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INTEGRATING COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING IN THE BSCE LADDERIZED CURRICULUM

Henry P. Turalde, Francia H. Tomenio


ABSTRACT: The ladderized curriculum of BS in Civil Engineering at Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges offers a unique opportunity for community service learning. Basic construction courses such as carpentry, masonry, reinforced concrete and plumbing works are essential components of the ladderized curriculum, and students are learning more than these basic subjects as they perform community service. This service-learning scheme has significantly impacted students academic and practical training. Hands-on experience and opportunity for community service showed encouraging results as students developed new perspective and positive work attitudes, skills and competencies needed in their professional career. Integrating service-learning provided new insights and dimensions beyond class discussions, even beyond the students graduation day. KEYWORDS: service-learning, community service, ladderized curriculum

1.

INTRODUCTION

The Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges (CSPC) situated in Nabua, Camarines Sur in Bicol was founded through its college charter, Batas Pambansa Bilang 512 approved on June 10, 1983. Accordingly, the college shall primarily provide higher technological, professional and vocational instruction and training in fisheries, trades and technology, arts and sciences, as well as short term technical and vocational courses, (section 2 BP 512). The immediate clientele students are the graduates of the barangay, private and public high schools, out-of-school youths and drop-outs within Rinconada area, the 5th District of Camarines Sur comprised of six (6) municipalities and one (1) city namely: Nabua, Baao, Bula, Bato, Buhi, Balatan and Iriga City. As deemed necessary to make courses attractive and responsive to constituents, the college formulated the offering of ladderized curriculum in courses leading to baccalaureate degree in civil engineering. In fact, the college is offering ladderized curriculum in all courses leading to baccalaureate degrees, namely: electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, electronics engineering, nursing, office administration, food service, information technology and computer science giving diploma or certificate to practically every student every graduation day. 1.1 Ladderized Curriculum The ladderized education system is a learning modality that combines technical and vocational (Tech-Voc) courses that are creditable for a collegiate degree. Under the system, Tech-Voc and college degree components are harmonized allowing an individual to progress between and among Tech-Voc courses, college degree programs and progressively gain employment. The ladderization of all academic courses is mandated by Executive Order 358 that addresses the present compartmentalization of tech-voc and college degree programs that hinder the recognition and accreditation of tech-voc competencies in college degree and vice-versa. 1

Due to skills gap occurring in society, there is a need for the ladderized engineering programs to place a greater emphasis on preparing its graduates for the demands in the industry. This skills gap is most notable with college graduates, as they are not equipped with the desired skills needed to be successful. Employers believe that higher education is falling by not adequately developing the employability skills of graduates. In the study of Botor (2009), he posited that graduates of the ladderized engineering programs are generally employable, though performance in the licensure examinations is just slightly above the national passing percentage. The study continued to assert that college graduates need to be more creative and social in the workforce. Employers often state that college graduates are not being properly prepared for industry jobs. Therefore, a need exists for the program to investigate ways in which it can assist the engineering graduates in being prepared for the workforce once they leave the learning institution. 1.1.1 Ladderized Curriculum in Civil Engineering CSPC offers the ladderized curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering as approved by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED). In the ladder 1 (see Appendix B), aside from the regular engineering subjects in first year, there are Tech-Voc components of the course. One is CTW 1 - Carpentry during the first semester, and another is CTW 2 - Masonry during the second semester. Upon completion of all the requirements in Ladder 1, a Certificate in Civil Craftsman is awarded to the graduate. In ladder 2, the Tech-Voc components are CTW 3 - Reinforced Concrete Works in the first semester and CTW 4 - Plumbing Works in the second semester. Upon completion of all requirements, a Certificate in Civil Technology is awarded to the graduate. In ladder 3, the Tech-Voc components are CTW 5 - Building Design in the first semester and CTW 6 - House/Building Wiring in the second semester. Upon completion of all requirements, a Diploma in Civil Technology is awarded to the graduate. Ladder 4 and ladder 5 of the ladderized curriculum feature the common requirements of the course, in which upon completion a graduate is awarded the Bachelor in Civil Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering degrees respectively. 1.2 Extension Program Extension and outreach programs will be the keepers of the vision for the realization of the Millenium Development Goals of the country which is supportive of the Presidents Beat the Odds Program (Philippine Inquirer, 2005). This program, being a mandated function of the State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) has made institutions become proactive and supportive in the sustainable development of the communities. Specified under the 1987 Philippine Constitution, Article XIV, Section 2 states that, the state shall encourage non-formal, informal, indigenous learning systems, as well as self-learning, independent and out-of-school study programs, particularly those that respond to community 2

