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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

June 2010

Sero Consulting Ltd Sheffield Technology Parks Cooper Buildings Arundel Street Sheffield S1 2NS tel: +44 (0)845 111 4122 fax: +44 (0)114 221 1801 email: michael.dodd@sero.co.uk

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

CONTENTS
Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 i

CONTEXT ............................................................. INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT ............................................................. 1 ................................................................ ........................................... ECONOMIC ANALYSIS ........................................................................... 5 ................................................................ ................................... STAKEHOLDER FEEDBACK ................................................................... 15 CONSULTATIONS ................................................................ ................................. BUSINESS CONSULTATIONS ................................................................. 28 .......................................... EDUCATION AND SKILLS INFRASTRUCTURE .......................................... 37 ................................................................ ............................................... IMMAGE STUDIOS ............................................................................... 45 COMPARATIVE CASE STUDIES .............................................................. 54 STUDIES .............................................................. AND ............................................ CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................ 62

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Introduction 1. The purpose of this assignment is to undertake a feasibility study to evaluate the opportunities and potential of the creative and digital media Industries for North East Lincolnshire. The study focused on the infrastructure that already exists in the area, in particular, the potential role of Immage Studios as the Creative and Digital Industries hub. 2. The activities that were delivered to meet the terms of reference were: face-to-face consultations with 25 key stakeholders including members and officers at North East Lincolnshire Council, Yorkshire Forward, Screen Yorkshire, Arts Council England, Renaissance Grimsby and Renaissance Cleethorpes; we invited education and training providers, voluntary and community organisations and local businesses to a social media surgery held at the Fishing Heritage Centre on 29th April 2010; Humber MUD (Southbank) as a proxy for businesses within the digital media sector and held an open forum workshop on 13th April. Twenty-five individuals attended and this event was supplemented with face-to-face additional consultations with individual businesses and stakeholders at their request; we have undertaken three mini-case studies to understand how other areas have successfully developed a digital hub that has generated economic benefits; we have used the DTZ sector study as a baseline position from which to update knowledge of the size (businesses and employment) of the sector; we have assessed the range of qualifications required to meet the future skills requirement of the sector and mapped these against the range of education and training opportunities available locally; we have undertaken an informal workshop with the Immage management team regarding its potential as a hub and catalyst for the sector in the sub-region.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Economic Analysis 3. We estimate that there are approximately 337 businesses in the creative and digital sector, employing 1,609 people. The number of businesses has grown by 31%, between 1998 and 2007, the second highest growth in the sub-region, however, employment has fallen by 15%, the largest percentage fall in the sub-region, over the same period. 4. The size and shape of the creative and digital sector within North East Lincolnshire mirrors that of the Humber sub-region. Whilst the sector does not have significant critical mass, it does have significant business growth potential. It is important that interventions are targeted to ensure that employment growth within the sector keeps pace with the number of new businesses being created. Stakeholder Feedback 5. The general question was asked about whether the creative and digital sector had the potential to grow? There is an overall positive response to this question. The key issues identified through a SWOT analysis of the sector is summarised below

Creative & Digital SWOT Analysis Strengths fibre network Immage studios East Coast Media low cost of living existing skills base existing cultural activities Weaknesses fibre operator monopoly shared vision understanding creative and digital key advocates business support inward investment

Opportunities Greater Grimsby branding Links to more established sectors sector integration community engagement wifi collaboration and synergy

Threats current publicity surrounding GIFHE leadership lack of demand sustainability lack of political engagement inertia/do nothing South Yorkshire fibre

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Business Consultations 6. We have drawn out the lessons learned by others who have successfully been involved in growing the creative and digital sector elsewhere through identifying the enabling, critical success and inhibiting factors. Enabling Factors ensure that there is a pathway of provision in terms of capital infrastructure; provisi strong public sector support; access to finance; brokerage an agency that can translate the needs of the sector to potential investors; links to economic drivers, for example, emerging technologies; community engagement; meaningful investment; local, regional and national connectivity;

Critical Success Factors a core strategy; consultation; commitment; a framework for relationship building; advocates and connectors;

Inhibiting Factors short-termism; lack of finance; innovation; development of investor and investee knowledge.

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

7.

A number of useful observations and areas for potential intervention emerged from a networking event hosted by Humber MUD (Southbank). The observations focused on how best to maximise the potential of the creative and digital sector, issues related to branding and identity of the geographical area and how to communicate the digital message effectively. The discussion also included identifying potential areas for intervention, some of which are taken forward as recommendations for action. The areas identified included: creating and disseminating positive images of the local area; attracting creative professionals to return to North East Lincolnshire; raising awareness of the benefits of internet connectivity for communities and business; potential actions related to the existing physical infrastructure or potential capital development; actions connected with communication with the creative and digital sector, including training and marketing. Education and Skills Infrastructure

8.

On the whole, North East Lincolnshire is well served in relation to the availability of specific qualifications that are required by the creative and digital sector. changing needs of the creative and digital industry. In particular, East Coast Media provides a centre of expertise that is responsive to the

9.

We have identified two areas where additional provision would be beneficial: the Advanced Apprenticeship in Creative and Digital Media is a new qualification designed to give participants the know-how, the experience and the access to key industry contacts. There is no evidence that this apprenticeship is offered in North East Lincolnshire; ICT vendor training (Microsoft, CISCO. Adobe etc.) is in short supply and it would be advantageous if train-the-trainer activity was available to boost the capacity of indigenous training providers to deliver vendor-accredited training.

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Immage Studios Conclusions 10. Immage Studios is a significant creative facility that has the potential to succeed as a private business. District. Its current location in Immingham, alongside the lack of development on its current site, is not conducive to it being a creative hub for the In addition, significant investment in equipment is initially required to ensure that the facilities are brought up to industry standards and ongoing investment is required to maintain this status. Options 11. It is imperative that the management team at Immage Studios, representatives of GIFHE and senior officers at North East Lincolnshire Council meet to consider a range of options that provide the best o opportunity for Immage to survive and thrive. 12. Location A decision needs to be made regarding the most advantageous location for Immage Studios. The options are: Immage remains at its current location in Immingham (short-term); Immage relocates as part of the development of the HE Block at GIfHE (mediumterm); Immage is part of a potential HE/Education development (Tier 3) at Alexandra dock (long-term). 13. Incorporation It is important for the Immage Studios management team in consultation with its stakeholders review its current legal status and explore the advantages and disadvantages of: becoming a Community Investment Company (CIC) to mirror Channel 7s current status; becoming a department within GIFHE rather than a wholly-owned subsidiary; sever its ties with GIFHE to focus solely on private sector income generation; consider the possibility of merging with other local media providers to take advantage of the new political climate. 14. Business Focus Immage Studios needs to: focus preferably on a single, or at most, two core areas of work that provide a steady income stream and have the potential for growth;

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

consider how it can contribute to implementing the recommendations in this report and whether North East Lincolnshire Council would pay for these services; seek to open up its facilities to other education and training providers subject to the decision regarding growth; 15. Investment Discuss with North East Lincolnshire the most critical investment need in relation to equipment and the possibility of a loan to upgrade its equipment or a prominent role (and potential location) in the development of the equipment bank loan scheme. Summary 16. We think that there are currently too many uncertainties and possibilities in the offing to come to a definitive recommendation about the future of Immage. 17. It is clear, however, that the status quo is the least favourite option and some action needs to be taken to secure the future of both Immage Studios and Channel 7. 18. We would recommend that some of the considerations to be taken into account when considering the future of Immage are: the changed environment where social media and user-generated content have become as important as expensively-produced TV, radio and newspaper output; the relationships between Immage and the rest of the Creative & Digital sector in North East Lincolnshire and beyond; the potential for Immage to work with providers other than GIFHE and to spread its horizons beyond the district boundaries. Comparative Comparative Case Studies

19.

We have drawn on the experience of others who have used a physical space as a hub to attract creative professionals and through this process organically grow the creative and digital sector, specifically: the Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber. the Abbey Walk Gallery in Grimsby; the Woodend Creative Workspace in Scarborough and;

20.

Brief vignettes of each example are available in the main report, but the common themes and critical success factors that are needed for a physical hub to be successful include:

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

creative sector knowledge; location and accessibility; flexible terms; creative community & landlord involvement; facilities/managed services. 21. Other important, but not critical factors included: 24 x 7 access; connectivity; supply-side considerations (demand); legal structures and incorporation. Conclusions 22. Our consultations have led us to believe that there are a number of steps which need to be taken to prepare the district for the digital future. Despite significant, even leading edge infrastructure which should be of great assistance in creating a district with future digital possibilities, it seems to us that awareness of the possibilities offered by digital technologies is unusually low at most levels in the area. The strong traditions of industries such as fishing, oil refining, chemicals and seaside tourism continue to have strong resonance in the area, and to shape local peoples ideas about their working futures. The local authority and its partners have taken strong, effective action to assist these sectors to make the most of what persists of their traditional markets, and to adapt to modern realities and changing requirements. While these are very necessary actions and demonstrate strong leadership of the local authority and partners in ensuring the districts economy has a robust base for the future, it also serves to reinforce peoples views about the nature of viable jobs and where their economic futures might lie. 23. We would recommend that North East Lincolnshire Council and its partners explore the extent to which they can take a similar approach to supporting and stimulating the Creative and Digital Industries as is currently pursued with sectors such as chemicals, fish processing and renewables. But, alongside these measures, which may well have the effect of taking a relatively small sector, stabilising it, and helping it to achieve a certain amount of growth, we believe it is necessary to pursue an approach which seeks to embed knowledge and awareness of the possibilities offered by digital technologies, the first step in which is in making digital a reality in their lives.

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Overarching Recommendations 24. Our recommendations include the following two overarching community-based initiatives. civic a programme of Social media for civic renewal this recommendation is modelled on the Amplified Leicester programme, which has been sponsored by NESTA (the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts). We believe that this approach could be an important first step in utilising modern technologies and social media to harness the talents and creativity of North East Lincolnshires people to drive the district forward into a modern era where technology plays an increasing part in the everyday lives of all its citizens, and people are able to use it to develop the skills and capacity necessary to shape the districts future. We also believe that this approach goes with the grain of the new Governments Big Society initiative, which is dependent on mechanisms to harness local individuals and groups initiative to drive community regeneration. It is vital that such an approach can be underpinned by measures to network initiatives and amplify their products; Community Technology Initiative - the second overarching programme is our recommendation that Working Neighbourhoods Fund and other available resources should be used as match funding for a bid to Priority 3, Objective 4 of the European Regional Development Fund for a Community Technology Initiative designed to build the capacities of individuals and communities to use digital technologies for personal and community development, and to gain skills for employment. This initiative would include developing three strands of activity: communitycommunity-based social media centres - a social media centre is a place that not only supports the development of content but also provides a social space for people to interact and learn from each other. It acts as a communication hub for the local community by providing a single point of access for the development and distribution of content; community reporter programme this programme is an exciting and innovative way for people to build confidence, learn new skills and tell a story about themselves. Reporters learn how to produce content on blogs, podcasts, video and images using technology in the pocket devices such as mobile phones, video cameras and webcams. Stories are distributed through an online network, which consists of community web sites, Facebook, Twitter and other social networking sites, ensuring that those voices can be heard by anyone online;

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

providing refurbished computers and associated connectivity - despite the widespread availability of fast broadband in the district, it still remains the case that take up of computers and internet access is lower than average. Sero is currently working with DC10plus, Ofcom, and the National Digital Participation Consortium to roll out a national programme to make refurbished public sector computers available to low income people. We recommend that North East Lincolnshire partners seek EU funding to develop a local version of this programme ahead of the national roll out, and allowing a more intensive focus on local residents than will be possible in the national scheme.

