813 and
practiced law in Baltimore for several years, becoming a very prominent figure in local
and state politics.

Benjamin Clark Craycroft was born July 10th, 1780104. He attended school in
Georgetown, Maryland, and was very highly educated. He was a local merchant for
many years and when he died in 1817 he was quite wealthy. He was only 38 years old
when he died. Before this however, he married Martha Thompson December 25th, 1803,
when he was 23 years old105. Their first child was born October 20th, 1806, and was
named Aaron. His second child was born September 25th, 1809, and they named him
Edward Scott Craycroft. His third child was born June 12th, 1812, and they named him
Benjamin. This child was later to become the one that was the father of the Illinois and
Missouri Craycrofts and known as Benjamin Craycroft Senior in this family history later.
His fourth child was born February 26th, 1816, and she was named Ellen Mary
Craycroft.106 All of the children were given extra good educations being teached a great
part of the time by their mother who also was well educated.

Benjamin Clark Craycroft was a very hard worker and demanded his hired help to work
hard for their pay. He also demanded that each of his children have a certain task to do as
they grew up in the family. At the early age of 4 years and 5 years he had them help their
mother do the house work, such as wash dishes, sweep the floors of the rooms, carry in
the wood for heating the house, and other tasks, some easy others hard for their ages. As
they grew older their tasks also grew both in number and harder, for at from the young
ages of from 7 to 8 and 9 years of age he had them deliver orders to his customers from
his store. Still farther on as they grew older 10, 11 and 12 years old they became regular
clerks in his store. No one was ever idle around the store or home or farm. The children
were deprived of much of their childhood playing even at school, for often at recess the
boys would be required to make some deliveries from the store, for the store was close to
the school.

The result was that as the boys grew to manhood they left their home and secured work
and pleasures among outsiders and let it be known that they much preferred that to their
home life. The oldest boy Aaron left home at the age of fifteen years and secured
employment as a clerk in Baltimore, Maryland. His father threatened him many times
but Aaron decided to risk the result of his father’s threats and remained on his place of
employment. But his father also objected and made many threats against him, but the

104
In the previous paragraph this person is listed as Benjamin Joseph, born July 10th, 1779.
105
There is evidence that Benjamin was first married to Eleanor (Nelly)Prather who gave birth to a son
named John P., born around 1802.
106
Benjamin and Martha actually had eight children: Aaron, Edward Scott, Eliza Ann, Benjamin, John P.
Ellen Mary, Charles and Angeline. The names of the males and Eliza Ann were listed in the will of
Angeline Craycroft probated 30 March 1841, listing them as benefactors.

107
residents knowing of the hard life in the Craycroft family decided to stand behind the boy
and nothing was ever done. At the age of twenty-one years of age Edward opened a store
of his own and was very prosperous.

Benjamin Craycroft tried very hard to withstand the harsh treatment and stayed home a
full year longer than the other boys, for he did not leave home until he was sixteen years
of age. When he left home he followed his older brother Edward to Rockville, and
worked for a time for his brother in the grocery store. He was very thrifty and his brother
paid him liberally for his work and in a few months he had about $100 saved up. One of
his cousins and he had been studying the history of the west and intended to make a trip
to the west as soon as conditions was right.

They met nearly every Sunday and other holiday and planned and discussed their
contemplated trip to the west. Benjamin’s father visited him at his brother’s store one
day and made such awful threats against him that the boy became very nervous and
irritated. He tried to explain to his father that he did not want to return home on account
of various reasons, but his father insisted that he was still a minor under the law and that
unless Benjamin returned home within a week he would invoke the Minors Law and have
him brought home or put in jail. This threat forced the boy to make up his mind which he
did that very night. He consulted his cousin George Craig Craycroft and they decided to
immediately start on their trip to the unknown to them west. They had a week to make
arrangements for Benjamin’s father had given him that long to return or suffer the
consequences. So they began immediately to arrange their trip. After two days
preparations they left. Benjamin’s brother helping him only to the extent of paying him
in full for his work and making him a present of $50, they agreeing that he could pay it
back whenever he could and if he never could, it would be alright, just consider it as a
present. That night the brothers kissed each other goodbye and the two boys, Benjamin
and George Craig Craycroft his cousin, left on their long and eventful trip to the west. In
a few days they found themselves in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where both secured
employment at various tasks, not steady employment but at odd jobs of helping load
boats plying on the Ohio River. At last they did secure steady employment, Benjamin in
a grocery store and George in a wagon-making shop. They stayed here until about 1830.
They secured employment on an Ohio riverboat named Crescent Star that was being
loaded for landings south toward the west and New Louisiana. They had tried for a long
time to secure employment on one of these riverboats but would not take the positions
before for they wanted to get a place on the same boat for both of them. This being the
first opportunity they had to get a place for both on the same boat they immediately
accepted it with glee. They did not know the work was of the very hardest kind of hard
labor consisting of being on regular duty for not less than sixteen hours every day and
often eighteen and twenty hours a day. However they talked it over and decided to stay
with it as long as they could stand it, and decided to stay at least until they could draw
their pay. Money was very scarce and it was hard to get their pay for the captain was
afraid if he paid his help in full they would get on shore and not be ready to go when the
boat was loaded. They were completely worn out to almost exhaustion when they
reached Cincinnati, Ohio, and appealed to the captain to at least give them enough money
to be able to consult a doctor. After much appealing and promises the captain had them
sign a paper and gave them their pay right up to that day. They went ashore and never

108
returned to the boat. The captain very shrewdly offered to give them a dollar or two more
than their pay, but the boys refused this for if they had accepted this the captain would
have had them arrested and brought on the boat on the grounds that they was in debt to
him and was attempting to evade payment. The boys had seen and heard of many cases
of this kind so they were prepared to avoid any complications.

After several days delay the boat left and they looked around and both secured work.
Benjamin went to a grocery store as was usual and George to a wagon shop. They left
Cincinnati after a few weeks by signing up on a boat headed down the river toward Cairo,
Illinois. This was farther than they had decided to go now for they wanted to go only as
far as Evansville, Indiana, for Benjamin had heard about the famous trip the Craycroft
family of his forefathers had made to Indianapolis and Vincennes, Indiana, and he wanted
to visit that part of Indiana, for no doubt it had by now been settled up by more settlers.

They signed up with the captain to work only to Evansville, Indiana, and when they
reached that place they promptly drew their pay and left the boat. They had no trouble in
securing contracts for clearing land for cultivation, for there was a great rush of settlers
and many of them wanted to clear their lands quickly and get in their crops as early as
possible. The boys learned quickly that good prices were being paid for this work and in
placing their bids on the work pointed out that their bids was for a strictly first class job.
They lost some of the jobs for their bids were too high. But they did not care much for
they wanted to make a trip to Vincennes and Indianapolis and if they got some good
paying jobs they would take them. But if they lost them they did not worry. But their
guarantee of giving a strictly high-class honest job had its weight and they began a very
highly paying business. In fact they soon had to begin turning down some good jobs for
they could not secure enough help to do the work. In the late fall the rains and cold
weather and floods of the Ohio River slowed up their work almost to a stop. Now they
agreed was a good time to make their trip to Vincennes and Indianapolis. There was a
stage line in operation between Evansville and Vincennes. They purchased passage and
were soon on their way to Vincennes. Arriving there they soon located several families
named Craycroft, who were very friendly and all welcomed them with every hospitality
they could offer.

They spent much time talking to these near and distant relatives, each trying to locate just
how near related they were to the two boys. They spent nearly two weeks here and they
announced they were going to make a trip to Indianapolis. There was no regular
transportation between the two places, which compelled the two lads to seek employment
on one of the wagon trains of freight wagoning that hauled freight regularly between the
two places. Upon securing a place to work they left one morning as helpers to drive part
of each day and to help take care of the stock of horses and oxen of the train. It took
them nearly twelve days to make the trip. They learned the foreman on the wagons was
in no particular hurry for he worked by the month for his pay and he said he was just as
well off in one place as another. That his pay went on just the same, no more no less, so
why hurry.

Arriving in Indianapolis they located themselves in a hotel then set about to locate them
some of the Craycroft family if any. The first day they did not locate any but secured

109
several directions as to where they could locate one or two families out on the outer edges
of the town. Then by directions from this first family they were able to locate several
Craycroft families. It was just like these in Vincennes each family wanted to trace their
ancestry and see just how close related these two boys were related. Some were able to
apparently able to trace themselves directly back to the original William Roger Craycroft
who had made the long trip from Baltimore and back nearly one hundred years before.
They also learned that there was an enormous travel westward of trains of settlers headed
west. As many as four and five trains each day passed through Indianapolis. Some were
headed west and some southwest, some northwest, and some just headed anywhere they
had no destination. They were going until they came to some place that looked good to
them and then they would stop and try to get located.

The two boys almost decided to join some of them. But they remembered that there was
an excellent chance to get settled in Evansville and at last decided they would stay in
Indianapolis for another week and then return to Evansville. They did this and had to
work their way back to Vincennes, then they were able to get a stage back to Evansville.
When they arrived they soon discovered that there was a big movement on to build a lot
of levies along the north bank of the Ohio River and other smaller streams emptying into
the Ohio, to keep the flood waters from flooding the lowlands every winter. They
listened to talks made in public places almost every night and soon became convinced
that there was a great opportunity to make a lot of money by taking contracts to build
these levies. The building of these levies was a big undertaking and there was no one that
would take a contract to build more a than a mile or two at a time, for help was scarce
and one or two men could not build a levy very fast. But they began taking contracts to
build levies and when the rains stopped and the overflow waters flowed back into the
Ohio River they started to work. They put all of their capitol into equipment such as
horses, wagons, plows and harness. They soon started with a force of about thirty-five
men on their first levy building.

After almost a year of this work they sold out everything and moved on to Shawneetown,
Illinois. They arrived here in the early part of 1832 and it was just as they had learned or
heard while in Evansville, that is that Shawneetown was a lively place and plenty of
work. We had been taking contracts so long and was so successful that we no longer
desired to work for others, for when we took contracts we knew we had and did make a
profit on other men’s work and now we still wanted to make profit on the work of others.
The most prominent contract work to be had in and around Shawneetown was the
clearing of land for the cultivation of yearly crops grown in that part of the state.

As we had had some experience in this kind of work at Evansville it stood us well in hand
for there were many others who also were taking contracts in clearing land, therefore
competition was a little keen and close. However we soon learned that most of the other
contractors were taking contracts at very high prices and were making handsome profits.
We therefore decided to find out as much as possible as to their bids and that was not
hard to do in most cases, then we based our figures on theirs and cut our prices down at
from 5% to 10% below theirs. In most cases we got the contract, but in some cases the
contracts were given to some higher bidders. We didn’t care so much about this for we
soon had all the work we could do because we had some trouble in securing good help

110
without which we could not do the work in the stipulated time therefore lost money on
the contract. We were only two boys just a little over 18 and 19 years of age therefore we
attracted a lot of attention and many older contractors prophesied that we would go broke
because we were so young and inexperienced. We did lose money on some of our
contracts but we made sufficient profits that we stayed in the business for nearly two
years and six months. The work became scarcer and competition got closer and more
complicated that owing to the fact that their work had dwindled down so that it took only
one of them to supervise it so in May, 1836 Benjamin decided he would make a trip back
to their old home in Rockville and Baltimore, Maryland.

Benjamin left Shawneetown on a stagecoach being pulled by four horses May 6th, 1836,
which took him to Evansville, Indiana, and his cousin George Craig Craycroft continued
to run their business. We had agreed that I Benjamin should make the trip this year and
that George would make the trip next year and as stated Benjamin started on the long trip
May 6th, 1836. Arriving in Evansville, Indiana, late the next evening it gave him a little
time to look up some old friends but late he went to his room in the hotel and retired for
the night.

Here in the record mention is made of a map reported to show the route taken by
Benjamin Craycroft’s return trip to Maryland from Illinois. The map is not in the book at
this time. The following passage is the accompanying description of the map.

It will be understood that the two boys dissolved partnership at Shawneetown, Illinois,
and Benjamin Craycroft went west and his cousin George Craig Craycroft wanted to go
south into Kentucky, which he did. However Benjamin went west then north in Illinois.
The two boys never saw each other again so far as the record shows.

So that the future descendants may be able to know the exact identity of the future
Benjamin’s please make note of this important information.

That this particular Benjamin Craycroft, the one that this record is of, will be called
Benjamin Craycroft Senior for very shortly he will be married and his first son will be
named after him and will be known and referred to as Benjamin Craycroft Junior. This is
to be able to identify each as the years go on. This will enable all to distinguish which of
the Benjamin’s it was that came down the Ohio River and on to Beardstown, Illinois,
married, then went on to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in 1837 where he lived until 1849
when he and his large family returned to Illinois where he died.

Route no. 1 (marked in red) as shown on the map of Indiana is the route used by William
Roger Craycroft, one of the forefathers that made the first and original trip form
Baltimore, Maryland, nearly one hundred years ago. He made a round-trip that is from
Baltimore to Indianapolis and Vincennes, Indiana, and back to Baltimore encountering
much suffering caused principally by wild Indian raids besides there were no railroads or
other means of transportation and only horses, mules, and oxen was the only means of
transportation.

111
Their route across Indiana was from Richmond to Indianapolis and on to Vincennes
where they lived for sometime then decided to return to Baltimore over the same route
and back through Richmond and on through Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

Route no. 2 marked in green ink down the Ohio River is the one traveled nearly one
hundred years later by Benjamin Craycroft who later became the Benjamin Craycroft
Senior mentioned many times in later years. He came down the Ohio River as far as
Evanstown (should be Evansville), Indiana, and then on down the Ohio River to
Shawneetown, Illinois, where after a year or two he continued his trip farther in Illinois
north (actually northwest) to Beardstown, Illinois.

But before this he made a trip back to his own hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. He
used the stage then in operation. This route is shown in green ink from Shawneetown,
Illinois, to Cincinnati, Ohio. From there on the route is shown on the map of Ohio and
Pennsylvania and Maryland in this record. He, Benjamin Craycroft, also used this same
route when he returned to Shawneetown later, and after a year or two delay he continued
on into northern Illinois where he married and then went south into the state of Missouri
where he lived and raised a large family of two girls and four boys then returned to
Illinois where he died in the year of 1849 and died very suddenly 1851.

Here we are returned to the record.

About three o’clock in the morning a fire broke out in the store building next door to the
hotel and he had a narrow escape for his life but escaped without a scratch but it was a
very narrow escape for the entire side of the hotel building was on fire when he jumped
out of the second story window of his hotel room. I got no more sleep that night and was
very tired, but my stage left that morning at six o’clock and I had to be on it or lose my
place. I was on it and spent many weary and tired hours in making the trip to Cincinnati,
Ohio. It was a long hard trip for owing to a breakdown on the stage, we were nearly a
week reaching Cincinnati and had very little rest the entire distance. Normally it took
them only a little less than three days107. Then after an all night’s rest we started from
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, after four days struggle, resting for two days we left and after
three days we reached Baltimore, Maryland.

His relatives received him with open arms. He soon learned that his father had died in
1817 soon after he, Benjamin, had left home108. The estate of his father had been divided
up among his other children, leaving absolutely nothing to or for Benjamin. He had
never communicated with any of them, so they just considered him as dead and he had
left home without his father’s consent therefore when his father died he only left him $5
in his will. At first this made Benjamin very angry and he was going to try to open up the
case again in court but the three other brothers called a meeting of the four brothers and
after some long and almost fighting talks the other brothers agreed to contribute into a
fund and put five hundred dollars into this fund and give it to Benjamin which was just

107
It is highly unlikely that a stagecoach could make the trip from Evansville, Indiana, to Cincinnati, Ohio
in three days. This is a distance of over 200 miles. The stagecoach would have to cover 70 miles a day. It
makes more sense that this trip should normally take a week or more.
108
This cannot be correct. The younger Benjamin was born in 1812 and left home at age 16, in 1828.

112
about one quarter of the amount he should have gotten out of the estate. However he
thanked them in the end and after about two months visit he returned to Shawneetown,
Illinois.

During the discussion about the settling of the amount they would give him the question
of who should have the permanent possession of the Craycroft family record arose. They
all agreed to give it to Benjamin and he took it back to Shawneetown with him.

Upon his return to Shawneetown business seemed to go to pieces. Money got very scarce
and general hard times seemed to settle on the town and they soon decided to close up
their business and leave there as soon as they could. It took them well into January 1837,
to dispose of all of their horses, mules, plows, wagons, harness all other equipment. They
still had a small amount of land, which was some town lots in the town. They were worth
only a few hundred dollars so they had just about decided to let them stand as they were
and probably come back at some future time and dispose of them. But at a last try they
offered them to a man named J.R. Robinson who had just come into the place from
Kentucky and wanted a place to build a home and large barn and the location and size
just happened to suit him so they closed the deal at a good price. We had closed up
everything by March 1st, 1837.

They had already decided where each was going. Benjamin wanted to go west and north
in Illinois and George Craig Craycroft, his cousin, wanted to go south to Kentucky. They
could not agree on this so each went in the direction he wished. They paid all debts they
owed and counting their combined wealth found they had exactly $7,250 (seven
thousand, two hundred and fifty dollars) each by dividing the $15,500 (fifteen thousand,
five hundred dollars) they had accumulated since leaving their homes in Maryland.

When Benjamin was back in Baltimore on his visit he learned that some of the Craycrofts
and others had collected a large sum of money to finance a party to go to Indiana and
Illinois and Missouri to investigate the country and conditions there and make a report.
This committee had been gone several months and had just returned and made their
report just two or three days before Benjamin had started back to Shawneetown, Illinois.
He had attended the meeting of this report and was very favorably impressed by their
report. Some of the Craycroft boys was now organizing a train to start west to Illinois in
a few days and invited Benjamin to join them. But he had to refuse for he already had
big business interests in Shawneetown and had to go back there. The idea of the
Craycrofts was to form a large colony to settle down in some place in Illinois or
Missouri. They later settled in and around Macon. The Macon settlement was their
destination when they started and reached there early in 1837 A.D.109

109
I first thought that these Craycrofts mentioned were actually Benjamin’s brothers Aaron, Edward and
John, but Aaron and John did not arrive in Macon County until the 1850’s. However there is an E.
Craycroft and a male between 10 and 15 years old in the 1840 census for Macon County. Edward had a
son, William Benjamin, who was born in 1829 and could be this male. It is possible that Edward and his
eldest son traveled to Macon County in advance of bring the rest of his family out from Maryland. No other
Craycrofts appear in the 1840 census for Macon County.

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When we left Shawneetown we bought a new wagon and I had two good horses and
harness. We furnished the wagon so that we could live in it and placed a good canvas top
on it to keep out the rain. In this we started and traveled about twenty miles a day. My
partner’s name was Samuel Kinsley Dayly. He also wanted to go a few hundred miles
north. In that we made a good team and got along wonderfully. We reached Vandalia,
the state capitol, after several days of hard travel. It was a town at this time of about
2,000 inhabitants or this is what they claimed it was. I had the largest part of the
investment so he paid a little more than I did each day. We got along fine no
disagreements at any time. There was much agitation about the building of a railroad
through Vandalia, but this did not occur until many years later. In fact it was not until
1852 that the Illinois Central Railroad was built through Vandalia. Later we learned that
the capitol had been moved to Springfield.

At this point in the record there is mention of a map of Illinois, which was not replaced in
the last transcription. The following is the accompanying text.

This map of the State of Illinois shows the important routes and roads traveled by
Benjamin Craycroft Senior.

Starting at Shawneetown, Illinois, which is in the southeastern part of the state he


traveled east about 70 miles, then turned straight north about in the center of the state.
Going north to a settlement named Macon where he found several families named
Craycroft110. He learned some were settled in this locality when he was back to his old
home in Baltimore some time ago.

On his way to Macon he passed through Vandalia which was the capitol of the state at the
time, although there was a big movement to move the capitol to some other place, such as
Alton, Springfield, Shawneetown and other places and a vote was soon to be taken in the
entire state to decide the issue. Benjamin and partner only stopped at Vandalia a day or
two then went on their way toward Macon.

He remained here a short time and met a pretty girl and after a short courtship they were
married and left almost immediately for Missouri and settled permanently in a small town
known as Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Here they lived from 1837 to 1849 when they
returned to Illinois where he died in 1852 at a place near Macon.111

This ends the map text.

After several days travel we came to a camp they called Macon and still maintains that
name. In my investigations I learned that a family of Craycrofts was living about a mile
from this camp in the country. I visited them and when they learned my name was
Craycroft I was warmly welcomed into their home. After much talk and comparing
births and other information it was decided and proved that they were near relatives of

110
Again, according to the 1840 census for Macon County the only Craycroft family there was an E.
Craycroft, very likely his own brother Edward and he would certainly known him.
111
The 1850 Illinois Census does show Benjamin, Elizabeth, Matilda, Benjamin, John W., Thomas H.B.
and Columbus Craycroft living in Macon County in an unnamed township.

114
Bladen Craycroft, a lawyer in Baltimore, Maryland, and of course were distant relatives.
They insisted that I stay with them until I could decide just what I wanted to do and
where I would locate. Therefore I spent a full week with them. Land values had
advanced rapidly and scarcely no land for sale at less than $12.50 per acre and most of it
was selling for as high as $20.00 per acre and a few sales. Most of it had cost the present
owners about $1.25 per acre.

The paragraph above raises a question. According to a history of the Edward Craycroft
branch of the family, written by Benjamin William Craycraft (which will be included at
the end of this transcript), the three brothers of Benjamin Senior, Aaron, John and
Edward Scott, settled southeast of Elwin, Illinois. This would be in the vicinity of Macon,
Illinois. It should be noted that an uncle of all four men was a Bladen Craycroft. This
information is fairly reliable since Benjamin Craycraft was given this information by two
of his uncles, who were in turn grandsons of Edward Scott and they would have likely
known this information to be true. So if the writer of the above paragraph was in fact
Benjamin Senior then he would have known that this Craycroft family was that of one of
his brothers, not distant relatives as is stated. It is likely that the writer was instead a
descendant of Benjamin Craycroft Sr.

I had heard that a lot of work was being done in and around Beardstown which was
located on the Illinois River, which was constantly overflowing and flooding the bottom
lands and parts of the town. There was a public movement being made to build a big
levy on each side of the river to keep the waters within the river inside of its own banks.

It being only about 75 miles to Beardstown I decided I would drive over there and look
over the situation. My partner or traveling friend had already departed on his own
resource when I decided to stop for a while at the Craycroft farm near Macon. In a day or
two I arrived in Beardstown which proved to be one of the most lively localities I had
seen since I left Edwardsville (Evansville?), Indiana, and after a stay of only two days I
decided to locate there if I could get a contract to help build some of the levies. The
people seemed so nice there and treated everyone with a marked consideration that it
immediately imbedded a desire to become their friend. They had many public gatherings
also religious denominations were holding their meetings nightly. One of the
denominations, the Methodists, was holding their meetings almost nightly and was taking
in new members constantly with a very convincing minister by the name of Reverend
Clayton M. Johnson preaching nightly. I was not and am not now of a very religious turn
of mind although I do enjoy going to church when convenient. As there was no decent
place to spend the evenings I was attending his meetings nightly. It was my 4th or 5th
night I attended his meeting that a family by name of Dixon I had become acquainted
with introduced me to a very pretty and attractive girl by name of Miss Elizabeth Pate. I
must say right here that I fell violently in love with her immediately the very moment I
was introduced I was in love.

Although she was very young she displayed very much intelligence and charm and her
every movement was fascinating. I was flushed and nervous at the introduction to her
that I could scarcely talk and I noticed that she was also groping her way in attempt to
hold an intelligent conversation.

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The next day I lost no time in finding where this beautiful girl lived with her parents and I
spent a great part of the day a short distance from their house in an attempt to supposedly
by accident meeting some member of the family coming out of the house so I could ask
them directions to a certain person’s home whom I was supposed to be looking for but in
reality was not but was just using that as an excuse to get contact with some member of
the family and possibly later on get to meet the girl again in daylight. After a long wait
her father came out of the house and luckily for me turned up the street toward me and I
immediately started walking up the street toward him. When we were only a few feet
from each other he recognized me as the young man his friend Mr. Dixon had introduced
him, his wife and daughter to the night before at the church meeting. He stopped, shook
hands warmly, and we stood several minutes talking and finally went our way after I
made it a point to let him know I was attending the church meetings every night and he
stated his wife, daughter and himself were nightly attendants also. I was at the church
meeting early that night and met them as soon as they arrived and when we secured a seat
I was sitting beside the girl. We talked freely and at the close of the meeting I asked her
if I could take her home. She blushingly told me she would be pleased to have me take
her home but I would have to secure the consent of her parents. No time was wasted in
taking the question up with her father, Mr. R.G. Pate, I apologized and then asked him
point blank and he promptly said “My boy she is only seventeen years old and seldom
ever goes out with boys.” I argued that I meant no harm and that I had her consent
providing he would give his. I see she is a very obedient girl and I sure admire her in this
wonderful trait. He said a few more words and then asked his wife if she approved. She
said “It is up to you Bob, if it is alright with you it is with me.” Then Mr. Pate turned to
me and said, “Alright my boy you may take her home, but don’t keep her out later than
10:30 o’clock and that don’t mean 11 o’clock,” and we all laughed and I thanked both
him and his wife and the girl and I started off. I mention this in my part of this record for
in years to come it may prove amusing to some of my descendants. I had never spent
such a pleasant evening in my whole life. We walked slowly towards her home. In fact
we walked past her home as we had some time yet to be together before our allotted time
would expire and both seemed to enjoy each other’s company immensely so we wanted
to spend all the time we could. When we finally went inside the gate to her home she
suggested that I come in and sit on the porch a little while and of course I accepted. We
sat there on the porch until about 11 o’clock when I told her I thought it best for me to go
for I certainly did not want to make her parents angry at me. Before leaving I asked her if
I could see her again the next night she answered with a beautiful smile, “Yes certainly.”
We met again at the church meeting but before I left her I had told her she was the only
woman I had ever paid the slightest attention to which was a fact.

We kept seeing each other every meeting until the meeting was brought to an end, which
was in about two weeks after we first met. But before this time I had asked her to
become my wife. At first she asked for time to think it over. I consented to wait a week
for her answer. At the end of the week she agreed to be married providing her parents
consented. We agreed that I was to go to church Sunday night then I was to come to her
home Monday at noon for dinner and at that dinner I was to talk before her parents arm in
arm and that I was to ask the consent of both parents for their consent to our marriage. I
arrived at the home about 11:30 Monday morning and the girl and I were given the
exclusive use of the nicely furnished living room while her lovely mother busied herself

116
cooking the dinner. About 12:30 noon we were invited into the dining room for the
lovely dinner Mrs. Pate had cooked. It was exceedingly good chicken dinner. Just before
we took out seats at the table I announced “Mr. And Mrs. Pate, before being seated at this
lovely dinner I wish to say a few words to both of you, and I respectfully ask your
indulgence for just a few moments.” We all stood up at and around the table.

Then I said, “Mr. And Mrs. Pate, your lovely daughter and I are in love with each other
and want to be married. We have talked this important matter over many times in a
thorough manner and we both are sure we are in love and the only solution is our
marriage. I am fully able and willing to support a wife and family and it only remains
now to make our happiness complete is your consent, which we both pray for. I now ask
both of you for your full consent for our marriage at an early date the quicker the better.
It is true we have not know each other very long, but in talking matters over we have
discovered that the very moment we first met it was an absolute case of “love at first
sight” and that love has grown more and more since that time. We have both agreed on
all of the details of our wedding but she being the faithful and obedient daughter she is,
she insists that we secure your consent. I am now pleading with you for that consent and
I promise you with all the sincerity at my command that neither you nor Elizabeth will
ever have cause to regret having given your consent. May we have your consent?”

All was very quiet until I had finished, then the two parents looked at each other then
looked at the girl then looked at me. This took several minutes before another word was
spoken by anyone. Then Elizabeth broke the silence and said, “Father, Mother, please. I
love him and I know both of you will love him too when you know him better. Please
say yes. It is my only and most cherished wish, please.”

There was a slight appearance of tears in her mother’s eyes. I stood there almost
breathless. I think my heart was skipping beats. At last Mr. Pate said, “My boy both of
you are very young, especially Elizabeth is only (17) seventeen years old. I hope you
both fully know and realize that marriage is a serious step in everyone’s life. It is not a
thing to be tampered with. It is a lifetime contract and cannot be treated lightly. You
must realize that once you are married it means you are tied to each other for life, and not
for a week, month, or a year or two, but for life. Do you understand? For life, for your
whole life?”

We both answered together, “Yes.”

Mr. Pate then said, “Well we have almost spoiled a good dinner, I suggest that we
postpone further action in the matter until immediately after we finish our dinner. I am
almost starved and if we wait much longer everything will be too cold to be good.”

I spoke up and agreed with him that we would wait until all had finished our dinner. The
whole subject was dropped and scarcely a word was said about the marriage. We talked
about almost everything that could be brought up for discussion. I told them about my
parents, where they lived, and about our family history, about the Craycroft history in
George Washington’s time as told in the family history, which I had read several times.
They also told some of their family history. After we had all finished our dinner, I

117
whispered to Elizabeth and told her I would like to talk to her father confidentially for a
few minutes. She told her mother and Mr. Pate and I then went out on the front porch
and I began my talk to convince him that I meant business in my marriage to Elizabeth.
We talked for the greater part of an hour. By that time Elizabeth and her mother had
cleared away the dishes and food from the table. We then went inside and seated
ourselves around the table as we were seated at dinner. We sat there until about four
o’clock. All had talked in turn but me. It then came my time to talk. I stood up and with
as pleasant a smile as I could, I said, “I am going to start in right now on a regular
practice that I shall keep up the balance of my life. It is this. You, Mr. Pate, shall be
known and called by me as ‘Dad’ and you Mrs. Pate shall be known and called by me as
‘Mother’.” All joined in a big hearty laugh. Then I said to Mr. Pate, “I am ready Dad
and Mother for your consent.”

Both answered “Yes and God bless you both.” And Mrs. Pate said with tears in her eyes,
“Benjamin I have talked this serious matter over with my girl Elizabeth and I am
convinced that she would not be happy unless I consented to this marriage, and my
greatest desire as a mother is to do all I can for her happiness, so I hereby give my
consent,” and she turned away to hide her tears. I thanked her and Mr. Pate, and walked
to Mrs. Pate and holding her in my arms I kissed her several times. Then I turned around
to Elizabeth and grabbed her in my arms and smothered her with kisses and they were
returned as earnestly as mine were given.

That ended my nervous waiting and from that moment on we began planning for our
wedding and agreed that it would take place on June 5th, 1837 A.D. Promptly on that
date everything was in readiness so at exactly 10:30 A.M. on the morning of June 5th,
1837 A.D. Benjamin Craycroft and Miss Elizabeth Pate were married by the Rev.
Clayton M. Dobson, the local minister of the Methodist Church meeting place in
Beardstown, Illinois.

This story about the courtship of Benjamin Craycroft and Elizabeth Pate is suspect as is
the date of the birth of their first child. In July, 2004, I received a copy of a marriage
record for Benjamin Craycroft and Elizabeth Pate. It reads as follows:

State of Illinois,
Sangamon County

I do hereby solemnly swear that Benjamin Craycroft is over 21 years old and that
Elizabeth Pate is over 18 years old.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10 May 1838 C.R. Matheny

Mr. and Mrs. Pate insisted that I move into their home with my bride until such time as
we could decide just what we intended to do or we could provide a place of our own. I
moved in but after one week we had decided to make a trip partly as a honeymoon and
partly as a business trip. So we improved the outfitted wagon I had been traveling in and
set out. We intended to return and settle in Beardstown if we did not find another
location we liked better. We left the Pate home on June 12th on our trip and headed

118
directly toward the home of the Craycroft family on the farm near Macon. They
welcomed us enthusiastically and offered to help us all they could if we decided to locate
in that vicinity. After a stay of two days we started out and headed south and west
toward St. Louis, Missouri. I had heard a lot of Missouri and wanted to see what it
looked like and after almost a week of slow traveling we reached St. Louis. We found
that place a small town on the banks of the Mississippi River, full of life112. But we also
heard that the country south was being settled up by eastern people and the more I talked
to persons who seemed to know the country south the more I wished to go there and
investigate for myself. We spent almost a week in St. Louis then started directly south
and after several days travel we reached Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Here we found a
lively little settlement of a very sociable eastern people. We both liked the locality and
the people and soon learned that there was a great opportunity to get into the levy
contracting business. I took two contracts and started to work. Help was very scarce so I
made a trip up to St. Louis to try to get more help to work building levies around
overflowed land. I was able to secure 14 men and we returned to Cape Girardeau and
went to work. Shortly after that several other contractors arrived with a lot of heavy
equipment and began underbidding us so that after my first contract was finished I was
underbid. Then the opportunity to get into the stock raising business was good.
Especially there was a big demand for horses and mules for the United States government
was paying handsome prices for good stock for the army.

After finishing my levy contract I decided to purchase a piece of land and enter stock
raising on a reasonably large basis. At first we had bought a small house and lot inside of
the town. It was not very large, but made a fairly good house to live in. Shortly after we
got settled in this house my wife Elizabeth became ill and it instilled the fear that possibly
the climate did not agree with her as it was a little low land and also a little swampy.
There was quite a lot of ague and swamp fever. She seemed to feel very ill early in the
mornings. Vomiting freely after which she would feel much better the rest of the day.
We called in the only doctor in that locality and after the third call he called me outside of
the house and said, “Well Mr. Craycroft don’t be alarmed or worried about your wife’s
illness for it is only a case of she is going to have a baby. So don’t worry for it is only
nature taking place and within a month or two she will be all right.

This information relieved me very much and I immediately started to get into the stock
raising business. We had now been married nearly two months and we were both very
happy at the prospect of becoming the parents of a real child, either boy or girl would be
all right with us. It turned out just as the doctor had said it would, that is her illness got
better and she got to feeling as well as she had ever felt in her life. I took new interest in
getting into stock raising work. In my investigating I met a pair of married people that
had a small farm just outside the outer limits of the town that had fell heir to a reasonably
large fortune by the death of the man’s father in Pennsylvania. He had just returned from
that state to settle up his affairs in Cape Girardeau so they could return to Pennsylvania to
make their permanent home. He was offering his farm for a price of $5,250 which was a

112
According to the 1830 census the population of St. Louis was 14,125. In 1840 the population had grown
to 35,979. It is safe to say that by 1837 the population had to be over 20,000. Even by today’s standards
that is not a “small town”.

119
very reasonable price considering all that it included, which was 40 acres of good non-
overflowing land, a good log house of 4 rooms, all had board floors air tight, two wells,
one 65 feet deep, the other 70 feet deep, both have a good supply of good water, a good
barn, all of the place well fenced with a good rail fence six rails high, about 28 acres
cleared of all trees and stumps and under cultivation. Two teams of four-year mules well
broken to work, one team of five year old horses, three wagons, one light buggy, two
plows, six sets chain harness, one set of buggy harness, twenty-six chickens, four ducks,
three cows and one bull. After offering him $4,500 spot cash he promptly turned it down
with the advice that his offer could not be replaced short of about $7,000. He told me
that if I could pay him $5,000 spot cash he would let me have it at once. I then offered
him $4,000 cash and the other $1,000 in two years at 6% interest. But he turned it down
saying he wanted to leave there with everything sold and paid for, for he never expected
to return to that place again and he did not want to ever own anything there again. I had
the cash to pay him but I wanted to purchase some brood mares and if I had all cash I
could purchase them at a much better price than if I purchased on time. That was my
reason for trying to pay as small amount as was possible. But we finally closed the deal
at his price and Elizabeth and I moved in the last of that week, just as soon as they got
out. They sold most of their household furniture and personal articles. But they had
quite a lot that they could not sell and had to leave it. It was worth possibly $150, they
offered it all to me for $50 but we did not really need any of it, so we would not buy any
of it. At last the day for them to depart and they said “Well Craycroft, you are a hard
man to deal with, but I like to deal with you, so I will make you a present of everything
we leave on the farm.” I thanked him and they left. I got two letters from him in about
six months saying to please send him the $150 for the furniture. I never answered either
of them and never sent him any part of $150 for I did not owe him anything according to
our understanding

I immediately began laying plans to get into the stock raising business, besides taking a
few small contracts of levy building and kept busy all the time and within another month
I had rented some 500 acres of low swamp land for pasture and had secured twenty brood
mares. I had to make several trips to Illinois and one trip as far as Vincennes, Indiana, to
be able to pick up the brood mares for I only bought good stock. At last I was really and
truly in the stock raising business. Luckily I was able to keep fairly busy with my levy
building and land clearing contracting.

Then on the morning of March 12th, 1838, our first baby was born. I had hoped it would
be a boy but it was not and I was glad for Elizabeth was so pleased. We pondered for
nearly two weeks over finding a suitable name for her. At last we settled on a name and
called Matilda West Craycroft. She was a strong youngster and thrived right from the
start and grew into a beautiful girl and looked very much like her mother.

I had been able to purchase another 40 acres of land adjoining our home place at $7.50
per acre and I immediately fenced it with a good rail fence and used it as a pasture for my
stock. I had also succeeded in renting more of the lowlands for pasturage. Now I had
several young mules, which I had bought to raise, for all of them were to young to work,
ranging at from two weeks to three months old. I purchased these at from $0.00 to
$15.00 each.

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Then June 25th, 1840, I thought I missed some of my stock. I got an officer and we made
a thorough check and we found six mules missing. All were nearing the age of three
years, the age they were being broken to harness. I had not started to break any of them
but intended to start soon. All of the land was well fenced. We made a trip around the
entire acreage to be sure they had not been able to jump over the fence or tear it down
sufficiently to get out. Satisfying ourselves of this we then went to the headquarters of
the military staff and asked for help which was given immediately.

In about ten days the mules were located in a pasture about 35 miles northwest of Cape
Girardeau. They were promptly identified by my brand. The military officials turned the
mules and the owner of the pasture to the sheriff and he returned them to me and the
thieves (two in number) spent nearly a year in jail waiting their trial for horse stealing or
rather mule stealing which amounted to the same thing. I had no more trouble until
August 1848113 when thieves made another raid on my pastures. This time they took 12
of my best and oldest mules. We were only able to locate three of them but the thieves
got wind of our coming and departed before we could arrest them. But we did get three
of the mules they had sold to farmers near De Soto, Missouri. It took some time and a lot
of expense to get them back for the farmer fought giving them up unless I gave him back
what he had paid for them. I would not do this for they were stolen property and I was
the owner. I finally got a court order to get them and taking the sheriff with me we went
to the stable where the court had ordered them kept until a decision was made. I took
them home and my health had began to fail because of too much overwork and I began
trying to sell out.

In the meantime our second child was born on November 12th, 1840 and it was a boy this
time. Both Elizabeth and I were elated. Elizabeth insisted that he be named Benjamin
and named especially for me114. This is the beginning of Benjamin Senior and Benjamin
Junior. I soon was able to dispose of my stock raising business and bought out grocery
store. I had learned some about the ins and outs of the grocery business back in
Maryland and thought by slowing up on my hard working my health would be better. In
this I was right for in a very short time I had improved in my health to a marked degree. I
remained in the grocery business for several years during which time we had several
children.