needs, and provide adult citizens, the disabled, and out-of- school youth with the training in civic, vocational efficiency and other skills. As a response to this constitutional mandate, various programs and projects can be conducted by the different agencies, both government organization (GOs) and non-government organizations (NGOs), hence the participation of the state universities and colleges (SUCs), with CSPC among them. With the commitment to take active part in peoples development, CSPC has taken initiative to enhance its extension program through the adoption of an extension program flagship dubbed, CSPC CARES which means, CSPC Community Assistance thru Responsive and Equitable Services for the community. 1.3 Community Service-Learning As CSPC is mandated also to conduct research, extension and production, it has taken active role in the community development in its service area, the 5th district of Camarines Sur. In the Civil Engineering Department, the extension activities focused on Tech-Voc courses in carpentry, masonry, reinforced concrete, and plumbing works. As CSPC extension office identifies barangays and indigenous residents needing of construction services, students taking up TechVoc courses are deployed for the community service. With the coordination of the extension office, regular community services are planned and conducted under the supervision of the faculty for the entire semester. Senior students who had completed Tech-Voc courses are also enlisted to serve as team members or leaders. According to National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, service-learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. Students involved in the service learning are expected not only to provide community service but also to learn about the context in which the service is provided, the connection between the service and their academic coursework, and their roles as citizens (Seifer et al., 2007). Moreover, service-learning is a form of experiential learning that is developed, implemented and evaluated in collaboration with the community; responds to community-identified concerns; attempts to balance the service and the learning; enhances curriculum by extending beyond the classroom and allowing students to apply what theyve learned to real world situations; and provide opportunities for critical reflection. Service-Learning in engineering education is gaining ground throughout the variety of disciplinary fields of engineering education (Vaughn, 2004). Engineering is uniquely situated for the integration of service-learning because of its emphasis on experiential education, problem solving and working in groups. Although, CSPC has not formally structured service-learning as a component of the civil engineering academic program, it has practically emerged as a major activity of the students taking up Tech-Voc courses. This study is an initial attempt to measure the impact of the said activity. Evaluating the students learning through these community service activities is the central focus of this discussion.