Recommendations Detailed Recommendations 25. There are 35 detailed recommendations allocated to one of six workstreams and are identified as either short (up to 12 months), medium (two to five years) or longterm (five years+) in terms of achievability. Below we summarise the actions under each workstream heading. Awareness Raising publicise the vibrancy of the sector - there is an opportunity to use the existing creative talent within the sector to populate the creative and digital section within the Greater Grimsby website; develop an online Cultural and Arts Programme we came across an issue when we delivered the Social Media Surgery at the Heritage Centre, as it clashed with another sub-regional event. There are sufficient ongoing activities within the sector to publicise an annual programme of events; Transformational ICT Programme (TICT) as this Yorkshire Forward programme comes on stream, it is important that businesses in North East Lincolnshire have the opportunity to participate in ICT activities that are designed to lead to a step-change in business performance; social media surgeries the first Social Media Surgery was a success with a number of individuals and businesses expressing interest in attending, although they could not on this occasion. Social Media Surgeries are open to all businesses, not just those in the creative and digital sector. Community Focus consider adopting a Social Media for Civic Renewal programme (see earlier); engage with the voluntary and community sector to develop a Community Technology Initiative using ERDF funding (see earlier);

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

social housing opportunity there is a win/win opportunity to providing social housing tenants with next generation access. The social housing landlord has significant buying power with a broadband provider plus a new and cheaper consultation mechanism with their client base, and the broadband provider has access to a new unreached market base; Capital Infrastructure Immage Studio option appraisal we have been unable to come to a cut and dried decision in relation to Immage Studios. However, we have been able to present a range of scenarios which provides good basis to enable North East Lincolnshire Council and the Immage Studios (including GIFHE) management team to engage in discussions regarding the future of the facility; Virgin Media relationship if one of the USPs of the district is its fibre network, it should be an ideal test-bed for piloting Virgin Media next generation access products and services; ICT Active although there are adequate business facilities including the efactor business incubation premises coming on-stream, it is important that they have appropriate connectivity to support both creative and digital businesses and businesses in general in the future. ict Active provides an assessment and accreditation route to a British Standard which should be the benchmark to which business premises aspire. e-factors current premise portfolio have met this standard; existing facilities there is a range of facilities that seek to serve the creative and digital sector that are well worth promoting prior to making decisions about any capital new-build or refurbishment projects; equipment store businesses within the sector have identified the lack of professional equipment as a barrier to development. Consideration should be given to developing a mechanism to enable creative professionals to hire equipments at reasonable rates. Immage Studios; studio/editing/pitching facilities although there is no discernable excess demand for business facilities, a number of people have cited the need for small scale studio/editing facilities and a space to pitch to potential clients: joinedjoined-up regeneration activity there are a range of opportunities to provide facilities that creative professionals can use as part of existing regeneration plans at Alexandra Dock, as part of Cleethorpes Renaissance and the developments at East Marsh; The equipment store could be hosted by

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Education and Skills there is a gap in provision in relation to the delivery of the relatively new Advanced Apprenticeship in Creative and Digital Media. Media programme: vendor skills training professionals within the sector have identified a lack of locally sourced software training. Consideration should be given to sponsoring train-thetrainer activity to boost the capacity of the district to offer vendor accredited training to professionals and students; Public Sector extensive fibre network although other areas are catching up quickly, and most notably Digital Region, specifically in South Yorkshire, North East Lincolnshire already has a solid, reliable and fast fibre network; strategic plan the importance of a having a vision to indicate not only direction of travel but also a final destination for the creative and digital sector was highlighted from key commentators in Section 4. The action plan emerging from this research should be adopted by the local authority as its key strategic document for the sector; senior officer and lead member it is critical that the local authority signals its intent by ensuring that, as for other priority sectors, there is a senior officer who has some responsibility for the digital and creative sector. In addition, a member of the council, who can champion the sector, should be identified to provide the political credibility that the sector requires; digital and ICT integration with priority sector development the lead officer should ensure that the cross-cutting potential impact of digital and ICT activity is incorporated within strategic planning for the other local authority priority sectors; Balfour Beatty expertise the extent to which additional specific expertise in relation to the creative and digital sector is available via the new publicprivate partnership with Balfour Beatty should be investigated; maximising the digital and creative offer the lead officer for the sector should liaise with the local authoritys economic development unit and other local inward investment agencies to ensure that the creative and digital sector adds value to potential investors to North East Lincolnshire; maximise collaboration we are aware of a number of local authorities, some of whom are neighbouring councils e.g. North Lincolnshire, who would be open to collaborative action to address digital inclusion and related creative and digital sector issues Education and training stakeholders should consider the viability of delivering this

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Sector Development create a sector microsite this is one of a number of actions designed to bring the sector together and could be used to publicise sector events, contracts, jobs etc based on the successful Hull Digital model; secure the continuity of Humber MUD (South Bank) the Humber MUD collective has proven invaluable in identifying the needs of the sector and provides a useful consultation mechanism for the local authority; case study development a number of creative professionals have established their careers outside the region and have since returned to North East Lincolnshire for a number of reasons. A small number of case studies could be developed to highlight the benefits of the local authority area; develop an online directory a relatively low cost and easy win would be to commission an online directory that collates the diverse range of creative and digital talent in the local area; sectorsector-specific business support small-scale research should be commissioned to identify whether the business support needs of the creative and digital sector are different from other sectors, and the extent to which the existing business support offer is meeting the needs identified; investigate the Swindon wifi model a small creative and digital (including local authority representation) delegation should be sent to investigate the transferable benefits of the Swindon wifi model; maximise the use of Northern Net the extent to which Northern Net connectivity can be used more creatively and extensively should be investigated, for example, to network with creative and digital entrepreneurs from overseas using videoconferencing; deliver a digital and creative trade fair the creative and digital professionals we have met are ready to engage in direct activity to support their sector and a relatively small amount of funding could be used to deliver a North East Lincolnshire digital and creative trade fair; North East Lincolnshire Girl Geek Dinners/Events there are currently regular Girl Geek dinners/events in Leeds, Sheffield and Hull and there is no reason why a North East Lincolnshire event in Grimsby, Cleethorpes or Immingham could not be launched.

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT Introduction

1.1 The purpose of this assignment is to undertake a feasibility study to evaluate the opportunities and potential of the creative and digital media Industries for North East Lincolnshire. The study focused on the infrastructure that already exists in the area, in particular, the potential role of Immage Studios as the Creative and Digital Industries hub. 1.2 This report provides recommendations on how best to maximise the opportunities and strengths that have been identified to grow the Creative and Digital sector and to raise the performance, productivity and profile of businesses across all sectors in the Borough. Pragmatic suggestions indicating what additional infrastructure and interventions are needed to exploit opportunities for job and wealth creation from the sector with reference to the areas Strategy for Economic Wellbeing are also identified. 1.3 We also provide brief commentary on the general and local elections that took place on 6th may 2010 and evaluate any impact that this may have in taking the recommendations forward.

Context
1.4 As part of the desk research we have been undertaking, we have identified two articles that can be directly related to the situation within North East Lincolnshire. One article acts as a warning about having a narrow focus and the other article is an encouragement about the real potential of a digital economy.

Beware of a High Tech Focus


1.5 The extract from Peter Druckers What will not work thoughts about economic development warns against trying to establish high tech without the underpinning of an entrepreneurship culture across all sectors and job roles.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

What Will Not Work Peter Drucker Above all, to have high-tech entrepreneurship alone without its being embedded in a broad entrepreneurial economy of no-tech, low-tech, and middle-tech, is like having a mountaintop without the mountain. Even high-tech people in such a situation will not take jobs in new, risky, high-tech ventures. They will prefer the security of a job in the large, established, safe company or in a government agency. Of course, high-tech ventures need a great many people who are not themselves high-tech: accountants, salespeople, managers, and so on. In an economy that spurns entrepreneurship and innovation except for that tiny extravaganza, the glamorous high tech venture, those people will keep an looking for jobs and career opportunities where society and economy (i.e., their classmates, their parents, and their teachers) encourage them to look: in the large, safe established institution. Neither will distributors be willing to take on the products of the new venture, nor are investors willing to back it.

1.6

Therefore it is important that:

entrepreneurship is established as a solid career pathway alongside more traditional routes; that the creative and digital sector recognises the importance of other professional roles that can add value to their businesses.

Fibre in Paradise
1.7 An article in the Economist on February 20th 2010, reports how Bristol, a small city in Virginia has been replacing the declining manufacturing sector with technology jobs. The key points of interest are:

the cost of living is 20% below the national average;

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

in 1999, Bristol Virginia Utilities ran optical fibre between its substations and city offices and soon after to local businesses and homes in 2002; fibre brought inward investment and jobs via a defence contractor and an international IT consultancy; the cost of living and links with the local university were attractions, but the fibre network was critical for investment.

1.8 North East Lincolnshire needs to take full advantage of the fibre network at its disposal.

Methodology
1.9 We undertook the following two parallel work streams to fulfil the research brief:

sector and stakeholder engagement; mapping and assessment of the creative and digital sector.

1.10 Below we briefly describe the activities that were delivered within each of the two workstreams.

Sector and Stakeholder Engagement


1.11 Gauging perception perception and awareness: awareness We conducted face-to-face

consultations with 25 key stakeholders including members and officers at North East Lincolnshire Council, Yorkshire Forward, Screen Yorkshire, Arts Council England, Renaissance Grimsby and Renaissance Cleethorpes to determine the current perception of the sector. 1.12 Assess current contribution and future potential of the sector: We invited education and training providers, voluntary and community organisations and local businesses to a social media surgery held at the Fishing Heritage Centre on 29th April 2010 to provide an opportunity to contribute to research. Thirty individuals attended this event including the social media surgeons who facilitated the session.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

1.13 Business Consultations: We used Humber MUD (Southbank) as a proxy for Consultations: businesses within the digital media sector and held an open forum workshop on 13th April to identify current economic performance issues, perceptions opportunities. about future growth individuals and barriers to developmental this event was Twenty-five attended and

supplemented with face-to-face additional consultations with individual businesses and stakeholders at their request. 1.14 Comparative Case studies: We have undertaken three mini-case studies to understand how other areas analogous to North East Lincolnshire have successfully developed a digital hub that has generated economic benefits including identifying the pre-conditions for success.

Mapping and Assessment


1.15 Updated sector mapping: We have used the DTZ sector study as a baseline position from which to update knowledge of the size (businesses and employment) of the sector. Whilst we are comfortable with the DTZ methodology and definition of the sector, Yorkshire Forward has developed a different approach which may provide a best-fit for a sector which is not readily defined. 1.16 Map current education and skills trends: We have assessed the range of qualifications required to meet the future skills requirement articulated by the industry and mapped these against the range of education and training opportunities available in North East Lincolnshire. 1.17 SWOT analysis of Immage Studios: We have undertaken an informal workshop with the Immage management team regarding its potential as a hub and catalyst for the sector in the sub-region.

Intervention Intervention Development


1.18 Throughout the report, we identify actions in response to findings as they arise which are collated and explained in more detail in Section 8.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Context

2.1 It is important to place the size and shape of the creative and digital sector in North East Lincolnshire within both a regional and sub-regional context. It is equally important to briefly discuss the difficulties in relation to defining what we mean by the creative and digital sector. 2.2 Digital & New Media (synonymous to creative and digital) is one of five priority sectors identified by Yorkshire Forward which emerged from the previous cluster strategy delivered by the RDA. The priority sectors have been identified following research to determine which industries in the region:

can offer the most significant potential for growth and economic impact; whose growth would be significantly enhanced by dedicated

investment and support in addition to the Business Support offered by Business Link. 2.3 Public sector initiatives and support interventions must therefore capitalise on those opportunities presented by supporting those sectors & sub-sectors that can have a significant impact on the regions economic growth, in terms of

an increase in GVA (Gross Value Added); employment opportunities; workforce skills development.

