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The Avalon Hill Game Company

DIVISION OF MONARCH AVALON, INC.


4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214
1994 Printed in USA All Rights Reserved
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2 Table of Contents , ,
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Table of Contents
1. Introduction .. . .................. . ......... .4
2. Combat Information Center (CIC) Screen ........ 5
3. Tactical Reference Screen . ... . . . .... . . .. .... .. 6
4. Configuration (COMNET) Screen .. . . ..... .. . ... 7
5. Scenarios Screen ... . ....... . . . ............ . . 8
6. Operations (Ops) Display . . . . . ............. . . 10
Buttons .... . . .. .. . ....... . . . ..... . .. . .. .... ...... . . . 10
The Map ........... . .................... .. .......... 12
Miscellaneous Ops Display Feat ures . . . . .. . ..... . ....... .. 13
End Game Buttons ............... . . . ................. . 14
Unit Identification .................... . ............... 14
7. How a Turn is Played ............ . .......... 15
Phases ........... . ... . ............ .. . . .............. 15
Steps . .... . . .. ..... . .. . . . .. .. . . .. . ... . . ... . . . . . . .. . . 15
8. Strategic Display .. . ............. . ...... . .. . 16
Surface, Submarine, Aircraft Buttons ... .. . .. . ........ . .. . 16
Air Missions Button . . .... . . . .... .... .... ... .. . .... .. . . 17
WEAX (Weather) Button .... . .......... . . . .. . .......... 18
Ops Display Button .. ......... . ...... . ..... . .. . . . ..... 18
9. The Surface Phase ... . . . .. ... ...... ... ... ... 18
The Move Step . . . .. . . ......... . .. .. ......... . . . ...... 18
The Combat Step .. ... .. .. . . . .. . . . ............ .. . . .... 19
Ending a Surface Phase .... ... .. . . .. . ........ .... . .. .. . 19
10. The Submarine Phase . . . .... .. .. . .... .. ... . 20
The Move Step . . . .... . ... .. . . .... ..... . . ............ . 20
The Combat Step .. .. .......... . ... . . .. . . ... .. .... . . .. 21
The Deep Mode Button ............. . .. . ...... . . . ... . .. . 21
Ending a Submarine Phase .... .. .............. .... ..... 21
11. The Air Phase .................... .. . . ..... 22
Strategic Air Missions ........ .. . ... .... ..... ... .... . .. 22
Attack Missions .... . . . ..... . ......... . . . ..... . .. . .... 22
12. Strategic Air Missions Screen ................ 23
CAP Missions ............. . ..... . .. . .. . . . ............ 24
Intercept Missions ...... .... .. . .. . . . . . ................ 24
Recon Missions ..... ..................... . .... . ... ... . 24
How to Assign Units to Strategic Air Missions .. .. ....... .. . 24
Surface Ships, Subs, Aircraft and Air Missions Buttons ... . . . 26
Total CAP AA Display ...... . . . ..... . . . .. .... ... .. .. .. . 26
Length of Strategic Air Missions .. . ..... . 0 . o o o o o o o 026
13. Scrolling Through the Units ... .. .. . 0 .... 0 0 .26
When Red and Green Units Occupy t he Same Hex . . 0 27
14. Combat ...... . ... 0 0 .................. 0 028
Types of Combat .. .. .. .. . o 0 .29
How to Perform Combat o o o o o o o o o o 0 .29
When Combat is Executed ..... o o o o o 33
Damage and Kill Probabilities .. .. . ... .. . 0 0 33
The Tactical Display ... . . 0 . .... . .. . ... . .... 0 . ..... 0 . 0 .33
If Combat Cannot Take Place . .. . .. . ......... . .. 0 33
15. Combat Effects ... 0 ...... . 0 0 ..... 0 .... . 0 034
The Battle Results Display .. . ........ . ... . .. . ... . . .. . 0 .34
Combat Damage ...... o 34
16. Tactical Display . 0 0 ...... 0 ..... 0 ...... .. 035
The Grouping Template . 0 0 . . . . . 0 . 0 . 0 0 0 . .... 0 0 .... . . . ... 35
Groups ... 0 ... . .... ...... 0 .. . . . . .. ... 0. 0. 0. 0 ....... 35
How to Group ........... . ........... . .... 0 0 36
How Formations Affect Combat . . . . ... . 0 37
Leaving the Tactical Display . o o o o 37
17. Replenishment . 0 0 38
At-Sea Replenishment . o o o o o o o o 38
In-Port Replenishment . o o o o o o 39
Notes on Replenishment o o o o o . o o o o o o o o. o .40
180 Docking ....... 0 ..... 0 0 .......... 0 0 . .40
How to Dock . 0 . . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ..... ... ...... .. . . .. . .40
Docking Restrictions . o o o o o o o o o o o o o o .41
How to Undock . 0 .. 0 0 0 . 0 . 0 . 0 . 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 . . . . . . . .... . .41
190 Neutral Ships .. 0 ... 0 . 0 ........... 0 0 .. .41
Unknown Contacts . . o o o o o .41
Neutral Contacts .. . o o .41
20. Playing by E-Mail .... . .............. . .. 0 . .42
Starting an Electronic Mail Game ... . . . ........ .. .. .. . .. .42
Playing an Electronic Mail Game .......... . .... . . .. .. .. .42
Sending a File to Your Opponent .... . . ........... . . . o o .42
Receiving a File From Your Opponent .. .. . .. .... .. . .. . . . .42
21. Victory Points .... ...... ... .. . . ....... 0 . .. .43
Destroying Enemy Units ..... . ... .. . .. .... .... o .43
Reaching Objective Hexes ... .. .. . ... . . .. 0 o .43
Destroying or Damaging Bases . . . 0 o .44
The Victory Point Display ... . .. .. . . .. . 0 . 0 . 0 .. . .. 0 . . ... .44
Awarding Victory Points Taken to the Enemy .. .... . o .44
Winning a Scenario . 0 0 0 ... . . 0 .. . ...... 0 . 0 .. .... ... o o .44
22. GLOSSARY 0 . .. . 0 . . . .... .. 0 0 .... 0 0 0 0 0 .. .45
......
AA: Anti-aircraft
AAA: Area anti-air value
AAW: Anti-Air Warfare
AE: Ammunition ship
AEW: Airborne Early Warning
AI: Artificial intelligence
AO: Oiler
AOR: Supply ship
ARG: Amphibious Ready Group
ASROC: Anti-Submarine Rocket
ASW: Anti-Submarine Warfare
ATK: Attack aircraft
AU: Australia
BB: Battleship
BH: Bahrain
BMB: Bomber aircraft
BS: Bomber Squadron
CAP: Combat air patrol
CG: Guided Missile cruiser
CGN: Nuclear-powered missile cruiser
CIWS: Close-In Weapons System
CM: Cruise missile
Comm: Commissioned
COR: Corvette
CV: Aircraft carrier
CVN: Nuclear-powered aircraft carrier
DD: Destroyer
DDG: Guided Missile destroyer
Detect: Detection
ET: Ethiopia (also empty tanker)
EW: Electronic Warfare
FC: Fast convoy
FF: Frigate
FFG: Guided Missile frigate
Flot: Flotilla
Flt: Flotille
FR: France
5TH FLEET ABBREVIATIONS
Below is a list of abbreviations used in this game.
FS: Fighter Squadron
FT: Full tanker
SC: Slow convoy
Sqd: Squadron
HM: US Navy helicopter minesweeping squadron SS: Attack submarine (diesel)
ID: Indonesia
IL: Ilyushin
IN: India
INT: Interceptor aircraft (or mission)
IR: Iran
IT: Italy
KW:Kuwait
LHA: Amphibious assault ship
LHD: Helicopter/Dock landing ship
LPD: Amphibious transport, dock
LPH: Amphibious assault helicopter carrier
LSD: Amphibious warfare ship
Max: Maximum
MiG: Mikoyan-Gurevich
Mk:Mark
mph: Miles per hour
MPS: Maritime ?repositioning Ship
MS: Minesweeper
MSW: Aerial Minesweeper
NBS: Naval Bomber Squadron
NFS: Naval Fighter Squadron
NHS: Naval Helicopter Squadron
om: Nautical miles
No: Number
OM: Oman
PCS: Patrol combatant squadron
PK: Pakistan
Pt: Point
QT: Qatar
RCN: Reconnaissance aircraft
RCS or RS: Reconnaissance Squadron
Recon: Reconnaissance strategic air mission
RU: Russia
SA: Saudi Arabia
SSGN: Guided-missile attack submarine (nuclear)
SSM: Surface-to-surface missile
SSN: Attack submarine (nuclear)
STK: Stack of non-combat ships
SU: Sukhoi
TASM: Tomahawk Anti-Ship Missile
Tu: Tupolev
TG: Task group
TF: Task force
TFS: Tactical Fighter Squadron
TLAM: Tomahawk Land-Attack Missile
TLW: Tube-launched weapon
TRM: Tactical Reference Manual
UA: United Arab Emirates
UK: United Kingdom
URG: Underway replenishment group
US: United States
VA: US Navy attack squadron
VAQ: US Navy electronic warfare squadron
VAW: US Navy airborne early warning squadron
VF: US Navy fighter squadron
VFA: US Navy fighter/attack squadron
VMAQ: US Marine Corps electronic warfare
squadron
VMA: US Marine Corps attack squaC.ron
VMFA: US Marine Corps fighter/attack squadron
VP: US Navy patrol squadron
VS: US Navy anti-submarine warfare squadron
WEAX:Weather
WG:Wing
Y:Yakolev
YM:Yemen
1. INTRODUCTION
Thank you for purchasing 5TH FLEET. Please take a
moment to fill out and send in the game's registration
card. This will ensure that you receive timely updates and
p_roduct If you have any problems or ques-
tions regardmg th1s or any other Avalon Hill computer
product.' contact us at 410-426-9600. Although 5TH
FLEET 1s based on an older Avalon Hill boardgame of the
same name, the two games are not identical.
Before starting, there are a few basic 5TH FLEET
functions you should know:
Basically, 5TH FLEET is played
from the Ops Display, which can
be accessed from the Scenarios
screen. Once in the Ops Display,
you can reach several other
screens to play the game, and
you can even go back to the
Tactical Reference Display to
access "real world" and game
information.
System Config's
Tactical Reference
5th Fleet
Screen Flowchart: See the diagram below.
Control: All game functions can be controlled using
only the mouse. Simply move the mouse arrow to a
specific point on the screen and click on the left (or
sometimes the right) mouse button.
"H t" K I . o n many cases, you can giVe game orders
w1thout usmg the mouse by pressing specific keys on the
keyboard. For a full "Hot" Keys listing, see the separate
card enclosed with the game.
Loading Instructions: Consult the separate LOAD-
ING INSTRUCTIONS to start the game.
Ops Display
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Strategic
Display
Options
Tactical
Display
Air
Missions
Victory
After screen introductions, 5TH FLEET opens with
the "Combat Information Center" (CIC) screen. This
screen shows a typical US Navy CIC and contains a
number of computer consoles that can be used by the
player during the game.
IIII'M._ if the mouse arrow is
upper left of tOe CIC
point the moue arrow to
The Configuration (COMNET)
Console: The term "System
Config's" appears if the mouse
arrow is moved to the console on
the left of the CIC screen. To reach
the COMNET screen, point the
mouse arrow to this console and
click once (see Section 4).
Console:.The term "Scenarios" appears
if the mouse arrow 1s moved to the console in the
center of the CIC screen (the one with a small
map of the Indian Ocean region). To reach the
Scenarios screen, point the mouse arrow to this
console and click once (see Section 5).
3. TACTICAL REFERENCE
SCREEN
This screen provides reference information about the
military equipment in 5TH FLEET.
View Buttons: The two buttons
with arrows underneath the
word "view" allows you to scroll
through all the aircraft, surface
ships, and submarines in the
tactical reference section.
Quit Boiton: Point the
mouse erow to the "Quit"
button and click once to
return to the CIC Screen.
Reference data: A picture of each unit
is displayed along with its "real world"
data. The "simulation" data (which is
listed to the left and right of the pic-
ture) is specific to each unit, and only
appears when you access this screen
from the Ops Display Screen.
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: . : , .. Configuration Screen 7
. CONF GURATION COMNET)
SCREEN
This display allows you to set hardware
tions. The first time the game is run, 5TH FLEET
automatically determine your hardware configuratw.n
and set itself accordingly. The controls here permit
overrides on initial configurations. This screen also
allows direct connection with another player for E-Mail
games (see Section 20).
This portion of the
screen is used to play a
game by E-Mail. See
Section 20 to learn more
about E-Mail play.
Initialize Modem Readout
Baud Rate Knob
Mode Buttons
Phone Controls
Quit Station Button
When you begin a game, 5TH FLEET will automati-
cally try to detect your sound configuration and set
itself accordingly. However, you can change your con-
figuration by using this portion of the screen to turn
the music on or off, set your address and IRQ.
WARNING: Change the address or IRQ only when you are
certain that your current configuration is incorrect.
Decorative Radar Sweep
(plays no in the game)
5. SCENARIOS SCREEN
On the Scenarios screen, players choose sides and
select one often scenarios to play.
Objective
Display
Map
Scenario
Button
Scenario
Selection
Line
Scenario
Information __ _.
Area
Choosing scenarios: There are ten scenarios in 5TH
FLEET. To select a scenario, point the mouse arrow to
the Scenario button (the small square gray button) and
click once. A list of ten scenarios appears. To select a
scenario, point the mouse arrow to one of the ten sce-
nario names and click once. (The scenario name appears
at the top of the list next to the word "select".) Now, click
again on the Scenario button. A summary of both sides'
forces and objectives appears on the screen. On the right
of the screen the scenario's "mission parameters" (com-
plexity level and length in turns) are listed. If you want
Player
- - - ~ Selection
Knobs
Mission
Parameters
Display
Weather
Button
Quit Station
Button
to choose a different scenario, click on the Scenario but-
ton again and follow the same procedure.
Choosing sides: Move the mouse arrow to the "Player
1" circle in the upper right of the screen. Player 1, who
is always a human player, must be designated as
either the "Red" or "Green" player. To make this selec-
tion, click on the knob. Player 2 always controls the
side not controlled by Player 1. Move the mouse arrow
to the Player 2 circle and click on the knob to change
the mode of play to "Human" (if Player 2 is another
511tf111f
person), or "AI" if you want the computer to be Player
2. If this scenario is to be played via E-Mail, you
should select "E-Mail" for Player 2.
AI Level: If Player 2 is the computer, select the com-
puter's artificial intelligence level by moving the mouse
arrow to the AI box on the right of the screen and click-
ing on the "1" box (low computer intelligence), "2" box
(moderate computer intelligence), or "3" box (high com-
puter intelligence). Also, select the computer's "aggres-
sion" level by clicking on the "Nominal" aggression box
or the "High" aggression box. We recommend you
choose AI level "1" with "Nominal" computer aggres-
sion if you're just starting to learn 5TH FLEET.
Weather button: If the players wish the computer to
generate random weather patterns on the map, they
must click on the "WEAX" box (i .e., weather). The use
of weather, however, may affect the balance of the sce-
nario. If you don't click on the Weather box, the weath-
er throughout the scenario in progress is assumed to
be clear.
Starting play: Mter selecting a scenario and choosing
sides, you may begin a game by clicking on the
"Commit" button. If you have previously saved a game
in progress for this scenario, a clipboard will appear,
which will ask you whether you wish to start a new
game, resume the previously saved game, or delete the
previously saved game. Click in the appropriate box on
the clipboard. The Operations Display screen will soon
appear (see Section 6). If you wish to return to the CIC
screen instead of starting a game, click on the Quit
button in the lower right of the Scenarios screen.
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to Operations 9'splay : .- ...
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6. OPERATION (OPS) DISPLAY
The Operations (Ops) Display is the main screen in
5TH FLEET. On this screen, you control your units
and initiate attacks. In short, the game is played from
this screen.
Strategic
BUTTONS
Options button: Click on this button at the top of the
Ops Display to open the "Options" clipboard. By click-
ing in the appropriate boxes on the clipboard, you may
turn background music, sound effects, and animation
on or off. If you want to play the game with a hexago-
nal grid superimposed over the map, click on the
Selected Unit box
appears here when
the Surface, Submar-
ine, or Air Phase is
initiated .
.... ________ Execute
button
-------- Compass
-------Game Clock
._. _____ Oueruiew Map
...._ ______ Victory Point
Indicators
Saue & Quit
buttons
"Hexgrid" box. To delete a selected option from the
game, click on the appropriate box again, which
removes the check mark in the box. To return to the
Ops Display, click in the "OK" box.
Strategic Display button: Click on this button at the
top of the Ops Display to open the Strategic Display. The
Strategic Display gives you a view of the overall situa-
tion in a scenario throughout the Indian Ocean/Persian
Gulf region. See Section 8 for a description of the
Strategic Display. Once in this screen, click on the Ops
Display button to return to the Ops Display screen.
Tactical Display button: Click on this button at the
top of the Ops Display to open the Tactical Display.
The Tactical Display is used when joining surface
ships together in groups and when adjusting the posi-
tions of those ships within the groups. It is also used
for replenishment and docking. See Section 16 for a
description of the Tactical Display. Once in this screen,
click on the Ops Display button to return to the Ops
Display screen.
Air Missions button: Click on this button at the top
of the Ops Display to open the Strategic Air Missions
screen. You assign air units to missions on this screen.
See Section 12 for a description of the Air Missions
screen. Once there, click on the Ops Display button to
return to the Ops Display.
Attack button: To initiate an attack, you must click
on the Attack button, which is located just to the right
of the four buttons described above. See Section 14 for
more information on performing attacks.
Phase buttons: Four square "Phase" buttons are
located in the upper right corner of the Ops Display.
One shows an aircraft icon, another shows a surface
ship icon, a third shows a submarine icon, and the
fourth says "Pass." At the start of each phase, the com-
puter instructs the Red or Green player to select a
"phasing unit type," which means that player must
click on one of the four Phase buttons (see Section 7).
There are always six phases per turn: Red Air, Red
Surface, Red Submarine, Green Air, Green Surface,
and Green Submarine. Each player may "pass" once
per turn.
Phase indicator box: The Phase indicator box, which
is located just to the right of the Attack button, shows
the phase in progress by displaying an aircraft, surface
ship, or submarine icon (see Section 7). Each phase has
two "steps" (a "Move" step and a "Combat" step), which
are shown just to the right of the Phase indicator. (An
Air phase, however, has just one step. ) During a phase,
you may repeatedly click on the Phase indicator button
using the left or right mouse button to select each of
your units eligible for activation in the current phase.
Selected unit box: When you initiate a phase by
clicking on a Phase button, the four Phase buttons in
the upper right of the Ops Display are replaced by a
red or green box with a drawing of an aircraft, surface
ship, submarine, airfield, or port. This box has the
name or number of the unit or base, its abbreviated
nationality and unit type (see list of abbreviations),
and a small national flag. If the unit has land attack
cruise missiles, a small illustration of a cruise missile
appears above the unit's picture. Each time you click
on a piece on the Ops Display map, that unit is "select-
ed" (i.e. , it's surrounded by a white hexagon). The
selected unit appears in greater detail in the box in the
upper right. To obtain detailed information about the
selected unit, click once on the box. The Tactical
Reference screen will appear.
....---- Flag
Ship
Icon
.. ,_.
12 Operations .. lilt Filet
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Execute button: Click on this button to carry out all--;::====================::::-.....J
movementJcombat orders issued to units during a phase.
THE MAP
The bulk of the Ops Display is taken up by the
map, which portrays the Indian Ocean/Persian Gulf
region at a scale of about one hex = 50 miles. When the
first phase of a scenario is initiated, the map appears
on the screen. At any given time, only a small portion
of the total map is shown on the screen. But there are
several ways to scroll back and forth across the map
during play.
Compass: The circular compass appears on the right
side of the screen. It's divided into eight directions (N, S,
E, W, NE, SE, SW, NW). You may scroll back and forth
across the map by pointing the arrow to one of these
eight directions and clicking. For example, if you click on
the letter "N," the map will move directly north. The clos-
er you click to the center circle on the compass, the
smaller the distance the map will scroll. Furthermore, if
you click directly within the small circle in the center of
the compass, the computer will automatically scroll the
map so that the currently selected hex will be positioned
in the center of the screen.
Overview Map: The overview map, which is located
below the clock, provides a convenient way to scroll
anywhere on the Ops Display map. Point the arrow to
the red rectangle on the overview map, press the left
mouse button, and drag the rectangle anywhere on the
overview map. The computer will automatically scroll
MAP SYMBOLS
Airfield: Only airfields active in a sce-
nario are shown. They are shown in their
side's color.
Blocked Hexside: Surface ships and
submarines may not pass through these
hexsides.
City: These small red, blue, or yellow rec-
tangles are for reference only; they have
no effect on the game.
Coast: A hex that is partially land and
partially water. All units may enter coast
hexes. SSM attacks against units in a
coast hex are slightly reduced in effective-
ness by the computer.
Boundary: These thin yellow-black lines
indicate international boundaries. They
are for reference only and do not affect the
game.
Land: Surface ships and submarines may
not enter land hexes or cross an all-land
hexside.
Port: Only ports active in a scenario are
shown. They are shown in their side's
color.
....... ,
Restricted Water: All units may enter
restricted water hexes. However, surface
units occupying these hexes have their area
air defense capabilities downgraded by the
computer. Furthermore, SSM attacks
against units in a restricted water hex are
severely reduced in effectiveness by the
computer.
Sea: A water hex of medium blue color. All
units may enter.
D
Shallow: A water hex of light blue color.
All units may enter. However, submarines
are more easily detected in shallow water.
II
Shoal: Only patrol combatants (PC) and
corvettes (CO) may enter shoal hexes.
Shoal hexes are found only in the Persian
Gulf.
Strait of Malacca: In some scenarios, the green play-
er's full tanker units (FT) must attempt to reach the
two star hexes, which are just north of Sumatra.
Zone Boundary: Zone boundaries are
r-"L:=71 marked in solid red lines. There are 22
zones on the map, each of which is desig-
nated by name (e.g., the "Africa" zone).
.......,........,....,.___.. Players may view all 22 zones at a glance
by opening up the Strategic Display.
the Ops Display map to the area bordered by the rec-
tangle on the overview map. The positions of friendly,
enemy, neutral, and unknown units are indicated by
tiny dots on the overview map. Friendly or enemy
units may be red or green dots, neutral ships are yel-
low dots, and unknown ships are white dots.
MISCELLANEOUS OPS DISPLAY FEATURES
p:r.;:;;OJM"M;ii=2Pi:r.;;n Fuel level gauge: This green bar
appears near the upper right cor-
ner and measures the amount of
fuel possessed by surface and submarine units.
Deep mode button: This small gray rec-
tangular button featuring a submarine icon
with a downward arrow appears just below
the fuel level gauge. You may place a submarine in
"deep" mode by clicking on this box when that subma-
rine is selected. A submarine in deep mode is difficult
to detect but may only move a maximum of one hex per
turn and may not conduct any missile attacks. Torpedo
attacks are reduced in strength.
rF-;=:==N AI button: This small gray rectangular button
featuring a computer icon appears just to the
right of the Deep Mode button. If you click this
button, the selected unit will be given orders by the com-
puter unless you issue overriding orders.
. (
........................ i
Clock: The clock, which is located
just below the compass, displays the
day and time in green digital num-
bers. The first two digits represent the current day.
(The first day of each scenario is "Day 1.") The last four
digits show the current time of day using a 24-hour
clock (e.g., "0800" is 8 AM and "1600" is 4 PM). Each
day consist of three 8-hour turns: the "0000" (midnight
to 8 AM) turn; the "0800" (8 AM to 4 PM) turn; and the
"1600" (4 PM to midnight) turn.

----..........
Victory points: Victory points are
gained by sinking enemy ships,
destroying enemy air units, and
Click anywhere on this
screen to exit to the
Ops Display Screen.
Green
Victory
Points
accomplishing objectives. Both sides' current victory
point levels are shown in the two boxes beneath the
overview map. The red numbers show the red side's
victory point level and the green numbers show the
green side's victory point level. Click once in either the
red or green victory point box to change from the Ops
Display to the Victory Display Screen (see above). This
screen summarizes both sides' victory point gains.
END GAME BUTTONS
Quit button: Clicking once on this button
brings the current game to an end. If you
wish to continue the game later, don't forget
to click on the Save button immediately
before clicking on "Quit". If you do not wish to continue
the game later, don't bother to click on "Save".
Save button: Clicking once on this button
saves the current game. Only one game can
be saved at a time for each scenario, so
remember that saving a game in progress
will wipe out a previously saved game for that scenario.
6th Fleet
Red
Victory
__ _._.-- Points
To return to a saved game, click on the "Saved Game"
box when the clipboard appears as you open up that
scenario from the Scenario screen. Important: Save a
game between phases. If you save a game in the middle
of a phase, your orders for that phase will be lost.
UNIT IDENTIFICATION
A "unit" is defined as a single surface ship (or,
rarely, a group of ships), a single submarine, or a
squadron of aircraft. A "base" is defined as an airfield
or a port. Whenever a unit or base is selected by click-
ing on that piece on the map, a larger picture of the
selected unit/base appears in the upper right of the
screen, displaying its name, nationality, and type. (For
a full list of abbreviations, see page 3.)
Unit Examples
= =
Surface Ship Submarine Airfield Port
5th Fleet
7. HOW A TURN IS PLAYED
Scenarios have a variable number of turns. Each
turn equals eight hours of real time, and three turns
make up a day.
PHASES
A turn is divided into six "phases". These are:
Red surface phase
Red submarine phase
Red air phase
Green surface phase
Green submarine phase
Green air phase
At the start of each phase, the computer randomly
selects an "active" player (red or green), and prompts
that player to "select a phasing unit type." The active
player must then decide whether to initiate a surface,
submarine, or air phase. Alternatively, he may "pass".
Initiating a phase: To initiate a surface, submarine, or
air phase, move the arrow to the upper right-hand cor-
ner of the Ops Display and click once in one of the three
boxes containing surface, submarine, or aircraft icons.
Air button Ship button Sub button Pass button
You may then perform actions on the Ops Display map
with all your units of the selected type. After you finish
this phase, the computer again randomly selects an
active player and prompts him to select a phasing unit
type. That player then clicks on a surface, submarine,
or aircraft icon as described above and carries out that
phase. This process is repeated until all six of the
phases are completed.
Passing: Instead of selecting a phasing unit type, you
may "pass." This means that the enemy player must
immediately choose a phasing unit type rather than
the active player. Each player may pass once per turn.
Restrictions: Each player must perform one surface,
one submarine, and one air phase per turn, yielding a
total of six phases. If a player has already clicked on an
icon and carried out that phase, the computer does not
allow him to click on that icon again for the rest of the
turn. It reminds him of this restriction by coloring an
already-selected icon red or green. For example, if the
red player is made active first and clicks on his aircraft
icon, he may not click on his aircraft icon again until
the start of the next turn.
STEPS
Each surface and submarine phase is divided into
a "Move step" and a "Combat step" (in that order) .
These steps are listed on the top of the Ops Display
screen. When the Move step is in progress, the words
"Move" and "Combat" are both shown in green; when
the Combat step is in progress, only the word "Combat"
is shown in green. Note: Air phases have only one
step, combining movement and combat functions
together.
in progress
Movement orders and combat orders may be issued
in the Move step. Only combat orders may be issued in
the Combat step. During a Move step or a Combat
step, you should issue orders to some, none, or all of
your eligible units. To carry out those orders, click once
on the Execute button. Note: Combat orders issued in
a Move Step are carried out before the unit moves, but
you don't see the results of those combats until the end
of the phase.
8. STRATEGIC DISPLAY
To open up the Strategic Display, click once on the
Strategic Display button at the top of the Ops Display
screen. This display contains a map which gives the
players a view of the overall situation throughout the
Indian Ocean/Persian Gulf region. The same 22 zones
delineated on the Ops Display are also portrayed on
the Strategic Display.
Submarines
Button
Notes: The positions
er's surface ships abd .abitmlr.lii!s
or peen on tM8tleatAIIJC
and ail'mlft
square
or green color means
already been issued orders f.be c:urrent tutn; an empty
SURFACE, SUBMARINE, AIRCRAFT BUTIONS
These three gray rectangular buttons are located in
the upper left of the Strategic Display.
Surface Ships button: Click once on this button to
view the positions of all friendly surface ships and all
detected enemy, neutral, and unknown surface ships.
Their positions are indicated by small red, green, yel-
low (neutral) or gray (unknown) squares.
Selected Unit
Friendly List
Hostile,
Neutral, and
Unknown List
or green square or cirde means that the 1mit or air- t=========
field bas not been issued orders. Yellow squares are
neutral ships; gray squares are unknown ships.
, .. :
. .. <.: . : Strategic Display 11