The purpose of this paper is to get feedback or reactions from students that could be used as basis in the formulation of a working plan for the college to eventually integrate community servicelearning in the curriculum of civil engineering program. Specifically, its objectives were as follows: 1. To determine the level of agreement of the integration of community service-learning in the ladderized curriculum of civil engineering course along four (4) Key Areas (KA): (1) perspective on community service-learning; (2) attitude toward community involvement; (3) enhancement of competence; and (4) influence on future professional work. 2. To identify the differences in the level of agreement across different respondent groups according to four (4) groupings: (a) gender groups; (b) age groups; (c) educational background; and (d) employment status. 2. METHODOLOGY The main gathering tool used in this study is questionnaire checklist. Survey instrument was patterned after the Methods and Strategies for Assessing Service-Learning in the Health Profession (Shinnamon et al., 1999). Questions were drawn in details to define specific issues in a typical five-level Likert scale format (see Appendix A). This bipolar scaling method is selected to measure either positive or negative response to a statement. Survey questionnaires were distributed to CSPC civil engineering students and graduates in order to measure the impact of the community service learning experience. Survey questionnaires were personally handed to civil engineering students currently enrolled and by email or social networking via internet to others who can not be personally reached. Retrieval is through the way it was sent. 2.1 Statistical Analysis The data gathered from the questionnaire were analyzed using the weighted mean, frequency count, percentage technique, rank, Friedmans Two Way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Wilcoxson Rank-Sum Test. To determine the level of agreement to the statement, typical five-level Likert scale is adopted: 1) strongly disagree; 2) disagree; 3 neutral; 4) agree and 5) strongly agree. For interpretation, the following scale is used: (1.00 to 1.80) strongly disagree; (1.81 to 2.60) disagree; (2.61 to 3.40) neutral; (3.41 to 4.20) agree; and (4.21 to 5.00) strongly agree. 2.2 Respondents Respondents to this study were civil engineering students currently enrolled and alumni of CSPC. Profile of the respondents is shown in table 1 as classified according to different groupings. As shown in table below, fifty-one (51) students and fifty-five (55) graduates returned the questionnaires. There were 69 males and 37 females. Twenty (20) of the respondents are below 20 years old age, 59 are aged 20-24 years, 20 respondents are aged 25-29 years old, and 7 respondents are aged 30-24 years old. Across educational background, 51 respondents are undergraduates, 44 are baccalaureate degree holders, 11 are graduate students. Across 4

employment status, 50 respondents are unemployed, 40 are employed of less than 5 years, 16 respondents are identified as employed within 5-9 years. Table 1. Profile of the Respondents
Grouped according to Gender Male Female 69 37 Total 106 Grouped according to Age Under 20 years old 20 to 24 years old 25 to 29 years old 30 to 34 years old Total 20 59 20 7 106 Total Grouped according to Educational Background Undergraduate Baccalaureate Degree Graduate Student 51 44 11 106 Total Grouped according to Employment Status Not employed Employed for <5 years Employed 5 to 9 years 50 40 16 106

3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Summary ratings on the level of agreement in Integrating Community Service-Learning in the Ladderized BSCE Curriculum Table 2. Summary Ratings on Level of Agreement across Gender Groups
KEY AREA (KA1) Perspective on service-learning (KA2) Attitude toward community (KA3) Enhancement of competence (KA4) Influence on future profession AVE. WEIGHTED MEAN Legend: WM= Weighted Mean INT = Interpretation SA= Strongly Agree A = Agree N= Neutral D = Disagree SD = Strongly Disagree FEMALE WM 4.03 4.30 4.11 4.14 4.15 INT A SA A A A MALE WM 4.05 4.30 4.03 4.15 4.13 INT A SA A A A GRAND WM 4.04 4.30 4.06 4.15 4.14 INT A SA A A A

Rating Scale: 4.21 - 5.00 = 3.41 - 4.20 = 2.61 - 3.40 = 1.81 - 2.60 = 1.00 - 1.80 =

(SA) Strongly Agree (A) Agree (N) Neutral (D) Disagree (SD) Strongly Disagree

Table 2 reveals that the levels of agreement on (KA2) attitude toward community for both male and female groups both rank 1 with weighted mean of 4.30 both with an interpretation of (SA) strongly agree, followed by (KA4) for both with (A) agree. However they differ in ranking (KA3) and (KA4). The female group favors (KA3) enhancement of competence over (KA1) perspective on service-learning, while the male group ranks (KA1) higher than (KA3). The female group sees that community service-learning enhanced their competence than their male counterparts. The grand weighted mean of 4.14 yields a result interpreted as (A) agree.