Regional Strategy
2.4 The newly approved and developing Regional Strategy for the Digital & New Media Industries, 2008-10 is focused on sector growth and creating a significant impact on the overall regions economic growth, in terms of increased GVA, employment opportunities and skills development.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

2.5 This will be achieved primarily through the creation of new businesses within the sub-sectors with employment growth potential, existing businesses growth and stimulating greater start-up activity. 2.6 Yorkshire Forward has identified the application of the following three elements, explanations of which are taken directly from the strategy, to spearhead the growth strategy: Innovation: 1. Innovation: To promote an environment for open innovation and creativity as drivers for business success, supporting the development of new ideas and content, as well as product & processes. A culture of open innovation is developing, not only to share knowledge but also to exploit that shared knowledge Competitiveness: 2. Business Competitiveness: The adoption of enabling technologies within business activities and processes will lead to business efficiency, productivity & profitability. In addition an improvement in the Regional profile will result in increased global competitiveness. Practice: 3. Collaboration & Best Practice: The way that CDI businesses interact with their markets and customers has changed dramatically over the past few years. The emerging business models for revenue generation and wider market penetration demands a more collaborative approach between businesses within the same sectors and with other related sectors. 2.7 This study which is focused on the potential for growth of the creative and digital sector within North East Lincolnshire is therefore timely and supported by a region-wide strategy for growth.

Creative and Digital Sector: Definition


2.8 The most up to date definition of the creative and digital sector provides a more accurate descriptor for the sector as Digital & New Media Industries. This definition is based on a combination of Standard Industry Classification (SIC) Codes1 and Standard Occupational Classifications (SOC) where:
1

Where a single code encompasses both relevant and non-relevant activities, an estimated fraction is used. 6

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

the SIC codes are used to identify the relevant industrial activities; the SOC codes are used to identify relevant self-employment occupations within those industries.

2.9 This produces the following six groupings of industrial activities:


Media and New Media (MNM); Music, Visual and Performing Arts (MVPA); Design; Electronics; Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and; Print and Packaging (P & P).

2.10 The detailed composition of each of these sectors is presented in Appendix A.

Size of the sector in the Region


2.11 The key facts in relation to Yorkshire and the Humber are as follows:

97,300 people employed in Creative & Digital 2007; 21% employment increase (1998 -2007); 4.6% of the regions employment; 19,794 self employed (freelance) 2006; 14,000 creative & digital companies-2007; 24% companies increase (1998 -2007); 11.46bn GDP (2005); 5.14bn GVA (2005.)

2.12 Between 1998 and 2007 the number of creative and digital businesses grew steadily, increasing by 25% to 14,000 by 2007. ICT companies made up the largest share of creative and digital businesses (43%).

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Number of Businesses in Yorkshire and Humber

Source: ONS ABI (2009)

2.13 Between 1998 and 2007 business numbers grew in four of the six subsectors. Design experienced a strong increase of 76% whereas Media, Visual & Performing arts and Print & Packaging experienced significant decreases (-17% and -13% respectively).

Employment
2.14 Employment had been continually rising until it reached a peak in 2003 of 104,300 employees. Since 1998 employment has experienced an overall increase of 21% to its current total of 97,300. Again, ICT has the biggest employment share at 25% closely followed by Media & New Media and Print & Packaging.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

1998Numbers of employees in Yorkshire and the Humber, 1998-2007

Source: ONS ABI (2009)

2.15 The Design and ICT sub-sectors have grown strongly with MNM and MVPA not far behind. Print & Packing, and to a lesser extent, Electronics, both saw a fall in employment.
Sub-sectoral change in business and employees in the Region, 1998-2007 Businesses Employees Year Sector Design Electronics ICT MNM MVPA P&P Total 1998 1,700 800 4,700 1,300 1,200 1,600 11,300 2007 3,000 900 6,000 1,700 1,000 1,400 14,000 % change 76% 13% 28% 31% -17% -13% 24% 1998 7,600 16,300 15,200 15,400 4,100 21,900 80,500 2007 12,000 16,000 23,900 21,200 4,900 19,300 97,300 % change 58% -2% 57% 38% 20% -12% 21%

2.16 The average creative and digital business in Yorkshire and the Humber has around seven employees. However, there are significant variations between the sectors. Electronics firms are the largest with an average of 18 employees whilst both ICT and Design companies average four employees each.

North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Digital SubSize of Digital and New Media in the Humber Sub-Region


2.17 At a sub-regional level, there are:

11,500 people employed in Creative & Digital 2007; 4.5% employment percentage increase (1998 -2007); 2,000 creative & digital companies-2007; 33% companies percentage increase (1998 -2007).

2.18 This means that the sub-region has approximately 12% of the overall regional employment and 14% of total businesses in Yorkshire and Humber. Whilst the Humber sub-region has a higher percentage increase in companies established (+9%), it has a much lower employment increase (16.5%) over the same period. sector at a sub-regional level. This leads us to the conclusion that a relatively high volume of micro businesses have been created within the

Businesses Businesses
2.19 The Humber saw steady increases in the amount of CDI businesses up to 2003 where numbers flattened out. However, 2007 saw an all-time high of CDI businesses, driven mostly by rises in the Design sub-sector which represent 25% of all CDI businesses.
Numbers of businesses in The Humber, 1998-2007

Source: ONS ABI (2009)

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North East Lincolnshire Council Digital Media Feasibility Study

Employment
2.20 Employment has shown greater variation over this period. Patterns were quite volatile until 2002, at which point employment levels reached an alltime high of 12,400; numbers have since declined steadily, with the exception of 2007 which saw an increase of 800 compared to the previous year.
Numbers of employees in The Humber, 1998-2007

Source: ONS ABI (2009)

2.21 ICT and Design have both driven the growth in business numbers within the Humber. They accounted for 45% and 25% respectively of the total business numbers within the Humber in 2007. Media and New Media, Design and MVPA have all experienced strong growth in employment whereas P & P has seen significant decreases. The average business size varies from three employees per business in Design to around twenty in Electronics.

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Sub-sectoral change in business and employees in The Humber, 1998-2007 Businesses Employees Year Sector Design Electronics ICT MNM MVPA P&P Total 1998 300 100 600 200 100 200 1,500 2007 500 100 900 200 100 200 2,000 % change 66.7 0.0 50.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 33 1998 900 2,200 1,800 2,000 400 3,700 11,000 2007 1,500 2,000 2,300 3,100 600 2,000 11,500 % change 66.7 -9.1 27.8 55.0 50.0 -45.9 4.5

Source: ONS ABI (2009)

Digital and New Media in North East Lincolnshire


2.22 Using the new four digit SIC code definitions which were introduced in September 2009 we are able to provide an updated perspective on the size and composition of the digital and new media sector.
Businesses Year Loc Auth East Rid. Hull NE Lincs N.Lincs Total 684 454 258 328 1,724 997 520 337 404 2,258 +313 +66 +79 +76 + 534 3,184 5,371 1,885 1,611 12,051 4,609 5,106 1,609 1,563 12,887 +1,425 265 276 48 + 836 1998 2007 Change 1998 Employees 2007 Change

2.23 Over the period 1998, to the latest figures available (2007), the number of businesses has grown by 31%, the second highest growth in the sub-region, however, employment has fallen by 15%, the largest percentage fall in the sub-region. This closely mirrors the position across the sub-region. The local authority area ranks fourth in terms of number of businesses and third out of four in terms of the number of people employed.

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2.24 Using this revised definition, we can provide a more detailed breakdown of the number of businesses within the sector by the six industry groups. This is presented in the figure below.

2.25 The three main sub-sectors are Design (architectural/engineering activities), ICT (hardware & software consultancy/data processing/database activities) and Media and New Media (publishing/sound, video & media reproduction/advertising/photographic/film & TV). 2.26 A similar analysis of the total number of people employed in the sector sees Design and MNM as the two dominant sectors, with electronics (manufacture of computers, transmitters, receivers etc and telecoms) replacing ICT as the third sub-sector employing the most people.

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Summary
2.27 The size and shape of the creative and digital sector within North East Lincolnshire mirrors that of the Humber sub-region. Whilst the sector does not have significant critical mass, it does have significant business growth potential. It is important that interventions are targeted to ensure that employment growth within the sector keeps pace with the number of new businesses being created.

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STAKEHOLDER FEEDBACK Introduction

3.1 In this Section we highlight the key issues that have been identified through the key stakeholder consultations and the two workshop sessions that have been undertaken. With these contributions we have been able to undertake a comprehensive SWOT analysis in relation to the sector. The key elements of the SWOT are presented in Figure 3.1 on the following page. 3.1

Sector Potential
3.2 Prior to analysing the SWOT in more detail, the general question was asked about whether the creative and digital sector had the potential to grow? There is an overall positive response to this question with the following caveats:

North East Lincolnshire has a tendency to be inward looking and an outward focus is required; at the moment there is a limited career pathway in the area and graduates (FE and HE) are likely to be more attracted to other areas such as Manchester and London; there is a need to attract more creative and digital inward investor companies including Blue Chip entrants; there is a need to celebrate the success and vibrancy of the indigenous digital and creative sector to counteract the relatively poor local perception of the local area, and to a lesser extent, the sector; visible local authority support is required including the ability to make quicker decisions; the sector needs to develop its own but complimentary identity as the Greater Grimsby brand is perceived to be a difficult one to sell; despite the lack of critical mass compared to Manchester or London there is a strong potential for the area to punch above its weight.

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Strengths
Fibre Network
3.3 Virgin Media ability to provide fibre to the home or fibre to the premises at a range of speeds across North East Lincolnshire is a significant strength in the local area. For many other areas of the UK seeking to establish a creative and digital hub or cluster, connectivity is often a limiting factor. Virgins focus on providing increasingly fast connections, obviously at a commercial cost, is positive in relation to inward investors who may see fast broadband as a necessity for investment. 3.4 Action Point: Promote the unique selling point that North East Lincolnshire has a solid fibre network infrastructure. 3.5 Action Point Develop an effective partnership arrangement with Virgin Point: Media to position North East Lincolnshire as a test-bed for future pilot activity.

Immage Studios
3.6 A more detailed assessment of the potential of Immage Studios is presented in Section 3. However, a facility like Immage which can provide production capacity for creative individuals and companies as well as a real, live work experience opportunity for students is a real strength of the area. Making the most of this potential is key to its sustainability. Ideas could include:

focus on niche areas; focus on web-based broadcasts; becoming a production centre for public sector services i.e. building on the health-related production that has taken place so far.

3.7 Action Point: North East Lincolnshire Council and the management team at Action Immage Studios work together to agree a sustainable forward strategy to optimise use of the facilities.

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East Coast Media


3.8 Grimsby Institute of Higher and Further Education, and in particular East Coast Media, as the sole HE provider in the area is a strength for a number of reasons:

a track record and reputation for providing skills and qualifications that equip students to successfully enter the creative and digital sector; industry recognition through the Skillset Media Academy providing students with a badge recognised by the sector; a new HE block which is currently being built and space for further development.

3.9 Action Point: Ensure that the benefits the East Coast media can offer to potential new entrants as well as existing sector members are packaged and marketed.

Low Cost of Living


3.10 The attractiveness of living in North East Lincolnshire due to its relative low cost of living and proximity to the coast is a plus point. Using average house prices as a proxy for cost of living, Table 2.1 below demonstrates that, whilst house prices have increased faster than other areas, the average house price is at least 7% lower than its nearest comparator (Manchester) and considerably lower than the average for the region and Greater London.
Table 2.1: Average House Prices Area North East Lincolnshire Manchester Yorkshire & Humberside Greater London Average House Price () 129,839 138,523 162,707 370,571 Annual Change (%) +18.6 +5.9 +6.7 +7.6

Source: Land Registry of England & Wales, October to December 2009

3.11 Action Point: Develop case studies featuring returning or relocating creative professionals demonstrating the lifestyle lower costs of living benefits of living and working in Greater Grimsby/North East Lincolnshire.