Our third child was born April 18th, 1842, and was named John Wesley Craycroft115.
Then our fourth child was born March 9th, 1844, and we named him Thomas Benton
Craycroft. Our fourth child was born 1846. (No date given in the record, only the year of
1846. We will try to locate the exact date of birth later. If we do not we will write it in

113
Could this instead be 1840, since in the next paragraph the writer indicates that around November 1840
Benjamin sold out his stock raising business to become a grocery store owner.
114
By this time Benjamin and Elizabeth had moved to Benton, Scott County, Missouri. Ben Jr.’s death
certificate states his birthplace was Benton, Missouri. Also the 1840 census for Scott County, Missouri lists
“Ben Craycraft” as head of a household.
115
John Wesley Craycroft was, in fact, born March 4, 1842, according to his obituary.

121
with pen and ink.116) This boy was named Columbus Joel Craycroft117. All of these
children were born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

My health has not been very good for the last year or two. We decided we would sell out
the grocery store and our small land holdings and return to someplace near Decatur or
Macon, Illinois. We had a few head of good mules and horses yet but a well organized
bunch of horse thieves working in and around Cape Girardeau kept everyone worried for
we could never tell from one day to the next whether we would have any of our stock left
the next morning or not. We now have succeeded in disposing of all of our property and
intend to move to Illinois within the next month. We will take our best team of horses
and move on a wagon taking our time on the way. My health seems to be gradually
getting a little worse and on account of so many of my mules and horses having been
stolen my venture in the stock raising business can really be considered almost a
complete failure for about every few months some of my best young stock was stolen and
most of it was never recovered. This loss coupled with my illness has reduced my
income very materially, so we have decided to get out while we can.

We at last moved to Illinois at a point near Macon. We bought a small farm of 10 acres
and while here our last baby was born. It was a girl born October 16th, 1850. This was
the last item recorded in this record by Benjamin Craycroft Senior for he died December
11th, 1853. He had a very sick horse and was giving him some medicine that a horse
doctor had prescribed for a disease they called black-leg. The skin of the horse turned
black, very black. In giving the medicine to the horse he (the horse) struggled very hard
to avoid taking it from a large bottle and in the struggle he knocked Benjamin Senior
down and injured him very badly and knocked a large place on his skin on his arm and
leg off. It is not known if the horse bit him with his teeth or not but there was a large spot
on his arm that looked like a bite, and it was thought by his doctor that the horse had
really bitten him on the arm, thus communicating the dreaded disease of black-leg to him.
Diphtheria set in in a few days and he died with a combination disease of black diphtheria
and black-leg August 24th, 1852118, and was buried in the cemetery near Decatur, also
near Macon, Illinois.119

This sudden death of her husband was a real calamity for the widow for now she had a
family of six small children to look after, the oldest being a girl only about fifteen years
old and the youngest another baby girl only two years old. The first girl name(d) Matilda
and the baby named Eliza. However the widow stood up under her responsibilities very
bravely just as she had always done in her entire married life. Her neighbors were very
116
I have conflicting information regarding his actual birth date. I have one date of December 13, 1845,
and another of May 30, 1846. According to a biography of C.J. in Fresno, California and another
biography compiled for the Soldiers and Sailors Historical and Benevolent Society the December date
would seem to be the correct one.
117
Columbus Joel was born 13 Dec 1845. Account sheet from the funeral home which buried C.J. gives
date of birth as Dec. 13, 1845, age 69 years, 11 months 4 days.
118
This data conflicts with the date of death given at the beginning of this same paragraph. It also conflicts
with the date on Benjamin’s grave marker.
119
Benjamin was buried in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, Illinois, next to Benjamin Jr.’s
first wife Elizabeth Ann Breese Craycroft.

122
kind and offered and did give her many kind favors. Her father and a brother came to her
rescue. But of course their help was limited for they had their own homes and families to
look after. She struggled along for several years and with the help of her two oldest boys,
Benjamin Junior and John Wesley Craycroft, she got along reasonably well. Her main
object was to keep all of her children together and with her, and while it looked very
gloomy very often she succeeded.

There were several other Craycroft families living quite near in and around Macon.
Some were closely related and some quite distant related and some that could not trace
their relation back far enough to be sure they were related or just how close if at all.
They were all very kind in their relations toward the widow and all of her children120.
The two oldest boys were very young, especially the two oldest boys seemed to realize
the importance of their mother’s loss as well as their own loss of their father and did
everything they possibly could to help her. They worked at everything they could do
both at home and at other relatives and even neighbors they would do all they could to
make a little money to help their mother. True it was not much but anything even ever so
little would help and they did it so willingly that everyone noticed it and went out of their
way to help these willing young boys help their widowed mother. They proved their
worth especially in the fall of the year in the hard task of shucking of the crops of corn.
Although very young they could and did shuck as much corn as most of the older men
did and as a result they had not trouble in always having a place to shuck corn when there
was any to do.

Thus the family lived and got along in finances for several years. As all of the children
especially these two older boys grew up and got stronger they were able to secure work
regularly on some nearby farms and they always contributed most of their earnings to
their mother’s support and to that of the expenses of her family.

In March 1857 a man by the name of John Fouts, then living at Canton, Illinois, some
distance north of Macon121, the widow’s home, was introduced to her. He was a mild-
tempered man and was in the grocery store business in Canton. On account of the
widow’s deceased husband having been in the grocery store business in Canton122 many
years in his boyhood days and in the later years of his life, the two found much to discuss
and talk about. Mr. Fouts also traveled around the country buying up corn for resale to
other farmers located in his district at Canton. He visited Decatur, Macon and other corn
raising localities on these trips and when in the locality of Macon always paid a visit to
the widow. There was a short courtship of a few months and on August 28th, 1857, they
were married.123 He was a few years older than she was. John Fouts was born December
24th, 1803, near Canton, Illinois124, therefore he was about 17 years older than she was.
120
Actually, the Craycroft families in the area were either the brothers of her late husband or their children.
The 1860 census for Macon County lists Columbus living with Edward’s daughter and son-in-law William
and Cornelia Craycroft Morris.
121
Canton is about 100 miles northwest of Macon.
122
This must be an error on the part of the writer. Benjamin had worked in his brother’s store in Baltimore,
Maryland.
123
I have a certified copy of their marriage certificate. It shows the date of their marriage as August 29,
1856.
124
According to the 1870 Illinois Census, John Fouts was born in North Carolina.

123
He was 53 years of age and she was 37 years of age. They lived a very busy and happy
life together until he died. They became the parents of two children, both boys. The first
one was born in the year of 1859. No exact date is recorded. He was named Charles
Fouts. He only lived a few months and died. Then another son, and their last child, was
born in Walnut Hill, Illinois, July 30th, 1861 and they named him William Fouts. He
survived and at the time this record is being retyped (January 10, 1947) he is still living
on the same farm he was born on near Walnut Hill, Illinois. The reason for this being
retyped is because the record had been left out in the open where it got very wet and
moldy and in order to save it, it had to be retyped or renewed in order to preserve it for if
it had not been retyped it would have been rotted and spoiled in a short time. He is now
well past 85 years of age and is still in fairly good health and may survive many years
yet. We hope so.

His father, John Fouts, her second and last husband was the father of several children
before he married Elizabeth Pate Craycroft Fouts and as stated was also the father of two
sons by this Craycroft-Fouts marriage. He, John Fouts, was born December 24th, 1803,
and died September 24th, 1888, at the age of 85 years of age. They operated a sugarcane
crushing plant and manufactured sorghum molasses for many years where small farmers
could bring small amounts of sugarcane, have the juice crushed out of it, and boiled so
that it turned into sorghum molasses which we used instead of sugar. Sugar can be
obtained but is sold at a very high? price of from 18 to 25 cents per pound. The two
oldest Craycroft boys were not in favor of their mother’s marriage to John Fouts but did
nothing to prevent it only by expressing their opposition and offering to combine their
efforts to support her and the other children as they had been doing the last few years.
But their mother went ahead and married John Fouts anyway and their marriage proved a
good one for they spent many happy years together.

At the time of the marriage the two boys had taken a contract at Macon to plow and raise
a 40-acre plot of land to corn and harvest it in the fall of the year. When the Fouts-
Craycroft families moved to Walnut Hill after marriage these two boys had to remain in
Macon to fulfill their contract, but in December of that year, 1857, both closed out all of
their holdings of corn and also went to Walnut Hill. They bought passage on a train on
the Illinois Central Railroad and it was the first time that either had ever rode on a train.
They rode from Macon, Macon County, to Centralia, Marion County, and as Walnut Hill
was only six miles east of Walnut Hill125 they set out and walked to that place. We were
all very much surprised at their arrival. We knew they were coming to our house but we
did not really expect them until Christmas.

The two boys were very successful in securing work in and around Walnut Hill and
surrounding territory. They did not spend much of their time at the Fouts home. They
were satisfied to only visit there occasionally. Their step-father and his wife, their
mother, encouraged them to make their home with them and the other Craycroft and
Fouts children, but they enjoyed making their own way and only visited the Fouts home
occasionally. Their cane-crushing and sorghum-making business proved a very good
paying business and they were kept busy well into each fall of each year. One year the

125
This should be Centralia.

124
two Craycroft boys were hired to work in the cane-crushing plant. But the next year they
secured work on a brick-making plant and the next year they opened a plant of their
own126.

Elizabeth Pate Craycroft Fouts died in their family home in Walnut Hill, Illinois,
September 18th, 1891, at the age of 71 years, 7 months, and 2 days. She spent a clean and
honest life and became a member of the Methodist Church when only a girl at
Beardstown, Illinois at the age of only 15 years old, in 1835 and remained a continued
faithful member throughout her long and useful life.

She was buried in the Little Grove Church Cemetery in Walnut Hill, Illinois September
20th, 1891. Rev. James Snow officiating. There was a very large attendance which
consisted of almost everyone living in and around Walnut Hill, testifying to the respect
and love in which she was held by the community and its sympathy with the bereaved
children and relatives among which sons, daughters, grand-children, and great-grand-
children.

It must be recorded here that her oldest daughter, Matilda West Craycroft, made her
home with her mother and stepfather John Fouts up to the time she was married to C.
Tate Morris127. She then moved to Lamar, Missouri, where she lived and raised a large
family and died in 1879. Her history is given in more detail elsewhere in this record.

The above referenced detail was included in the previous transcript on two separate
pages earlier in the record. I am putting these pages in here at this point to make the
flow of information easier on the reader (and myself). Part of these pages also include
additional information on her father, Benjamin Senior.

Benjamin Craycroft Senior in many ways was a very remarkable man. Being born in
Baltimore, Maryland, where he grew up with three other brothers. His father was a hard-
working man and as his boys grew up he insisted that they also do hard work and seen to
it that everyone did his full share of the work assigned to them. As the boys grew up they
gradually secured employment from others than his father for they found they did not
have to work nearly so hard and secured much more pay and thanks.

When Benjamin reached the age of sixteen years he left his father’s home for conditions
were not to his (young Benjamin’s) liking. His father objected for he had plenty of work
for all of his boys and wanted them to stay at home and help him. The boy worked hard
all his life right up to the time of his death. Immediately after his marriage to the pretty
girl Elizabeth Pate in Beardstown, Illinois, they worked hard together and made a fairly
good estate. But unfortunately much of it had to be spent on account for medicines for
his health.

126
Benjamin Jr. did not go into the brick making business until at least the late 1860’s. John Wesley, the
second eldest son, never did go into the brick business. Columbus took up this business in 1866.
127
I have a certified copy of her marriage certificate and it shows her husband as William E. Morris, and
they were married on August 30, 1857.

125
They spent a very happy life together and raised a family of two girls and four boys, all
strong and happy until the tragedy of his death. The map on the reverse side of this sheet
(not available in the record at this time) shows the route they traveled together. The
exclusive (red line) is shown in red to show the route taken by the oldest daughter
Matilda West Craycroft Morris and her family.

Many Craycrofts have made their homes in the state of Missouri. The first was Benjamin
Craycroft Senior. He and his family lived in Cape Girardeau from 1837 to 1849.
Another branch of the Craycroft family lived in Sedalia. One of them a Benjamin
Craycroft128 was Mayor of Sedalia in 1888 and 1889 and had one girl and two sons, one
named Benjamin and the other Frank. The girl’s name was Grace Wright.

THIS IS THE LIFE RECORD OF MATILDA WEST CRAYCROFT MORRIS.

She was the first child of Benjamin Craycroft and Elizabeth Pate Craycroft, the last
named (Matilda’s mother) married John Fouts of Walnut Hill, Illinois. This is mentioned
only for identification purposes only.

Matilda was born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in 1837, lived there many years then
moved to a place near Macon, Illinois, with her parents. She lived with them many years
after he mother married her second husband, John Fouts. She was making her home with
them at the time she married. On this occasion she was visiting her grandmother, Mrs.
R.G. Pate in Beardstown, Illinois. While here she met and married Mr. C. Tate Morris
and they almost immediately went to Lamar, Missouri, and purchased a farm and lived
there for many years, and raised a large family. She died in Lamar in 1879129.

Their children’s names as given in a family record owned by their half-uncle named John
P. Craycroft130, of Sedalia, Missouri, is:

1. Sarrah Elizabeth, 2. Charles M., 3. Minnie Lemon, 4. Mytrly (?), 5. Leslie B., 6. Ella
M., 7. Nancy Jane, 8. Franklyn C., 9. Louis A. Morris. All of these children were born in
or near Lamar, Missouri. He gave not dates of any of the births. Eventually most if not
all of the children moved to California, where they married too and raised families.

This short record of Matilda West Craycroft Morris is placed in this part of the record
because it has not been customary to keep the records of the female members of the
family because when the women marry they do not carry the family name of Craycroft.
The intention of the founders of this family record is to preserve the old family name of
Craycroft created in the year of 1297 A.D. and that can only be done by the male or men
of the family because only they carry the family name of Craycroft even after marriage.

SIGNED John P. Craycroft131

128
This Benjamin was the son of Aaron Craycroft, Benjamin’s brother.
129
According to the Barton County Cemetery Records Matilda died in 1878 at the age of 39.
130
John P. Craycroft was the half-brother of Benjamin (father of Benjamin Senior), Aaron, and Edward
Scott Craycroft.
131
John P. Craycroft was an uncle of Matilda Craycroft, her father’s brother.

126
FAMILY RECORD OF BENJAMIN CRAYCROFT SENIOR AND HIS
DESCENDANTS

This record has been re-checked from the year of 1780 to 1947. It is from the father of
Benjamin Craycroft Senior on down to this year (1947).

The father of Benjamin Craycroft Senior was born July 10th, 1780 at Georgetown,
Maryland. He married when young and had a family of four boys, their names being
Aaron, Edward, Benjamin (Senior), and John132.

1st child Aaron born October 20th, 1806 at Georgetown, Maryland.

2nd child Edward born September 25th, 1809, born in Georgetown, Maryland.

3rd child Benjamin (Senior) born June 5th, 1812. Born in Baltimore, Maryland. This is
the Benjamin Senior of whom this family record is of. The word senior is being used for
identification purposes, for he is the real senior of this particular branch of the family,
who have faithfully kept the record moving from father to son since June 1297 A.D.
There are many Craycrofts closely and distantly related but this one is the one that has
kept the record from father to son all these past years. Now that he is identified we start
on his own family record.

He married a beautiful girl named Miss Elizabeth Pate, 17 years old, on June 5th, 1837 at
Beardstown, Illinois. They moved almost immediately to Cape Girardeau, Missouri,
where they established their home from 1837 to 1849 and raised a family of two girls and
four boys. Their children are:

1st child, Matilda, born March 12th, 1838, born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

2nd child, Benjamin Junior, November 12th, 1840, in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

3rd child, John Wesley, born April 18, 1842, in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

4th child, Thomas Benton, born March 9, 1844, in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

5th child, Columbus Joel, May 30th, 1846, born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

6th child, Eliza Jane born October 16, 1850, in Macon County, Illinois.

This is a complete list of all of his children. All grew up to maturity and had families of
their own later. Their histories are told in this record in the following pages.

History and Deaths

132
Benjamin actually had nine children, most of them confirmed by the will of Angeline Craycroft, a
daughter. They were John P. (by his first wife Eleanor Prather), Charles, Angeline, Aaron, Benjamin,
Edward, Eliza Ann, John P. and Ellen Mary.

127
The father of Benjamin Craycroft Senior lived all his life in Maryland and in and around
Georgetown and Baltimore.

He worked hard all of his life and when he died he was ordinarily wealthy. He died in
1817 and because his son Benjamin Senior left home and came west against his will he
disinherited him in the settlement of his will and estate.

The family record does not show the deaths of the first and second children born before
Benjamin Senior was given possession of these records, shortly after his father’s death
when he went back to Baltimore, Maryland, in May, 1836. His other brothers felt he had
been mistreated in the settling of their father’s estate and each chipped into a purse and
gave him a sum of money that amounted to less than one-third of what he was justly
entitled to. They also agreed that he should have the original family record and he
brought it west with him. He worked hard all his life and in his declining years his health
broke and he died in Blue Mound, Illinois, in 1853. He was buried in the Salem
Cemetery, Macon County, leaving a large family for his widow to support.

She married John Fouts in 1858 in Macon, Illinois. They soon moved to Walnut Hill,
Illinois. She had 2 sons by Fouts, Charles and William in 1859 and 1861. She died in
1891 in Walnut Hill, Illinois and is buried in the cemetery there.

Their first child Matilda married C. Tate Morris133 in Beardstown, Illinois, moved
immediately to Lamar, Missouri, where they raised a large family. C. Tate Morris died,
but no date given. She died in 1879 in Lamar. Her children’s names are Sarrah
Elizabeth, Charles B., Ella May, Nancy Jane, Franklin c., and Louis A. Morris. Their
children were all born in or near Lamar, Missouri. After her death the family disposed of
the family holdings and moved to California134 and settled in Banning, some later going
to Bakersfield, Oakland, Madera and Santa Cruz, California. However most of them
remained in Banning.

The second child was a boy, named after his father Benjamin and was known as
Benjamin Junior until his father Benjamin Senior died in Blue Mound, Illinois, in 1853.
Then this boy Benjamin dropped the title of Junior and simply used the name of
Benjamin ever since. He was born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, November 12th, 1840,
died in Vandalia, Illinois, March 19th, 1917, aged 76 years 4 months., buried in the
Craycroft family burial plot in the cemetery at that place135.

This concludes the inserted section about Matilda West Craycroft and her father
Benjamin Senior.

Continuing about the two Craycroft boys, Benjamin Junior and John Wesley Craycroft
seemed to want to be together and work together as much as was possible. The year they
started into the brick making business seemed to start them on their way to remain in that

133
I am confused by the repeated reference to Matilda’s husband as C. Tate Morris, when I have their
marriage certificate and it shows his name as William E. Morris.
134
The 1880 census shows William Morris and seven children still living in Lamar, Missouri.
135
I have a photo of his grave marker.

128
business. The next year they started a brick making yard in Centralia which was about
six or seven miles west of Walnut Hill, Illinois.

This is not accurate. In 1860 John Wesley was living in Sulphur Hill, Indiana, in the
home of J. A. Williams, a minister. Shortly after this he enrolled in Eureka College in
Eureka, Illinois, and graduated with a theology degree. Immediately upon graduation in
1864 John left for New York from where he sailed for San Francisco, arriving there at
the end of May. He never was in the brickmaking business as I have pointed out
previously.

Then the war came on under Abraham Lincoln and John Wesley sold his part of the brick
making business to his brother Benjamin and went out to California. But before this we
spent much of our time in Walnut Hill where my mother and her second husband John
Fouts had their home.

John Wesley Craycroft was very much interested in becoming a Minister of the Gospel
(preacher). At an early age he began systematically studying the bible and at an early age
was ordained a Minister of Christianity by his church. He was appointed as the pastor of
the congregation at Walnut Hill136.

Owing to the facts directly connected with the life of our famous President Abraham
Lincoln, I am placing in this Craycroft family record some of the true and noteworthy
happenings of some of the family with and about our great President. On July 16th, 1864,
President Lincoln issued a call for 500,000 volunteers for active duty in the Southern
States to put down the so-called Confederate War. Almost immediately my two younger
brothers, Thomas Benton Craycroft and Columbus Joel Craycroft, enlisted in Company
C, 11th Illinois Infantry. They fought many battles and both were wounded in battles.
Both returned home at the end of victory of the war. Later both drew substantial
pensions from the United States government on account of their injuries.

I did not enlist for I was a Minister of the Christian Church and to do as much good as I
could by spiritual advice. I had been converted to Christianity at the age of seventeen
years and at once decided to become a Minister of the Gospel. In looking over our family
record I found that several former Craycrofts had been ministers with much credit to
themselves by rendering valuable service and families. I had worked at many different
jobs, among which were farming, logging, woodcutting, rail making, brick making and
preaching at every opportunity. I had saved enough from my small savings to pay the
expense of a special training for the ministry and on May 15th, 1860, I was ordained a
Minister of the Christian Church. I remained in and around my new hometown of
Walnut Hill, also in the nearby towns of Centralia and the county seat of Salem and often
made visits to the old state capitol Vandalia to preach on Sundays to the small Christian
congregations located in those cities. On all of these trips the collections made at the
meeting never paid my actual expenses although I traveled by my own horse and buggy.
I knew I was doing a great amount of good so I willingly kept it up until later I went to
faraway to California.
136
This is highly unlikely since between 1860 and 1864 John was in college and upon graduation
immediately sailed to California.

129
Up to this time there was no Christian Church in my own town of Walnut Hill so we had
to meet in the town hall located on the corner of the Main Street and the road that went
north past the John Fouts and his wife’s, my mother, home about ½ mile north of this
corner. Then a long time later we met in a schoolhouse located about ½ a mile west of
this same corner. We did not have to pay any rent for either of these places.

I made a desperate effort to collect funds enough to build a Christian Church in Walnut
Hill but failed to accomplish this self-appointed task, but I did succeed in collecting about
$500 and a Board of Trustees was elected and the fund was turned over to them before I
left for California later. I was told years later that this Board with the help of another
minister succeeded in building a church but I never learned whether it was a Christian
Church or a community church where all the different denominations could meet. I was
told years later the land on which the church was finally built was donated by Richard
Breese, a wealthy landowner in Walnut Hill, who years afterward became the father-in-
law of Benjamin Craycroft, my oldest brother, January 3rd, 1861.

I occupied the pulpit for the Christian Church for quite a long time after President
Lincoln issued his call for volunteers of 500,000 July 1st, 1864137, and as stated before by
me in this record two of my younger brothers almost immediately enlisted, I think it was
on July 16th, 1864, and left at once for army duty. They tried very hard to get me to enlist
but I did not for several good reasons. But they did succeed in getting a neighbor boy
named S. Jack Shaw to enlist so they all left together. This boy, S. Jack Shaw, later
married my only living sister Eliza when they returned from army duty. This marriage
took place in Salem, Illinois, December 23rd, 1866. I was then in California and could
not attend the wedding. After the two brothers and my friend Shaw left I resigned
Pastorship of my church and left for California. I want to mention here that my oldest
brother Benjamin Craycroft was married to Miss Elizabeth Ann Breese January 3rd, 1861
at Salem, Illinois.

When I left Walnut Hill, Illinois to go to California I went to New Orleans, Louisiana138.
After a weeks delay I secured a ship for the Isthmus of Panama and landed at (the writer,
thought to be John Wesley Craycroft, does not say where this was)

We made several landings before we reached our landing place in Panama, some of
which I never learned their names, for I was seasick most of the time and was in bed at
several of the landings. But I do remember we landed some place in Mexico, Brazil139
and two other places I do not know. After about three weeks we finally landed and were
informed that this is the place you go across the Isthmus of Panama and get another ship
to wherever you are going. I told them I was going to San Francisco, California. After
landing we learned that all of us would have to take our turn at crossing the Isthmus.
That meant that all first-class passengers would be taken across first, and that would take
a least a week, after which second-class passengers would be lined up and taken across
next. I held second-class passage, therefore had to wait for several days before I could
137
John Wesley was already in California at this time.
138
As I stated earlier John left for California from New York, not New Orleans.
139
Brazil is not a likely port-of-call on a trip from New Orleans to Panama as it a very long distance from
Panama. Belize, Honduras, is much more likely.

130
even start across. It was only about 31 miles by stage road across, but was a very
dangerous road to travel on account of the extreme heat and mosquitoes of which there
were an unlimited number, any of the female specie could cause death from fever. We
went around every day with our heads wrapped in a cloth called Mosquito-Bar over our
entire heads and hands for fear one might bite us. Some of the second-class passengers,
weary of waiting, started out and walked across the isthmus and thought they could and
would make it in not more than two days at most. Some of them never succeeded in
arriving at the western side of the isthmus, but fell very ill on the way and most of them
died. Some got across but were too ill to get on the boat when it sailed, while others
succeeded in getting on the boat, but died at sea, and had to be buried at sea.

All of us were warned by the officials and others also warned by the natives not to try to
walk across, but all of us thought they only did it so that the state companies could get the
money it would cost us to ride across. But in this we found later that we were badly
mistaken, for as we went across on the stage, we could see many of those who were well
and hearty on the boat were staggering along the road and we could plainly see that they
were just about staggered out. The stages could not pick them up en route for they were
loaded to full capacity before starting across. It was the most horrifying sight I have ever
seen. Even the horses and mules used in pulling the stages had to be protected from the
bites of the deadly mosquitoes. Some were coated with some liquid concoction while
others were covered with Mosquito-Bars like the passengers.

Arriving at the western terminus where we would be taken by small boats out to the
larger sailing vessels that would take us up the western coast of Mexico and California to
San Francisco, we found another delay of possibly another week at least and perhaps
longer. For in some instances the sailing ships were badly delayed by storms at sea and
many times were wrecked, so there was absolutely no permanent way that we could tell
just when we would be able to set sail. The only real way we could be partly certain was
after we were actually on the boat and even then we might be delayed a day or two on
account of a heavy storm. It was a long, hard, dangerous and weary trip and I shall never
forget it and I am giving this account to be placed in the Craycroft family record for a
permanent record for our future descendants. I am writing it now and will send it to my
oldest brother Benjamin and ask him to place it in the record.

I arrived in San Francisco on March 29th, 1863140, and was seasick a greater part of the
way from Panama. But after a few days rest I had my strength partly back and began
making plans. First I found out all I could about the gold mining and found that anyone
could get a job in the mining district up in the Sierra Nevada Mountains east of Stockton.
A riverboat line could be had as far as Stockton or Sacramento, California, then from
there on a stage had to be used. I did not know anything about mining but I was assured
that I would find plenty of work at good pay if I went up the river. I delayed for a few
days more in San Francisco and could plainly see that there was a community that needed
spiritual guidance so I tried to preach to them for a few days and evenings without very
much success. I could see quickly that the people were much more interested in digging
for gold than they were in saving their souls.

140
John was still in college at this time. He arrived in San Francisco on 29 May 1864.

131
After some delay I thought of a plan, of going up to the gold digging country near
Placerville, California, and secure a job digging gold. It was just as I had been advised
that is I had no trouble in securing a job. I went to work. Each working place had one or
two men who did nothing but inspect the pans of each digger as they washed the rocks
and sands as they panned out the gold. If there was any gold in the pan he would place it
in a small sack and write the name of the man who washed it out, this being done in each
case for each worker got a small percent as a bonus for each week’s gold he found and
washed out. My supply of money was getting quite low so I kept this job for several
weeks until I had accumulated about $550 then I thought I would try my own hand at
prospecting and if I were successful I might make a cleanup like some had done in the
past. Then I could return to San Francisco and devote my entire time to the ministry. I
put in about a month at this and found that it looked like all the gold bearing streams had
been taken up by others.

I then returned to working for others in the daytime and holding meetings at night. I
could always have from twenty-five to fifty in my meetings and the collections were fair,
but very few would come forward and confess and become members of the church. I
found it was more than I could stand to work hard all day then dress up and hold
meetings at night. I found it was too much for my strength so had to abandon either
working or my meeting. It did not require an accountant to show that the donations or
collections would not be sufficient to even pay my actual living expenses let alone pay
for the use of a hall to hold the meetings in. At last I had to give up my meetings. I had
been purchasing songbooks, bibles and other religious matter and upon request was
handing them out to my audience free, paying all of the expense and cost out of my
earnings panning out gold. After about a year of this hard work and plainly unsuccessful
church effort I had to decide to return to San Francisco and get into something like
farming or contracting like I had followed in Illinois. I found a place in a general supply
store in San Francisco located on the waterfront facing the San Francisco Bay. I worked
at this for several months then I went south to the town of San Jose, California, which
was then a small thriving locality. Here I found little farming but met many different
sheep-raisers and cattle-raisers among who were Henry Shaw, the Martinez families, the
Crutners, Valpey’s and many others.

I had in the last year saved about $1,500 which I had made mostly in several trades I
made in real estate and on the advice of some of the above good businessmen I purchased
a small band of sheep and entered the sheep-raising business vigorously. I had very good
luck and made a good start in my life. Although I am not wealthy I have made a good
start. I went into debt and bought several pieces of real estate, which I succeeded in
selling at a good profit. In one case I more than doubled my investment. I had made
enough profit that I purchased a tract of land near a settlement north of San Jose,
California. This tract of land became my home for many years. On July 28th, 1868 I was
married to Miss Alice Valpey in San Jose, California141. We immediately set up
housekeeping on my farm as soon as I could have a residence built. Here we lived for
many, many years and here is where all of my children were born which consisted of two
boys and one girl.

141
John and Mary Alice Valpey were, in fact, married 11 Sep 1867. I have a copy of the marriage record.

132
I continued with my work for the church, also continued in the sheep-raising business but
after a long time I was able financially to employ the full-time of a man to herd my
sheep. My business grew and in a year or two I had increased my band of sheep to three
different bands.

In the summer of 1875 my older brother Benjamin arrived at my home and after a short
time he also entered the sheep-raising business. He had three children still living out of
his former seven, four having died. He had arranged with our brother Thomas, who had
recently married our stepsister, she was a daughter of John Fouts our stepfather. When
they married they went to Salem, Illinois, and he entered the brick making and
contracting business. Brother Benjamin arranged with him to take care of his
(Benjamin’s) youngest son John and he also arranged with our mother to care for the girl,
Lulia, and he brought the oldest boy Benjamin Richard, Dick, with him to California.

As already stated he immediately entered the sheep-raising business and rented a section
or two of land in a large valley then known as Panoche Valley, about 80 miles southeast
of my home. He also filed a claim on a 160-acre homestead of government land located
near Gilroy, California. He and his young son Richard, Dick, able to herd and look after
his sheep.

This family record was left with our mother Mrs. Elizabeth Pate Craycroft Fouts, in
Walnut Hill, Illinois. She, it will be remembered, married John Fouts some years after
our father’s death, near Macon, Illinois.

In 1879 brother Benjamin decided to return to Illinois on a visit intending to return to


California after a short visit, but he never returned. For when he reached brother
Thomas’ home in Salem, Illinois, he found that Thomas had invented and patented a
brick making machine on May 27th, 1879, that had almost revolutionized the brick
making business, for while men could only make less than 3,000 to 4,000 bricks per day
at hard work, this machine could make 30,000 to 35,000 and even make 45,000 to 50,000
if put under steam pressure instead of horse power and brother Thomas was very busily
engaged in manufacturing and selling these famous machines, and placing them on the
market with very good success.

There was good enough for a good salesman who had experience in the brick making
business and as Benjamin had both, brother Thomas engaged brother Benjamin’s service
at once to both sell and erect these machines and guarantee the successful operation of
every one of these machines. In a very short time Benjamin had met a young woman
named Miss Elizabeth M. Honecker in Centralia, Illinois, and after a few months of
courtship they were married at the home of brother Thomas in Salem, Illinois, March 2nd,
1880. After that time brother Thomas Benton Craycroft sold all of his patent rights to a
firm named W.R. Gerhard located at the old capitol of Vandalia, Illinois. This was a new
establishment and everything connected with the manufacture of the brick making
machine was moved to Vandalia, Illinois, including the continued employment of brother
Benjamin Craycroft. I mention this fact in this record in order to show just why
Benjamin Craycroft never returned to California in 1879 or 1880 as he intended. This
man, W.R. Gerhard, in a short time met with severe financial reverses and the bank and

133
other creditors closed him out and took over the machine shop and foundry including all
rights of and patents of the Eagle Brick Machine. In a short time all was sold to brother
Benjamin.

He took immediate charge of all of the property and was very successful from the start.
Therefore he was now well established in business and decided he had far better
prospects of success than any he had in California. In November 1883 I decided to go
back to Illinois on a visit. This would be my first visit to my boyhood home for over 19
years and I was quite anxious to make the trip. Besides I had made a contract with the
Southern Pacific and with the Central Pacific and they made a contract for me with
several other railroads in the east for me to act as an emigration agent between the East
and California. In this work I would be paid a small sum of cash and a commission on
each family or person I secured to go to and settle in the State of California.

I was quite successful on this trip both financially and pleasure. It was not quite near the
Christmas holidays of the year of 1883 and brother Benjamin was arranging for a big
family reunion to be held at his home on Christmas Day, December 25th, 1883, where all
four of the brothers and Eliza, the only sister, and other relatives would be present
besides our mother. This would be the first time we had all been together for nearly
twenty years. The celebration was held as scheduled and all present had a wonderful
time. During the meeting the question of who should have the permanent possession of
the famous Craycroft family record. Up to this time it had been considered by all of the
four brothers as rightfully belonging to the oldest boy and that was Benjamin. But he,
Benjamin, insisted a vote be taken at this meeting and by that vote it be decided which
one of the four would be the holder of it permanently.

THIS IS A MEETING HELD AT THE HOME OF


BENJAMIN CRAYCROFT, AT VANDALIA, ILLINOIS AT A
CRAYCROFT FAMILY REUNION ON DECEMBER 25TH, 1883, FOR THE
PURPOSE OF DECIDING BY A SECRET VOTE WHICH
ONE BETWEEN FOUR BROTHERS WHICH ONE
SHALL HOLD THE RECORD PERMANENTLY

So that future descendants of this branch of the Craycroft family shall become the
permanent owner and possessor of this famous family record this meeting is being held at
this time to take a vote from all four brothers as to which one will be selected. All four
are eligible under the regulations of the record. But only one can have permanent
possession at a time. Benjamin Craycroft Junior has always been considered the rightful
one to have it, but he insists that at this meeting a vote be taken to establish from now on
who shall kept it permanently until his death.

All four brothers, one sister, our mother, all of their husbands and wives were invited to
be present at this reunion. The following persons are present when the meeting was
called to order by Benjamin Craycroft, the oldest in years of the four brothers.

Mrs. Elizabeth Pate Craycroft Fouts, mother of all 4 boys and 1 girl

134
Benjamin Craycroft Junior, Elizabeth Honecker Craycroft, his wife, Benjamin Richard,
Lulia Jane, and John Henry, all his children

John Wesley Craycroft, of Warm Springs, California

Thomas Benton Craycroft, Lydia Fouts Craycroft, his wife.

Columbus Joel Craycroft, of Fresno, California

Eliza Jane Craycroft Shaw, of Danville, Illinois, S. Jack Shaw, her husband and William
A. Shaw, their son.

Total number of person present was twelve.

Total number of persons entitled to vote was four. It was ruled that only the four boys
were the only ones to be allowed to vote for they were the only ones that could hold the
possession of the record.

By a unanimous vote Mrs. Lydia Fouts Craycroft, wife of Thomas Benton Craycroft, one
of the candidates, was elected Secretary-Treasurer.

The Chairman made a detailed statement that in the past he had supposedly been the one
in possession of the Craycroft family record, but as a matter of fact that for many years he
had allowed it to remain in the possession of his mother for convenience, for he had been
in so many different parts of the country that is was very inconvenient for him to always
have it in his possession and besides he was such a poor writer that it was his desire to
take a vote and elect someone else to take it and keep it. All of the others present spoke
and it was finally decided that they would write the name of the one whom they thought
should have it.

It was understood by all that the only ones who would be eligible to have it would be one
of the four brothers. They agreed that each should write only one name on the slip of
paper and the one receiving the most votes would be the one elected.

Thomas Benton Craycroft and his wife Mrs. Lydia Fouts Craycroft was elected to collect
the ballots and openly count them. After the votes were counted it was found that all
votes were for John Wesley Craycroft, therefore he was unanimously elected to have
possession of the record and would be allowed to take it to California.

In the discussion it was agreed that the record should be typewritten for now it was
mostly handwritten and only a few pages were typewritten, which made it very
cumbersome and bad looking. Besides some of the pages were badly faded out and could
hardly be seen. It was also agreed that the secretary, Mrs. Lydia Fouts Craycroft, would
have this work done as soon as possible and that the expense would be paid by each one
of the brothers paying one-fourth of the cost. Mrs. Lydia explained that she could not
type it but would hire the work done by someone else.

135
She was instructed to have the work done and send her bill to Benjamin who would
notify all of the others. Lydia informed them that she did not want any pay for any of the
work she could and would do. They voted her a vote of thanks.

Then the chairman asked “Is there anything else to be brought before this meeting?”
After several moments silence the chairman announced “It seems there is nothing to be
brought before the meeting, therefore I declare the meeting closed permanently.”

Benjamin Craycroft, Chairman, Mrs. Lydia Fouts Craycroft, Sec. Treasurer

Witnesses: Mrs. Elizabeth Fouts, Benjamin Craycroft, John W. Craycroft, Thomas B.


Craycroft, Mrs. Eliza J. Shaw, S. Jack Shaw

After that the family celebration continued and a good time was expressed by all. This
celebration was remembered by all for many years for never afterward did all of the
brothers, sister and their mother ever meet at the same time. The celebration ended with
all wishing good luck and a long life for each other.

After some delay the record was typed in good order and was very neatly stapled together
by Mrs. Lydia Craycroft, our stepsister and sister-in-law, and the record was turned over
to me. The cost for typing it cost $20, which was paid to the girl Miss Grace Tracy of
Salem, Illinois, Lydia Craycroft paid this amount and was promptly reimbursed by the
four brothers, which amounted to $5 each.

I left there in four days to complete my contract for the different railroads. On June 20th,
1884, I reached my home after having completed my contract. My trip and work was
fairly successful, for I was able to contract with a total of 878 persons to move to
California from eight different states, which were Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin,
Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas and Kansas (?)142.

There was a map at this point in the record, some time in the past but there is no map
now. There only remains the following “explanation”.

The lines marked in red ink are the routes or lines the Rev. John Wesley covered in his
work in 1883 and 1884 for the Southern Pacific Railroad in his work to get families and
individuals to move to California.

In October 1883 I went to San Francisco, California, on business and while there I
consulted an acquaintance, an official of the Southern Pacific Railroad about the cost of a
round-trip ticket to Centralia, Illinois, the nearest railroad station to my old hometown of
Walnut Hill, Illinois. Walnut Hill was not on any railroad. I was intending to spend the
coming Christmas in my old home.

142
There some doubt about this work John supposedly did for the railroads recruiting families to move
west. According to other public records John was busy raising sheep and doing church business in Warm
Springs and Panoche during this same period.

136
In our conversation my friend suggested that if I could start on my trip about two months
before Christmas and would be willing to do a little work for his company he believed he
could have it arranged so that I would be provided with passes by the company that
would not cost me anything. The idea sounded too good to be true, but it was true as I
soon found out.

He took me upstairs before two different officials, introduced me, and he explained that I
was going to make a trip east to spend Christmas and he thought I would be willing to do
some emigration work in several states now open for assignment. After a long
conversation with them we signed a contract assigning me to several states centering
around Illinois. They mapped out the territory and routes I was to cover, and I started on
my work early in November 1883.