51hfllat
Submarines button: Click once on this button to
view the positions of all friendly submarines and all
detected enemy submarines. Their positions are indi-
cated by small red or green squares.
Aircraft button: Click once on this button to view the
locations of all friendly and enemy airfields, friendly
aircraft carriers, and all "detected" enemy aircraft car-
riers. Their positions are indicated by small red or
green circles (not squares).
Toggling buttons: The Surface Ships, Submarines,
and Aircraft buttons may be "toggled" on and off.
Clicking on a button once depresses it, leaving it in an
"on" position. The button remains on until the player
clicks on it again, which puts it in an "off" position. At
any given time, some, none, or all of the Surface Ships,
Submarines, and Aircraft buttons may be placed in the
"on" position. If all three buttons are on at the same
time, the positions of all friendly surface ships, sub-
marines, airfields, and aircraft carriers (as well as rele-
vant information concerning enemy units and airfields)
are displayed.
Friendly and Hostile Force Lists: A list of friendly units
appears on the right side of the Strategic Display. To see a list
of all friendly units in a scenario, place all three buttons (sur-
face, submarine, aircraft) in the "on" position. To see a list of
only one unit cype, place only that button in the "on" position.
Also, a list of known enemy units in the lower right of the
Strategic Display under the heading "Hostile." To see all
known enemy units, place all three buttons in the "on" posi-
tion. To see a list of only one unit cype, place only that button
in the "on" position. If the friendly and hostile/unknown/neu-
tral force lists are longer than the space available on the
screen, players may scroll through the list by using the scroll
bar on the list's right side.
Unit information: To find out information about one
of the squares or circles on the Strategic Display, move
the mouse arrow there and click on it. The square or
circle will begin to flash. The name of that unit is high-
lighted on the friendly or hostile force list on the right
of the screen. Also, a picture of that unit appears in the
upper right of the screen. If the square or circle con-
tains more than one unit , click repeatedly on that
square/circle using the left mouse button. Each unit
will be highlighted in turn and its picture will appear
in the upper right. Conversely, you can click on the
name of a unit to locate its position.
Centering a unit on the Ops Display: If you leave
the Strategic Display, the units comprising the current-
ly selected square or circle (i.e. , the one that is flashing)
will appear in the center of the Ops Display map.
AIR MISSIONS BUTION
If you want to see a summary of your current air
missions, click once on the "Air Missions" button. Any
zone in which a friendly air mission is occurring will
contain a square divided into several small boxes. If a
number appears in one of these boxes, that is the num-
ber of missions currently in progress in that zone.
Numbers in the upper right box (yellow when anum-
ber is present) indicate "Recon" missions.
Numbers in the upper left box (red when a number is
present) indicate "CAP" (combat air patrol) missions.
Numbers in the lower left box (green when a number
is present) indicate "Interception" missions.
If there is no number in a box, there is no mission of
that type currently plotted for that zone.
The bottom right box is not used in this game. Future games
in this series may use this box.
WEAX (WEATHER) BUTTON
If you are using the weather option in a scenario,
the computer generates random weather patterns in
each zone which may affect the capabilities of units. To
determine the weather in each zone, click once on the
"WEAX" button. ("WEAX" is the U.S. Navy term for
weather reports. ) A map of the Indian Ocean/Persian
Gulf region will appear. Each ofthe 22 zones on the map
displays one of three weather symbols.
Clear: The weather is normal and has no effect
on play.
Squall: Surface ship movement is reduced,
detection is less effective, and at-sea replenish-
ment is impossible.
Storm: Surface ship movement is severely
reduced, detection is not possible, and air mis-
sions, in-port replenishment, and at-sea replen-
ishment may not take place.
OPS DISPLAY BUTTON
5th Fleet
9. THE SURFACE PHASE
To initiate a Surface phase, click on the surface ship
icon in the upper right of the Ops Display when the com-
puter prompts you to "select a phasing unit type. "
During the Surface phase, only the active player's sur-
face units may move and perform combat. Each Surface
phase consists of a Move step and a Combat step.
THE MOVE STEP
During the Move step, the active player's surface
units may be issued movement and combat orders.
Orders may only be issued to one ship at a time
(although note that surface units grouped in a "task
force", "task group", or "stack" may be issued orders
together). Issuing movement and combat orders is vol-
untary; you do not have to issue orders if you don't
want to.
Movement orders: To issue a movement order to a
surface unit, follow this procedure:
1. Select the unit to which
movement orders will be issued
by clicking once on that unit.
The unit will be highlighted
(i.e. , surrounded by a white
hexagon). Alternatively, you
may click repeatedly on the
surface ship icon in the Phase
Indicator box at the top of the
screen. Each time you click on
this icon, the computer will
select an eligible unit to which the player may issue
movement orders. Clicking the left mouse button
selects a new unit; clicking the right mouse button
selects the previously selected unit. The computer
places this unit in the center of the Ops Display map.
Note: At the start of a phase, the computer automati-
cally selects an eligible surface unit. You don't have to
issue orders to this unit; you may issue orders to
another surface unit first if you wish.
'.
.:>.. The Surface Phase 19
; .
......
2. Point the arrow at the selected
unit, hold down the left mouse
button, and drag the unit to the
location where you wish it to end
its move. The computer will not
let you move the ship further
than its maximum possible 8-
hour travel distance, nor will it
let you move across land or
blocked hexsides. A series of
arrows will appear, showing the
path the unit will take in its
move. If the arrows are red, the
unit is moving at maximum
speed, using up fuel quickly. If the arrows are gray, the
unit is using fuel at normal or minimal levels. The com-
puter moves ships in straight directions. However, you
may designate an exact movement path, changing direc-
tions in the middle of movement, by dragging to an inter-
mediate destination, releasing the mouse button, and
then dragging to a new location. Note: Ships move at dif-
ferent speeds, so their movement capabilities on the Ops
Display will vary. Also, the weather may affect movement
(see Section 8).
3. After you have decided upon
movement orders for a particular
unit, select other eligible units
and issue movement orders to
them as you wish. Movement is
not executed until you click on
the "Execute" button at the end
of the Move step, so you may go
back to a unit which has already
been issued movement orders
and change those orders if you
wish. Also, remember that move-
ment and combat orders may be
issued to surface units in the Move step. Don't click on the
Execute button until you have issued all movement and
combat orders to your satisfaction in this step.
Combat orders: To issue a combat order to a surface
unit, follow this procedure:
1. Select the unit to which a combat order will be
issued as described in "Movement orders."
2. Point the arrow to the "Attack" button at the top
of the screen and click once. The button will flip to
the "open" position.
3. Select the enemy unit or base you wish to attack
by clicking on it once. The Combat screen will
appear. Follow the instructions of Section 14 to
perform combat.
4. After you have decided upon combat orders for a
particular unit, select other eligible units and issue
combat orders to them as you wish. The Move step
is brought to an end when the player clicks once on
the Execute button. Although combat is resolved
during the Move Step, the results are not displayed
until the end of the phase; so, you will not see the
results of your attacks immediately.
THE COMBAT STEP
During the Combat step, the active player's surface
units may be issued only combat orders. To issue a
combat order to a surface unit, follow the same proce-
dure described in "Combat orders," above. However, if
a unit performed an attack in the immediately preced-
ing Move step, it may not perform that same type of
attack in the current Combat step (see Section 14).
ENDING A SURFACE PHASE
When the active player has completed both the
Move step and the Combat step, the Surface phase is
over. The computer will randomly select an active play-
er and will prompt him to select a "phasing unit type".
If the Surface phase was the sixth (and last) phase of
the turn, the computer will begin a new turn (or end
the game if the turn was the last turn of the scenario).
10. THE SUBMARINE PHASE
To initiate a Submarine phase, a player must click
on the submarine icon in the upper right of the Ops
Display when the computer prompts him to "select a
phasing unit type." During the Submarine phase, only
the active player's submarine units may move and per-
form combat. The Submarine phase consists of a Move
step and a Combat step.
THE MOVE STEP
During the Move step, the active player's subma-
rine units may be issued movement and combat orders.
Orders may only be issued to one submarine at a time.
Issuing movement and combat orders is voluntary; you
don't have to issue orders if you don't want to.
Movement orders: To issue a movement order to a
submarine, follow this procedure:
1. Select the submarine to
move by clicking once on that
unit. The unit will be highlight-
ed (i.e., surrounded by a white
hexagon). Alternatively, you
may click repeatedly on the
submarine icon in the Phase
Indicator box at the top of the
screen. Each time you click on
this icon, the computer selects
an eligible submarine to which
you may issue movement
orders. Clicking the left mouse
button selects a new unit; click-
ing the right mouse button
selects the previously selected
unit. The computer places this unit in the center of the
Ops Display map. Note: At the start of a phase, the
computer automatically selects an eligible submarine.
You don't have to issue orders to this unit; you may
issue orders to another submarine first if you wish.
5th Fleet
2. Point the arrow at the select-
ed submarine, hold down the
left mouse-button, and drag the
unit to the location where you
wish it to end its move. The
computer will not let you move
the submarine further than its
maximum possible 8-hour trav-
el distance, nor will it let you
move across land or blocked
hexsides. A series of arrows
will appear, showing the path
the unit will take in its move. If
the arrows are red, the subma-
rine is moving at maximum speed, and will be easier
for the enemy to detect because of increased noise. If
the arrows are gra y, the submarine is moving at slow-
er speeds and is more difficult to detect because of low
noise levels . (Submarine fuel levels are virtually
unlimited in game terms, so higher speeds do not affect
submarine fuel consumption.) The computer moves
submarines in straight directions. However, a player
may designate an exact movement path, changing
directions in the middle of movement, by dragging to
an intermediate destination, releasing the mouse but-
ton, and then dragging to a new location. Note:
Submarines move at different speeds, so their move-
ment capabilities on the Ops Display will vary.
Generally, nuclear submarines (SSN or SSGN) move
much faster than diesel submarines (SS).
3. After you have decided upon
movement orders for a particu-
lar submarine, select other eli-
gible submarines and issue
movement orders to them as
you wish. Movement is not exe-
cuted until you click on the
"Execute" button at the end of
the Move step, so you may go
back to a submarine which has
already been issued movement
orders and change those orders
if you wish. Also, remember
that movement and combat
orders may be issued to sub-
marines in the Move step. Don't click on the Execute
button until you have issued all movement and combat
orders to your satisfaction in this step.
Combat orders: To issue a combat order to a subma-
rine, follow this procedure:
1. Select the submarine to which a combat order will
be issued as described in "Movement orders."
2. Point the arrow to the "Attack" button at the top
of the screen and click once. The button will flip to
the "open" position.
3. Select the enemy unit or base you wish to attack
by clicking on it once. The Combat screen will
appear. Follow the instructions in Section 14 to
perform combat.
4. After you have decided upon combat orders for a
particular submarine, select other eligible sub-
marines and issue combat orders to them as you
wish. The Move step is brought to an end when
the player clicks once on the Execute button.
Although combat is resolved at the beginning of
the Move Step, the results are not displayed until
the end of the phase; so, you will not see the results
of your attacks immediately.
THE COMBAT STEP
During the Combat step, the active player's sub-
marines may be issued only combat orders. To issue a
combat order to a submarine, follow the same proce-
dure described in "Combat orders." However, if a sub-
marine performed an attack in the immediately preced-
ing Move step, it may not perform that same type of
attack in the current Combat step (see Section 14).
DEEP MODE BUTTON
This small gray rectangular button showing a sub-
marine icon with a downward arrow appears just
below the fuel level gauge on the right of the Ops
Display. You may place a submarine in "deep" mode by
clicking on this box during the Move Step when that
submarine is selected. (Exception: Submarines with
slow speeds, including many diesel submarines, may
not enter deep mode.) A submarine in deep mode is
very difficult to detect, but its speed is severely
reduced and it may not conduct any missile attacks.
Torpedo attacks are reduced in strength.
ENDING A SUBMARINE PHASE
When you have completed both the Move step and
the Combat step, the Submarine phase is over. The com-
puter will randomly select an active player and will
prompt him to select a "phasing unit type." If the
Submarine phase was the sixth (and last) phase of the
turn, the computer will begin a new turn (or end the
game if the turn was the last turn of the scenario).
11. THE AIR PHASE
To initiate an Air phase, you must click on the air-
craft icon in the upper right of the Ops Display when
the computer prompts you to "select a phasing unit
type." During the Air phase, only the active player's air
units may perform activities. Unlike Submarine and
Surface phases, the Air phase consists of only a single
step, which combines movement and combat. You do
not actually move air units on the map (although air
missions are abstractly animated by the computer).
Instead, you may assign your air units to one of two
activities: "strategic air missions" and "attack mis-
sions." Assigning air units to missions is voluntary;
you don't have to assign air units to missions if you
don't want to.
STRATEGIC AIR MISSIONS
During the Air phase, the active player may assign
his eligible air units to strategic air missions. To assign
an air unit to a strategic mission, follow the procedure
described on page 24.
ATTACK MISSIONS
During the Air phase, the active player may attack
enemy surface and submarine units as well as bases
with his eligible air units. To assign an air unit to an
attack mission, follow this procedure:
1. Select a friendly airfield or
aircraft carrier containing the
air unit. Alternatively, you can
click repeatedly on the aircraft
icon in the Phase Indicator box
at the top of the screen. Each
time you click on this icon, the
computer selects an airfield or carrier containing at
least one air unit which may be eligible for assignment
to an attack mission. Clicking the left mouse button
selects a new unit; clicking the right mouse button
selects the previously selected unit. The computer
places this airfield/carrier in the center of the Ops
Display map. Note: At the start of a phase, the com-
puter selects an airfield/carrier. You don't have to
assign air units in this hex to an attack mission; you
may assign other units to missions first if you wish.
2. Click once on the Attack button
at the top of the Ops Display screen.
The Attack button will flip to an
"open" position.
3. Select the enemy unit or base you wish to attack by
clicking on it once. The Combat screen will appear.
Follow the instructions of Section 14 to complete an air
attack mission.
4. After you have decided upon
an attack mission for an air unit,
select other eligible air units and
issue attack missions to them as
you wish. The Air phase is brought to an end when you
have assigned all air units you want to strategic air mis-
sions and attack missions. Click once on the Ops Display
button to move back to the Ops Display.
12. STRATEGIC AIR MISSION
SCREEN
During the Air phase, the active player may assign
his eligible air units to strategic air missions.
CAP Button Intercept Button Recon Button
Air
These buttons, when pushed,
show the locations of all
" k ~ w n " 7'' on th =P
Selected
Airfield
or
Aircraft
Carrier
CAP
Total
.,,,
24 Strategic Air Mission Screen .
' ,
There are three types of strategic air missions:
. I
' I
l !
CAP MISSION
I
Air units on CAP (Combat Air Patrol)
missions circle over a specific loca-
- tion, protecting their parent base or
carrier from enemy attack.
INTERCEPT MISSION
Air units on Intercept missions fly to
a zone and attempt to attack enemy
c..======::..J units performing strategic air mis-
sions in that zone. Alternatively, they attempt to pro-
tect friendly air units performing strategic air missions
in that zone.
RECON MISSION
Air units on Recon missions fly to a
zone and attempt to detect enemy
surface and submarine units which
are situated in that zone. Each air unit placed on a
Recon mission increases the chance of detecting and
accurately identifying enemy units. Note: Enemy air-
fields and ports are considered detected at all times
throughout a scenario.
.... ' --I ,h. "i;
HOW TO ASSIGN UNITS
TO STRATEGIC AIR MISSIONS
1. Select a friendly airfield or aircraft
carrier containing the air unit. The
selected airfield/carrier will be high-
lighted (i.e., surrounded by a white
hexagon), and an illustration of that
airfield/carrier will appear in the upper
right of the Ops Display. Alternatively, you can click
repeatedly on the aircraft icon in the Phase Indicator
box at the top of the screen. Each time you click on this
icon, the computer selects an airfield or carrier contain-
ing at least one air unit which may be assigned to a
strategic mission. Clicking the left mouse button selects
a new unit; clicking the right mouse button selects the
previously selected unit. The computer places this air-
field/carrier in the center of the Ops Display map.
Note: At the start of a phase, the computer selects an
airfield or carrier. You don't have to assign air units in
this hex to a strategic air mission; you may assign other
units to missions first if you want.
2. Click once on the Air Missions
button at the top of the Ops
Display screen. The Strategic Air
Mission screen appears. This screen, which is similar
in appearance to the Strategic Display, shows the
entire Indian Ocean/Persian Gulf region.
3. On the Strategic Air Mission screen, an illustration of
the airfield or carrier appears in the Selected
Airfield/Carrier box in the lower right of the screen. The
position of that airfield or carrier on the map is indicat-
ed by a flashing red circle on the Strategic Air Mission
screen. Directly above the illustration in the lower right
is a list of all the air units situated on that airfield/carri-
er. On this list, select an individual air unit by clicking
once on that air unit's designation. The designation will
turn from gray to white, and an illustration of that air
unit will appear in the Selected Air Unit box.
''!!:::;'i:;' ... ' '0,0' ' 0
.
0
Air Mission Screen 25
.. ... ..... ,
.. ... < ' - ...
4. After an air unit is selected from the list on the right
side of the screen, look at the three buttons and their
accompanying rectangular lights at the top of the
screen: CAP (red), Intercept (green), and Recon (
). These three buttons represent the three types of
strategic air missions air units may be eligible to per-
form. If the selected air unit is eligible to perform one
or more of the three missions, the name of that mis-
sion-type appears in color; if the selected air unit is not
eligible to perform a mission, the name of that mission-
type appears in white. For example, if an air unit may
perform a CAP mission, the word "CAP" appears in
red; if not, it appears in white.
5. If you wish to assign an air unit to a strategic air
mission, it must be assigned to a specific zone. The
zones where the selected air unit is eligible to perform
a mission contain small white squares. To assign the
selected air unit
to a zone, point
the arrow to one
of these white
squares and click
once. The box
will be filled in
with a light blue
color and an ''X."
6. Now that you have selected the zone where the
selected air unit will perform its mission, you must
select the type of mission the unit will perform. To do
this, click once on one of the three buttons on the top
of the screen, but remember that you may not click on
a mission for which that air unit is not eligible. (Make
sure you click on the button, not the light above it.)
The light above the selected mission button will "turn
on" to indicate its selection. Also, the designation of
the selected air unit on the list at the right of the
screen will assume a color corresponding to that unit's
mission (red for CAP, green for Intercept, yellow for
Recon).
7. When you have finished assigning air units on the
selected airfield or carrier to strategic air missions,
click once on the Selected Airfield/Carrier box in the
lower right of the screen. The computer will scroll to
another one of your airfields or carriers. If you wish to
assign air units from this new airfield/carrier to strate-
gic air missions, follow Steps 1 to 7 again.
8. When you have finished assigning as many air units
as you wish to strategic missions, click once on the Ops
Display button on the right of the screen. The comput-
er will execute your strategic air missions when you
finish the current Air phase. The computer abstractly
animates all your missions to remind you of your
strategic air mission assignments. Since strategic air
missions are not carried out until a player clicks on the
Execute button on the Ops Display at the end of the
Air phase, a player may go back and change his strate-
gic air mission assignments at any time before the Ops
Display Execute button is pushed.
Important: An air unit will remain on its current
mission until you change its mission. Furthermore, it
must remain on a mission for at least three turns. To
take it off a mission after three turns, click the
appropriate mission button and the light will go off.
The exception to this is aircraft flying from carriers.
If you move the carrier to another zone, its aircraft
on INT and Recon missions will land automatically
after three turns.
SURFACE SHIPS, SUBMARINES, AIRCRAFT &
AIR MISSIONS BUTIONS
These buttons are
located to the right of
the Recon button on
' - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - ' the Strategic Air
Missions screen. They work identically to the same
buttons on the Strategic Display (see Section 8).
Clicking on the appropriate button or buttons shows
the locations of all friendly and all known enemy units,
as well as unknown and neutral ships.
TOTAL CAP AA DISPLAY
This button shows the total "Anti-
Aircraft" (AA) value of all air units
=....:;......._.;:.."'"'""'===..J assigned to a CAP mission over the
selected airfield or carrier. The higher the AA value,
the more effective the CAP mission.
LENGTH OF STRATEGIC AIR MISSIONS
Air units which are assigned to Recon and INT
missions must remain on those missions throughout
the current turn and the following two turns. Units on
CAP missions may be reassigned to other missions in
the following turn. (Exception: Units on strategic air
missions may be forced to return to base by enemy !NT
missions.) In the third turn following an air unit's
assignment to a non-CAP strategic air mission, a play-
er may reassign that air unit to another mission
(including an attack mission-or to no mission at all).
However, if the player does not alter that air unit's
assignment, the computer automatically reassigns the
unit to the same mission to which it was originally
assigned.
.,...,
13. SCROLLING THROUGH UNITS
Surface and submarine units are permitted to end
their moves in the same hex as other friendly or enemy
units. There's no limit to the number of units that may
end their moves in the same hex. If there are many
pieces in the same hex simultaneously, you may scroll
through all the units and bases situated in that hex by
using the left and right mouse buttons in the following
manner:
1. Select the units you wish to scroll through by click-
ing once on those units. The hex occupied by those
units will be highlighted (i.e., it will be surrounded by
a white hexagon).
2. To scroll through the pieces currently situated in
this hex, point the arrow anywhere within the white
hexagon and click on the left mouse button. Each click
rotates through the pieces in that hex and brings a
new piece to the top of the stack. An illustration of that
piece appears in the upper right of the screen.
3. Individual surface ships comprising a "task force"
(TF), "task group" (TG), or "stack" (STK) do not appear
when scrolling through pieces as described in Step 2.
To scroll through these units, bring a TF, TG, or STK
to the top of a hex as described in Step 2. Then click
once on the right mouse button. One of the surface
ships in that TF, TG, or STK will be illustrated in the
upper right of the screen. To scroll through all the
ships in that TF, TG, or STK, click on the left mouse
button as described in Step 2. To return to the TF, TG,
or STK, click once again on the right mouse button.
(Exception: Clicking on the right mouse button when an
aircraft carrier is illustrated in the upper right of the
screen will enable the player to scroll through that car-
rier's assigned aircraft; see Step 4 below.)
4. Individual air units assigned to an aircraft carrier
do not appear when scrolling through pieces as
described in Steps 2 and 3. To scroll through these air
units, select an aircraft carrier as described in Step 2
ltltAIIt
,, , ,
. . Scrolling Through Units 27
"
or Step 3. Then, click once on the right mouse button.
One of the air units assigned to that carrier will be
illustrated in the upper right of the screen. To scroll
through all the air units assigned to that carrier, click
on the left mouse button exactly as described in Step 2.
To return to the TF or TG to which the carrier belongs,
click once again on the right mouse button.
WHEN RED AND GREEN UNITS OCCUPY
THE SAME HEX
If you move a unit into a hex occupied by a detect-
ed enemy unit, the hex becomes highlighted with a
yellow border.
The yellow hexagon serves no other purpose than
to keep you aware of the location of your units during
play. As the example above shows, your units can shift
to the bottom of the stack after you've moved them.
The only advantage of moving into an enemy-occupied
hex is to give yourself the chance to attack enemy sur-
face ships with gunfire. You must be in the same hex
as the target unit to attack with guns (see Section 14).
Clicking through a Task Force
Click left mouse
button to highlight
Task Force.
Click left mouse
button to display
the next ship of the
TaskForce.
Click left mouse
button to display
another ship of the
Task Force.
Click left mouse
button to display
another air unit on
that carrier.
Click right mouse
button to display
the first ship of the
Task Force.
Once a carrier is
displayed, click
right mouse button
to display the first
air unit on that
14. COMBAT
Surface and submarine units may receive combat
orders during both the Move and Combat steps of the
Surface or Submarine phase (see Sections 9 and 10).
Air units may be assigned to attack missions in the Air
Selected
Attacking
unit
Surface-to-
surface
missiles
Attacking Force
Guns
Torpedoes
5lf1RIIf
phase (see Section 11). When you issue an attack order
to a surface, submarine, or air unit, the Ops Display
shifts to the Combat screen when you click on the
enemy unit or base that is the target of the attack.
Defending Force
Cruise Missiles
Selected
---- Target
unit
Air
Strike
Options
TYPES OF COMBAT
There are six types of combat:
SSM Combat: Surface, submarine, and air units
armed with "primary'' or "secondary'' SSMs (surface-to-
surface missiles) may attack enemy surface units with
their missiles.
Torpedoes: Submarines may attack enemy surface
units with torpedoes.
Cruise Missiles: Surface, submarine, and air units
armed with cruise missiles may attack enemy ports
and airfields with these missiles. Surface ships, sub-
marines, and air units armed with cruise missiles are
indicated with a small illustration of a missile just
above the drawing of the unit in the upper right of the
Ops Display when that unit is selected.
ASW: Surface, submarine, and air units may attack
enemy submarines using ASW (anti-submarine war-
fare) combat.
Air Strike: An air unit participating in an attack mis-
sion may be assigned to one of four categories of air
strikes: "bomb", "intercept" (INT), "SSM", or "electronic
warfare" (EW). If an air unit is eligible to perform a
type of air strike, that type of strike is listed in bright
red letters on its button. If it is not eligible for a partic-
ular air strike type, that type is listed in gray letters.
Guns: You may use "Gun" combat as part of an SSM
attack against an enemy surface unit when the attack-
ing unit and the target are situated in the same hex. If
the attacking unit has no SSMs, the guns may be used
by themselves.
HOW TO PERFORM COMBAT
When the Combat screen appears, a list of units
which may be eligible to participate in the attack
appears under "Friendly Forces". The enemy unit or
units which may be the targets of the attack appear
next to that list under "Enemy Forces". A player may
select a unit from the friendly forces list by clicking
once on its name. The name will turn from a faded
green to a bright green, and an illustration of that unit
appears in the upper left of the screen. Similarly, you
:rp.ay select a unit from the enemy forces list by clicking
once on it. An illustration of that unit appears in the
upper right of the screen.
SSM Combat
To determine whether a unit is eligible to partici-
pate in an SSM attack, select it by clicking on its name
on the friendly forces list. If
the circular red light under-
neath the "Primary SSM"
heading or the "Secondary
SSM" heading is lit in
bright red, that unit may
make an SSM attack. If nei-
ther light is lit, the unit
may not make an SSM
attack. If a unit is eligible to
make an SSM attack, it will
have an SSM type listed in
the box underneath the
"Primary SSM" red light. (It
may have two SSM types, in
which case the other SSM is
listed underneath the
"Secondary SSM" red light.)
Each SSM type will also
have a number of missiles
listed in the "Available" box.
To execute an SSM attack,
follow this procedure:
1. Select a unit from the friendly forces list which is
eligible to make an SSM attack. Select an enemy unit
from the enemy forces list. This is the target.
2. Determine how many pri-
mary SSMs (and secondary
SSMs, if available) will be
launched at the target by
clicking once on the plus sign
( +) button for each SSM you
wish to fire. The total number
of SSMs to be fired by the
attacking ship is listed in the
box next to the minus(-) sign.
If you wish to reduce the num-
ber of SSMs fired, click once
on the minus sign button for
each missile you wish to with-
draw from the attack. Of
course, you may never fire
more SSMs than the number
available, and an attacking
unit may never fire more than
8 SSMs in a single attack.
3. An attacking unit may launch SSMs against differ-
ent targets by repeating Steps 1 and 2 above.
4. When you are through assigning SSMs to one or
more targets for a given unit, other units on the friend-
ly forces list which are eligible to perform SSM combat
may also fire their missiles at the same or different
targets as part of the same combat. To fire SSMs with
other units, repeat Steps 1, 2, and 3 for each unit you
wish to join in the attack.
5. When you are finished assigning SSMs to enemy
targets, click once on the Ops Display button. The Ops
Display will reappear and the SSM combat will be
resolved later.
Note: SSM attacks carried out by air units are under-
taken in a different manner; see the "Air Strikes" sec-
tion.
Torpedo Combat
To determine whether a submarine is eligible to
make a torpedo attack, look at the circular red light to
the left of the "Torpedoes" heading. If this light is on,
the submarine may make a torpedo attack. If a subma-
rine is eligible to make a torpedo attack, it will have a
number of torpedoes listed in the "Available" box. To
execute a torpedo attack, follow this procedure:
1. Select an enemy unit from the enemy forces list.
This is the target.
2. Determine how many torpedoes will be fired at the
target by clicking once on the plus sign ( +) button for
each torpedo you wish to fire. The total number of tor-
pedoes to be fired by the attacking submarine is listed
in the box next to the minus (-) sign. If you wish to
reduce the number of torpedoes fired, click once on
the minus sign button for each torpedo you wish to
withdraw from the attack. A submarine may never
fire more than 8 torpedoes in a single attack. Of
course, you may never fire more torpedoes than the
number available.
3. An attacking submarine may fire torpedoes against
different targets by repeating Steps 1 and 2 above.
4. When you are completely through assigning torpe-
does to enemy targets, click once on the Ops Display
button. The Ops Display will return and the torpedo
combat will be resolved later.
-Alit
?'
) Combat 31
Cruise Missile Combat
.-.; ' .

To determine whether a surface, submarine, or air
unit is eligible to make a cruise missile attack, look at
the circular red light to the left of the "Cruise Missiles"
heading. If this light is on, the unit may make a cruise
missile attack. If the light is not lit, the unit may not
make a cruise missile attack. If a unit is eligible to
make a cruise missile attack, it will have a number of
cruise missiles listed in the "Available" box. To execute
a cruise missile attack, follow this procedure:
1. Select a unit from the friendly forces list which is
eligible to make a cruise missile attack. Then select an
enemy port or airfield from the enemy forces list. This
is the target. If a port and an airfield are in the same
location, you can determine which base you are attack-
ing by looking at the illustration in the upper right of
the Combat screen.
2. Determine how many cruise missiles will be
launched at the target by clicking once on the plus sign
( +) button for each cruise missile you wish to fire. The
total number of cruise missiles to be fired by the attack-
ing ship is listed in the box next to the minus (- ) sign. If
you wish to reduce the number of cruise missiles fired,
click once on the minus sign button for each cruise mis-
sile you wish to withdraw from the attack. Of course,
you may never fire more cruise missiles than the num-
ber available, and an attacking unit may never fire
more than 8 cruise missiles in a single attack.
3. An attacking unit may launch cruise missiles
against different targets by repeating Steps 1 and 2.
4. When you are through assigning cruise missiles to
one or more targets for a given unit, other units on the
friendly forces list which are eligible to perform cruise
missile combat may also fire their missiles at the same
or a different target. To fire cruise missiles with other
units, repeat Steps 1, 2, and 3 for each unit you wish to
join in the attack.
5. When you are finished assigning cruise missiles to
enemy targets, click once on the Ops Display button.
The Ops Display will return and the cruise missile
combat will be resolved later.
ASWCombat
To determine whether a surface, submarine, or air
unit is eligible to make an ASW attack, look at the cir-
cular red light to the left of the "ASW" heading. If this
light is on, the unit may make an ASW attack. If the
light is not on, the unit may not make an ASW attack.
To execute an ASW attack, follow this procedure:
1. Select a unit from the friendly forces list which is
eligible to make an ASW attack. Select an enemy sub-
marine from the enemy forces list. This is the target.
2. Click once on the "Launch" button. (You don't assign
a specific number of ASW weapons as in other types of
combat.) The green light next to the Launch button
will light up. An attacking unit may make an ASW
attack against only one enemy submarine per phase.
3. After clicking on the ASW Launch button for an
attacking unit, up to two more surface or air units on
the friendly forces list which are eligible to perform an
ASW attack may join in the combat. To join in an ASW
>
32 Combat : - -
,
attack with other friendly surface or air units, repeat
Steps 1 and 2 for each unit you wish to join in the com-
bat. Note: A submarine may be attacked by a maximum
of three surface units or two air units. Although there is
no limit to the number of submarine units that may par-
ticipate in an ASW attack, each submarine has its
attack resolved separately.
4. When you are through assigning units to an ASW
attack against a single enemy submarine, other units
on the friendly forces list (eligible to perform ASW
combat and which have not joined in a previous attack)
may initiate an ASW attack against a different enemy
submarine in the same hex. To initiate an ASW attack
against a new target, repeat Steps 1, 2, and 3 above.
5. When you are finished assigning units to ASW
attacks, click once on the Ops Display button. The Ops
Display will reappear and the ASW combat will be
resolved later.
Air Strike Combat
To determine whether an air unit is eligible to
make an air strike, look at the circular red light near
the "Air Strike" heading. If this light is on, the unit
may make an air strike. If the light is not on, the unit
may not make an air strike. If a unit is eligible to make
an air strike, one or more of the four "mission" buttons
beneath the Air Strike heading (Bomb, !NT [intercep-
tion], SSM, [surface-to-surface missile], and EW [elec-
tronic warfare]) will be lit up in red. This means that
the air unit is eligible to participate in that type of mis-
sion. If the mission button is gray, the air unit may not
perform that mission. To execute an air strike, follow
this procedure:
1. Select a unit from the friendly forces list which is
eligible to make an air strike. Then select a surface
ship, airfield, or port from the enemy forces list. This is
the target. If a port and an airfield are situated in the
same location, you can determine which you are
attacking by looking at the illustration in the upper
right of the Combat screen.
2. Click on one of the red mission buttons (Bomb, !NT,
SSM, or EW). When you click on the button, the light
to the right of the button lights up in green. An air unit
may participate in only one air strike mission per turn.
3. When you are through assigning an air unit to an air
strike, other air units on the friendly forces list which
are eligible to perform an air strike may also be
assigned to a mission against the same or a different
target. To assign other units to an air strike, repeat
Steps 1 and 2 for each unit you wish to join in the strike.
4. When you are completely through assigning air
units to air strike missions, click once on the Ops
Display button. The Ops Display will return and the
air strike will be resolved later.
Important: Air units participating in an air strike as
INT or EW protect all the other aircraft going to the
target hex.
Stealth Attacks: When the US F-117A "Stealth"
fighter executes a Bomb attack by itself, the effective-
ness of enemy AA fire is significantly reduced.
Gun Combat
Only surface units may perform gun combat .
However, guns can be used only as part of SSM attack
against enemy surface units in the same hex as the
attacking unit. A unit performing an SSM attack is eli-
gible to use guns if the red light next to "Guns" is on. If
you want a unit to add guns to its SSM attack, click
once on the "Fire" button. The computer will thereby
enhance the unit's SSM attack. If the attacker has no
SSMs, the unit may attack with guns only. Because of
the relatively low gunnery capabilities of most modern
warships ( l o w ~ class BBs are a notable exception),
gunfire alone w1ll generally be ineffective.
WHEN COMBAT IS EXECUTED
Combat ordered during the Move step is carried out
before movement. Combat ordered during the Combat
step takes place after the Execute button is pressed.
Results of all combat are displayed at the end of the
phase. All combats, whether successful or not, are ani-
mated by the computer on the Ops Display, after which
the Combat Result screen will automatically appear (see
Section 15).
DAMAGE AND Kill PROBABILITIES
A "Probability" box appears near the upper right of
the Combat screen. "Damage" and "Kill" probabilities
(expressed in percentages) against a target appear here
when you prepare an attack order against that target.
Note: The probabilities expressed in the Damage and
Kill boxes are theoretical percentages based on normal
operating conditions. Actual damage and kill percent-
ages, particularly in SSM attacks, will often be lower
than those listed. Unforeseen circumstances, such as
weather, weapons malfunctions, and enemy counter-
measures will sometimes effect the percentage.
THE TACTICAl DISPLAY
The formations of surface ships on the Tactical
Display (see Section 16) may affect their capabilities
w h ~ n defending against enemy SSM, torpedo, and air
stnke attacks.
IF COMBAT CANNOT TAKE PlACE
If you can't make an attack you think you should be
allowed to make, click on the "unlit" red light next to the
attack type you want to make. A clipboard will appear
with a brief reason why that attack cannot be made.
15. COMBAT EFFECTS
THE BATTLE RESULTS DISPLAY
The computer automatically goes to the Battle
Results Display at the end of the Combat step if any
attacks have taken place. This display, which is
accompanied by a background
illustration matching the type of
attack, shows the results of that
attack. Each report displays the
type of battle report (surface,
submarine, or air), the turn and
time of the attack, the target,
and the results (if any) achieved
against that target. Click once on
the "Next Phase" button to
return to the Ops Display. If bat-
tle reports are lengthy, you may
use the sidebar on the Battle
Results Display to scroll through
the attack results.
COMBAT DAMAGE
Units and bases may be dam-
aged or destroyed during combat.
If a surface ship, submarine, or
air unit is damaged, its silhouette
(in the Selected Unit box in upper
right of the Ops Display) is
accompanied by a background
illustration of an explosion. A
unit's capabilities are reduced by
5th Fleet
Bases receive damage differently. Each port and
airfield has five "damage levels," from 0 (undamaged) to
4 (destroyed). Each port and airfield starts the game at
damage level 0. This level goes up each time the base is
damaged. If the damage level of a base reaches 4, it is
destroyed. To determine the current damage level of a
damage. Examine the unit's "Sim- This is an example of a Combat Result Screen showing a bombing attack against Djibouti.
ulation Values" on the Tactical
Reference screen to determine its reduced values.
Damage to surface ships and submarines may reduce
their combat capabilities, their speed, or both. Damage
to air units simply reduces their combat and detection
capabilities.
base, select it on the Ops Display and examine the
Selected Unit box in the upper right of the screen. The
one-digit number just below the base's nationality
abbreviation indicates its current damage level. When a
base is destroyed it's removed from the Ops Display.
5th Fleet
16. TACTICAL DISPLAY
You may group surface ships into formations on
the Tactical Display. You may also also perform dock-
ing, at-sea replenishment, and in-port replenishment
on the Tactical Display. Defensively, it is advantageous
to group surface ships together on the Tactical
Display-the more warships in the group, the better.
(Although no more than 22 surface ships may be situ-
ated in the same group.) To reach the Tactical Display,
select a unit on the Ops Display and click once on the
Tactical Display button at the top of the screen.
Grouping
Template
THE GROUPING TEMPLATE
Most of the Tactical Display consists of the
"Grouping Template." This consists of four concentric
circles on a blue background, subdivided into 22 sec-
tions. The template represents a single hex of about 50
miles from side-to-side.
GROUPS
Surface units operate individually unless they are
grouped. (At the start of a scenario, most surface units
begin the game grouped.) Submarines and air units
List of
ships not
part of a
group
' .
'
36 Tactical Display . ..
.
.,..,
may never be in a group. There are three types of
groups: task forces, task groups, and stacks. A task
force is any group consisting of at least four surface
warships and any number of non-combat ships; a task
group is any group consisting of two or three surface
warships and any number of non-combat ships; a
stack is any group consisting of at least two ships,
only one of which may be a combat ship. "Non-combat"
ships include all amphibious assault, replenishment,
minesweeper, and merchant vessels.
HOW TO GROUP
All grouping actions (including forming groups, dis-
banding groups, and combining groups) may only be
performed in the Move step of the Surface phase-
before the units wishing to perform a grouping action
execute any movement. Units may not perform a group-
ing action after their movement is executed in a Surface
phase. On the Tactical Display, ungrouped ships are
listed under "Vessels" at the right of the screen. You
may select an ungrouped ship from this list by clicking
once on its name. The selected ship counter appears in
the blue hex just above the word ''Vessels." A larger sil-
houette also appears in the upper right of the screen in
the Selected Unit box. Grouped ships appear in one of
the 22 sections of the Grouping Template. Players may
select a grouped ship by clicking once on it on the tem-
plate. Its silhouette will appear in the Selected Unit box
in the upper right of the screen.
Identifying Groups
Each group has a name and number-for example,
"TF 8" (Task Force 8), "TG 2" (Task Group 2), or "Stack
4." The names and numbers of all groups in a hex are
listed under the word "Groups" at the right of the
screen. To examine the formations of each of these
groups, click once on the group's name on this list. All
the ships comprising that group will appear on the
Grouping Template. Note: When you open the Tactical
Display, the computer displays the formation of one of
the groups in the selected hex on the Grouping
Template.
Forming a Group from Ungrouped Ships
1. Select an ungrouped ship from the ''Vessels" list at
the right of the screen by clicking once on its name. Its
counter will appear in the blue hex.
2. Move the mouse arrow to the blue hex, hold the left
mouse button down, and drag the counter to any of the
22 sections on the Grouping Template. You may not
place it in a section already occupied by another ship.
Once a ship is placed in a section, you may change its
location if you wish. You may also return it to the blue
hex if you decide that you do not wish to place it in a
group.
3. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for each vessel you wish to
place in the group.
4. When you have organized the group to your satisfac-
tion, click once on the "Form" button in the lower right
of the screen. The computer will form the group and
issue it a name and number on the "Groups" list. To
examine the formation of that group later on, click
once on its name on the "Groups" list.
Adding Ungrouped Ships to a Group
1. Select the group by clicking once on its name on the
"Groups" list. Its formation will appear on the
Grouping Template.
2. To add ungrouped ships to this group, follow Steps 1
to 4 from the "Forming a Groups from Ungrouped
Ships" procedure, above.
Disbanding Groups
1. Select the group you wish to disband by clicking
once on its name on the "Groups" list. Its formation
will appear on the Grouping Template.
2. Click once on the "Disband" button in the lower
right of the screen. The computer disbands the group
511tRelt
.... ;_ , ;
<' Tactical Display 37
and sends the individual ships comprising that group
to the ''Vessels" list on the right of the screen. On the
Ops Display, those ships are now ungrouped and will
operate individually.
Removing a Ship from a Group
1. Select the group from which you wish to remove a
ship by clicking once on its name on the "Groups" list.
Its formation appears on the Grouping Template.
2. Move the mouse arrow to the ship you wish to
remove from the group, hold the left mouse button
down, and drag the counter to the right of the screen
anywhere off the blue Grouping Template. That ship is
now ungrouped, and is added to the ''Vessels" list on
the right of the screen.
3. Repeat Step 2 for each ship you wish to remove from
the group. If your group falls below the minimum
requirements for a task force, task group, or stack, the
computer will automatically adjust it.
Combining Groups
1. Select one group by clicking once on its name on the
"Groups" list. Click once on the "Disband" button in the
lower right of the screen. All the ships comprising this
group are now ungrouped.
2. Select another group by clicking once on its name on
the "Groups" list. Its formation appears on the
Grouping Template.