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Existing Skills Base


3.12 It is clear that the indigenous creative and digital businesses, whilst small in number, provide a solid skills base foundation for growth. In addition, there is a trend of creative professionals returning to the area once they have established themselves within the sector. This provides valuable networking capacity with mainstream broadcasters and other creative professionals from larger companies outside of the region. 3.13 Action Point: Foster greater collaboration and networking by creating a directory of creative and professional companies using Humber MUD (Southbank) as a starting point.

Existing Cultural Activity


3.14 There is a wide range of creative and cultural activities and spaces in North East Lincolnshire, which require publicising and celebrating. include:

Examples

Miniscus Film Festival (www.meniscusfilms.com): This annual event takes place at the Whitgift Cinema in Grimsby and screens a range of independent films as well as running a number of other events throughout the year; Centre: Fishing Heritage Centre The centre is located in Alexandra Dock and celebrates Grimsbys maritime history. A series of temporary exhibitions and talks are also held throughout the year;

Abbey Walk Gallery (www.abbeywalkgallery.com): The gallery is situated in Grimsby town centre and includes two exhibition spaces, studio facilities and a shop. Abbey Walk Gallery is profiled in Section 6; Caxton Players: This theatre group was founded in 1943 and is the only amateur theatre group in North East Lincolnshire who own and run its own theatre, The Caxton Theatre and Arts Centre, 128 Cleethorpes Road, Grimsby.

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Nunnytv (www.nunny.tv): Nunnytv is an award-winning community media project run by North East Lincolnshire's Library Service and based at Nunsthorpe Library, providing a range of stills and video cameras for the public to borrow as well as professional digital editing facilities; Forum: Humber MUD (Southbank) & North East Lincolnshire Arts Forum Both of these groups provide excellent networking and sharing of practice opportunities; North Festival: North East Lincolnshire Arts Festival An annual month of art-related activities that has been increasing year-on-year.

3.15 There are many more examples and there is a need to bring together and strengthen the creative community to maximise the potential of what is already happening in the area. 3.16 Action Point: Work with existing groups to develop an online Cultural and Arts Programme of Events for North East Lincolnshire. The diary can also be used to publicise forthcoming events.

Weaknesses
3.17 We have identified a number of weaknesses, which provide an entry point for identifying interventions that may be required.

Fibre Operator Monopoly


3.18 Although the fibre network is a strength, we need to recognise that Virgin is the only operator in the area with this capability. The decision as to whether Virgin decides to connect or invest in schemes in the local area is made in the absence of a competing offer or offers which will generally lead to a sub-optimal output. 3.19 Action Point: Work with Virgin Media to establish whether North East Lincolnshire can be a test-bed for piloting new Virgin products and services.

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Shared Vision
3.20 This weakness is intrinsically linked to an identified threat, leadership. A number of our consultations have been with people who have successfully created digital and creative hubs elsewhere in the region or in the country. A common factor has been the need for key stakeholders to have a shared vision of the future for the sector. This can take different forms and has included:

a blueprint; an action plan; a forward strategy;

3.21 The key is a document that stakeholders can refer to that reminds all concerned what the vision for the sector is. So when obstacles arise, as they surely will, there is a firm foundation on which to build. Linked to this is the identification of resources that have been secured to turn the vision into reality. 3.22 Action Point: The action plan emanating from this study needs to be adopted by the local authority as the first strategic plan for the creative and digital sector. 3.23 Action Point: Identify a senior lead officer and lead member who will Action champion the benefits of the sector and seek to ensure that the strategy is implemented. 3.24 Action Point: Use the benefits of the new strategic partnership with Balfour Beatty to provide additional sector specific expertise.

What is Creative and Digital


3.25 Although there is a tacit understanding that digital is good, there is a lack of understanding of the benefits that a strong creative and digital sector and economy can have on both businesses and the wider community.

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3.26 Action

Point:

Engage

Yorkshire

Forward

and

business

intermediary

organisations to ensure that the benefits of digital are promoted to local businesses. Ensure that the Transformational ICT (TICT) Programme activities are piloted and delivered in North East Lincolnshire.

Key Advocates
3.27 In parallel to a fundamental understanding of what the benefits of the creative and digital are to businesses and the wider community is a consistent and clear message from key decision makers and stakeholders that the creative and digital sector is important and has potential for growth. At the moment there is not a shared understanding of the current position and future potential of the sector across the local authority, industry and local communities within North East Lincolnshire.

Business Support
3.28 There is recognition that the specific business support and advice that startup and SMEs within the creative and digital sector require is absent. 3.29 Action Point Work with district wide business support agencies to further Point: investigate the need for sector-specific business support.

Inward Investment
3.30 The Bristol example in the USA cited in Section 1 not only required an existing fibre network, this was a perquisite, but also a major inward investor who acted as an anchor tenant in the area and stimulated supply chain activity and changes in the educational infrastructure. The location of a medium or large inward investor is would make a substantial difference to the creative and digital sector. 3.31 Action Point The lead officer for creative and digital should work alongside Point nt: the inward investment team to ensure that the creative and digital offer is maximised as part of the pitch to potential investors.

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Opportunities
3.32 There are a number of opportunities that build on existing activities already in-train within the local area.

Greater Grimsby
3.33 The current rebranding exercise provides an excellent opportunity to showcase the strengths of the creative and digital sector. This can start by using the new website that has recently had a soft launch. 3.34 Action Point: Use existing businesses to provide content to publicise the vibrancy of the sector by providing a summary of successes on the new Greater Grimsby website and a link to a creative and digital microsite.

Links to More Established Sectors


3.35 It is important to be clear that the creative and digital sector does not have the critical mass, at present, to compete with the more established sectors in the local area. The strategy therefore needs to be one of identifying ways of establishing links with the food, ports and embryonic environmental technologies sectors. 3.36 One way forward in building on the strengths of existing sectors could be to examine how the established industries might make greater use of technology to improve their efficiency and competitiveness. This is likely to lead to more technology-related jobs becoming available in the local economy, with the added advantage that such jobs would be likely to be seen as more relevant to local people, as they would be underpinned by more traditional economic values. The Yorkshire Forward-sponsored Transformational ICT Programme, part of Digital 20/20, offers both an opportunity for local businesses in this respect, and a potential model for a more intensive local support programme.

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3.37 It is suggested that a good way of promoting the potential of technology to the traditional sectors of the local community could be practical demonstrations of the possibilities offered by Social Media. One idea which we are floating here is a high profile event demonstrating social media applications on a fishing trawler, perhaps the trawler at the National Fishing Heritage Centre. 3.38 Action Point: Ensure that the lead officer for creative and digital is involved in other sector strategy development.

(Virtual-MeetingSector Integration (Virtual-Meeting-Physical)


3.39 A way forward that has proved successful in other areas is to follows a three-step strategy to establishing the sector:

virtual start with an engaging virtual presence that draws businesses within the sector and stakeholders with an interest together; meeting once a critical mass has been reached, the nest step is to meet, perhaps monthly, always for a reason and always at a neutral location. After a while, it may be possible to hold a one-day conference that will draw in those from outside the area;

physical location once the virtual meeting is vibrant and the monthly meetings are reasonably well attended, then it may be appropriate to think of a physical business space where creative and digital SMEs and individuals can be co-located and work together.

3.40 This approach means that in the short-to-medium term, a relatively modest amount of revenue spending is required and only when a community has been established is the need for a building/premises and therefore capital spending. 3.41 Action Point: Create a microsite for the sector (see above) which will act as a virtual meeting space for the sector, promote regular monthly events and opportunities for sector businesses. Decisions will need to be made regarding branding e.g. Greater Grimsby/Humber MUD (South Bank).

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Community Engagement
3.42 There is ample opportunity to raise awareness across the community about the benefits of the creative and digital sector. This could include piggybacking on national campaigns to encourage people to get online as well as more local activities targeted at particular community groups. 3.43 We believe that a sustained programme of community engagement linked to opportunities offered by creative and digital technologies could underpin the district strategy going forward. Building on Druckers warning above, it is apparent that there is a disconnect between the high profile success stories offered by the provision at GIFHE and at Immage Studios, and peoples perceptions of what constitutes viable economic opportunity. Thus, we believe that work needs to take place at community level to build awareness of the possibilities that technologies can bring. 3.44 This work can take a variety of forms, and there are a number of models which might be drawn on, including those such as the e-Neighbourhoods Programme project/), in The Sunderland Knowle West (http://e-voice.org.uk/coi/e-championsCarbon Makeover Project in Bristol

(http://www.carbonmakeover.org.uk), or wider programmes such as Talk About Local (http://talkaboutlocal.org.uk/). At the very least, we think it is necessary to engage with voluntary and community organisations to build their capacity to utilise technology, specifically social media, in their work, thus amplifying their own activities, and enabling them to engage communities and individuals. 3.45 The use of social media, such as community websites, local blogs, community reporting, video and audio reporting, etc, can be powerful tools, in building community cohesion by raising awareness of community activities, making a reality of the promises about the positive role technology can play in peoples lives, and developing practical technologyrelated skills. 3.46 Action Point: Consider the adoption of existing community models.

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3.47 Action Point: Engage with the community and voluntary sector to develop a creative and digital community engagement plan to encourage the use of digital technology include social media, blogs, community reporting etc.

WiFi
3.48 It is not currently clear whether the Victoria Street WiFi pilot has been successful i.e. that people have been willing to pay for WiFi beyond the initial free period. In addition, there are plans for the regeneration around the Freeman Street Market area to also include WiFi connectivity. Swindon has recently embarked on an ambitious municipal WiFi programme and it may be worthwhile discussing ideas about whether, Grimsby, for example should seek near universal WiFi coverage. 3.49 Action Point: Arrange a meeting of North East Lincolnshire creative and

digital stakeholders with their counterparts in Swindon to investigate whether the Swindon model has transferable benefits.

Collaboration and Synergy


3.50 Our discussions with businesses in the creative and digital sector have demonstrated:

that there is a lot of existing partnership activity taking place between micro and small businesses; that through informal groups such as Humber MUD (Southbank), momentum to undertake collective activities rather than wait for public sector support, is beginning to take shape.

Threats
3.51 We have identified the following seven threats:

publicity GIF current press and publicity surrounding GIFHE the Institute has suffered from a certain amount of negative publicity recently and it may not be the best time to be contemplating investing significant resources into GIFHE activity;

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leadership there is a perception that there has been a lack of senior officer and member leadership in relation to the sector; lack of demand although we have found a relatively small but vibrant creative and digital sector within North East Lincolnshire, there has not been a groundswell of activity from either the business or community sectors in relation to the creative and digital sector; sustainability although there has been previous investment in the sector, this has not translated into sustainably activity that has had a lasting impact on the local economy; election the recent local and national elections may have an impact in relation to the perceived priority of the sector. In particular, whether the previous administrations recent identification of the potential of the creative and digital sector continues via the new coalition2 and the extent to which no overall control at a local level impacts on decision making; inertia/do nothing one of the greatest threats is that the lack of leadership results inactivity; South Yorkshire Fibre the Digital Region programme. focused on South Yorkshire (which aims to being fibre to the cabinet to 97% of the sub-regions premises), could detract from the existing fibre network already present in North East Lincolnshire.

3.52 Most of the threats are not critical, however, there is a strategic link between an absence of leadership and inertia and to fail to show intention by delivering some strategic, relatively low cost, quick wins would be a missed opportunity.