My contract was for a period of six months. The company was running large
advertisements in many of the large newspapers and the arrangement was that as they
received answers to their advertisements they would send them to me and I would contact
each person and explain the advantages of conditions in the lovely state of California, and
if possible sign them up to move to California. I was quite successful in the work and
spent December 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st and January 1st visiting my
mother and brothers. Then on January 2nd I started out on my work again and completed
it just as our contract provided.

This part of his report of his trip is placed in this particular place in this record for it was
not a part of his report about the family record but a personal account of his trip.

In checking over the record I see that there is no record of the births of any of my three
children, consisting of two boys and one girl. So I will place it in at this late date,
December 25th, 1884, Christmas Day.

Our first child was born on April 10th, 1870. We named him William Wert Craycroft.
Our second child was born November 19th, 1873. We named him Harry J. Craycroft.
Our third child was born August 26th, 1876. It was a girl, and we named her Franke
Craycroft. The name Franke for a girl was an old Valpey family name of my wife’s and
she insisted that we use that name in honor of her family located in Nova Scotia143.

All of our children were born on our home farm near Warm Springs, California, and were
educated in the local school and in San Jose, California.

SPECIAL NOTICE. THIS IS IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING THIS


RECORD AND SHOULD BE REMEMBERED.

The above record was the last ever placed in the Craycroft family record by Rev. John
Wesley Craycroft. The date on it shows he entered this last information in regard to the
births of his children on December 25th, 1884, and so far as we are able to trace the

143
This passage is obviously not written by John Wesley Craycroft because his first child was Elizabeth
Valpey Craycroft, born 4 Aug 1868, William was born 14 July 1871, Franke was born 17 July 1875 and
Harry was born 19 Oct 1877. These dates are verified by public records.

137
mysterious disappearance of the record for a period of forty-four years, it was lost and
everyone knowing anything of its existence had either died or forgotten about its
existence.

It was not until after the death of Rev. John Wesley Craycroft on August 20th, 1935144,
that anything was ever heard about it, and that information was accidentally discovered in
1936 on a Santa Fe Railway train running between Oakland and Bakersfield, California.
A full account of this discovery will be given in detail, by the person who discovered it,
who was a nephew of the Reverend John Wesley Craycroft and was named John in honor
of the minister back in Illinois at his (the nephew’s) birth. It is a startling revelation and
should be and will be recorded in full detail in this Craycroft family record.

Since the passing from this life of Rev. John Wesley Craycroft a very startling and
important discovery has accidentally come to light in regard to this family record for 44
years of the past 60 years, in which no records has been made in the record.

By an accidental discovery of this unwarranted lapse of time and entries in the record a
thorough investigation had been made and the more we investigate the more it is shown
that the jealousy and whims and a determined mind of one individual woman was and has
been the entire cause of this unfortunate break in the keeping of the record. It is intended
by the present holder of the record to collect what authentic information that can be
verified that should have been entered during the period from December 25, 1884, and
August 20, 1935 when the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft passed away in Modesto,
California.

The whole matter reduced to a few words is this woman spurred on by jealousy and other
self-imposed reasons secured possession of the Craycroft Family Record soon after the
last entry was made in 1884 and stored it in a building of one of her relatives farm near
San Jose California. Here it stayed for many years. Although a diligent search was
frequently made by the proper owner, the Rev. John W. Craycroft, it was never
discovered until accidentally discovered by a distant relative of the woman in the year of
1936 and turned over to the writer after a thorough investigation so that he could prove he
was the proper person to have possession of it.

It is especially recorded here that there is a period of fifty-two years between the year of
1884 and 1936 that nothing was recorded in the record for the simple reason that it had
disappeared and could not be found.

It should be noticed that the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft made his last entry, which is an
entry of the births of his three children. This entry was made Christmas Day, December
25th, 1884, but the discovery of the record was not made by me until after the death of the
reverend until 1936, quite a while after the death and burial of him, and even then it was
purely accidental.

144
John Wesley Craycroft died on 13 Nov 1930 at his home in Modesto, California. This is confirmed by
his obituary.

138
It would serve no good purpose to give all the details of the discovery and recovery of the
record here, for it is a long, long story and only shows just how far some people will go
to carry out their jealous desires and as she also has passed on from this life, we will give
only the necessary details to show how, where and when the recovery was carried out,
and the record placed again in its proper place, and in proper hands145.

First I want to say firmly and without reservation that I thoroughly believe and am
convinced that this record is genuine and is the true record as was and is shown to be the
real record of the Craycroft Family. As proof of my belief, I want to state for the record
in this record. In another place in this record it gives an account of the family reunion
given at my father's home December 25, 1883, at Vandalia, Illinois. I was at this meeting
at that time. I was a boy nearly 13 years of age, and remember it thoroughly. I also
remember that at this meeting at the request of my father a vote was taken in favor of
turning the record over to my father's brother, my uncle, the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft.

But I must confess that as the years passed since 1883 I had forgotten about the record
until 1936, for it had been in California all these years, and so far as I was concerned
there was no reason for ever having it brought to my attention or memory. For many
years I remained a resident of Illinois, and resided in several other states, besides in Old
Mexico. In the meantime I had grown to manhood, and entered railroad work until 1946
when I retired.

After working on several other railroads I entered the services of the Atchison Topeka &
Santa Fe Railway in train service, working between Oakland and Bakersfield on March
17, 1900 and remained with this company until April 30, 1946, when I retired.

On or about January 2, 1937 I was working on a passenger train on regular duty, when
one of my passengers on my train, with a ticket from Oakland to Los Angeles California
asked me if I knew a man name Craycroft working on the line name (Craycroft). I told
him that my name was Craycroft.

He then said “I would like to talk to you when you have time.” I told him I could talk to
him now, for my train would not stop for the next 30 minutes, and I sat down in the seat
with him. He started in by asking me a lot of different questions, such as, my name,
where I was born, how long I had been in California, I told him John W. Craycroft was a
brother of my father, and that he was my uncle.

I then asked him what the object was of his wanting to know all of these things. He
answered, “I think you are the man I have been looking for, for the past 6 months. I am
quite sure I have some important information that you should know.” We continued to
talk until we reached Bakersfield, where all passengers, including him leave the train and
board a bus to go to Los Angeles. But before he left we had arranged to meet each other
in Oakland California in about 3 weeks. He told me a long detailed story about knowing
a Craycroft family in fact he said they were distant relatives of his. He stated that when

145
See Appendix A for letters from Franke Craycroft and others regarding the “disappearance” and
recovery of the History by John Henry Craycroft.

139
he was a small boy they lived at a place called Warm Springs California, but many years
ago they left that place and moved either to Fresno, Merced or Modesto, he did not know
for sure. But he said he had heard lately that John W. Craycroft had died and was
supposed to be buried in Fresno. He stated many times that he was a distant relative of
the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft, and his wife Alice, but had not seen them for many
years, on account that the Reverend's wife made it very plain that she did not want to be
bothered with any of his or other relatives, and as a result he had never bothered them for
many years, although in his babyhood and boyhood days he had visited the Craycrofts at
their home and played often with all three of the Craycroft children at Warm Springs146.

I could see by his familiar reference to all the members of the family that he knew them
intimately and there was no doubt in my mind that his startling information was true in
every detail, and it made me very anxious to obtain every bit of information I could from
him. There is a lot more of the details, but it would serve no purpose here, and would
only take up a lot of unnecessary space, so I will simply say we did meet in Oakland as
arranged and he brought the Craycroft Family Record and we spent the day together in
Oakland.

The record was in a very badly decomposed condition, and plainly showed it had either
been stored in a wet or damp place, or had been allowed to be rained on continuously for
a long time in the past years. In fact a lot of it was so dim that it could not be read at all
then. Most of it was covered with a thick coat of moldy green moss. I thought at first
that it was a complete useless condition. Much of the ink used had run together and was
very dim.

Of course I thought his object in delivering the record to me was he would expect me to
pay him a goodly sum of money for it, and I made up my mind that in its condition I
would not pay any great moment, although I did want if very badly, because I knew it
went back into the Craycroft Family so far.

After we had spent most of the day talking and visiting different sights in and around
Oakland I ventured to say, “How much do you want for the record?” He stopped
abruptly in his tracks, and gave me a look of either surprise or disgust and said “Why my
dear fellow I don't want you to pay me anything, I am only too glad to give it to you, but
of course if you don't want it I can give it to someone else.” I was quick to beg his
pardon and explained that my thanks had no bounds, and the incident ended.

In the course of our day long visit he told me how Uncle John's wife had taken the record
out of their home, years before this man was born and stored in some out side building,
(possibly the barn) and told them that she did not want such a thing in her home and not
under any circumstances bring it back to her home or ever tell Uncle John anything about
it.

146
This is clearly contradictory to comments made by William and Franke Craycroft, children of John
Wesley Craycroft, in letters included in Appendix A. According to Franke’s own words the exact opposite
was the case. It is obvious, from the letters in Appendix A that there were hard feelings between Will and
Franke, and their cousin John Henry.

140
This is a complete fabrication on the part of John Henry Craycroft and underscores the
animosity between him and his cousin Franke Craycroft. John Craycroft, the great-
grandson of John Wesley and Mary Alice Valpey Craycroft, is in possession of
photographs, documents and scrapbooks made by Mary Alice and her daughter Franke
of and about the Craycroft and Valpey families.

He told me this in such a firm and convincing manner that I must say that there is
absolutely no doubt in my mind but that every word of this is true. One thing that helps
to convince me of its trueness is, I myself have been one of the victims of her not wanting
relatives around their home, although she spent a full week as a guest at my home once
when I lived in Fresno. I think her real reason for spending this time in my home was,
there was no other place for her to stay except in a hotel, and she did not want to be out
the expense. But it did get under my hide some of the things she pulled off while there.
One of these was, she had many persons to come to visit her among which was a
prospective bride of her eldest son. This girl came to my home and she (uncle's wife)
took her into our parlor, shut the door and entertained her for several hours and kept the
door shut and locked and did not, and would not even introduce her to my wife and
myself. This made us very angry, but we did not make an issue of it. A few years
afterward I happened to be in Modesto where they lived, and thought I would stop and
say hello. I went around to her home, went up on the front porch, rang the doorbell
several times, and just about decided that on one was home. Then I seen one of the
window shades move and I could see her very plainly peeking out to see who it was at the
door. I waited and rang the doorbell several times, and could hear it ring, but after about
ten minutes I left. She deliberately would not come to the door. I have never given her
the slightest consideration. I merely mention this in this record to show how selfish and
self-centered, a person she was.

About two years ago I accidentally met one of her sons, on my train. We had an
agreeable long talk between stations and in our conversation he made this remark. "My
father was the most hen-pecked man I ever knew." His father no less a person than this
selfish woman's husband.

To my own personal knowledge he was a very mild-tempered-man, and being a minister


he was a very kindly person, but he lived a very dominated life. His only daughter is
exactly like her mother. It is fortunate that she (the daughter) became an old maid, never
married, and at this time is 69 years old and of course has no descendants. She is now
living a slow, lonesome, and selfish life147.

It is appropriate for me to state here that owing to the many facts in my father’s past life,
among which is the fact that he having been the rightful possessor and owner of the
record before he insisted on taking a vote that the result of the vote was to turn the record
over to Rev. John Wesley Craycroft in 1883 and that I am father’s only survivor of a
family of seven children of his first family, that now I am the proper owner and possessor

147
On the contrary, diaries in the possession of John Craycroft, J.W.’s great-grandson, and newspaper
articles about Franke she was active in the community and well thought of by those who knew her, except
John Henry.

141
of this Craycroft family record. But I shall allow any direct descendants of his to make a
copy of it at any time they want it. But this copy must and will go to one of my four
sons. I will close this long and correct report of the mishandling for many years of this
Craycroft family record and will state positively that I believe it to be an honest, correct,
true and correct record of the long lives of the old Craycroft family that came into being
in the year of 1297 A.D. and I hope it will be continued for at least as many years more.
This report is being recorded this first day of January in the year of 1947 A.D.

We will not put on record all of the facts we possess that should have been placed on
record during the time the record was hidden out from 1884 to 1936 A.D.148

NOTICE

When we first secured possession of the family record it seemed there was very little
prospect of ever being able to secure a complete copy of it owing to its badly decayed,
and very badly faded condition of all of the typewritten pages. But after much
experimenting and the expensive work of a chemist and his chemicals he and we have
been able to get this good copy to continue the record indefinitely.

The manner we are now placing this copy in an iron bound, locked binder we are
confident that it will not need retyping for at least one hundred years, unless it is allowed
to get wet like it did in the last few years.

We will repeat the last item made by Rev. John Wesley Craycroft so as to connect it with
the last item on page 87 (page 134 of this new transcript) made just before the record
mysteriously disappeared in the year of 1884 and was absent for nearly forty-four years.

Our children were born on our home farm near Warm Springs, California. On August
14th, 1904, we sold our home place near Warm Springs and moved to Modesto,
California, located in the great San Joaquin Valley, where I entered the brick making
business. You will remember I was in that business before I came to California.

In justice to the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft it should be repeated here that he was a very
mild-tempered, mild-natured, honest and to a great extent an easygoing man. It can be
truthfully said that he was his worst enemy. His life was not his own, for almost his
every movement was dominated by his boss, “dominating” self-centered, superiority-
complexed wife Alice. They lived together in a way for many years until his death.

He seldom, if ever, asserted his authority or rights as head of his household. It was
already stated they were the parents of three children, two boys and one girl. The oldest
boy was William Wert Craycroft, educated in the public schools in Warm Springs,
California. When he reached the high school stage he was then sent to San Jose High
School. Graduating from high school he was sent to San Francisco College of Dentistry,
where in due time he graduated as a dentist. He followed this profession all the rest of
his life, and in many different localities in California, among which were Fresno,
148
This must be a typo. He probably meant to write “We will NOW put on record. . .”

142
Stockton, and sever different locations in and around Los Angeles. His worst enemy was
liquor. The use of this curse brought him into several bad and unattractive and
unprofitable situations and trouble. He left no children, therefore his branch of the
Craycroft family died out.

Their next child was also a boy. He was Doctor Harry J. Craycroft, an admirable
individual and well liked by all. He was also educated in the Warm Springs schools until
he reached the high school age, then he was sent to the high school in San Jose, when he
graduated he then entered the Cooper Medical College in San Francisco, California, and
in due time graduated as an M.D. and carried the title of Doctor and he proved to be a
good one too. He immediately located in Fresno, California, where he became a
prominent and widely known physician and surgeon since 1907.

He married the daughter of a wealthy lumberman name Shaver. He died June 27th, 1933.
Surviving him was his widow Grace Shaver Craycroft, a daughter Marian and one son
name Burr Charles Craycroft149, who attended the Stanford University where he
graduated as an M.D. or a physician and surgeon. He was also survived by his mother
Mrs. Alice Valpey Craycroft, and a sister, Miss Franke Craycroft of Modesto and a
brother William Wert Craycroft, dentist of Long Beach, California.

Rev. John Wesley Craycroft and his wife Alice Valpey Craycroft were the parents of
only one daughter. She was born on their farm home in Warm Springs, California, and
lived with them practically all of her life. She never married and was still living in the
year of 1947, a very lonesome, bossy, self-centered old maid. Both parents and one
brother are dead, and only one brother is still living and he has no descendants. She has
followed closely in the footsteps and traditions of her mother and although she never
married she interfered in the family affairs of her own and the affairs of other relatives
and friends until practically everyone just ignores her. Hence her loneliness.

She inherited the entire estate of both her father and mother and has been able to live a
long, lonesome and unprofitable life on the small estate they left her. We are well
informed that her only living brother, the dentist, voluntarily contributes liberally to her
support but this is only hearsay. At this time he is over 76 years of age.
She will leave no descendants as she is now past 70 years of age and was never married.

Her mother was the wife of Rev. John Wesley Craycroft. Her full name was Mrs. Alice
Valpey Craycroft of Modesto, California, and she was the mother of Doctor William
Wert Craycroft, dentist, Doctor Harry J. Craycroft, and the one girl Franke Craycroft.
She died at her home in Modesto, California, 1202 13th Street, Saturday morning, August
3rd, 1934. She was born in Nova Scotia on April 16th, 1849, and was 85 years of age at
the time of her passing. She and her mother came to the United States when she was a
small girl with her parents. They lived in Yarmouth, Mass. for about a year. Then they
moved to Boston, Mass. After a stay here a short time they moved to New York City.
This was the first time any of them had traveled on a railroad train. California was
drawing people to that state like a huge magnet. Her father made arrangements with
149
This son was named Charles Burr Craycroft, after his maternal grandfather Charles Burr Shaver.

143
some of his relatives living in New York City for Alice and her mother to live with them
until he could go out to California and investigate possibilities of moving out there
permanently.

Mr. Valpey then left for California by way of Panama, crossed across the Isthmus of
Panama to the Pacific Ocean and boarded a sailing vessel for San Francisco,
California150. He spent several months in his investigations and at last he purchased a
farm near San Jose, California, and sent for his wife and daughter, Alice, in New York
City. They also took a sailing vessel for the Isthmus of Panama, crossed the isthmus and
again boarded a sailing vessel and arrived in San Francisco, California, and Mr. Valpey
met them and took them to their new home near San Jose. Here they lived for many
years, where she, Alice, married Rev. John Wesley Craycroft September 11th, 1867 A.D.
The balance of the history of Rev. John Wesley Craycroft has been given on the many
pages of this family record in the past.

It has been necessary to give some unfavorable detailed information of this family on
account of so many unfortunate circumstances connected with it that a clear
understanding can be given and understood by future descendants.

Thus ends the family history of Rev. John Wesley Craycroft whose long life has ended.
He was a man loved by all who knew him. His kindly approach to give up his ministry
work almost entirely although he always practiced Christianity in an honest and practical
way.

It was unfortunate that through the jealousy and traditionally selfish and dictator attitude
of his wife he lost the personal possession of these records for so many years, for no
doubt he would have entered many events that should have been recorded on these pages.

However, this record has been restored to its rightful owner which is the son of Benjamin
Craycroft who would have been the owner if it had never been given to the Rev. John
Wesley Craycroft in 1883 or 1884 in Vandalia, Illinois. So far as has been possible the
record has been brought up to date.

THE FAMILY RECORD OF BENJAMIN CRAYCROFT AND HIS DESCENDANTS


FROM HIS FATHER BORN IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, AND MARRIED IN
BEARDSTOWN, ILLINOIS AND ALL BUT ONE OF HIS CHILDREN WERE BORN
IN CAPE GIRARDEAU, MISSOURI. NOVEMBER 12TH, 1840 – MARCH 19TH, 1917.

Benjamin Craycroft, Senior was born in Baltimore, Maryland on June 12th, 1812 A.D.
He is the father of Benjamin Craycroft, Junior, and married Benjamin Craycroft, Junior’s
mother in Beardstown, Illinois on June 5th, 1837. This is stated here for the purpose of
being sure to identifying the right person, for there has been so many persons named
Benjamin in the last 150 years that some people may get the wrong persons lined up.

150
This is unlikely since Mr. Valpey, Calvin Valpey, was a ship captain and is known to have sailed his
vessel from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia to California in November, 1850.

144
The following three pages is the Craycroft Family Record of the Benjamin Craycroft
born November 12th, 1840, at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, located on the Mississippi River
and who passed away March 19th, 1917, in Vandalia, Illinois, at the age of 76 years and 4
months. He was the father of 12 children.

His second marriage took place sometime in 1874 or 1875151. This marriage was a
complete failure and only lasted a few months when he secured a divorce. Soon after this
short marriage we went to California and did not return until 1879.

When he returned from California to his old home in Illinois it was his intention to stay in
Illinois on a short visit and then return to California permanently, but upon arrival on his
visit he found one of his brothers had invented and patented a brick making machine that
almost revolutionized brick making and he was engaged immediately by his brother to set
up and put the machines in full operation on a guaranteed basis. He eventually became
the owner of the patents and also the owner of the foundry and machine shop where they
were manufactured152. Becoming so well established in this business he soon gave up all
intentions of returning to California.

Early in the year of 1880 he met an attractive young lady by the name of Miss Elizabeth
Honecker in Centralia, Illinois, and after a vigorous courtship they were married on
March 2nd, 1880, and soon afterward moved to the old capitol of the state, Vandalia.
Here they both lived a long and happy life and raised a family of two boys and three girls.

He made several pleasure trips to California to visit his brother Rev. John Wesley
Craycroft, also to visit one of his sons that had lived in California for many years. On his
last trip before his passing to the beyond he related an incident in his younger life over
which he had a great laugh. It was about his first ride on a train in the year of about
1857. He had been living in a small town in Illinois named Macon when it became
necessary for him to go to Centralia, which was about 110 miles south. He had never
seen a train nor never had rode on one before but this day he rode from Macon to
Centralia and he laughingly stated he had never before experienced such a thrill. This
railroad was built through Illinois in the year of 1857 and opened up for business
September 27th, 1856.
The following three pages is the record of all of his children. Space has purposely been
left so that other important records may be entered later as the years pass.

This record starts with the father of Benjamin Craycroft Senior who was born in
Baltimore, Maryland, in the year of 1812, and his mother, who was born in Beardstown,
Illinois, in the year 1820. Benjamin Craycroft of Vandalia, Illinois, was named after his
father therefore up until his father’s death in 1853 he was called Benjamin Junior, but
after his father’s death in 1853 the prefix (should be suffix) of Junior was dropped and he
was known only as Ben and always signed his legal signatures Ben J. Craycroft but was

151
On 15 Sep 1874 Benjamin Craycroft married Ora Frances Wolfe in Kinmundy, Illinois.
152
This company was known as the Eagle Brick Machine Works according to a letter written on the
company letterhead, of which I have a photo static copy.

145
always known as and called Ben. He was married three times and was the father of
twelve children.

Starting with the father of Benjamin Craycroft of Vandalia, Illinois.

The father of Benjamin Craycroft. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland, June 5th, 1812.
Died on a farm near Decatur and Macon, Illinois, in 1853, and was buried near Macon,
Illinois, in 1853153.

After the father Benjamin died, his wife Elizabeth married John Fouts August 28th, 1857.
Her second husband was born December 24th, 1803, near Canton, Illinois154. He died in
Walnut Hill in 1888 and was 85 years of age at that time. He was buried in Walnut Hill
Cemetery. His wife, the mother of Benjamin Craycroft Junior and also the mother of two
of Fouts children died in Walnut Hill on September 18th, 1891, and was buried in Walnut
Hill Cemetery September 20th, 1891.

In her first marriage to Benjamin Craycroft Senior they had a family of two girls and four
boys, whose names as born were Matilda, Benjamin Junior, John Wesley, Thomas
Benton, and Columbus Joel, and their last child a girl named Eliza Jane Craycroft.

Now the correct history and record of Benjamin Craycroft Junior starts on this line. Most
of the above is history of his father and mother and their lives.

Benjamin Craycroft Junior was born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, on November 12th,
1840. He lived there with his parents until 1849 when his parents moved to a farm near
Macon, Illinois. His father was badly bitten by a diseased horse and died with a
combination disease of black leg and black diphtheria. He was buried in the cemetery
near Macon, Illinois, in 1853. This unfortunate happening left the widow with a large
family of six children, the youngest of which was a girl about 2 years old named Eliza
Jane and the oldest about 13 years old. They lived here on their farm until their mother
married John Fouts then they sold the farm and moved to Walnut Hill, Illinois.
Benjamin, whose history is given in a detailed story in another part of this record, died in
Vandalia, Illinois, March 19th, 1917 at the age of 76 years, 4 months. He was buried in
the cemetery at Vandalia, Illinois, in the Craycroft family burial plot.

His First Wife

He was married to Miss Elizabeth Ann Breese in Walnut Hill, Illinois, on ?? 1861155.
She was born on a farm near Walnut Hill, Illinois, on August 13th, 1844, was the daughter
of Richard Breese. She died in Walnut Hill, Illinois, March 25th, 1873, as a result of
childbirth of her last child John Henry Craycroft. She left 3 small children named
Benjamin Richard, Arlulia Jane, and the baby, John Henry Craycroft. She was the
mother of seven children, four of which died before she did. She was buried in the

153
Benjamin is buried in Salem Cemetery in South Wheatland Township, Illinois, southwest of Decatur.
154
According to the 1870 Census of Illinois, John Fouts was born in North Carolina.
155
Earlier in this record states that Benjamin and Elizabeth were married on January 3, 1861.

146
cemetery near Macon where two of her baby children were buried156. Tombstones were
later erected by her husband and father of her children, Benjamin Craycroft.

Their Children

(First) Amanda Ann Craycroft was born on a farm near Macon, Illinois, on January 15th,
1862157. She died at the same place on January 12th, 1865, aged 11 months and 3 days.
Was buried in the cemetery near Macon, Illinois. Her mother was many years later
buried beside her.

(Second) Their second child was born on a farm near Macon, Illinois, on September 3rd,
1862. Died December 21st, 1862158. Lived only 3 months. Was buried in the Craycroft
burial plot, beside her sister. Her name was Josa Craycroft. Buried in cemetery near
Macon, Illinois.

(Third) Their third child, Benjamin Richard Craycroft, Dick, was born on a farm near
Decatur, Illinois, October 31st, 1864. Died in Sacramento, California, July 15th, 1933 as
the result of a paralytic stroke. Body shipped to his old family home in Vandalia, Illinois
for burial, according to his last request, and was buried in the Craycroft burial plot there.
The stroke was brought on by the extreme hot day. He was on his way by automobile as
a delegate to a convention of advertising men held in Indianapolis, Indiana, when he
reached Needles, California, the day was extremely hot, it being more than 116 in the
shade. Near Needles he suddenly had a stroke. He was returned to his home in
Sacramento, California, when after six days he had another stroke, which resulted in his
death on July 15th, 1933. He was 68 years and 8 months of age.

(Fourth) Their fourth child, John Craycroft was born in Walnut Hill, Illinois, January 5th,
1867. Lived only three hours. Died same day as born. Was buried in the cemetery in
Walnut Hill, Illinois. Aged three hours.

(Fifth) Their fifth child, Robert Ellis Craycroft, was born February 2nd, 1868, in Walnut
Hill, Illinois, and died September 23, 1868, and was buried in the Craycroft burial plot in
the Walnut Hill Cemetery. His age was seven months and 21 days.

(Sixth) Their sixth child was born in Walnut Hill, Illinois, July 18th, 1869. She died April
6th, 1913, aged 44 years and 8 months and 18 days. Died in her father’s home in
Vandalia, Illinois, where she had lived all of her life. That is ever since his last marriage.
She was buried in the Craycroft burial plot in the cemetery in Vandalia, Illinois. She
never married. She was named Arlulia Jane Craycroft.

156
Elizabeth is buried in Salem Cemetery in South Wheatland Township, Illinois, next to Amanda and Josa
and her father-in-law, Benjamin.
157
My records indicate that Amanda Ann was born January 15, 1864 and died January 12, 1865, three days
short of one year. In mid-December, 2001, I received a photocopy of cemetery records from Salem Church
Cemetery that indicates a “Josie” Craycroft, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Craycroft died Jan. 12,
1865. I think that this is actually Amanda.
158
The date of death on Josa’s grave marker is Dec. 24, 1863. I have a photograph of this stone. The two
children are buried next to their mother, Elizabeth Ann Breese Craycroft and grandfather, Benjamin.

147
(Seventh) Their seventh child, John Henry Craycroft, was born on a small farm 3 miles
northwest of Walnut Hill, Illinois, October 15th, 1871. He was the second child to be
named John in honor of his father’s brother the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft then in
California. This uncle took these family records with him to California in 1884 and they
were stolen from him about Christmas, 1885, and never heard of again until 1936 nearly
51 years, when they were discovered and recovered from a distant relative of the wife of
the Rev. John Wesley Craycroft and turned over to the last living son of the first family
of Benjamin Craycroft, John Henry Craycroft, who is retyping and will pass them on to
the proper surviving descendants. He is now nearly 76 years of age and will leave four
sons and at present 4 grandsons as descendants.159

At this time he is the only living descendant of the original Benjamin Craycroft (Ben)
now living, of the first family. Benjamin Craycroft was married three times. Therefore
there is more descendants of his from the later families.

This is the record of Benjamin Craycroft’s second marriage, which was a very
unfortunate incident of his life. There was a marriage in Salem, Illinois. But after a short
duration he secured evidence upon which he had no trouble in securing a divorce of the
grounds of adultery. After he secured this divorce there was a child born, but it was not
his. All of the evidence proved this as all legal and medical calculations proved. The
time elapsed after the separation was much too long to make possible for him to be its
father160. Therefore no record is made in this Craycroft family record of this unfortunate
incident because it should not be made any part of the family record. It is very
unfortunate in the extreme and he put an end to it as soon as was possible.

The third marriage and children of Benjamin Craycroft.

Miss Elizabeth Mary Honecker, the third wife of Benjamin Craycroft, was born in
Waterloo, Illinois, on July 29th, 1859. Her father died when she was quite young, leaving
the widow (her mother) with a family of several children. The family soon moved to
Centralia, Illinois, where after a few years her mother married a man name George D.
George. Elizabeth met Benjamin Craycroft and they were married in Salem, Illinois, at
the home of Thomas Benton Craycroft, brother of Benjamin, on March 2nd, 1880. This
marriage was a very successful one and lasted until he died in the year 1917. They had 5
children, 3 girls and 2 boys as shown below.

Their Children

First child. Charles Edward Craycroft was born in Salem, Illinois, July 27th, 1881. He
died July 21st, 1882, aged 11 months, 25 days. The family had previously moved to

159
It should be noted that John Henry Craycroft died on February 12, 1949, and, like his brother Benjamin
Richard, was returned from Richmond, California, where he died, to be buried in the Craycroft burial plot
in Vandalia, Illinois. I have a photo of his tombstone to verify this.
160
I do not know the facts of this divorce but I do know that Ora’s son, Otto Grant was named Craycroft on
his birth certificate and carried that name throughout his life.

148
Vandalia, Illinois, and he was buried in the Craycroft family burial plot in Vandalia
Cemetery.

Second child. Margaret Mary Craycroft was the second child, was born October 10th,
1883 in Vandalia, Illinois. Was educated in the Vandalia public schools and lived there
until she married.

Third child. Harry Benjamin Craycroft was the third child, was born in Vandalia,
Illinois, on April 29th, 1885. He was educated in the Vandalia public schools. At the
time this record is made, in 1947, still lived in the old home he was born in, and is a well
known businessman in Vandalia, Illinois.

Fourth child. Lettia Florance Craycroft was the fourth child, was born in Vandalia,
Illinois, on December 24th, 1887, and was considered a grand Christmas present by the
whole family. She was educated in the Vandalia public schools and lived in the old
Craycroft home until she was married.

Fifth child. Ethel Irene Craycroft was the fifth child, was born in Vandalia, Illinois, on
January 22nd, 1895. She was educated in the Vandalia public schools and lived in the old
Craycroft home until she was married.

This is the last entry in the “Great Craycroft Book” made by John Henry Craycroft. All
that follows is written by me, Robert Lynn Craycroft. I can reliably trace my line back to
Edward Scott Craycroft. This is as far I have been able to find primary documentary
evidence. First I will offer up my own conclusions drawn from research that I have
conducted in an effort to confirm or refute information presented in this record.
Secondly I will present a document about the Edward Scott Craycroft branch of the
Family that was given to my by two of my father’s aunts, Jesse May Craycroft
Cornthwaite and Edna Ferne Craycroft Veech on the day of my marriage to my first wife,
Emily Ruth Bruington. Edward is who I am descended from. Finally I will present my
own addition to the latter document and a descendants report beginning with Benjamin
Joseph Craycroft, the father of Edward Scott Craycroft and continuing down to the
present day, December, 2005.

149
CONCLUSIONS
Now that you have read the entire document you probably have a headache, like I have
had, from trying to make sense of the poor writing in most of The Book. It surely made it
very difficult to read at times. But I want to address the accuracy of the “facts” presented
in The Book, not the grammar and spelling.

When I first saw the comparatively brief transcript of The Book in 1964 I was impressed
and awed by the story of James Cray and Susan Croft. I was proud, also, of being
connected with such an event. Then in 1973 I wrote to London in an effort to secure
some type of document that would verify this wonderful story. What I received instead
are the letters shown on pages 19 and 20. They seem to disprove the story of James and
Susan. Other attempts have been made by others to prove this marriage but they too have
failed. The narration also states the ceremony was conducted in the Church of England
by a minister or priest of the Church of England. This was impossible since the Church
of England did not come into being until 1534 when the Act of Supremacy was passed by
the Parliament. I can only conclude that this fairy tale marriage is just that, a fairy tale.

Another thing to consider is that surnames did not see common usage until the last half of
the 1300’s. Up until that time a man’s name would be something like Walter de Cracroft
or Humphrey fitz Walter indicating the man’s home in the former or his father in the
latter. This is one more reason to think that someone wrote or created this passage at a
much later date.

After the retelling of the wedding ceremony, The Book goes on to tell of the Craycroft
family’s involvement with the Reformation and the compilation of the King James
Version of the Bible and the family’s relationship with Martin Luther. After searching
through a couple histories of the King James Version of the Bible, and the Encyclopedia
Britannica I have located 50 names of people involved in translating and compiling the
KJV but none of them were Craycrofts, as was stated in this record. It also appears to me
that the purported to be the translator could have been fashioned after William Tyndale,
an early translator of the Bible into English.

The record also consistently mentions the Protestants in the 1300 and 1400’s, but the
word Protestant, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was first given to those who
dissented from the decision of the Diet of Spires in 1529, in Germany. This gives us two
options on this point. Either the writer was writing these passages after the fact, which
doesn’t seem to be the case judging by the tense used, or this is fabrication based on the
then current existence of the Church of England, in as much as it gives Craycroft family
members credit for participation in the named events.

After considerable research I have reason to believe that the writer of the portion of this
history concerning the English origins of the family knew a great deal about both English
history and the history of religion in that country. But it appears that the religious history
presented here was adapted to cast one or more Craycrofts in the roles played by other
men.

150
The record goes on to say that three brothers emigrated from England to Jamestown,
Virginia, and after about a year moved on to Providence, Rhode Island. Initial
investigations by Denise Miller and Nancy Stull uncovered no Craycrofts living or
arriving in either town. While this is not conclusive it is not very hopeful either. It is
known through historical documents in the Archives of the State of Maryland that a John
Craycroft was an extensive property owner in Maryland in the mid and late 1700’s.

Later in the record there are passages that state that certain members of the Craycroft
family met or worked directly with or for George Washington. The first incident states
that shortly after being attacked by Indians in western Ohio, in 1752, the Craycroft family
met with an 18 year old George Washington who was on a survey trip for Virginia. In
fact, George Washington was 20 in 1752 and at the time of the Indian raid he was in
residence at Mount Vernon, which he had just inherited from his brother. Also,
Washington was no longer working as Chief Surveyor of Virginia at that time.

The record includes what is purported to be a letter from President George Washington
(pages 104 and 105) to William Roger Craycroft II. The letter says that Roger (as he was
commonly referred to) was the secretary to President Washington and the letter was
written to thank William for his service. On page 102 Roger says that he also served as
orderly, lieutenant, personal bodyguard, doorkeeper, and several other minor offices.
After reading two different biographies of George Washington and referring to the
Encyclopedia Britannica I have found no mention of any Craycroft being a member of
Washington’s staff at any point in time. After searching the Revolutionary War records I
have not found any mention of a William Roger Craycroft serving in any capacity. If he
had actually served on Washington’s staff he would have surely been listed on the muster
rolls.

As for William Roger Craycroft acting as secretary to President Washington in 1791, as I


showed in an italicized note following the Washington letter on pages 104-105 President
Washington’s secretary was actually a Major Jackson.

Because of these and other errors I have pointed out in the body of the record in footnotes
and italicized notes I am forced to conclude that the passages referring to Craycroft
involvement or participation in certain historical events, prior to 1800, are fabrications.
The letters from the City of London on pages 20 and 21 refute the supposed marriage of
James Cray and Susan Croft and cast serious doubt on their existence. Further, without
any primary or secondary documents, other than this record itself, I seriously doubt that
any of the Craycrofts named as living prior to about 1750 were ever born. The oldest
primary document I have in my possession is the marriage license for Edward Scott
Craycroft and Elizabeth Bohner issued in 1848. This at the least confirms the existence
of Edward who, according to secondary information I have, was born September 25,
1809. Beyond this all information I have is secondary, that is hearsay or secondhand
information. I have hoped for many years that this record would be accurate but
unfortunately I have to think otherwise.

151
One thing that surprises me is the information about John Wesley Craycroft. I feel certain
that John Henry Craycroft is the person who wrote most of this about John Wesley. But
John Wesley was his uncle and he seems to know very little about major events in his
life.

Now I direct your attention to Appendix A which contains letters from Franke and
William W. Craycroft (children of John Wesley and Mary Alice Valpey Craycroft), and
John Henry Craycroft regarding this history. In Franke’s letters she states that John gave
three conflicting versions of how he came into possession of the Craycroft records. In
John’s own letter to Franke he states “I am making a FAMILY RECORD of the
Craycroft Family and desire it to be absolutely correct.” (Emphasis is John’s) If he were
actually transcribing a pre-existing record as he states here in the history he would not
have likely said he was “making” a family record.

Because of all of these things I am convinced that this history is the product of John
Henry Craycroft’s imagination and that the events prior to about 1800 are a complete
fiction. Also, obviously many events after that time are incorrectly reported by John
Henry as many of the dates he reports are inaccurate.

Also, reading these letters there is no doubt in my mind that there was tremendous
animosity between Franke, William and John, particularly on the part of John. His words
in his last letter to Franke are extremely bitter. I have no doubt that this carried over into
his words regarding the circumstances surrounding the “disappearance” of the Craycroft
history.

Now after all this there is one thing I want to bring to your attention. If this is not the
first time you have seen all or part of the History of The Craycroft Family you are
probably disappointed to some degree. The first time I saw this document I was caught
up in the romance that the early passages evoked and you may have been also. Believe
me when I say that I was very disappointed when I saw the whole document and
researched as much as I could. But the important thing to remember is that this is still an
important document. The Craycrofts named from about 1750 to 1800, I think, are
accurate. I’ve been able to confirm almost all of the persons after 1800 through one
means or another. This makes the history valuable because it acts as a guidepost to our
past, to the History of The Craycroft Family. Use it well.

152
APPENDIX A

Letter from William W. Craycroft to his sister Franke Craycroft dated January 20, 1946.

153
Letter from Franke Craycroft to Mae Tobin Craycroft, wife of Franke’s 1st cousin Frank
Joel Craycroft.

154
Notes from Franke Craycroft regarding John Henry Craycroft’s version of how he came
into possession of the Craycroft records, written 21 May 1946.

155
156
157
158
159
160
Letter from John Craycroft to Franke Craycroft dated 11 Nov 1946.

161
Letter from John Craycroft to Franke Craycroft dated 17 Dec 1946.

162
Appendix B

Descendant Indented Chart of Benjamin Joseph Craycroft


Benjamin Joseph1 CRAYCROFT (243),161 b. circa 1775, d. between 1820 and 1841162
+Eleanor1 PRATHER (1396),163 b. 1776 in MD,164 m. 8 Dec 1796165
└── John P.2 CRAYCROFT (2813),166 b. 1802 in Prince George, MD,167 d. before 1815 in MD

161unknown compiler, compiler, History of the Craycroft Family from June 10, 1297 A.D. (n.p.:
John Henry Craycroft, January 1, 1942), Page 71; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family,
Page 71.
162AngelineCraycroft will (30 March 1841), Will of Angeline Craycroft, Montgomery County,
Maryland L 4, page 224, Office of Register of Wills, 50 Courthouse Square, Rm. 322, Rockville,
Montgomery, MD. Hereinafter cited as Will, Angeline Craycroft; unknown household, 15/1/1820
unknown record type, unknown repository address, unknown repository M33_44, image 129.
163unknown author, Will of Mary Prather (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), I give and bequeath unto my
Daughter Eleanor Craycraft One bed & furniture one womans saddle and One Spinning wheele
My will and desire is that she shall receive one moiter or half part of the money due me from my
son William Prather; which appears on his bond dated the 13th of October 1803. A Ballance due
me of Sixty two pounds Eight shillings U.K.
164unknown author, E-mail from Betty Gregston (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Generation No. 1
1. Benjamin1 Craycraft was born 1776. He married Nelly Prather 08 Dec 1796 in Montgomery
Co., Prince George Parish, MD.. She was born 1776.