Table 3. Summary Ratings on Level of Agreement across Age Groups


KEY AREA (KA1) Perspective on service-learning (KA2) Attitude toward community (KA3) Enhancement of competence (KA4) Influence on future profession AVE. WEIGHTED MEAN UNDER AGE 20 WM 3.86 4.30 3.95 4.03 4.04 INT A SA A A A AGE 20-24 WM 4.10 4.34 4.17 4.23 4.21 INT A SA A SA SA AGE 25-29 WM 4.05 4.36 4.15 4.02 4.15 INT A SA A A A AGE 30-34 WM 3.18 3.82 3.54 3.48 3.51 INT N A A A A GRAND WM 3.98 4.30 4.08 4.10 4.12 INT A SA A A A

Table 3 shows the level of agreement across age groups. The (KA2) is the common rank 1 across age groups: under age 20 with 4.30 rated strongly agree; age 20-24 years with 4.34 rated strongly agree; age 2529 years with 4.36 rated strongly agree and age 3034 with 3.81 rated agree. The age 20-24 group puts the greatest values on all key areas, particularly on (KA2) and (KA4) respectively. Interesting to note that in this group; (KA4) has a rating of 4.23 interpreted as strongly agree showing that community service has strong influence on future profession on the aforementioned age group, with average weighted mean of 4.21 interpreted as strongly agree, the highest of all groups. Age 3034 group surprisingly shows lowest ratings in all key areas and with average weighted mean of 3.51. Age 2529 group, has an average weighted mean of 4.15, a score between age 20 24 group and age group 3034. Table 4. Summary Ratings on Level of Agreement across Educational Background
UNDERGRAD. KEY AREA WM (KA1) Perspective on service-learning (KA2) Attitude toward community (KA3) Enhancement of competence (KA4) Influence on future profession AVE. WEIGHTED MEAN 4.04 4.24 4.08 4.16 4.13 INT A SA A A A BAC. GRADUATE WM 3.90 4.31 4.11 4.04 4.09 INT A SA A A A GRAD. STUDENT WM 4.07 4.36 4.02 4.09 4.14 INT A SA A A A GRAND WM 3.99 4.28 4.09 4.10 4.11 INT A SA A A A

Table 4, shows the level of agreement across educational background. It is interesting to note that that the graduate students group has highly favored community service-learning with an average rating of 4.14, over the undergraduate group rated 4.13, and even the baccalaureate graduates scoring it 4.09, with the grand average weighted mean of 4.11. Similarly, (KA2) attitude toward community has the highest grand weighted mean, a value of 4.28, interpreted as strongly agree. The baccalaureate group favoring community service on the (KA3) enhancement of competence (rated 4.11) even higher than the rating of undergraduates (4.08) and graduate school (4.02).

Table 5. Summary Ratings on Level of Agreement across Employment Status


NOT EMPLOYED WM (KA1) Perspective on service-learning (KA2) Attitude toward community (KA3) Enhancement of competence (KA4) Influence on future profession AVE. WEIGHTED MEAN 4.20 4.25 4.07 4.13 4.16 INT SA SA A A A <5 YEARS EMPLOYED WM 4.09 4.44 4.24 4.23 4.25 INT A SA SA SA SA 5 to 9 YRS EMPLOYED WM 3.61 4.02 3.77 3.71 3.78 INT A A A A A GRAND WM 4.07 4.29 4.09 4.10 4.14 INT A SA A A A

KEY AREA

Table 5, the level of agreement across employment status, reveals that the respondent belonging to the group with less than 5 years of employment strongly agree to the community servicelearning with a rating of 4.25, followed by the group which are unemployed with the average weighted mean of 4.16, but those employed with 5-9 years has a bit lower mean of 3.78. Table 6. Differences in the level of agreement in Integrating Community Service-Learning in the BSCE Ladderized Curriculum
SUBJECT 1. ACROSS GENDER GROUPS 2. ACROSS AGE GROUPS 3. ACROSS EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND 4. ACROSS EMPLOYMENT STATUS Computed Value 8.00 9.90 0.50 6.50 Tabular Value 0.00 7.82 5.99 5.99 Interpretation Not Significant Significant Not Significant Significant