3. Drag any or all of the ships ungrouped in Step 1 into
any of the empty arcs of the Grouping Template as
described in "Adding Ungrouped Ships to a Group."
The computer adds these ships to the existing group.
4. Repeats Steps 1 to 3 if you wish to disband another
group and add it to an existing group.
Adjusting the Formation of Ships in a Group:
1. Select the group in which you wish to adjust forma-
tions by clicking once on its name on the "Groups" list.
Its formation appears on the Grouping Template.
2. Move the mouse arrow to the ship you wish to move,
hold the left mouse button down, and drag the counter
to any empty section on the Grouping Template.
3. Repeat Step 2 for each ship you wish to move to
another location on the Grouping Template.
HOW FORMATIONS AFFECT COMBAT
The positions of ships on the Grouping Template
affect a group's capability to defend against enemy
attacks. As a general rule, place your most important
ships in the center of the Grouping Template (or as
close as possible to the center of the template) as you
can. They can be more easily protected in these loca-
tions. If you fear enemy torpedo attacks, place your
good anti-submarine ships (those with high ASW val-
ues) in the outer sections of the template. Their ASW
values are enhanced in these locations. If you fear
enemy bombing or SSM attacks, place your ships as
close as possible to the center of the template. Here,
they can more easily intercept enemy aircraft and
SSMs as they approach the group.
LEAVING THE TACTICAL DISPLAY
To exit the Tactical Display, click once on the "Ops
Display" button in the lower right of the screen.
17. REPLENISHMENT
To regain full ammunition and fuel capacities, sur-
face ships and submarines may replenish. Air units
may never replenish. There are two types of replenish-
ment: in-port and at-sea. You are permitted to replen-
ish your units' fuel and ammunition stocks before they
are exhausted. Units which replenish may not move or
perform combat in the phase in which they replenish.
Both types of replenishment are carried out on the
Tactical Display (see Section 16).
AT-SEA REPLENISHMENT
Only surface ships (not submarines) may perform
at-sea replenishment. At-sea replenishment may only
be performed in the Move step of the Surface phase-
before the units you want to replenish execute any
movement.
Supply Ships
At-sea replenishment is provided by three types of sup-
ply ships: oilers (AO), ammunition carriers (AE), and
combat support ships (AO or AOR). Full tankers (FT)
and empty tankers (ET) are not supply ships.
How to Perform At-Sea Replenishment
A surface ship may only perform at-sea replenish-
ment if it is in the same group as it least one supply
ship. If so, follow this procedure to replenish:
1. During a Surface phase, select a hex on the Ops
Display occupied by at least one friendly supply ship.
2. Click once on the Tactical Display button at the top
of the screen. The Grouping Template appears.
3. If the group displayed on the Grouping Template con-
tains at least one supply ship, you may begin replenish-
ment (see Step 4). If there is no supply ship displayed on
the template, you may display a different group by click-
ing once on its name on the "Groups" list in the lower
right of the screen. If all the supply ships in the hex are
ungrouped, you must add at least one of them to a group
before replenishment can occur (see Section 16).
4. Move the mouse arrow to a ship you want replen-
ished on the Grouping Template, hold the left mouse
button down, and drag the counter to the section occu-
pied by a supply ship. (This is the only time two or
more ships are allowed to occupy the same section.) A
clipboard notice appears, stating the name of the ship
scheduled for replenishment. Click once on the "OK"
box to return to the Tactical Display.
5. Repeat Step 4 for each ship in the group you wish to
replenish.
6. When you are through arranging for replenishment
of your ships, click once on the Ops Display button in
the lower right of the screen. There is no limit to the
number of hexes in which at-sea replenishment may
take place per turn. To perform replenishment in other
hexes, simply repeat Steps 1 to 6.
At-Sea Replenishment Limitations
Each supply ship may provide a maximum of six
"replenishment actions" per turn. There are two types
of replenishment actions: refueling and rearming. A
ship is eligible to refuel only if it is at 80% fuel capacity
or less. A ship is eligible to rearm if it has expended
any amount of ammunition during the game. SSM
ammunition may never be replenished at-sea.
Applying At-Sea Replenishment
At the end of the phase in which ships have been
assigned to at-sea replenishment, the computer car-
ries out replenishment according to strict guidelines.
Ships are replenished in order of their assignment to
a supply ship, with priority given to refueling. Keep
this in mind when assigning units for replenishment,
as each supply ship can only provide six "replenish-
ment actions" per turn. If more ships attempt to
replenish from a supply ship than that supply ship
can handle, the computer will not allow the excess
ships to replenish. Ships that are successfully replen-
ished will be noted on a clipboard. Note: Squalls and
storms may prevent at-sea replenishment from taking
place.
Effects of At-Sea Replenishment
Units participating in at-sea replenishment may
not move or attack during the turn replenishment is
taking place. In addition, a replenishing ship has its
defense capabilities halved for that turn. Once replen-
ishment is completed, the resupplied ship is moved to a
random empty section on the Grouping Template.
Supply ship Limitations
Supply ships only carry limited amounts of fuel
and ammunition for replenishment purposes. In the
event they run out of supplies, they themselves must
be replenished before they can provide at-sea replen-
ishment to other ships.
IN-PORT REPLENISHMENT
Surface ships and submarines may perform in port
replenishment. In-port replenishment may only be per-
formed in the Move step of the Surface or Submarine
phase- before the units you want to replenish execute
any movement.
How to Perform In-Port Replenishment
A surface ship or submarine may only perform in-
port replenishment if it occupies a friendly port. Note:
Scenarios 9 and 10 restrict in-port replenishment for
both players to specified ports; see the scenario cards.
To carry out in-port replenishment, perform this
procedure:
1. During a Surface or Submarine phase, select any
port containing at least one surface ship or submarine.
(Surface ships may only replenish in the Surface
phase; submarines may only replenish in the
Submarine phase. )
2. Click once on the Tactical Display button at the top
of the screen.
3. Move the mouse arrow to any unit on the Tactical
Display (grouped or ungrouped), hold the left mouse
button down , and drag the counter to the
"Replenishment" box in the lower left of the screen. A
clipboard notice appears, stating the name of the ship
scheduled for replenishment. Click once on the "OK"
box to return to the Tactical Display.
4. Repeat Step 3 for each ship you wish to replenish.
5. When you are through arranging for replenishment
of your ships, click once on the Ops Display button in
the lower right of the screen. There is no limit to the
n
40 Docking . ,-
' . :{:
number of ports in which in-port replenishment may
take place per turn. To perform replenishment in other
ports, simply repeat Steps 1 to 5.
Applying In-Port Replenishment
At the end of the phase in which ships have been
assigned to in-port replenishment, the computer car-
ries out replenishment according to strict guidelines.
Ships are replenished in order of their assignment to
the replenishment box, with priority given to refueling.
Generally, a greater amount of replenishment may
occur in-port as opposed to at-sea. However, if more
ships attempt to replenish in a port than that port can
handle, the computer will not allow the excess ships to
replenish. Ships that are successfully replenished will
be noted on a clipboard.
NOTES ON REPLENISHMENT
Many ships in the game (including nuclear-pow-
ered ships, submarines, and merchant ships) are con-
sidered to have an unlimited fuel supply, so there is
never any need to refuel them. Also, non-combat ships
do not carry ammunition, so there is never any need to
rearm them. Although replenishment may take place
in any scenario, there is rarely any need to replenish
in scenarios which last less than 15 turns. Therefore,
don't waste your time replenishing in the shorter sce-
narios. However, if you move surface ships at high
speed (i.e., red rather than gray arrows show the path
of movement), fuel is used up rapidly. If you keep this
speed up continuously, you will need to refuel quickly.
If you move surface ships at two, three, or four hexes
less than their top speeds, you will use up very little
fuel, so don't move fast if you don't have to. Also, keep
in mind that SSMs and torpedoes cannot be replen-
ished at sea, so if you shoot them all off in one turn,
you will be weaponless until you return to port. In
some circumstances, returning to port could take the
whole game.
18. DOCKING
Surface ships and submarines occupying friendly
ports may dock. Docked units may not be attacked by
enemy submarines, nor may they be attacked by
enemy SSMs launched by surface ships. Docking takes
place on the Tactical Display (see Section 16).
HOW TO DOCK
Docking may only be performed in the Move step of
the Surface or Submarine phase-before the units you
want to dock execute any movement. To dock a surface
ship or submarine, follow this procedure:
1. During a Surface or Submarine phase, select a port
on the Ops Display occupied by at least one surface
ship or submarine.
2. Click once on the Tactical Display button at the top
of the screen.
3. Move the mouse arrow to any unit on the Tactical
Display (grouped or ungrouped), hold the left mouse
button down, and drag the counter to the "Dock" box at
the bottom of the screen.
4. Repeat Step 3 for each ship you are docking. An
unlimited number of surface ships and submarines
may dock in each port.
5. When you are through docking your ships, click once
on the Ops Display button in the lower right of the
screen. There is no limit to the number of ports in
which docking may take place per turn. To perform
docking in other ports, simply repeat Steps 1 to 5.
511tRIIf
DOCKING RESTRicriONS
Docked units may not move. To allow them to move
again, they must undock.
HOW TO UNDOCK
Ships and submarines may undock only in the Move
step of the Surface or Submarine phase. To undock a
surface ship or submarine, follow this procedure:
1. During a Surface or Submarine phase, select a port
on the Ops Display occupied by at least one docked
surface ship or submarine.
2. Click once on the Tactical Display button at the top
of the screen.
3. Move the mouse arrow to the "Dock" box. Hold the
left mouse button down and drag the unit to any loca-
tion off the blue Grouping Template on the right of the
screen. The unit is now undocked and may move nor-
mally on the Ops Display. If more than one ship occu-
pies the Dock box, you may scroll through a stack of
docked units by clicking repeatedly with the left mouse
button on the stack. The unit that is brought to the top
of the stack may be undocked as described above.
4. Repeat Step 3 for each unit you want to undock. An
unlimited number of surface ships and submarines
may undock per turn.
5. When you are through undocking your ships, click
once on the Ops Display button in the lower right of
the screen.
19. NEUTRAL SHIPS
During play, both players' units may make contact
with surface ships whose nationality and affiliation are
unknown. When you make contact with an unknown
unit, you won't know whether that contact is an enemy
surface ship or a neutral merchant ship. You may
attack an unknown unit, but if it turns out to be a neu-
tral merchant ship, your opponent will gain Victory
Points (VP) for sinking or damaging it. (Five VP for
damaging a neutral ship; ten VP for sinking one.)
UNKNOWN CONTAcrS
"Unknown" contacts appear on the Ops
1 1 - i . . - ~ 1 Display as gray counters. When selected, a
P large question mark appears in the Selected
..,. .. , Unit box in the upper right of the Ops
Display. On the small overview map on the Ops
Display, unknown contacts appear as light gray dots.
On the Strategic and Air Mission Displays, unknown
contacts appear as small squares with gray borders.
NEUTRAL CONTAcrS
Further reconnaissance of an unknown con-
.M., " tact may reveal that it is an enemy surface
ship or group of surface ships. However, the
unknown may also turn out to be a single
neutral merchant ship. Neutral merchant ships appear
on the Ops Display as yellow counters. When selected,
a large yellow counter appears in the Selected Unit box
in the upper right of the Ops Display. The ships are
designated as Panamanian or Liberian freighters and
are named. They have no combat values and may not
attack. The computer controls their movements
between turns. On the small overview map on the Ops
Display, identified neutral merchant ships appear as
yellow dots. On the Strategic and Air Mission Displays,
identified neutral merchant ships appear as small
squares with yellow backgrounds. Neutral merchant
ships may be attacked normally. At the start of each
scenario, the computer randomly (and secretly) deploys
several neutral merchant ships on the Ops Display.
Each deployment is different, even if the same scenario
is played over and over again. Thus, you should find it
difficult to predict the patterns of neutral merchant
ship movement.
20. PLAYING BY E-MAIL
5TH FLEET can be played via electronic mail,
enabling two human opponents to compete on different
machines when connected by a modem.
STARTING AN ELECTRONIC MAIL GAME
1. Open up the game and go to the CIC (Combat
Information Center) screen. Click once on the Scenario
console in the center of the CIC screen. This will bring
up the Scenarios screen.
2. Consult with the person or persons with whom you
will be playing and select a scenario.
3. Choose sides. Then decide who will be "Player 1."
The person chosen to be Player 1 must set the "Player
1" dial in the upper right of the screen to the side he
has chosen to play (Red or Green).
4. Set the "Player 2" dial to the "E-Mail" setting.
5. You are ready to play the game. Click once on the
Commit button in the lower right of the screen.
.. ,..,
PLAYING AN ELECTRONIC MAIL GAME
1. When the Ops Display is opened up, Player 1 selects
a "Phasing Unit Type" and carries out movement and
combat normally with his selected units.
2. When the computer selects your opponent to carry
out a phase, a clipboard appears on the screen with the
message, "The Opposing player has been selected to
move next." Click once on the "OK" box. This saves
your moves in a special file. Another clipboard appears
on the screen-it names your file and asks you to send
this file to your opponent. Click once on the "OK" box.
The CIC screen appears.
One or two files may be created. The first will have
an ".EML" extension. The second will only be created if
combat occurred, and will have an ".RPT" extension.
3. Click once on the System Config's console in the
upper left of the screen and follow the instructions
below to send your move file to your opponent.
Experienced E-Mail players
The following information is for those inexperi-
enced with sending flies through E-Mail. Tnere is no
special method for sending a 5TH FLEET fiie; you can
use any procedure you're familiar with to send the file.
SENDING A FILE TO YOUR OPPONENT
1. On the Systems Config's screen, select your "Baud
Rate" by clicking on the appropriate number in the
Baud Rate box. Generally, the Baud Rate is 9600.
2. Select your "Comport" by clicking once on one of the
numbered buttons in the Comport box. Generally,
Comport button 2 is used.
3. Type in the phone number of your opponent.
4. Click once on the "Send" button. A list of E-Mail
games in progress appears on the screen. (There may
be only one game listed.)
5. Click once on the game you are currently playing
and then click once on the "Connect" button. Your
move file has now been sent to your opponent. To leave
the Systems Config's screen, click once on the "Quit
Station" button.
RECEIVING A FILE FROM YOUR OPPONENT
1. On the Systems Config's screen, select your "Baud
Rate" by clicking on the appropriate number in the
Baud Rate box. Generally, the Baud Rate is 9600.
2. Select your "Comport" by clicking once on one of the
numbered buttons in the Comport box. Generally,
Comport button 2 is used.
3. Type in the phone number of your opponent.
4. Click once on the "Receive" button and wait. You
will soon receive your opponent's move files.
21. VICTORY POINTS
5TH FLEET is played in "scenarios". There are ten
scenarios to choose from, and each has a different set
of goals for both the Green and Red side. To win a sce-
nario, you must score Victory Points (VPs) by destroy-
ing or damaging enemy units, airfields, and ports; you
also score VPs by sending units to certain hexes on the
Ops Display. The scenario cards included with the
game provide detailed information about each sce-
nario. Before playing a scenario, you should read its
card thoroughly to understand your side's objectives.
DESTROYING ENEMY UNITS
Below is a list of VPs awarded to both sides for
destroying enemy units:
Enemy Unit
INT, ATK, BMB air units
All other air units
- - ~ -
SSN/SSGN
ss
Surface unit*
VPs Received
3 VPs per unit
No VPs received
5 VPs per unit
3 VPs per unit
"Defense" value of the unit
* Generally, the Victory Point value of a surface unit is equal to its
"Defense" value. However, certain units (like aircraft carriers and
battleships) have an enhanced "Victory Point" value. See the
Reference Manual to find the Victory Point value for each class of
surface unit.
After a battle, the computer will display the Battle
Results screen listing all the enemy units damaged or
destroyed. If you destroyed any units in that battle,
your Victory Points total in the bottom right of the Ops
Display should increase accordingly.
REACHING OBJECTIVE HEXES
You will receive VPs if your units reach the "objec-
tives hexes" listed in the scenario. Objective hexes are
listed as either "primary" or "secondary". Primary
objectives are listed first; secondary objectives are list-
ed after the phrase "failing that." During a game, you
- : ;
44 Victory Points
7
;
/ '. ' .., l':,_
.....
decide which objectives are obtainable based on your
current situation. However, reaching primary objec-
tives awards you more points than reaching secondary
objectives, so be careful when deciding where to send
your units.
DESTROYING OR DAMAGING BASES
In some cases, airfields or ports are listed as objec-
tives for destruction. If you destroy or damage these
structures, you receive VPs.
THE VICTORY POINT DISPLAY
The Victory Point Display appears when you click
on the Red or Green VP box at the bottom right of the
Ops Display. As you destroy enemy units or satisfy
other scenario objectives, you
earn VPs. The more VPs you
earn, the better your odds of
winning.
The Victory Point Display
lists a number of categories
like "enemy bases destroyed."
The category will be followed
by a number. This number is
the total number of VPs that
you have been awarded for
destroying units in that catego-
ry (not the number of individ-
ual units of that type ). For
example, if the number after the category "enemy
bases destroyed" is "5", that means you have been
awarded 5 VPs for destroying enemy bases; it doesn't
mean that you've destroyed 5 enemy bases.
AWARDING VICTORY POINTS TO THE ENEMY
5TH FLEET doesn't take VPs away from you. So, if
you make a mistake during play, the computer will
award your opponent VPs instead. The net result, of
course, is the same.
WINNING A SCENARIO
Winning a scenario of 5TH FLEET isn't easy. Just
because you are ahead in VPs at one point in the game,
doesn't mean that you have the upper hand on your
opponent. The tides of victory can turn suddenly, and
VPs are awarded all the time. In fact, you might find
yourself receiving VPs when you haven't done any-
thing. This can happen, because the computer takes
into account everything: Movement of your enemy's
units, how far you are away from objective hexes, how
successful your CAP and Intercept missions are, etc.
Small, subtle occurrences can affect your number of
VPs. The best thing to remember during play is to
"know your objectives" and move your units to posi-
tions where these objectives can be achieved.
Each scenario has a set number of turns.
At the end of the final turn, the computer
determines a winner. If you choose to end a
scenario early, you can look at the number
ofVPs you've been awarded so far. If you are
ahead, you can claim a "moral" victory; you
cannot, however, claim a "definite" victory.
Being ahead in points doesn't mean you're
winning. The only
way to know if
you're winning is to
view the Victory
Points Display. If
your commanders
are jumping for joy,
you are winning. If
they aren't and you
are leading in
points, that means
the point difference
between you and
your opponent is too small (i.e., you're leading, but
you're not winning the game).
5th Fleet
GLOSSARY
The following glossary of screens, buttons, and
terms used in 5TH FLEET provides a handy reference
for the players during game play.
Air Mission screen: The screen
on which air units may be
assigned to strategic air mis-
sions and CAP (combat air
patrol). To reach this screen,
select an airfield of aircraft car-
rier on the Ops Display and then
click on the Air Missions button.
r;;;:i:'i:ii::'i:i;:i;l Attack button: If you want to attack an
enemy unit or base, first select the attack-
ing unit on the Ops Display and then click
-..-..-.___. on the Attack button. The button's cover
will "lift," after which you must click on the enemy unit
or base you want to attack. After completing these
functions, the Combat screen will appear.
Battle Results screen: This is
the screen where the results of
all attacks are indicated. This
screen is displayed automatical-
ly after all combats have been
executed at the end of an Air,
Surface, or Submarine phase.
CIC (Combat Information
Center) screen: This schematic
drawing of a US Navy warship's
combat information center (CIC)
is the opening screen of the
game. Three computer consoles
are illustrated. To choose a sce-
nario to play, click on the console just to the right of
center (the one with a small black and green map of
the Indian Ocean region). To consult the Tactical
Reference screen, click on the console on the right (the
one with a side and top view of a warship). To go to the
Systems Configuration screen, click on the console in
the upper left (the one with a circular radar screen). To
quit play and leave the game, click anywhere in the
doorway at the top of the screen when the word "Exit"
appears.
Clock: The clock is displayed on
the right side of the Ops Display in
green digital numbers. The first two
digits represent the current day. (The first day of any
scenario is always "Day 1.") The last four digits show
the current time of day using a 24-hour clock (e.g.,
"0800" is 8 AM and "1600" is 4 PM). Each day consists
of three 8-hour turns: the "0000" (midnight to 8 AM)
turn; the "0800" (8 AM to 4 PM) turn; and the "1600" (4
PM to midnight) turn.
Combat screen: This is the
screen where you select attaCk-
ing units and targets. The
attacker must also select an
attack type (SSM, torpedo, cruise
missile, ASW, air strike-eligible
attacks are indicated by a red
light) and sometimes decide upon the number of
weapons fired. To reach this screen, click on the Attack
button and select an enemy target on the Ops Display.
Compass: The compass appears on the right-
hand side of the Ops Display. It is divided into
eight directions. You scroll back and forth
across the map in a particular direction by
clicking on one of these directions. Furthermore, if you
click on the small circle in the center of the compass,
the computer will automatically scroll the map so that
the currently selected hex will be placed in the center of
the map. Players may also scroll the map by clicking
and dragging the small red box as far as they wish on
the small overview map, which appears directly below
the compass on the Ops Display.
Computer icon button: This is the small
gray computer button to the right of the Deep
Mode Button. If you want to give control of a
surface unit to the computer, click once on this button.
The computer will now conduct all movement and
attacks for this unit.
Deep Mode button: Most (but not all) sub-
marines may enter "deep" mode. To select
this mode for a particular submarine, select
that submarine on the Ops Display and then click on
the small submarine icon with the downward arrow,
which is located just under the Fuel gauge. A subma-
rine in deep mode is very difficult to detect, but has
restrictions on movement and combat.
Execute button: This button
appears on the Ops Display screen.
Click this button when you are fin-
ished issuing movement and attack orders to your
units in an Air, Submarine, or Surface phase.
I
"' MJ:f"_(.., I Fuel Gauge: You may determine
!liiiiliiili the fuel_ level for units and
. . submannes by exammmg the "Fuel
Level" gauge near the upper right-hand corner of the
Ops Display. As a unit's fuel level decreases, the small
green boxes on the gauge are reduced in number.
Generally, the aster a unit moves he more uel it
uses. (Units moving slowly-or not at all-use little or
no fuel. ) Note that some units, particularly nuclear-
powered ships, submarines, and most non-combat ves-
sels possess virtually unlimited amounts of fuel and
cannot possibly run out during the course of a scenario.
Movement (Surface and Submarine units): To
move surface and submarine units, select the unit you
wish to move on the Ops Display by clicking on it.
Then, hold the mouse button down and drag the point-
er as far as you wish in the direction you want to move.
(The computer will not let you move further than the
unit's maximum possible distance, nor will it let you