Child of Benjamin Craycraft and Nelly Prather is:


John P.2 Craycraft, born 1802 in St. George Co., MD
.
165unknown author, E-mail from Betty Gregston, Generation No. 1
1. Benjamin1 Craycraft was born 1776. He married Nelly Prather 08 Dec 1796 in Montgomery
Co., Prince George Parish, MD.. She was born 1776.
Child of Benjamin Craycraft and Nelly Prather is:
John P. Craycraft, born 1802 in St. George Co., MD
.
166unknown author, E-mail from Betty Gregston, Generation No. 1
1. Benjamin1 Craycraft was born 1776. He married Nelly Prather 08 Dec 1796 in Montgomery
Co., Prince George Parish, MD.. She was born 1776.

Child of Benjamin Craycraft and Nelly Prather is:


John P.2 Craycraft, born 1802 in St. George Co., MD
; unknown author, E-mail from Betty Gregston, Generation No. 1
1. Benjamin1 Craycraft was born 1776. He married Nelly Prather 08 Dec 1796 in Montgomery
Co., Prince George Parish, MD.. She was born 1776.

Child of Benjamin Craycraft and Nelly Prather is:


John P.2 Craycraft, born 1802 in St. George Co., MD
.
167unknown author, E-mail from Betty Gregston, Generation No. 1
1. Benjamin1 Craycraft was born 1776. He married Nelly Prather 08 Dec 1796 in Montgomery
Co., Prince George Parish, MD.. She was born 1776.

Child of Benjamin Craycraft and Nelly Prather is:

163
+Martha1 THOMPSON (244), m. 25 Dec 1803, d. before 9 Dec 1840 in Montgomery, MD168
├── Angeline2 CRAYCROFT (3297),169 b. in Montgomery, MD,170 d. before 30 Mar 1841 in
Montgomery, MD171
├── Charles2 CRAYCROFT (3298),172 b. in Montgomery, MD173
├── Aaron2 CRAYCROFT (756),174 b. 20 Oct 1806 in Montgomery, MD,175 d. 18 May 1881 in
Otterville, Cooper, MO,176 bur. after 18 May 1881 in Walnut Grove Cemetery Number Two,
Otterville, Cooper, MO177

John P.2 Craycraft, born 1802 in St. George Co., MD


.
168Will,Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224: In her will Angeline left her "dec'd mother's estate "yet
unsettled" to her brothers Charles, Edward and Benjamin and her sister Eliza Ann Harriss.
169Will,
Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224; Will, Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224; Will, Angeline
Craycroft L 4, page 224.
170Will, Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224.
171Will, Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224.
172Will,Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224: Angeline Craycroft left a portion of her mother's
unsettled estate to her brothers, including Charles Craycroft; Will, Angeline Craycroft L 4, page
224: Angeline Craycroft left a portion of her mother's unsettled estate to her brothers, including
Charles Craycroft; Will, Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224: Angeline Craycroft left a portion of her
mother's unsettled estate to her brothers, including Charles Craycroft.
173Will,Angeline Craycroft L 4, page 224: Angeline Craycroft left a portion of her mother's
unsettled estate to her brothers, including Charles Craycroft.
174unknown author, RootsWeb Cemetery Records (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Died: 18 May 1881; aged
76 years; born in Montgomery County, MD; husband of Harriet G. nee’ Harris Craycroft; Elizabeth
Prather Ellsberry, Cooper County, Missouri, Cemetery Records, Vol. 1-12 (n.p.: Provo, UT:
Ancestry.com, 2001, n.d.), Name: Aaron Craycroft
Death Date: 18 May 1881
Age: 76 yrs.
b. born in Montgomery County, Maryland; hus. of Harriet G. (Harris) Craycroft
Cemetery: Walnut Grove Cemetery
Description: Number 2 near Otterville, Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast
quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. & Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from
the church.

; Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX; unknown author, RootsWeb
Cemetery Records, Died: 18 May 1881; aged 76 years; born in Montgomery County, MD;
husband of Harriet G. nee’ Harris Craycroft; unknown author, RootsWeb Cemetery Records,
Died: 18 May 1881; aged 76 years; born in Montgomery County, MD; husband of Harriet G. nee’
Harris Craycroft; Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry, Cooper County, Missouri, Cemetery, Name: Aaron
Craycroft
Death Date: 18 May 1881
Age: 76 yrs.
b. born in Montgomery County, Maryland; hus. of Harriet G. (Harris) Craycroft
Cemetery: Walnut Grove Cemetery
Description: Number 2 near Otterville, Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast
quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. & Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from
the church.

; Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX.

164
│ +Harriet G.2 HARRIS (2573), b. circa 1812 in Baltimore, MD,178 m. 13 Oct 1838 in
Montgomery, MD,179 d. 4 Oct 1872 in MO,180 bur. in Walnut Grove Cemetery Number Two,
Otterville, MO181

175unknownauthor, RootsWeb Cemetery Records, Died: 18 May 1881; aged 76 years; born in
Montgomery County, MD; husband of Harriet G. nee’ Harris Craycroft.
176unknown author, RootsWeb Cemetery Records, Died: 18 May 1881; aged 76 years; born in
Montgomery County, MD; husband of Harriet G. nee’ Harris Craycroft; Elizabeth Prather
Ellsberry, Cooper County, Missouri, Cemetery, Name: Aaron Craycroft

Death Date: 18 May 1881

Age: 76 yrs.

b. born in Montgomery County, Maryland; hus. of Harriet G. (Harris) Craycroft

Cemetery: Walnut Grove Cemetery

Description: Number 2 near Otterville, Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast
quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. & Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from
the church.

Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX; Aaron Crayroft, Decatur Daily
Republican, Decatur, Illinois, 4 June 1881, Aaron Crayroft, who lived in Wheatland township, this
county, from 1857 to 1865, died in Cooper county, Missouri, on May 18th, aged 78 years. The
deceased was a brother of John Craycroft who built the brick building on the south side of the
new square, now occupied by John Washburn, the grocer, and has a nephew, William
Craycroft,now residing in Wheatland township. Hereinafter cited as Decatur Daily Repoblican.
177unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.),
Name: Aaron Craycroft
Death Date: 18 May 1881
Age: 76 yrs.
b. born in Montgomery County, Maryland; hus. of Harriet G. (Harris) Craycroft
Cemetery: Walnut Grove Cemetery
Description: Number 2 near Otterville, Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast
quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. & Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from
the church.
178Aaron Craycroft, Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297,
family 301, Ancestry.com Series M432, roll 295, Age given at Census as 42 years old; Pg. 368.
179unknown author, Montgomery County Marriages (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Received in e-mail from
Margaret Whippee, 2/23/2000:
Page 77 Montgomery Co. Marriages
Craycroft Aaron m. Harriet Harriss (that is how it was spelled) 13 Oct. 1838; Page 77.
180unknown author, RootsWeb Cemetery Records, Died: 4 October 1872; aged 60 years;
Inscription: "Beloved wife of Aaron Craycroft, born in Baltimore, MD"; Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry,
Cooper County, Missouri, Cemetery, Name: Harriet G. Craycroft
Death Date: 04 Oct 1872
Age: 60 yrs.
nee' Harris, Inscription: "Beloved wife of Aaron Craycroft, born in Baltimore, Md."
Cemetery: Walnut Grove Cemetery

165
│ ├── Frank3 CRAYCROFT (2586),182 b. 21 Sep 1841 in MD,183 d. 3 Mar 1911 in
Fresno, Fresno, CA (Cause of death: cerebral meningitis, la grippe (influenza)),184 bur. 5 Mar 1911 in
1411 W. Belmont Ave., Fresno, Fresno, CA (A.O.U.W., Lot 3, Block 30)185
│ │ +Emily3 HUFF (3172),186 b. Feb 1851 in MO,187 m. 29 Dec 1870 in Morgan,
MO, 188 d. 18 Aug 1929 in Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX,189 bur. 20 Oct 1929 in Riverside Cemetery,
Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX190

Description: Number 2 near Otterville, Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast
quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. & Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from
the church.
; Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX.
181Elizabeth Prather Ellsberry, Cooper County, Missouri, Cemetery, Number 2 near Otterville,
Mo. Location: T-45-N; R-18-W; Section 4; in the northeast quarter of section. Recorded by Mr. &
Mrs. Farrie Cole, Sr.; - quite aways back in the woods from the church.; Cemetery Records of
Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX.
182Frank Craycroft entry, County of Fresno, Fresno, California; Death certificate Frank Craycroft
Sr., Office of the Fresno County Recorder, P.O. Box 766, Fresno, Fresno, CA. Hereinafter cited
as Frank Craycroft death cert; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368,
dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 8 years old; Pg. 368; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned
mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 8 years
old; Pg. 368.
183Frank Craycroft death cert; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368,
dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 8 years old; Pg. 368; Letter from Grace
Craycroft (Wichita Falls, Texas) to Bernice Inez Murphy, 21/10/1938; unknown repository
(unknown repository address); Stephens & Bean, Funeral Director, Account ledger entry for
Frank Craycroft Sr., (202 N. Teilman Ave., Fresno, CA: n.pub., March, 1911). Hereinafter cited as
Frank Craycroft, Sr..
184Frank Craycroft death cert., I hereby certify that I attended deceased from Feb. 1, 1911, to
March 3, 1911, that I last saw him alive on March 3, 1911, and that death occurred on the date
stated above at 5 p.m. The cause of death was as follows: Cerebral Meningitis, Contributory La
Grippe.

(signed) H.J. Craycroft, M.D; Death of Frank Craycroft, Wichita Daily Times, Wichita Falls, Texas,
March 4, 1911, Page 5, column 4, Mrs. M.A. Bundy of this city has received a message
announcing the death of her father, Frank Craycroft, at his home in Fresno, California. Deceased
was 65 years of age and leaves a widow and four children all of whom were with him during his
last hours with the exception of Mrs. Bundy, who could not reach the bedside after receiving word
of his serious illness. Hereinafter cited as Wichita Daily Times; Stephens & Bean, Frank
Craycroft, Sr..
185Frank Craycroft death cert; Stephens & Bean, Frank Craycroft, Sr..
186James Nolan, June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family
58, Ancestry.com T9, Roll 238, Name: Emma Craycroft, Age: 28, Birthplace: New York.
187Frank Craycroft, 13 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 393,
family 418, Ancestry.com Series T623, roll 1626, image 596, According to this 1900 census
return, Emily was born in February, 1851; Emilie Craycroft, January 12, 1920 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 93, dwelling 145, family 149, Ancestry.com Series T625, roll 1858.
188June
5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58, Name:
Emma Craycroft, Age: 28, Birthplace: New York.
189Funeral Services for Mrs. Emily Craycroft to be 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Wichita Daily Times,
Wichita Falls, Texas, August 19, 1929, Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 4:30

166
│ │ ├── Grace4 CRAYCROFT (3173),191 b. 28 Sep 1871 in MO,192 d. circa 9 May
1948 in Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX, bur. 11 May 1948 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls,
Wichita, TX193
│ │ │ +WRIGHT4 (3206), m. circa 1892194
│ │ ├── Emma4 CRAYCROFT (3174),195 b. Aug 1874 in MO,196 d. 1959 in Wichita
Falls, Wichita, TX
│ │ │ +Marvin A.4 BUNDY (3243), b. circa 1875 in MO,197 mlc. after 28 Apr 1899
in Dallas, Dallas, TX (It must be noted that although the Dallas Morning News reported on 28 Apr 1899
that a marriage license was issued to Emma Craycroft and M.A. Bundy, in the 1900 census for Oak Cliff,
Texas, Emma is living in her father Frank's household and is shown as single.

o'clock at the home of a daughter, Mrs. M. A. Bundy, 1673 Dayton street, for Mrs. Emily Claycroft,
aged 78, 1008 Fifth Street, who died in a local hospital about 6:45 o'clock, Sunday night. The
services will be under the direction of Rev. Patrick Henry, pastor of the Highland Heights
Christian Church. Burial will be in Riverside.

Mrs. Claycroft is survived by two daughters, Mrs. M.A. Bundy and Mrs. Grace C. Wright; also two
sons, Frank and Ben Craycroft, the three last-named living at the family home on Fifth street. Mrs.
Claycroft had been a resident of Wichita Falls for 12 years.

Active pallbearers will be F.F. Knox, J.N. Prothro, Dr. A.R. Prothro, Wayne Holmes, J.W. Hooper
and Ike Simmons. Hereinafter cited as Wichita Daily Times.
190Wichita Daily Times, August 19, 1929.
191June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5,
1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5, 1880 scanned
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58.
192Letter, Grace Craycroft to Bernice Inez Murphy, 21/10/1938, In letter Grace notes that Nellie
Murphy "was hurt on dear Papa's birthday anniversary and went the 27th, the day before mine."
Nellie died 27 Sep 1938. This would make Grace's birthday 28 September.

According to the 1900 census of Oak Cliff, Texas, Grace was born in Sep, 1871; June 5, 1880
scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58.
193City of Wichita Falls Parks Department: Grace Wright, buried 5-11-1948, Block C, Lot 58,
space 3, unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as Wiichita Falls
Parks Dept.
19413 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 393, family 418,
According to the 1900 census return for Oak Cliff, Texas, Grace was living in her father Frank's
household but is shown as married 8 years at that time. It was also reported that she had given
birth to a single child and that child was not living at the time of the census.
195June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5,
1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5, 1880 scanned
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58.
19613 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 393, family 418,
According to this 1900 census return, Emma was born in August, 1874; June 5, 1880 scanned
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58.
197Marvin A. Bundy, April 4, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 10,
family 11, Ancestry.com Series TX T626, Roll 2409, Page 261.

167
It is possible that their marriage was postponed by Marvin's enlistment during the Philippine Insurrection, but
this is only supposition. It is known that they eventually married, but apparently not until after June, 1900.

I've located no record of the marriage itself, but given that their marriage license was issued in Dallas I
would assume that they were married there as well)198
│ │ │ ├── Paul Craycroft BUNDY (3329)199 is still living
5

│ │ │ │ +Josephine Newton TUCKER (3737) is still living


5

│ │ │ │ └── Kay Tucker BUNDY (3738) is still living


6

│ │ │ ├── Mabel D. BUNDY (4009)200 is still living


5

│ │ │ └── Frank M. BUNDY (3286),201 b. circa 1908 in TX202


5

│ │ ├── Frank4 CRAYCROFT (3175),203 b. 10 May 1876,204 d. circa 19 Sep 1950 in


Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX, bur. 19 Sep 1950 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX205
│ │ └── Ben4 CRAYCROFT (3205), b. 27 Oct 1886 in Sedalia, Pettis, MO,206 d. 1
Dec 1972 in Wichita Falls, Wichita, TX,207 bur. 4 Dec 1972 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls,
Wichita, TX208

198Licensed
to Wed, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, 28 Apr 1899, M.A. Bundy and Miss
Emma Craycroft. Hereinafter cited as Dallas Morning News.
199Ben Craycroft funeral Monday, Wichita Daily Times, unknown location, 3 December 1972, P.
4A, Survivors include two nephews, Paul Bundy of Houston. Hereinafter cited as Wichita Daily
Times.
200Marvin A. Bundy, 2 April 1910 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 243, family 283,
page 15A, Ancestry.com Series T624, film 1597, image 472; 2 April 1910 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 243, family 283, page 15A; 2 April 1910 scanned microfilm, Provo,
Utah, UT, Dwelling 243, family 283, page 15A.
201April 4, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 10, family 11; April 4,
1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 10, family 11; April 4, 1930 scanned
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 10, family 11.
2022April 1910 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 243, family 283, page 15A; April 4,
1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 6B, dwelling 10, family 11.
203June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5,
1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58; June 5, 1880 scanned
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58, family 58.
204Draft Registration, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 (Washington, D.C.:
National Archives and Records Administration), Date of birth: May 10, 1876. Hereinafter cited as
WWI Draft Registration; June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 7, dwelling 58,
family 58.
205Wiichita Falls Parks Dept.: Frank Craycroft, buried 9-19-1950, Block C, Lot 58, space 2.
206WWI Draft Registration, Ben reported his date of birth as October 27, 1886, and his place of
birth as Sedalia, Missouri, when he registered for the WWI draft; Ben Craycroft funeral Monday,
Wichita Daily Times, Wichita Falls, Texas, December 3, 1972, Page 4A. Hereinafter cited as
Wichita Daily Times.
207Wichita Daily Times, 3 December 1972, P. 4A, Ben Craycroft, 86, of 1008 Fifth, a resident of
Wichita Falls 50 years, died Friday in a hospital here.

Graveside rites will be at 11 a.m., Monday in Riverside Cemetery with the Rev. Oden Latham,
associate pastor of First Christian Church officiating. Burial will be under direction of Hampton-
Vaughan Funeral Home.

168
│ ├── Rose3 CRAYCROFT (2587),209 b. 1844 in MD210
│ │ +Perrian3 PORTER (3207),211 m. 7 Sep 1882 in Pueblo, CO212
│ ├── Benjamin3 CRAYCROFT (2588),213 b. 1846 in MD,214 d. 28 Mar 1912 in Chicago,
Cook, IL, 215 bur. 31 Mar 1912 in Chillicothe, Livingston, MO (Edgewood Cemetery)216

Craycroft, a retired railroad worker, was born Oct. 27, 1886, in Sedalia, Mo.

Survivors include two nephews, Paul Bundy of Houston and Frank Bundy of Waco, Tex., and a
niece, Mrs. E.H. Shaw of Midland, Tex.
208WiichitaFalls Parks Dept.: Ben Crayroft buried 12-4-1972, Block C, Lot 58, space 1; Wichita
Daily Times, December 3, 1972, Page 4A, Ben Craycroft, 86, of 1008 Fifth, a resident of Wichita
Falls 50 years, died Friday in a hospital there.

Graveside rites will be at 11 a.m., Monday in Riverside Cemetery with the Rev. Oden Ltham,
associate pastor of First Christian Church officiating. Burial will be under direction of Hampton-
Vaughan Funeral Home.

Craycroft, a retired railroad worker, was born Oct.. 27, 1886, in Sedalia, Mo.

Survivors iclude two nephews, Paul Bundy of Houston and Frank Bundy of Waco, Tex., and a
niece, Mrs. E.H. Shaw of Midland, Tex.
209Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 6 years old; Pg. 368; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page
368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 6 years old; Pg. 368.
210Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 6 years old; Pg. 368.
211unknown author, Boonville Weekly Advertiser (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.).
212unknown author, Boonville Weekly Advertiser.
213Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 4 years old; Pg. 368; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page
368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 4 years old; Pg. 368.
214Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 4 years old; Pg. 368.
215Sudden Death of Ben Craycroft, The Chillicothe Constitution, Chillicothe, Missouri, March 28,
1912, 6, Ben Craycroft, a former resident of this city, died suddenly in his office, 1439 West
Twenty-first street, Chicago, Ill., Thursday morning shortly after eight o'clock. His death was due
to heart trouble.

Mr. Craycroft, who was a member of the firm of Craycroft & Co., enetered the office and greeting
the members of the firm, stated, "I am not feeling well this morning." Within minute he dropped to
the floor and expired before a phsycian arrived.

The decedent was born near Hagertown, Md., and resided there during his boyhood days, after
which he moved to Southern Illinois, where he resided until 1868, when he went to Sedalia and in
1872 moved to Chillicothe, where he was general agent for the McCormick Harvester company.
While here he also held minor city offices. In 1889 he went to Oklahoma where he resided ten
years, when he went to Chicago and engaged in business for himself.

169
│ │ +Mary3 BROWNING (3170),217 m. before 5 Jun 1880 in MO,218 d. 15 Jul 1942 in
San Diego, Californiia,219 bur. 30 Jul 1942 in Edgewood Cemetery, Chillicothe, Livingston, MO220
│ └── Harriett3 CRAYCROFT (2589),221 b. 1849 in MD222
├── Benjamin2 CRAYCROFT (758),223 b. 10 Jun 1809,224 d. 11 Dec 1853 in Blue Mound,
Macon, IL (Black Diptheria plague),225 bur. 13 Dec 1853 in Salem Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Browning Craycroft.

The body is expected to arrive here Saturday and the funeral probably will be held Sunday.
216Chillicothe Constitution, March 28, 1912, 6.
217ChillicotheConstitution, March 28, 1912, 6, He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Browning
Craycroft; unknown author, The Chillicothe Constitution (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Thursday Evening,
March 31, 1892 - . . . .I also met at this place his most estimable lady, Mrs. Craycroft, the
daughter of Hon. W.T. Browning, of Chillicothe, Mo.
218Chillicothe Constitution, March 28, 1912, 6, He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Browning
Craycroft.
219Ashes of Mrs. Mary Craycroft Interred, Chillicothe Constitution Tribune, Chillicothe, Missouir,
30 July 1942, Pg. 4, The ashes of Mrs. Mary Browning Craycroft arrived here yesterday from San
Diego, Calif., where she died on July 15. Funeral services were held at San Diego, July 16 with
cremation. Burial was made in Edgewood cemetery by the J.D. Gordon Home for Funerals this
morning.

Mrs. Craycroft was the widow of Ben Craycroft and was a resident of Chillicothe a number of
years ago. While residing here Mr. Craycroft was connected with the International Harvester
Company as a traveling salesman.

A sister, Mrs. Effie King resides at San Diego. Hereinafter cited as Constitution Tribune.
220Constitution Tribune, 30 July 1942, Pg. 4.
221Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 1 year old; Pg. 368; Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page
368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age given at Census as 1 year old; Pg. 368.
222Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 368, dwelling 297, family 301, Age
given at Census as 1 year old; Pg. 368.
223unknown family info, Family bible (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); unknown present owner, unknown
location, Benjamin Craycroft dyed the 11 of December 1853; Decatur Genealogical Society,
Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Vol. III (n.p.: Third Printing, July, 1987, n.d.),
CRAYCROFT, BENJAMIN
Dec. 11,1853
aged 44 years, 6 m., 1 day; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 67; unknown
compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 67; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, CRAYCROFT, BENJAMIN
Dec. 11,1853
aged 44 years, 6 m., 1 day; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 80; Family
bible, Benjamin Craycroft dyed the 11 of December 1853.
224Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, CRAYCROFT,
BENJAMIN
Dec. 11,1853
aged 44 years, 6 m., 1 day.

170
│ +(--?--)2 (375) is still living
│ +Elizabeth2 PATE (761),226 b. circa 1817 in Beardstown, Cass, IL,227 m. 5 Jun 1837 in
Beardstown, Cass, IL, d. 18 Sep 1891 in Walnut Hill, Jefferson, IL,228 bur. 20 Sep 1891 in Little
Grove Church Cemetery, Walnut Hill, Jefferson, IL229
│ ├── Matilda West3 CRAYCROFT (1361),230 b. 12 Mar 1838 in Cape Girardeau, MO,231
d. 28 Oct 1878 in Lamar, Barton, MO (The 1880 census for Lamar, Missouri, indicates that William
Morris was a widower at that time)232
│ │ +William Ervin3 MORRIS (1362),233 b. 2 Dec 1833, m. 30 Aug 1857 in Macon, IL
(Married by Wm. P. Austin),234 d. 24 Jul 1898
│ │ ├── Sarah Elizabeth4 MORRIS (1359),235 b. 11 Jun 1858 in IL,236 d. 10 Nov
1941 in Riverside, CA237
│ │ │ +GILMAN4 (3060) is still living
│ │ ├── Ella M.4 MORRIS (2690),238 b. circa 1870 in Lamar, Barton, MO239

225Family bible, Benjamin Craycroft dyed the 11 of December 1853; Decatur Genealogical
Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, CRAYCROFT, BENJAMIN
Dec. 11,1853
aged 44 years, 6 m., 1 day; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 80.
226Edward Scott Craycroft, June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling
291, family 291, Ancestry.com Series M432, page 118, Age given at Census as 33 years old and
born in Illinois.; Pg.167; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family.
227June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291, Age
given at Census as 33 years old and born in Illinois.; Pg.167; Benjamin Craycroft, Photocopy
12598 (21 Mar 1917), Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield,
Sangamon, IL, On Death certificate for Benjamin Craycroft (Jr.), his moter's birthplace is given as
Beardstown, Ill. Hereinafter cited as DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr.
228unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family.
229unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family.
230unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
231unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
232unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
233Marriage License for William E.Morris and Matilda W. Crayroft, Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage Lic., Wm. Morris, Matilda
Craycroft.
234Marriage Lic., Wm. Morris, Matilda Craycroft.
235unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; California Death Index,
1940-1997, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180. Hereinafter cited as
California Death index 1940-97; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
236California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
237California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.

171
│ │ ├── Nancy Jane4 MORRIS (2691),240 b. circa 1873 in Lamar, Barton, MO241
│ │ ├── Franklyn C.4 MORRIS (2692),242 b. circa 1875 in Lamar, Barton, MO243
│ │ ├── Leslie B.4 MORRIS (2689),244 b. circa 1868 in Lamar, Barton, MO245
│ │ ├── Charles M.4 MORRIS (2686),246 b. circa 1866 in Lamar, Barton, MO247
│ │ ├── Minnie Lemon4 MORRIS (2687),248 b. between 1860 and 1878 in Lamar,
MO249
│ │ ├── Mytrly4 MORRIS (2688),250 b. between 1860 and 1878 in Lamar, MO251
│ │ └── Louis A.4 MORRIS (2693),252 b. 7 Apr 1878 in Lamar, Barton, MO,253 d. 10
Apr 1949 in Riverside, CA254

238unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
239William Ervin Morris, 14 June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling
272, family 308, Ancestry.com Series T9, roll 673; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family,
verso of page 76.
240unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
24114June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling 272, family 308;
unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
242unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
24314June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling 272, family 308;
unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
244unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
24514June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling 272, family 308;
unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
246unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
24714June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling 272, family 308;
unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
248unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
249unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
250unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso page 76; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page
76.
251unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
252unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; California Death index 1940-
97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97,

172
│ ├── Benjamin3 CRAYCROFT Jr. (631),255 b. 12 Nov 1840 in Benton, Scott, MO,256 d.
19 Mar 1917 in Vandalia, Fayette, IL (Obstructed bowel),257 bur. 22 Mar 1917 in South Hill
Cemetery, Vandalia, Fayette, IL (Undertaker: Fred Easterday)258
│ │ +Elizabeth Ann3 BREESE (591),259 b. 13 Aug 1844 in Walnut Hill, Marion, IL,260
m. 3 Jan 1861 in Salem, Marion, IL (Married by James Snow in Marion County, Illinois),261 d. 25 Mar
1878
│ │ ├── Josa4 CRAYCROFT (734),262 b. 3 Sep 1863, d. 21 Dec 1863, bur. after 21
Dec 1863 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, Macon, IL
│ │ ├── Amanda Ann4 CRAYCROFT (408),263 b. 15 Jan 1864, d. 12 Jan 1865, bur.
after 12 Jan 1865 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, Macon, IL
│ │ ├── Benjamin Richard4 CRAYCROFT (364),264 b. 31 Oct 1864 in Decatur,
Macon, IL, d. 15 Jul 1933 in Sacramento, CA
│ │ │ +Lizzie4 TREFFORT (3104), m. 26 Feb 1898 in Marion, IL, d. before 27 Apr
1910 in CA 265

online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; unknown compiler, History of


Craycroft Family, verso of page 76; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
253CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
14 June 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 80, dwelling 272, family 308; unknown
compiler, History of Craycroft Family, verso of page 76.
254California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
255unknown author, Craycroft Family Record of Ray J. Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); Benjamin
Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin
Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin
Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr.
256Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Letter from Benjamin Craycroft Jr. (Vandalia,
Illinois) to Rose Craycroft, January 16, 1916; Robert Lynn Craycroft (Rolling Meadows, Cook, IL).
257Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr; Benjamin Craycroft Jr., State database 12598
(17 Mar 1921), Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon,
IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
258Benjamin Craycroft, DC Benjamin Craycroft Jr.
259unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
260Letter,Benjamin Craycroft Jr. to Rose Craycroft, January 16, 1916, Benjamin wrote "Mother
Elizabeth Breeze born in Marion Co Ill ni Aug. 13, 1844, died Mar. 25 (year illegible).
261unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, I want to mention here that my oldest brother
Benjamin Craycroft was married to Miss Elizabeth Ann Breese January 3, 1861 at Salem, Illinois.
(John Wesley Craycroft); Page 82; Marriage License issued to Benjamin Craycroft and Elizabeth
Ann Breeze: Marriage license No. 199 issued to Benjamin Craycroft and Elizabeth Ann Breeze,
January 2, 1861 in Salem, Illinois, by James S. Martin, County Clerk. Filed January 10, 1861,
County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marr.
Lic., Benj. Craycroft, Elizabeth Breeze.
262unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
263unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
264unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.

173
│ │ ├── John4 CRAYCROFT (365),266 b. 5 Jan 1867 in Walnut Hill, IL, d. 5 Jan
1867 in Walnut Hill, IL
│ │ ├── Robert Ellis4 CRAYCROFT (366),267 b. 2 Feb 1868 in Walnut Hill, IL, d. 23
Sep 1868 in Walnut Hill, IL
│ │ ├── Arlulia Jane4 CRAYCROFT (367),268 b. 18 Jul 1869, d. 6 Apr 1913 in
Vandalia, Fayette, IL, bur. after 6 Apr 1913 in South Hill Cemetery, Vandalia, Fayette, IL
│ │ └── John Henry4 CRAYCROFT (589),269 b. 15 Oct 1871 in Walnut Hill, IL,270 d.
11 Feb 1949 in Contra Costa, CA,271 bur. after 12 Feb 1949 in South Hill Ccemetery, Vandalia,
Fayette, IL
│ │ +Lucy L.4 SOLORSANO (3846), b. circa 1872 in CA, m. 29 Sep 1894 in
Madera, CA
│ │ +Rosetta4 NIDAY (438),272 b. 5 Jan 1880 in Hartsugg, AR,273 m. 25 Nov
1900,274 d. 3 Feb 1967 in Pleasant Hill, CA275
│ │ ├── Harry T.5 CRAYCROFT (1397), b. 12 Nov 1898 in Fresno, Fresno,
CA,276 d. 2 Oct 1974 in Lake, CA277
│ │ │ +Hazel5 TAYLOR (439) is still living
│ │ │ +Georgia5 CLEVELAND (440), b. in Concord, CA, m. 30 May 1927
in San Rafael, CA, d. after 1973
│ │ │ └── Harry T.6 CRAYCROFT Jr. (441) is still living
│ │ ├── Ray Jack5 CRAYCROFT (442),278 b. 26 Jan 1903 in Fresno, CA,279
d. 13 Nov 1978 in Fresno, CA280

265LizzieTreffort, 27 April 1910 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 174, family 318, page 13A,
Ancestry.com Series T624, film 84, image 1173, In the 1910 Census for Los Angeles, CA,
Benjamin R. Craycroft is listed as a widower.
266unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
267unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
268unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
269Interviewwith Ray Jack Cracyroft (unknown informant address), by Robert L. Craycroft.
unknown repository (unknown repository address); California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft; California
Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
270Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft.
271California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
272Interview,Ray Jack Cracyroft; Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft; Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft;
Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft.
273Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft.
274unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
275Interview, Ray Jack Cracyroft.
276WWI Draft Registration, Date of birth reported on registration card by Harry is Nov. 12, 1898.
277California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
278CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.

174
│ │ │ +Marion Fay5 SHORB (461), b. 23 Feb 1903 in Scott Bar, Siskiyou,
CA,281 m. 11 Dec 1939 in Reno, Washoe, NV, d. 15 Jul 2000 in Fresno, Fresno, CA282
│ │ └── Benjamin N.5 CRAYCROFT (1394),283 b. 18 Oct 1906 in Fresno,
Fresno, CA,284 d. Mar 1966 in CA
│ │ +Lorene Thelma5 HEATH (462) is still living
│ │ ├── Wallace Benjamin6 CRAYCROFT (463),285 b. 15 Dec 1925
in Albany, Alameda, CA, 286 d. 1 May 2000 in Arcata, CA287
│ │ └── Wayne Heath6 CRAYCROFT (464) is still living
│ │ +Janet Abby4 BUSHNELL (368),288 b. 9 Jun 1881 in KS,289 m. 4 Jan 1914,
d. 2 Mar 1953 in Napa, CA290
│ │ └── Robert Newton5 CRAYCROFT M.D. (437),291 b. 3 Nov 1917 in
Fresno, CA,292 d. 9 Oct 1987 in San Jose, Santa Clara, CA (Cancer),293 bur. 14 Oct 1987 in
Santa Clara, Santa Clara, CA

279California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.


280California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
281Ray J. Crayroft, "Pedigree for Ray J. Craycroft", July 3, 1977 (3755 E. Hampton Way, Fresno,
Calif. 93726). unknown memo. Hereinafter cited as "Ray Craycroft pedigree".
282unknown author, Obituary published in the "Fresno Bee," July 18, 2000 (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.),
Memorial services for Marion Fay Craycroft, 97, of Fresno will be at noon today at Chapel of the
Light. Mrs. Craycroft died Saturday.
283California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
Hereinafter cited as California Birth Index, 1905-1995; California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
284California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
285Social Security Death Index, (Provo, Utah: Ancestry.com). Hereinafter cited as SSDI; SSDI.
286California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
287SSDI.

288CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;


California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
289California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
290California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
291California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
Dr. R.N. Craycroft, Los Gatos Surgeon, San Jose Mercury News, San Jose, CA, 13 Oct 1987,
Local Section, pg. 5B, Los Gatos surgeon Robert N. Craycroft, 70, died of cancer Friday at
O'Connor Hospital in San Jose.
A ninth-generation American, Dr. Craycroft opened his Los Gatos practice in the
middle 1960s. He retired earlier this year
. Hereinafter cited as Mercury News; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; Mercury News, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section,
pg. 5B, Los Gatos surgeon Robert N. Craycroft, 70, died of cancer Friday at O'Connor Hospital in
San Jose.
A ninth-generation American, Dr. Craycroft opened his Los Gatos practice in the

175
│ │ +Alverta5 WOLFE (2730) is still living

middle 1960s. He retired earlier this year


; California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
292CaliforniaBirth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
293MercuryNews, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section, pg. 5B, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
DR. R.N. CRAYCROFT, LOS GATOS SURGEON

DATE: Tuesday, October 13, 1987, Section: Local, Edition: Morning Final, Page: 5B
Memo: Obituaries

Los Gatos surgeon Robert N. Craycroft, 70, died of cancer Friday at O'Connor Hospital in San
Jose.

A ninth-generation American, Dr. Craycroft opened his Los Gatos practice in the middle 1960s.
He retired earlier this year.

The Craycroft family traces its American ancestry to the March 15, 1641, arrival of two Craycroft
brothers from London in Jamestown Colony. Descendants settled in what would later become
Indiana in 1750 and Craycroft's father, the late John Craycroft, came to California from Illinois in
the late 1880s.

An amateur sportsman, Dr. Craycroft raced both cars and boats, the latter in San Francisco Bay,
the former at Pebble Beach, Laguna Seca and Bakersfield. He also collected classic cars and at
one time owned a 1931 V-16 Cadillac Phaeton. Bob Gillespie of Watsonville, a retired commercial
and Navy pilot and friend of Dr. Craycroft, said the Los Gatos physician was a good pilot as well.
Only recently, the two had shared ownership of a P-51 Mustang, one of the hottest fighter planes
to come out of World War II.

''Among our flying friends were Hap Harper and the late Bob Love," recalled Gillespie.

Harper is reported to have introduced air traffic reporting on radio in the Bay Area in 1957. San
Josean Love is credited with having shot down seven Russian-built MIG-15 fighter planes over
Korea during that war.

Dr. Craycroft, who was born in Fresno, moved with his parents to Richmond to live as a young
man and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California at Berkeley, then went to the
University of California School of Medicine in San Francisco.

He was exempted from military duty during World War II because of a shortage of civilian doctors
and in 1943 was assigned to Tulare County Hospital as a resident.

Dr. Craycroft returned to Berkeley after the war and opened a private practice there, where he
began his long surgical career.

Surviving are his wife, Martha Craycroft of Los Gatos; four daughters, Colette Craycroft of Santa
Barbara, Anne Craycroft of San Jose and Yvonne and Janet Craycroft, both of Santa Clara; and a
son, Warren Craycroft, a computer design engineer temporarily working in France.

The rosary service will begin at 7:30 p.m. today at St. Frances Cabrini Church, 15333 Woodard
Road, San Jose. Funeral services will be held at the church at noon Wednesday followed by
burial at Mission City Memorial Park, Santa Clara
; California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.

176
│ │ +Ruth Caroline5 KIDDOO (467)294 is still living
│ │ ├── Carolyn Ruth6 CRAYCROFT (468),295 b. 20 Sep 1943 in San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA,296 d. 15 Aug 1973 in Oakland, Alameda, CA297
│ │ ├── Warren Bruce6 CRAYCROFT (2654)298 is still living
│ │ └── Anne Eleanor6 CRAYCROFT (469) is still living
│ │ +Martha5 SOL (470)299 is still living
│ │ ├── Janet6 CRAYCROFT (2653)300 is still living
│ │ ├── Yvonne6 CRAYCROFT (2652)301 is still living
│ │ └── Colette A.6 CRAYCROFT (2647)302 is still living
│ │ +Eric E.6 VANDEMARK (2648) is still living
│ │ +Ora Frances3 WOLFE (1210), b. 23 Mar 1853 in Fayetteville, Fayette, IN, m. 15
Sep 1874 in Kinmundy, Marion, IL (Married by James N. Hogg, minister),303 d. 8 Jul 1919 in
Kinmundy, Marion, IL304
│ │ └── Otto Grant4 CRAYCROFT (1211),305 b. 4 Jan 1876 in Marion, IL306

294Bette Butcher Topp, compiler, A History of the Kiddoo Family in the United States -- 1780-
1981 (108 Washington Street, Decorah, Iowa 52101: The Anundsen Publishing Company, 1981).
Hereinafter cited as History of the Kiddoo Family.
295CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
296CaliforniaBirth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
Bette Butcher Topp, History of the Kiddoo Family.
297California
Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
Bette Butcher Topp, History of the Kiddoo Family.
298California
Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
Mercury News, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section, pg. 5B, Oct. 13, 1987, Morning Final Edition, Page
5C.
299CaliforniaBirth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247,
The record for Colette A. Craycroft's birth shows her mother's maiden name as Sol.
300Mercury News, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section, pg. 5B, Oct. 13, 1987, Morning Final Edition, Page
5C.
301Mercury News, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section, pg. 5B, Oct. 13, 1987, Morning Final Edition, Page
5C.
302Mercury News, 13 Oct 1987, Local Section, pg. 5B, Oct. 13, 1987, Morning Final Edition, Page
5C.
303Illinois Marriage Index, 1763-1900, Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex,
Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900; Marriage license
issued Sept. 14, 1874 for Benjamin Craycroft and Ora F. Wolf: Marriage license issued Sept. 14,
1874 to Benjamin Craycroft and Ora F. Wolf, by T.W. Purcell, County Clerk. Licenes registered
Sept. 16, 1874, County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL. Hereinafter
cited as Marr. Lic., Benj. Craycroft, Ora Wolf.
304Ora Frances Wolfe, State database 23637 (10 Jul 1919), Illinois State Archives, Norton
Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-
50.