Table 6 shows the differences in the level of agreement in integrating community servicelearning in the BSCE ladderized curriculum. As shown in the table across gender groups, using Wilcoxson Rank-Sum test (U-test), the computed value is greater than the tabular value, therefore, difference is not significant. For the difference across age group, using ANOVA, the computed value of 9.90 is greater than the tabular value of 7.82 at 0.05, (X2 > X2 0.05), therefore, there is significant difference. For grouping across educational background, the computed value of 0.50 is lesser than the tabular value of 5.99 (X2 < X2 0.05), therefore, the difference is not significant. For the difference across employment status, the computed value is greater than the tabular value (6.50> 5.99), therefore, the difference is significant. 4. FINDINGS This study indicates that community service-learning is consistently highest in improving attitude toward community involvement. 7

Level of agreement across gender groups confirms that: 1) both gender groups were influenced in their future professional work; and 2) female group indicated higher score than male group on the enhancement of skills and competencies. Level of agreement across age groups indicates that: 1) influence on future professional work is high in group age 20-24; 2) enhancement of skills and competencies is highest in group age 2024 followed by group age 25-29. Level of agreement across educational background shows: 1) graduate students are the most benefited by community service-learning; 2) baccalaureate graduates indicated enhancement of skills and competencies during the service-learning; and 3) undergraduates perceived its high influence on their future professional work. Level of agreement across employment status reveals that: 1) those employed within 5-9 years were both highly influenced in their future profession and enhanced of their skills and competencies. Differences in age group and employment status are found to be both significant. These simply indicate that: 1) as respondents grew in age; and 2) as they were exposed to various jobsite experiences, views on community service-learning change as well. 5. CONCLUSION Based from the findings, the following conclusions can be derived: Integrating the community service-learning in the BSCE ladderized curriculum is positively viewed by the civil engineering students currently enrolled and graduates of the CSPC as consistently instrumental in improving attitude toward community involvement. Hands-on experience enhanced students competencies by helping them define personal strengths and weaknesses, improving problem-solving skills and communications skills, and enhancing leadership. Community service made the students become more aware of the roles in the community of their chosen profession, clarify career choice and integrate community involvement in future professional work. 6. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Further study must be made on structuring community service-learning program to formally integrate it as a component of the academic program of BSCE ladderized curriculum. 2. Further study should be undertaken to develop a monitoring mechanism on the development of students experiential learning and the opportunities for critical reflection.

REFERENCES Astin, A.W. (2000) How Service Learning Affects Students. Higher Education Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles Atian, D. F. (2007) CSPC Community Assistanceship Thru Responsive and Equitable Services (CSPC CARES) for San Vicente, Gorong-Gorong: An Assessment. Unpublished Institutional Research, Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges, Nabua, Camarines Sur. Botor, L. H. (2009) Effectiveness of the Implementation of the Ladderized Engineering Programs and Quality of Graduates of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Camarines Sur State Agricultural College, Pili, Camarines Sur. Driscol, A. et al (1996) An Assessment Model for Service-Learning: Comprehensive Case Studies of Impact on Faculty, Students, Community and Institution. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning Layfield, K. D. et al (2004) The Impact of Service-Learning: A Quasi-experimental Assessment of Student Performance in an Introductory Microcomputer Course. Journal or Southern Agricultural Education Research Seifer, S.D. and Connors K. (2007) Community Campus Partnerships for Health. Faculty Toolkit for Service-Learning in Higher Education. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse Shinnamon, A. F., Gelmon, S. B., and Holland, B. A. (1999) Methods and Strategies for Assessing Service-Learning in the Health Professions, San Francisco Community Campus for Health Vaughn, R. L. et al (2004) Engineering Education and Service-Learning. Scotts Valley, CA National Service-Learning Clearinghouse ABOUT THE AUTHORS Henry P. Turalde is a registered civil engineer with more than 20 years experience local and overseas before he joined the faculty of College of Engineering at the Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges. A PICE specialist in Construction Management & Engineering (CME) and Transportation Engineering (TE), he is also a certified real estate professional, geodetic engineer, master plumber and quality control engineer. (e-mail: engineer_pluss@yahoo.com)

Francia H. Tomenio is the dean of the College of Engineering of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges. A registered civil and junior geodetic engineer, she holds a degree in Master of Engineering Technology.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors wish to acknowledge the following personages of CSPC who, in one way or another, were instrumental in the accomplishment of this work: Dr. Dulce F. Atian, President; Dr. Teresita B. Salazar, VP for Academic Affairs; and Dr. Lourdes G. Laniog, former President. The authors likewise would like to thank the CSPC Extension office.