This seems unlikely as the CDI pages on the BIS website have been removed. 27

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CONSULTATIONS BUSINESS CONSULTATIONS Introduction

4.1 In this section we draw out the lessons learned by others who have successfully been involved in growing the creative and digital sector elsewhere. Stakeholders include Integreat Yorkshire3, Screen Yorkshire and North East Lincolnshire Arts Forum. In addition we present the ideas that emerged from the Humber MUD (Southbank) workshop that took place on 13th April 2010. 4.2 Most of the ideas do not naturally lead to interventions or actions that can be delivered, but they identify either contextual pre-conditions of success or attitudes/behaviours that need to be borne in mind when developing the sector.

Learning Lessons
4.3 Consultation with a wide range of stakeholders resulted in the identification of transferable lessons and ideas that can be taken forward by the creative and digital sector in North East Lincolnshire. 4.4 The key questions we asked were:

What are the primary enabling factors in developing the creative and digital sector? What are the constraints/inhibitors/barriers that prevent development? What critical success factors have you observed? What kinds of interventions are successful? How do you after all help investors to understand the value, the real economic value of creativity?

Integreat Yorkshire is Yorkshire Forward's Regional Centre of Excellence for regeneration,

renaissance and placemaking skills for Yorkshire and the Humber, helping create a lower carbon economy. Integreat Yorkshire is a programme within Yorkshire Forwards Environment Directorate.

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What are the enabling factors?


4.5 The key enabling factors are:

pathways of provision - pathways were needed to support a ladder of provision in terms of build, digital infrastructure, shared offices, fully served creative and digital spaces; strong public sector support - the whole process could have been accelerated by strong public policy support. At times it wavered, when production went to consumption, ie if it did not work. Some lost heart and doubted the entire vision and mission. Some felt creatives could not deliver. This was before the understanding about the knowledge economy globally was clearly focused; access to finance this is absolutely critical otherwise there is a massive black hole. We are fighting against the view that they are not a serious business. Investors, coming from another world can sometimes confuse cultural and creative industries. In an investors mind they must seem serious. There is a cultural gap between the creative and the corporate and city type. Financiers need help to understand the dynamics and risks of the creative sector. a broker - an agency is needed that completely understands the sector, the market issues, and understands where to invest and indeed where not to invest. investors. Creatives need to understand the language of Organisations, for example Screen Yorkshire, have filled

that gap by speaking the language of the creative sector and investors;

links to economic drivers - there are real opportunities here for Green Businesses, where the creative and cultural industries are economic drivers into the future; community links - linked into the real community, for example, Digital Exchange, where real and deep connections can be made with local communities. Project examples in Sheffield include Developing Creativity which provided pathways and access to the creative industries for young people from Sheffields poorer communities;

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investment meaningful investment - investment needs to be meaningful and of significance, in developing Intellectual Property, seeing where the real value lies, building companies, and developing enough companies of real scale and significance; international) local, regional and national (and international) connectivity - we believe our critical role is in matching people to markets. extremely difficult for individual companies. This is

Critical Success Factors


4.6 The factors that need to be in place include:

a core strategy the temptation in the early stages of development to focus at a project level is understandable, but a core strategy is essential to meaningful planning. The Economic Masterplan was absolutely critical to the success of the Creative Cluster within Sheffield; consultation - if the core participants are not involved they will be undermined by immediate changes. Sheffield has a fractured history. and immediate changes, for example, the NCPM (National Centre for Popular Music) was seen as a failure commitment Sheffield City Council made a commitment to the creative economy in an extraordinary way. They had the foresight,to commit to a vision for a new knowledge economy, for a creative and digital cluster, as a way of repositioning the existing economy. This in an era of economic change in which the creative sector (in this country if not internationally the US led the way) was not necessarily valued or recognised in the way it is now. Today we know there is value in investment in creativity, that it brings real economic value to a region, but 25 years ago this was not universally agreed; a framework for relationship building - mistrust and disconnect happened. There is a need to create a framework that allows a real market exchange. Relationships are key. relationships are not right. What tends to happen in spatially defined areas is that fragmentation and dissonance happens if The framework needs to be sufficiently robust, the rewards and value of the vision has to last beyond spasmodic and periodic dysfunction in relationships;
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advocates and connectors there must be room for advocates and connectors, these important people who provide strong brokerage in place-making terms. They can assist, animate the policy objectives and make it real. To act imaginatively, stay inspired, it takes time and a real commitment. The brokers, advocates and connectors provide the glue, without that the elements will not fit together. Networks must be supported, however embryonic, to build leverage and strength in a region.

inhibitin factors? nhibiting What are the inhibiting factors?


4.7 The factors that constrain growth in the sector include:

short termism in terms of funding, but more importantly strategically in terms of vision. A long-term view, a strategic direction of travel towards an agreed destination is required. In the early stages there can be a tendency to be too opportunistic, with a lack of planning, it is vital to think through clearly what it is you want and need to achieve; lack of finance- for creative content and IP this is high risk and the finance distinct business challenges of these sectors innovation funding is very often oriented around technology- other forms of creative development tend to be under-supported development development of investor and investee knowledge providing

information re these markets

What kind of interventions are successful?


4.8 Sheffield infrastructure development: What was attempted was the

developing of an infrastructure, the buildings and the opportunities developed to tap into the talent being pumped out by the universities. Red Tape Studios, Yorkshire Artspace, The Science Parks, Digital Campus, these were all focused on and around production and production facilities. In earlier years there was not the same understanding and consensus around the value of artists and creatives in economic terms- but the value of technology could be seen. Hence studios, film facilities, technological infrastructure - skills around these were well supported;

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4.9 Network of sub-regional partners North East Lincolnshire may wish to look subpartners: at developing a network of people/organisations within the region as partners. As new markets are emerging there is a special value in these relationships. For example, Screen Yorkshire has developed partnerships with Nokia, Vodafone and Orange.

How do you after all help investors to understand the value, the real economic value of creativity?
4.10 The following characteristics were identified:

present and position yourself effectively; learn how to be taken seriously; look and think and behave like a serious business if you are seeking serious investment; local authorities are key to success. Their involvement as drivers in the strategic overview is critical to success. You need someone making strategic connections; understanding is key. Investors need to get it to overcome

preconceptions that creative businesses are high risk and flaky;

apply standard assessment techniques so that your business/products and/or services are open to scrutiny and can stand up to robust challenge.

Summary
4.11 What is needed?

The vision to map out funding and progression routes within a smart and intelligent framework. Maximising all possibilities in terms of connectivity and collaboration. Ultimately the vision must have a smart intelligence guiding it - it cannot drift or coast - it must be driven and finally not importing creative businesses -although this may ultimately be a sign of success when businesses are drawn to a creative cluster - but the growing and nurturing of indigenous talent.

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Humber MUD Observations and Areas for Intervention


4.12 A number of useful observations and areas for potential intervention emerged from a networking event hosted by Humber MUD (Southbank). Some, but not all of these observations and intervention areas are taken forward as recommendations for action in Section 8.

Observations Observations
4.13 The observations were wide ranging and included maximising the potential that already exists, commentary about branding and the identity of the local area and communicating the advantages of digital technology. Maximising Potential

There needs to be an ongoing dialogue with regional agencies, such as Screen Yorkshire, Techmesh, Learning Light, etc. The potential of Northern Net should be maximised, for example, by providing opportunities for high profile individuals to speak via video conferencing. The BBC held its Humber election programme from Immage Studios, with an audience of Immingham people. Immage is the only facility in the East of the region with broadcast and large-scale audience capabilities. It is important to take advantage of potential funding streams, especially if their investment in the District has been relatively low, for example, the Heritage Lottery Fund.

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Branding and Identity

The District needs to create a proper brand. No one knows where North East Lincolnshire is, and the residents of Grimsby, Cleethorpes and Immingham will not agree on alternative names. Greater Grimsby is being used in an Inward Investment Campaign. There is residual resentment about (a) being subsumed into Humberside in 1974, and (b) the former Boroughs of Great Grimsby and Cleethorpes being merged to form North East Lincolnshire. Until there is consensus, it will be difficult for the District to promote itself with confidence to the outside world. People in the District tend to orient themselves towards Lincolnshire and the East Midlands, and there is also an external perception that this is a natural relationship. This is always going to be a disadvantage when the administrative boundaries tie North East Lincolnshire to Leeds and Yorkshire & the Humber. There is a low-profile student scene in the District. This makes it hard to attract students in from outside, and encourages indigenous students to leave as soon as they can.

Communicating the Digital Message

Businesses need to become digitally enabled and recognise how digital and specifically, web technologies can boost business. Digital technology can be used to connect people in rural communities.

Potential Areas for Intervention


4.14 Some of the observations led to the identification of potential areas where intervention may be effective including:

there is a pressing need to create positive images of the District and broadcast them to the world. Members of the Group realised they have a key role to play in this; there is a need to attract people who have trained in the area and left to come back. A number of people attending Humber MUD have left to progress their careers but returned when they had established themselves because they know the District is a pleasant and cheap place to live;

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there is a low level of take-up of Internet access in the Borough which needs to be combated through an awareness-raising campaign at both a community and business level;

4.15 A number of potential interventions were linked to the existing physical infrastructure or potential capital development:

the districts social housing stock is being renewed. Advantage should be taken of this opportunity to ensure that tenants are enabled with next generation access. The possibility of using interactive set-top boxes such as those used by STREAM in Hull to deliver services should be investigated. Shoreline Housing has established a social enterprise, Contract Lincs, which would be well placed to assist with the approach; there are other existing creative facilities in the area that need their profile raising; particularly the Gate, Abbey Walk Gallery and the Fishing Heritage Centre; E-Factor is building a Business Village. Part of the specification should be ensuring that it is digital-friendly; regeneration opportunities; programmes need to take account of digital

there is not a pressing need for a creative space or digitally enabled business units. However, a central facility to hire specialist kit, which is happening in an ad-hoc and informal way already, is worth pursuing. It is also worthwhile considering whether small studio spaces, editing suites and presentation facilities to pitch to potential clients are also required.

4.16 The remaining interventions covered communication with the creative and digital sector, training and marketing.

the Council should be encouraged to engage with Humber MUD (Southbank) as being representative of the creative and digital sector in the District; consideration should be given to rebranding and keeping the Humber MUD (Southbank) Group going beyond June 2010; it makes sense to consider joint working with North Lincolnshire who face similar issues;

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there is insufficient software training in the District and the potential for sub-regional and regional training providers to deliver to small cohorts of trainees in the District should be considered; there is appetite for Humber MUD (Southbank) to organise a day-long Digital Trade Fair.

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EDUCATION AND SKILLS INFRASTRUCTURE Introduction

5.1 This section sets out

the qualifications currently available nationally with relevance to the digital, media and creative sectors; and the qualifications which are delivered in North East Lincolnshire.

The National picture


5.2 Nationally, with the move from the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) to the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) the picture is somewhat unclear as to what qualifications are available in that there are some still live on the NQF till they expire and some coming live on the QCF with more to follow. Awards from Higher Education Institutes (JEIS) of course are outside of the QCF and while diverse courses may lead to the award of Honours Degree, the content of the course will vary from institution to institution as each HEI designs and delivers its own qualifications.

Qualifications National Database of Accredited Qualifications (NDAQ)


5.3 Qualifications available through the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) and qualifications that are still live in the National Qualifications Framework (NQF4) have been identified from the National Database of Accredited Qualifications (NDAQ) and are listed in Appendix B B. community education centres. Most of these qualifications would be offered through further education or

N.B. NQF qualifications will be closed for new candidate registrations at the end of 2010 unless

redesigned and input into the QCF.

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General Education qualifications


5.4 In addition to the NDAQ qualifications, there are GCSEs, A and AS Levels, NVQs and a small number of relevant 14-19 Diplomas and Apprenticeships (the relevant Apprenticeships and Diplomas may include some of the qualifications listed above) qualifications that are also listed in Appendix B.