177
│ │ +Josephine4 DAGGETT (4076),307 m. 16 Oct 1898 in Marion, IL308
│ │ +Elizabeth Mary3 HONECKER (633), b. 29 Jul 1859 in Waterloo, IL, m. 2 Mar
1880 in Salem, Marion, IL,309 d. 5 May 1921 in Vandalia, Fayette, IL,310 bur. after 5 May 1921 in
South Hill Cemetery, Vandalia, Fayette, IL
│ │ ├── Charles Edward4 CRAYCROFT (1209), b. 27 Jul 1881 in Salem, IL,311 d.
21 Jul 1882
│ │ ├── Margaret Mary4 CRAYCROFT (719), b. 10 Oct 1883 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ │ +R.S.4 ALLEN (3127) is still living
│ │ ├── Harry Benjamin4 CRAYCROFT (629), b. 29 Apr 1885 in Vandalia, IL, d. 30
May 1962 in Vandalia, Fayette, IL
│ │ │ +Ella Frances4 SMITH (630), b. 23 Nov 1886 in Fayette County, IL, m. circa
1905,312 d. Mar 1974 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ │ ├── Harry Benjamin5 CRAYCROFT Jr. (1415), b. 1906, d. 1931, bur.
1931 in South Hill Cemetery, Vandalia, Fayette, IL
│ │ │ ├── Helen Frances5 CRAYCROFT (556),313 b. 21 Jun 1908 in IL,314 d.
16 Feb 1994 in San Mateo, San Mateo, CA315
│ │ │ │ +Dr. Robert Fischer5 MONTIETH (2774), b. 19 Apr 1902 in IA, m.
before 1934, d. 1945 in Redwood City, CA
│ │ │ │ ├── Robert Craycroft6 MONTIETH (2775),316 b. 7 Dec 1932 in
CA,317 d. 11 Jan 1995 in San Diego, CA318

305WWI Draft Registration.


306WWI Draft Registration, Otto reported his date of birth as Jany 4, 1876.
307ILMarr. Index, 1763-1900: CRAYCROFT, OTTO; DAGGETT, JOSEPHINE; 10/16/1898; VOL.
E, PG 65; COUNTY: MARION.
308ILMarr. Index, 1763-1900: CRAYCROFT, OTTO; DAGGETT, JOSEPHINE; 10/16/1898; VOL.
E, PG 65; COUNTY: MARION.
309IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900: Even though the State index shows a marriage record for Benjamin
and Elizabeth, in Vol. D, page 138, the Marion County Clerk has certified that they cannot locate
the record.
310Elizabeth Mary Honecker, State database 10713 (5 May 1921), Illinois State Archives, Norton
Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-
50.
311Register of Births entry, Certified copy 1881, Name of child not given, sex: male, first child of
this mother, date of birth: July 27/81, Place of birth of father: Mo, Age: 40, Place of birth of
mother: Ill, Age of mother: 23, Full name of Mother: Elizabeth Craycroft, Residence of Mother:
Salem, Full name of Father: Benj Craycroft, Occupation: Brick Maker, Name and address of
Medical Attendant: W.M. Finley, Salem (27 July 1881), County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main
Street, Salem, Marion, IL.
312Harry Benjamin Craycroft, April 23, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 5A,
dwelling 99, family 111, Ancestry.com Series IL T626, page 515-0447, Age of Harry at time of
marriage given at Census as 20, Ella's age given as 19.; Pg. 8A.
313CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
314California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
315California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.

178
│ │ │ │ │ +Sara (2777) is still living
6

│ │ │ │ │ ├── Sara MONTIETH (2778) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ ├── Amy MONTIETH (2779) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ └── Julia MONTIETH (2780) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ └── Phillip Harry MONTIETH (2776),319 b. 20 May 1934 in


6

CA,320 d. 16 Dec 1995 in San Mateo, CA321


│ │ │ │ +(--?--)6 CHARLOTTE (2781) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Michelle7 MONTIETH (2782) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Phillip7 MONTIETH (2783) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Charlotte7 (3008) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Michelle8 MONTIETH (3009) is still living
│ │ │ │ +John Reginald5 BALL (769) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Charles Howard5 CRAYCROFT (1416), b. 18 Apr 1911, d. 13 Dec
1962 (Car accident), bur. after 13 Dec 1962 in South Hill Cemetery, Vandalia, Fayette, IL
│ │ │ │ +Mary Selena5 BROOKS (2768), b. 8 Jan 1911, m. 13 Sep 1931, d.
6 Aug 1991
│ │ │ │ └── Patricia Ann6 CRAYCROFT (2769),322 b. 8 Dec 1931,323 d. 4
Dec 2000324

316CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;


California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
317California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
318California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
319CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
320California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
321California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
322unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), My sister, Patricia
Ann, was born on Dec, 8, 1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002); unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, My sister, Patricia Ann, was
born on Dec, 8, 1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002); unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, My sister, Patricia Ann, was
born on Dec, 8, 1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002); unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, My sister, Patricia Ann, was
born on Dec, 8, 1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002).

179
│ │ │ │ +Robert6 CLARK (2773) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Robert6 HYATT (2770) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Mark7 HYATT (2771) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Amanda7 HYATT (2772) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Unknown7 SCHULZ (3024) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Virginia Lee5 MACDONALD (2765), b. 3 Jun 1930, m. 24 Dec
1956, d. 24 Jun 2000
│ │ │ │ ├── John Christopher DIMMICH (2766)325 is still living
6

│ │ │ │ └── Sarah Elizabeth CRAYCROFT (2767) is still living


6

│ │ │ │ +William Joseph MEYER (3030)326 is still living


6

│ │ │ │ └── Cara MacDonald CRAYCROFT (3027) is still living


7

│ │ │ ├── Philip Paul CRAYCROFT (628), b. 11 Oct 1914 in Vandalia, IL, d.


5

19 Oct 1994 in Vandalia, IL (Congestive heart failure, pneumonia)


│ │ │ │ +Marian5 TRAYLOR (1370), b. 21 Jan 1915 in CA, m. 20 Jun 1935
in Benton, IL, d. 19 May 1999 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ │ │ ├── Traylor6 CRAYCROFT (2558), b. 1936 in Vandalia, IL, d.
1936 in Vandalia, IL, bur. in Vandalia, Fayette, IL (South Hill Cemetery)
│ │ │ │ ├── Sheila Gay6 CRAYCROFT (1413), b. 16 Jan 1938 in
Vandalia, IL, d. 15 Oct 1992 in Indan Point Lodge, Branson, Taney, MO327

323unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, My sister, Patricia Ann, was born on Dec, 8,
1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002).
324unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, My sister, Patricia Ann, was born on Dec, 8,
1931. Sadly, she passed away
in 2000. Although I can't remember the date and don't have a calender in
front of me, I do know that she died on the first Monday in December of that
year. (7/22/2002).
325unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth; unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth.
326unknown author, E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth, Cara's father is William Joseph Meyer. (Bill)
We were never married. Billy lives in Hapeville, GA - just south of Atlanta. He's a great guy, a
great friend, and a great father
.
327unknownarticle title, Decatur Herald and Review, unknown location, 17 Oct 1992, page A7,
VANDALIA -Shelia G. Craycroft, 54, of Vandalia, died 11:40 a.m. Thursday

(Oct. 15, 1992) at Indian Point Lodge, Branson, Mo.

Ms. Craycroft was born Jan. 16, 1938 in Vandalia, daughter of Philip P. and
Marian A. Taylor Craycroft. She was a licensed practical nurse and worked at the Fayette
County Hospital, Vandalia. She was a member of the First
Presbyterian Church, The National Wildlife Society and the Sarah Club.

Surviving are her sons, Tom "Bink" Craycroft, Rand Craycroft, Geoff Craycroft and Tim
Craycroft, all of Vandalia; sisters, Paula. Craycroft and Mrs. Jim (Ellen) Flood, both of Vandalia;
grandchildren; Eric, Jordan, Judson and Brandon.

180
│ │ │ │ │ +Thomas Ray6 CLAYTON (2561) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Thomas Ray7 CLAYTON (2562)328 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Deborah7 RINE (2680) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Eric Lewis8 CLAYTON (2681) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Riitta Heleena7 MAUNULA (2682)329 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Jussi Kalevi8 CRAYCROFT (2683) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Immi Shiela8 CRAYCROFT (2684) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Kreetta Liina8 CRAYCROFT (2685) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Rand Phillip7 CLAYTON (2563) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Patricia7 BINGHAM (2746)330 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Christopher8 CRAYCROFT (2747),331 b. 12
Sep 1988 in St. Louis, MO, d. 13 Sep 1988 in St. Louis, MO
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Brandon Phillip8 CRAYCROFT (2748)332 is
still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Nicole Dawn8 CRAYCROFT (2749)333 is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Geoffrey Durward7 CLAYTON (2564) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Jodi Lynn7 STINE (2566) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Jordan Aubrey8 CRAYCROFT (2567) is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Judson Bartlett8 CRAYCROFT (2568) is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Timothy Mark7 CLAYTON (2565)334 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Melissa7 (2745) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Vicky7 LUTZ (2744) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Paula Sue6 CRAYCROFT (2559) is still living

She was preceded in death by one grandchild.

Memorial service will be 7 p.m. Saturday in First Presbyterian Church Vandalia, with the Rev.
Bill Staff officiating. No visitation. Arrangements by Hohlt & File Funeral Home, Vandalia.
Memorials: Friends and Families of Fayette County Hospital, St. Jude Children's Hospital or The
National Wildlife Society.

Section: Obituaries
Page: A7

Copyright, 1992, Herald & Review, Decatur, IL. Hereinafter cited as Herald and Review.
328unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey Durward Clayton Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.);
unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
329unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
330unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
331unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
332unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
333unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.
334unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey; unknown author, Oral history via Geoffrey.

181
│ │ │ │ │ +Stephen W.6 OLDFIELD (2712) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Jennifer Lynn7 OLDFIELD (2713) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Andrew Clay7 MCCULLOUGH (2715) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Madelyn Karyn8 MCCULLOUGH (2724) is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Karen Ann OLDFIELD (2714) is still living
7

│ │ │ │ └── Ellyn Francis CRAYCROFT (2560) is still living


6

│ │ │ │ +Thomas Leo6 COCAGNE (2707) is still living


│ │ │ │ ├── Greta Leah7 COCAGNE (2708) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Frederick William7 KRUEGER (2716) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Frederick Dylan8 KRUEGER (2717) is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Austyn Ellyn KRUEGER (2718) is still living
8

│ │ │ │ └── Kristen Gay COCAGNE (2709) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ +Keith Albert7 SCIARRA (2719) is still living


│ │ │ │ └── Tyrus Luigi8 SCIARRA (2720) is still living
│ │ │ │ +James Joseph6 FLOOD (2711) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Robert Lee6 CAMERON (2710) is still living
│ │ │ └── Harriett Elizabeth5 CRAYCROFT (2557) is still living
│ │ │ +Charles Donald5 LOW (2750), d. 18 Jan 1980 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ │ ├── Carol Ann6 LOW (2753), b. 20 Mar 1949, d. 22 Mar 1949
│ │ │ ├── Patricia Gaye6 LOW (2751) is still living
│ │ │ │ +Alan6 KNUTSEN (2754) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Laura Joelle7 KNUTSEN (2755) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Brian Alan7 KNUTSEN (2756) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Benjamin Charles7 KNUTSEN (2757) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Elizabeth Gaye7 KNUTSEN (2758) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Katherine Meghan7 KNUTSEN (2759) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Amy Susan7 KNUTSEN (2760) is still living
│ │ │ └── Susan Joelle6 LOW (2752) is still living
│ │ │ +Mark6 BRATOVICH (2761) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Nicholas Paul7 BRATOVICH (2762) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Johanna Maria7 BRATOVICH (2764) is still living
│ │ │ └── Allison Nicole7 BRATOVICH (2763) is still living
│ │ ├── Lettia Florence4 CRAYCROFT (369), b. 24 Dec 1887 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ │ +Walter4 GENRICH (3010) is still living
│ │ │ └── Walter5 GENRICH Jr. (3011) is still living
│ │ │ +Faith5 (3012) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Jerry6 GENRICH (3013) is still living
│ │ │ └── Robert6 GENRICH (3014) is still living
│ │ └── Ethel Irene4 CRAYCROFT (370), b. 22 Jan 1895 in Vandalia, IL
│ │ +Harry4 LEACH (3015) is still living
│ │ ├── Ben5 LEACH (3016) is still living
│ │ ├── Carl5 LEACH (3017) is still living

182
│ │ └── Elizabeth5 LEACH (3018) is still living
│ ├── John Wesley CRAYCROFT (770),335 b. 4 Mar 1842 in Cape Girardeau, Cape
3

Girardeau, MO, d. 13 Nov 1930 in 1202 13th Street, Modesto, Stanislaus, CA, bur. 15 Nov 1930
in Parkview Cemetery, Stockton, San Joaquin, CA (From John Craycroft per "Chimes of Memory"
book by Franke Craycroft. Services held Nov 15, 1930, body was conveyed to Park View Cemetery near
Stockton for cremation. Moved for interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Freson CA May 10, 1937)
│ │ +Mary Alice3 VALPEY (5),336 b. 16 Apr 1849 in NS,337 bur. 13 May 1937 in
Fresno, Fresno, CA338
│ │ ├── Elizabeth Valpey4 CRAYCROFT (3281),339 b. 4 Aug 1868 in CA,340 d. 1
Dec 1903 in San Jose, Santa Clara, CA
│ │ │ +Elmore4 BROWNELL (3871), b. Jun 1865 in VT (This per the 1900 Census
for San Jose, California), m. 24 Jul 1890
│ │ │ ├── Raymond Elmore5 BROWNELL (3872), b. 4 Jun 1891 in CA
│ │ │ ├── John Russell5 BROWNELL (3873), b. 20 Jul 1892 in CA
│ │ │ │ +Edith Ethel5 JORGENSON (3878) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Harry Leslie5 BROWNELL (3874), b. 4 Jan 1894 in CA
│ │ │ │ +Leola5 NILSON (3879) is still living
│ │ │ └── Herbert William5 BROWNELL (3875), b. 15 Jan 1898 in CA
│ │ │ +Dorothy Chesley5 BALLIANT (3880) is still living
│ │ ├── Dr. William Wert4 CRAYCROFT D.D.S. (371),341 b. 14 Jul 1871,342 d. 9
Sep 1958 in Napa, CA,343 bur. 17 Sep 1958 in 1300 Sneath Lane, San Bruno, San Mateo, CA344

335unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, On August 14th 1904 we sold our home place near Warm Springs and moved
to Modesto California, located i the great San Joaquine Vallye, where I entered the brickmaking
business. You will remember I was in that business before I came to California.; Page 91;
unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft
Family, On August 14th 1904 we sold our home place near Warm Springs and moved to Modesto
California, located i the great San Joaquine Vallye, where I entered the brickmaking business.
You will remember I was in that business before I came to California.; Page 91.
336Calvin Valpey, June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 527A, dwelling 3,
family 3, Ancestry.com Series CA T9, 62-0623; June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT,
Page 527A, dwelling 3, family 3.
337unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 92.
338Mary Alice Valpey entry, Mountain View Cemetery burial records for Mary A. Craycroft, Burial
location given as A.O.U.W. tract, Lot 30, block 3, grave 3, Mountain View Cemetery, 1411 W.
Belmont Avenue, Fresno, Fresno, CA. Hereinafter cited as Mountain View Cemetery records.
339John Wesley Craycroft, June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 527A,
dwelling 4, family 4, Ancestry.com Series CA T9, roll 62-0623; June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 527A, dwelling 4, family 4; June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah,
UT, Page 527A, dwelling 4, family 4.
340June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 527A, dwelling 4, family 4.
341unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Our first child was born April 10th 1870. We
named him William Wert Craycroft.; Page 88; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Our
first child was born April 10th 1870. We named him William Wert Craycroft.; Page 88; unknown
author, WWW. Interment.net (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Craycroft, William W, b. 07/14/1871, d.
09/09/1958, CPL CO B 8 REGT CALIF INF, Plot: V 418, bur. 09/17/1958; California Death index
1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; unknown compiler, History

183
│ │ │ +Mildred4 RORICK (3274),345 b. circa 1886 in CA,346 m. 28 Nov 1906 in
Fresno, Fresno, CA347
│ │ │ └── Ann CRAYCROFT (3275) is still living
5

│ │ ├── Franke CRAYCROFT (1392),348 b. 17 Jul 1875 in Warm Springs, CA,349 d.


4

22 Dec 1970 in Santa Clara, CA350


│ │ └── Dr. Harry Judge4 CRAYCROFT M.D. (372),351 b. 19 Oct 1877 in Warm
Springs, Alameda, CA,352 d. 18 Mar 1932 in 710 Pine Street, Fresno, Fresno, CA (Cause of death:
influenza),353 bur. after 18 Mar 1932 in Belmont Memorial Park, Fresno, Fresno, CA

of Craycroft Family, Our first child was born April 10th 1870. We named him William Wert
Craycroft.; Page 88; unknown author, WWW. Interment.net, Craycroft, William W, b. 07/14/1871,
d. 09/09/1958, CPL CO B 8 REGT CALIF INF, Plot: V 418, bur. 09/17/1958; California Death
index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
342unknown author, WWW. Interment.net, Craycroft, William W, b. 07/14/1871, d. 09/09/1958,
CPL CO B 8 REGT CALIF INF, Plot: V 418, bur. 09/17/1958; California Death index 1940-97,
online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; Department of Veterans Affairs
National Cemetery Administration, online http://www.cem.va.gov/index.htm. Hereinafter cited as
Nationwide Gravesite Locator.
343unknown author, WWW. Interment.net, Craycroft, William W, b. 07/14/1871, d. 09/09/1958,
CPL CO B 8 REGT CALIF INF, Plot: V 418, bur. 09/17/1958; California Death index 1940-97,
online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
344Nationwide Gravesite Locator, online http://www.cem.va.gov/index.htm.
345Dr.William Wert Craycroft D.D.S., January 5, 1920 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page
2A, dwelling 33, family 33, Ancestry.com Series T625, roll 96.
346Dr.Harry Judge Craycroft M.D., January 7, 1920 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page
3A, dwelling 55, family 55, Ancestry.com Series T625,roll 96.
347January 7, 1920 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 55, family 55.
348unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 88; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, Our third child was born August 26th, 1876. It was a girl, and we named her
Franke Craycroft. The name Franke for a girl was an old Valpey Family name of my wifes, and
she insisted that we use that name in honor of her family located in Nova Schocia (Nova Scotia,
Canada).

All of our children were born in our home farm near Warm Springs California, and were educated
in the local school and in San Jose California.; Page 88; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft
Family, Our third child was born August 26th, 1876. It was a girl, and we named her Franke
Craycroft. The name Franke for a girl was an old Valpey Family name of my wifes, and she
insisted that we use that name in honor of her family located in Nova Schocia (Nova Scotia,
Canada).

All of our children were born in our home farm near Warm Springs California, and were educated
in the local school and in San Jose California.; Page 88; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
349California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
350California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
351unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Our second child was born November 19th
1873. We named him Harry J. Craycroft.; Page 88; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft
Family, Our second child was born November 19th 1873. We named him Harry J. Craycroft.;

184
│ │ +Grace4 SHAVER (2697),354 b. 24 Feb 1885 in MI,355 m. 6 Oct 1909, d. 12
Aug 1943 in Fresno, Fresno, CA356
│ │ ├── Unnamed5 CRAYCROFT (3877), b. 10 Sep 1910 in Fresno, Fresno,
CA, d. 10 Sep 1910
│ │ ├── Marion Shaver5 CRAYCROFT (2698),357 b. 18 Aug 1912 in Fresno,
Fresno, CA, 358 d. 19 Dec 1952 in San Francisco, San Francisco, CA359
│ │ │ +Walter Allen5 RUDE (3061) is still living
│ │ │ └── John Craycroft6 RUDE (4003) is still living
│ │ │ +Mildred Emily6 SWEET (4004) is still living
│ │ │ └── Peter Stuart7 RUDE (4005) is still living
│ │ └── Charles Burr5 CRAYCROFT M.D. (2699),360 b. 6 Mar 1914 in
Fresno, Fresno, CA, 361 d. 2 Feb 1967 in San Jose, Santa Clara, CA362
│ │ +Jean Parks5 HEMPHILL (1391),363 b. 25 Sep 1916 in Madera,
CA,364 d. 4 May 1995 in Santa Clara, CA

Page 88; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Our second child was born November
19th 1873. We named him Harry J. Craycroft.; Page 88.
352American Medical Association, Journal of the American Medical Association (n.p.: n.pub.).
Hereinafter cited as JAMA.
353American Medical Association, JAMA, Harry Judge Craycroft (member, AMA), resno, calif.;
Cooper Medical College, San Francisco, 1904; fellow of the American College of Surgeons; on
the staff of the Fresno County Hospital; aged 54; died, March 18, of influenza.
354CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
355California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
356California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
357CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
358California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247,
In the California Birth Index Marian's mother's maiden name is shown as Keasse; California
Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
359California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
360California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
361California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
362SSDI; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
363CaliforniaBirth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247,
Name: Jean P Hemphill
Birth Date: 25 Sep 1916
Gender: Female

185
│ │ ├── Carolyn Jean6 CRAYCROFT (3810),365 b. 29 Jun 1942 in
Fresno, Fresno, CA,366
d. 31 Jan 2004 in Los Gatos, Santa Clara, CA367
│ │ │ +unknown spouse
│ │ │ +John Easterbrook6 THOMAS (3921) is still living
│ │ │ └── Julie A.7 THOMAS (3922) is still living
│ │ │ +Rob7 LUDEMAN (3923) is still living
│ │ ├── Peter Burr6 CRAYCROFT (3817)368 is still living
│ │ └── John Shaver6 CRAYCROFT (3818)369 is still living
│ │ +Kathleen6 HOGARTY (3924) is still living
│ │ ├── Zachary John7 CRAYCROFT (3925) is still living
│ │ ├── Leaf Shaver7 CRAYCROFT (3926) is still living
│ │ └── Zoe Mariah7 CRAYCROFT (3927) is still living
│ │ +Frances Merle6 AYERS (3928) is still living
│ ├── Thomas Benton3 CRAYCROFT (771),370 b. 9 Mar 1844 in Cape Girardeau, Cape
Girardeau, MO,371 d. 17 Jan 1921 in Oakland, Alameda, CA372

Mother's Maiden Name: Binder


Birth County: Madera; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180, In the California Death Index Jean's
mother's maiden name is listed as Binder.
364California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
365California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247;
California Birth Index, 1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
366Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail message from craycroft@qwest.net (BobCc@craycroft.us)
to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Re: Info"; California Birth Index,
1905-1995, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247.
367Thomas,Carolyn Craycroft, San Jose Mercury News, unknown location, 4 Feb 2004, Pg. 5B,
THOMAS, Carolyn Craycroft, 61, of Los Gatos, died Jan. 31, 2004. Private services.
Arrangements by Neptune Society of Central California, San Jose. Hereinafter cited as San Jose
Mercury News; Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005.
368Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005; Peter Craycroft, "Re:
Info," e-mail to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005; Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail to Robert
Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005.
369Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005; Peter Craycroft, "Re:
Info," e-mail to Robert Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005; Peter Craycroft, "Re: Info," e-mail to Robert
Lynn Craycroft, 9 Aug 2005.
370unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; unknown article title, Modesto
Evening News, unknown location, November 18, 1915, J.W. Craycroft ofModesto received word
this afternoon. . .the condition of his brother, T.B. Craycroft, who was shot at the same time, is not
serious, and he will recover.; Saturday, Dec. 12, 1914. Hereinafter cited as Modesto Evening
News; unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), THOMAS BENTON5
CRAYCROFT (BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1)
was born March 09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland,
Alameda Co, Ca. He married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of
JOHN FOUTS and UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in
Berkeley, Ca. He married (2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt.

186
│ │ +Lydia3 FOUTS (374),373 m. 24 May 1866 in Marion, IL,374 d. 11 Apr 1907 in
Berkeley, CA (Heart trouble)375

1846; unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; Modesto Evening News,
November 18, 1915, J.W. Craycroft ofModesto received word this afternoon. . .the condition of his
brother, T.B. Craycroft, who was shot at the same time, is not serious, and he will recover.;
Saturday, Dec. 12, 1914; unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5
CRAYCROFT (BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1)
was born March 09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland,
Alameda Co, Ca. He married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of
JOHN FOUTS and UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in
Berkeley, Ca. He married (2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt.
1846.
371unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; Thomas Benton Craycroft, Personal
narrative by Thomas Benton Craycroft (n.p.: None, n.d.).
372unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March
09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He
married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846; DEATHS, Oakland
Tribune, Oakland, California, 17 Jan 1921, page 6, In Oakland, January 17, 1921. Thomas
Benton, dearly beloved husband of Viola Craycroft, loving father of Mrs. Nellie Bayley of Oakland,
brother of J.W. Craycroft of Modesto and Mrs. Eliza Shaw, grandfather of Mrs. Blanche Smith of
Oakland and Mrs. Della Gillespie of Sacramento; a native of Missouri, aged 75 years, 10 months
nd 7 days.

Funeral notice later. Fresno papers please copy. Hereinafter cited as Oakland Tribune.
373unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born
March 09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca.
He married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846; unknown author, E-mail
from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT (BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3,
JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March 09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and
died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866
in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and
died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married (2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca.
She was born Abt. 1846; unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5
CRAYCROFT (BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1)
was born March 09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland,
Alameda Co, Ca. He married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of
JOHN FOUTS and UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in
Berkeley, Ca. He married (2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt.
1846; unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March
09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He
married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846.
374unknown author, Illinois Marriage Index (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); Marriage License issued for
Thomas P. Craycroft and Lydia Fouts: Marriage licensed issued May 21, 1866, in Marion County,

187
│ │ └── Nellie Ida4 CRAYCROFT (376),376 b. 5 May 1867 in Salem, IL,377 d. 3 Dec
1942 in Alameda, CA378
│ │ +John M.4 BAYLEY (377), b. circa 1865 in NC, m. 6 Jan 1885 in Marion,
IL 379

│ │ ├── Blanche5 BAYLEY (378), b. Oct 1885 in IL380


│ │ ├── Bertie5 BAYLEY (379), b. Jan 1887 in CA381
│ │ └── Della5 BAYLEY (380), b. Aug 1890 in CA382
│ │ +Viola E.3 HUNT (2818),383 b. 11 Jul 1860 in OH,384 m. 17 Jun 1913 in Fresno,
Fresno, CA,385 d. 13 May 1955 in Tuolumne, Tuolumne, CA386
│ ├── Columbus Joel3 CRAYCROFT (773),387 b. 13 Dec 1845 in Cape Girardeau, Cape
Girardeau, MO,388 d. 17 Nov 1915 in Fresno, Fresno, CA (Fall from top of business property,

Illlinois, by J.S. Jackson, County Clerk, County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem,
Marion, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marr. Lic., T.P. Craycroft and Lydia Fouts.
375unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March
09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He
married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846.
376CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
377California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
378California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
379IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900: Groom's name given as John M. Bagley.
380unknown household, 4 and 5 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Ancestry.com
Series T623, roll 115, image 947.
3814 and 5 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT.
3824 and 5 June 1900 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT.
383unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March
09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He
married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846; California Death index
1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index
1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
384California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
385unknown author, E-mail from Dan Craycraft, THOMAS BENTON5 CRAYCROFT
(BENJAMIN4, BENJAMIN JOSEPH3, JOSEPH WALTON2, WILLIAM ROGER1) was born March
09, 1844 in Cape Girardeau, MO, and died January 17, 1921 in Oakland, Alameda Co, Ca. He
married (1) LYDIA FOUTS May 24, 1866 in Marion Co., IL, daughter of JOHN FOUTS and
UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1847 in IL, and died April 11, 1907 in Berkeley, Ca. He married
(2) VIOLA HUNT June 17, 1913 in Fresno, Ca. She was born Abt. 1846.
386California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.

188
possibly caused by heart attack),389 bur. 19 Nov 1915 in A.O.U.W. section, Lot 30, Block 3, Grave 1,
Fresno, Fresno, CA390
│ │ +Rebecca A.3 GRABLE (373), b. 1 Nov 1843 in KY,391 m. 10 Oct 1866 in Walnut
Hill, Marion, IL,392 d. 14 Apr 1872393

387unknown author, History of Fresno County (n.p.: Vandor, 1919, n.d.), I received this via e-mail
from Dan Craycraft.; p.423-429; Modesto Evening News, November 18, 1915, Mr. and Mrs. J.W.
Craycroft went to Fresno this morning where they were called by the sudden death yesterday of
Mr. Craycroft's brother, C.J. Craycroft. It is believed that the accident was due to an attack of
heart trouble while Mr. Craycroft was inspecting a house owned by him. He fell 22 feet from the
roof to the ground and was taken to his home unconcious, dying two hours later. No one
witnessed the untimely accident. the funeral will be held Friday. Dr. H.O. Breeden conducting the
services.

C.J. Craycroft was a prominent business man of Fresno where he was for eight years chairman
of the board of trustees. He was president and principal owner of the Craycroft-Herrold Brick
Company, and owned considerable valuable city properties in Fresno.
; Thursday, Nov. 18, 1915; unknown author, History of Fresno County, I received this via e-mail
from Dan Craycraft.; p.423-429; Modesto Evening News, November 18, 1915, Mr. and Mrs. J.W.
Craycroft went to Fresno this morning where they were called by the sudden death yesterday of
Mr. Craycroft's brother, C.J. Craycroft. It is believed that the accident was due to an attack of
heart trouble while Mr. Craycroft was inspecting a house owned by him. He fell 22 feet from the
roof to the ground and was taken to his home unconcious, dying two hours later. No one
witnessed the untimely accident. the funeral will be held Friday. Dr. H.O. Breeden conducting the
services.

C.J. Craycroft was a prominent business man of Fresno where he was for eight years chairman
of the board of trustees. He was president and principal owner of the Craycroft-Herrold Brick
Company, and owned considerable valuable city properties in Fresno.
; Thursday, Nov. 18, 1915.
388Stephens & Bean Chapel, compiler, Stephens & Bean account sheet for Columbus Joel
Craycroft (Fresno, California: Stephens & Bean Chapel, November 19, 1915), Account sheet
gives date of birth as Dec. 13, 1845, age 69 years, 11 months 4 days. Hereinafter cited as
Stephens & Bean accounts; "Certificate of Records"; Robert Lynn Craycroft; Rolling Meadows,
Cook, IL. Hereinafter cited as "Certificate of Records".
389unknown author, History of Fresno County, I received this via e-mail from Dan Craycraft.;
p.423-429; Modesto Evening News, November 18, 1915, Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Craycroft went to
Fresno this morning where they were called by the sudden death yesterday of Mr. Craycroft's
brother, C.J. Craycroft. It is believed that the accident was due to an attack of heart trouble while
Mr. Craycroft was inspecting a house owned by him. He fell 22 feet from the roof to the ground
and was taken to his home unconcious, dying two hours later. No one witnessed the untimely
accident. the funeral will be held Friday. Dr. H.O. Breeden conducting the services.

C.J. Craycroft was a prominent business man of Fresno where he was for eight years chairman
of the board of trustees. He was president and principal owner of the Craycroft-Herrold Brick
Company, and owned considerable valuable city properties in Fresno. Thursday, Nov. 18, 1915.
390Stephens & Bean Chapel, Stephens & Bean accounts.
391Family bible, Rebecca A. Craycroft was born Nov. the 1 1843; Columbus Joel Craycroft, 27
July 1870 microfilm, unknown repository address, Page 3, Dwelling 26, family 25, unknown
repository Series M593, roll 253.
392ILMarr. Index, 1763-1900; Family bible, Columbus J. Craycroft and Rebecca A. Grable was
married the 10th of October 1866; Marriage license issued to Columbus Craycroft and Rebecca

189
│ │ ├── Arlie J.4 CRAYCROFT (381),394 b. 2 Jul 1867,395 d. 22 Nov 1888 in Fresno,
Fresno, CA (Burns from roman candle),396 bur. 25 Nov 1888 in Fresno, Fresno, CA397
│ │ ├── Nina Ellen4 CRAYCROFT (435),398 b. 15 Nov 1869,399 d. 6 Dec 1875400
│ │ └── Mary Elizabeth4 CRAYCROFT (436),401 b. 6 Feb 1872,402 d. 27 Sep
1872403
│ │ +Frances Cordelia3 BALDRIDGE (382),404 b. 14 Jun 1854 in Cenrtralia, Marion,
IL, m. 19 Feb 1874 in Jefferson County, IL,405 d. 26 Jul 1884 in Gilroy, Santa Clara, CA406

A. Grable: Marriage license No. 1322, C.J. Craycroft and R.A. Grable, issued Oct. 9, 1866,
Married Oct. 10, 1866, Registered Oct. 12, 1866. Married by L. Casey, Minister of M.E. Church,
unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as Marr. Lic., Columbus
Craycroft and Rebecca A. Grable.
393Familybible, Rebecca A. Craycroft the 20 of November 1871 and departed this life Sunday
morning April the 14 1872.
394Family bible, Arlie Craycroft was born July the 2nd 1867; Family bible, Arlie J. Craycroft died
Nov. 1888; Family bible, Arlie Craycroft was born July the 2nd 1867; Family bible, Arlie J.
Craycroft died Nov. 1888.
395Family bible, Arlie Craycroft was born July the 2nd 1867.
396Family bible, Arlie J. Craycroft died Nov. 1888; Arlie J. Craycroft entry, Mountain View
Cemetery burial record for A. Craycroft, Mountain View Cemetery burial records indicate Arlie
Craycroft as buried in the A.O.U.W. tract, in Lot 30, Block 3, grave 12, Mountain View Cemetery,
1411 W. Belmont Avenue, Fresno, Fresno, CA. Hereinafter cited as Mountain View burial
records.
397ArlieJ. Craycroft entry, Mountain View Cemetery burial records for Arlie J. Craycroft,
According to plot map Arlie is buried in A.O.U.W. tract, Lot 30, Block 3, Grave 12, Mountain View
Cemetery, 1411 W. Belmont Avenue, Fresno, Fresno, CA. Hereinafter cited as Mountain View
Cemetery records.
398Family bible, Nina Ellen Craycroft was born 15th of November 1869; Family bible, Nina Ellen
Craycroft departed this life the 6 day of December 1875; Family bible, Nina Ellen Craycroft was
born 15th of November 1869; Family bible, Nina Ellen Craycroft departed this life the 6 day of
December 1875.
399Family bible, Nina Ellen Craycroft was born 15th of November 1869.
400Family bible, Nina Ellen Craycroft departed this life the 6 day of December 1875.
401Family bible, Mary Elizabeth Craycroft was borned the 6 of February 1872; Family bible, Mary
Elizabeth Craycroft departed this life the 27 of Sept. 1872; Family bible, Mary Elizabeth Craycroft
was borned the 6 of February 1872; Family bible, Mary Elizabeth Craycroft departed this life the
27 of Sept. 1872.
402Family bible, Mary Elizabeth Craycroft was borned the 6 of February 1872.
403Family bible, Mary Elizabeth Craycroft departed this life the 27 of Sept. 1872.
404unknown author, Letter from Columbus J. Craycroft to H.B. Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), C.J.
wrote this letter hours after Frances died to inform his brother, Harry B., of her death; unknown
author, Letter from Columbus J, C.J. wrote this letter hours after Frances died to inform his
brother, Harry B., of her death.
405unknown author, Illinois Marriage Index; Family bible, Columbus J. Craycroft and Frances C.
Baldridge was married Feb. the 19th 1874; unknown author, Marriage Certificate issued Feb.19,
1874 (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), State of Illinois
Jefferson County

190
│ │ ├── Charles Augustine4 CRAYCROFT (3138),407 b. 5 Dec 1874,408 d. 22 Jan
1875409
│ │ ├── Frank Joel4 CRAYCROFT (774),410 b. 30 Mar 1876 in Walnut Hill, IL,411 d.
14 Sep 1929 in Fresno, Fresno, CA412

Feb. 19th, 1874.


I James Snow a minister of the Gospel hereby certify that on this day I joined in Marriage Mr.
Columbus J. Craycroft and Miss Frances C. Baldridge agreeably to law.

(signed) James Snow.


406unknown author, Letter from Columbus J, C.J. wrote this letter hours after Frances died to
inform his brother, Harry B., of her death.
407Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and departed
this life Jan the 22nd 1875; Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th
1874 and and departed this life Jan the 22nd 1875; Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft
was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and departed this life Jan the 22nd 1875; Family bible,
Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and departed this life Jan the
22nd 1875; Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and
departed this life Jan the 22nd 1875.
408Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and departed
this life Jan the 22nd 1875.
409Family bible, Charles Augustine Craycroft was borned Dec. the 5th 1874 and and departed
this life Jan the 22nd 1875.
410unknown author, Craycroft Family Record; Family bible, Frank Craycroft was borned March
the 30 1876; F.J. CRAYCROFT, HEAD OF BRICK COMPANY , DIES, The Fresno Republican,
Fresno, California, September 15, 1929, Frank J. Craycroft, owner of the Craycroft Brick
Company and resident of Fresno for about 45 years, died yesterday at his home on Palm avenue
in the Fig Gardens. He had been ill for four months, but was reported to be slightly improved
recently. Hereinafter cited as Republican; Family bible, Frank Craycroft was borned March the 30
1876; Republican, September 15, 1929, Frank J. Craycroft, owner of the Craycroft Brick
Company and resident of Fresno for about 45 years, died yesterday at his home on Palm avenue
in the Fig Gardens. He had been ill for four months, but was reported to be slightly improved
recently.
411Family bible, Frank Craycroft was borned March the 30 1876.
412Republican, September 15, 1929, Frank J. Craycroft, owner of the Craycroft Brick Company
and resident of Fresno for about 45 years, died yesterday at his home on Palm avenue in the Fig
Gardens. He had been ill for four months, but was reported to be slightly improved recently.

Funeral services will be held at the home on Tuesday, September 17, at 9:30 a.m., with the Lisle
Funeral Home in charge of the arrangements.

He was 53 years old and a native of Illinois, but came to Fresno with his parents when quite
young. His father, the late C.J. Craycroft, was at one time chairman of the board of trustees of the
city of Fresno, a position corresponding to mayor.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mae Craycroft; a son, Kenneth T. Craycroft, and a daughter,
Mrs. Parker T. Trask, all of Fresno.