move across land.) If the unit moves its maximum dis-
tance, red arrows appear-indicating very high fuel
expenditure (for surface units) or greater detection pos-
sibility (for submarines). If the unit moves less than its
maximum distance, gray arrows appear-indicating
normal or low fuel expenditure (for surface units) or
normal detection possibility (for submarines). If you
wish to change direction in the middle of movement,
drag the pointer as far as you want before you wish to
change direction and then release the mouse button.
Then drag the pointer in a new direction. You may
change directions as many times as you wish up to the
unit's maximum movement distance. After you have
issued movement orders to all your units, click on the
Execute button. The units will then move to the desti-
nations just selected by you.
Movement (Air units): To issue movement orders to
air units, select an airfield or carrier on which air units
are based and assign those units to air missions by
clicking on the Air Missions button on the Ops Display.
Alternatively, issue attack orders to those air units by
clicking on the Attack button. Don't concern yourself
with the distance and direction the air units move; the
computer takes care of that for you. (Although you will
see animated aircraft on the screen representing those
missions.)
Ops Display button: This but-
ton is found on four screens: Air
Missions, Strategic, Tactical, and Combat. Click on
this button to return to the Ops Display.
Ops Display screen: This is the
main screen of the game, where
a portion of the full-color map of
the Ir.dian Ocean and Persian
Gulf is displayed. All surface,
submarine, and air unit move-
ment and combat takes place on
this screen.
Options button: The Options button
appears on the Ops Display. This
button allows you to turn the music,
sound effects, and animation on or off. Also, you may
choose to play with or without a hexgrid superimposed
over the Ops Display map.
8
Pass button: When the computer instructs
you to select a unit type at the start of each
of the six phases of a turn, you may "pass" in
lieu of selecting one of your aircraft, surface
warship, or submarine icons in the upper right-hand
corner of the Ops Display. If you pass, your opponent
must then select one of his aircraft, surface ship, or
submarine icons. You may pass only once per turn (and
may not pass immediately after your opponent has
passed).
Phase: Each turn of eight hours consists of six "phases":
an Air, Submarine, and Surface phase for the green
player and an Air, Submarine, and Surface phase for
the Red player. At the beginning of each phase, the
computer randomly selects a player and instructs him
to select an Air, Submarine, or Surface phase. To select
a phase, click on the aircraft, submarine, or surface
ship icon in the upper right-hand corner of the Ops
Display. (Each icon may only be selected once per
turn.) When a phase has been selected, the Ops
Display map appears and you may move and perform
combat with the unit type selected at the start of the
phase. The phase in progress is indicated by the col-
ored icon situated next to the Attack button at the top
of the Ops Display. When all six phases have been
completed, a turn is over.
Quit button: Click on this button in the lower
right-hand corner of the Ops Display when you
wish to stop play in the current scenario.
Make sure you follow instructions for saving the game
if you wish to resume playing later.
Save button: Click this button to save the
game you're currently playing. Note, however,
that you may only have one saved game for
each scenario. For example, if you already have a saved
game of scenario 8, "Convoys to Iran," and you are cur-
rently playing a different game of scenario 8, your cur-
rent game will be saved over the previous scenario 8.
Scenario screen: You may
choose the scenario you want to
play on this screen. In addition,
you may choose to play the
game against a human opponent
or against the computer's "artifi-
cial intelligence" (AI). If you
play against the computer, the AI level (1, 2, or 3)
must be selected, as well as the computer's "aggres-
sion" level ("Nominal" or "High"). To reach the
Scenario screen, click on the drawing of the center
computer console on the Combat Information Center
(CIC) screen (the one with a small black and green
Indian Ocean map). To choose a scenario once you
have reached the Scenario screen, click on one of the
ten scenario titles and then click on the small square
button just to the right of the "Select" line. Then, click
on the "Commit" button on the lower right of the
screen. The Ops Display will appear.
Strategic Display screen: This
is the display where you can
view the location of your surface,
submarine and air units, as well
as the location of known enemy
units. The current weather con-
ditions and status of units on air
missions may also be seen on this screen. To reach this
screen, click on the Strategic Display button on the
Ops Display.
System Config's screen: Use
this screen to configure games
played by modem/electronic mail
and to adjust background
sound/music. To reach this
screen, click on the drawing of
the computer console on the left
of the Combat Information Center (CIC) screen (the
one with a circular radar screen, near the door).
Tactical Display screen: The
blue screen with a series of con-
centric circles (divided into sec-
tions) on which you can adjust
the formations of your surface
ships and form task forces and
task groups. To reach this
screen, click on the Tactical Display button on the Ops
Display.
Tactical Reference screen:
This screen shows a picture of
each air, surface, and submarine
unit in the game, and lists the
"real world" and "simulation"
data pertaining to those u n i t ~ .
Before starting a scenario, you
may reach this
1
screen by clicl9ng on tlie arawing of
the computer console on the right of the Combat
Information Cen,_ter (CIC) screen. During the play of a
scenario, you may also reach this screen by clicking on
the red or green box in the upper right-hand corner of
the Ops, Strategic, Air Missions, or Tactical Displays
(the box displaying the silhouette and nationality flag
of the air, surface, or submarine unit). If the Tactical
Reference screen is reached from the CIC screen
before the start of a scenario, only "real world" data is
displayed; if the Tactical Reference screen is reached
during a scenario, both "real world" and "simulation"
data are shown. (The simulation data is updated as
units expend ammunition or are damaged. ) To exam-
ine data pertaining to aircraft, surface ships, and sub-
marines, click on the appropriate icon under the word
"select." To move back and forth between individual
aircraft, surface ships, and submarines, click on the
left or right arrow under the word "view" on the lower
left of the screen.
Turn: A turn represents eight hours, divided into six
phases.
Victory Point indicators: The
computer determines who wins a
scenario by keeping track of victory
points . Victory points are gained by damaging or
destroying enemy units or bases and by achieving spec-
ified objectives. During a game, you may view both
sides' current victory point totals by glancing at the
red and green numbers directly underneath the small
overview. The red numbers are the Red player's cur-
rent victory point total and the green numbers are the
Green player's current victory point total. At the end of
a scenario, the computer displays a special screen
informing you about which side won the game.
:WEAX: The US Navy term for weather reports. To
aetermine the weather, click on the WEAX button,
which appears on the Strategic Display. The weather
in all twenty-two zones on the map is indicated by a
symbol. There are three weather symbols: clear, squall,
and storm. Click on the :WEAX button on the scenario
screen if you want weather to be used in a scenario.
Zone: The map is divided into twenty-two named
zones (e.g., "Bay of Bengal Zone"). On the Ops Display,
zone boundaries are drawn in red. On the Air
Missions and Strategic Display screens, zone bound-
aries are yellow.
The Avalon Hill Game Company
DMSION OF MONARCH AVALON, INC.
4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214
1994 Printed in USA All Rights Reserved
STANLEY
ASSOCIATES
Table of Contents
5th Fleet Designer's Notes ............ 3
The flags of
Carriers .......................... 10
Battleship ........................ 15
Australia
Bahrain
Cruisers .......................... 16
=
Ethiopia
France
Destroyers ........................ 21
India
Indonesia
Frigates .......................... 28
Iran
Italy
Corvettes ......................... 37
Kenya
Kuwait
Patrol Combatants ................. 39
Liberia
Oman
Amphibious Assault Ships .......... .43
Minesweepers .................... .4 7
Pakistan
Panama
Replenishment Ships ............... 51
Qatar
Russia
Merchant Ships .................... 59
Saudi
UAE
Arabia
Submarines ....................... 63
UK
us
Aircraft .......................... 72
Yemen
Technical Support Information ....... 96
5TH FLEET DESIGNER'S NOTES
by Joseph M. Balkoski
Why do navies exist? The 19th century American
naval theorist Alfred Thayer Mahan postulated that no
nation could achieve greatness without a great navy.
History has confirmed this theory. From the
Peloponnesian Wars in the 5th century B.C. to the
Persian Gulf conflict of the late 20th century, the side
controlling the seas has generally emerged victorious
in war.
For the past 250 years or more, the navies of the
English-speaking world have dominated the world's
oceans. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, the British
triumph over royalist, revolutionary, and Napoleonic
France in a conflict that was actually the first "world
war," led directly to one hundred years of Pax Britannica.
During this period of relative international calm, the
British planted their flag in the far corners of the world,
exploited foreign markets, and imported goods from afar
by sea on an unprecedented scale to feed the machinery of
the Industrial Revolution at home. In the late 19th and
early 20th centuries, the efforts by other nations, particu-
larly Germany, to share the bounties of colonialism with
the British ignited the Great War, which in turn led
directly to the Second World War.
The upheaval of the 20th century's two world wars
sapped the strength of Great Britain and brought about
the end of Pax Britannica. However, following the Allies'
triumph over the Axis powers in the Second World War,
the years of Pax Americana began. Somewhat reluctantly,
the United States inherited the role of the world's domi-
nant power, a state of affairs which has continued since
1945.
One of the means by which global economic domi-
nance is achieved is by vigorous international commerce.
Even in an era of burgeoning aviation, by far the most
effective means of carrying goods between markets is by
sea. Quite simply, a nation needs ships to carry goods; to
protect those ships, it needs a navy. Furthermore, the
more a nation relies on seaborne commerce, the bigger its
navy must be.
As the British learned in the 19th century, with
power comes responsibility. It was no accident that the
Royal Navy came to be the world's most powerful military
force during the era of Pax Britannica, for the British
would not tolerate encroachment by foreign powers in
their lucrative colonial markets, nor would they stand for
blockage of their vital seaborne commerce. For one hun-
dred years, the Royal Navy dominated the seas, and no
nation dared to stand up against it. The Royal Navy was
both an impenetrable barrier against foreign invasion of
the homeland and a pillar supporting the British Empire.
Of course, a powerful navy costs a great deal of
money. Pax Britannica came to an end essentially
because the costs of fighting two world wars bankrupted
Britain. Similarly, the Soviet Union's attempt to oust the
United States as the world's strongest power during the
Cold War failed because the Soviets could simply not
afford to compete militarily with the United States.
.Before World War Two, the United States tradition-
ally devoted little money to its military in peacetime and
scrupulously adhered to George Washington's advice "to
steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the
foreign world". Starting in 1945, however, the profound
change in American diplomacy brought about by the
United States' new status as the world's dominant power
necessitated major changes in American defense policy.
To furnish manpower for a larger armed force, the gov-
ernment initiated a peacetime draft-an unthinkable
concept in 19th century America. Furthermore, a sepa-
rate and distinct U.S. Air Force was established, whose
primary mission was to wield the powerful new atomic
weapons in the American arsenal. Above all, the U.S.
Navy readily stepped into the power vacuum created by
the downsizing of the Royal Navy and the collapse of
much of the British Empire. American naval technology,
particularly nuclear propulsion and air power, clearly
established the American fleet as the most powerful navy
in the post-war world.
The U.S. Navy spent much of the Cold War preparing
to fight the Soviet fleet, which grew dramatically from a
coastal defense force in the 1950's to a first-rate "blue
water" navy in the 1980's. Of course the U.S. Navy never
fought the decisive Trafalgar-style battle it expected to
fight against the Soviets in the event the Cold War turned
hot. Instead it performed secondary roles in medium-sized
regional conflicts such as Vietnam, Korea, and the
Persian Gulf, supporting the other branches of the armed
forces in what were essentially ground and air wars.
Although the post-World War Two U.S. Navy was
almost never used for the purposes for which it was
designed, it was unrefutably the world's most powerful
naval force. Its very existence was a deterrence to Soviet
aggression. Furthermore, the Soviet effort to build a fleet
that could wrest control of the seas from the west was a
dismal, costly failure-a failure that contributed mightily
to the eventual bankruptcy of the Soviet Union. When one
considers that the Soviets also failed to develop ground
and air forces on a qualitative par with the west, it is
clear that America's final victory in the Cold War was in
large measure attributable to the fact that the Soviets
could simply never hope to roll over the western democra-
cies on the field of battle. The fact that the west's Cold
5th Fleet
War victory was won without the loss of a man on the bat-
tlefield is all the more remarkable.
For America, however, the price of its Cold War victo-
ry was not cheap. For 45 years, the Soviet Union-the
"evil empire" in President Ronald Reagan's words-was
an enemy. In his farewell address in 1796, President
George Washington warned, "The nation which indulges
toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fond-
ness is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosi-
ty or to its affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it
astray from its duty and its interest". America's obsession
with the containment of communism changed the pattern
of American life forever. Although there was no climactic
military struggle with the Soviets, a great deal of money
and effort was spent on developing a war machine of
unheard size and power in peacetime America. Of course
the United States had geared up for global war twice in
the 20th century, but these wars were of short duration
compared to the massive 45-year effort to maintain a
large, well-prepared armed force during the Cold War. A
whole generation grew up with the "military-industrial
complex," the draft, and the Berlin Wall. Meanwhile,
income taxes ballooned and the American social fabric
deteriorated.
For the United States, victory in the Cold War initiat-
ed an immediate downsizing of the American armed
forces and triggered much-publicized media attention on
the so-called "peace dividend." As defense dollars became
more scarce in the mid-1990's, the three branches of the
armed forces scrambled for funding. Notwithstanding
Tailhook and the Naval Academy cheating scandal, the
Navy has so far emerged from these budget battles bat-
tered, but fairly intact. Naval air power and submarines
are still the cornerstones of the U.S. Navy and will be for
years to come. And in any future international crisis, the
query "Where are the carriers?" is still sure to be the first
question out of the President's mouth.
Although the United States no longer has "an habitu-
al hatred" for any nation of the world posing a direct mil-
itary threat to the western democracies, the much-
reduced American armed forces of the mid- and late-
1990's must continue to prepare to wage war. The critical
question facing American defense planners is who to pre-
pare to fight . Throughout the debates on American
defense preparedness, one thing is certain: the United
States is clearly still heavily dependent on seaborne com-
merce and therefore must be prepared to defend its mer-
chant shipping from foreign aggressors, even in distant
locales such as the Indian Ocean and the Persian Gulf.
Even with the end of the Cold War, there is no short-
age of countries with a deep animosity towards the
United States. The Korean peninsula could explode into
war at any time; a hostile
Cuba is situated only 90 miles
from Key West; and, in the
Middle East, Iraq and Iran
threaten the flow of oil from
the Persian Gulf to North
America, Europe, and Asia.
Furthermore, although there
is no more "evil empire" of
Soviet communism, the cur-
rent chaotic state of Russian
society could easily turn ugly
and again transform Russia
into an enemy of the west.
Indeed, to some defense ana-
lysts, Russian instability is
more threatening to world
peace today than the vitriolic diplomatic showdowns
between the superpowers at the height of the Cold War.
Of all the hot spots in the world today, there is none
hotter for the United States than the Persian Gulf.
Although America and its allies decisively defeated Iraq
in the Gulf War of 1991, the region is as unstable as ever
today. Ever since the downfall of the Shah in 1979, Iran
has been an implacable enemy of the United States.
Furthermore, much to the surprise of American diplo-
mats, Saddam Hussein still reigns supreme in Baghdad.
Thus, the entire northern and eastern coastlines of the
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5

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Gulf are occupied by powers hostile to the United States
and the western democracies. Even worse, the Strait of
Hormuz chokepoint connecting the Persian Gulf with the
Indian Ocean is directly threatened by Iranian missiles
and mines.
The western powers' abiding interest in Persian Gulf
oil originated less than a century ago. Significantly, it was
the warship rather than the automobile that first devel-
oped an insatiable thirst for oil. The first warships to use
oil (rather than coal) as a fuel source were the Royal
Navy's Queen Elizabeth class dreadnoughts, which were
built in the years immediately prior to the Great War. As
oil provided significantly
greater sailing endurance
than coal, it was not surpris-
ing that the world's navies
soon turned to oil as an ener-
gy source for their warships.
For the Royal Navy, the
Persian Gulf provided a vir-
tually unlimited oil supply.
Simultaneously, the
civilian world' s oil needs
grew dramatically as the
automobile came into wide-
spread use and homeowners
realized the advantages of
oil-based heating systems.
By the latter half of the 20th
century, most of the industrially developed nations of the
world were highly dependent on Persian Gulf oil. Indeed,
when the western powers were faced with a sharply
reduced supply of Persian Gulf oil during the oil crises of
1973 and 1979, their economies-as well as their entire
social fabric-were thoroughly disrupted. Today, the
west's-and Japan's-thirst for Persian Gulf oil is still
very high; supposedly, 75 percent of Japan's oil origi-
nates in the Gulf, as opposed to about 60 percent for
western Europe. For the United States, the figure is
around 15 percent.
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It is therefore no wonder that the western powers are
so sensitive about the safety of the shipping lanes in the
Persian Gulf and the adjacent waters of the Indian
Ocean. A complete cut-off of Persian Gulf oil to the west
would clearly have catastrophic economic consequences
throughout the world. The western powers' sensitivity
about this region helps to explain why they were willing
to go to war in the Gulf over Iraqi aggression, but were
not willing to go to war in the Balkans over Serbian
aggression.
Probably the most vital mission for the post-Cold War
U.S. Navy is to guarantee the safety of merchant ships
plying the Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean shipping lanes.
Although the Navy has main-
tained a modest presence in
this region since the end of
World War Two, the Pentagon
has learned that supporting a
major force there in times of
crisis is a logistical night-
mare. Except for the U.S.
base at Diego Garcia, the
Indian Ocean region is devoid
of permanent American naval
bases, and in the event of a
major regional conflict the
United States would be forced
to seek significant support
from countries with which it
has few strong cultural or
political ties. Although during the Gulf War of 1991, bas-
ing facilities were freely provided by friendly Gulf nations
such as Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Qatar, it is by no
means certain that these offers will be repeated in the
future-especially in a conflict with a more nebulous mili-
tary objective than the liberation of Kuwait.
The key American base at Diego Garcia atoll in the
Chagos Archipelago is about as far away from the conti-
nental United States as one can get: almost 12,000 miles,
in fact, from either New York or San Francisco. Diego
5th Fleet
Garcia, which was once used as an RAF relay airfield, is
1,000 miles south of the nearest landmass-the southern
tip of India-and more than 2,000 miles from the Strait of
Hormuz. Thus, the U.S. Navy is burdened not only with
getting supplies from Diego Garcia to an active theater of
military operations within the Indian Ocean region, but
with getting those supplies from the United States to
Diego Garcia in the first place. In the Gulf War, logistics
never posed a serious problem because the friendly Gulf
nations provided adequate base facilities and because the
Iraqi Navy never posed a significant threat. An Indian
Ocean war against an enemy with a modern navy, howev-
er, would be an entirely different matter.
When Bill Clinton ascen-
ded to the presidency in
1993, there was general
agreement among both par-
ties on Capitol Hill that the
federal government must
spend less money on the mil-
itary than it did when the
Soviet threat still existed.
Clinton administration offi-
cials stressed that this
downsizing would not go too
far, assuring the Pentagon
that America would always
be strong enough to fight
two moderate-sized regional
conflicts simultaneously.
Certainly, one of the regions in which the United
States must still be prepared to fight is the Persian
Gulf. The sheer quantity of western shipping in the
Persian Gulf as well as the predictability of Gulf ship-
ping routes (ships can only enter and leave the Gulf via
the Strait of Hormuz), make the Gulf a very inviting
place for any nation wishing to attack or harass the
western democracies.
The 5th Fleet computer game traces its origins to the
board game of the same name, which was published by
Victory Games (a division of the Avalon Hill Game
Company) in 1989. Actually, the game's roots may be
traced back as early as 1983, when I began designing 6th
Fleet-the first of what turned out to be a series of five
operational naval games (6th, 2nd, 7th, 5th, and 3rd
Fleets). Players familiar with the five board games proba-
bly remember how that series evolved over the years.
During the design of 6th Fleet, the Falklands War was
fresh in my memory, and my general objective was to
show how the modern naval weapons of that war, such as
Exocet and Sea Wolf, could affect modern naval opera-
tions in a larger conflict between the superpowers.
The series proved remarkably popular, eventually
portraying the world's hotspots from the Mediterranean
(6th Fleet), to the North Atlantic (2nd Fleet), to the west-
ern Pacific (7th Fleet), to the Indian Ocean/Persian Gulf
(5th Fleet), and finally to the Caribbean, Baltic, and
Aleutians (3rd Fleet). When the series came to an end in
1990, there were no more oceans to cover. But the Soviet
Union and most of its allies were on the verge of breaking
up anyway, so it seemed a convenient time to bring the
series to a close and let glasnost have its day.
Dozens of garners wrote to me after 3rd Fleet was
released to ask what would next happen to the series. I
honestly thought there was little more we could do with
modern navies in a game format now that the Soviet
Union had disappeared, and I commenced another major
series of games on the American Civil War (a multi-year
project that I am still in the middle of). But in the spring
of 1993, Stanley Associates, an Alexandria, Virginia-
based consulting firm, approached Avalon Hill with the
intriguing idea of computerizing the entire Fleet series.
The idea was simple: Stanley would program the games
with the aid of the original designer (me), and Avalon Hill
would market them. A deal was struck and programming
work began in earnest.
As it turned out, it was a propitious time to convert
the series to a computer format . Despite the end of the
Cold War, the devotees of the five board games have
never lost their interest in the game system and have
been clamoring for several years for new modules, scenar-
ios, maps, and orders of battle. In addition to providing
those new elements, the computer game simplifies the
play of the game immensely. Players no longer have to
calculate attacks in their heads, keep track of logistical
information on pads, and place markers on detected units.
The computer handles all that for them. Most important,
you don't need a huge table on which to play the game-
and you don't even need a live opponent. For me, by far
the most significant improvement in the computer game
is the "fog of war". Even when you play the game solitaire
against the computer, you don't know where the enemy
forces are situated. That element alone changes the origi-
nal board game profoundly.
A computer version of the Fleet series is also timely
because of the major changes in the U.S. Navy over the
past several years. Indeed, since the publication of 3rd
Fleet in 1990 the Navy has undergone one of the greatest
overhauls in its history. In the Reagan-Bush years, the
Navy almost achieved its much publicized "600-ship
Navy" goal. By the late 1990's, however, the Navy will
maintain hardly more than 300 ships. Soon the mainstays
of the Cold War U.S. Navy will all be gone: A-6 Intruders,
Coontz and Adams class destroyers, Leahy and Belknap
class cruisers, Forrestal class carriers, Sturgeon and
Permit class nuclear submarines, and the ungainly LST
tank landing ships. The Navy of the late 1990's will
become less varied: there will probably be only one major
type of carrier (the Nimitz class), one type of cruiser (the
Ticonderoga class), two types of destroyers (Arleigh
Burkes for air defense, Spruances for ASW), one type of
frigate (the Perry class), and one type of attack submarine
(the Los Angeles class, with a few Seawolf subs and per-
haps a few boats of a completely new design). Players
familiar with the Fleet board games will be surprised at
how significantly the U.S. Navy has changed since the
publication of 6th Fleet in 1984.
Abroad, there have been some fairly significant
changes in the maritime world over the past several
years. The Soviet Navy has ceased to exist. The Iranians
have submarines. Western European navies have shrunk
to their smallest levels in modern history. The Indian
Navy has returned a nuclear-powered submarine it had
leased from the Russians. Former Soviet warships now fly
the Russian flag and have even participated in exercises
with American ships.
However, the breakup of the Soviet Union has by no
means led to the collapse of Russian military power.
Anyone who scans the latest edition of Jane's Fighting
Ships will see at a glance that the Russian Navy is still a
formidable fighting force. Indeed, the number of first-rate
surface warships in the fleet today is far greater than five
or ten years ago. The Russian Navy now has two fixed-
wing aircraft carriers, so it is currently one of only two
fleets in the world (the U.S. Navy is the other) with "cat
shot and tail hook" aviators. Furthermore, the Russians
are maintaining a vigorous submarine construction pro-
gram which more than makes up for the dozens of 1960's-
era diesel submarines they sent to scrap dealers. Clearly
the technological advantage enjoyed by U.S. Navy sub-
mariners for the past several decades is getting smaller
every year. Finally, the Russian land-based bomber force-
the element most feared by U.S. Navy tacticians during the
Cold War-still has the capability to wreak havoc on
enemy surface warships, even at great distances from land.
5lltRIIf
Clearly, the time to update the Fleet series had come,
and the only way to do it was to convert the whole series
to a computer format. I had spent my entire professional
life (19 years) as a board game designer, so acclimating to
the computer genre was by no means easy. But thanks to
the hard workers at Stanley, what I feared would be a
deadening task turned out to be remarkably enjoyable. I
had been accustomed to working completely independent-
ly on board game designs, but from the start of the 5th
Fleet project, it was obvious that the single most critical
element of computer game design is teamwork. Nothing
can be done without the programmers' cooperation.
Indeed, a talented game designer working with inade-
quate programmers will certainly produce a terrible
game. But a wonderful game will result from the dedicat-
ed labors of brilliant programmers, even when working
with a designer possessing less-than-average talent.
Thus, as much as I hate to admit it and thereby
deflate my ego, it is obvious to me that the programmers
are the heart and soul of computer game production. They
perform the lion's share of the work-by far-and are
responsible for all the nifty graphics by which game
actions are portrayed. We were extraordinarily lucky to
have such a dedicated and talented programming staff at
Stanley during the 5th Fleet design. Mike Innella,
Stanley's vice president in charge of software develop-
ment, expertly managed the project from start to finish
and used his experience as a U.S. Navy officer to guide
the programmers (and me) through dozens of challenging
tasks. Lead programmer Mike Gercken and programmers
Dean Pianta and Mike Peremsky were amazingly patient
with my computer phobias and were always amenable
when I suggested ways in which the game could be
improved in the computer format. (I wasn't so sure they
would go for my hint that each scenario should begin with
a random set-up, but they finally did.) One thing is for
sure: if you enjoy 5th Fleet, it is mostly due to the work of
these four people.
One question that frequently crops up is why the com-
puter game uses a sequential turn- or phase-based system
instead of a "real-time" format. To this I reply that 5th
Fleet is an operational rather than a tactical game.
Although some small degree of low-level naval tactics is
reflected in the game, 5th Fleet's overall goal is to give
players a feel for naval operations as viewed by a relative-
ly senior naval officer-a three- or four-star fleet com-
mander or "CINC" (theater commander-in-chief) , for
example, rather than a one-star admiral in charge of a
task force or a captain in command of an individual war-
ship. Just as General Lee would not concern himself
much with the placement of a single cannon, a modern
four-star admiral would not be very concerned with
angles of attack, sonar convergence zones, or the weapons
load-out of an F/A-18C Hornet. He would instead concen-
trate on fulfilling the directives issued to him by the
President or the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Shortly before the Battle of Trafalgar in October
1805, Admiral Horatio Nelson said to his subordinates,
"No captain can do very wrong if he places his ship along-
side that of the enemy". Today, however, naval tactics are
far from simple. In the modern world, war at sea is an
impersonal struggle between sailors who operate
extremely complex pieces of machinery from the deep
recesses of their ships. However, from the beginning of
the 5th Fleet design, we have always felt it important to
give the players a feel for the "big picture" in naval opera-
tions rather than to overburden them with too many com-
plex tactical details. Also, we were convinced that in turns
of eight hours duration, it would be nearly impossible to
simulate minute-by-minute actions simultaneously. For
these reasons, the computer game retains the sequential
turn system of its board game predecessor. We have divid-
ed each eight-hour turn into six phases. At the start of
each phase, the computer selects the active player (red or
green), and then the active player must choose to activate
his aircraft, surface, or submarine units. Since the com-
puter selects the active player randomly, the players don't
know who will get to move next. Furthermore, each time
a player is made active, he must make a critical decision
concerning which of his unit types to activate next.
..
. /.: 9
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This decision-making process, which is almost a
"game within a game," is the heart of 5th Fleet. Instead of
the "I move everything, you move everything'' approach of
most wargames, which greatly abstracts simultaneity, 5th
Fleet demands that the players keenly observe develop-
ments as soon as they occur on the screen. As in real
naval operations, and all military operations for that mat-
ter, even the most careful plans last only as long as the
first shot is fired. A good military commander carries out
his plans by remaining flexible and reacting intelligently
to the movements of his enemy. A tactical "real-time"
naval simulation, therefore, is of little interest to us.
What concerns us first and foremost is that the players
have fun-which in our view can only happen when play-
ers are constantly challenged. We have attempted to chal-
lenge them by giving them a feel for high-level command
in the most realistic manner possible.
A final word about future computer games in the
Fleet series: If 5th Fleet is well received, we fully expect to
computerize the other four games in the Fleet board game
line. Our next project would probably be 7th Fleet, which
deals with the current naval situation in the western
Pacific. (The northern Pacific, including the Aleutian
Islands, is covered on a single map in the 3rd Fleet board
game and will probably be included in the computer ver-
sion of 7th Fleet. ) It is also likely that we will create new
scenarios for 5th Fleet, which will be sold as expansion
kits for those who already own the original computer
game. These expansion kits will include the latest order of
battle changes in the relevant navies.
Finally, we sincerely thank you for purchasing 5th
Fleet. If you enjoy playing it and learning from it, we have
succeeded. Thanks again, and keep in touch.
STANLEY
ASSOCIATES
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CARRIERS
For the American player, aircraft carriers are your
main striking force. With carrier air squadrons, you
can hunt for the enemy, launch devastating air strikes
against surface ships, and attack submarines at long
ranges. However, make sure you defend your carriers
adequately. The best means of doing this is to always
sail in task forces with other surface warships, which
can protect the carrier from enemy air and submarine
attacks. Also, make sure to maintain a constant com-
bat air patrol (CAP) over your carrier, consisting of at
least one F-14 Tomcat fighter squadron (VF) and one
E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning squadron
(VA W). Of course, this CAP cover will also serve to pro-
tect the other surface ships in the carrier's task force.
Other navies with carriers (the British, French,
Indian, and Russian) have much smaller carrier air
wings. When operating under the threat of enemy air
attack, use these air units mostly for CAP. When oper-
ating with little threat of enemy air attack, use the
carrier air units offensively. In general, carriers are
most vulnerable to torpedo attacks, so try to sail clear
of areas infested with enemy submarines. Finally,
always keep your carriers in the center circle in a task
force or task group formation on the Tactical Display.
This is the safest spot and the one that can be most
easily protected by escorts.
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
cv
None
Thomson-CSF Crotale
Guns: 4xDCN 100mm
ASW: None
Ships: Clemenceau
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
5th Fleet
None
1961
32 knots
Displacement: 32780 tons
Countries: France
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 6
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 9
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 0