Qualifications available in the North East Lincolnshire area


Higher Education
5.5 The only institution offering higher education qualifications in North East Lincolnshire appears to be Grimsby Institute for Further and Higher Education (part of the Yorkshire and Humber Skillset Media Academy) who offer the following:

BA (Hons) Commercial Photography; BA (Hons) Television Production; BA (Hons) Multimedia Design and Animation; Foundation Degree in Press Photography.

5.6 According to the HESA data on student numbers for the Grimsby Institute for Further and Higher Education for 2007-08 the following full time equivalents were enrolled on:

Media Studies 0 Creative Arts 149 Technology 39 Art and design 78

5.7 Due to the way the numbers are collected it is not possible to identify which of these figures relate to which degree.

Further Education
5.8 GIFHE also offers the following further education courses:

National Diploma in Interactive Media Media with Art and Design - Level 1
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National Diploma in Media (Print and Publishing) National Diploma in Media (Television and Film) National Diploma in Games Development AS and A2 Level Film Studies Diploma in Digital Applications for IT Users (Edexcel Diploma in Digital Applications) Diploma Level 1 BTEC First Diploma in Media (Edexcel First Diploma In Media) First Diploma Level 2 BTEC National Diploma in Media Production (BTEC National Diploma In Media) Edexcel National Diploma Level 3 BTEC National Diploma in Media Production (BTEC National Dip In Photography) Edexcel National Diploma Level 3 Diploma in Digital Applications for IT Users (Edexcel Diploma In Digital) Diploma Level 1)

Unaccredited courses
5.9 GIFHE additionally offers the following short course which appears to have no accreditation:

Short Courses in All Aspects of the Media from Photoshop to NonLinear Editing

Qualifications and Courses offered By Other Institutions


5.10 The following section lists courses at other institutions across North East Lincolnshire. This list may not be exhaustive and includes qualifications which have varying amounts of Digital Media content.

GCSEs
5.11 Havelock Academy offers the following:

GCSE Art and Design GCSE Design and Technology (Food Technology, Graphics, resistant Materials)

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A LEVELS
5.12 Oasis Academy, Immingham offers the following A levels:

GCE A Level in Design and Technology: Product Design (3-D Design) (AS/A2 Level Product Design (Level 3)) GCE A Level Photography (AS/A2 Level Photography (Level 3))

5.13 Franklin College offers the following A levels:


GCE AS Level Art & Design (Multimedia Graphics) GCE AS Level Art & Design (Graphics) GCE AS Level Art & Design (Photography) GCE AS Level in Applied ICT GCE AS Level Media Studies

5.14 Havelock Academy offers the following A levels:


GCE A Level in Photography GCE A Level in Art and Design GCE A Level in Photography GCE AS Level in Media Studies

1414-19 DIPLOMAS
5.15 14-19 Diplomas are offered at the following locations:

1414-19 Diploma in Creative and Media


The Lindsey School and Community Arts College in Cleethorpes Franklin College, Grimsby Grimsby institute of F&HE

1414-19 Diploma in Information Technology


Cambridge Park Maths and Computing college in Grimsby Humbersson School in Humbersson The Lindsey School and Community Arts College in Cleethorpes Hereford Technology School in Grimsby

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St Marys Catholic School in Grimsby South Bank Training Ltd in Grimsby Franklin College in Grimsby Grimsby institute of F&HE

NVQs
5.16 The following NVQs are offered by North East Lincolnshire Community Learning Services:

NVQ for IT Users (iTQ) (OCR Level 1 NVQ for IT Users) NVQ for IT Users (iTQ) (OCR Level 1 NVQ for IT Users) NVQ for IT Users (iTQ) (OCR Level 2 NVQ for IT Users) NVQ for IT Users (iTQ) (OCR Level 2 NVQ for IT Users) NVQ for IT Users (iTQ)(OCR Level 3 NVQ for IT Users)

Apprenticeships
5.17 IT User apprenticeships are offered by:

A4e - Grimsby SouthBank training- Grimsby North East Lincolnshire Council - Employment Development Services

5.18 ITQ Apprenticeships are offered by:


Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education North East Lincolnshire Community Learning Services

International Baccalaureate
5.19 The International Baccalaureate is offered by Tollbar 6th Form College, Grimsby at Level 3 in:

International Baccalaureate Diploma Design Technology HL (Design Technology) International Baccalaureate Diploma Design Technology SL (Design Technology)

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International Baccalaureate Diploma ITGS HL (ITGS) International Baccalaureate Diploma ITGS SL (ITGS)

Further Education
5.20 Franklin College, Grimsby offers the following further education courses leading to qualifications:

Certificate for iMedia Users Certificate (Inc. Entry Level) level 2 Diploma for Software Developers Edexcel First Diploma (new syllabus) level 2

5.21 Havelock Academy, Grimsby offers the following further education courses leading to qualifications:

BTEC First Diploma in Art and Design level 2 BTEC First Diploma in Art and Design Edexcel First Diploma (new syllabus) level 2

5.22 North Lincolnshire Council Adult Education Service offers the following further education courses leading to qualifications:

Award in Creative Digital Media (Digital Cre8or) Other Learning level 2 Oasis Academy, Immingham offers the following further education courses leading to qualifications: National Award in ICT level 2 (OCR National ICT) National Certificate in ICT National Certificate level 3 (OCR National ICT)

5.23 Oasis Academy, Wintringham offers the following further education courses leading to qualifications:

BTEC National Award in Art and Design Edexcel National Award level 3 National Certificate in ICT National Certificate level 3 National Diploma in ICT National Diploma level 3

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Unaccredited courses
5.24 North East Lincolnshire Community Learning Services offers the following unaccredited courses:

Creative Computing (experienced) Creative Computing beginners/intermediate Intermediate Digital Photography using Photoshop elements (Introduction to Digital Imaging Introduction to picture editing using Paintshop Pro Picture Editing for Improvers using Paintshop Pro Intermediate Picture Editing Introduction to Desktop publishing Introduction to photo editing Introduction to picture editing using Paintshop Pro Introduction to video editing Video editing for beginners Picture Editing for Improvers using Paintshop Pro Introduction to picture editing using Painshop Pro Picture Editing for Improvers using Paintshop Pro

Summary
5.25 On the whole, North East Lincolnshire is well served in relation to the availability of specific qualifications that are required by the creative and digital sector. In particular, East Coast Media provides a centre of expertise that is responsive to the changing needs of the creative and digital industry. 5.26 We have identified two areas where additional provision would be beneficial:

Apprenticeship the Advanced Apprenticeship in Creative and Digital Media is a new qualification designed to give participants the know-how, the experience and the access to key industry contacts. There is no evidence that this apprenticeship is offered in North East Lincolnshire;

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vendor ICT vendor training (Microsoft, CISCO. Adobe etc.) is in short supply and it would be advantageous if train-the-trainer activity was available to boost the capacity of indigenous training providers to deliver vendor-accredited training.

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IMMAGE STUDIOS Introduction Introduction

6.1 A key work package was to assess the potential for Immage Studios to act as a hub for the creative and digital sector in the District. It is important that we balance known issues Immage faces, with the potential that the facility offers the local area alongside recent political announcements regarding the role of local TV.

SWOT Analysis
6.2 A detailed SWOT analysis is presented in Figure 5.1 on the following page. The information for this analysis is taken directly from the Immage Business Plan for 2010/11 and we are particularly grateful to Helen Philpot for allowing us to use this data. The SWOT presents a refreshingly honest picture of the issues that Immage Studios currently faces. 6.3 Our initial observation is that the strengths of Immage reside in the human capital that has been developed and the technical platform (broadcasting and connectivity) that enables Immage to operate. We are less convinced about the financial strengths that have been presented because if larger projects from wider markets had been secured, then the need for public intervention would not be required. Addressing the key weaknesses will require initial and ongoing capital funding to invest in equipment and the fabric of the building. Whilst the opportunities are well presented, it is not clear what the focus for the business in the future should be, however, some of the threats identified can be minimised. 6.4 The focus of our assessment is therefore on the following four key areas:

location; incorporation; business focus; future investment.

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Figure 6.1: Immage Studios SWOT Analysis


Strengths Staffing Excellent creative staff with the ability to design and present creative briefs and win repeat business Clear management structure in place Weaknesses Staffing Staff development has been neglected in the past.

The working environment can be cramped at times as staff hot desk to make the best use of space. Weaknesses - Technology Much of the equipment is now more than 10 years old with a growing repair bill. Building rental and running costs exceed 75,000 per annum all of which is supported by Immage Studios Ltd Software gaps preventing increased productivity.

Excellent relationship with COMMS through shared resource Excellent relationship with ECM providing route to work opps Training courses delivered by staff members Technical trainee in place

Weaknesses Financial No long-term projects (year to year)

Succession planning structure in place (2 MBA students currently on team) Strengths Technology Multi-platform distribution technology available to meet every need of a potential client Airtime space available on both Virgin Media and SKY Studio environment gives impressive production space Separate 10MB link allows own hosting of Channel 7 website Separate VPN for external clients Increased value of projects so that there is greater flexibility to grow profit margin Growing ability to generate revenue to wider markets than just the sub-region Proven track record of income generation

Lack of clarity due to changing strategic objectives at parent company Lack of confirmed contracts with parent company that are a core of the business

Rent and service charge continue to affect margin Weaknesses Marketing Lack of marketing products (rate card, brochure, DVDs, business cards,stationary) Strong brand image needs developing No website

Strengths Financial

New account management system tested and proven. Strengths Marketing Development of business generating networks Excellent public sector reputation is growing this avenue of business National lobbying through ULTV

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Only centre of its kind in Humber Threats Staffing Loss of key staff would be a major set back as the team and its services grow Lack of support across GIFHE departments resulting in skills gaps

Opportunities Staffing Multi-skilled staff able to work across all areas of output Work experience opportunities for GIFHE students across all curriculum areas. A new product range of full cost training due to launch in Feb inc Web 2.0, ITP approved centre status, Diploma experience packages and media training. Potential to share key staff across GIFHE departments (IT, ECM) providing CPD. MSc delivery of Media and Innovation modules project Develop IPTV services (Health TV) Share Licenses with GIFHE to reduce costs Secure funding for new projector and screen via community partnership One Voice Cinema project Invest in a bulk eraser to reduce tape costs Introduce archiving system

Threats Technology Camera equipment is not widescreen and this is becoming the norm for most productions. HD kit is under utilised. Studio requires upgrade works to improve delivery of ECM shows and capacity build studio as a marketable facility

Opportunities Technology

Threats Financial Leading production role in the sub-region, but more serious competitors once moving out to look for a bigger regional market, small production companies

Threats Marketing Perception of Immingham limits the number of regional clients that can be brought over from bigger cities.

Upgrade studio and camera equipment as a staged approach Opportunities Financial Imaginative new projects filtering through with large clients Sub letting opportunity for complimentary media related businesses (Social enterprise) Strong BBC interest

Strong interest from GSMG and Cleethorpes Chronical Opportunities Marketing New website and promotional literature is a chance to get out a revised brand image

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Location
6.5 Immage Studios current location both geographically, in Immingham, and situationally, accessed via a local school, has both advantages and disadvantages:

Advantages

Although being owned by the college, it is physically separate, providing a more commercial feel for both visiting students and private sector contractors; It provides Immingham with a creative facility that can be used by the community; It is at the heart of the community.

Disadvantages

The entrance via the school detracts from the private sector focus. Immingham, whilst not having a particularly poor image, is not widely known. The fabric of the building and the rest of the site is looking tired. The other facilities occupying the site are not complimentary. Immingham is not well served by public transport meaning that to use the large studio with an audience, incentives are required to get people to the location. A schools sports facility is being developed on the site. To our knowledge, North East Lincolnshire Council has no concrete plans for developing the site further.