191
│ │ │ +Mae Florence4 TOBIN (775),413 b. 6 May 1881 in IA,414 m. 23 Aug 1899 in
Oleander, Fresno, CA,415 d. 26 Oct 1957 in Fresno, CA,416 bur. after 26 Oct 1957 in Belmont
Memorial Cemetery, Fresno, Fresno, CA
│ │ │ ├── Fanniemae5 CRAYCROFT (777),417 b. 11 Nov 1901,418 d. 27 Nov
1979 in Stanislaus, CA419
│ │ │ │ +Dr. Parker Davies5 TRASK (778),420 b. 7 May 1899 in Springfield,
MA,421 m. 30 Jan 1926 in Oakland, Alameda, San Francisco,422 d. 12 Nov 1961 in Berkeley,
CA423

Mr. Craycroft was a charter member of the First Christian church of Fresno, a member of the
W.O.W. and of the Rotary Club. He was also the director of the Fresno Traffic association.
413unknown author, Craycroft Family Record; unknown author, Wedding Invitation (n.p.: n.pub.,
n.d.), Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Tobin will welcom you at the marriage of their daughter Mae Florence to
Frank Joel Craycroft on Tuesday evening August twenty second, eighteen hundred nintey-nine,
at eight o'clock, at their residence, Oleander; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
414California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
415unknown author, The Fresno Weekly Republican, Fresno, California, Thursday, August 24
1899 (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Frank Craycroft, who has for several years been associated with his
father in the brick business in this city, was united in marriage last night to Miss Mae Tobin of
Oleander. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J.W. Craycroft of Warm Springs, near San
Jose, and took place at the residence of the bride's parents not far from Oleander. Miss Edith
McIndoo acted as bridesmaid and W.R. Monroe as best man. The ceremony was performed
under a bower of flowers with a bell in the center. The bridal party entered the room to the tune of
Mendelssohn's wedding march played on the piano by Richard Post.

After the wedding, supper was served under the trees on the lawn. The newly married couple
took the late train for Los Angeles. They will spend a portion of their honeymoon in that city and
the rest at Catalina; unknown author, Wedding Invitation, Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Tobin will welcom
you at the marriage of their daughter Mae Florence to Frank Joel Craycroft on Tuesday evening
August twenty second, eighteen hundred nintey-nine, at eight o'clock, at their residence,
Oleander.
416California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
417unknown author, Craycroft Family Record.
418California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
419California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
420unknown author, Craycroft Family Record; "unknown article title", In Memoriam 1963,
University of California, online unknown url. Previously published in hard copy (n.p.: University of
California, 1963). Hereinafter cited as "1963 Memoria".
4211963 Memoria, online, Parker Davies Trask was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on May 7,
1899, and
died in Berkeley on November 12, 1961. His life, though of only sixty-two years,
was lived at full throttle, and he managed to cover more ground, both literally
and figuratively, than many whose careers were much longer.

192
│ │ │ └── Kenneth Tobin5 CRAYCROFT (776), b. 12 Sep 1903 in Fresno,
Fresno, CA,424d. 30 Mar 1985 in Berkeley, CA,425 bur. 3 Apr 1985 in Fresno, Fresno, CA
│ │ │ +June Dolores5 GOETHE (2997),426 b. 15 Jun 1915 in Parkersburg,
Butler, IA,427 m. 1 Jun 1960 in Montreux, Vaud, d. 17 Feb 2003 in Fresno, Fresno, CA428
│ │ └── Hattie Maude4 CRAYCROFT (434),429 b. 17 Apr 1878,430 d. 28 Jul 1879 in
Warm Springs, CA431

422MissCraycroft Weds Member of Yale Faculty, Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, 7 Feb
1926, Page 40. Hereinafter cited as Oakland Tribune; 1963 Memoria, online.
4231963 Memoria, online.
424California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
425California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
426Craycroft,
Jue Goethe, Obituary for June Dolores Goethe Craycroft, unknown location, April,
2003, See Notes for June Dolores Goethe; Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003, See Notes for
June Dolores Goethe.
427Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003.
428Obituaryfor June Dolores, April, 2003, The following is a transcript of on obituary sent to me
by Gary Craycroft, June's son, from an unknown newspaper:

A memorial service was held April 6th at the Berkeley Piano Club honoring composer, world
traveler, and patron of the arts, June Goethe Craycroft, who passed away in Fresno, CA Feb.
17th (2003).

Born in Parkersburg, Iowa, June spent her formative years in Omaha, NE, then attended college
in Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska, with post-graduate work at the University of Chicago. By 1937
she had received her Masters from the Chicago Musical College under Rudolph Ganz and
married fellow musician, conductor, and teacher, Austin E. Garrels.

Following her mother's death in 1945, she returned to Omaha with her infant son. She played and
performed piano and violin with the Omaha Symphony, taught at the University of Omaha, and
published children's songs until her love of music first lead her to France to teach war orphans in
1949, and again to study composition with Nadia Boulanger and Georges Migot from 1954 to
1956.

Following a year's residence inNew York City, her second marriage to Kenneth T. Craycroft in
Montreux, Switzerland in 1960 took her to Fresno, CA, where she was involved with the Fresno
Musical Club, Fresno Philharmonic, and many non-profit organizations. Upon her husband's
retirement in 1979, the two relocated to Berkeley, CA where June continued her composition,
philosophical studies, and piilanthropy.

She is survived by her step-mother, Mrs. Robert L. Goethe of Clear Lake, IA; her son, Gary
Craycroft, and his wife CAthleen Craycroft-Glenn of Fresno; grandsons Brad Craycroft of San
Jose and Jared Craycroft of Los Angeles; granddaughter Callie Rowell of Clovis; two
greatgranddaughters; and her dear friend and companion, the Honorable Jay Pfotenhauer of
Walnut Creek.

Besides her music, June will be long remembered for endowing an oncology wing at Children's
Hospital of Central California and a gallery at the Palace of the Legion of Honor
.

193
│ │ +Laura Jane3 HAYS (2854),432 b. 14 Feb 1849 in IN,433 m. 7 Oct 1886 in Salem,
Marion, IL,434 d. 8 Mar 1921 in Fresno, Fresno, CA,435 bur. 10 Mar 1921 in Fresno, Fresno,
CA436
│ └── Eliza Jane3 CRAYCROFT (748),437 b. 16 Oct 1850 in Near Macon, Macon, IL438
│ +S. Jack3 SHAW (1372), m. 23 Dec 1866 in Salem, Marion, IL439

429Family bible, Hattie Maud Craycroft was borned April the 17 1878; Family bible, "And departed
this life July the 28 1879; Family bible, Hattie Maud Craycroft was borned April the 17 1878;
Family bible, "And departed this life July the 28 1879.
430Family bible, Hattie Maud Craycroft was borned April the 17 1878; Return of a Birth entry,
Certified copy, 1. Fulle name of Child (if any): none given, 2. Sex: female, No. of Child of this
Mother: third, 3. Race or color: white, 4. Date and place of birth: April 17, 1878, Centralia, Marion
Co., Ill., 5. Nationality, place of birth and age of each parent: United States, both born in Illinois.
Mothers age 24 years, Fathers age 31 years, 6. Full name of mother and maden name: Fanny C.
Craycroft - nee Fanny C. Baldrigde; Mother's residence: Centralia, Illinois, 7. Full name of father:
C. John Craycroft, 8. Father's occupation: Brickmaker, 9. Name of medical or other attendant and
address: P.M. McFarland, Centralia, Ill. Returned by P.M. McFarland, M.D., Dated April 18th,
1878 (18 April 1878), County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL;
Register of births entry, Certified copy 135, Same information given in Register of Birth as on the
Return of a Birth (18 April 1878), County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem,
Marion, IL.
431Family bible, "And departed this life July the 28 1879.
432Stephens & Bean Chapel, Stephens & Bean accounts, Stephens & Bean account sheet lists
Columbus' wife as Laua J. Hays; Stephens & Bean Chapel, compiler, Stephens & Bean account
sheet for Laura Jane Craycroft (Fresno, California: Stephens & Bean Chapel, March, 1921).
Hereinafter cited as Stephens & Bean accounts; Stephens & Bean Chapel, Stephens & Bean
accounts; Stephens & Bean Chapel, Stephens & Bean accounts.
433Laura J. Craycroft, January 17, 190 microfilm, unknown repository address, unknown
repository Series T625, roll 96; Stephens & Bean Chapel, Stephens & Bean accounts.
434IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900: Even though the State index shows a marriage record for C.J. and
Laura Monroe, in Vol. D, page 188, the Marion County Clerk has certified that they cannot locate
the record; "Certificate of Records".
435Laura Jane Hays entry, Mountain View Cemetery burial record for Laura J. Craycroft,
According to burial records of Mountain View Cemetery, Laura J. Craycroft died March 8, 1921,
and is buried in the A.O.U.W. section, Lot 30, Block 3, Grave 4. Stephens & Bean were the
funeral directors, Mountain View Cemetery, 1411 W. Belmont Avenue, Fresno, Fresno, CA.
Hereinafter cited as Mountain View Cemetery.
436Laura Jane Hays entry, Mountain View Cemetery burial records for Laura J. Craycroft,
A.O.U.W. tract, Lot 30, Block 3, Mountain View Cemetery, 1411 W. Belmont Avenue, Fresno,
Fresno, CA. Hereinafter cited as Mountain View Cemetery records; Stephens & Bean Chapel,
Stephens & Bean accounts.
437unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79; unknown compiler, History of
Craycroft Family, Page 79.
438unknown compiler, History of Craycroft Family, Page 79.
439unknown author, Decatur Review (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Mr. and Mrs. S.J. Shaw of St. Elmo, Ill.,
recently celebrated their fifty-seventh wedding anniversary in Decatur with their daughters, Miss
Ruby Shaw and Mrs. Lydia Ballinger, also their grandsons, Raymond and Harold Gaston of
Brownstown, Ill., and Russell Ballinger of Decatur.

194
│ ├── Ruby4 SHAW (3125) is still living
│ ├── Lydia4 SHAW (3126) is still living
│ └── William A.4 SHAW (2696), b. before 1883
├── Edward Scott2 CRAYCROFT (687),440 b. 25 Sep 1809 in Georgetown, MD, d. 18 Dec
1883 in Prince William, VA (Dropsey)441
│ +Permelia A.2 BECKWITH (2634),442 b. 19 Aug 1805, m. 2 Feb 1829 in Montgomery,
MD,443 d. 4 Jul 1847 in Macon, IL,444 bur. in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, IL445
│ ├── William Benjamin3 CRAYCROFT (142), b. 26 Nov 1829 in Rockville, Montgomery,
MD,446 d. 16 Feb 1897 in Decatur, Macon, IL (La grippe (pneumonia)),447 bur. 18 Feb 1897 in Mt.
Gilead Cemeter, Decatur, Macon, IL

S.J. Shaw and Eliza Craycroft were married in Walnut Hill, Marion county, in 1866. They
afterwards moved to Vandalia, where Mr. Shaw was in the brick and tile business for twenty
years. Later they moved to St. Elmo where they have since resided. Mr. Shaw is a Civil War
Veteran; Sunday, January 13, 1924.
440Beth Fridley, Prince William County, VA Death Records, 1853-96 (n.p.: Orem, UT: Ancestry,
Inc., 1999, n.d.), p.77; Beth Fridley, Prince William County, VA, p.77.
441Beth Fridley, Prince William County, VA, p.77.
442Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions in South Wheatland
Township (n.p.: Volume 7, June 1987, n.d.), SALEM CEMETERY
CRAYCROFT, PERMELIA A. wife of E. CRAYCROFT
died 7-4-1847
aged 41 yrs.,10 m., 15 days; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, CRAYCROFT, PERMELIA A. wife of E. CRAYCROFT
died 7-4-1847, aged 41 yrs 10 mo 15 days.
443unknown author, Montgomery County Marriages, Received via e-mail from Margaret Whippee,
2/23/2000:
Page 77 Montgomery Co. Marriages
Edward Craycroft m. Parmelia A. Beckwith 2 Feb.1829
; Page 77; unknown author, Marriage Index: Maryland, 1655-1850 database (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.),
Craycroft, Edward Spouse : Beckwith, Permelia A.
Marriage date : Feb 2, 1829
County of record : Montgomery Co.
Sex : M.
444Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, SALEM CEMETERY
CRAYCROFT, PERMELIA A. wife of E. CRAYCROFT
died 7-4-1847
aged 41 yrs.,10 m., 15 days; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, CRAYCROFT, PERMELIA A. wife of E. CRAYCROFT
died 7-4-1847, aged 41 yrs 10 mo 15 days.
445Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions.
446The Late W.B. Craycroft, Decatur Evening Republican, Decatur, Illinois, 17 Feb 1897, pg. 8,
He was born in Rockville, Md., on November 26,1829. Hereinafter cited as The Evening
Republican.
447The Evening Republican, 17 Feb 1897, pg. 8, William B. Craycroft, whose death in Riverside
Place was announced last evening, came to Macon County in 1837. He was born in Rockville,
Md., on November 26, 1829, and was in the 68th year of his age at the time of his death. When
he came to this county he settled in Wheatland township and lived there until 1881 when he
moved to the vicinity of Turpin where he made his home until he came to Decatur in 1896. He
was twice married, his first wife being Miss Sarah Scott to whom he married in 1864. His second

195
│ │ +Sarah3 SCOTT (143),448 b. 15 Feb 1837 in near Oaktown, IN,449 m. 5 Apr 1864 in
Christian, IL (Married by Alexander T. Orr),450 d. 4 Nov 1889 in KS (Tuberculosis),451 bur. after 4
Nov 1889 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ ├── Dora Bess4 CRAYCROFT (145),452 b. 21 Jan 1865 in South Wheatland
Township, IL, d. 8 Feb 1902 in South Wheatland Township, Macon, IL (Pulmonary tuberculosis),453
bur. 10 Feb 1902 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL454

wife was Miss Harriet Donaker to whom he was married in 1895. She survives him. There were
six children by his first wife, five of them surviving their father. They are Mrs. Dora Craycroft, W.B.
Craycroft, F.S. Craycroft, Miss Maude Craycroft and W.T. Craycroft; William Craycroft Dead,
Decatur Review, Decatur, Illinois, 17 Feb 1897, pg. 8, Well Known Retired Farmer Succumbs
to Influenza.

ILLNESS OF SHORT DURATION

Was a Man of Wealth Though Unostentatious.

William B. Craycroft, an old and highly respected citizen of Macon county, died at 1:30 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon at his home in Riverside Place. Mr. Craycroft had been suffering from an
attack of the grip, but his condition was not thought to be particularly dangerous until about 3
o'clock yesterday morning, when his heart became affected. The family physician was hurriedly
summoned, but he was unable to stay the progress of the disease. Mr. Craycroft soon lost
consciousness and remained in that condition till the end came.

Mr. Craycroft was aged 68 years. He came to Illinois from Maryland when but a boy. By industry
and economy he amassed considerable wealth, the most of which was invested in real estate. He
owned land in Macon and Moultrie counties, besides city property. The most of his life was spent
in Wheatland township. For several years before moving to Decatur he lived on his farm near
Turpin station in Mt. Zion township. He was twice married, and his second wife, two daughters
and three sons by his first wife survive him.

Mr. Craycroft was well known to nearly all the older residents of the county and was held in
highest esteem by all. He was member of Ionic Lodge, No. 312, A.F. and A.M., and it was his
wish that he be buried with Masonic honors.

The arrangements for the funereal have not been completed. The hour and place will be
announced later. Hereinafter cited as Decatur Review.
448Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Sarah Scott Craycroft,
wife of W.B. Craycroft, died Nov 24, 1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da; Decatur Genealogical Society,
Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Sarah Scott Craycroft, wife of W.B. Craycroft, died Nov 24,
1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions,
Sarah Scott Craycroft, wife of W.B. Craycroft, died Nov 24, 1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Sarah Scott Craycroft, wife of W.B.
Craycroft, died Nov 24, 1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da.
449Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Sarah Scott Craycroft,
wife of W.B. Craycroft, died Nov 24, 1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da.
450Marriage record for William B. Craycroft and Sarah Scott: License no. 1462, issued April 5,
1864, Illinois Regional Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243,
Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage record; The Evening Republican, 17 Feb
1897, pg. 8, He was twice married, his first wife being Miss Sarah Scott to whom he married in
1864.
451Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Sarah Scott Craycroft,
wife of W.B. Craycroft, died Nov 24, 1889 aged 52 yr 9 mo 9 da.

196
│ │ │ +Edgar Marks4 CRAYCRAFT (150),455 b. Dec 1866 in Princeton, IN,456 m.
18 Dec 1894 in Elwin, Macon, IL,457 d. 1940 in Eustis, Lake, FL,458 bur. 1940 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL

452WilliamBenjamin Craycroft will (n.d.), Last Will and Testament of William Benjamin Craycroft,
Decatur Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Will, Wm.
Benj. Craycroft.
453Dora Bess Craycroft entry, Death Certificate, State of Illinois, Macon County, Macon County
Clerk, 141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Death Certificate, Dora
Craycraft; unknown author, Submitting Will to Probate in death of Dora B. (Craycroft) Craycraft
(n.p.: Dated February term, 1902, n.d.); unknown author, Affidavit, State of Illinois, Macon
County, January 7, 1922 (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Affiant further sates that the aforesaid Dora Craycraft
is now dead and that she died on February 8th 1902., at her home near Boody, Macon County
Illinois; Affidavit, State of Illinois, Macon County, July 13, 1936: . . .that said Dora Craycraft died
February 8, 1902, and that she never had any but three children, unknown repository, unknown
repository address.
454Death Certificate, Dora Craycraft, Undertaker: D. Brintlinger, Decatur, Ill.
455Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956), Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL; unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown
repository, unknown repository address; unknown reader; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon
County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 11; Office of Vital Records, 1998 Florida: Florida Health
Department, Florida Death Index, 1940 (n.p.: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998.,
n.d.), Name: Edgar Marks Craycroft
Place: Lake
Gender: M
Race: W
Volume: 894
Certificate: 8624
Death Date: 1940; Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956); unknown
name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 11; Florida: Florida Health
Department, Florida Death Index, 1940, Name: Edgar Marks Craycroft
Place: Lake
Gender: M
Race: W
Volume: 894
Certificate: 8624
Death Date: 1940.
456Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956).
457Marriage Record, Macon County, Illinois, Edgar Craycroft and Dora Craycroft, Illinois Regional
Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL.
Hereinafter cited as Marriage Record, Edgar Craycroft - Dora Craycroft.
458Florida: Florida Health Department, Florida Death Index, 1940, Name: Edgar Marks Craycroft
Place: Lake
Gender: M
Race: W
Volume: 894
Certificate: 8624
Death Date: 1940; unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown
repository address; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 11.

197
│ │ │ ├── Benjamin William5 CRAYCRAFT (151),459 b. 27 Jul 1896 in South
Wheatland Township, IL, d. 2 Sep 1968 in Ypsilanti, MI, bur. after 2 Sep 1968 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ │ +Dora5 LEATHERMAN (755),460 b. 4 Jul 1907, d. Nov 1986
│ │ │ │ +Jeannette Moore5 RUMRILL (2820), b. 1910, d. 1940
│ │ │ │ ├── Walter Benjamin6 CRAYCRAFT (527)461 is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Edna Jean6 CRAYCRAFT (823)462 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +SHAMO6 (2833) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +EFFRON6 (1404) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Dora Susan6 CRAYCRAFT (1960)463 is still living
│ │ │ │ +BENNETT6 (822) is still living
│ │ │ │ +BURRELL6 (2832) is still living
│ │ │ ├── John CRAYCRAFT (152),464 b. 5 Oct 1898 in South Wheatland
5

Township, IL
│ │ │ └── Frank5 CRAYCRAFT (153),465 b. 8 Jun 1900 in South Wheatland
Township, Macon, IL,466 d. 26 Jan 1962 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,467 bur. after 26 Jan
1962 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL468
│ │ ├── Walter Benjamin4 CRAYCROFT (146),469 b. 13 Mar 1867 in Macon, IL, d.
16 Nov 1948 in Flat Branch Township, Shelby, IL,470 bur. after 16 Nov 1948 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL

459unknown author, Submitting Will to Probate.


460unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address.
461unknown author, Probate Records (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Proof of Heirship, dated March 14,
1969, filed april 23, 1969.
462unknown author, Probate Records, Proof of Heirship, dated March 14, 1969, filed april 23,
1969.
463unknown author, Probate Records, Proof of Heirship, dated March 14, 1969, filed april 23,
1969.
464unknown author, Submitting Will to Probate.
465Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956); unknown author, Submitting
Will to Probate; Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956); unknown name
of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 11; Frank Craycraft entry,
Certified copy 203418 (January 30, 1956); unknown name of person unknown record type,
unknown repository, unknown repository address; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 11.
466Frank Craycraft entry, Certified copy 203418, Supporting documents: Social Security
Application, no. 524-01-5461 issued May 9, 1937 and Affidavit dated January 4, 1956 made by
brother, Benjamin W. Craycroft, 6300 Buntin Rd., Ypsilanti, Michigan
(January 30, 1956).
467California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
468Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions.
469Will, Wm. Benj. Craycroft.

198
│ │ │ +Mary E.4 FISHER (176),471 b. circa 1876 in IL,472 m. 10 Aug 1896 in
Decatur, Macon, IL473
│ │ │ ├── CRAYCROFT5 (409), b. 10 Dec 1904 in Assumption, IL, d. 12 Dec
1904 in Assumption, IL
│ │ │ └── CRAYCROFT5 (386), b. 1 Mar 1906 in Assumption, IL, d. 1 Mar 1906
in Assumption, IL
│ │ ├── Frank Scott4 CRAYCROFT (147),474 b. 7 Jan 1869 in Macon, IL,475 d. 14
Aug 1932 in Decatur, Macon, IL (from an apparent suicide),476 bur. after 14 Aug 1932 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL

470Walter Benjamin Craycroft, State database 46617, Illinois State Archives, Norton Building,
Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
471Marriage record of Walter B. Craycroft and Mary E. Fisher, Illinois Regional Archives
Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter
cited as Marriage record, Walter B. Craycroft and Mary E. Fisher; Marriage record, Walter B.
Craycroft and Mary E. Fisher.
472Walter Benjamin Craycroft, April 11, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3B,
dwelling 70, family 70, Ancestry.com Series IL T626, Page 561-0627, Age at time of marriage
given as 19 and age at time of Census as 54; Pg. 3B.
473Marriagerecord, Walter B. Craycroft and Mary E. Fisher: Record no. 9567, married by D.F.
Howe, Minister.
474Will, Wm. Benj. Craycroft; unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown
repository, unknown repository address; unknown author, Proof of Heirship for Frank S. Craycroft
(n.p.: Dated April 22, 1935, n.d.); unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown
repository, unknown repository address; Affidavit, State of Illinois: . . .that said Frank S. Craycroft
died August 14, 1932, leaving him surviving his widow, Jennie E. craycroft, who is still living;
unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address; unknown author, Proof of Heirship for; unknown name of person unknown record type,
unknown repository, unknown repository address; Affidavit, State of Illinois: . . .that said Frank S.
Craycroft died August 14, 1932, leaving him surviving his widow, Jennie E. craycroft, who is still
living.
475unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address.
476Frank Scott Craycroft, State database 580121 (16 Aug 1932), Illinois State Archives, Norton
Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL, Long Creek Township, Macon County,
Illinois. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50; unknown author, Proof of Heirship for;
unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address; Affidavit, State of Illinois: . . .that said Frank S. Craycroft died August 14, 1932, leaving
him surviving his widow, Jennie E. craycroft, who is still living; Broth of Local Man Comits Suicide
At Decatur, The Prairie State Tribune, Assumption, Illinois, August 19, 1932, The following is a
transcript of the obituary for Frank Craycroft which appeared in the August 19, 1932, edition of
the Prairie State Tribune, Assumption, Illinois:

Brother of Local Man Commits Suicide at Decatur -

Mr. Frank S. Craycroft, 63, brother of Walter B. Craycroft of here, committed suicide Sunday by
hanging himself on a tree in a wooded tract near the south shore of Big Creek Inlet of Lake
Decatur. The body was discovered about 8:30 p.m. by a party of picnickers.

Mr. Craycroft left no note or other indication of the reason for his act. He had spent practically his
entire life in South Wheatland township, Macon County.

199
│ │ │ +Jennie Elizabeth4 CAIRNES (162), b. 1865 in Muskingum, OH, m. circa
1892 in Macon, IL,477
d. 7 Jun 1962 in Blue Mound, Macon, IL478
│ │ │ ├── Robert Cairns5 CRAYCROFT (163),479 b. 2 Sep 1894 in Macon,
IL,480 d. 28 May 1918 in Manitou, El Paso, CO,481 bur. 31 May 1918 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery,
Decatur, Macon, IL482
│ │ │ │ +Clara May5 PASOLD (394) is still living
│ │ │ ├── Walter Scott5 CRAYCROFT (164),483 b. 2 Sep 1896 in South
Wheatland Township, IL, d. 29 May 1944 in Clear Lake Township, Sangamon, IL484

Surviving are his widow, two sons, Wilbur, Macon; Walter, California, two brothers Wm. T.
Craycroft, Mt. Zion, and Walter Craycroft. . . . (here the article has been cut off)

I learned in the spring of 2002 from Michelle Craycroft that the reason that Frank committed
suicide is that he had recently learned he had terminal cancer. (Robert L. Craycroft)
. Hereinafter cited as Prairie State Tribune.
477Frank Scott Craycroft, April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling
51, family 63, Ancestry.com Series IL T626, page 539-0142, According to Census Frank was 23
and Jennie was 27 at the time they were married.; Pg. 3A.
478unknown author, Proof of Heirship for Jennie E. (Cairns) Craycroft (n.p.: Dated July 10, 1962,
n.d.).
479unknown author, Proof of Heirship for; unknown author, Proof of Heirship for; unknown author,
Proof of Heirship for.
480WWI Draft Registration.
481Former Millikin Student Dead, Decatur Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, 29 May 1918, pg. 4,
Robert Craycroft Expires in Colorado

Word was received in Decatur Tuesday afternoon of the death of Robert Craycroft, which
occurred at 11:10 o'clock Tuesday morning at Manitou, Colo. Mr. Craycroft, who was a
stenographer in the offices o the Wabash, went to Colorado some time ago in the hope of
benefiting his health. His wife was with him when he died. Besides his wife he is survived by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.E. Craycroft of near Macon, and two brothers, Walter and Wilbur
Craycroft, also of Macon. He was a son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. John A. Pasold and was a member
of Macon lodge No. 8, A.F. & A.M., and the Kappa delta Chi fraternity of the James Millikin
University.

The body is expected to arrive in Decatur at 11:30 o'clock Thursday morning. The funeral will be
held at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Pasold, 506 West Macon street.
Hereinafter cited as Daily Review.
482Robert Craycroft, Decatur Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, 30 May 1918, pg.12, The body of
Robert Craycroft, son of Mr. and Mrs. F.E. Craycroft, of Macon, and son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs.
John I. Pasold of Decatur, arrived from Manitou, Colo., at 4 o'clock Thursday morning and was
taken to the Dawson chapel to remain till time for the funeral, which will be held at 3 o'clock
Friday afternoon at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. John I. Pasold, 508 West Macon street. The
interment will be in the Mt. Gilead cemetery. Hereinafter cited as Daily Review.
483unknown author, Birth Certificate for William Francis Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); unknown
author, Proof of Heirship for.
484Walter Scott Craycroft, State database 21432, Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol
Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50; unknown
author, Probate Records, Petition for Letters of Administration.

200
│ │ │ │ +Catherine Gertrude5 SWEENEY (165),485 b. 19 Aug 1897 in
Bloomington, McLean, IL,486
m. 18 May 1918 in Macon, IL, d. 4 Sep 1993 in Los Angeles, CA487
│ │ │ │ ├── William Francis6 CRAYCROFT (196),488 b. 23 Oct 1919 in
Decatur, Macon, IL,489 d. 23 Oct 1919 in Decatur, Macon, IL (Prolonged pressure on umbilical cord
during breech labor),490 bur. 23 Oct 1919 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL (Undertaker -
C.E. Dawson, Decatur, Illinois)491

485unknown author, Birth Certificate for William; unknown author, Birth Certificate for William;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180;
unknown author, Birth Certificate for William; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
486unknown author, Birth Certificate for William; California Death index 1940-97, online
http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180; William Francis Craycroft entry, Certificate
of Death for Infant of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Craycroft, Registratin No. 465, Macon County Clerk,
141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Death Certificate, William Francis
Crayroft.
487California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180.
488Walter S. Craycroft, Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number, Decatur
Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548, Decatur, Macon, IL, Court: You say there was one child
that died?

Cora: Yes sir.

Court: When did that child die?

Cora: Right after their first marriage. It was their first one.

Court: That child died in infancy?

Cora: Yes sir - childbirth. Hereinafter cited as Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft; unknown
author, Death Certificate (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file
number, Court: You say there was one child that died?

Cora: Yes sir.

Court: When did that child die?

Cora: Right after their first marriage. It was their first one.

Court: That child died in infancy?

Cora: Yes sir - childbirth; unknown author, Death Certificate.


489William Francis Craycroft entry, Certified copy 722 (October 23, 1919), Macon County Clerk,
141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL.
490Death Certificate, William Francis Crayroft, Registratin No. 465; William Francis Craycroft,
State database 33844 (23 Oct 1919), Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex,
Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50; Proof of Heirship for
Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number, Court: You say there was one child that died?

Cora: Yes sir.

201
│ │ │ │ ├── James Robert6 CRAYCROFT (197), b. 12 Oct 1921 in
Decatur, Macon, IL,492
d. 18 Feb 1984 in Los Angeles, CA, bur. 30 Jun 1993 in Fort Rosecrans
National Cemetery, San Diego, San Diego, CA493
│ │ │ │ │ +Mary Jane6 MCGRATH (2976) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Michele Marie7 CRAYCROFT (2909)494 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Mossimo7 SERACINI (2977) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Monica8 SERACINI (2978) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Olivia8 SERACINI (2979) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Mark7 CARLSON (2980) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Amelia8 CARLSON (2981) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Joanna8 CARLSON (2982) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Andrew Scott7 CRAYCROFT (2910) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +(--?--)7 (2918) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Barrett8 CRAYCROFT (2919) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Christine Marie7 CRAYCROFT (2911) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Stuart James7 CRAYCROFT (2912) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Cameron Douglas7 CRAYCROFT (2913) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Duncan Keith7 CRAYCROFT (2914) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Robin Marie7 CRAYCROFT (2915) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Malcom Robert7 CRAYCROFT (2916) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Gordon Cairns7 CRAYCROFT (2917) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Barbara7 DROZD (3250) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Ian Thomas8 CRAYCROFT (3251) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Diana Grace8 CRAYCROFT (3252) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Jeremiah Joseph6 CRAYCROFT (2837),495 b. 3 Apr
1926,496 d. 29 Feb 2000 in Los Angeles, CA497

Court: When did that child die?

Cora: Right after their first marriage. It was their first one.

Court: That child died in infancy?

Cora: Yes sir - childbirth.


491Death Certificate, William Francis Crayroft, Registratin No. 465.
492James Robert Craycroft entry, Certified copy 895 (October 12, 1921), Macon County Clerk,
141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL.
493unknown
author, WWW. Interment.net, Craycroft, James R, b. 10/21/1921, d. 02/18/1984,
COXSWAIN USCG, Plot: ROW 1111, bur. 06/30/1993.
494unknown author, Yates, Mauck and Bohrer web site (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); unknown author,
Yates, Mauck and Bohrer.
495Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number, Court: Did he have any children
by his former wife?

Cora: He has one dead. He had two living.

202
│ │ │ │ +Cora May5 SMITH (2834),498 b. circa 1877 in Champaign, IL,499 m.
4 Mar 1940 in Saint Charles, Saint Charles, MO500
│ │ │ └── Wilbur Haines5 CRAYCROFT (166),501 b. 24 Aug 1902 in Long
Creek, Macon, IL,502 d. 16 Mar 1966 in Decatur, Macon, IL,503 bur. after 16 Mar 1966 in Mt.
Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ +Elma L.5 WICKER (425),504 b. circa 1902 in IL,505 m. 2 Aug 1924 in
Macon, IL,506 d. 1992 in Macon, IL, bur. 1992 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ ├── Wilma Jean6 CRAYCROFT (384)507 is still living
│ │ │ │ +Raphael Richard6 SINGER (2942), b. 10 Mar 1920,508 m.
circa 1947 in Decatur, Macon, IL (My mother, Margaret Bresnan Craycroft, attended the wedding shortly
after she married my father), d. 12 May 1996 in Decatur, Macon, IL509

Court: What are the names of the two sons that are living?

Cora: One is James Robert Craycroft and the other one is Jeremiah Craycroft
; SSDI; Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003; SSDI; Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003.
496SSDI.

497Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003.


498Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number.
499Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number.
500Proof of Heirship for Walter S. Craycroft unknown file number.
501unknown author, Proof of Heirship for.
502SSDI; Wilbur Haines Craycroft entry, Certified copy 75, Sworn to by Jennie E. Craycroft
(mother), R. #2, Macon, Ill, August 19, 1942 (August 19, 1942), Macon County Clerk, 141 S. Main
Street, Decatur, Macon, IL.
503Wilbur Haines Craycroft, Proof of Heirship for Wilbur H. Craycroft 66-P-87, Decatur
Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Proof of Heirship,
Wilbur H. Craycroft.
504Proof of Heirship, Wilbur H. Craycroft 66-P-87.
505April
7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given
at Census as 28 years old.; Pg. 3A.
506Proof of Heirship, Wilbur H. Craycroft 66-P-87.
507Proof of Heirship, Wilbur H. Craycroft 66-P-87; April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah,
UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given at Census (April,1930) as 4 years and 10
months.; Pg. 3A; April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family
63, Age given at Census (April,1930) as 4 years and 10 months.; Pg. 3A.
508SSDI, , Name: Raphael R. Singer
SSN: 488-10-8264
Last Residence: 62526 Decatur, Macon, Illinois
Born: 10 Mar 1920
Died: 12 May 1996
State (Year) SSN issued: Missouri (Before 1951 ).
509unknown article title, The Decatur Herald and Review, unknown location, 14 May 1996, Page
A11, 76, Decatur, drivers license examiner, died Sunday (May 12, 1996). World War II Army Air
Corps veteran and previous owner of Belvidere Inn. Survivors: wife, Wilma; son, Rick, Colorado

203
│ │ │ ├── Robert Alan6 CRAYCROFT (385)510 is still living
│ │ │ │ +D'Arlene F.6 COWGILL (3246),511 b. 27 May 1934 in
Decatur, Macon, IL,512 m. 1955,513 d. 16 Apr 2004 in Decatur Memorial Hospital, Decatur,
Macon, IL514

Springs, Colo.; daughters, Linda Mills, Decatur; Carol Lipsky, Galesburg; six grandchildren.
Preceded by: parents and one sister.

Visitation: 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Graceland/Fairlawn Funeral Home. Memorials: Decatur Memorial


Hospital Home Health Care. Hereinafter cited as Herald and Review; SSDI, , Name: Raphael R.
Singer
SSN: 488-10-8264
Last Residence: 62526 Decatur, Macon, Illinois
Born: 10 Mar 1920
Died: 12 May 1996
State (Year) SSN issued: Missouri (Before 1951 ).
510April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given
at Census (April, 1930) as 2 years and 11 months old.; Pg. 3A; April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given at Census (April, 1930) as 2 years
and 11 months old.; Pg. 3A.
511unknown article title, Decatur Tribune, Decatur, Illinois, April 21, 2004, Craycroft, D'Arlene F.,
69, of Decatur, died 4:13 p.m. Friday, April 16, 2004, in Decatur Memorial Hospital. Dawson &
Wikoff Colonial Chapel North in charge of arrangements. Burial was in Mt. Gilead Cemetery.
Memorials: Macon United Methodist Church.

D'Arlene was born May 27, 1934, in Decatur, daughter of Ralph O. and Faye Reed Cowgill. She
was a member of Macon United Methodist Church, having been choir director, soloist and board
member for many years; served as a member of the Macounty Farm Bureau and American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary. She married Robert A. Craycroft in 1955.

Survivors include: her husband; sons, Aaron Craycroft and wife Madeline of Williamsburg, Va.,
Bart Craycroft and wife Suzanne of Macon, Eric Craycroft and wife Annmarie of Mission Viejo,
Calif; four grandchildren; one great-granddaughter.

Her parents, two brothers and one sister preceded her in death
. Hereinafter cited as Decatur Tribune.
512Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004, Craycroft, D'Arlene F., 69, of Decatur, died 4:13 p.m. Friday,
April 16, 2004, in Decatur Memorial Hospital. Dawson & Wikoff Colonial Chapel North in charge
of arrangements. Burial was in Mt. Gilead Cemetery. Memorials: Macon United Methodist
Church.

D'Arlene was born May 27, 1934, in Decatur, daughter of Ralph O. and Faye Reed Cowgill. She
was a member of Macon United Methodist Church, having been choir director, soloist and board
member for many years; served as a member of the Macounty Farm Bureau and American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary. She married Robert A. Craycroft in 1955.

Survivors include: her husband; sons, Aaron Craycroft and wife Madeline of Williamsburg, Va.,
Bart Craycroft and wife Suzanne of Macon, Eric Craycroft and wife Annmarie of Mission Viejo,
Calif; four grandchildren; one great-granddaughter.

Her parents, two brothers and one sister preceded her in death
.

204
│ │ │ │ ├── Aaron CRAYCROFT (3247)515 is still living
7

│ │ │ │ ├── Bart CRAYCROFT (3248)516 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ └── Eric CRAYCROFT (3249)517 is still living


7

│ │ │ ├── John Franklin CRAYCROFT (411),518 b. 11 Jan 1929 in


6

Decatur, Macon, IL,519 d. 10 Jun 2005 in St. Mary's Hospital, Decatur, Macon, IL520

513Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004, Craycroft, D'Arlene F., 69, of Decatur, died 4:13 p.m. Friday,
April 16, 2004, in Decatur Memorial Hospital. Dawson & Wikoff Colonial Chapel North in charge
of arrangements. Burial was in Mt. Gilead Cemetery. Memorials: Macon United Methodist
Church.

D'Arlene was born May 27, 1934, in Decatur, daughter of Ralph O. and Faye Reed Cowgill. She
was a member of Macon United Methodist Church, having been choir director, soloist and board
member for many years; served as a member of the Macounty Farm Bureau and American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary. She married Robert A. Craycroft in 1955.

Survivors include: her husband; sons, Aaron Craycroft and wife Madeline of Williamsburg, Va.,
Bart Craycroft and wife Suzanne of Macon, Eric Craycroft and wife Annmarie of Mission Viejo,
Calif; four grandchildren; one great-granddaughter.

Her parents, two brothers and one sister preceded her in death
.
514Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004, Craycroft, D'Arlene F., 69, of Decatur, died 4:13 p.m. Friday,
April 16, 2004, in Decatur Memorial Hospital. Dawson & Wikoff Colonial Chapel North in charge
of arrangements. Burial was in Mt. Gilead Cemetery. Memorials: Macon United Methodist
Church.

D'Arlene was born May 27, 1934, in Decatur, daughter of Ralph O. and Faye Reed Cowgill. She
was a member of Macon United Methodist Church, having been choir director, soloist and board
member for many years; served as a member of the Macounty Farm Bureau and American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary. She married Robert A. Craycroft in 1955.

Survivors include: her husband; sons, Aaron Craycroft and wife Madeline of Williamsburg, Va.,
Bart Craycroft and wife Suzanne of Macon, Eric Craycroft and wife Annmarie of Mission Viejo,
Calif; four grandchildren; one great-granddaughter.