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Type: CVN CM: None
Type: cv CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1961
SSM: None Comm: 1959
SAM: NATO Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 33 knots
SAM: Sea cat Max Speed: 28 knots
Guns: 3x20mmCIWS Displacement: 75700 tons
Guns: None Displacement: 28700 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States
ASW: None Countries: India
Ships: Enterprise
Ships: Viraat
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None Max Speed: 4
SSM1: None
Defense: 8
Quantity:
Defense: 5
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity:
ASW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 60
Range:
Surface Detect: 50
Range:
CM: None
CM: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Gunnery: 6
Range:
Victory Point: 16
Torpedoes: 8
Victory Point: 6
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
Guns:
ASW:
cv
None
Sea Dart
3x20mmCIWS
None
Ships: Ark Royal
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1980
20 knots
Displacement: 20600 tons
Countries: United Kingdom
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Sea Dart
Defense: 6
Quantity: 4
AAW: 4
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
Quantity:
ASW: 7
Range:
Surface Detect: 60
CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 6
Torpedoes: 4
Area Anti-Air: 3
Type: CV
SSM: 8xSS-N-12
SAM: SA-N-3, SA-N-4,
SA-N-9
Guns: 4x3", 8x30mm
ASW: SUW-N-1
Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Kiev
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1972
Max Speed: 32 knots
Displacement: 40500 tons
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-12
Defense: 7
Quantity: 8
AAW: 4
Range: 6 hexes
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: None
Quantity:
ASW: 10
Range:
Surface Detect: 70
CM: None
Sub Detect: 40
Quantity:
Gunnery: 6
Range:
Victory Point: 7
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 9
5Ift AIIt
Type: cv CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1960
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 3x20mmCIWS Displacement: 81123 tons
ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: America
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 8
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 60
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 16
Torpedoes: 8
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: cv CM: None
SSM: 12xSS-N-19 Comm: 1985
SAM: SA-N-9 Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 6x30mm Displacement: 67500 tons
ASW: None
Countries: Russia
Ships: Admiral Kuznetsov, Varyag
Game Information
Max Speed: 5 =S=SM= 1-'-- : ----=S=S--=- N-'-- -=19
Defense: 8 Quantity: 12
AAW: 0
CloseAAW: 9
ASW: 7
Surface Detect: 70
Sub Detect: 10
Gunnery: 0
Victory Point: 10
Range:
SSM2:
Quantity:
Range:
CM:
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes:
Area Anti-Air:
5 Hexes
None
None
10
0
. : : - ~ ~ ; : ~ ~ ~ , : ~ ~ h
,
~ ~ .,'ft;o..
14 ' . ,.
5th Fleet
~ ~ <;-
Type: cv CM: None Type: CVN CM: None
SSM: None Com.m: 1961 SSM: None Com.m: 1975
SAM: None Max Speed: 24 knots SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 19500 tons Guns: 4x20mm CIWS Displacement: 102000 tons
ASW: None Countries: India ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: Vikrant Ships: Abraham Lincoln, George Washington
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSMl: None
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 5
Quantity:
Defense: 9
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity:
ASW: 7
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 50
Range:
Surface Detect: 60
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 6
Range:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 6
Torpedoes: 6
Victory Point: 16
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 0 Area Anti-Air: 0
BAnLESHIP
Only the American player has battleships. These
behemoths, which were laid down before the Japanese
attack on Pearl Harbor, are actually no longer in com-
mission. They did, however, play a major role in the
Persian Gulf War, providing gunfire support for Allied
forces ashore and launching large numbers of
Tomahawk cruise missiles against targets far inside
Iraq. Despite their continuing effectiveness, their oper-
ating expenses and manpower needs were simply too
high given the limited naval budgets of the post-Cold
War era. However, it is conceivable that in a major
conflict, they would be recommissioned. In the game,
use the battleships to attack key enemy ports and air-
fields at long ranges with cruise missiles. In a surface
action, the battleships are extraordinarily useful
because of their plentiful supply of Harpoon and
Tomahawk SSMs. If you can close with an enemy force
by engaging it in the same hex, do so, for the battle-
ships will devastate the enemy with their high gunfire
values. Moreover, the battleships are very difficult for
the enemy to damage or destroy. However, battleships
are impotent against enemy submarines and stand-off
air attacks. Therefore, make sure that battleships
always sail in task forces with escorts which can pro-
vide protection against these types of attacks.
Type: BB
SSM: TASM, 16xHarpoon
SAM: None
Guns: 9x16', 12x5",
4x20mmCIWS
ASW: None
Ships: Missouri, New Jersey
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
TLAM
1943
33 knots
Displacement: 57500 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Har oon
Defense: 9
Quantity: 16
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 6
88M2: TASM
ASW: 0
Quantity: 16
Range: 5 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
CM: TLAM
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity: 24
Gunnery: 30
Range: 30 hexes
Victory Point: 16
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
CRUISERS
Of the participants in the game, only the
Americans and the Russians possess cruisers. In the
U.S. Navy, cruisers are used mostly as escorts for air-
craft carriers. In the game, make sure that wherever
an American carrier goes, at least one (and preferably
two) Ticonderoga class cruisers accompany it. The
Ticonderoga (also known as "Aegis") cruisers are
unsurpassed at air defense. They are also a formidable
shield against enemy submarines. With a large SSM
and cruise missile capacity, they may also be used
effectively in an offensive role. Try to keep your
Ticonderoga cruisers in the three arcs adjacent to the
center circle in a task force or task group formation on
the Tactical Display. The most effective protection of
the high value target in the center of the display (most
likely a carrier) is offered from these positions. For the
Russian player, your two Kirov class nuclear-powered
cruisers are the closest thing to a battleship in your
fleet. (Indeed, some naval analysts refer to these ships
as ''battle-cruisers".) These are your most powerful sur-
face ships and are very difficult to damage or destroy
due to their large size. They are plentifully stocked
with powerful SS-N-19 SSMs, so use them aggressively
to initiate a surface action. They are also more than
adequate at air defense and ASW, so they can effec-
tively protect high-value targets such as the two
Russian carriers.
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
CG
8xHarpoon
SM-2ER
Guns: 2x20mm CIWS
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Fox
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1964
32 knots
Displacement: 8200 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: Harpoon
Defense: 4
Quantity: 8
AAW: 7
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 7
Area Anti-Air: 5
Type: CG CM: None
Type: CGN CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1971
SSM: 20xSS-N-19 Comm: 1977
SAM: SA-N-3, SA-N-6, Max Speed: 34 knots
SAM: SA-N-6, SA-N-4, Max Speed: 30 knots
SA-N-4 Displacement: 9900 tons
SA-N-9 Displacement: 24300 tons
Guns: 4x3", 4x30mm
Countries: Russia Guns: 2x100mmor Countries: Russia
ASW: SA-N-14, 2x130mm,8x30nun
Type 53 Torpedoes
ASW: SS-N-14,
Ships: Kerch
Type 53 Torpedoes
Game Information Ships: Admiral Nakhimov, Admiral Ushakov
Max Speed: 5
SSM1:
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 4
Range:
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2:
ASW: 4
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM:
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes:
Area Anti-Air:
SA-N-3
Game Information
1
SSM1: SS-N-19
1 hex
Max Speed: 5
None
Defense: 7
Quantity: 20
AAW: 6
Range: 5 hexes
CloseAAW: 9
SSM2: None
None ASW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 30
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
8
Gunnery: 8
Range:
5
Victory Point: 7
Torpedoes: 8
Area Anti-Air: 12
..
.
,..- -<""J
-.
18 :_,;.,
.
Type: CG CM: None Type: CG CM: None
SSM: 4xSS-N-3B Comm: 1965 SSM: 8xSS-N-3B Comm: 1963
SAM: SA-N-1 Max Speed: 35 knots SAM: SA-N-1 Max Speed: 34 knots
Guns: 4x57mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 7700 tons Guns: 4x76mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 5550 tons
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes
Countries: Russia
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes Countries: Russia
Ships: Admiral Zozulya Ships: Admiral Golovko
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-3B
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-3B
Defense: 4
Quantity: 4
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
AAW: 2
Range: 5 hexes
AAW: 2
Range: 5 hexes
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
ASW: 1
Quantity:
ASW: 1
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 5
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 4
Area Anti-Air: 5 Area Anti-Air: 2
SfltRelt
Type: CG CM: None
SSM: 16xSS-N-12 Comm: 1982
SAM: SA-N-6, SA-N-4 Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 2x130mm, 6x30mm Displacement: 11200 tons
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes
Countries: Russia
Ships: Charvona Ukraina, Marshal Ustinov, Slava
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-12
Defense: 5
Quantity: 16
AAW: 4
Range: 6 hexes
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
ASW: 1
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Gunnery: 6
Range:
Victory Point: 5
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 8
Type: CG CM: TLAM
SSM: TASM, 8xHarpoon Comm: 1983
SAM: SM-2MR Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 2x5", 2x20mm CIWS Displacement: 9466 tons
ASW: ASROC, Countries: United States
Mk 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Anzio, Gettysburg, Hue City, Lake Erie, Princeton,
Thomas S. Gates
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: H a q ~ o o n
Defense: 4
Quantity: 8
AAW: 11/12
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: TASM
ASW: 9
Quantity: 8
Range: 5 hexes
Surface Detect: 20
CM: TLAM
Sub Detect: 30
Quantity: 0/16
Gunnery: 6
Range: 30 hexes
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 8/10
Type: CGN
SSM: TASM, 8xHarpoon
SAM: SM-2MR
Guns: 2x5",
2x20mmCIWS
ASW: ASROC,
MK 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Arkansas
CM: TLAM
Comm: 1976
Max Speed: 30 knots
Displacement: 11300 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: Harpoon
Defense: 5
Quantity: 8
-
Range: 2 hexes
AAW: 4
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: TASM
ASW: 2
Quantity: 8
Range: 5 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
CM: TLAM
Sub Detect: 2
Quantity: 4
Gunnery: 2
Range: 30 hexes
Victory Point: 5
Torpedoes: 7
Area Anti-Air: 7
5th Fleet
5th Fleet
DESTROYERS
In modern navies, there is not much difference in
appearance between cruisers and destroyers .
Functionally, however, destroyers tend to have more
narrow capabilities than cruisers. The U.S. Navy's
Spruance destroyers, for example, are primarily ASW
ships. The new Arleigh Burke destroyers are oriented
mostly to long-range air defense, as are Royal Navy
destroyers. Russian Souremennyy destroyers are dead-
ly in the surface attack role. In the game, try to use
your destroyers in the roles for which they were
designed. For example, in every American carrier bat-
tle group, at least one (and preferably two) Spruance
destroyers should protect the carrier from enemy sub-
marine attacks. If the battle group is operating in
waters infested by enemy submarines, the Spruances
should be placed in the outer arcs of a task force or
task group formation on the Tactical Display. Here
they are most effective in countering enemy torpedo
attacks. If there is no threat of enemy submarines,
they may be repositioned closer to the center of the
Tactical Display, where they will be more effective in
providing close anti-aircraft protection to the carrier.
For the Russian player, your Souremennyy destroyers
are your most effective offensive platforms. They are
each armed with eight SS-N-22 SSMs, one of the
fastest and most effective anti-ship missiles in the
world. Use them aggressively when engaging the
enemy in a surface action. On the other hand, Russian
Udaloy ASW destroyers should be used in a manner
similar to the American Spruances.
Type: DDG CM: None
SSM: 8xHarpoon Comm: 1964
SAM: SM-1MR Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 2x5", Displacement: 4618 tons
2x20mm CIWS
Countries: Australia
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Brisbane
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Harpoon
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
AAW: 2
Range: 2
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
ASW: 1
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 4
Type: DDG CM: None Type: DDG CM: TLAM
SSM: 8x0tomat Comm: 1992 SSM: TASM, 8xHarpoon Comm: 1991
SAM: Standard SM-1MR Max Speed: 31 knots SAM: SM2-MR/ER Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: l xO. Melara 127mm, Displacement: 5400 tons Guns: 1x5", 2x20mm CIWS Displacement: 9033 tons
3x0. Melara 76mm
Countries: Italy ASW: ASROC,
Countries: United States
ASW: B-515 Torpedoes Mk 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Luigi De La Penne Ships: Barry, Stout
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Otomat
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: H a r ~ o o n
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
Defense: 4
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 3 hexes
AAW: 9
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: TASM
ASW: 6
Quantity:
ASW: 2
Quantity: 8
Range: Range: 2 hexes
Surface Detect: 20
CM: None
Surface Detect: 0
CM: TLAM
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 2
Quantity: 10
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Gunnery: 2
Range: 30 hexes
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 8
Area Anti-Air: 0 Area Anti-Air: 8
Type: DDG CM: None Type: DD CM: None
SSM: 4xSS-N-22 Comm: 1995 SSM: 4xExocet l\1M40 Comm: 1979
SAM: SA-N-7 Max Speed: 28 knots SAM: Thomson-CSF Crotale Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 1x76mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 6200 tons Guns: 1xDCN100mm Displacement: 4490 tons
ASW: Whitehead A244S Countries: India ASW: ECAN L5 Torpedoes Countries: France
Ships: Delhi, Mysore Ships: Dupleix, Georges, Leygues, Montcalm
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-22
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 4
Quantity: 4
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 5
Range: 2 hexes
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 7
Quantity:
ASW: 7
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 5
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 5 Area Anti-Air: 0
~ ' - - ~ , . , . ~ ~
:'
24 - ' ~ :
Type: DDG
SSM: 8xHarpoon
SAM: SM2-MR
Guns: 2x5" Mk45,
2x20mmCIWS
ASW: Mk46 Torpedoes
Ships: Chandler
~ ~
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1979
33 knots
Displacement: 9574 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Ha oon
Defense: 4
Quantity: 8
AAW: 4
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 8
Area Anti-Air: 6
Type: DD
SSM: None
SAM: Sea Dart
Guns: Vickers 4.5"
1x or 2x20mm
ASW: Stingray Torpedoes
Ships: Gloucester
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1982
Max Speed: 30 knots
Displacement: 4675 tons
Countries: United Kingdom
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 3
Quantity:
AAW: 4
Range:
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 4
StfiRelf
Type: DDG CM: None
SSM: 4xSS-N-2C Comm: 1962
SAM: SA-N-1 Max Speed: 35 knots
Guns: 4x76mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 4900 tons
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes Countries: India
Ships: Rajput, Rana, Ranvir, Ranjit
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-2C
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 2
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 5
Type: DDG CM: None
SSM: 8xSS-N-22 Comm: 1988
SAM: SA-N-7 Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 4x130mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 7300 tons
ASW: Type 55 Torpedoes Countries: Russia
Ships: Boyevoy, Burny, Gremyashchy, Okrylenyy, Stoykiy
Game Information
Max Speed:
Defense:
AAW:
CloseAAW:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Gunnery:
Victory Point:
5 =SS=M== 1: ________ = S S ~ - ~ N ~ - 2 = 2
4
Quantity:
5
Range:
6
SSM2:
2
Quantity:
10
Range:
CM:
2
Quantity:
10
Range:
4
Torpedoes:
Area Anti-Air:
8
2 hexes
None
None
5
5
Type: DD CM: TLAM
SSM: TASM, 8xHarpoon Comm: 1973
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 33 knots
Guns: 2x5", 20mm CIWS Displacement: 8040 tons
ASW: ASROC,
Countries: United States
Mk 46 Torpedoes
Ships: Arthur W. Radford, Fletcher, Hayler, Hewitt, Ingersoll,
O'Bannon, Paul F. Foster
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Ha oon
Defense: 4
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: TASM
ASW: 9
Quantity: 8
Surface Detect: 20
Range: 5 hexes
CM: TLAM
Sub Detect: 30
Quantity: 20
Gunnery: 3
Range: 30 hexes
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
DDG
4x Exocet MM38
Mk2Mod3
Guns: 2 xDCN 100mm
ASW: Malafon,
ECAN L5 Torpedoes
Ships:Suffren
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1967
Max Speed: 34 knots
Displacement: 6910 tons
Countries: France
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1 Exocet
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 3
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
ASW: 2
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 6
Type: DD CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1980
SAM: SA-N-9 Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 2x100mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 8700 tons
ASW: SS-N-14, Countries: Russia
Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Admiral Karlanov, Admiral Kulakov, Admiral
Panteleyev, Admiral Levchenko
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-14
Defense: 4
Quantity: 2
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: None
ASW: 7
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 7
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
DD
4xSS-N-22
SA-N-9
Guns: 2x130mm, 4x30mm
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Tolstoy
CM: None
Comm: 1994
Max Speed: 30 knots
Displacement: 8900 tons
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-22
Defense: 4
Quantity: 4
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 10
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Gunnery: 8
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 10
Area Anti-Air: 0
p 1
' . .,.. .., . ., "
' "':-
28 , . ' r}

FRIGATES
Frigates are essentially smaller and less expensive
versions of destroyers. In modern navies, frigates serve
in the same capacity as World War Two destroyers and
destroyer escorts. Probably their most important mis-
sion is to provide anti-air and ASW protection for mer-
chant shipping and non-combatant military vessels,
such as supply ships, oilers, and amphibious assault
ships. They are also useful as picket or scout ships and
can provide critical information to the main fleet con-
cerning enemy activities and intentions. Only rarely
are frigates expected to serve in a carrier battle group
in direct support of their larger cruiser and destroyer
cousins. (This would not be the case in the Royal Navy,
however, in which frigates provide the backbone of bat-
tle group defense.) In the U.S. Navy, Oliver Hazard
Perry frigates are the only active frigate class in the
fleet. In the game, frigates can serve many of the same
duties as cruisers and destroyers but on a more limited
scale. Ships of the Perry class, for example, are armed
with only four Harpoon SSMs and 36 Standard sur-
face-to-air missiles, as opposed to eight Harpoons and
about 100 Standards on a typical Ticonderoga class
cruiser. Nevertheless, frigates can hit the enemy hard
in a coordinated SSM assault, so don't hesitate to use a
frigate's full supply of SSMs in a single attack.
However, it will be impotent offensively after the
attack, so don't expect to slug it out turn-after-turn in
a surface battle with larger enemy ships. When guard-
ing non-combatant ships, forget about offensive
weapons and stick close to your flock.
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
Guns:
ASW:
FF
4xExocet MM38
Sea cat
1x4.5"
Mk 46 Torpedoes
CM: None
Comm: 1974
Max Speed: 30 knots
Displacement: 2750 tons
Countries: Pakistan
Ships: Tariq, Tabuk, Aslat, Harbah
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 0
Range: 1
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: FF CM: None Type: FF CM: None
SSM: 8xHarpoon Comm: 1988 SSM: 8xHarpoon Comm: 1990
SAM: Sea wolf Max Speed: 30 knots SAM: Sea wolf Max Speed: 28 knots
Guns: 1x4.5", 1xGoalkeeper Displacement: 4900 tons Guns: 1x4.5" Displacement: 4200 tons
ASW: Stingray Torpedoes
Countries: UK ASW: Stingray Torpedoes
Countries: UK
Ships: Cumberland
Ships: Richmond, Somerset
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: H a r ~ o o n
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Harpoon
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 9
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 10
SSM2: None
ASW: 7
Quantity:
ASW: 5
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
CM: None
Sub Det ect: 10
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 5
Quantity:
Gunnery: 8
Range:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 6 Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 7
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
,, , = ~ ~ ~ . ; r . ,
~ \i , . . . , ~ ~
30 _:. . '
Type: FF CM: None
SSM: 8x0tomat Mk2 Comm: 1986
SAM: Thomson-CSF Crotale Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 1x3.9" Displacement: 2870 tons
ASW: ECANF17P
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Ships: Abha, Hofouf, Taif
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Otomat
Defense: 2
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 3 hexes
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: FF
SSM: 6xExocet MM-38
SAM: Thomson-CSF Crotale
Guns: 2xDCN 100mm
ASW: Malafon,
ECAN L5 Torpedoes
Ships: De Grasse
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1974
Max Speed: 32 knots
Displacement: 5950 tons
Countries: France
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 3
Quantity: 6
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 4
SSM2: None
ASW: 7
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 6
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: FFG CM: None
Type: FFG CM: None
SSM: 4xExocet MM38 Comm: 1979
SSM: BxSS-N-25 Comm: 1994
SAM: None Max Speed: 30 knots SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 26 knots
Guns: 1x120mm Displacement: 1450 tons
Guns: 1x3", 2x30mm Displacement: 1900 tons
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes Countries: Indonesia ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes Countries: Russia
Ships: Nala Ships: Gepard
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Exocet
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-25
Defense: 2
Quantity: 4
Defense: 2
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hex
CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 1/3
Quantity:
ASW: 2
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0/10
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
CM: None
Sub Detect: 113
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 2
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 4 Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
. - ~ ~ ~ ~ : ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ : ~ : ~ ~
32 '- ~ .;,-> 5th FIHt
. ~ " ' ~ "'!
Type: FF CM: None
SSM: 8xSS-N-25 Comm: 1969
CM: None
4xSS-N-2C Comm: 1983
SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 32 knots
SA-N-4 Max Speed: 27 knots
Guns: 4x76mm Displacement: 3600 tons
Guns: 2x57mm, 2x30mm Displacement: 4000 tons
ASW: SS-N-14, Countries: Russia
ASW: A244S Torpedoes Countries: India
Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Ganga, Gomati
Ships: Doblestnyy, Zadornyy
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-2C
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-25
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None CloseAAW: 3
SSM2: None
ASW: 6
Quantity: ASW: 1
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Sub Detect: 8
CM: None
Sub Detect:
CM: None
Quantity:
1
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 4
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: FF
SSM: None
SAM: SA-N-4
Guns: 2x100mm
ASW: SS-N-14,
Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Rezvyy
CM:
Co nun:
Max Speed:
None
1976
32 knots
Displacement: 3600 tons
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: SS-N-14
Defense: 3
Quantity: 2
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 4
SSM2: None
Quantity:
ASW: 1
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: FF CM: None
SSM: None Co nun: 1984
SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 1x100mm, 2x30mm Displacement: 3600 tons
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes Countries: Russia
Ships: Dzerzhinsky, Dzgutshi , Imeni 27 Syezda KPSS,
Menzhinskiy
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 3
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 4
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 4
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: FFG CM: None Type: FFG CM: None
SSM: 8x0tomat Mk2 Comm: 1977 SSM: 4x Otomat Mk2 Comm: 1982
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 35 knots SAM: Aspide Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 1x0. Melara 127mm Displacement: 2525 tons Guns: l xO. Melara 127mm Displacement: 3200 tons
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Countries: Italy ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Countries: Italy
Ships: Sagittario Ships: Scirocco
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: Otomat
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: Otomat
Defense: 2
Quantity: 8
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 0
Range: 3 hexes
AAW: 0
Range: 3
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
ASW: 5
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 5
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 4 Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: FF CM: None
SSM: 8xSS-N-25 Comm: 1994
SAM: SA-N-9 Max Speed: 32 knots
Guns: 1x100mm Displacement: 4100 tons
ASW: SS-N-15,
Countries: Russia
Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Neustrashimy, Sderzhanny
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: SS-N-25
Defense: 3
Quantity: 8
AAW: 0
Range: 2
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: None
ASW: 5
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 5
Quantity:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 6
Area Anti-Air: 0
0. H. Perry Class 1
Type: FFG CM: None
SSM: 4xHarpoon Comm: 1977
SAM: SM-1MR Max Speed: 29 knots
Guns: 1x3", 1x20mm CIWS Displacement: 4100 tons
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes Countries: United States,
Australia
Ships: Adelaide, Aubrey Fitch, Canberra, Clifton Sprague,
Copeland, Curts, Darwin, Ingraham, Jack Williams, Jarrett,
Kauffman, Klakring, Lewis B. Puller, Mahlon S. Tisdale,
McCluskey, Mcinerney, Nicholas, Stephen W. Groves,
Underwood
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSMl: H a q ~ o o n
Defense: 3
Quantity: 4
AAW: 3
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 7
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 5
Area Anti-Air: 4
- 7 " \ ~ ~ ~
o!!t.J.,. >->'
36 . ~
i ~
5th Fleet
Vosper Mk5 Class
Type: FF CM: None Type: FF CM: None
SSM: 4xExocet Comm: 1967 SSM: 4xSea Killer Comm: 1971
SAM: Seacat Max Speed: 28 knots SAM: None Max Speed: 39 knots
Guns: 1x0 . Melara 76mm Displacement: 2835 tons Guns: 1x4.5" Displacement: 1350 tons
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Countries: Indonesia
ASW: ASWMortar Countries: Iran
Ships: Ahmed Y ani, Slamet Riyadi , Yos Sudarso Ships:Alborz, Alvand
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Exocet Max Speed: 6
SSMl: Sea Killer
Defense: 2
Quantity: 4
Defense: 2
Quantity: 4
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 3
88M2: None
Close AAW: 4
88M2: None
ASW: 3
Quantity:
ASW: 1
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 10
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
CM: None
Sub Detect: 3
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2
Range:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 4
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 4
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
CORVEnES
The U.S. Navy and most western navies no longer
use corvettes. In modern navies, the corvette category
is somewhat ill-defined, ranging from warships a little
bigger than patrol boats (the Russian Navy's Tarantul
class, for example) to vessels that are essentially small
frigates (the Indian Navy's Khukri class, for example).
Corvettes are too small to embark a helicopter, so their
capabilities as picket or scout ships are limited. They
are also of little use in ASW operations. Furthermore,
their fuel capacity is small, and they are therefore not
capable of operating effectively as long-range convoy
escorts or in conjunction with larger "blue water" war-
ships at great distances from friendly bases. Corvettes
are most efficiently used in coastal operations. If they
are used properly, they can pack a powerful punch in a
surface battle, even against much larger enemy war-
ships. Note that in the game, each corvette actually
represents several ships. However, they are essentially
"eggshells armed with hammers," so don't expect them
to survive very long if you leave them in close proximi-
ty to the enemy for more than a turn. They are also
virtually defenseless when facing air attacks and are
completely impotent against enemy submarines. The
best tactic for corvettes is to find the right moment to
dash in and attack an enemy surface group with SSMs
and then to beat a hasty retreat.
,_ .
. . 37
,_
u .:.." .
Type: COR CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1968
SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 30 knots
Guns: 2x57mm or 2x76m Displacement: 1200 tons
or 1x30mm
Countries: Russia
ASW: Type 53 Torpedoes
Ships: Flotilla 1, Flotilla 2
Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
ASW: 5
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 5
Quantity:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 8
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: COR CM: None
SSM: 2x or 4xSS-N-2C Comm: 1989 Type: COR CM: None
SAM: SA-N-5 Max Speed: 25 knots SSM: 6xSS-N-9 Comm: 1969
Guns: 1x76mm, 2x30mm Displacement: 1350 tons SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 360 knots
ASW: None Countries: India
Guns: 2x57mmor Displacement: 850 tons
Ships: IN Flotilla 1, IN Flotilla 2
1x76mm, 1x30mm
Countries: Russia
ASW: None
Game Information
Ships: RU PCS 2
Max Speed: 5
SSM1:
Defense: 2
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 4
SSM2:
ASW: 2
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 20
Range:
CM:
Sub Detect: 2
Quantity:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes:
Area Anti-Air:
SS-N-2C
10
Game Information
1 hex
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: SS-N-9
None Defense: 2
Quantity: 30
AAW: 0
Range: 2
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
3
Gunnery: 2
Range:
0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
PATROL
COMBATANTS
Patrol combatants serve only one function: to
attack enemy surface ships with surface-to-surface
missiles, torpedoes , and gunfire. They have limited
endurance, so they can only expect to engage the
enemy in coastal waters at short distances from friend-
ly bases. They are small and fast, and must use their
size and speed to catch the enemy by surprise and then
retreat as quickly as possible back to base. They will
certainly be lost if they are caught alone at sea by an
enemy air attack. They are equally defenseless against
submarines. When used properly, however, they can
inflict damage on the enemy out of all proportion to
their tiny size. The U.S. Navy no longer employs patrol
combatants. The six hydrofoils of the Pegasus class, all
of which had been based at Key West, Florida, have
recently been decommissioned. However, "PCs" are
very common in Third World navies, since they provide
an inexpensive yet potent threat to hostile shipping.
The navies of the Persian Gulf are equipped almost
exclusively with PCs. They are well-suited to this the-
ater, for they could emerge from port, search out and
attack an enemy force, and return to base all in a mat-
ter of hours. They may also operate effectively in the
Gulfs shallow waters in places inaccessible to frigates,
destroyers, or cruisers. In the game, each patrol com-
batant unit actually represents three to six ships.
Type: PCS
SSM: 4xHarpoon
SAM: None
Guns: 1x3" OTO Melara,
1x20mm CIWS
ASW: None
Ships: SA PCS 1, SA PCS 2
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1980
38 knots
Displacement: 4 78 tons
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Game Information
Max Speed: 6
SSMl: H a r ~ o o n
Defense: 2
Quantity: 16
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
CloseAAW: 8
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 4
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Tor pedoes: 16
Area Anti-Air: 0
Sift Reef
Type: PCS CM: None Type: PCS CM: None
SSM: 8xHarpoon Comm: 1980 SSM: 4xExocet or 2xYJ-1 Comm: 1977
SAM: None Max Speed: 30 knots SAM: None Max Speed: 37 knots
Guns: 1x3", lx20mm CIWS Displacement: 1038 tons Guns: 1x76mm Displacement: 275 tons
ASW: Mk 46 Torpedoes
Countries: Saudi Arabia
ASW: None
Countries: Qatar, Iran
Ships: SA PCS 3 Ships: IR PCS 1, IR PCS 2, IR PCS 3, QT PCS 1
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 5
SSM1: Har:Qoon
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 2
Quantity: 24
Defense: 2
Quantity: 24/12
AAW: 0
Range: 2 hexes
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 1
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 1
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Gunnery: 3
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 5
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0 Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: PCS CM: None Type: PCS CM: None
SSM: 4xExocet MM40 Comm: 1984 SSM: 4xSS-N-2A or Comm: 1960
SAM: None Max Speed: 40 knots 4xHY-2 Max Speed: 37 knots
Guns: 1x76mm Displacement: 259 tons SAM: SA-N-5 Displacement: 245 tons
ASW: None Countries: Bahrain, UAE,
Guns: 4x30mm Countries: Pakistan,
Kuwait ASW: None
Ethiopia, Yemen
Ships: Al Sanbouk, BH PCS 2, UA PCS 1 Ships: ET PCS 1, PK PCS 1, YM PCS 1
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: Exocet
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: SS-N-2A
Defense: 2
Quantity: 4/16
Defense: 2
Quantity: 8/12/16
AAW: 0
Range: 1 hex
Range: 1 hex
AAW: 0
CloseAAW: 4/5
SSM2: None
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 2/3
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Quantity:
Range:
ASW: 0
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Gunnery: 112/3
Gunnery: 1/2/3
Quantity:
Range:
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0 Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
. -
.. ...
42 < ' :;. ':,
. . . . '
Type: PCS
SSM: 6xExocet MM40 or
4x0tomat Mk 2
SAM: None
Guns: 1x76mm
ASW: None
Ships: OM PCS 1, KY PCW 1
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1982
38 knots
Displacement: 394 tons
Countries: Oman, Kenya
Game Information
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 2
Quantity: 20/8
AAW: 0
Range: 113 hexes
CloseAAW: 3/4
SSM2: None
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2/3
Range:
Victory Point : 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: PCS
SSM: 4xSS-N-2C/D (I/II),
4xSS-N-22 (III)
SAM: SA-N-5
Guns: 76mm, 2x30mm
ASW: None
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1978
Max Speed: 36 knots
Displacement: 455 tons
Countries: India, Russia,
Yemen
Ships: IN PCS 1, IN PCS 2, RU PCS 1, YM PCS 1
Game Information
Max Speed: 6
SSM1: SS-N-22
Defense: 2
Quantity: 8/12/16
AAW: 0
Range: 1/2 hex
CloseAAW: 3/4
SSM2: None
Quantity:
0
Range:
0
CM: None
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 2/3/4
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
AMPHIBIOUS
ASSAULT SHIPS
In the game, only the U.S. Navy operates amphibi-
ous assault ships. The "amphibs" or "gators" (as the
amphibious assault ships are known) serve a single
purpose: to embark Marines and their heavy equip-
ment. Disembarkation may be by landing craft or by
helicopter-either unopposed or against a defended
shore. In the Persian Gulf War, the threat of a
seaborne invasion posed by a group of amphibs off the
coast of Kuwait pinned down thousands of Iraqi troops
in coastal defense duties. Generally, a U.S. Navy
"Amphibious Ready Group" (ARG), consisting of four or
five amphibs, is situated in the Indian Ocean or west-
ern Pacific at any given time. The ARG embarks a
"Marine expeditionary unit" (MEU), which consists of a
Marine infantry battalion augmented by armor, heli-
copter, fixed-wing aircraft, special operations, and var-
ious support units. Generally one LHD or LHA deploys
with each ARG. These are essentially small aircraft
carriers which are capable of embarking over 40 troop-
carrying helicopters or 20 AV-8B Harrier VSTOL fight-
ers. The Harriers would normally be committed to the
support of Marine ground operations, but could con-
ceivably play a role in fleet air defense. In the game,
strive to get your amphibs to their destinations safely.
The best way to do this is to avoid areas infested with
enemy warships and to steer clear of areas within
range of enemy air power. Make sure the ARG is
always accompanied by an adequate escort force of at
least four frigates, destroyers, or cruisers.
Type: LSD CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1969
SAM: None Max Speed: 22 knots
Guns: 4x3", Displacement: 13700 tons
2x20mmCIWS
Countries: United States
ASW: None
Ships: Anchorage, Mount Vernon
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: LPD CM: None Type: LPH CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1964 SSM: None Comm: 1963
SAM: None Max Speed: 21 knots SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 23 knots
Guns: 2x or 4x3", Displacement: 17244 tons Guns: 4x3", Displacement: 18300 tons
2x20mmCIWS Countries: United States
2x20mm CIWS Countries: United States
ASW: None ASW: None
Ships: Coronado, Denver, Dubuque, Juneau Ships: Guadalcanal, New Orleans
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Max Speed: 3
SSM I: None
Defense: 5
Quantity:
Defense: 5
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0 Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: LHA
SSM: None
SAM: Sea Sparrow
Guns: 2x5",
2x20mmCIWS
ASW: None
Ships: Tarawa
CM: None
Comm: 1973
Max Speed: 24 knots
Displacement: 39967 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 7
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 6
SSM2: None
None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 1
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: LHD CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1989
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 22 knots
Guns: 2x20mmCIWS Displacement: 40532 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States
Ships: Essex, Kearsarge
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 7
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 7
SSM2: None
ASW:
Quantity:
0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 3
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: LSD CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1985
SAM: None Max Speed: 22 knots
Guns: 2x20mrn CIWS Displacement: 16740 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States
Ships: Carter Hall, Comstock, Gunston Hall, Harpers Ferry,
Oak Hill, Tortuga
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSMl: None
Defense: 5
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
MINESWEEPERS
Until recently, the U.S. Navy was alarmingly defi-
cient in mine warfare. During the Cold War, American
sailors had always assumed that the plentiful
minesweepers of the NATO navies would lend their sup-
port to the U.S. Navy in wartime. To the Americans,
mines were an element of coastal warfare-a type of war-
fare that the Navy did not expect to fight. However, dur-
ing the Kuwaiti tanker reflagging operations in the
Persian Gulf in the late 1980's, it became painfully obvi-
ous that the U.S. Navy would have to build its own
minesweepers. At that time, the bulk of American
minesweepers were of 1950's vintage. In the Gulf, U.S.
Navy captains usually had a supertanker-a ship the
Navy was supposed to protect-lead the way through an
Iranian minefield, with the escorting warships close
behind. During the Persian Gulf War, U.S. Navy mine
warfare weaknesses were highlighted when two
American warships were damaged by mines. After the
hard lessons of the Persian Gulf, the U.S. Navy has final-
ly come to the realization that mines are one of the most
effective means by which Third World enemies of the
United States can attempt to render the American fleet
impotent. Mines are generally employed only in shallow
coastal waters. Since all of the scenarios in 5th Fleet sim-
ulate naval action on the high seas, mines are not used in
the current version of the game. However, future scenar-
ios in 5th Fleet expansion modules may include rules for
laying and sweeping mines.
Type: MS CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1987
SAM: None Max Speed: 13 knots
Guns: 2x12.7mm Displacement: 1312 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States
Ships: Avenger, Defender
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 2
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
'
.,
48 '