Appendix A
* COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE This survey questionnaire is to assess the impact of the community service-learning to students as they performed community service while taking up Tech-Voc courses such as carpentry, masonry, reinforced concrete works, and plumbing works through CSPC extension services. BACKGROUND INFORMATION Female ___________ 25-29___ 30-34___ 35 and above ____

Gender: Male________ Age group:

< 20___ 20-24___

Acad. Background: Undergraduate Stud.____

Bachelor Grad. ____ Grad. Stud. ___ Post Grad ______

Employment Status: Unemployed____ Employed _____ If employed, please state the total years of employment: <5 years____ 5-9y____ 10-14y____ 15- 19y ____ Key Area 1: Perspective about community service-learning

20 and above _____

Please mark the box that indicates your level of agreement with the following statements. (1= strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3= neutral, 4=agree, 5= strongly agree) No. Statement 1 Community service-learning helped me better understand the course from lectures and readings. 2 Community service-learning should be implemented in more classes in my course. 3 Community service-learning made me take more responsibility for my own learning. 4 Community service should be voluntary rather than a course requirement. Key Area 2: Attitude toward community involvement Statement The service-learning experience showed me how I can become more involved in my community. 6 I feel that the work I did through service-learning benefited the community. 7 Service-learning helped me become more aware of the needs of the community. 8 I have a responsibility to the community. Key Area 3: Effect on enhancement of skills and competencies Statement Community service-learning helped me define my personal strengths and weaknesses. Community service-learning helped me improved my problem-solving skills. Community service-learning helped me improved my communication skills. Community service-learning helped me enhanced my leadership skills.

No. 5

No. 9 10 11 12

No. 13

Key Area 4: Influence of community service-learning on future professional work Statement Service-learning made me become more aware of the roles of my chosen profession in the community. 14 Performing work in the community helped me clarify my career choice. 15 I would like to integrate community service into my future career plans.

Adapted from: Shinnamon, A. F., Gelmon, S. B., and Holland, B. A. (1999) Methods and Strategies for Assessing ServiceLearning in the Health Professions, San Francisco Community Campus for Health

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Appendix B
LADDERIZED CURRICULUM LEADING TO

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING


LADDER 1 - ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE IN CIVIL CRAFTSMAN
FIRST SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CTW 1 Carpentry EDR 111 Engineering Drawing 1 EM 111 College Algebra EM 112 Plane & Spherical Trigonometry EN 001 English Plus EN 111 Study & Thinking Skills ES 221 FIL 111 NS 124 PE 111 NSTP 111 Environmental & Safety Engineering Komunikasyon sa Akademikong Filipino General Chemistry 1 Physical Fitness NSTP 1 No. of Units Lec. Lab. 4 2 1 1 3 0 3 0 1 3 3 3 4 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Total Units 4 1 3 3 1 3 3 3 SECOND SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CTW 2 Masonry EDR 122 Engineering Drawing 2 EM 122 Advanced Algebra EM 123 Analytic Geometry & Solid Mensuration EN 122 Writing in the Discipline FIL 122 Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa Pananaliksik NS 125 General Chemistry 2 PE 122 NSTP 122 Fundamental of Rhythmic Dances NSTP 2 No. of Units Lec. Lab. 2 2 0 2 2 0 4 0 3 3 3 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 Total Units 4 2 2 4 3 3 4 2