Incorporation
6.6 Although a wholly owned subsidiary of GIFHE, Immage Studios incorporation as a company limited by guarantee was a deliberate act to enable the following advantages:

a commercial company capable of providing a real work placement environment for a range of students studying at FE and HE levels;

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helping to fulfil the requirements of the Skillset Media Academy; providing a model for charging full-cost on private and/or public sector contracts.

6.7 However, Immage incorporation also means that it has to face the real world private sector pressures that all companies face, not least in the midst of an economic downturn. This means being able to, as a minimum, meet the fixed costs that enables Immage to deliver its core activities. In addition to meeting fixed costs, Immage needs to generate surplus funds to enable continual investment in new equipment to ensure that it will be able to provide industry-standard facilities.

Business Focus
6.8 Immage has a number of potential workstreams:

full-cost commercial work; contracts for work placement with GIFHE; public sector and/or community usage.

6.9 There is a strong rationale for the company to develop a more discrete focus on one of these activities, whereas the current economic pressures means that Immage is trying to be all things to all people in order to maintain income streams to ensure its survival. 6.10 Going forward, it would be preferable for Immage Studios to develop a niche area of operation, with the Health TV business, providing the most natural springboard for development.

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6.11 However, recent announcements by the new Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt5, suggests a focus on local news in the future and that this will be provided via local TV franchises, potentially through mergers with local newspapers and radio stations. We are aware that Immage via United for Local Television (ULTV) has already written to Jeremy Hunt supporting his proposals and has made a submission to Ofcom about potential ways forward. 6.12 There will be a time-lag before the impact of these announcements come through and although promising, does not provide the short-term action that may be required. 6.13 The new developments obviously present opportunities for Immage and Channel 7. However, it is not yet clear how they will be implemented, and it may take some time before they produce anything concrete. It is our view that the development traditional of Web 2.0 technologies and has fundamentally made the undermined media models, potentially

maintenance of facilities requiring expensive equipment and specialist staff untenable, except in circumstances where they can reach mass markets and generate substantial income from advertising and/or licence fee arrangments. The ability for almost anyone to use mobile phones, or other relatively inexpensive equipment to capture video and audio, and even broadcast live, is shifting the balance of power and putting the tools for story-telling and communication in the hands of everyone. 6.14 Media is no longer about one-way consumption. And, in this environment, demand for facilities such as Immage is declining, and the likes of Channel 7 are operating in a landscape where they compete for attention on the one hand with lavishly-funded channels with national reputations, and usergenerated content on Youtube. While the latter lacks the production values that Channel 7 can bring, its advantages are its immediacy, its ability to tap into the values and culture of young people, and its capacity to spark genuine dialogue.

http://blogs.channel4.com/news/benjamin-cohen-on-technology/2010/06/08/culturesecretary-jeremy-hunt-sets-out-vision-for-broadband-and-local-tv/

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6.15 We are thus taking a midly sceptical approach to the Culture Secretarys announcement on local TV. It would, nevertheless, be a very retrograde step to risk destroying such a facility if the Government has something in mind which would revitalise such operations, as that would give North East Lincolnshire a unique advantage in starting ahead of the position of most localities. We therefore believe that this is another reason to explore every possible option to keep Immage Studios and Channel 7 in operation, in the short-term at least.

Future Investment
6.16 It is estimated that 160k of funding is required to ensure that the equipment at Immage is brought up-to-date to meet current industry standards. Additional investment in equipment will be required in light of developments in the industry as they occur. 6.17 Updating the fabric of the building is the responsibility of the leaseholder in addition to the lease fee. We acknowledge that this can amount to a significant cost to the organisation, although it is not clear that these costs are beyond those that a private limited company would incur if the lease was operated via a private sector landlord. It is also not clear that reducing the lease or allowing a lease-free period would necessarily ensure the longterm survival of Immage Studios.

Conclusion and Options


Conclusions
6.18 Immage Studios is a significant creative facility that has the potential to succeed as a private business. Its current location in Immingham, alongside the lack of development on its current site, is not conducive to it being a creative hub for the District. In addition, significant investment in equipment is initially required to ensure that the facilities are brought up to industry standards and ongoing investment is required to maintain this status.

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Options
6.19 It is imperative that the management team at Immage Studios,

representatives of GIFHE and senior officers at North East Lincolnshire Council meet to consider a range of options that provide the best opportunity for Immage to survive and thrive. 6.20 Location A decision needs to be made regarding the most advantageous location for Immage Studios. The options are:

Immage remains at its current location in Immingham (short-term); Immage relocates as part of the development of the HE Block at GIfHE (medium-term); Immage is part of a potential HE/Education development (Tier 3) at Alexandra dock (long-term)

6.21 Incorporation It is important for the Immage Studios management team in consultation with its stakeholders review its current legal status and explore the advantages and disadvantages of:

becoming a Community Investment Company (CIC) to mirror Channel 7s current status; becoming a department within GIFHE rather than a wholly-owned subsidiary; sever its ties with GIFHE to focus solely on private sector income generation; consider the possibility of merging with other local media providers to take advantage of the new political climate.

6.22 Business Focus Immage Studios needs to:

focus preferably on a single, or at most, two core areas of work that provide a steady income stream and have the potential for growth; consider how it can contribute to implementing the recommendations in this report and whether North East Lincolnshire Council would pay for these services; seek to open up its facilities to other education and training providers subject to the decision regarding growth;

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6.23 Investment Discuss with North East Lincolnshire the most critical investment need in relation to equipment and the possibility of a loan to upgrade its equipment or a prominent role (and potential location) in the development of the equipment bank loan scheme proposed in Section 8.

Summary
6.24 We think that there are currently too many uncertainties and possibilities in the offing to come to a definitive recommendation about the future of Immage. 6.25 It is clear, however, that the status quo is the least favourite option and some action needs to be taken to secure the future of both Immage Studios and Channel 7. 6.26 We would recommend that some of the considerations to be taken into account when considering the future of Immage are:

the changed environment where social media and user-generated content have become as important as expensively-produced TV, radio and newspaper output;

the relationships between Immage and the rest of the Creative & Digital sector in North East Lincolnshire and beyond;

the potential for Immage to work with providers other than GIFHE and to spread its horizons beyond the district boundaries.

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STUDIES COMPARATIVE CASE STUDIES Introduction

7.1 In this Section we draw on the experience of others who have used a physical space as a hub to attract creative professionals and through this process organically grow the creative and digital sector. 7.2 We have specifically chosen three examples where it is relatively easy to draw parallels with the potential inherent in North East Lincolnshire. The three examples are:

the Abbey Walk Gallery in Grimsby; the Woodend Creative Workspace in Scarborough and; the Ropewalk in Barton upon Humber.

7.3 We present a brief vignette of each example but also draw out the common themes and distinct differences to identify the critical success factors that are needed for a physical hub to be successful.

Critical Success Factors


Common Factors
7.4 The Operation Managers/Directors of all three examples agree that a number of factors have stood out as being critical to success:

creative sector knowledge all three case study examples were clear about which sub-sectors of the creative and digital community they were seeking to attract. This ranged from focusing on art and design professionals who require workshop and exhibition space, through to more generic creative professionals that require space and meeting rooms; location and accessibility all three examples have a USP either in terms of the building facility itself, its location either because it is centrally located, or in a scenic location and all three are readily accessed via car and public transport or within comfortable walking distance for those who live in the locations;
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flexible terms the ability to agree flexible licenses is perceived to be important for creative professionals. Terms range from a minimum of one month to six months and exit clauses include as little as 20 working days notice; creative community & landlord involvement all three examples identified that the connection between landlord and tenant needs to go beyond a contractual relationship and having a genuine interest in the businesses locating in the facility and being available to support these businesses beyond providing facilities is highly valued. Developing a creative community to encourage collaboration is part of this process and it is incumbent on landlords to encourage applications from companies/organisations that have synergy; facilities/managed services having access to kitchen facilities (preferably your own) and/or an open cafe area, access to additional meeting space (either free or at a preferable rate) plus managed services (reception/fax/photocopier/admin etc.) is becoming the norm and adds to the attractiveness of the offer for current and perspective clients; Abbey Walk Gallery

Elaine Munson and Gill Gibbon graduated in 2007 and asked the question, what would we as artists want from a building to take our professional careers forward to produce work and how can we promote emerging artists and help them to be taken seriously in their careers? They concluded that they needed studio space, like minded people, professional exhibition, art materials, and space to run workshops. They knew they wanted a space to work in as artists, somewhere with a professional outlook so that people would have the experience of a major city art gallery, but which is welcoming and not frightening to enter, where people would feel encouraged to visit. They undertook extensive research into what other artists needed combining this with a search for a building that would meet their requirements. Their approach to research was very thorough, with information gathered from a wide variety of people and organisations, such as the Arts Development Council, Grimsby Institute, The Gate Gallery, Austen Mitchell Labour MP, Arts Council Dewsbury, Urban Artspace, and Ropewalk. They also hosted workshops at East Coast College, to talk with students about their needs following graduation. In addition they worked closely with their architect going over previous plans for the building, and included information gathered from visits to other galleries and shared spaces.

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They set up as a Partnership, because they see the Gallery as providing a living for them, they have an investment in the building, and their strengths complement each other. Capital investment in the building was a key decision leading to their Partnership Agreement, with income streams from the artist licences, weekly workshops and sale of art materials and artwork. They host exhibitions every 4-6 weeks, know the space well, know how market it having developed an extensive client list. They also promote artists to London galleries, and provide encouragement and support Since opening in July 2008 they have attained 95% occupancy with recent graduates, full time artists, part time artists, retired artists, sculptors, painters, print, photography, installation as tenants. There are 10 resident artists including the proprietors. Factors that

affect occupancy rates include the artists desire to be part of an arts environment, to gain inspiration from each other, but have a door to shut if they need peace and quiet. Abbey Walk Gallery provides a place of work outside the home, as well as a permanent exhibition space upstairs and use of the workshop area to provide additional income. Critical to this success is the location of the Gallery, which needed to be accessible, but not too close to hustle and bustle of commercial centre so that it is provides somewhere conducive to artists working, but is close enough for a good footfall. The Gallery also provides good value for money for the tenants, with the flexibility of a licence agreement rather than fixed rental term, and with the proprietors acting as their promoters. This promotion is a key success factor, with a wide range of marketing tools employed from articles and adverts in local newspapers, every exhibition is featured in the Grimsby Evening Telegraph, magazines, a large email and postal list, electronic media such as Facebook and Twitter, Website and blog. posters to the Library. There are poster updates on the building, The adverts in Cleethorpes Tourism and Yellow pages, and hand delivery of leaflets and However, one the most effective is word of mouth. proprietors comment that they have lots of advocates, and in the artistic world this counts enormously. This is evident from the amount of research they did before setting up and also from the ongoing networking they do. Their unique selling point is that everything is under one roof, from studio space to exhibition space, the shop and opportunity to delivery workshops. There is a real sense of community amongst the artists and this conveys beyond the Gallery doors to the community outside.