5th Fleet
MS CM: None
None Comm: 1985
CM: None
None Comm: 1980
None Max Speed: 15 knots
None Max Speed: 15 knots
Guns: 1x20mm Displacement: 405 tons
Guns: 1x40mm Displacement: 750 tons
ASW: None Countries: Italy
ASW: None
Countries: UK
Ships: Milazzo
Ships: Brecon
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: None
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: None
Defense: 2
Quantity:
Defense: 2
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity: Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Surface Detect:
Range: Sub Detect: 0
CM: None
0
Sub Detect: 0
CM: None
Gunnery: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery:
Quantity:
Victory Point: 2
Range:
0
Range:
Torpedoes: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: MS CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1970
Type: MS CM: None
SAM: SA-N-5 Grail Max Speed: 19 knots
SSM: None Comm: 1989
Guns: 4x30mm Displacement: 770 tons
SAM: None Max Speed: 13 knots
ASW: None Countries: India, Russia
Guns: 2x30mm Displacement: 450 tons
Ships: Bedi, Elektrik, Pondicherry, Radist
ASW: None Countries: Saudi Arabia
Game Information
Ships: Al Jawf
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Game Information
Defense: 2
Quantity:
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
AAW: 0
Range: Defense: 2
Quantity:
CloseAAW: 2/4
SSM2: None AAW: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect:
CM: None
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
0
Quantity:
CM: None
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Area Anti-Air: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type:
SSM:
SAM:
Guns:
ASW:
MH
None
None
1x20mm
None
Ships: Lyre
Max Speed:
Defense:
AAW:
CloseAAW:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Gunnery:
Victory Point:
CM:
Comm:
Max Speed:
None
1984
15 knots
Displacement: 595 tons
Countries: France
Game Information
3
SSM1: None
2
Quantity:
0
Range:
2
SSM2: None
0
Quantity:
0
Range:
CM: None
0
Quantity:
0
Range:
2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
REPLENISHMENT
SHIPS
Aside from naval avaition, the factor that most
distinguishes the U.S. Navy from other world fleets is
its ability to provide logistical support to its warships
in any remote corner of the world-even when allied
bases are unavailable. During the Persian Gulf War,
the U.S. Navy was able to support a half-dozen carrier
battle groups in the theater despite the fact the
Persian Gulf is about as far from the United States as
one can get. Given the carriers' voracious appetite for
aircraft ordnance and jet fuel in high tempo military
operations, this was an astounding accomplishment-
one which no other navy could come close to achieving.
Generally, each American carrier group is accompa-
nied by a single fast combat support ship (AOE),
which can dispense fuel, ammunition, and provisions
either directly from ship-to-ship or by helicopter.
"Underway replenishment groups" (URG) usually con-
sist of one oiler (AO), one ammunition ship (AE), and
a combat stores ship (AFS-not represented in the
game). In the game, logistics is not very important in
short scenarios, in which units will rarely run out of
fuel. In longer scenarios, however, you will be sur-
prised at how quickly your ships will find themselves
in the middle of the ocean with no fuel or ammunition.
(The longer the scenario, the more acute the problem.)
Take care to protect your replenishment ships, for
they will be needed toward the end of the game.
Type: AOR CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1975
SAM: SA-N-4 Max Speed: 22 knots
Guns: 4x57mm, 4x30mm Displacement: 35000 tons
ASW: None
Countries: Russia
Ships: Berezina
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSMl: None
Defense: 5
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
Close AAW: 5
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
:. : ' : : : : t ~ ~ : '
52 . - .. - - ~ ~ : ..
'Yk
Type: AOR CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1971
SAM: None Max Speed: 17 knots
Guns: 4x57mm Displacement: 23400 tons
ASW: None Countries: Russia
Ships: Boris Chilikin, Dnestr
Game Information
None
Max Speed: 3 ::: S::: SM= 1:.:.... : - - - - ~ =
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: AO
SSM: None
SAM: None
Guns: 2x20mm CIWS
ASW: None
Ships: Monongahela
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1981
Max Speed: 19 knots
Displacement: 37870 tons
Countries: United States
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 4
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5thReet
Type: AO
Type: AOR CM:
SSM: None Comm:
SSM: None Comm: 1980
SAM: None Max Speed: 16 knots
SAM: None Max Speed: 20 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 11500 tons
Guns: 1x40mm, 2x20mm Displacement: 17900 tons
ASW: None Countries: Russia
ASW: None Countries: France, Australia
Ships: Dubna
Ships: Marne, Success
Game Information
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 3
Quantity:
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
SSM2: None
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 0
Quantity: CloseAAW: 2
Quantity: ASW: 0
Range: ASW: 0
Range: Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
- . ! ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ -
' '
54 . '-
Type: AOR CM:
SSM: None Comm:
SAM: None Max Speed:
Guns: 2x30mm Displacement:
ASW: None Countries: UK
Ships: Fort Victoria
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1:
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 3
88M2:
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
CM:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes:
Area Anti-Air:
.,.
~ ~
None
1993
20 knots
32300 tons
None
None
None
0
0
5th Fleet
Type: AO CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1986
SAM: None Max Speed: 20 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 40700 tons
ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: John Lenthall, Pecos
Game Information
Max Speed: 3 SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 4
88M2: None
ASW: 0
Surface Detect: 0
Quantity:
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: AO CM: None Type: AE CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1982 SSM: None Comm: 1968
SAM: None Max Speed: 14 knots SAM: None Max Speed: 20 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 8600 tons Guns: 4x3", Displacement: 19940 tons
ASW: None Countries: Russia 2x20mmCIWS Countries: United States
Ships: Vyaz'ma
ASW: None
Game Information
Ships: Mount Baker
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: None Game Information
Defense: 3
Quantity:
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
AAW: 0
Range:
Defense: 3
Quantity:
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
AAW: 0
Range:
ASW:
Quantity:
CloseAAW: 4
SSM2: None
0
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
CM: None Range:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Area Anti-Air: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: AE CM: None Type: AE CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1963 SSM: None Comm: 1959
SAM: SA-N-5 Max Speed: 14 knots SAM: None Max Speed: 20 knots
Guns: 4xor 8x57mm Displacement: 4600 tons Guns: 4x3" Displacement: 16003 tons
ASW: None Countries: Russia ASW: None Countries: United States
Ships: Admiral Gaydar, General Riyabakov, Voronezh Ships: Haleakala
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: None
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 3
Quantity:
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 2
Range:
CloseAAW: 3
88M2: None
CloseAAW: 0
88M2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0 Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: AOR CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1964
Type: AOR CM: None
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 26 knots
SSM: None Comm: 1993
Guns: 2x20mmCIWS Displacement: 53600 tons
SAM: Sea Sparrow Max Speed: 25 knots
ASW: None Countries: United States
Guns: 2x20mmCIWS Displacement: 48800 tons
Ships: Sacramento
ASW: None Countries: United States
Game Information
Ships: Arctic
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Game Information
Defense: 5
Quantity:
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
AAW: 0
Range:
Defense: 5
Quantity:
SSM2: None
Range: CloseAAW: 6
AAW: 0
Quantity:
SSM2: None ASW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 6
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
CM: None ASW: 0
Range:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity: Surface Detect: 0
CM: None
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Area Anti-Air: 0
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: AE CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1956
SAM: None Max Speed: 18 knots
Type: AO CM: None
Guns: 4x3" Displacement: 15500 tons
SSM: None Comm: 1961
ASW: None
Countries: United States
SAM: None Max Speed: 17 knots
Ships: Mauna Kea
Guns: None Displacement: 7110 tons
Game Information
ASW: None Countries: Russia
Max Speed: 3
SSM I: None
Ships: Lena, Terek
Defense: 4
Quantity:
Game Information
AAW: 0
Range:
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
CloseAAW: 2
SSM2: None
Defense: 3
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 2
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
MERCHANT
SHIPS
One of the main reasons for the existence of any
navy is the protection of seaborne commerce. For the
United States and its western European allies, main-
taining the security of shipping routes in the Persian
Gulf and Indian Ocean is of paramount importance
given the West's dependence on Middle East oil. In the
game, merchant ships which typically ply these waters
are portrayed by "slow convoy" (SC) units, empty
tankers (ET-heading toward the Gulf), and full
tankers (FT-heading away). Each unit represents a
group of freighters and tankers. Many of the tankers
are truly "super," displacing 400,000 tons or more. As
the United States came to play a major role in the
Middle East in the 1970's, the Pentagon began to
develop rapid deployment forces which could be
shipped to the Persian Gulf on short notice to protect
the oil fields and shipping routes. The most daunting
problem was not the lifting of troops to the theater, but
shipping their supplies there. Maritime prepositioning
ships (MPS) and 30-knot SL-7 containerships (repre-
sented by "fast convoy'' units in the game) help to solve
that problem. The MPS ships are fully loaded with
enough equipment to support a Marine brigade for sev-
eral weeks of combat operations. In the Indian Ocean,
an MPS squadron remains on station in a constant
state of readiness at Diego Garcia. The SL-7's are
home-ported in the United States and can be readied
for overseas deployment in a matter of days.
Type: MPS CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1985
SAM: None Max Speed: 18 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 44330 tons
ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: 1st Lt. Jack Lummus, 2nd Lt. John P. Bobo
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSMl: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air:
Type: FC CM: None Type: MPS CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1973 SSM: None Comm: 1979
SAM: None Max Speed: 30 knots SAM: None Max Speed: 17 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 41127 tons Guns: None Displacement: 46552 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: Antares, Capella, Denebola, Regulus Ships: Louis J. Hauge, PFC William B. Baugh
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSMl : None Max Speed: 3
SSMl: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
Type: MPS CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1981
SAM: None Max Speed: 20 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 48754 tons
ASW: None Countries: United States
Ships: Maj . Stephen W. Pless, Sgt. Matej Kocak
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
88M2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: sc CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1970
SAM: None Max Speed: 16 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 60000 tons
ASW: None
Countries: United States
Ships: American Titan, Cape Ann, Cape Charles, Cape Cod,
Elizabeth Lykes, Falcon Leader, Green Island, Letitia Lykes,
Lyra, Overseas Alice, Overseas Valdez, Overseas Vivian,
Rapid
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 4
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
88M2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
Type: Tanker (ET/FT) CM: None
SSM: None Comm: 1980
SAM: None Max Speed: 16 knots
Guns: None Displacement: 26000 tons
ASW: None Countries: Various
Ships: Barcelona, Bay Ridge, Bayuk Hun, Bridgeton, Burma
Endeavor, Gas Prince, Glacier Bay, Pivot, Seawise Giant,
Sungari, Tiburon
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 6
Quantity:
AAW: 0
Range:
CloseAAW: 0
SSM2: None
ASW: 0
Quantity:
Surface Detect: 0
Range:
CM: None
Sub Detect: 0
Quantity:
Gunnery: 0
Range:
Victory Point: 4
Torpedoes: 0
Area Anti-Air: 0
5th Fleet
SUBMARINES
There is a saying among American submariners
that in sea warfare there are two types of ships: sub-
marines and targets. This is a brash statement given
the fact that a U.S. Navy submarine has not sunk an
enemy warship since the Second World War .
Nevertheless, American nuclear attack submarines are
indeed formidable warships. They carry as much fire-
power as cruisers and destroyers (except for guns and
anti-aircraft weapons), can move underwater as fast as
a surface combatant can sail on the surface, and can
remain virtually invisible to the prying eyes of the
enemy. In the game, submarines can be your most
effective units, but their strengths can easily be wasted
if employed improperly. There is little need to concern
yourself with enemy aircraft when moving your sub-
marines, for it is difficult to destroy a submarine from
the air. The odds are great that you will detect enemy
surface forces long before they detect you. Unlike sur-
face ships, however, submarines operate independent-
ly, and it is difficult to accomplish significant results
on their own. They are best employed in "packs"
because the enemy's defenses can quickly become over-
whelmed. However, you may have difficulty using
diesel submarines effectively, for they are very slow.
Finally, keep a sharp lookout for enemy submarines,
for in modern naval operations the most effective
counter to a submarine is another submarine.
Type: SSG CM: None
Max Speeds: 12/20 knots Comm: 1977
Tubes: 4x21" Displacement: 1760 tons
Torpedoes: 20xTLW
Countries: Pakistan
SSM: Harpoon
Ships: Hashmat, Hurmat
Game Information
Max Speed: 3 ::: S.::: S=.: M-=c1::..: : ____ ____:H=a.o_j rp"-' o"-" o=n
Defense: 7
ASW: 4
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 4
Torpedo Attack: 12
Victory Point: 3
TLW: Tube-launched weapons
Quantity:
Range:
SSM2:
Quantity:
Range:
CM:
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes:
4
2 hexes
None
None
16
Note: First number in "Max Speed" entry is surfaced speed;
second number is submerged speed.
Type: SSN CM: SS-N-21
Max Speeds: 18/32 knots Comm: 1984
Tubes: 4x21", 4x25.6" Displacement: 9100 tons
Torpedoes: 24xTLW Countries: Russia
SSM: None
Ships: I. M. Tropyin, N ogin
Game Information
None
Max Speed: 4 """ SS::e:M= 1"- : - - - - ~ =
Defense: 8 Quantity:
ASW: 9
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
SS-N-21
Sub Detect: 30
Quantity:
Torpedo Attack: 30
Range:
CM:
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 4
Range: 28 hexes
Torpedoes: 20
Charlie II Class
Type:
Max Speeds:
Tubes:
Torpedoes:
SSM:
Ships: Irtysh
SSGN
15/25 knots
6x21"
14xTLW
SS-N-9
5th Fleet
CM: None
Comm: 1973
Displacement: 5550 tons
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSMl: SS-N-9
Defense: 7
Quantity: 8
ASW: 4
Range: 2 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Torpedo Attack: 12
Range:
CM: None
Victory Point: 5
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes: 12
lthFIHt
Type: ss CM: None
Max Speeds: 13/16 knots Comm: 1964
Tubes: 12x21.7" Displacement: 1038 tons
Torpedoes: 12xTLW
Countries: Pakistan
SSM: Harpoon
Ships: Ghazi, Shushuk
Game Information
Max Speed: 2 ____
Defense: 6 Quantity: 2
ASW: 4
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 4
Torpedo Attack: 12
Victory Point: 3
Range:
SSM2:
Quantity:
Range:
CM:
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes:
2
None
None
10
Type: ss CM: None
Max Speeds: 10/20 knots Comm: 1979
Tubes: 6x21" Displacement: 3076 tons
Torpedoes: 18xTLW
Countries: Russia, Iran,
SSM: None India
Ships: Beluga, Chaika, Delfin, Grif, Larak, Shshuka, Sind-
hudhvaj, Sindhukiri, Sindhuraj, Sindhuratna, Tareq
Game Information
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 7
Quantity:
ASW: 5
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 5
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 18
CM: None
Victory Point: 3
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes: 16
Type: SSN CM: TLAM
Max Speeds: 18/32 knots Comm: 1976
Tubes: 4x21" Displacement: 6927 tons
Torpedoes: 26xTLW
Countries: United States
SSM: TASM,
Harpoon
Ships: Albany, Annapolis, Baton Rouge, Honolulu, Key
West, Santa Fe
Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSM1: H a q ~ o o n
Defense: 8
Quantity: 4
ASW: 10
Range: 2 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: TASM
Quantity: 4
Sub Detect: 40
Range: 5 hexes
Torpedo Attack: 30
CM: TLAM
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 6
Range: 30 hexes
Torpedoes: 14
Type: SS
Max Speeds: 12/17 knots
Tubes: 6x21"
Torpedoes: 20xTLW
SSM: Harpoon
Ships: Orion
lth FIHt
CM: None
Comm: 1968
Displacement: 2410 tons
Countries: Australia
Game Information
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: H a q : ~ o o n
Defense: 7
Quantity: 4
ASW: 6
Range: 2 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 10
Quantity:
Torpedo Attack: 22
Range:
CM: None
Victory Point: 3
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes: 16
5th Fleet
Type: SSGN
Max Speeds: 19/30 knots
Tubes: 4x21", 4x25.6"
Torpedoes: 24xTL W
SSM: 24xSS-N-19
Ships: Balkhash, Baykal, Tobol
CM:
Comm:
SS-N-21
1980
Displacement: 12500 tons
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSM1: SS-N-19
Defense: 8
Quantity: 24
ASW: 6
Range: 5 hexes
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 22
CM: SS-N-21
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 6
Range: 28 hexes
Torpedoes: 12
Type: SSN
Max Speeds: 14/25 knots
Tubes: 4x21"
Torpedoes: 18xTLW
SSM: SM-39 Exocet
Ships: Casabianca
CM: None
Comm: 1983
Displacement: 2670 tons
Countries: France
Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSM1: Exocet
Defense: 7
Quantity: 4
ASW: 6
Range: 1 hex
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 8
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 22
CM: None
Victory Point: 5
Quantity:
Range:
Torpedoes: 14
5th Fleet
Type: SSN CM: TLAM Type: SSN CM: SS-N-21
Max Speeds: 18/35 knots Comm: 1996 Max Speeds: 18/34 knots Comm: 1983
Tubes: 8x26" Displacement: 9137 tons Tubes: 8x25.6" Displacement: 7900 tons
Torpedoes: 50xTLW
Countries: United States Torpedoes: 22xTLW
Countries: Russia
SSM: TASM, SSM: None
Harpoon
Ships: Ovseenko
Ships: Connecticut, Seawolf
Game Information
Game Information
SSM1: None
SSM1:
Max Speed: 5
Max Speed: 5
Harpoon
Quantity:
Defense: 9
Defense: 9
Quantity: 8
Range:
Range: 2 hexes
ASW: 9
ASW: 10
SSM2: None
SSM2: TASM
Surface Detect: 0
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 30
Quantity:
Quantity: 8
Sub Detect: 40
Range: 5 hexes Torpedo Attack: 30
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 35
CM: SS-N-21
CM: TLAM Victory Point: 5
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 6
Quantity: 16
Range: 28 hexes
Range: 30 hexes
Torpedoes: 16
Torpedoes: 28
Type: SSN CM: TLAM Type: ss CM: None
Max Speeds: 15/30 knots Comm: 1967 Max Speeds: 13/16 knots Comm: 1973
Tubes: 4x21" Displacement: 4960 tons Tubes: 8x21" Displacement: 3800 tons
Torpedoes: 23xTLW
Countries: us
Torpedoes: 16
Countries: Russia
SSM: TASM, SSM: None
Harpoon
Ships: Korshun, Linj, Syomga
Ships: L. Mendel Rivers
Game Information
Game Information
SSM1:
Max Speed: 2
SSM1: None
Max Speed: 4
Har:Qoon
Quantity:
Quantity: 4
Defense: 6
Defense: 7
Range:
Range: 2 hexes
ASW: 4
ASW: 9
SSM2: None
Surface Detect:
SSM2: TASM
Surface Detect: 0
0
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Quantity: 2
Sub Detect: 30
Range: 5 hexes Torpedo Attack: 12
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 22
CM: None
CM: TLAM Victory Point: 3
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 2
Quantity:
Range:
Range: 30 hexes
Torpedoes: 16
Torpedoes: 15
5th Fleet
Type: SSN CM: None Type: ss CM: None
Max Speeds: 18/32 knots Comm: 1983 Max Speeds: 11/22 knots Comm: 1986
Tubes: 5x21" Displacement: 5900 tons Tubes: 8x21" Displacement: 1850 tons
Torpedoes: 25xTLW
Countries: UK
Torpedoes: 12 Countries: India
SSM: Harpoon SSM: None
Ships: Turbulent Ships: Shalki, Shankush
Game Information Game Information
Max Speed: 4
SSM1: H a q ~ o o n
Max Speed: 3
SSM1: None
Defense: 8
Quantity: 4
Defense: 7
Quantity:
ASW: 10
Range: 2 hexes
ASW: 4
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 40
Quantity:
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Torpedo Attack: 22
Range:
Torpedo Attack: 18
Range:
CM: None CM: None
Victory Point: 5
Quantity:
Victory Point: 3
Quantity:
Range: Range:
Torpedoes: 20 Torpedoes: 12
Type: SSN CM: SS-N-21
Max Speeds: 18/30 knots Comm: 1972
Tubes: 2x21", 4x 25.6" Displacement: 5800 tons
Torpedoes: 24TLW Countries: Russia
SSM: None
Ships: A.E. Yakimshik, Kapitanents, Lunarcharsky,
Oppokov, Shiapnikov, Skvortsov
Game Information
Max Speed: 4 SSM1: None
Defense: 7
Quantity:
ASW: 4
Range:
Surface Detect: 0
SSM2: None
Sub Detect: 4
Quantity:
Torpedo Attack: 18/22
Range:
CM: SS-N-21
Victory Point: 5
Quantity: 6
Range: 28 hexes
Torpedoes: 20/16
AIRCRAFT
For the past half century, naval aviation has been
the dominant force in sea warfare. In the U.S. Navy,
aircraft carriers have been the centerpieces of the fleet
since 1942. Today, a single American carrier wields
more power than most of the world's navies combined.
Even in an era of burgeoning cruise missile technology,
the airplane is still far and away the most effective
means of striking the enemy. In the Gulf War, the
media focused a great deal of attention on Tomahawk
cruise missiles, but it was manned aircraft that deliv-
ered the vast majority of ordnance against Iraq. Of
course, naval aviation consists of much more than car-
rier-based aircraft. Indeed, the Russian Navy's prima-
ry offensive capability is contained in its fleet of land-
based Tu-16 Badger and Tu-26 Backfire bombers. In
the game, make sure to protect your airbases by main-
taining fighters continuously on CAP when you can, for
a single well-delivered enemy strike could render your
key attack aircraft impotent for the rest of the game.
When attacking an enemy target that is protected by
CAP, make sure your attacking air units are escorted
by aircraft in the "INT" (interceptor) role; otherwise,
the attacking units will simply not get through. When
EW units are available, use them to escort attacking
aircraft, for this will significantly lessen enemy anti-
aircraft fire.
Role: INT
Date: 1981
Max Speed: 668 mph
Range: 150nm
Countries: United States,
UK, India
Game Information
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
14 hexes
5
0
20
0
40
None
3
SSM:
Range:
Attacks:
Sea Eagle
1
2
5th Fleet
Role: AEW Range: 300nm
Date: 1962
Countries: France
Max Speed: 254 mph
Game Information
Range:
12hexes __________
AA:
ASW:
0
0
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Range:
Attacks:
Atlantique
\
Role: RCN Range: 1000 nm
Date: 1984 Countries: France, Pakistan
Max Speed: 350 mph
Game Information
Range: 70 hexes
SSM: Exocet
AA: 0
Range: 1
ASW: 4
Attacks: 10
Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 10/20
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: 15
Victory Point: 0
,,
'
>.
. ,.
74 I

',.;,tt&W':'M
Role: RCN Range: 2000 nm
Date: 1966 Countries: Russia
Role: BMB Range: 9000nm
Max Speed: 330 mph
Date: 1952 Countries: United States
Max Speed: 525 mph
Game Information
Game Information
Range: 120 hexes
SSM:
AA: 1
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Range: 36 hexes
SSM: None
Harpoon
AA: 0
Range:
2
ASW: 2
Attacks:
20
Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 5
Surface Detect: 30
Bomb Value: 0
Sub Detect: 0
SSM Value: None
Bomb Value: 90
SSM Value: 40
Victory Point: 0
Victory Point: 3
Role: RCN Range: 450nm Role: AEW Range: 1000 nm
Date: 1955 Countries: India Date: 1971 Countries: United States
Max Speed: 350 mph Max Speed: 375 mph
Game Information Game Information
Range: 14 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 26 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
AA: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 30 Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 0 Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0 Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0 Victory Point: 0
EW Range: 700nm
Role: ATK Range: 600nm
Date: 1971 Countries: United States
Date: 1983 Countries: United States
Max Speed: 613 mph
Max Speed: Mach .9
Game Information
Game Information
Range: 30 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 28 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
AA: 3
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 30
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 100
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Victory Point: 3
5th Fleet
INT Range: 500nm
Date: 1973 Countries: United States
Max Speed: Mach 2.4
Iran '
Game Information
Range: 22118 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 7/8/10
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Role: INT Range: 685nm
Date: 1979 Countries: Saudia Arabia
Max Speed: Mach 2.5
United States '
Game Information
Range: 28 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 12/14/18
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10/15/90
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
N o t ~ : F-15E ("Strike Eagle") is the deep-strike ground attack
verswn.
511tRIIf
Role: INT Range: 340nm Role: INT Range: 500nm
Date: 1982 Countries: United States,
Date: 2002 Countries: United States
Max Speed: Mach2
Bahrain, Pakistan, Indonesia
Max Speed: Mach 1.7
Game Information Game Information
Range: 20 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 28 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 7/9/12
Range:
AA: 20
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20 Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0 Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10/15 Bomb Value: 30
SSM Value: None SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3 Victory Point: 3
Role: RCN Range: 175 nm
Role: RCN Range: 228nm
Date: 1963
Countries: Iran
Date: 1960 Countries: Iran
Max Speed: Mach 1.4
Max Speed: Mach 2.1
Game Information
Game Information Range: 20/28 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 24130 hexes
SSM: None AA: 410
Range:
AA: 0/5
Range: ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 30
Surface Detect: 20/30
Sub Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0/50
Bomb Value: 5/0
SSM Value: None
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3/0
Victory Point: 3/0
Role: INT/ATK Range: 400nm
Date: 1982 Countries: United States
Max Speed: Mach 1.8
Game Information
Range: 20 hexes
SSM: Harpoon
AA: 617/1
Range: 2
ASW: 0
Attacks: 2
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 15/35/60
SSM Value: None/40
Victory Point: 3
Note: F/A-18E is a strike version (as yet unfinalized) intend-
ed to replace U.S. Navy A-6 Intruders
5th Fleet
Role: AEW Range: 200nm
Date: 1980
Countries: Russia
Max Speed: 135 mph
Game Information
Range: 6 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Role: RCN Range: 1800 nm
Date: 1968 Countries: Russia, India
Max Speed: 390 mph
Game Information
Range: 60 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
ASW: 3
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 10
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
.
< \1--.. '

": ';' .
' 81
:
Jaguar
Role: INT Range: 788nm
Date: 1975 Countries: India, Oman
Max Speed: Mach 1.5
Game Information
Range: 20 hexes
SSM: Sea Eagle
AA: 3/4
Range: 2
ASW: 0
Attacks: 5
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 50/60
SSM Value: None/32
Victory Point: 3
Note: Indian Air Force Jaguars are maritime strike aircraft.
Role: INT Range: 650nm Role: INT Range: 290nm
Date: 1959 Countries: India, Ethiopia, Date: 1971 Countries: India, Russia
Max Speed: Mach 2.1
Yemen
Max Speed: Mach 1.1
Game Information Game Information
Range: 10 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 18/14 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 3/4
Range:
AA: 6
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20 Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0 Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10/15 Bomb Value: 15/50
SSM Value: None SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3 Victory Point: 3
N:'Jte: MiG-27 is ground attack version ofMiG-23.
Role: RCN Range: 1150 nm
Date: 1970 Countries: India
Max Speed: Mach 2
Game Information
Range: 32 hexes _____
AA:
ASW:
0
0
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Range:
Attacks:
-'<,/ "' '
. ' .
:. f-
;i!Y: .
... . . 83
'
Role: INT
Date: 1984
Max Speed: Mach 2.3
Range: 380nm
Countries: Russia, Iran,
India
Game Information
Range: 18 hexes
SSM: AS-17
AA: 4/9/10
Range: 2
ASW: 0
Attacks: 2
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 20/35170
SSM Value: None/20
Victory Point: 3
Note: MiG-29K is carrier-based version of MiG-29A.
Role: INT Range: 380nm
Role: INT Range: 380nm
Date: 1976 Countries: Russia
Date: 1995 Countries: Russia
Max Speed: Mach 2.35 Max Speed: Mach 2.35
Game Information
Game Information
Range: 32 hexes
SSM: None
Range: 24 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 9
Range:
AA: 12
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
Bomb Value: 90
SSM Value: None
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Victory Point: 3
Note: MiG-33 is a new (as yet unfinalized) version ofMiG-29.
Mirage Fl
Role: INT Range: 450nm
Role: INT Range: 800nm
Date: 1969
Countries: France Qatar
Date: 1982 Countries: India, UAE
Max Speed: Mach 2.2
Kuwait ' '
Max Speed: Mach 2.2
Game Information
Game Information
Range: 18 hexes
SSM: Exocet
Range: 24 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 6/9
Range: 1
AA: 8/9
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks: 2
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10/25
Bomb Value: 15
SSM Value: None/18
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Victory Point: 3
Role: INT Range: 670nm Role: RCN Range: 2400 nm
Date: 1961
Countries: Pakistan
Date: 1969
Countries: UK
Max Speed: Mach 2.2 Max Speed: 520 mph
Game Information Game Information
Range: 18/26 hexes
SSM: Exocet
Range: 70 hexes
SSM: Har2oon
AA: 5/6
Range: 1
AA: 0
Range: 2
ASW: 0
Attacks: 3
ASW: 4
Attacks: 2
Surface Detect: 20 Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 0 Sub Detect: 30
Bomb Value: 50 Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None/30 SSM Value: 20
Victory Point: 3 Victory Point: 0
5th Fleet
Role:
Date:
Max Speed:
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
RCN Range: 1346 nm
1962 Countries: United States,
473 mph
Australia
Game Information
70 hexes _____ -===...c==
Harpoon
0
4
30
20
0
20
0
Range:
Attacks:
2
2
Role: MSW Range: 1000 nm
Date: 1986 Countries: United States
Max Speed: 170 mph
Game Information
Range: 6 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
. . ~ ' .. ;...: .. t
- ' ~
'.::-Jl ~ ~ ~ ' ''
88
';'( - ' ; t , ~ ,
> ~ J. ~ J I .
' ~
Role: INT Range: 590nm
Date: 1993 Countries: France
Max Speed: Mach 2
Game Information
Range: 24 hexes ===- S::::: SM==-=- : -------=N_:_: o::..:. n=e
AA:
ASW:
7
0
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Range:
Attacks:
SUtf'lllf
Role: RCN Range: 2300 nm
Date: 1974 Countries: United States
Max Speed: 506 mph
Game Information
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
40 hexes
0
2
30
5
0
40
0
SSM:
Range:
Attacks:
Harpoon
2
2
Role: INT Range: 370nm
Role: INT Range: 1200 nm
Date: 1971
Countries: Russia
Date: 1972 Countries: Iran, Russia
Max Speed: Mach2
Max Speed: Mach 1.35
Game Information
Game Information
Range: 14 hexes
SSM: None
38 hexes
SSM: None
Range:
AA: 4
Range:
AA: 4/5
Range:
Attacks:
Attacks:
ASW: 0
ASW: 0
Surface Detect: 20
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 50
Bomb Value: 70
SSM Value: None
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Victory Point: 3
.
90 .;
.....
Role:
Date:
INT
1986
Range: 800nm
Countries: Russia
Max Speed: Mach 2.35
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
Game Information
24 hexes :o: S..:o: S.=.: M:::..::_____ .=.. N.:...:: o=n=e
11
0
20
0
15
None
3
Range:
Attacks:
Role:
Date:
INT
1993
Max Speed: Mach 2.35
Range: 800nm
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
24 hexes :o: S.:= S:::..: M:::..: : _____
7
0
20
0
0
None
Range:
Attacks:
Victory Point: 3
Note: Su-33 is carrier-based version of Su-27B.
5th Fleet
Role: INT Range: 810nm
Date: 1995 Countries: Russia
Max Speed: Mach 2.35
Game Information
Range: 28 hexes
SSM:
AA: 16
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 15
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
None
Role:
Date:
AEW
1961
Max Speed: 166 mph
Range: 560nm
Countries: India, UK
Game Information
Range: 6 hexes =S=S=M=: _____ - = - N ~ o = n = e
AA:
ASW:
0
0
Surface Detect: 0
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Range:
Attacks:
Role:
Date:
Max Speed:
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
INT
1962
600 mph
Range: 390nm
Countries: France
Game Information
20 hexes
SSM:
5
Range:
0
Attacks:
20
0
60
36
3
Exocet
1
2
Role:
Date:
Max Speed:
Range:
AA:
ASW:
Surface Detect:
Sub Detect:
Bomb Value:
SSM Value:
Victory Point:
Tu-16C/DIE/G Badger
EW/RCN/BMB
1953
535 mph
Range: 3100 nm
Countries: Russia
Game Information
60170 hexes
SSM: AS-2
0/1
Range: 3
0
Attacks: 24
0/20/30
0
0/60
None/48
0/3
5th Fleet
Role:
Date:
BMB
1974
Max Speed: Mach 2
Range: 2150 nm
Countries: Russia
Game Information
Range: 90 hexes
SSM: AS-4
AA: 1
Range: 4
ASW: 0
Attacks: 24
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 90
SSM Value: 64
Victory Point: 3
'fu-95D Bear
..... .....--
Role: RCN Range: 3400 nm
Date: 1965 Countries: Russia
Max Speed: 450 mph
Game Information
Range: 160 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 0
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 30
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 0
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 0
Tornado-FIG
Role:
Date:
INT
1982
Max Speed: Mach 1
Range: 750 nm
Countries: UK, Saudi Arabia
Game Infonnation
Range: 24 hexes
SSM: None
AA: 617/14
Range:
ASW: 0
Attacks:
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 10/20170/80
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Note: Tornado-F is air defense version; Tornado-G is ground
attack version.
Role:
Date:
INT
1995
Max Speed: Mach 1. 7
5UtReet
Range: 545nm
Countries: Russia
Game Infonnation
Range: 12 hexes _____
AA:
ASW:
3
0
Surface Detect: 20
Sub Detect: 0
Bomb Value: 30
SSM Value: None
Victory Point: 3
Range:
Attacks:
Note: Yak-141 is new (as yet unfinalized) successor to Yak-
38 Forger, for use on Kiev-class carriers.
The
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The Avalon Hill Game Company
DIVISION OF MONARCH AVALON, INC.
4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214
1994 Printed in USA all Rights Reserved
400305403
STANLEY
ASSOCIATES
II
,,
KEYS
CIC Screen
[] Configuration Display
[] Scenario Display
{[] Tactical Reference Display
{[]Exit
Scenario Display
iaJ Select Red Side
[] Select Green Side
Select AI Opponent
(I] Select two-player option
i!J Select E-mail option
rc='i)