Her parents, two brothers and one sister preceded her in death
.
515Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004.
516Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004; Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004; Decatur Tribune, April 21,
2004.
517Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004; Decatur Tribune, April 21, 2004; Decatur Tribune, April 21,
2004.
518April7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given
at Census (April,1930) as 1 year and 3 months old.; Pg.3A; April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given at Census (April,1930) as 1 year
and 3 months old.; Pg.3A.
519April7, 1930 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 3A, dwelling 51, family 63, Age given
at Census (April,1930) as 1 year and 3 months old.; Pg.3A; John F. "Jack" Craycroft, Decatur
Herald and Review, unknown location, 11 June 2005, John F. “Jack” Craycroft, 76, of Decatur,

205
│ │ │ │ +Eileen HARDIMON (3793)521 is still living
6

│ │ │ │ ├── Mark CRAYCROFT (3794)522 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ ├── Stephen CRAYCROFT (3795)523 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ └── Vincent CRAYCROFT (3796)524 is still living


7

│ │ │ └── Lois Elizabeth CRAYCROFT (383) is still living


6

│ │ │ +Lloyd6 TOMLINSON (2943) is still living


│ │ ├── Maud4 CRAYCROFT (148),525 b. 29 May 1871 in Macon, IL, d. 14 Aug
1900 in Macon, IL (Died in childbirth),526 bur. after 14 Aug 1900 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur,
Macon, IL

died Friday, June 10, 2005, in St. Mary’s Hospital following a courageous battle of 18 months with
cancer.

Mass of Christian Burial will be 10:00 am Monday, June 13, 2005, in Holy family Catholic Church
(2400 South Franklin Street) with Fr. Joseph Molloy as Celebrant. Visitation will be 4-7:00 pm
Sunday in the church. Burial will be in Mt. Gilead Cemetery. Moran & Goebel Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers memorials are suggested to Holy Family School in his
memory. View the online obituary and send condolences to the family
www.moranandgoebel.com.

Jack was born on January 11, 1929 in Decatur, the son of Wilbur and Elma Wicker Craycroft. He
was a charter member of Holy Family Catholic Church. He was a United States Army Veteran. He
was a graduate of Macon High School. He farmed with his brother in Macon and Mount Zion
areas for 45 years. He married Eileen Hardimon in 1957. They lived in the Mount Zion area for 40
years.

Surviving are his wife, Eileen, his sons; Mark (and Gail) of Sullivan; Stephen (and Debra) of
Mount Zion and Vince (and Shelly) of Ankeny, Iowa. His grandchildren are Andrew, Nicole and
Jack Craycroft, Jerrica and Brock Doyle. He also raised his nephews and nieces, John Nale,
Jerry Nale, Jim Nale and Judy Doyle. He also leaves a brother, Robert Craycroft of Decatur and
two sisters, Wilma Singer of Decatur and Lois Tomlinson of Orland Park.

His parents preceded him in death and one niece – Janet Nale.

The family wishes to thank the nurses on the 7th floor for their wonderful care and Dr. Esparaz for
his caring ways. Hereinafter cited as Herald and Review.
520Herald and Review, 11 June 2005.
521Herald and Review, 11 June 2005.
522Heraldand Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11
June 2005.
523Heraldand Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11
June 2005.
524Herald and Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11 June 2005; Herald and Review, 11
June 2005.
525Will, Wm. Benj. Craycroft; unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown
repository, unknown repository address; William T. Craycroft, Affidavit, State of Illinois, Macon
County, November 19, 1900 unknown file number, Decatur Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548,
Decatur, Macon, IL, . . . affiant's said sister Maud departed this life on or about 14th day of
August 1900. Hereinafter cited as Probate for Maud Craycroft; unknown name of person
unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address; Probate for Maud

206
│ │ │ +Charles R.4 JONES (177), m. 23 Dec 1897 in Macon, IL
│ │ ├──
William Tecumcah4 CRAYCROFT (673),527 b. 2 Mar 1873 in South
Wheatland Township, Macon, IL, d. 9 Oct 1961 in Decatur, Macon, IL (Great-grandad was in the
hospital for a checkup. While sitting on an examining table he had been left alone momentarily and suffered
a heart attack and fell off the table and hit the floor, striking his head
)
│ │ │ +Ada May4 DAVIDSON (674),528 b. 18 Sep 1875 in Pomona, Franklin, KS,
m. 20 Oct 1897 in Decatur, Macon, IL,529 d. 16 Jun 1956 in Mt. Zion, Macon, IL
│ │ │ ├── Jessie May5 CRAYCROFT (136), b. 20 Aug 1898 in LaPlace,
Macon, IL, 530 d. 17 Oct 1975 in Decatur, Macon, IL, bur. after 17 Oct 1975 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ │ +Boyd L.5 CORNTHWAITE (680), b. 29 Jul 1902 in Crowley, Acadia,
LA,531 m. 4 Feb 1925 in Springfield, Sangamon, IL, d. Aug 1972 in Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ │ └── Lynn6 CORNTHWAITE (681), b. 17 Feb 1932 in Decatu and
Macon County Hospital, Decatur, Macon, IL,532 d. 18 Feb 1932 in Decatur and Macon County
Hospital, Decatur, Macon, IL,533 bur. 18 Feb 1932 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL534
│ │ │ ├── Edna Ferne5 CRAYCROFT (683), b. 13 Jan 1902 in Gueydan,
Vermillion, LA, d. 3 Jun 1978 in Mt. Zion, IL, bur. 6 Jun 1978 in Mt. Gilead Cemetary, Decatur,
Macon, IL

Craycroft unknown file number, . . . affiant's said sister Maud departed this life on or about 14th
day of August 1900.
526unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address; Probate for Maud Craycroft unknown file number, . . . affiant's said sister Maud departed
this life on or about 14th day of August 1900.
527WWI Draft Registration, Granddad gave his name on the registration card, and signed it,
William Tecumcah Craycroft; Will, Wm. Benj. Craycroft.
528unknown author, Supplemental Report of Birth, Report of Name of Child for Fred Scott
Craycroft (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); unknown name of person, Affidavit, State of Illinois, Macon County,
November 8, 1922 unknown file number, unknown repository, unknown repository address, This
affiant further upon her oath states that the present heirs of said Robert Law, deceased are . . .
Fred Davidson, grandson. . .of Decatur, Illinois, and Ernest Davidson, bachelor, of Chicago,
Illinois, grandson, and Ada Craycroft (nee Davidson) a granddaughter. Hereinafter cited as 8 Nov
1922 Affidavit.
529Marriage record of W.T. Craycroft and Ada M. Davidson: Record no. 10074, married by A.W.
Hawkins, minister. Witnesses Jennie (?) E. Craycroft and Jessie Davidson, Illinois Regional
Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL.
Hereinafter cited as Marriage record, W.T. Craycroft and Ada M. Davidson.
530JessieMay Craycroft entry, Certified copy None (August 20, 1898), Macon County Clerk, 141
S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL.
531unknown compiler, online http://www.familysearch.org, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints (unknown location); Lynn Cornthwaite entry, Death Certificate for Lynn Cornthwaite,
Father's place of birth: Crowley, LA, Macon County Clerk, 141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon,
IL. Hereinafter cited as Death Certificate, Lynn Cornthwaite.
532Death Certificate, Lynn Cornthwaite.
533Death Certificate, Lynn Cornthwaite, Cause of death: Long labor -- intra-cranial hemorrhage.
534Death Certificate, Lynn Cornthwaite, Undertaker: Dawson and Wikoff.

207
│ │ │ │ +Everett Raymond5 VEECH (684), m. 17 Aug 1925 in Paducah,
McCracken, KY,535
d. 8 Feb 1970 in Decatur, Macon, IL, bur. 10 Feb 1970 in Mt. Gilead
Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL
│ │ │ │ ├── Beverly6 VEECH (767),536 b. 3 Dec 1926,537 d. Dec 1994
(Emphysema)
│ │ │ │ │ +Dudley6 PENNINGTON (3212) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Karen Sue7 PENNINGTON (3216)538 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Steven7 BURK (3213)539 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Ryan8 BURK (3217)540 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Kelley8 BURK (3218)541 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── William Bruce7 PENNINGTON (3214)542 is still living

535unknown article title, Decatur Daily Review, Decatur, IL, August 15, 1926 -

1925 WEDDING IS ANNOUNCED

Edna Craycroft and Everett Veech Kept Marriage Secret.

Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Edna Craycroft and Everett Veech which
took place in the Presbyterian church in Paducah, Ky., Aug. 17, 1925. Rev. J.P. Crawford
performed the ceremony.

Mrs. Veech is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Craycroft of Dalton City. She is a member of the
1926 graduating class of the Decatur and Macon County hospital training school. It was for this
reason that the marriage was kept a secret until she had completed her training.

Mr. Veech s the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis Veech of Oakley. He attended the Millikin university and
atpresent is engaged in farming near Oakley where they will make their home. Hereinafter cited
as Decatur Daily Review.
536unknown author, Decatur Review, Born to Mr. and Mrs. Everett Veach of near Oakley in the
Macon county hospital Friday, Dec. 3, a daughter. Mrs. Veach was formerly Miss Edna Craycroft
of Dalton City.; 12/13/1926; unknown author, Decatur Review, Born to Mr. and Mrs. Everett
Veach of near Oakley in the Macon county hospital Friday, Dec. 3, a daughter. Mrs. Veach was
formerly Miss Edna Craycroft of Dalton City.; 12/13/1926.
537unknown author, Decatur Review, Born to Mr. and Mrs. Everett Veach of near Oakley in the
Macon county hospital Friday, Dec. 3, a daughter. Mrs. Veach was formerly Miss Edna Craycroft
of Dalton City.; 12/13/1926.
538Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail message from Janet Hays (thejage@aol.com) to
Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft,
24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
539Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
540Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
541Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.

208
│ │ │ │ │ │ + (3219) is still living
7

│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Nicholas PENNINGTON (3220)543 is still living


8

│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Marisa PENNINGTON (3221)544 is still living


8

│ │ │ │ │ │ +Josianne WARREN (3222)545 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ ├── Robert Allen PENNINGTON (3223)546 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ │ +Sherry (3224)547 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ └── Cheryl PENNINGTON (3215)548 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ ├── Everett Richard6 VEECH (3209) is still living


│ │ │ │ │ +Martha Lee6 (3211) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Janet6 VEECH (3210) is still living
│ │ │ │ +John William6 LUNDAY III (3228)549 is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Jennifer Kaye7 LUNDAY (3229)550 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Conrad Lewis7 SMITH (3230)551 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Christian Hays8 SMITH (3231)552 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Lorena Marie8 SMITH (3232)553 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +unknown spouse

542Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
543Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
544Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
545Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
546Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
547Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
548Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
549Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
550Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
551Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
552Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
553Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.

209
│ │ │ │ ├── Jo-Deane LUNDAY (3233)554 is still living
7

│ │ │ │ │ +David Lewis DUFFY (3234)555 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ ├── Savannah Colleen DUFFY (3235)556 is still


8

living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Lara Mackenzie DUFFY (3236)557 is still living
8

│ │ │ │ └── Jason Lee LUNDAY (3237)558 is still living


7

│ │ │ │ +unknown spouse
│ │ │ │ +Stuart Randolph6 HAYS (3238)559 is still living
│ │ │ ├── William Clifton5 CRAYCROFT (17), b. 17 Oct 1903 in Dalton City,
Macon, IL,560 d. 19 Dec 1979 in Sullivan, Moultrie, IL (Heart attack), bur. 22 Dec 1979 in Bethany,
Moultrie, IL (St. Isidore's Cemetery)
│ │ │ │ +Florence Henora5 GLEESPEN (18), b. 3 Mar 1900 in Jerseyville,
Jersey, IL, m. 19 May 1925, d. 8 Sep 1986 in Springfield, Sangamon, IL, bur. 12 Sep 1986 in St.
Isadore Church Cemetery, Moultrie, IL561
│ │ │ │ ├── William Clifton6 CRAYCROFT (4), b. 19 Dec 1925 in
Decatur, Macon, IL, d. 7 Feb 1970 in Lost Bridge, Decatur, Macon, IL (
),562 bur. 10 Feb 1970 in St. Isidore Cemetery, Bethany, Moultrie, IL563
│ │ │ │ │ +Margaret Lou6 BRESNAN (421) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Robert Lynn7 CRAYCROFT (1)564 is still living

554Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
555Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
556Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
557Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
558Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re:
Craycroft correction," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004; Janet Hays, "Re: Craycroft correction,"
e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 24/2/2004.
559Letterfrom Janet V. Hays (Williamsburg, VA) to Robert L. Craycroft, 27/2/2004; Robert Lynn
Craycroft (Rolling Meadows, Cook, IL), My present (and last) husband, Stuart Hays, were married
in 1978.
560William Clifton Craycroft entry, Birth certificate of William Clifton Craycroft None (October 17,
1903), County Clerk, Marion County, 100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL.
561Obituary for June Dolores, April, 2003.
562William C. Craycroft entry, Death Certificate for William C. Craycroft, He died as a result of a
freak auto accident when the steering wheel assembly broke and his car veered across a bridge
(Lost Bridge in Decatur, Illinois) and through a cast aluminum guard rail into Lake Decatur. He
was trapped in the car and was drowned
, unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as Death Cert., Wm. C.
Craycroft.
563Death Cert., Wm. C. Craycroft.

210
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Emily Ruth BRUINGTON (3) is still living
7

│ │ │ │ │ │ +Joyce FALLARA (2) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ ├── Gary William CRAYCROFT (6) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ │ +Pamela Ann JONES (8) is still living


7

│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Penny Lynn CRAYCROFT (9) is still living


8

│ │ │ │ │ │ │ +James David CONNER (2821) is still living


8

│ │ │ │ │ │ │ └── Isabella Morgan CONNER (3121) is


9

still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Amy Nicole CRAYCROFT (10) is still living
8

│ │ │ │ │ │ │ +Michael Raymond PETTY (3912) is still living


8

│ │ │ │ │ │ │ └── Brittan Nicole PETTY (3913) is still


9

living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Jason William8 CRAYCROFT (11) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Briana8 GARIBAY (3910) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Lucas William9 CRAYCROFT (3911) is
still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Theresa Gayle7 CRAYCROFT (7) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Paul Joseph7 JONES (14) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Paul William8 CRAYCROFT (13) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Mariah Dee8 HULL (3059) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Gage William9 CRAYCROFT (3723) is
still living
│ │ │ │ │ +George7 FIDLER (15) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Aaron Robert8 CRAYCROFT (16) is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Dennis7 BADGER (12) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Sharon Ann6 CRAYCROFT (19), b. 13 Feb 1940, d. 10 Apr
1974 in Springfield, Sangamon, IL (Complications from diabetes)
│ │ │ │ +Robert Francis6 MIDDEN (20),565 b. 11 Nov 1924 in
Springfield, Sangamon, IL, 566 m. circa 1 Jun 1962 in Dalton City, Moultrie, IL, d. 21 Aug 1995 in
Springfield, Sangamon, IL567

564Robert Lynn Craycroft entry, Certificate (June 14, 1948), Macon County Clerk, 141 S. Main
Street, Decatur, Macon, IL.
565unknown author, Obituary, The State-Journal Register, Springfield, IL (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.);
unknown author, Obituary, State-Journal Register, Springfield, Robert Francis Midden, 70, of
Springfield died Monday at St. John's North. He was born Nov. 11, 1924, in Springfield, the son of
Henry E. and Louise Sommer Midden Sr. He married Sharon Ann Craycroft in 1962; she died in
1974.
Mr. Midden, a lifelong Springfield resident, was a self-employed electrical contractor for more
than 45 years. He was a dairy farmer and co-owner of Midden Dairy Farm and served as
supervisor of housekeeping at Bergners' downtown location for five years.
He was a member of St. Agnes Church, the Sangamon County Farm Bureau, a lifelong 4-H
leader, served as past president of CYO Deanery Council and was a past member of the Knights
of Columbus Council 4179. Survivors: a daughter, Ann Maria Midden of Springfield; two sons,
Robert C. and John Patrick Midden, both of Springfield; a sister, Julia Whiteleather of Hollister,
Mo.; two brothers, Henry E.
Midden Jr. and Charles J. Midden, both of Springfield; several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews and cousins.

211
│ │ │ │ ├── Robert C.7 MIDDEN (1739) is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── John Patrick7 MIDDEN (1740) is still living
│ │ │ │ └── Ann Maria7 MIDDEN (1741) is still living
│ │ │ └── Fred Scott5 CRAYCROFT (141),568 b. 17 Mar 1907 in near Dalton
City, Moultrie, IL, 569 d. 18 Jul 1965 in St. Mary's Hospital, Decatur, Macon, IL (Acute mesenteric
thrombosis),570 bur. 20 Jul 1965 in Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, Macon, IL571

Services: Mass, 10 a.m. Thursday, St. Agnes Church, the Rev. Tom Hagstrom officiating. Burial:
Calvary Cemetery. Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.; P. 8; unknown author,
Obituary, State-Journal Register, Springfield; unknown author, Obituary, State-Journal Register,
Springfield, Robert Francis Midden, 70, of Springfield died Monday at St. John's North. He was
born Nov. 11, 1924, in Springfield, the son of Henry E. and Louise Sommer Midden Sr. He
married Sharon Ann Craycroft in 1962; she died in 1974.
Mr. Midden, a lifelong Springfield resident, was a self-employed electrical contractor for more
than 45 years. He was a dairy farmer and co-owner of Midden Dairy Farm and served as
supervisor of housekeeping at Bergners' downtown location for five years.
He was a member of St. Agnes Church, the Sangamon County Farm Bureau, a lifelong 4-H
leader, served as past president of CYO Deanery Council and was a past member of the Knights
of Columbus Council 4179. Survivors: a daughter, Ann Maria Midden of Springfield; two sons,
Robert C. and John Patrick Midden, both of Springfield; a sister, Julia Whiteleather of Hollister,
Mo.; two brothers, Henry E.
Midden Jr. and Charles J. Midden, both of Springfield; several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews and cousins.
Services: Mass, 10 a.m. Thursday, St. Agnes Church, the Rev. Tom Hagstrom officiating. Burial:
Calvary Cemetery. Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.; P. 8.
566unknown author, Obituary, State-Journal Register, Springfield.
567unknown author, Obituary, State-Journal Register, Springfield, Robert Francis Midden, 70, of
Springfield died Monday at St. John's North. He was born Nov. 11, 1924, in Springfield, the son of
Henry E. and Louise Sommer Midden Sr. He married Sharon Ann Craycroft in 1962; she died in
1974.
Mr. Midden, a lifelong Springfield resident, was a self-employed electrical contractor for more
than 45 years. He was a dairy farmer and co-owner of Midden Dairy Farm and served as
supervisor of housekeeping at Bergners' downtown location for five years.
He was a member of St. Agnes Church, the Sangamon County Farm Bureau, a lifelong 4-H
leader, served as past president of CYO Deanery Council and was a past member of the Knights
of Columbus Council 4179. Survivors: a daughter, Ann Maria Midden of Springfield; two sons,
Robert C. and John Patrick Midden, both of Springfield; a sister, Julia Whiteleather of Hollister,
Mo.; two brothers, Henry E.
Midden Jr. and Charles J. Midden, both of Springfield; several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews and cousins.
Services: Mass, 10 a.m. Thursday, St. Agnes Church, the Rev. Tom Hagstrom officiating. Burial:
Calvary Cemetery. Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.; P. 8.
568unknown author, Supplemental Report of Birth, Report of Name of Child (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.);
unknown author, Supplemental Report of Birth; unknown name of person unknown record type,
unknown repository, unknown repository address; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred S. Craycroft (n.p.: Certificate
757, n.d.); unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown
repository address, Ill. Pfc. H.Q. Co., 351 Inf., World War II, B. sm PH; Decatur Genealogical
Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred;
unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred; unknown author, Supplemental Report of Birth;
unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author,
Death Certificate for Fred; unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository,

212
│ │ │ +Lela Marie5 OYE (169), b. 18 Mar 1913 in Arthur, Douglas, IL, m.
after 1946, d. 7 Aug 1996 in Tucson, Pima, AZ

unknown repository address, Ill. Pfc. H.Q. Co., 351 Inf., World War II, B. sm PH; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death Certificate
for Fred; unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred.
569unknown author, Supplemental Report of Birth; unknown name of person unknown record
type, unknown repository, unknown repository address; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon
County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred.
570unknown name of person unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository
address, Ill. Pfc. H.Q. Co., 351 Inf., World War II, B. sm PH; Decatur Genealogical Society,
Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death Certificate for Fred, The following
is a transcript of Fred's death certificate:

1.a.: Place of Death, state: Illinois


1.b.: County: Macon
1.c.: Inside corporate limits and in City: Decatur
1.f.: Name of Hospital or Institution: St. Mary's Hospital
1.g.: Length of Stay 1.f.: 19 hrs.
2.a.: Usual residence, state: Illinois
2.b.: County: Moultrie
2.d.: Outside corporate limits and in township name: Lovington
2.e.: Length of residenceat 2c or 2d: 16 years
2.f.: Residence Address: Lovington, Ill., R.F.D. 1
2.g.: Did decedent reside on a farm?: Yes
3. Name of deceased: Fred S. Craycroft
4. Date of Death: July 18, 1965
5. Sex: Male
6. Race: White
7. Married, never married, widowed, divorced: Married
8. Date of birth: March 17, 1907
9. Age (in years last birthday): 58
10a. Usual occupation: Farmer
10b. Kind of business or industry: Grain farm
11. Birthplace: Macon County, Illinos
12. Citizen of what country?: U.S.
13. Father's full name: Wiliam T. Craycroft
14. Mother's full maiden name: Ada Davidson
15. Was deceased ever in U.S. Armed Forces?: Yes, Give war or dates of service: WW II
16. Social Security Number: 329-07-0872
17a. Informant signature: Lela Craycroft
17b. Address: Lovington, Ill, R.F.D. 1
17c. Relationship to deceased: wife
18a. Medical cause of death, Immediate cause: Acute mesenteric thrombosis - interval between
onset and death - 24 hours
18b. due to: Chronic spastic colitis - interval between onset and death - 20 years
.
571Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; unknown author, Death
Certificate for Fred, Reported by L.W. McMullin Funeral Home, 503 W. Jackson, Sullivan,Ill.

213
│ │ └── Jessie C.4 CRAYCROFT (149),572 b. 8 Feb 1877 in South Wheatland
Township, Macon, IL, d. 2 Nov 1892 in Mt. Zion, Macon, IL (Tuberculosis),573 bur. 4 Nov 1892 in
Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Decatur, IL574
│ │ +Harriet3 RICHARDSON (144),575 b. 28 Jul 1831 in Knox, OH,576 m. 7 Feb 1895
in Decatur, Macon, IL,577 d. 2 Nov 1910 in Decatur, Macon, IL (Uremic poison and chronic
hepatitis),578 bur. 4 Nov 1910 in Greenwood Cemetary, Decatur, Macon, IL (Undertaker: Monson
and Wilcox)579

572Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Jessie C. Craycroft,,


dau. of W.B. and S.S. Craycroft, died Nov 2, 1892 aged 15 yr 8 mo 25 da; unknown article title,
Decatur Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, July 14, 1913, Jessie B. Craycroft, youngest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Craycroft, died yesterday afternoon at their home in Mt. Zion after a lingering
illness from the effects of la grippe. She was prostrated last spring and was taken to North
Carolina in hopes that she would be helped. The funeral will be held from Shady Grove church at
11 o'clock tomorrow morning. the burial will be at the Mt. Gilead cemetery.; Thursday, November
3, 1892. Hereinafter cited as Daily Review; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, Jessie C. Craycroft,, dau. of W.B. and S.S. Craycroft, died Nov 2, 1892
aged 15 yr 8 mo 25 da; Daily Review, July 14, 1913, Jessie B. Craycroft, youngest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Craycroft, died yesterday afternoon at their home in Mt. Zion after a lingering
illness from the effects of la grippe. She was prostrated last spring and was taken to North
Carolina in hopes that she would be helped. The funeral will be held from Shady Grove church at
11 o'clock tomorrow morning. the burial will be at the Mt. Gilead cemetery.; Thursday, November
3, 1892.
573Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Jessie C. Craycroft,,
dau. of W.B. and S.S. Craycroft, died Nov 2, 1892 aged 15 yr 8 mo 25 da; Daily Review, July 14,
1913, Jessie B. Craycroft, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Craycroft, died yesterday
afternoon at their home in Mt. Zion after a lingering illness from the effects of la grippe. She was
prostrated last spring and was taken to North Carolina in hopes that she would be helped. The
funeral will be held from Shady Grove church at 11 o'clock tomorrow morning. the burial will be at
the Mt. Gilead cemetery.; Thursday, November 3, 1892.
574Daily Review, July 14, 1913, The funeral of Jessie C. Craycroft was held from Shady Grove
church at 11 o'clock yesterday morning. the funeral service was preached by Rev. M. Auer, who
took his text from John xxv, 25-26. He preached an impressive sermon, paying a high tribute to
the dead. Music was furnished by the Christian Endeavor society of Mt. Zion of which Miss
Craycroft was a member. The casket was beautiful and was covered with rich floral offerings. A
large pillow wreath of cut flowers was presented by the Christian Endeavor societies of Mt. Zion
and North Folk. The pall bearers were Frank Cox, Thomas Foster, Ollie Turpin, Harry Scott,
Charles Fruit, and Walter Black. The burial was at Mt. Gilead cemetery.; Saturday morning,
November 5, 1892.
575Will, Wm. Benj. Craycroft.
576HarrietRichardson entry, Death Certificate for Harriet Crayroft, Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Harriet Craycroft, death certificate; Marriage
record of William B. Craycroft and Harriet Graham: Place of Birth: Knox Co., Ohio, Father's
Name: John Richardson, Mother's Name: Mary Dit(illegible), Illinois Regional Archives
Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter
cited as Marriage record, William B. Craycroft and Harriet Graham.
577Marriage record, William B. Craycroft and Harriet Graham: License No. 8881, date of license
Feb 7/95.
578Harriet Craycroft, death certificate; Joseph Krieg, Affidavit of Joseph Krieg, regarding Dora
Craycraft unknown file number, Decatur Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548, Decatur, Macon,
IL, Joseph Krieg being duly sworn upon his oath states. . .that the said Harriet Craycroft died in

214
│ ├── Cornelia Ann3 CRAYCROFT (668),580 b. 31 Aug 1831,581 d. 17 Jul 1861,582 bur.
after 17 Jul 1861 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, IL583
│ │ +William3 LOWRIE (1355),584 b. circa 1827 in TN,585 m. 23 Mar 1850 in Macon,
IL586
│ │ ├── Margaret Ellen4 LOWRIE (2804),587 b. 22 Mar 1851,588 d. 17 Oct 1923 in
Buchanan, MO589

Decatur Illinois on the second day of November A.D. 1910. Hereinafter cited as Joseph Krieg
Affidavit.
579Harriet Craycroft, death certificate.
580Marriage Certificate for Daniel Bresnan and Maggie Nolan, County Clerk, Moultrie County, 10
S. Main St., Sullivan, Moultrie, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage cert. for Daniel Bresnan and
Maggie Nolan; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Cornelia A.
Lowrie, wife of W.A. Lowrie, died Jul 17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da; Decatur Genealogical
Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Cornelia A. Lowrie, wife of W.A. Lowrie, died Jul
17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Cornelia A. Lowrie, wife of W.A. Lowrie, died Jul 17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da;
Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Cornelia A. Lowrie, wife of
W.A. Lowrie, died Jul 17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da.
581Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Cornelia A. Lowrie, wife
of W.A. Lowrie, died Jul 17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da.
582Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Cornelia A. Lowrie, wife
of W.A. Lowrie, died Jul 17, 1861, aged 29 yr 10 mo 17 da.
583Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions.
584Marriage License for William Lowrie and Cornelia Ann Craycroft, Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage License, Wm. Lowrie and Cornelia
Craycroft.
585June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291, Age
given at Census as 23 years old, born in Tennessee; Page unknown, dwelling 266.
586Marriage License, Wm. Lowrie and Cornelia Craycroft; June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo,
Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291, Census indicates they were married within the
year; Page unknown, dwelling 266.
587unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail message from unknown author e-mail
(unknown address) to unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
588Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail message from unknown author e-mail (unknown
address) to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005. Hereinafter cited as "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie"; unknown

215
│ │ │ +Ancel4 HOLMES (2808),590 b. circa 1849 in MO, m. 8 Sep 1870 in
Buchanan, MO591
│ │ │ └── Cora May HOLMES (2809)592 is still living
5

│ │ ├── Mary Elizabeth LOWRIE (2805),593 b. 19 Dec 1852 in Macon, IL,594 d. 7


4

Feb 1935 in Lawton, Comanche, OK595

author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of William and
Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
589Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
590unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
591Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; unknown author,
"E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
592unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
593unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray

216
│ │ │ +Benjamin Franklin4 GRAY (2810),596 b. 15 Jan 1850 in Buchanan,
MO,597 m. 28 Sep 1874 in Frazier, Buchanan, MO,598 d. 15 Sep 1929 in St. Joseph, Buchanan,
MO, 599 bur. after 15 Sep 1929 in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO600
│ │ │ ├── Stella5 GRAY (3940),601 b. 6 Jul 1875 in Frazier, Buchanan, MO,602
d. 27 Jan 1957, 603 bur. after 27 Jan 1957 in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO604
│ │ │ │ +Dr. Harvey L.5 TADLOCK M.D. (3941),605 b. circa 1870 in MO, m.
between 1 Jan 1905 and 5 Jul 1905606
│ │ │ ├── Minnie B.5 GRAY (3942),607 b. 11 Dec 1876 in Frazier, Buchanan,
MO,608 d. 4 Nov 1946,609 bur. after 4 Nov 1946 in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan,
MO610

Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
594Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; unknown author,
"E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
595Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
596Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
597Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
598Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
599Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
600Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
601Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
602Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
603Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
604Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
605Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; unknown
compiler; unknown compiler.
606Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
607Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.

217
│ │ │ ├── Ira5 GRAY (3943),611 b. 7 Jun 1879 in Frazier, Buchanan, MO,612 d.
19 Mar 1948 in OK613
│ │ │ │ +Dulcie Belle5 HOWARD (3944)614 is still living
│ │ │ ├── Roy5 GRAY (3945),615 b. 15 Aug 1882 in Frazier, Buchanan, MO,616
d. 4 Dec 1967,617 bur. after 4 Dec 1967 in Gower, Clinton, MO618
│ │ │ │ +Edith5 WALKUP (3946)619 is still living
│ │ │ ├── Ammy5 GRAY (3947),620 b. 19 Aug 1884 in Frazier, Buchanan,
MO, 621 d. 19 Sep 1974 in St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO,622 bur. after 19 Sep 1974 in Mt. Auburn
Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO623
│ │ │ │ +Logan Earl5 WING (3953),624 b. 4 Dec 1885 in Clayton, Adams,
IL,625 m. 23 Jun 1909 in Frazier, Buchanan, MO,626 d. 27 Nov 1967 in St. Joseph, Buchanan,
MO, 627 bur. after 27 Nov 1967 in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO628

608Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.


609Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
610Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
611Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
612Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
613Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
614Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
615Benjamin Franklin Gray, 19 Jun 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 27, dwelling
221, family 229, Ancestry.com Series T9, roll 675, image 749; 19 Jun 1880 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 27, dwelling 221, family 229; 19 Jun 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah,
UT, Page 27, dwelling 221, family 229.
616SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
61719 Jun 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 27, dwelling 221, family 229.
61819 Jun 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 27, dwelling 221, family 229.
619Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
620Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
621Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
622SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
623Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
624Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
625SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
626Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
627SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
628Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.

218
│ │ │ │ ├──
Logan Earl6 WING Jr. (3967),629 b. 10 Jun 1910 in
Buchanan, MO,630
d. 21 Nov 2004 in St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO631
│ │ │ │ │ +Hazel Evelyn6 WATSON (3968)632 is still living
│ │ │ │ ├── Virginia Elizabeth6 WING (3969),633 b. 25 Oct 1911 in
Buchanan, MO,634 d. 10 Feb 1999 in Savannah, Andrew, MO,635 bur. after 10 Feb 1999 in
Ashland Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO636
│ │ │ │ │ +Frederick Stanley6 BANGERTER (3970)637 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Robert Frederick7 BANGERTER (3978), b. 16 Oct
1944 in St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO
│ │ │ │ │ ├── William Otto7 BANGERTER (3979)638 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ +Margaret7 ELLIOT (3980)639 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ │ ├── Laura Beth8 BANGERTER (3981)640 is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ │ └── Lisa Marie8 BANGERTER (3982)641 is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Richard Lee7 BANGERTER (3983)642 is still living

629Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
630Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
631SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
632Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
633Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
634Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
635Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
636Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
637Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
638Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
639Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
640Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
641Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
642Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.

219
│ │ │ │ │ └── James Alan7 BANGERTER (3984)643 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ +Mary Jo7 DAILEY (3985)644 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Jill Amy8 BANGERTER (3986)645 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Jennifer Ann8 BANGERTER (3987)646 is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ +Jennifer Marie7 CROTTY (3988)647 is still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── Camilla Francis8 BANGERTER (3989)648 is
still living
│ │ │ │ │ ├── James Andrew8 BANGERTER (3990)649 is still
living
│ │ │ │ │ └── Alison Elizabeth8 BANGERTER (3991)650 is
still living
│ │ │ │ ├──
Ruth Anna6 WING (3973),651 b. 16 Dec 1913,652 d. 28 Nov
1918 in Buchanan, MO (Cause of death - influenza),653 bur. after 28 Nov 1918 in Mt. Moriah
Cemetery, Buchanan, MO654
│ │ │ │ ├── Lenore Elva6 WING (3974),655 b. 1 Oct 1915 in Buchanan,
MO,656 d. 2 Apr 1998 in Boonton, Morris, NJ657

643Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
644Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
645Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
646Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
647Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
648Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
649Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
650Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
651Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
652Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
653Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
654Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.

220
│ │ │ │ │ +Lawrence Chester6 COLT (3975),658 b. 19 Mar 1913,659 m.
13 Dec 1935,660d. 15 Oct 1994 (Lawrence Colt's date of birth and death are derived from the Social
Security Death Index and based on the fact that his wife died in Boonton, New Jersey. In the SSDI one of
Lawrence's last residences was Boonton)661
│ │ │ │ └──
Theodore Kenneth6 WING (3976),662 b. 6 Apr 1917 in
Buchanan, MO,663 d. 4 Dec 1998 in St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO664
│ │ │ │ +Mary Jane6 REES (3977)665 is still living
│ │ │ ├── Lenna Lois5 GRAY (3956),666 b. 21 Mar 1890 in Frazier, Buchanan,
MO,667 d. 27 Jan 1975 in Kansas City, Jackson, MO,668 bur. after 27 Jan 1975 in Mt. Auburn
Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan, MO669
│ │ │ │ +Jewell5 GIBSON (3957),670 b. 28 Jan 1890,671 m. 1913,672 d. Jun
1978 in MO 673

│ │ │ │ └── Virginia L.6 GIBSON (3958) is still living


│ │ │ └── Norman5 GRAY (3959),674 b. 14 Jun 1892 in Frazier, Buchanan,
MO,675 d. Sep 1966 in Gower, Clinton, MO676

655Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
656Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
657Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
658Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
659SSDI.

660Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.


661SSDI.

662Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
663Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
664Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
665Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
666Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler,
"Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; Jill A. Fockler, "Re:
Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
667SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
668SSDI; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
669Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
670Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
671Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
672Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
673Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
674SSDI; SSDI; SSDI.

221
│ │ │ +Grace5 WALKUP (3960)677 is still living
│ │ │ ├── Helen6 GRAY (3961) is still living
│ │ │ └── Glenna6 GRAY (3962) is still living
│ │ ├──Sarah Ann4 LOWRIE (2806),678 b. 18 Mar 1856 in Macon, IL,679 d. 30 May
1903 in Tremont, Buchanan, MO,680 bur. after 30 May 1903 in New Harmony Cemetery,
Buchanan, MO681
│ │ │ +Jesse Summers4 HOLMES (2811),682 b. circa 1855 in MO, m. 16 Jun
1878 in Eastman, Buchanan, MO683

675SSDI.

676SSDI.

677Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.


678unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
679Jill
A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005; unknown author,
"E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
680Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
681Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29 Sep 2005.
682unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
683unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.

222
│ │ ├── Unknown4 LOWRIE (2951),684 b. circa 18 Jul 1857,685 d. 18 Jul 1857 in
Macon, IL686
│ │ ├── Mariah E.4 LOWRIE (2952),687 b. circa 1858,688 d. 16 Dec 1858 in Macon,
IL689
│ │ ├── Ida Bell4 LOWRIE (2807),690 b. before 1861691

They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.


Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; Jill A. Fockler, "Re: Craycroft/Lowrie," e-mail to Bob Craycroft, 29
Sep 2005.
684Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant of Wm. A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jul 18, 1857; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Infant of Wm. A. and C.A. Lowrie, died Jul 18, 1857; Decatur Genealogical Society,
Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant of Wm. A. and C.A. Lowrie, died Jul 18, 1857.
685Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant of Wm. A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jul 18, 1857.
686Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant of Wm. A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jul 18, 1857.
687Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie, dau of
Wm. and C.A., died Dec 16, 1858; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie, dau of Wm. and C.A., died Dec 16, 1858; Decatur Genealogical
Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie, dau of Wm. and C.A., died Dec
16, 1858; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie,
dau of Wm. and C.A., died Dec 16, 1858.
688Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie, dau of
Wm. and C.A., died Dec 16, 1858.
689Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Mariah E. Lowrie, dau of
Wm. and C.A., died Dec 16, 1858.
690unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright; unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to
unknown recipient, Children of William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.

223
│ │ │ +James4 WRIGHT (2812)692 is still living
│ │ └── Unknown4 LOWRIE (2950),693 b. circa 19 Jun 1861,694 d. 19 Jul 1861 in
Macon, IL695
│ ├── Ellen V.3 CRAYCROFT (158),696 b. 18 Sep 1833 in MD,697 d. 16 Nov 1892 in
Decatur, Macon, IL,698 bur. 18 Nov 1892 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, IL699

691unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
692unknown author, "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer," e-mail to unknown recipient, Children of
William and Cornelia:
Margaret Ellen-born March 22,1851 in Decatur, Ill.
married Ancel Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
They had Cora May Holmes-- my great grandmother.
Mary Elizabeth-born 1854-married Ben Gray
Sarah Ann-born March 18, 1856--married Jesse Holmes in Buchanan Co., MO.
Ida Bell-married James Wright.
693Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19, 1861; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A. and C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19, 1861; Decatur Genealogical
Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A. and C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19,
1861; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A.
and C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19, 1861.
694Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19, 1861.
695Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Infant dau of W.A. and
C.A. Lowrie, died Jun 19, 1861.
696June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Ellen V. Bainter, wife of John, d. 11-
16-1892, aged 59 y 1m 29d; 73; Daily Review, July 14, 1913, Mrs. Helen Bainter died yesterday
at 11:30 at the home of her brother, W.B. Craycroft, in Mt. Zion township. She was the wife of
John Bainter and lived near Warrensburg. She went to the Craycroft home to attend the funeral of
Miss Jessie Craycroft, who died a week ago last Friday. She was taken sick that same day and
was unable to get home. Her illness grew out of a trouble of long standing. She leaves besides
the husband five children, who are Frank of Sumner county, Kan., William, living near Blue
Mound, Milford, Samina and Stella, all living at the home place.

The time for holding the funeral has not been fixed yet.; Thursday, November 17, 1892; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Ellen V. Bainter, wife of John, d. 11-
16-1892, aged 59 y 1m 29d; 73; Daily Review, July 14, 1913, Mrs. Helen Bainter died yesterday
at 11:30 at the home of her brother, W.B. Craycroft, in Mt. Zion township. She was the wife of
John Bainter and lived near Warrensburg. She went to the Craycroft home to attend the funeral of
Miss Jessie Craycroft, who died a week ago last Friday. She was taken sick that same day and
was unable to get home. Her illness grew out of a trouble of long standing. She leaves besides
the husband five children, who are Frank of Sumner county, Kan., William, living near Blue
Mound, Milford, Samina and Stella, all living at the home place.