4 2 3 30 The Student is now qualified to take the Competency Assessment in Carpentry NC II

3 27 The Student is now qualified to take the Competency Assessment in Masonry NC II

LADDER 11 - TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATE IN CIVIL TECHNOLOGY


FIRST SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CS 200 Computer Fundamentals & Programming CTW 3 Reinf. Concrete Works EM 214 Differential Calculus EN 213 EP 211 GE 211 HUM 211 PE 213 Tech. Communication Physics 1 Elementary Surveying Philippine Literature Sports Games No. of Units Lec. Lab. 2 1 1 4 3 3 2 3 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 Total Units 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 2 SECOND SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CTW 4 Plumbing EM 225 EN 213 EP 222 GE 222 HUM 212 PE 224 SS 111 Integral Calculus Effective Speech Communication Physics 2 Higher Surveying Art Appreciation Recreational Activity General Psychology w/ Family Planning, HIV Aids and Drug Education Program No. of Units Lec. Lab. 2 2 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 Total Units 4 4 3 4 3 3 2 3

25

26 The Student is now qualified to take the Competency Assessment in Plumbing NC II

LADDER 111 - THREE-YEAR DIPLOMA IN CIVIL TECHNOLOGY


FIRST SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CTW 5 Building Design EEE 311 Elements of Electrical Engineering EM 316 Differential Equations GE 311 Engineering Surveys MECH 311 SS 114 SS 125 Statics of Rigid Bodies Phil. Constitution & Government Phil. Economics w Land Reform & Taxation No. of Units Lec. Lab. 3 0 3 0 3 2 3 3 3 0 1 0 0 0 Total Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 SECOND SEMESTER Subj. Code Description BM 005 Probability and Statistics BME 321 Basic Mechanical Engineering CTW 6 House/Building Wiring EM 327 Advanced Engineering Mathematics for CE HUM 213 Introduction to Philosophy MECH 322 Dynamics of Rigid Bodies MECH 323 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies Phil. History & Culture Rizals Life, Works & Writings No. of Units Lec. Lab. 3 0 3 0 1 3 3 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 Total Units 3 3 2 3 3 2 3

21 25

SS 113 SS 126

3 3

0 0

3 3 25

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LADDER 1V - BACHELOR IN CIVIL ENGINEERING


FIRST SEMESTER Subj. Code Description BES 411 Engineering Economy CE 410 Mechanics of Fluids CE 412 Structural Theory 1 CE 413 Geotech. Engineering 1 (Soil Mechanics) CE 414 Highway Engineering CE 423 Const. Materials & Testing No. of Units Lec. Lab. 3 0 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 2 0 1 Total Units 3 3 4 4 3 3 20 SECOND SEMESTER Subj. Code Description BES 422 Engineering Management CAD 1 Computer Aided Drafting CE 422 Structural Theory 2 CE425 Hydraulics CE 421 ER 421 TE 514 Hydrology Engineering Research Transportation Engineering No. of Units Lec. Lab. 3 0 0 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 0 1 0 Total Units 3 1 4 3 3 2 3 19

SUMMER OJT

On-the-Job Training (240 Hours)

5 units

LADDER V - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING


FIRST SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CE 424 Structural Design 1 (Steel & Timber) CE 512 Structural Design 2 (Reinforced Concrete 1) CE 513 Construction Methods & Project Management CE 521 CE Laws, Contracts & Specifications TE 515 Water Resources Engineering TE 516 Earthquake Engineering No. of Units Lec. Lab. 3 1 2 3 3 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 Total Units 4 3 4 3 3 2 19 SECOND SEMESTER Subj. Code Description CE 522 Structural Design 3 (Reinforced Concrete 2) CE 523 Geotechnical Engineering 2 (Foundation) TE 522 Entrepreneurship for Engineers TE 523 Irrigation, Flood Control & Drainage Engineering. No. of Units Lec. Lab. 2 1 3 3 3 1 0 0 Total Units 3 4 3 3 13

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