Select AI
lLJ'lLJ'l:LJ level
Q Select AI
l!!..Jrlt!..J aggression level
[] Start Game
ifsci Return to CIC
{!] WEAX
The Avalon Hill
Game Company
Tactical Ref. Display
Display Air Units
Display Surface Units
0 Display Submarine Units
Item
ie:J Previous Item
ifsci Exit Tactical Ref. Display
Strategic Display
Display Air Units toggle
Display Surface Units toggle
([) Display Sub Units toggle
{[] Display Weather toggle
{!] Display Air Missions toggle
ifsci Exit Strategic Display
DI VISION OF STANLEY
MONARCH AVALON, INC. ASSOCIATES
Tactical Display
[] Form Group
iQJ Disband Group
ifscj Exit Tactical Display
Air Missions Display
iEscj Exit Air Missions Display
Phase Selection
Activate Air Units
Activate Surface Units
([) Activate Submarine Units
ie:J Pass Initiative
D+r.:=ilS Activate Strategic
l2..J Display
game
BaHie Results Display
ifscj Exit Battle Results Display
Victory Display
ifscj Exit Victory Display
400305406
I 3841 15022-1
Operations Display
r,:::=)l r.:=l Puts selected submarine in
Activate Strategic Display l!:LJ Deep Dive mode (toggle)
r.;=)l rr.==y Puts selected unit under
L!.J Activate Tactical Display lLJ computer AI control (toggle)
r.=:lJ (Arrows) Scroll map in the
l!.J Activate Air Missions Display corresponding direction
Activate Victory Display (] Center map on selected unit
[) Execute Turn Hexgrid toggle
[] Activate Attack button toggle Sound FX toggle
GJ Select next active unit Music toggle
r.:=lJ Se_lect previous active 0 r.===1
l!:J un1t Animation toggle
Activate Tactical Reference D 1f.:1
l!!..J Display for selected unit Save game
Quit game
Configuration Console
[] Enter modem initialization
liJ Select baud rate
(] Select com port
[] Set Send Mode
[] Set Receive Mode
[] Enter phone number to dial

{g] Set IRQ number
Set sound card address
[] Turn sound effects on/off
i!J Turn music on/ off
(Esci Exit Configuration Console
Combat Display
D Subtract one
le:!J+Le.J primary SSM
n
primary SSM
D Subtract one
1E!:!J + LJ secondary SSM
n
+ LJ secondary SSM
D rr:=il Subtract one
1E!:!J + lLJ torpedo
n r.:=\1 Add one
+ lLJ torpedo
D lf.:1 Subtract one
IE!:!J+l.J cruise missile
n rr:==li Add one
cruise missile
(g) Assign/cancel guns
i!J Assign/cancel ASW
F-'lj Assign/cancel aircraft to
Le...J air strike as a bomber
r,=='\l Assign/cancel aircraft to
l!..J air strike as a interceptor
r.:='iJ Assign/cancel aircraft to
air strike as EW
r.:='ll Assign/cancel aircraft to
L!!!J air strike to launch SSM
iEsci Exit Combat Display
II
EYS
SCENARIO 1
The Battle of the Maldives
Until recently, most Americans had never heard of the Republic of
the Maldives. This nation, consisting of 1,087 tiny islands (atolls)-
only 200 of which are inhabited-stretches 600 miles on a north-south
axis in the central Indian Ocean. The northernmost of the 19 major
atolls in the Maldives is only 250 miles from the southern tip oflndia;
the southernmost atoll is about 400 miles distant from Diego Garcia,
the US Navy's only permanent base in the Indian Ocean. The Mal-
dives' population is only about 160,000, almost all of whom are Sunni
Muslims. The country's economy, based almost entirely on fishing, is
extremely poor.
The Maldives became a British protectorate in 1887, but gained
independence in 1965. However, an RAF airfield on Addu Atoll re-
mained operational until1976. Since that time, the government of the
Maldives has made several unsuccessful attempts to strengthen the
nation's economy by encouraging Indian tourists to take their vaca-
tions there.
Although the Indian government has made it clear that it would
not tolerate foreign interference in the Maldives, it did nothing when
Russian diplomats approached Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul
Gayoom last year concerning a massive Russian economic assistance
package in exchange for use of two airfields in the Maldives. Under
pressure from the United States, Gayoom turned the Russians down,
but was toppled from power only three weeks later by a Russian-sup-
ported coup led by an Islamic fundamentalist group named "Maldi-
vian Jihad." The new Maldivian president subsequently invited the
Russians to lease the two airfields. Still, the Indian government did
nothing.
Six weeks ago, another coup took place, this one secretly sponsored
by the CIA. President Gayoom was restored to power and most mem-
bers of the Maldivian Jihad in the capital city of Male were rounded
up and executed. Gayoom promptly expelled all Russian diplomats
and invited the United States to establish military bases on several
different islands in the Maldives. Three weeks ago, 200 members of a
US Navy construction battalion arrived on Male Island to begin im-
provement work on nearby Hulule airfield. Only a week ago, US Ma-
rine Corps squadron VMA-231, flying AV-8B VSTOL aircraft, deployed
to Hulule. A few days later, a detachment of US Navy P-3C Orion pa-
trol aircraft from squadron VP-22 also deployed to the airfield.
After a year of silence concerning the Maldives issue, the Indian
Prime Minister has suddenly demanded that all US military person-
nel leave the Maldives at once. "India is firmly committed to main-
taining the Indian Ocean as a zone of peace," he declared. "We cannot
tolerate American nuclear weapons only 200 miles from our coast."
The American Secretary of State has responded by saying that Amer-
ican troops will not leave unless firm assurances are given that the
Russians will not be permitted to interfere in the internal affairs of
the Maldives again.
The Indian Prime Minister has called the commander of the In-
dian Navy's Southern Fleet to New Delhi, ordering him to conduct air
strikes against Hulule if the Americans do not depart within the next
48 hours. Furthermore, the Southern Fleet has been directed to block-
ade Male Atoll and prevent seaborne reinforcement and resupply of
the American airfield. Although the Indian admiral has privately
called the Prime Minister's action "madness," he is reluctantly
preparing his naval and air forces to execute the plan.
....
+ ._ J -
.t:-...
Player
One Marine Corps AV-8B (Harrier) squadron and a US
Navy P-3C squadron are deployed on Male Atoll. Two addi-
tional P-3C squadrons are situated at Diego Garcia. A four-
ship surface action group, including the battleship USS Mis-
souri, is in the Maldives zone. A fast convoy of four SL-7 con-
tainerships, escorted by four frigates, is located in the West
Indian Ocean zone. A single US submarine, the USS Hon-
olulu, is supporting the surface action group.
_...-.,
'

The fast convoy (FC) units Antares and Capella must reach
Male Atoll. In addition, destroy as many Indian units as pos-
sible.
SPECIAL NOTE:
The green player may not make cruise missile attacks in
this scenario.
FORCES: Red
Several air reconnaissance squadrons of the Indian Air
Force and Navy are situated in southern India to support the
operation. Two combat squadrons, including one trained in
naval attack, are based at Trivandrum airfield. Both of the In-
dian Navy's aircraft carriers, escorted by four destroyers and
frigates, are in position off the southwestern Indian coast.
Four Indian Navy destroyers of the Modified Kashin class are
in the Laccadives zone, sailing towards the Maldives. Two
submarines are supporting the surface forces.
Destroy or damage the US airfield on Male Atoll. In addi-
tion, destroy as many US units as possible.
SCENARIO 2
Russian Raiders
The blissful years of glasnost and perestroika are history. Several
weeks ago, the Russian Army invaded Lithuania following the
Lithuanian government's refusal to take steps to protect the rights of
ethnic Russians residing in that country. Although media reports are
sketchy, outright civil war has apparently broken out throughout the
Baltic States, pitting old hard-line communists against poorly armed
but numerous nationalist forces. Meanwhile, the Russians are de-
ploying troops to the Baltic States despite the vociferous objections of
the President of the United States, who has called for a United Na-
tions resolution condemning foreign military intervention in that re-
gion. Relations between the United States and Russia have sunk to
their lowest point since the Cold War.
Last week an unidentified submarine (thought to be Cuban) ap-
proached a Panamanian merchant ship in the Caribbean and, ac-
cording to some witnesses, fired two torpedoes. A Seahawk helicopter
from a US Navy frigate was dispatched to the area and dropped two
Mark 46 ASW torpedoes at the submarine. Contact with the target
was soon lost. No wreckage was spotted, so the submarine presum-
ably escaped.
Two days later, the President of Russia angrily announced that a
Russian Navy ballistic missile submarine of the giant Typhoon class
on routine patrol had been sunk by the US Navy off the coast of Cuba.
The entire crew of 180 was lost. The Russian President vehemently
denied that the submarine, which had recently reverted to its old So-
viet Navy name of Leninskiy Komsomol, had attacked the Panaman-
ian ship, claiming that submarines of that class do not even carry
anti-surface torpedoes. Comparing the incident to the shoot-down of
an Iranian airliner by the USS Vincennes in July 1988, the Russian
leader has demanded American reparations.
In secret session in the Kremlin, the Russian President has or-
dered the Russian Navy's Indian Ocean squadron to retaliate against
the United States by attacking American merchant shipping along
the critical Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf shipping lanes.
US Navy intelligence officers have only recently learned of the
Russian scheme and have informed the President of the United
States. The Chief of Naval Operations has recommended that all
American merchant ships in the Indian Ocean should promptly form
into convoys for mutual protection. Meanwhile, a significant force of
US Navy surface combatants is proceeding as rapidly as possible to
the theater to protect American shipping.
- .. 'i-f'"-
. , .. -""
; { U<'..- -
Several unescorted convoys, consisting of a mixture of
empty and full supertankers, freighters, and fast container-
ships, are situated in the western Indian Ocean. Three US
Navy surface action groups are sailing to the aid of the con-
voys. One group of four frigates, known as the "Middle East
Force," is replenishing in Raysut, Oman. Another group of five
surface combatants from the 7th Fleet in the Pacific is cur-
rently located in the West Indian Ocean zone. A powerful
group of five warships, including the battleship USS New Jer-
sey, is sailing off the coast of Kenya. Two submarines are cur-
rently deployed to the region. One squadron of P-3C recon-
naissance aircraft at Diego Garcia is supporting the operation.
FORCES: Red
A four-ship task force, including the nuclear-powered
cruiser Nakhimou, is somewhere in the vicinity of the Sey-
chelles. An Oscar class submarine is currently in the Arabian
Sea. Three air reconnaissance squadrons are deployed to air-
fields in Yemen and on Socotra island.
' ..,_ ., \ ., >
- h ..
: Green Player
Destroy as many Russian units as possible.
OBJECTIVES: Red
The four Russian surface warships must reach Aden, AI
Mukalla, or Ras Karma while destroying as many US mer-
chant ships and warships as possible.
SCENARIO 3
Battle ol the Arabian Sea
Civil unrest in Ethiopia has been a fact oflife for the past half-cen-
tury, but in recent months insurgencies in the two northernmost
provinces, Eritrea and Tigre, have taken a sharp turn for the worse.
The secessionist Eritrean People's Liberation Front (EPLF) seized the
Red Sea port of Assab ten weeks ago, destroying government and
army warehouses, communications stations, and port facilities. Dur-
ing the fighting in Assab, several dozen Russian sailors, whose ship
was dispatched to the port as a show of support for the Marxist
Ethiopian government, were captured and executed by the EPLF. The
Russians promptly deployed two naval infantry battalions and an air-
borne regiment to Assab. After ferocious fighting, the city was recap-
tured in less than a week. Russian Air Force combat aircraft stationed
in nearby Yemen are conducting daily bombing strikes against the
EPLF guerrillas.
After the Russian intervention in Assab, the surviving EPLF guer-
rilla groups retreated southward over the border, seeking sanctuary
in neighboring Djibouti. The Russians then demanded passage over
the border to hunt down the partisans. When the Djiboutian govern-
ment denied permission, Russian and Ethiopian ground troops in-
vaded Djibouti.
Although the EPLF is nominally a Marxist organization, its lead-
ers have actively sought western aid. Furthermore, Djibouti-a for-
mer French protectorate-quickly requested French military assis-
tance as soon as foreign troops crossed its borders. Assistance was
not long in coming, for a squadron of French Mirage Fl fighters sta-
tioned in Djibouti has already engaged Russian aircraft in Djibout-
ian airspace. Moreover, the President of France has dispatched a
naval task force to the Gulf of Aden with orders to help preserve the
territorial integrity of Djibouti against Russian aggression. The
President of the United States and the Prime Minister of Great
Britain are fully supportive of the French policy and have directed
major naval forces to enter the Gulf of Aden. The American and
British task force commanders have orders to establish firm control
over the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea to prevent reinforcement
and resupply of Ethiopian-Russian forces currently engaged in Er-
itrea and Djibouti.
Russian Navy headquarters in Aden has been instructed by
Moscow to close the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden to foreign shipping but
to refrain from initiating a naval engagement if at all possible. How-
ever, two days ago a French Mirage attacked and sunk a Russian
merchant ship in the Red Sea which was carrying provisions for Russ-
ian troops in Djibouti. Yesterday, the Russian President declared that
he considered a state of war to exist between his country and the
west. He has ordered his Indian Ocean fleet to interdict the western
sea lanes leading to the oil-rich regions of the Persian Gulf.
Faced with a possible blockage of their precious oil supplies from
the Middle East at the hands of the Russian Navy, western political
leaders are meeting at a secret conference in Paris. Here they have
unanimously agreed that Russian military power in the region must
be neutralized.
_,_,'","":1.:,;.;.;
. ' .
er
A French carrier battle group is situated north of the Sey-
chelles after a long journey around Mrica. American and
British carrier groups are situated in the Gulf of Oman and
North Arabian Sea. Three US Navy submarines have been de-
ployed to the Arabian Sea to support the operation. A French
Mirage squadron is deployed at Djibouti and US Navy P-3C
reconnaissance squadrons are stationed at Diego Garcia,
Mombasa (in Kenya), and Masirah (in Oman).
. . ,. ..

Player
Destroy as many Russian units as possible. Also, destroy
the Russian airfields at Ras Karma, Aden, and Al Mukalla.
FORCES: Red lj
A Russian battle group is operating in the western end of
the Gulf of Aden in support of the ground fighting in Djibouti.
Two other Russian Navy carrier battle groups are deployed in
the vicinity of Socotra island to block the passage of western
ships into the Gulf of Aden. Six Russian submarines are act-
ing as supports for the surface forces. Russian Navy strike,
electronic warfare, and reconnaissance aircraft are deployed
at airfields in Al Mukalla and Aden as well as on the island of
Socotra. Russian and Yemeni Air Force fighter squadrons are
also deployed at these airfields .
OBJECTIVES: Red
Destroy as many US, UK, and French units as possible.
Also, Russian surface and submarine units must occupy the
Gulf of Oman zone at the end of the scenario. Failing that,
they must occupy either the North Arabian Sea or South Ara-
bian Sea zones.
SCENARIO 4
Carrier Raid
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union and America's triumph
in the Persian Gulf War of 1991, few American political leaders felt
any need to preserve the great military machine that had been metic-
ulously built up in the Reagan-Bush years. Although during Bill Clin-
ton's presidency there seemed to be near-universal agreement on
Capitol Hill that America needed sufficient military strength to be ca-
pable of waging two medium-sized regional conflicts simultaneously,
once America's military drawdown gained momentum in the mid-
1990's it continued beyond anyone's expectations. By the time Clin-
ton's successor took over the White House in 1997, few could refute
the fact that the American military would be hard-pressed to wage
even one moderate-sized regional conflict.
Thus, when the United States came to the aid of South Korea upon
the outbreak of the Second Korean War in 1999, it committed virtu-
ally its entire military resources to that conflict. Much to the alarm of
its western allies, America's military commitments in other world
hotspots-particularly the Persian Gulf and Latin America-were al-
most completely abandoned. The Joint Chiefs of Staff rationalized
this policy by declaring that once the Korean War was won, America
would again shoulder its former global military responsibilities.
But amid the recent euphoria triggered by America's decisive de-
feat of the North Korean People's Army, few worried about the conse-
quences of military power vacuums in other areas of the world. Fur-
thermore, no one could predict that China and Russia would reach a
secret military pact that would take advantage of America's new
global military posture. Thus, when the Chinese Army crossed the
Yalu in force and came to the aid of the North Koreans last month-
just as they had done nearly half a century ago-it came as a great
shock to the administration in Washington. Just at the point when
American forces were ready to pull out of Korea, the United States
has now found itself involved in a costly military stalemate that has
sucked in almost all of America's military resources.
Although the Russians are not directly participating in the Second
Korean War, they are providing the North Koreans and Chinese with
large amounts of military hardware. Of more concern to American
military strategists, however, is the Russian military buildup in the
Middle East and Persian Gulf. Major Russian military bases and air-
fields have been constructed in Ethiopia, Yemen, Somalia, and on the
island of Socotra. In the past month the Russians have begun to de-
ploy long-range attack aircraft at these bases whose only purpose can
be to interrupt the flow of oil between the Persian Gulf and the west.
Suspecting that a surprise Russian strike on the major oil fields
and supertankers within the Persian Gulf is about to take place, the
American Joint Chiefs of Staff have decided to take a dramatic step
which could risk widening the conflict from a regional war to a world
war. According to the Joint Chiefs, a blockage of the oil flow out of the
Gulf would cause the American effort in Korea to collapse. Therefore,
in a special meeting with the President, they have recommended pre-
emptive strikes against Russian military bases and warships in the
western Indian Ocean. A US Navy carrier battle group, currently sail-
ing from Norfolk to Korea around the Cape of Good Hope, is in good
position to execute these strikes. The President has concurred. The
operation is about to begin.

.....
Player
A single US Navy carrier battle group is located some-
where in the western Indian Ocean. The group is supported
by a single submarine. P-3C reconnaissance squadrons in
Diego Garcia, Mombasa (in Kenya), and Victoria (in the Sey-
chelles) are supporting the operation.

. .,d l
Player
Destroy the Russian airfields at Aden, Berbera, Mo-
gadishu, Al Mukalla, and Ras Karma. In addition, destroy as
many Russian and Yemeni units as possible.
---
FORCES: Red
Russian and Yemeni combat and support aircraft are de-
ployed at airfields in Aden, Al Mukalla, Berbera, Mogadishu,
and Socotra island. Three small Russian convoys, each con-
sisting of three supply ships and two destroyers, are sailing
for Socotra with critical supplies for the new Russian naval
base at Ras Karma. Three additional Russian surface war-
ships, supported by five submarines, are patrolling the waters
around Socotra .
OBJECTIVES: Red
Russian oilers (AO), ammunition ships (AE), and supply
ships (AOR) must attempt to reach Ras Karma on Socotra is-
land. Also, destroy as many US units as possible.
SCENARIO 5
Locate and Destroy
It was the greatest intelligence coup in American history. For
years the CIA had fostered a "special relationship" with a Russian of-
ficial in the very highest reaches of the Kremlin, but had rarely re-
ceived information of any value. Several months ago, however, this
person had made a few vague promises to American agents about
handing over some documents which would "change forever the way
America views Russia". The American agents were of course in-
trigued. When the Russian official finally dropped the papers into CIA
hands, it was a shock to see how little America knew about the true
workings of the Russian government in the post-Cold War world.
The documents reveal-beyond a shadow of a doubt-that a vio-
lently anti-American faction in the Russian government is exerting
far more influence in international affairs than was thought possible.
Dozens of Russian officials, including members of President Yeltsin's
cabinet, are members of this cabal, and Yeltsin himself apparently
knows nothing of its existence. Over the years, the conspirators have
maintained the lowest possible profile, but have established close con-
tacts with the Russian military, defense industry, and the scientific
community. The plotters are pulling strings beyond the scenes in
preparation for a "silent coup" at the right place and the right time.
It came as a surprise to American intelligence officials that the
conspirators are actually controlling the movement of Russian army
and navy units and ordering the procurement of new military hard-
ware without Yeltsin's knowledge. But by far the most disturbing rev-
elation was that the Russian plotters are actively sponsoring inter-
national terrorism directed at Israel and the west and are using the
Russian military to support this effort. Even worse, the Russians
have apparently made it clear to terrorists and Third World enemies
of the west that they would make sufficient quantities of plutonium
available as long as the terrorists direct their attacks at places and
times of the Russians' choosing.
Among the documents handed over to the CIA is one dated only
eight days ago. It reveals that the infamous Iraqi terrorist "Yoosef the
Terrible" and several members of his terrorist group are currently on-
board the Russian cruiser Ushakov somewhere in the Indian Ocean.
Yoosefis the most wanted terrorist in the world, and is thought to have
masterminded the torture and execution of hundreds of Kuwaitis dur-
ing the Gulf War as well as plotting to kill ex-President George Bush
during his visit to Kuwait in 1993. Even more disturbing is the fact
that the Ushakov is carrying an undetermined amount of plutonium
which will supposedly be dropped off at a port somewhere within the
Indian Ocean region for later delivery to Iraq. CIA intelligence ana-
lysts believe that the port will be in either India, Iran, or Yemen.
Upon learning of this startling intelligence, the President of the
United States has issued immediate orders to the Commander-in-
ChiefCentral Command (CINCCENT): "locate and sink the Ushakov
whatever the cost".
-
" l(
"'-"'" ;.z
Player
A single USN avy carrier battle group has been deployed to
the western Indian Ocean, supported by two submarines. A
squadron ofP-3C reconnaissance aircraft is deployed at Diego
Garcia.
Player
Sink the Ushakou.
SPECIAL NOTE:
Neither player may make cruise missile attacks in this sce-
nario.
FORCES: Red
The Ushakou, accompanied by the new Russian aircraft
carrier Varyag, is situated somewhere northeast of Socotra Is-
land. Two Russian destroyers are currently sailing near Aden,
and two more are in the Strait of Hormuz. Four Indian de-
stroyers are also ready to escort the Ushakou should she sail
east to India. A single Russian submarine is currently on sta-
tion in the Arabian Sea. Indian Air Force reconnaissance air-
craft are patrolling the Indian Ocean and will report their
findings to Russian fleet headquarters at Aden. A Russian
Navy reconnaissance squadron is deployed at Bandar 'Abbas,
Iran; a Tu-26 Backfire regiment is deployed at Aden, sup-
ported by fighters and reconnaissance aircraft.
' 1 '''"' ):L_
OBJECTIVE: Red Pia er.
The Ushakou must reach Aden, Bandar 'Abbas, Bombay, or
Co chin.
SCENARIO 6
Convoy Battles
Tensions between the United States and Russia have been extra-
ordinarily high since the Russian invasion of the Ukraine and Poland
six weeks ago. United States military forces are being deployed to
Germany in numbers even greater than during the Cold War years.
The Russian President has declared this step "an act of war against
the Russian people," and has ordered Russian Navy submarines in
the Atlantic to sink American transports en route to Europe. For the
Russians, this campaign has been remarkably successful, as over
twenty-five American warships and merchant vessels have been sunk
in the past week. The Joint Chiefs of Staff have recommended to the
President of the United States that the movement of troops to Ger-
many be halted for the time being.
Unfortunately, one of the vessels sunk by a Russian submarine
three days ago was the P&O Line's Island Princess, a 1,200-passen-
ger cruise liner en route to Bermuda. In this repeat of the 1915 Lusi-
tania incident, a great many American and Canadian civilians lost
their lives. The American public is clamoring for retribution. Yester-
day, US Air Force F-117 Stealth fighters and B-1 bombers launched
raids against Soviet submarine bases near Murmansk. Claiming over
1,000 civilian casualties, the Russian President has called the raids
the "act of demented fascist warmongers". In an exclusive interview
with the CBS Evening News, the Russian leader declared, "This act
cannot go unpunished. The Americans will now feel the wrath of the
Russian people".
Moscow has decided to hit America where it hurts: in the Persian
Gulf and Indian Ocean. One Russian submarine wolfpack from the
Northern Fleet, consisting offour submarines, has been dispatched to
the Gulf of Oman to attack western supertankers entering and leav-
ing the Persian Gulf. Another wolfpack of six nuclear and three diesel
submarines from the Pacific Fleet has been deployed to the eastern
Indian Ocean to attack tankers transiting the vital Strait of Malacca
and to interdict the US Navy's supply line between the Pacific and its
critical base at Diego Garcia. More than a dozen supertankers and an
equal number US Navy supply ships are currently in this region, so
the Russian submarine captains have more than enough lucrative
targets.
However, the US Navy has not been caught by surprise. Intelli-
gence officers have accurately predicted the areas to which Russian
submarines are transiting and have warned the Chief of Naval Oper-
ations in the Pentagon. The CNO has hastily established a new fleet
with responsibility for the entire Indian Ocean region. It has been
designated the "5th Fleet" in honor of the World War Two fleet that
served with distinction in the Pacific under the command of Admiral
Raymond A. Spruance. The 5th Fleet's first mission is to ensure the
safety of merchant shipping in the eastern Indian Ocean.
Player
Several American supertankers are heading for the Strait
of Malacca. In addition, four large convoys of merchant ships
and US Navy supply vessels are sailing for Diego Garcia with
critical supplies for the US Navy base there. Six surface ac-
tion groups, including one from the Royal Australian Navy,
are in position to escort these convoys to their destinations.
Two US Navy submarines are also on station within there-
gion. Two US Navy P-3C reconnaissance squadrons are de-
ployed to Diego Garcia. An Australian P-3C squadron is sta-
tioned at Banda Aceh airfield on the western tip of Sumatra.
US slow convoys (SC), fast convoys (FC), oilers (AO), am-
munition ships (AE), and supply ships (AOR) must reach
Diego Garcia. US full tankers (FT) must reach the Strait of
Malacca (the eastern edge of the map immediately north of
Indonesia where the name "Strait of Malacca" appears). Also,
destroy as many Russian units as possible.
... . .......
FORCES: Red Plal er.
Eight Russian submarines are situated in the theater.
Three Russian Navy destroyers are replenishing at Colombo
in Sri Lanka. A naval infantry battalion has been embarked
on these three warships. The battalion has been ordered to
Addu Atoll to fortify and defend the small Russian airfield at
that site. A MiG-23 fighter regiment, supported by a Russian
Navy reconnaissance squadron is currently deployed at Addu.
Further north in the Maldives, at Male Atoll, is another air
reconnaissance squadron. Two additional reconnaissance
squadrons are stationed in Sri Lanka. Finally, a Tu-95D
"Bear" reconnaissance squadron is deployed at the small In-
dian airfield at Port Blair in the Andaman Islands.
- -
OBJECTIVES: Red
The three Russian destroyers (DD/DDG) must reach Addu
Atoll. In addition, destroy as many US and Australian units
as possible.
SCENARIO 7
Action in the Bay of Bengal
India and Indonesia have gone to war over the disputed Andaman
and Nicobar Islands, an archipelago in the Bay of Bengal stretching
almost 600 miles on a north-south axis between the western tip of In-
donesia and the southern coast of Myanmar (formerly Burma). India
currently owns both island chains, but as the majority of the island
residents are non-Indian, Indonesia had called upon India to imple-
ment a plebiscite for the islanders to determine their own future.
After India's rejection of this proposal five weeks ago, the government
of Indonesia began to expel thousands of persons of Indian descent
currently residing in Indonesia. Moreover, CNN reported that hun-
dreds of Indians were being massacred in the towns and cities of
western Sumatra.
The Indian government declared that the expulsion of Indian na-
tionals from Indonesia was "an act of war", and began to mobilize its
armed forces. Over the past two weeks air and ground reinforcements
have streamed into the Andamans and Nicobars to fortify the islands
against a possible Indonesian attack. Furthermore, the newly elected
fascist government of Russia has offered full military support to India
in the current crisis in exchange for free Russian use of Indian mili-
tary bases in the Andamans and Nicobars after the war.
In the United States, senior CIA officials have declared to the
President that the Russians must not be permitted to establish a
strong military presence in this region because they would then con-
trol the western approaches to the vital Strait of Malacca. This strait
is one of the busiest bodies of water in the world, and through it flows
virtually all the oil imported by Japan from the Persian Gulf. Block-
age of this strait, the CIA insists, would cripple the Japanese economy
which would in turn trigger a disastrous economic collapse in North
America and Europe. The President, who is vitally concerned with
improving his shockingly low approval rating, has determined to
make a tough stand against the Russians. During a nationally tele-
vised speech, he has evoked the spirit of John F. Kennedy in the
Cuban Missile Crisis and George Bush in the Persian Gulf War, de-
claring that the new fascist Russian government "must not push the
United States too far".
With over 150 million people, Indonesia is the world's fifth most
populous country, but most Americans have virtually no knowledge of
this archipelago nation. From both liberal and conservative circles in
the United States, there has been an outcry that no vital American in-
terests are at stake in this remote region of the world. Nevertheless,
the President is determined not to back down. Should the Russians
persist in participating in the war between India and Indonesia, the
President has ordered the Commander-in-Chief, Central Command
(CINCCENT) to deploy naval and air forces to the eastern Indian
Ocean in sufficient strength to crush Russian military power in that
region once and for all.
j
l
' ,.. :. r. '- - Player
One US Navy carrier battle group is sailing from the Per-
sian Gulf and is currently southeast of Sri Lanka. Another
carrier battle group is located southwest of Sumatra. An In-
donesian surface battle group is operating in the western ap-
proaches to the Strait of Malacca. An Australian task force is
proceeding to the theater and is currently situated south of
Sumatra. One Royal Australian Navy and three US Navy sub-
marines are currently deployed to the region. A P-3C recon-
naissance squadron is stationed at the US base on Diego Gar-
cia. At the Banda Aceh airfield on the western tip of Sumatra
are two additional P-3C squadrons (including an Australian
squadron) and three combat squadrons from a US Marine
Corps air wing.
J ' ( ' .
.. .
n Player
Destroy the Russian airfields at Port Blair and Car Nicobar.
The US CVN Lincoln and the CV America must end the game
within bombing range (of an F/A-18E) of Port Blair. In addi-
tion, destroy as many Russian and Indian units as possible.
A large Indian Navy task force, including two aircraft car-
riers, has just departed the navy base at Vishakapatnam. A
Russian Navy carrier group from the Pacific fleet is currently
situated near the Andaman Islands. A second Russian carrier
battle group from the Northern fleet has just arrived in the
theater and is located north of Sri Lanka. In the event that
Pakistan should enter the conflict, most of India's air force
and its entire submarine fleet are deployed in northwest India
and the Arabian Sea and are therefore unavailable in the up-
coming battle in the eastern Indian Ocean. However, five
Russian Navy submarines are on station in the theater. Russ-
ian long-range strike aircraft, supported by fighter, electronic
warfare, and reconnaissance units, are deployed to airfields at
Calcutta, Yangon (Rangoon), Car Nicobar (in the Nicobar Is-
lands) and Port Blair (in the Andaman Islands).
Destroy as many US, Indonesian, and Australian units as
possible.
SCENARIO 8
Convoys to Iran
Six weeks ago, Russian ground forces, with the assistance of the
Serbian (formerly Yugoslav) Army, launched a surprise invasion of
Bosnia, Slovenia, and Croatia. Despite vigorous debate in the United
Nations, no action was taken by the Security Council except for a
mildly worded resolution condemning human rights violations com-
mitted by both sides in the Balkans. In Brussels, the NATO powers
have gathered to discuss the feasibility of a military response, but
there is little enthusiasm for joining a Balkans war which could con-
ceivably last for a decade. Even so, the President of the United States
has ordered the Joint Chiefs of Staff to commit more than 150,000
American soldiers and airmen to Germany.
To draw American attention away from the Balkans, the Russians
have planned a diversionary political campaign in the Indian Ocean
and Persian Gulf. Moscow has just concluded a military alliance with
Indonesia and has strongly supported Indonesia's claim to the An-
daman and Nicobar Islands, currently held by India. The Russians
have committed much of their naval strength to the Indian Ocean re-
gion with the full knowledge that the Americans would become con-
cerned about the supposed threat to the Persian Gulf shipping lanes.
Furthermore, the Russians have engineered a coup in Iran, top-
pling the twenty-year reign of the Islamic clerics. The violently anti-
American Tudeh party has assumed power. With Iranian hatred for
the United States at a fever-pitch even before the coup, the Russians
found it simple enough to initiate Iranian attacks against European
and American shipping in the Persian Gulf. According to Moscow,
each American tank and warship drawn to the Middle East will be
one less force that will be capable of influencing the Balkans struggle.
The Russian-sponsored coup in Iran has caused the President of
the United States to commit most of his rapid deployment forces to
Iran to ensure free shipping passage through the vital Strait of Hor-
muz. The 82nd Airborne and lOlst Air Assault Divisions have seized
the Iranian port ofBandar 'Abbas on the northern shore of the strait,
and thousands of pro-American Iranians have fled their homes to the
American enclave there. The Joint Chiefs of Staff have organized a
massive sealift to the Persian Gulfto provide logistical support for the
troops at Bandar 'Abbas. Furthermore, two US Navy amphibious
ready groups (ARG), carrying the equivalent of nearly a brigade of US
Marines, are sailing for the Gulf to reinforce the American enclave.
The Prime Minister of Great Britain has offered support to the Pres-
ident, and has dispatched a Royal Navy task force to the region.
The President of Russia has ordered his Indian Ocean fleet to es-
tablish a blockade of the Persian Gulf, thereby closing the only life-
line for the American troops in Iran. Should the Russians succeed in
this campaign, it will be a humiliating defeat for the US Navy.
- ~ . ,.
" '
'
A US Navy carrier battle group is situated about 700 miles
northeast of the Seychelles. A fast convoy of SL-7 container-
ships, escorted by four frigates, is sailing northward about
200 miles east of the coast of Somalia. A convoy of MPS (mar-
itime prepositioning) ships, carrying enough equipment to
a US Marine brigade for two weeks of active opera-
twos, IS located off the horn of Africa under the escort of four
Royal Navy warships. A second MPS convoy, escorted by two
US Navy frigates, is about 250 miles west of Male Atoll in the
Two US Navy amphibious ready groups, each car-
rymg a marine expeditionary unit (MEU, or heavily rein-
forced battalion), are entering the southern portion of the Ara-
bian Sea en route to the Persian Gulf. Two US Navy sub-
are on station in the Indian Ocean to support the op-
eratwn. In the Gulf of Oman and the Persian Gulf are two
squadrons of US Navy minesweepers. At Masirah airfield in
Oman is a composite US Air Force wing consisting of an F-
16C an F-15E squadron, supported by a US Navy P-3C
reconnaissance squadron. At Dubai, near the western ap-
proaches to the Strait of Hormuz, are elements of a US Ma-
rine Corps air wing supported by a second P-3C squadron .
.. 1'i!;\. "'""":""'
,..r-'!& ..
Player
US fas.t (FC), maritime prepositioning (MPS), and
all amphibwus assault units (LHD, LPD, LSD, and LHA)
must reach Bandar 'Abbas. Failing that, they must attempt to
reach Masirah (in Oman), Muscat (in the United Arab Emi-
rates), or Jiwani (in Pakistan). In addition, destroy as many
Russian units as possible.