224
│ │ +John3 BAINTER (159), b. 1836 in IN,700 m. 8 Sep 1855 in Macon, IL, d.
?unknown
│ │ ├──
Franklin4 BAINTER (3122), b. circa 1855 in IL701
│ │ ├──
William4 BAINTER (3123), b. circa 1857 in IL702
│ │ ├──
Simina4 BAINTER (2953),703 b. circa 1861, d. 5 Dec 1936,704 bur. in Salem
Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, IL705
│ │ ├── Milford4 BAINTER (3124), b. between 1862 and 1875
│ │ └── Stella4 BAINTER (404),706 b. 3 Dec 1875, d. 7 Dec 1897,707 bur. after 7
Dec 1897 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, IL708
│ ├── Martha3 CRAYCROFT (168), b. circa 1838 in MD

The time for holding the funeral has not been fixed yet.; Thursday, November 17, 1892.
697June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291.
698unknown article title, Decatur Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, 17 Nov 1892, Mrs. Helen Bainter
died yesterday at 11:30 at the home of her brother, W.B. Craycroft, in Mt. Zion township. She was
the wife of John Bainter and lived near Warrensburg. She went to the Craycroft home to attend
the funeral of Miss Jessie Craycroft, who died a week ago last Friday. She was taken sick that
same day and was unable to get home. Her illness grew out of a trouble of long standing. She
leaves besides the husband five children, who are Frank of Sumner county, Kan., William, living
near Blue Mound, Milford, Samina and Stella, all living at the home place.

The time for holding the funeral has not been fixed yet.; Thursday, November 17, 1892.
Hereinafter cited as Daily Review; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Ellen V. Bainter, wife of John, d. 11-16-1892, aged 59 y 1m 29d; 73.
699Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 73; Daily Review, July
14, 1913, The funeral of Mrs. Ellen Bainter will be held from the Salem church southwest of
Decatur at 11 o'clock today. Rev. M. Auer will conduct the services. The funeral cortege will leave
the residence of W.B. Craycroft at 9 o'clock this morning.; Friday, November 18, 1892.
700JohnBainter, September 10, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 1963; Family
No. 1983, Ancestry.com, Age reported in census is 24.
701George Fortner, July 3, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Ancestry.com, Age given at
census as 5.
702July 3, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Age given at census as 3 years old.
703Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Simina Bainter, d. 12-5-
1936, a. 75 y; p.73; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Simina
Bainter, d. 12-5-1936, a. 75 y; p.73.
704Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Simina Bainter, d. 12-5-
1936, a. 75 y; p.73.
705Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p.73.
706Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Stella M. Bainter, d. 12-
7-1897, a. 22 y; p. 73; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Stella
M. Bainter, d. 12-7-1897, a. 22 y; p. 73.
707Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Stella M. Bainter, d. 12-
7-1897, a. 22 y; p. 73.
708Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p.73.

225
│ └── Nancy A.3 CRAYCROFT (156),709 b. 6 Feb 1843 in Macon, IL,710 d. 18 Jan 1918
in St. Mary's Hospital, Decatur, Macon, IL,711 bur. 20 Jan 1918 in Salem Cemetery, South
Wheatland Township, Macon, IL712
│ +Peter Wesley3 STICKEL (157),713 b. 18 Oct 1836 in PA,714 m. 29 Dec 1859 in
Macon, IL (Married by John C. Smith, M.G),715 d. 13 Apr 1868 in Macon, IL,716 bur. circa 16 Apr
1868 in Salem Cemetery, South Wheatland Township, Macon, IL717

709Marriage Lic., Wm. Morris, Matilda Craycroft; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, "Mother", Nancy A. Stickel, Feb. 6, 1843 - Jan 18, 1918; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, "Mother", Nancy A. Stickel, Feb. 6,
1843 - Jan 18, 1918; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Nancy
A. Stickel, Feb. 6, 1843 - Jan 18, 1918.
710Nancy A. Stickel entry, Death Certificate for Nancy A. Stickel, Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Death Cert., Nancy Stickel; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, "Mother", Nancy A. Stickel, Feb. 6,
1843 - Jan 18, 1918.
711Death Cert., Nancy Stickel, Cause of death - Bronchitis- pneumonia. Mrs. Carl Siehr of Elwin,
Illinois, signed the death certificate as witness; Nancy A. Craycroft, State database 30757 (19 Jan
1918), Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL.
Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, Nancy A. Stickel, Feb. 6, 1843 - Jan 18, 1918.
712Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions; Death Cert., Nancy
Stickel.
713Marriage Lic., Wm. Morris, Matilda Craycroft; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County
Cemetery Inscriptions, Date computed from dates on grave marker: Peter Wesley Stickel, died
Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, "My Father's Grave", Peter Wesley Stickel, died Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d;
unknown author, Petition For Sale of Real Estate (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), State of Illinois, Macon
County } ss. In county Court August August Term A.D. 1870. Estate of Peter W. Stickel
Deceased.

To the Hon. Samuel G. Greer Judge of the County Court of said County.

Your Petitioners William B. Craycroft and David H. Stickel, administrators of the estate of Peter
W. Stickel late of said County, deceased, respectfully represents: That the said Peter W. Stickel
departed this life at his residence in said county on or about the 13th day of April A.D. 1868;
Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Date computed from dates
on grave marker: Peter Wesley Stickel, died Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d; Decatur
Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, "My Father's Grave", Peter Wesley
Stickel, died Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d; unknown author, Petition For Sale, State of
Illinois, Macon County } ss. In county Court August August Term A.D. 1870. Estate of Peter W.
Stickel Deceased.

To the Hon. Samuel G. Greer Judge of the County Court of said County.

Your Petitioners William B. Craycroft and David H. Stickel, administrators of the estate of Peter
W. Stickel late of said County, deceased, respectfully represents: That the said Peter W. Stickel
departed this life at his residence in said county on or about the 13th day of April A.D. 1868.
714Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, Date computed from
dates on grave marker: Peter Wesley Stickel, died Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d.

226
│ ├── Willie4 STICKEL (2851),718 b. 20 Feb 1861, d. 18 Feb 1862

715Marriage License for Peter W. Stickel and Nancy A. Craycroft, Macon County Clerk, 141 S.
Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage License, Peter Stickel and Nancy
Crayroft.
716Peter Wesley Stickel, Petition for Letters of Administration, Peter W. Stickel 720, Decatur
Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 1548, Decatur, Macon, IL, Petition of Nancy S. Stickel in the
matter of the Estate of Peter W. Stickel deceased, for Letters of Administration.

To the Hon. Samuel F. Greet Judge of the County Court of Macon County, in the State of Illinois.

The Petition of the undersigned, Nancy A. Stickel, respectfully represents that Peter W. Stickel
late of the County of Macon aforesaid, departed this life at _____ in said County, on or about the
13 day of April A.D., 1868, leaving no last will and testament as far as your petitioner know or
believe.

An this Petition further shows that the said Peter W. Stickel died, seized and possessed of Real
and Personal Estate, consisting chiefly of horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, corn, farming utensils,
household and kitchen furniture, growing crops all of said personal estate being estimated to be
worth Fourteen Hundred dollars. That said decease left surviving him Nancy A. Stickel his widow
and Florence A, Edwin and Wesley Stickel his children as heirs. That your petitioner (being widow
of said deceased, and) believing that the said estate should be immediately administered, as well
for the proper management of said Estate as for the prompt collection of the assets, by virtue of
their right under the Statute therefore pray that your honor will grant Letters of Administration to
W.B. Craycroft and David H. Stickel in the premises, upon their taking the oath prescribed by the
Statute, and entering into Bond n such sum, and with securities, as may be approved by your
honor.

State of Illinois }
Macon County } ss. Nancy A. Stickel
being duly sworn, deposes and says that the facts averred in the above petition are true,
according to the best of their knowledge, information and belief. Hereinafter cited as Letters of
Administration, Peter W. Stickel; unknown author, Petition For Sale, State of Illinois, Macon
County } ss. In county Court August August Term A.D. 1870. Estate of Peter W. Stickel
Deceased.

To the Hon. Samuel G. Greer Judge of the County Court of said County.

Your Petitioners William B. Craycroft and David H. Stickel, administrators of the estate of Peter
W. Stickel late of said County, deceased, respectfully represents: That the said Peter W. Stickel
departed this life at his residence in said county on or about the 13th day of April A.D. 1868;
Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, "My Father's Grave", Peter
Wesley Stickel, died Apr 14, 1868, aged 31 y 5 m 27 d.
717Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions.
718unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.), Peter and Nancy Stickel had
four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940

227
│ ├──Florence Arabelle4 STICKEL (786),719 b. 2 Nov 1862,720 d. 22 Sep 1930 in
South Wheatland Township, Macon, IL,721 bur. circa 22 Sep 1930 in Salem Cemetery, Decatur,
Macon, IL722

Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, Willie V. Stickel, son of P.W. and N.J. Stickel, died Feb 18, 1862, aged 11 mos 26
das.
719unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864; unknown author, Petition For Sale, That the said deceased
left him surviving Nancy a. Stickel as his widow, having a dower interest in his real estate, and the
following named children Florence A. Stickel, Edwin Stickel and Wesley Stickel having no
guardian resident in said county; the said three children are minors and under fourteen years of
age; unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864; unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy
Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
720unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
721Florence Arabelle Stickel, State database 580138 (23 Sep 1930), Illinois State Archives,
Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL, SIEHR, FLORENCE A.: F/W
AGE: UNK CERT. NO: 0580138, DATE OF DEATH: 1930-09-22, COUNTY: MACON, CITY:
SOUTH WHEATLAND TWP, DATE REPORTED: 30-09-23
. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
722unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862

228
│ │ +Carl4 SIEHR (389), b. 1 Apr 1867,723 m. 9 Nov 1898 in Grace M E
Parsonage, Macon, IL,724 d. 20 Dec 1951,725 bur. circa 22 Dec 1951 in Salem Cemetery,
Decaturq, Macon, IL726
│ │ └── Alma Florence5 SIEHR (2852)727 is still living

Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery


m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864; Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery
Inscriptions, p. 42.
723unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
724unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930
Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il
.
725unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
726Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions, p. 42; unknown author,
E-mail from Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
727unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Karl and Florence Siehr had one child
Alma Florence Siehr b. May 26, 1900
d. Oct. 12, 1978 Salem Cemetery
m. Melvin Ridgeway Smith on July 15, 1920
b. July 12, 1899 d. May 10, 1943 Salem Cemetery.

229
│ │ +Melvin Ridgeway5 SMITH (2853),728 b. 12 Jul 1899, m. 15 Jul
1920, d. 10 May 1943, bur. in Salem Cemetary, Decatur, IL
│ ├── Edwin C.4 STICKEL (785),729 b. 6 Sep 1864
│ └── Wesley Wilbur4 STICKEL (784),730 b. 27 Nov 1866, d. 13 Nov 1940 in
Assumption Township, Christian, IL731
│ +Ida Belle4 CLIFTON (2850), m. 10 Mar 1892 in Macon, IL,732 d. 27 Apr
1940 in Assumption, Christian, IL733
│ +Elizabeth2 TRAVIS (155), b. circa 1820 in KY,734 m. 17 Jul 1848 in Macon, IL,735 d. 28
Oct 1853 in Macon, IL,736 bur. after 28 Oct 1853 in Mt. Zion Presbyterian Cemtery, Mt. Zion,
Macon, IL737

728unknown author, E-mail from Beverly Drum, Karl and Florence Siehr had one child Alma
Florence Siehr b. May 26, 1900
d. Oct. 12, 1978 Salem Cemetery
m. Melvin Ridgeway Smith on July 15, 1920
b. July 12, 1899 d. May 10, 1943 Salem Cemetery.
729unknown author, Petition For Sale, That the said deceased left him surviving Nancy a. Stickel
as his widow, having a dower interest in his real estate, and the following named children
Florence A. Stickel, Edwin Stickel and Wesley Stickel having no guardian resident in said county;
the said three children are minors and under fourteen years of age.
730unknown author, Petition For Sale, That the said deceased left him surviving Nancy a. Stickel
as his widow, having a dower interest in his real estate, and the following named children
Florence A. Stickel, Edwin Stickel and Wesley Stickel having no guardian resident in said county;
the said three children are minors and under fourteen years of age; unknown author, E-mail from
Beverly Drum, Peter and Nancy Stickel had four children:
Willie b. Feb. 20, 1861 d. Feb. 18, 1862
Florence Arabelle Stickel b. Nov. 2, 1862 d. 1930 Salem Cemetery
m. Karl Siehr b. April 1, 1867 Germany
d. Dec. 20, 1951 Salem Cemetery
Married Nov. 9, 1898 Grace M E Parsonage, Macon County, Il.
Wesley Wilbur Stickel b. Nov. 27, 1866 d. Nov. 13, 1940
m. Ida Belle Clifton d. April 27, 1940
Edward Stickel b. Sept. 6, 1864.
731Wesley Wilbur Stickel, State database 338 (November 17, 1920), Illinois State Archives,
Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index
1916-50.
732IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900.
733IdaBell Stickel, State database 130, Illinois State Archives, Norton Building, Capitol Complex,
Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
734June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291.
735Macon County Marriage Records, Edward Craycroft and Elizabeth Bohrer: Married by David
Wright, Minster of the Gospel, Illinois Regional Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144,
P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage Record, Edward
Craycroft and Elizabeth Bohrer; Marriage license issued to Edwrd Craycroft and Elizabeth Bohrer,
Macon County Clerk, 141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage
License, Edward Craycroft and Elizabeth Bohrer.
736DecaturGenealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions in Mt. Zion, Harristown
and Decatur Township (n.p.: Vol. 8, May, 1973, n.d.).
737Decatur Genealogical Society, Macon County Cemetery Inscriptions.

230
│ ├── Mary3 CRAYCROFT (231), b. circa 1848 in Macon, IL
│ ├── Permelia3 CRAYCROFT (230),738 b. circa 1848 in Macon, IL739
│ └── Edward M.3 CRAYCROFT (790),740 b. circa 1851 in South Wheatland Township,
Macon, IL741
│ +Ann A.2 HALFORD (3194),742 m. 22 Jan 1855 in Montgomery, MD743
├── Eliza Ann2 CRAYCROFT (2790),744 b. circa 1810 in MD745
│ +Thomas G.2 HARRISS (2789),746 b. circa 1809 in MD,747 m. 25 Oct 1836 in
Montgomery, MD748
│ ├── Mary L.3 HARRISS (3292),749 b. circa 1841 in MD750

738June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291, Age
given at Census as 2 years old.; Pg. 145; June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no.
145, dwelling 291, family 291, Age given at Census as 2 years old.; Pg. 145.
739June, 1850 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Page no. 145, dwelling 291, family 291, Age
given at Census as 2 years old.; Pg. 145.
740July 3, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, According to census, Edward Craycroft, aged
7, was living with George Fortner and his family; July 3, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT,
According to census, Edward Craycroft, aged 7, was living with George Fortner and his family.
741Anonymous, History of Macon County, Illinois. With Illustrations Descriptive of its Scenery, and
Biographical Sketches of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers (Philadelphia: Brink,
McDonough & Co., 1880), Patrons List states that E.M. Craycroft settled in South Wheatland
Township in 1851. Hereinafter cited as History of Macon County, Illinois.
742unknown author, Maryland Marriages, 1667-1899 (n.p.: Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000, n.d.).
743unknown author, Maryland Marriages, 1667-1899.
744unknown author, Montgomery County Marriages, Received via e-mail from Margaret Whippee,
2/23/2000:
Page 77 Montgomery Co. Marriages
Craycroft Eliza Ann m. Thomas G. Harriss 25 Oct. 1836; Page 77.
745Thomas G. Harriss, July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378,
dwelling 39, family 60, Ancestry.com M432, film 295, Place of birth given as Maryland.
746unknown author, Montgomery County Marriages, Received via e-mail from Margaret Whippee,
2/23/2000:
Page 77 Montgomery Co. Marriages
Craycroft Eliza Ann m. Thomas G. Harriss 25 Oct. 1836; Page 77.
747July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 41, born Maryland.
748unknown author, Montgomery County Marriages, Received via e-mail from Margaret Whippee,
2/23/2000:
Page 77 Montgomery Co. Marriages
Craycroft Eliza Ann m. Thomas G. Harriss 25 Oct. 1836; Page 77.
749July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 9, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and
378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 9, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 9, born Maryland.
750July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 9, born Maryland.

231
│ ├── Angeline C.3 HARRISS (3293),751 b. circa 1843 in MD,752 d. 16 May 1935 in
Moultrie, IL753
│ │ +James W.3 BERRY (3306),754 b. Mar 1847 in IL,755 m. 7 Mar 1869 in Moultrie,
IL,756 d. 26 Sep 1938 in Moultrie, IL757
│ ├── Alice Ann3 HARRISS (3294),758 b. circa 1845 in MD759
│ │ +John S.3 JONES (3296),760 b. circa 1838 in IL,761 m. 16 Dec 1868 in Macon,
IL,762 d. 7 May 1919 in Decatur, Macon, IL763
│ │ ├── James C.4 JONES (3309),764 b. circa 1871 in IL765

751July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 7, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and
378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 7, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 7, born Maryland.
752July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 7, born Maryland.
753AngelineBerry, State database unknown number, Illinois State Archives, Norton Building,
Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
754Marriage Record, Moultrie County, Illinois, James W. Berry and Angeline Harris: Married by
J.B. Wolfe, Minister of the Gospel, Illinois Regional Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB
144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage Record, James
W. Berry - Angeline Harris.
755Marriage Record, James W. Berry - Angeline Harris: Married by J.B. Wolfe, Minister of the
Gospel.
756Marriage Record, James W. Berry - Angeline Harris: Married by J.B. Wolfe, Minister of the
Gospel.
757James W. Berry, State database 95 (29 Sept 1938), Illinois State Archives, Norton Building,
Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-50.
758July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 5, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and
378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 5, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 5, born Maryland.
759July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 5, born Maryland.
760John S. Jones, June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188,
family 198, Ancestry.com Series T9, roll 229, image 439.
761June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198.
762IL Marr. Index, 1763-1900.
763John Samuel Jones, State database 18837 (7 May 1919), Illinois State Archives, Norton
Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as IL Death Index 1916-
50.
764June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Age
given at census as 9 years old, born Illinois; June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT,
Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Age given at census as 9 years old, born Illinois; June 16,
1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Age given at
census as 9 years old, born Illinois.

232
│ │ ├── Claude W. JONES (3310),766 b. circa 1875 in IL767
4

│ │ └── Electa JONES (3311),768 b. circa 1877 in IL769


4

│ ├── Emma Thomas HARRISS (3295),770 b. circa 1847 in MD771


3

│ │ +William A. DENNIS (3312),772 b. circa 1841 in OH,773 m. 27 Dec 1866 in Macon,


3

IL774
│ │ ├── Katie4 DENNIS (3313),775 b. circa 1868 in IL776
│ │ └── Nellie4 DENNIS (3314),777 b. Dec 1869 in Macon, IL778

765June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Age
given at census as 9 years old, born Illinois.
766June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen
given at census as 5 years old, born in Illinois; June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah,
UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen given at census as 5 years old, born in Illinois; June
16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen given at
census as 5 years old, born in Illinois.
767June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen
given at census as 5 years old, born in Illinois.
768June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen
given at census as 3 years old, born in Illinois; June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah,
UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen given at census as 3 years old, born in Illinois; June
16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen given at
census as 3 years old, born in Illinois.
769June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 188, family 198, Agen
given at census as 3 years old, born in Illinois.
770July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 3, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and
378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 3, born Maryland; July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm,
Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60, Age given as 3, born Maryland.
771July17, 1850 scanned microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 377 and 378, dwelling 39, family 60,
Age given as 3, born Maryland.
772Marriage Record, Macon County, Illinois, William A. Dennis and Emma T. Harris, Illinois
Regional Archives Depository, Brookens library - LIB 144, P.O. Box 19243, Springfield,
Sangamon, IL. Hereinafter cited as Marriage Record, Wm. A. Dennis - Emma t. Harris.
773William A. Dennis, 3 August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy
141, Ancestry.com Series M593, roll 441, image 235, Age given at census as 29, born Ohio.
774Marriage Record, Wm. A. Dennis - Emma t. Harris.
7753 August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at
census as 2 years old, born in Illinois; 3 August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26,
dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at census as 2 years old, born in Illinois; 3 August 1870
microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at census as 2 years
old, born in Illinois.
7763August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at
census as 2 years old, born in Illinois.
7773August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at
census as 9/12, 9 months, born Illinois; 3 August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26,
dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at census as 9/12, 9 months, born Illinois; 3 August 1870

233
│ ├── Maria HARRISS (3308),779 b. circa 1852 in MD780
3

│ └── Lilly HARRISS (3307),781 b. circa 1852 in MD782


3

├── John P. CRAYCROFT (3142),783 b. 15 Sep 1815 in Montgomery, MD,784 d. 13 Apr 1907
2

in Cooper, MO785
│ +Minerva Jane2 PRICE (3143), b. 24 Mar 1822 in Prince Albert County, MD, m. 13 Nov
1844 in Montgomery, MD,786 d. May 1873
│ ├── Charles3 CRAYCROFT (3145), b. 1845 in Montgomery, MD, d. 29 Nov 1851 in
Montgomery, MD
│ ├── Clark3 CRAYCROFT (3144),787 b. 18 May 1847 in Montgomery, MD, d. 14 Jul
1928 in Joplin, MO,788 bur. 17 Jul 1928 in Fairview Cemetery, Joplin, Jasper, MO789
│ │ +Alma3 SARGENT (3149), m. 1 May 1882 in Joplin, Jasper, MO,790 d. 12 Apr 1899
in Joplin, Jasper, MO791

microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at census as 9/12, 9
months, born Illinois.
7783 August 1870 microfilm, Provo, Utah, UT, Page 26, dwelling 141, famliy 141, Age given at
census as 9/12, 9 months, born Illinois.
779Thomas G. Harriss, June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family
No. 429, Ancestry.com M653, Roll 203, Age given at census as 8, bon Md; June 15, 1860
Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at census as 8, bon
Md; June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at
census as 8, born Md.
780June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at
census as 8, bon Md.
781June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at
census as 8, born Md; June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No.
429, Age given at census as 8, born Md; June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT,
Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at census as 8, born Md.
782June 15, 1860 Federal Census, Provo, Utah, UT, Dwelling 425; Family No. 429, Age given at
census as 8, born Md.
783unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IV (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.);
unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper; unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper.
784unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper.
785unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper; John P. Craycroft Memorial card; Jennifer
Evans personal colleciton, TX, Although the memoria card shows the name as John E. Craycroft,
there is little doubt that it is acutally for John P. Craycroft. The year is consistent with the known
year of death for John. The card was found in a collection of letters from and to Nellie Murphy, a
daughter of John P. Craycroft.
786unknown author, Maryland Marriages, 1667-1899.
787unknown author, History of Jasper County, Missouri. Including a condensed history of the
State, a complete history of Carthage & Joplin, other towns & townships (n.p.: Mills & Co., Des
Moines, Iowa, 1883, n.d.), P. 518; unknown author, History of Jasper County, P. 518.
788unknown author, History of Jasper County, P. 518.
789unknown author, History of Jasper County, P. 518.
790Marriage Certificate for Clark Craycroft and Alma Sargent, Jennifer Evans personal colleciton,
TX. Hereinafter cited as Marriage cert. for Clark Craycroft and Alma Sargent.

234
│ │ └── Rola4 CRAYCROFT (3150) is still living
│ ├── John 3
CRAYCROFT (3146), b. 3 Aug 1849 in Montgomery, MD,792 d. 1 Dec 1851
in Montgomery, MD793
│ ├── Bettie3 CRAYCROFT (3147), b. 4 Jan 1855 in Montgomery, MD,794 d. 22 Feb
1899,795 bur. in New Lebanon Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Cooper, MO796
│ │ +William T.3 PARRISH (3151)
│ │ ├── John P.4 PARRISH (3153) is still living
│ │ ├── William4 PARRISH (3154) is still living
│ │ └── Wallace4 PARRISH (3152),797 b. 12 Oct 1881 in MO,798 d. 21 Sep 1974 in
San Diego, CA799

791unknown author, History of Jasper County, P. 518; Kenneth E. Weant, compiler, Jasper
County, Missouri 4710 Deaths Reported In and Chronological Index to Selected Articles from the
Joplin Daily News and News Herald 1 March 1878 to 30 December 1899. Volume I. (n.p.: n.pub.,
2002). Hereinafter cited as Jasper County Deaths.
792unknown family info, Murphy Family Bible (n.p.: n.pub., n.d.); Jennifer Evans, unknown
location.
793Murphy Family Bible.
794Murphy Family Bible; unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper, Name: Bettie Parrish
Birth Date: 04 Jan 1855
Death Date: 22 Feb 1899
wife of W. T. Parrish

Cemetery: New Lebanon Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery

Description: Location: Center NE 1/4 of Section 21; T-46-N; R-18-W; on the Forest Lewis Farm
Note: August, 1978 Mr. Lewis informed Mr. Gene Cordry that recently some grave stones had
been discovered when he and his sons were cultivating land at this site. He had not known of a
burial plot there. They took the stones to his home and stacked them near the house. Mr. Cordry
and Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Mitzel were invited to his home and recorded these names:

Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IV.


795Murphy Family Bible; unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper, Name: Bettie Parrish
Birth Date: 04 Jan 1855
Death Date: 22 Feb 1899
wife of W. T. Parrish

Cemetery: New Lebanon Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery

Description: Location: Center NE 1/4 of Section 21; T-46-N; R-18-W; on the Forest Lewis Farm
Note: August, 1978 Mr. Lewis informed Mr. Gene Cordry that recently some grave stones had
been discovered when he and his sons were cultivating land at this site. He had not known of a
burial plot there. They took the stones to his home and stacked them near the house. Mr. Cordry
and Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Mitzel were invited to his home and recorded these names:

Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IV


.
796unknown author, Cemetery Records of Cooper.
797California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE

235
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
; California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
; California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
; California Death index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
.
798CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
.
799CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Name: PARRISH, WALLACE
Social Security #: 548320253
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 12 Oct 1881
Birthplace: MISSOURI
Death Date: 21 Sep 1974
Death Place: SAN DIEGO
.

236
│ │ +Hazel Dell4 FORD (3179),800 b. 9 Aug 1895 in Fort Scott, Bourbon, KS,801
m. 14 Jul 1920,802d. 2 Apr 1985 in San Diego, CA803
│ │ └── Cleo5 PARRISH (3690) is still living
│ │ +Rose5 (3691) is still living
│ │ └── Linda6 PARRISH (3692) is still living
│ │ +Mark6 NELSON (3693) is still living
│ └── Nellie CRAYCROFT (3148), b. 28 Nov 1859 in Decatur, Macon, IL, d. 27 Sep
3

1938 in Joplin, MO
│ +James Noah3 MURPHY (3155),804 b. 23 Jun 1859 in MO, m. 15 Apr 1885 in
Otterville, Cooper, MO (Presbyterian Church),805 d. 9 Nov 1942
│ ├── Fred4 MURPHY (3180),806 b. 22 Mar 1888 in KS,807 d. 4 Jan 1923808
│ │ +Alice4 CAVENDER (3181)809 is still living

800CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,


Hazel Dell Parrish's listing in the California Death Index reports that Hazel's mother's maiden
name was Coppage.
801CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Parrish, Hazel Dell
S.S.#: 552-72-7804
D.O.B.: 9-Aug-1895
Birthplace: Kansas
D.O.D.: 2-April-1985
Deathplace: San Diego
Mother's Maiden Name: Coppage
Father's Surname: Ford.
802CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Parrish, Hazel Dell
S.S.#: 552-72-7804
D.O.B.: 9-Aug-1895
Birthplace: Kansas
D.O.D.: 2-April-1985
Deathplace: San Diego
Mother's Maiden Name: Coppage
Father's Surname: Ford.
803CaliforniaDeath index 1940-97, online http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5180,
Parrish, Hazel Dell
S.S.#: 552-72-7804
D.O.B.: 9-Aug-1895
Birthplace: Kansas
D.O.D.: 2-April-1985
Deathplace: San Diego
Mother's Maiden Name: Coppage
Father's Surname: Ford.
804Murphy Family Bible.
805Joplin Gold Star Mother Succumbs, The Joplin Globe, Joplin, Missouri, 28/9/1938.
806Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
807Murphy Family Bible.
808Murphy Family Bible.

237
│ ├── Okley4 MURPHY (3182),810 b. 28 Nov 1890 in MO,811 d. 29 Jun 1949 in
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, OK812
│ │ +Jessie Louise Bonsal4 CRAMER (3183),813 m. 6 Feb 1922,814 d. 14 Oct
1959815
│ ├── James Wilbur4 MURPHY (3184),816 b. 7 Sep 1892 in MO,817 d. 24 May
1967818
│ │ +Mary Paula4 LONDON (3185),819 m. 27 Jun 1926,820 d. 30 Sep 1967821
│ │ └── Patricia Ann5 MURPHY (4077), d. 1971 (According to the police, Patty
Ann committed suicide by gunshot the day before her divorce was to be final, leaving her husband the heir
to a considerable estate left her by her parents)
│ │ +Hugh L.5 JOHNSON Jr. (4078) is still living
│ │ ├── Mary Elizabeth6 JOHNSON (4079) is still living
│ │ └── Hugh L.6 JOHNSON III (4080) is still living
│ ├── Maurice Leland4 MURPHY (3186),822 b. 22 Dec 1896 in MO,823 d. 3 Oct
1918 in Mont Blanc824
│ ├── Bernice Inez4 MURPHY (3187),825 b. 3 Aug 1900826
│ │ +Sidney Thomas4 COBINE (3188),827 m. 15 Sep 1928,828 d. 8 May
1971829

809Murphy Family Bible.


810Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
811Murphy Family Bible.
812Murphy Family Bible.
813Murphy Family Bible.
814Murphy Family Bible.
815Murphy Family Bible.
816Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
817Murphy Family Bible.
818Murphy Family Bible.
819Murphy Family Bible.
820Murphy Family Bible.
821Murphy Family Bible.
822Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
823Murphy Family Bible.
824LelandMurhpy Is Killed In France, Unknown, Joplin, Missouri, October, 1918. Hereinafter cited
as Unknown.
825Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
826Murphy Family Bible.
827Murphy Family Bible.
828Murphy Family Bible.
829Murphy Family Bible.

238
│ └── Lloyd Craycroft4 MURPHY (3189),830 b. 11 Jul 1903 in Oklahoma City,
OK,831 d. 9 Dec 1935 in Killed in car accident, Roswell, NM832
│ +Anna M.4 WILSON (3190)833 is still living
│ ├── Maurice Leland5 MURPHY (3191)834 is still living
│ ├── Jo Ann5 MURPHY (3192)835 is still living
│ ├── Patricia Ann5 MURPHY (3203),836 b. 7 Aug 1927,837 d. 20 Sep
1971838
│ │ +(--?--)5 JOHNSTON (3204)839 is still living
│ └── Betty Jane5 MURPHY (3193)840 is still living
└── Ellen Mary2 CRAYCROFT (759), b. 26 Feb 1816

830Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.


831Murphy Family Bible.
832Murphy Family Bible; unknown author, Letter from Wallace Parrish to Anna Wilson Murphy
(n.p.: n.pub., Jan. 21, 1936).
833Murphy Family Bible.
834Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
835Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
836Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.
837Murphy Family Bible.
838Murphy Family Bible.
839Murphy Family Bible.
840Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible; Murphy Family Bible.

239
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100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL. Birth certificate of William Clifton Craycroft. Craycroft,
William Clifton entry.

100 E. Main Street, Salem, Marion, IL. Certified copy. Register of Births entry.

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141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Certificate. Craycroft, Robert Lynn entry.

141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Certified copy. Craycraft, Frank entry.

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141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Certified copy. Craycroft, William Francis entry.

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entry.

141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Macon County Clerk. Certified copy. Craycroft, Dora
Bess entry.

141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Macon County Clerk. Certified copy. Craycroft, William
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141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Macon County Clerk. Certified copy. Richardson, Harriet
entry.

141 S. Main Street, Decatur, Macon, IL. Macon County Clerk. photocopy of original. Nancy A.
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1411 W. Belmont Avenue, Fresno, Fresno, CA. Mountain View Cemetery. Burial Record. Hays,
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240
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Craycroft, Benjamin Jr., letter. January 16, 1916, from Vandalia, Illinois, to Rose Craycroft.
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Craycroft, Grace, letter. 21/10/1938, from Wichita Falls, Texas, to Murphy, Bernice Inez. unknown
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Craycroft, John P.. Memorial card. Jennifer Evans personal colleciton. TX.

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241
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In Memoriam 1963, University of California. n.p.: University of California, 1963. Online unknown
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24/2/2004.

Janet V. Hays, letter. 27/2/2004, from Williamsburg, VA, to Robert L. Craycroft. Robert Lynn
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address. 29 Sep 2005.

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Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Illinois State Archives. State
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242
Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Illinois State Archives. State
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Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Illinois State Archives. State
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Norton Building, Capitol Complex, Springfield, Sangamon, IL. Illinois State Archives. State
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Aug 2005.

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Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. April 23, 1930 scanned microfilm. Series IL T626, page 515-0447.
Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. April 4, 1930 scanned microfilm. Series TX T626, Roll 2409, Page 261.
Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. April 7, 1930 scanned microfilm. Series IL T626, page 539-0142. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. Aug. 10, 1850 scanned mirofilm. Series M432, roll 295. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. January 12, 1920 scanned microfilm. Series T625, roll 1858. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. January 5, 1920 scanned microfilm. Series T625, roll 96. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. January 7, 1920 scanned microfilm. Series T625,roll 96. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. July 17, 1850 scanned microfilm. M432, film 295. Ancestry.com.

244
Provo, Utah, UT. July 3, 1860 Federal Census. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm. Series CA T9, 62-0623. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June 1, 1880 scanned microfilm. Series CA T9, roll 62-0623. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June 15, 1860 Federal Census. M653, Roll 203. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June 16, 1880 scanned microfilm. Series T9, roll 229, image 439. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June 5, 1880 scanned microfilm. T9, Roll 238. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. June, 1850 Federal Census. Series M432, page 118. Ancestry.com.

Provo, Utah, UT. September 10, 1860 Federal Census. Ancestry.com.

Ray J. Crayroft. "Pedigree for Ray J. Craycroft". Compiled July 3, 1977. 3755 E. Hampton Way,
Fresno, Calif. 93726.

Ray Jack Cracyroft, interview. unknown informant address. unknown repository; unknown
repository address.

Rolling Meadows, Cook, IL. Robert Lynn Craycroft.

San Jose Mercury News, San Jose, CA, 13 Oct 1987.

San Jose Mercury News, unknown location, 4 Feb 2004.

Social Security Death Index, Provo, Utah: Ancestry.com.

Stephens & Bean Chapel. Stephens & Bean account sheet for Columbus Joel Craycroft. Fresno,
California: Stephens & Bean Chapel, November 19, 1915.

Stephens & Bean Chapel. Stephens & Bean account sheet for Laura Jane Craycroft. Fresno,
California: Stephens & Bean Chapel, March, 1921.

Stephens & Bean. Account ledger entry for Frank Craycroft Sr.,. 202 N. Teilman Ave., Fresno,
CA:, March, 1911.

The Chillicothe Constitution, Chillicothe, Missouri, March 28, 1912.

The Decatur Herald and Review, unknown location, 14 May 1996.

The Fresno Republican, Fresno, California, September 15, 1929.

The Joplin Globe, Joplin, Missouri, 28/9/1938.

The Prairie State Tribune, Assumption, Illinois, August 19, 1932.

Thomas Benton Craycroft. Personal narrative by Thomas Benton Craycroft. n.p.: None.

TX Jennifer Evans personal colleciton scanned photocopy of original document.

unknown author "E-mail from Gayle Sellmeyer." E-mail message from unknown author e-mail at
unknown address.

245
unknown author. Affidavit, State of Illinois, Macon County, January 7, 1922. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Birth Certificate for William Francis Craycroft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Boonville Weekly Advertiser. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IV. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Cemetery Records of Cooper County, Missouri Volume IX. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Craycroft Family Record of Ray J. Craycroft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Death Certificate for Fred S. Craycroft. n.p.: Certificate 757.

unknown author. Death Certificate. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Decatur Review. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. E-mail from Betty Gregston. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. E-mail from Beverly Drum. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. E-mail from Dan Craycraft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. E-mail from Sarah Elizabeth Craycroft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. History of Fresno County. n.p.: Vandor, 1919.

unknown author. History of Jasper County, Missouri. Including a condensed history of the State, a
complete history of Carthage & Joplin, other towns & townships. n.p.: Mills & Co., Des Moines,
Iowa, 1883.

unknown author. Illinois Marriage Index. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Letter from Columbus J. Craycroft to H.B. Craycroft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Letter from Wallace Parrish to Anna Wilson Murphy. n.p.: n.pub., Jan. 21, 1936.

unknown author. Marriage Certificate issued Feb.19, 1874. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Marriage Index: Maryland, 1655-1850 database. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Maryland Marriages, 1667-1899. n.p.: Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.

unknown author. Montgomery County Marriages. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Obituary published in the "Fresno Bee," July 18, 2000. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Obituary, The State-Journal Register, Springfield, IL. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Oral history via Geoffrey Durward Clayton Craycroft. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Petition For Sale of Real Estate. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Probate Records. n.p.: n.pub.

246
unknown author. Proof of Heirship for Frank S. Craycroft. n.p.: Dated April 22, 1935.

unknown author. Proof of Heirship for Jennie E. (Cairns) Craycroft. n.p.: Dated July 10, 1962.

unknown author. RootsWeb Cemetery Records. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Submitting Will to Probate in death of Dora B. (Craycroft) Craycraft. n.p.: Dated
February term, 1902.

unknown author. Supplemental Report of Birth, Report of Name of Child for Fred Scott Craycroft.
n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Supplemental Report of Birth, Report of Name of Child. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. The Chillicothe Constitution. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. The Fresno Weekly Republican, Fresno, California, Thursday, August 24 1899.
n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Wedding Invitation. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Will of Mary Prather. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National
Archives and Records Administration.

unknown author. WWW. Interment.net. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown author. Yates, Mauck and Bohrer web site. n.p.: n.pub.

unknown compiler. History of the Craycroft Family from June 10, 1297 A.D.. n.p.: John Henry
Craycroft, January 1, 1942.

unknown compiler. Online http://www.familysearch.org, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day


Saints. unknown location.

unknown family info. Family bible. n.p.: n.pub., n.d.. unknown present owner, unknown location.

unknown family info. Murphy Family Bible. n.p.: n.pub., n.d.. Jennifer Evans, unknown location.

unknown repository address unknown repository County license.

unknown repository address, unknown record type, unknown repository.

unknown repository address, unknown repository. unknown file number, 8/11/1922, unknown
name of person.

unknown repository address. 15/1/1820 unknown record type. M33_44, image 129. unknown
repository.

unknown repository address. 27 July 1870 microfilm. Series M593, roll 253. unknown repository.

unknown repository address. January 17, 190 microfilm. Series T625, roll 96. unknown
repository.

247
unknown repository address. unknown repository. Coroner's Certificate of Death. William C.
Craycroft entry.

unknown repository address. unknown repository. unknown record type.

Unknown, Joplin, Missouri, October, 1918.

Wichita Daily Times, unknown location, 3 December 1972.

Wichita Daily Times, Wichita Falls, Texas, August 19, 1929.

Wichita Daily Times, Wichita Falls, Texas, December 3, 1972.

Wichita Daily Times, Wichita Falls, Texas, March 4, 1911.

248