FORCES: Red
.Two powerful Russian carrier battle groups are in position
to Imple.ment a ?locka de of the Persian Gulf. One group is cur-
rently situated m the northern part of the Arabian Sea and a
second is located near Socotra island. Six Russian
are also in the theater. Long-range Russian strike aircraft,
supported by fighter, reconnaissance and electronic warfare
units, are deployed at airfields in Aden (in Yemen) Ras Karma
(on Socotra island), and Yazd (in Iran). A reconnais-
sance squadron is located at Al Mukalla airfield in Yemen.
OBJECTIVE: Red
Destroy as many US and British units as possible.
SCENARIO 9
Indian Ocean Sideshow
The recent controversy concerning the construction of nuclear
bombs by North Korea has suddenly erupted into war following a sur-
prise attack across the 38th Parallel by the North Korean People's
Army. Reports from the front are sketchy, but the North Koreans are
apparently making a massive effort to rupture the South Korean line
north of Seoul. US Army troops from the 2nd Infantry Division are al-
ready heavily engaged, and the President of the United States has or-
dered fresh American ground and air forces to deploy to South Korea.
Meanwhile, the US Navy has initiated a blockade of the North Ko-
rean coast.
In the United Nations, the Russian ambassador has claimed that
more than 200 Russian sailors were killed when the US Navy sank
three Russian freighters outside Wonsan. The commander of the
American 7th Fleet, however, has declared that the "freighters" were
actually Russian Grisha class corvettes escorting North Korean ves-
sels to the Russian port of Vladivostok. According to the official Amer-
ican account, the Russian warships fired at and shot down two US
Navy F-18C's which were attacking the North Korean ships. A later
wave ofF -18's attacked and sank all three Russian vessels.
A hawkish faction within the Kremlin has recommended that
Russian naval forces throughout the world take punitive measures
against American warships and seaborne commerce. Perceiving the
American sensitivity about maintaining the freedom of the seas in the
Persian Gulf over the past two decades, the Russian president has di-
rected Russian naval and air forces to harass American shipping in
the Indian Ocean region, particularly in the Gulf.
Western European nations have declared their neutrality in the
Korean conflict and, in fact, have openly criticized Washington's deci-
sion to fully mobilize American Reserve and National Guard forces.
Although most European oil originates in the Persian Gulf, European
leaders have refused to send naval forces into the Indian Ocean to
protect the sea lanes against potential Russian attacks. Said the
President of France at a news conference: "America is no longer the
world's policeman, and US escalatory action in the Indian Ocean is
only provoking a Russian response. If we leave them alone, the Rus-
sians will simply not bother us".
Even as the French President spoke, a Russian Tu-26 Backfire
bomber was launching AS-4 Kitchen air-to-surface missiles against
the French supertanker Ile-de-France in the Strait of Hormuz. The
Second Korean War had rapidly grown into a world war.
With no allied navies available and much of America's seapower
committed to the North Korean blockade, the US Navy's 5th Fleet
must stand alone in the Indian Ocean for at least the next two weeks
against the Russians. In private, congressmen are warning the Pres-
ident that a quick naval victory in the Indian Ocean is of paramount
importance, for the American public will not tolerate a protracted war
on two fronts.
: Green Player
A large US Navy carrier battle group is escorting an am-
phibious ready group in the Arabian Sea. A Marine expedi-
tionary unit is embarked onboard the "amphibs." A surface ac-
tion group, including the refurbished battleship USS Mis-
souri, is located about 600 miles northeast of Diego Garcia.
Four submarines are also deployed in the theater. Several
convoys of tankers, maritime prepositioning ships, freighters,
and US Navy supply ships are scattered over the region. Until
recently these unescorted convoys were highly vulnerable to
enemy attack, but at the insistence of the Chief of Naval Op-
erations, many US Navy frigates were wisely diverted from
the Pacific to the Indian Ocean and have recently joined the
merchant ships as escorts. There are also two squadrons of
American minesweepers in and near the Persian Gulf. Within
the theater are four US Navy P-3C reconnaissance squadrons:
two at Diego Garcia, one at Masirah, and another in Mom-
basa. The last surviving B-52G squadron in the US Air Force
has been hastily deployed to Diego Garcia. An Air Force com-
posite wing, including a squadron of new F-22A fighters, has
just transferred from the United States to the AI Muharraq
airfield in Bahrain, accompanied by an F-15C squadron which
has deployed to nearby Abu Dhabi. Elements of a US Marine
Corps air wing are stationed at the Salalah airfield on the
Arabian Sea coast of Oman, and another Marine fighter
squadron and an Air Force F -117 A Stealth fighter squadron
are in Muscat. Far away on the other side of the Indian Ocean
is another US Air Force composite wing at the Banda Aceh
airfield on the western tip of Sumatra.
"'""';
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,}:liiia;;

All US amphibious assault units (LHD, LPD, LSD, but not
the LHA Tarawa) and maritime prepositioning ships (MPS)
must reach Socotra island (the island on which the Russian
Ras Karma airfield is situated). Failing that, the amphibious
assault and MPS units must reach Raysut or Salalah (both on
the Omani coast in the Socotra zone). US full tanker units
(FT) must reach the Strait ofMalacca (the eastern edge of the
map immediately north of Indonesia where the name "Strait
of Malacca" appears). US empty tanker (ET) units must reach
Kuwait, Ras al Mishab, AI Jubayl, Ras Tannurah, or AI Man-
amah (all of which are situated in the Persian Gulf zone). US
fast convoy (FC) and slow convoy (SC) units must reach Diego
Garcia, which is in the Chagos Archipelago zone. In addition,
destroy as many Russian units as possible.
SPECIAL NOTES:
US surface and submarine units may only perform in-port
replenishment in AI Manamah (in Bahrain), Muscat (in
Oman), Diego Garcia (in the Chagos Archipelago zone), and
Mombasa (in Kenya). Russian surface and submarine units
may only perform in-port replenishment in Massawa (in
Ethiopia), Aden (in Yemen), Ras Karma (on Socotra island),
and Vishakapatnam (on the northeast coast of India).
FORCESi Red
A Russian carrier battle group is operating in the vicinity
of Socotra island, and a second carrier group is situated in the
Bay of Bengal somewhere near the Nicobar Islands. A task
force of four destroyers and frigates is sailing in the Gulf of
Aden after having escorted a group of oilers, supply ships, and
minesweepers to the naval base at Aden. An oiler and ammu-
nition ship have just arrived at Car Nicobar from the Soviet
naval base at Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam to provide logistical
support to the carrier group in the Bay of Bengal. Ten sub-
marines are dispersed throughout the Indian Ocean. Several
squadrons of long-range attack aircraft, fighters, reconnais-
sance aircraft and electronic warfare aircraft are operating
from airfields in Yemen, including the airfield at Ras Karma
on Socotra island. The pro-Russian Iranian government has
given permission for Russian air units to operate from Iranian
airfields, and long-range attack and reconnaissance aircraft
(including Navy Tu-26 Backfires) have been hastily deployed
to Shiraz, Yazd, and Zahedan. In the eastern Indian Ocean,
one reconnaissance and two fighter squadrons are operating
from the Indian airfield at Car Nicobar. Three more squadrons
. are based at the Yangon (Rangoon) international airport.
Destroy as many US units as possible.
SCENARIO 10
The Indian Ocean War
It all began in December 1997 in the Crimea. The breakup of the
Soviet Union in the early 1990's had triggered many major political
disputes between the old Soviet republics, but none as vitriolic as the
crisis between Russia and the Ukraine over control of the former
Black Sea Fleet at Sevastopol. Over the years several attempts had
been made to defuse the powder keg, leaving neither government sat-
isfied. Then, shortly before Christmas in 1997, the charismatic
Crimean nationalist, Yuri Meshkov, took matters into his own hands
by ordering the Crimean militia to seize all former Soviet Navy ships
at Sevastopol currently under Ukrainian control.
The President of the Ukraine, Leonid Kravchuk, responded imme-
diately, directing the Ukrainian Army to reseize the warships. A fierce
struggle ensued in Sevastopol between the Ukrainians and Meshkov's
Crimeans, resulting in high casualties on both sides. Right-wing
Russian nationalists in Moscow urged Boris Yeltsin, the President of
Russia, to support the Crimean nationalists with arms and ammuni-
tion-and even troops. Despite Yeltsin's condemnation of the Ukrain-
ian attack on Sevastopol, he stopped short of actively supporting
Meshkov's Crimean nationalists.
Yeltsin's failure to act in the Crimea was the last straw for the
hard-line right-wing faction in Moscow. With the Russian economy in
a shambles and Yeltsin's popularity among the Russian people at an
all-time low, the fascist leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky found it remark-
ably easy to stage a bloodless coup and oust Yeltsin and his few re-
maining government loyalists. Much to the delight of the Russian
people, Yeltsin fled Moscow for America, and for six or seven weeks
was a frequent guest on the American daytime TV talk show circuit.
He then passed into history.
Under Zhirinovsky, the Russian armed forces underwent a com-
plete renaissance. Eighteen months after the coup, the Russian mili-
tary was again a formidable fighting force with international power
projection capabilities equal to the height of the former communist
regime. On CNN, Zhirinovsky guaranteed that the "Russian people
will gain the greatness that they richly deserve in the 21st century,
and Russians will dominate the world for the next thousand years as
Rome dominated the world two thousand years ago". In Russia, Zhiri-
novsky is now more popular than any leader in recent Russian history.
Altering its traditional focus on Europe, Russia has concentrated
much of its attention on the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Early
this year the Russians signed a twenty-year military alliance with
India. Under the provisions of this treaty, the Russians are to provide
India with vast quantities of new military equipment, and both coun-
tries have agreed to come to each other's aid in the event that either
is attacked.
The new Russian diplomacy has been remarkably successful. After
a decade of instability within Mghanistan following the Soviet with-
drawal in 1988, the Russian Army invaded Mghanistan again in far
greater strength-and with far greater ruthlessness-than before.
After the closing of the Mghanistan-Pakistan border and the subse-
quent defeat of the meager Mghan guerrilla forces, Zhirinovsky re-
cently installed a puppet government in Kabul.
Meanwhile, Zhirinovsky has made a major diplomatic effort to win
over the Middle East. Following the overthrow ofthe Iranian mullahs
in a populist revolution last year, Iran was thrown into chaos. Al-
though the vast majority of the populace regarded the United States
and the west with favor, the pro-Russian Tudeh party ruthlessly elim-
inated opposition leaders and intimidated voters. Openly supported
by Russian arms and covertly aided by former agents of the KGB, the
Tudeh group eventually emerged as Iran's strongest faction. Th help
maintain control over an unsupportive Iranian populace, the Tudeh
leaders recently invited the Russians to establish military bases in
Iran. Of course, this was just the opportunity Zhirinovsky was wait-
ing for, and Russian ground and air forces rapidly occupied the north-
ern two-thirds of the country.
Zhirinovsky has also taken advantage of a similar political situa-
tion in Yemen, which had been in chaos ever since the 1994 civil war
between the socialist-oriented southern region and the religiously
conservative north. The Russians have used their support of the south
as an excuse to establish a major military presence in the Gulf of
Aden. Indeed, they have just completed new naval and air bases at
Aden, Al Mukalla, and on Socotra island.
Much to the Russians' surprise, the United States and western Eu-
ropean powers have reacted decisively to Russian intervention in
Mghanistan and the Middle East. American rapid deployment forces
have been sea-lifted and air-lifted to southern Iran to support the pro-
western factions within that country. Furthermore, the President of
the United States has declared that any Russian attempt to interfere
with international shipping in the Persian Gulf and Strait of Hormuz
will be considered an act of war. The British and French governments
have actively supported the President, and significant US, British,
and French naval forces are now deployed throughout the Indian
Ocean region. For the President, the security of the supply line be-
tween the American forces in Iran and their distant supply bases is of
paramount importance. The nearest American supply base, Diego
Garcia, is over 2,500 miles away by sea from the Persian Gulf.
Following a dramatic three-week diplomatic showdown in the
United Nations between Russia and the west, during which no mili-
tary action between the two sides took place, the situation took a
sharp turn for the worse when Indian military forces suddenly in-
vaded Pakistan and decisively defeated the Pakistani Army in the
opening battles of the war. Furthermore, the Indian Navy imple-
mented a tight blockade of Pakistani ports to prevent American re-
placement of destroyed or captured Pakistani military equipment.
According to the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, a major Pakistani defeat
would be catastrophic to American Middle East policy. Even before
the Indo-Pakistani war, the US and western European navies fre-
quently used Pakistani port facilities due to their proximity to the
Persian Gulf. The loss of these facilities would significantly hamper
naval operations in the western Indian Ocean. Even worse, Indian
seizure of key Pakistani military bases could conceivably result in
Russian use of Pakistani airfields, an event which would in all likeli-
hood make the American military position in the Persian Gulf unten-
able. Therefore, despite the Indian blockade, the President of the
United States has ordered the deployment of a US Marine division to
Pakistan to protect the key port and air facilities on the Arabian Sea.
The President and his European allies, however, were unprepared
for Russia's next move. Claiming that America's direct support of Pak-
istan amounted to an act of war against Russia's firmest ally, India,
the Russian President has ordered the Russian army of occupation in
Afghanistan to invade Pakistan from the north. Furthermore, Russ-
ian naval forces in the Indian Ocean have been heavily reinforced and
placed in a high state of readiness should the United States and its al-
lies decide to respond militarily-a response considered highly un-
likely by Moscow.
The President has labeled the Russian invasion of Pakistan a "de-
spicable stab in the back-an act that will not be permitted to stand".
The President's senior advisors, however, have warned him that an
escalatory step by the United States would result in war between the
superpowers. With the American military of the late 1990's so unpre-
pared for global conflict, the President's options are limited. However,
against the advice of many members of the National Security Coun-
cil, the President has decided to commit every military force at his dis-
posal to the Indian Ocean region. It is a gamble, but the President's
firm hope is that war, should it occur, will be short and confined to the
Indian Ocean.
The green player has one Royal Navy, one French Navy,
and three US Navy carrier battle groups in the Indian Ocean.
The US Navy's Lincoln carrier group, currently situated in
the Gulf of Oman, is accompanied by the refurbished battle-
ship USS Missouri and is escorting an amphibious ready
group (ARG) of five amphibious assault ships with US
Marines onboard. The Washington carrier group, situated in
the eastern Indian Ocean, is escorting another ARG. A third
ARG is located at the American base at Diego Garcia along
with an assortment of US Navy frigates, destroyers, maritime
prepositioning ships, an ammunition ship and an oiler. Also at
Diego Garcia is a combined US Air Force-US Navy air wing,
consisting of a B-52G squadron, an F -15C squadron, and two
P-3C reconnaissance squadrons.
In the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea, the navies and air
forces of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Pak-
istan, and the United Arab Emirates are actively supporting
the western powers in the campaign and have given permis-
sion for American and British air units to operate from their
airfields. In the western Indian Ocean, the allies have estab-
lished airfields at Victoria (in the Seychelles), Mombasa (in
Kenya), and at Djibouti. A US Marine Corps air wing and a
US Air Force fighter squadron are deployed at the American
enclave in Bandar 'Abbas, Iran. Nearby, at Bandar-e Lengeh,
are two US Navy supply ships, a minesweeper group, and two
frigates. Several escorted and unescorted convoys of American
supertankers and freighters are scattered over the region,
sailing as quickly as possible for friendly waters. The Indone-
sian government is allowing the allies to use the Banda Aceh
airfield at the western tip of Sumatra. A US Air Force com-
posite fighter wing has deployed there, accompanied by Amer-
ican and Australian P-3C reconnaissance squadrons. Just off
the western tip of Sumatra is a US Navy underway replen-
ishment group (URG), consisting of three supply ships and
four escorts. Finally, fifteen American, British, French, Aus-
tralian, and Pakistani submarines are currently on patrols in
the Indian Ocean.
(continued on the back of the Screen Flow Chart card)
Continued from Scenario 1 0 ..
. ---
FORCES: Red
A Russian carrier battle group is deployed near Socotra is-
land, supported by supply ships, escorting frigates, and
minesweepers. A second Russian carrier group is situated in
the Bay of Bengal and is supported by supply ships and es-
corts at Trincomalee, Sri Lanka. The Indian Navy has com-
mitted both of its carrier groups to the campaign: one is de-
ployed on India's east coast and the other on the west coast.
The Indian Navy's smaller surface combatants are stationed
on the west coast at Karwar and on the east coast at Vishaka-
patnam. A flotilla of Russian Navy minesweepers, frigates,
and supply ships is currently docked at Aden. Although most
of the Indian Air Force is committed on the Pakistani front,
several combat and reconnaissance squadrons have deployed
to southern India (as well as to the Male Atoll airfield in the
Maldives) and have been ordered to support Russian and In-
dian naval operations in the Indian Ocean.
Yemen, Ethiopia, and Iran have offered the services oftheir
air forces and navies to the Russians. Furthermore, in Yemen
the Russians have established major airfields at Aden, Al
Mukalla, and on Socotra island. In Iran, the Russians have
deployed several long-range attack, fighter, and support
squadrons at Esfahan, Yazd, Zahedan, and Kerman. In the
eastern Indian Ocean, the Indian government has given per-
mission for Russian aircraft to operate from airfields in the
Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The Russians have also de-
ployed an air wing to Yangon (Rangoon), Burma. Finally,
twenty-six Russian, Indian, and Iranian submarines are cur-
rently scattered over the Indian Ocean region.
' 0
0
All US amphibious assault units (LHD, LPD, LSD, LHA,
LPH) and maritime prepositioning ships (MPS) must reach
any (or all) of the following ports:
Bandar 'Abbas (in Iran), or
Bandar-e Lengeh (in Iran), or
Karachi (in Pakistan), or
Port Blair (in the Adaman Islands), or
Car Nicobar (in the Nl.cobar Islands).
Failing that, they must reach:
Muscat (in Oman), and/or
Banda Aceh (in Sumatra).
US full tanker (FT) units must reach the Strait ofMalacca
(the eastern edge of the map immediately north oflndonesia
where the name "Strait of Malacca" appears).
US empty tanker (ET) units must reach Kuwait, Ras al
Mishab, Al Jubayl, Ras Tannurah, and/or Al Manamah (all of
which are situated in the Persian Gulf zone).
US fast convoy (FC) and slow convoy (SC) units must reach
Diego Garcia, which is in the Chagos Archipelago zone.
In addition, destroy as many enemy units as possible.
OBJECTIVE: Red Player-
Destroy as many enemy units as possible.
SPECIAL NOTES:
The green player's surface and submarine units may only
perform in-port replenishment in Kuwait, Al Jubayl (in Saudi
Arabia), Al Manamah (in Bahrain), Muscat (in Oman), Diego
Garcia (in the Chagos Archipelago zone), Djibouti (in the Gulf
of Aden zone), and Mombasa (in Kenya). The red player's sur-
face and submarine units may only perform in-port replenish-
ment in Massawa (in Ethiopia), Aden (in Yemen), Ras Karma
(on Socotra island), Vishakapatnam (on the northeast coast of
India), Madras (on India's east coast), Bombay, and Cochin
(both on India's west coast).
This chart shows which screens can be accessed from other screens. 5TH FLEET is played from
the Ops Display, which can be accessed from the Scenarios screen. Once in the Ops Display, you can reach several other game
screens, and you can even go back to the Tactical Reference Display to access "real world" and game information. In addition to the
five main screens accessed from the Ops Display (Strategic, Options, etc.), the Combat screen is displayed when you click on an
enemy unit to attack it, and the Battle Results Display screen is automatically shown by the computer after a battle takes place.
This is the first screen
that appears in the game.
System Config's
This screen allows you to ad-
just your computer's sound
and E-Mail settings.
This screen is used to select
one of ten scenarios.
Ops Display
The game is played from
this screen. Movement
and attacks are plotted
here. I
I
I
..., _____ _
Tactical Referance
This screen provides both
"real world" and game data
for the units in play.
~
l . ./' !
, _ - - , ~ i
- : ___ -tJ
Strategic
Display
Used to show
locations of all
spotted units.
Options
Used to
customize
game settings.
Tactical
Display
Used to form
and disband
grouped units.
Air
Missions
Used to send
air units on
strategic air
missions.
Victory
Used to show
each side's
victory level.
Loading Instructions: IBM PC &.. 1 00/o Compatibles
Contents:
Your 5TH FLEET package should contain:
Five 3.5" Floppy Disks
5TH FLEET Game Guide
5TH FLEET Reference Manual
5TH FLEET Player Aid Map
Loading Instructions
Scenario Cards & Hot Keys Card
Registration Card
Inside Minimum Requirements:
PC compatible 386SX or better
4MB RAM or better for best results
Hard Drive space with 11 + MB free
3
1
/ 2" HD Floppy Drive
MS-DOS v5.0 or higher
VGA Graphics Card
Microsoft-compatible Mouse
Minimum System Requirements for Sound:
4MB Total RAM
1MB of EMS and 590K Conventional Memory
Available
SoundBlaster or 100% SoundBlaster-compati-
ble sound card.
After installing 5TH FLEET, we recom-
mend you take some time to become famil-
iar with the Game Guide. However, if you
are anxious to start immediately, you can
read through the glossary in the back of the
guide and review the screen flowchart card
to understand the "basics."
...J 1-)t, I
hi T'st
Important!
Check the README.TXT file for last
minute changes.
The Avalon Hill Game Company
DIVISION OF MONARCH AVALON. INC.
4517 Harford Road, Baltimore, MD 21214
1994 Printed in USA All Rights Reserved
lt'l0"7A AIW\'11\o:..ti\A 1111)AA A
STANLEY
ASSOCIATES
To Install 5TH FLEET
5TH FLEET includes an Installation program which decompresses the data from the diskettes supplied with the game
and transfers it to your hard drive. 5TH FLEET must be installed on your hard drive before you can begin play.
1. Make sure you have at least 11MB of free disk space on your hard drive. For saving games, make sure additional HD
space is available.
2. Put the disk labeled "5TH FLEET Disk 1" into your floppy disk drive (A or B).
3. Type A: orB: (location of Disk 1) then press the [ENTER] key.
4. Type Install then press the [ENTER] key.
5. Follow the on-screen prompts.
Memory Notes for DOS 5. 0 Users
Beyond the Minimum Memory Require-
ment guides, we strongly recommend that
you not have unneeded TSRs active while
playing 5TH FLEET. This will help free up
more memory for the program. To find the
amount and type of memory you have avail-
able, type MEM/C at the DOS prompt. Here
is an example (DOS 5.0):
This tells you that you have 594.8K bytes
Free Conventional memory, and 7,274,496
bytes free XMS memory. This is enough to
run 5TH FLEET.
5TH FLEET is compatible with most
common memory managers, including
HIMEM.SYS, EMM386, QEMM, and
386MAX.
Conventional Memory:
~ Size in Qe!;;irn!;l !
MSDOS 14144 (13.8K)
HIM EM 11 84 ( 1 .2K)
ANSI 4192 (4.1K)
COMMAND 4416 (4.3K)
MOUSE 11440 ( 11 .2K)
UNIVBE 3920 (3.8K)
COMMAND 3408 ( 3.3K)
FREE 609024 (594.8K)
Total FREE: 609024 (594.8K)
Total bytes available to programs:
Largest executable program size:
Size io l : l e ~
3740
4AO
1060
1140
2CBO
FSO
DSO
94800
609024 (594.8K)
608480 (594.2K) Make sure you have configured your ma-
chine to have EMS memory avai lable. The
two "DEVICE" li nes in your CONFIG.SYS
file should look something like thjs:
7340032 bytes total contiguous extended memory
DEVICE=HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=EMM386.EXE 1024 RAM
For furt her information on how to config-
ure your XMS/EMS memory usage, please
consul t your DOS Manual, or your Memory
Manager's Manual.
0 bytes available contiguous extended memory
7274496 bytes available XMS memory
MS-DOS resident in High Memory Area
IBM is a trademark of International Business Machines, Inc.
SoundBi aster is a trademark of Creative Labs, Inc.
Memory Notes for DOS 6. 0 or Higher Users
Beyond the Minimum Memory Requirement guides, we strongly recommend that you not have unneeded TSRs active while pl ay-
ing 5TH FLEET. This will help free up more memory for the program. To find the amount and type of memory you have available, type
MEM/C/P at the DOS prompt. Here is an example (DOS 6.22):
Modules using memory below 1 MB:
t:l.a.r:!N I.Q.ta!
MSDOS 16,029 (16K)
HIMEM 1,168 (1 K)
EMM386 3,1 20 (3K)
COMMAND 2,928 (3K)
MOUSE 24,608 (24K)
Total FREE: 609024 (594.8K)
Memory Summary:
I :ll12!l Qf MemQr:l I.Q.ta!
Conventional 655,360
Upper 93,024
Reserved 393,216
Z.21Z,QQB
Total memory 8,388,608
Total under 1 MB 748,384
Total Expanded (EMS)
Free Expanded (EMS)
+ Ugge[
16,029 (16K) 0 (OK)
1,1 68 ( 1 K) 0 (OK)
3,120 (3K) 0 (OK)
2,928 (3K) 0 (OK)
272 (24K) 24,336
---
Uill +
23,648
24,336
393,216
196.BQQ
938,000
47,984
7,667,712
6,995,968
.E.me
631,712
68,688
0
6.Z5Q,2QB
7,450,608
700,400
(7,488K)
(6,832K)
Largest executable program size 631 ,488 ( 61 7K)
Largest free upper memory block 68,688 (67K)
MS-DOS is resident in the high memory area
Sound
To see how much free conventional memory
you have, look at the "Largest executable pro-
gram size" line. To see how much EMS memory
you have, look at the "Free Expanded " line.
5TH FLEET is compatible with most common
memory managers, including HIMEM.SYS,
EMM386, QEMM, and 386MAX.
Make sure you have configured your machine
to have EMS memory available. The two "DE-
VICE" lines in your CONFIG.SYS file should
look something like this:
DEVICE=HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=EMM386.EXE 1024 RAM
For example, if you had 8MB of total RAM on
your system, you would have 6.9 MB of EMS
memory avai lable set up by EMM386.
For further information on how to configure
your XMS/EMS memory usage, please consult
your DOS Manual, or your Memory Manager's
Manual.
5TH FLEET has an automatic sound card detect ion routine. Once you have completed the installation process, you start up the game using
the FLEET.EXE fi le. The game wi ll ask if you have a SoundBiaster compatible card. Click on "yes" or "no" accordi ngly. If "yes" is se-
lected, the auto-detection routine wi ll execute, search for, and adj ust 5TH FLEET to your sound card. If "no" is selected, the game wi!J ex-
ecute and bypass the sound detection routi ne. If you decide to use a sound card later, delete the fi le "FLEET.PRF'. Then, restart 5TH FLEET
and click on "yes" at the sound card prompt. If you encounter problems wi th sound effects, SoundBlaster owners should check the
BLASTER setti ngs, and Gravis users should check the ULTRASND settings in AUTOEXEC.BAT.
Installing from a CD:
If you own the CD version of 5TH FLEET, you can install the game to your hard drive. This method is recommended for best results.
5TH FLEET can also be played from the CD itself (although this method wi ll not resul t in optimal game play).
To install 5TH FLEET to the hard drive:
1. Log onto your CD drive, type D: then press [ENTER].
2. At the prompt, type INSTALL then press [ENTER].
3. Follow the on-screen prompts to complete the install ati on.
To play 5TH FLEET from the CD:
1. Log onto your CD drive, type D: then press [ENTER]
2. Type in FLEET, press [ENTER] and the game begins.
Having Memory Problems or Hardware Conflicts?
... &Peate a Boot Disk!
1. You will need a 3'/z" blank, high-density floppy disk.
2. You must be in DOS at the "C:/>" prompt.
3. Change directories to DOS by typing CD DOS and press [ENTER].
4. At the "DOS" prompt type FORMAT A:/S and press [ENTER]. This will format the blank disk as a Systems Disk (or, in other words, a
"Boot Disk").
5. Now follow the on-screen prompts. Once the formatting process is complete press theN key (to tell the computer you do not want to for-
mat another disk) [ENTER].
6. At the "DOS" prompt type A: and press [ENTER] .
7. At the "A:/>" prompt type EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT and press [ENTER].
8. You should now see a blank (probably blue) screen which is the DOS Editor screen.
9. Use the blinking cursor to type the following lines:
PROMPT $P$G [ENTER]
PATH C:\DOS; [ENTER]
LH C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.EXE [ENTER]
(NOTE: leave a blank line here for your mouse driver; just press:} [ENTER]
C: [ENTER]
CD C:\FLEET [ENTER]
FLEET
10. After typing the above lines, use your mouse to click on the "FILE" pull-down menu and select "SAVE".
11. Once saved, use the "FILE" pull-down menu, select "EXIT" to return to the "A:/>" prompt.
12. At the "A:/>" prompt type EDIT CONFIG.SYS [ENTER]. You should now see the same blank (blue) screen.
13. Using the same methods of step 9 (above), type the following lines:
DEVlCE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS [ENTER]
DEV1CE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE 1024 RAM I=B000-B7FF [ENTER]
DOS=IDGH, UMB [ENTER]
FCBS=4,0 [ENTER]
STACKS=9,256 [ENTER]
BUFFERS = 30,0 [ENTER]
FILES= 40,0 [ENTER]
SHELL=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM C:\DOS /E:512/P
{NOTE: the following line isn't necessary if you haven't compressed your hard drive}
DEVICEIDGH=C:\DOS\DBLSPACE.SYS /MOVE [ENTER]
14. After typing the above lines, use your mouse to click on the "FILE" pull-down menu and select "SAVE".
15. Once saved, use the "FILE" pull-down menu, select "EXIT" to return to the "A: />" prompt.
16. You must now change drives (from your "floppy drive" to your "hard drive") by typing C: [ENTER] , then type CD\ [ENTER] .
17. At the "C:/>" prompt type EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT [ENTER]. This allows you to look at the "AUTOEXEC.BAT" file on your hard
drive.
18. You should now see a larger version of the "AUTOEXEC.BAT' file than the one you created on your Boot Disk. Look for a line (or lines)
that have anything to do with the word "mouse".
19. Once thi s line(s) is located, carefully write it down on a sheet of scrap paper character-for-character, just the way you see it on the screen.
20. Once you have this information copied down, use the "FILE" pull-down menu to select "EXIT". Don't save any changes if the com-
puter prompts you to.
21. At the "C:/>" prompt type A: [ENTER] to switch back to your floppy drive.
22. At the "A:/>" prompt type EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT [ENTER]. You should now see the "AUTOEXEC.BAT" file that you created pre-
viously.
23. Insert the blinking cursor at the beginning of the third (blank) line.
24. Now type in the mouse info line(s) that you copied down on the sheet of paper. Don't forget to press the [ENTER] key if you need an-
other blank line. Ensure that the lines read exactly as you copied them down.
25. Next, use your mouse to click on the "FILE" pull-down menu and select "SAVE". Once saved, again use the "FILE" pull-down menu, se-
lect "EXIT' to return to the "A:!>" prompt.
You have now created a Boot Disk for 5TH FLEET Now, whenever you want to play the game. just insert this Boot Disk and reboot your system (or turn the computer on).
NOTE: If you have a Sound Card, you'll need to follow the same steps on how to install your Mouse Driver. Just replace the "mouse" line(s) with the three to four "sound" lines.