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Other Important Factors


7.5 There are differences of opinion about a range of issues:

24 x 7 access some creative professionals see the flexibility to be able when they want to as important, whilst others view their occupations as 9 5 jobs where out-ofhours access is not a necessity; connectivity for some creative professionals, high speed broadband access is perceived as a given, whilst for others it is seen to be less important; supplysupply-side considerations although not having sufficient demand needs to be a consideration, if there is already a facility offering the same/similar facilities within the same geographical location, it will be important to reconsider the opportunity and/or choose a more appropriate location. Although competition is important to an extent as it drives differentiation, at best it will drive down rental fees and at worst will mean that one facility is oversubscribed and another facility lies empty; incorporation whilst the three examples we have showcased have different features: a formal or informal mechanism for tenant /interaction to ensure needs continue to be met; a separate business structure focused on ensuring that the facilities are sustainable businesses in their own right. Woodend Creative Workspace communication legal structures e.g. limited company, commercial partnership, not-for-profit organisation, they have two common

Woodend Creative Workspace is a flagship project in Scarborough which provides purpose-built managed office accommodation for individuals, companies and enterprises operating in the digital, media and creative sector. They offer a range of services to external businesses including conference and meeting spaces, a virtual office service and hot-desk facility. Development of the Workspace was driven by the Scarborough Renaissance programme which had creativity at its heart. They have taken a crumbling landmark building, and turned it into a vibrant creative business community which is managed by Creative Industries Creative Trust Ltd, a not for profit organisation. The Trust is committed to assisting and supporting the growth of the creative industries

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sector in the area through the provision of quality workspace and programmes that attract and develop new businesses and jobs in the sector and support cultural regeneration. There are 52 units, 8 artists studios, a Museum store, an Art Gallery and 3 Meeting Rooms. 60% of the units were let within one year of starting up, and for the last year they have been at 90% occupancy with a wide variety of creative and digital businesses covering web designers, graphic designers, photographers, software developers, architect, public sector NYCC youth services connecting with youth culture, painters, textile, goldsmiths, antiques, applied visual arts, machinery design. Occupancy rates are attributed to the quality of the building, which offers value for money, the opportunity to be part of a large creative collaborative business community, with good managed services and business support within the building. Marketing has been mainly via word of mouth, referrals and networking, building up relationships so that editorials are run in the press, raising the profile regionally. There were some sceptics in the early days, encountered in the open meetings held, and one of the first marketing tasks for the Director, was to get to know the local creative community to help people get beyond the idea of Woodend on paper and translate it into the real thing. Once businesses started to move in, people began to see the opportunity the building provides to the creative industry. One aspect of their success is the quality and personability of the managed services aspect, a hotel for businesses. Businesses can plug in and play, there are excellent reception services creating a professional feel to the building. There is also a personal approach from the management who consider themselves part of the creative community, who are visible and accessible, and interested in what the tenants are doing. business and creative community. The management is able to provide advocacy and business opportunities from the wider Woodend offers creative businesses the prestige of being based in a historical and yet innovative building. Becoming tenants broadens their horizons, allows them to collaborate, provide mutual support and use of business expertise and products/services that they might otherwise not have had access to. For example, if the Museum needs photographer or web designer then local businesses are all on site. The current Director joined the project during the building phase and comments that the build would have benefited from bringing in the people who would be managing the building at an earlier stage to work alongside architects and developers. The managers know the what the day to day use of the building will require and can feed this into the design and development. It can be difficult to change structures once they have been

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built. Examples of things that could have been done include putting glass windows in doors, because creative people like to see out and to be seen (or use glass walls), building one kitchen bigger than the others to provide catering facilities for the meetings and conferences. Not placing the comms unit near the plant room, because of the sensitivity of the equipment housed there, and repairing the roof during the build. Maintenance costs should be considered before installing systems that will be a drain on future financial resources and operating costs. Scarborough had a core creative community, the right timing due to the Renaissance project, as well as the right people with passion and vision to enable Woodend Creative Workspace to happen. There was a good link up between private and public sector and education all working together and these structures and linkages provided a great starting point for the project. The team was also clear on what it could offer, the Scarborough lifestyle surf before work and the type of businesses they could attract, individuals who want to branch out on their own, are flexible to be anywhere with a good broadband facility and are attracted to the lifestyle.

Starting the Process


7.6 There appears to be to schools of thought regarding starting the process of establishing a creative hub:

wait until there is a critical mass of creative and digital businesses that would benefit from a physical collaborative space and build on this foundation; establish the space and with sufficient drive and passion, creative professionals will be drawn to the facility;

7.7 Whichever approach is adopted, there appears to be three phases and associated timelines to development:

Phase 1: Consultation and Planning this typically includes needs analysis with perspective tenants to agree how the space should be configured, community forum meetings to establish the likely impacts depending on the location and due diligence work to inform building /refurbishment costs and negotiations with the local authority/other funding stakeholders. if this is not the case;
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This phase can take between 6 month and a

year if a suitable site/facility has been sourced, or considerably longer

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Phase 2: Building/Refurbishment once the construction/layout of the facility has been agreed, appropriate suppliers need to be identified and contracted to undertake the work which needs to be completed before tenants can move in. The timescale for this phase will depend on the condition of the site for a new-build or the scale of alterations required if an existing building is being refurbished. Again a minimum of 6 months, or more likely 12 months, should be anticipated; Phase 3: Established Tenancies It will take up to six months to secure 60-80% occupancy, although interest in the facility should have been sparked in Phase 1 and making arrangements for anchor tenants to move in can be negotiated in parallel to Phase 2.

The Ropewalk
In 1999 a group of like-minded artists came together wanting to save the Ropery building in Barton upon Humber, and provide studio and exhibition space. There was no critical mass of artists, and there was no particular decision made to grow the sector, just determination and passion from like-minded artists. The Ropewalk opened in April 2000 with four artist studios, 2 galleries, picture framing and printmaking facilities and a darkroom. Since then there has been growth in the sector, as people are drawn to the Ropewalk as a centre for creativity. business help, support and advice. other. The success has been down to passion, hard work and determination, and an understanding of the creative/artistic mindset, whereby the environment they work in is not just where they go to work, but is somewhere they want to be and to bring their clients and where there is a sense of community. The ethos of the building is one of the critical success factors enticing both tenants and audiences, because there is something romantic about an old industrial unit that provided work for the local community, being restored in a creative and imaginative way, again providing work for the local community. Success is also down the use made of their spaces, both in terms of the galleries, single, double and treble units, and the meeting rooms. Although there is a caf, more often than not, tenants use the meeting rooms to meet with their clients, since this provides additional professional space outside of their units. The three meeting rooms are also let externally on a daily-hire basis providing a lucrative source of income. The largest seats 120 people, theatre style, and is used for film nights, theatre, comedy and music gigs. 60 Phase 2 was the opening of Fathom Works in Today they are at 80% occupancy, with a vibrant September 2005, offering 18 creative industry units, 12 artist studios and providing artistic and creative community of professionals collaborating and encouraging each

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This all adds to the sense of lots going on that the creative industries tenants can feel a part of in the business community. The managed services are also a key factor in occupancy rates. Tenants can make use of the receptionist and administrative services, but also the more intangible service, of feeling they are looked after, they have an opportunity to be part of a larger community than their own small business. They benefit from being featured on the Fathom Works website, and often the management act as advocates and provide business opportunities word of mouth. This word of mouth is a key marketing tool for filling the units, and networking and collaboration amongst the tenants. Before, developing the creative industries units (Phase 2 of the building) there was a 6 month process of consultation with 200 creative industries surveyed on their space requirements and training needs. Other buildings and sites were visited to gather information on how other buildings have been developed/operate. The building ultimately dictated how large the units could be, but it has been sympathetically refurbished retaining some of the old feature of the building, adding to the sense of charm.

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CONCLUSIONS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

8.1 In this section we:

provide our overall conclusion in relation to the creative and digital sector in North East Lincolnshire; present two overarching community-based initiatives to raise the profile of the use and value of digital technologies; make 32 short, medium and longer-term detailed recommendations that the local authority, its stakeholders and the creative and digital sector can take forward in partnership.

Conclusion
8.2 Our consultations have led us to believe that there are a number of steps which need to be taken to prepare the district for the digital future. Despite significant, even leading edge infrastructure which should be of great assistance in creating a district with future digital possibilities, it seems to us that awareness of the possibilities offered by digital technologies is unusually low at most levels in the area. The strong traditions of industries such as fishing, oil refining, chemicals and seaside tourism continue to have strong resonance in the area, and to shape local peoples ideas about their working futures. The local authority and its partners have taken strong, effective action to assist these sectors to make the most of what persists of their traditional markets, and to adapt to modern realities and changing requirements. While these are very necessary actions and demonstrate strong leadership of the local authority and partners in ensuring the districts economy has a robust base for the future, it also serves to reinforce peoples views about the nature of viable jobs and where their economic futures might lie.

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8.3 We would recommend that North East Lincolnshire Council and its partners explore the extent to which they can take a similar approach to supporting and stimulating the Creative and Digital Industries as is currently pursued with sectors such as chemicals, fish processing and renewables. But, alongside these measures, which may well have the effect of taking a relatively small sector, stabilising it, and helping it to achieve a certain amount of growth, we believe it is necessary to pursue an approach which seeks to embed knowledge and awareness of the possibilities offered by digital technologies, the first step in which is in making digital a reality in their lives.

CommunityOverarching Community-Based Initiatives


8.4 We therefore recommend that local partners seek to pursue two key strands of activity, which are related to each other, but which are perhaps best treated as two distinct entities. These initiatives are designed to achieve a number of objectives, namely:

to introduce people to the potential of digital technologies to improve their standard of life; to generate engaging activities which will encourage people to use technologies repeatedly, thereby developing digital fluency; to use social media to harness the power of social networks to:

build local civic pride; generate new ideas; promote the district and its communities to the outside world; allow local people to co-create and deliver services; and foster participation in democratic processes.

8.5 The two initiatives are:


Social Media for Civic Renewal; and a Community Technology Initiative.

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Social Media for Civic Renewal


8.6 The first is a programme of Social media for civic renewal modelled on the Amplified Leicester programme, which has been sponsored by NESTA (the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts) over the past 18 months. 8.7 Amplified Leicester is a city-wide experiment designed to boost the innovation capacity of the city and share new skills which are fast becoming essential in 21st Century workplaces and communities. 8.8 In 2009/10 De Montford Unversity has led a partnership which has brought together a group of around 30 participants from across the city to explore the potential of social media to develop the potential to:

benefit from an areas diversity of people and cultures; generate new ideas quickly; think like a futurist and see the bigger picture; organise and collaborate better; be persuasive in different social situations; share and develop creative ideas; manage the stream of information which bombards us every day; choose the best people to collaborate with; make the most of different kinds of resources social, economic, creative.

8.9 Every fortnight participants attended inspiring lectures and workshops and in between meetings worked together via Twitter, Facebook and other social media applications. They filmed interviews in their communities and shared the videos online.

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8.10 Much of the thinking behind Amplified Leicester came from the work of Andrea Saveri, Research Director of the Institute for the Future, Palo Alto, California. Saveri argues that cities and communities need to amplify themselves to build resilience. This philosophy is particularly apt in the current climate, as it seeks to build capacity for communities to do more with less in response to the global financial crisis (and, in the UK context, in a time of major cuts in public expenditure). Through the use of social media to bring people together across disciplines, combine skills, and co-produce new ideas, communities can be enabled to develop flexible responses to the rapid changes which are a feature of modern life. Unlike traditional forms of organisation and planning, this approach focuses on future patterns rather than past trends, and is informed by intuitive solutions and creative processes, rather than historical data. 8.11 The amplified approach helps communities to learn what is possible and develop a culture of resilience. It distributes the possibility of innovation and exploits the diversity of groups to organise flexibly and respond to new challenges. It facilitates people working together to engage in prototyping, the repeated creation of potential models for action, most of which will not succeed, but the process of creation is a useful learning process, both in the practical learning process of creation, but also in the fact that it teaches participants that failure is an action, not an identity, projects and schemes fail, individuals dont, they pick themselves up, learn from the process, and aim to be successful next time.

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8.12 Amplified Leicester has created empathetic relationships between decisionmakers and community members, and the intention is that this will contribute to the formation of a collective transformational mindset. With communities as with individuals, fixed mindsets are characterised by the belief that talents are fixed at an early stage, and that the key life task is to demonstrate them. A growth mindset considers that talent is a constantly evolving quality, and that people and communities are always growing and acquiring new skills. Through the effective use of social media, interactions can take place within communities, across boundaries and between people in different disciplines. In a similar way to how the human brain grows more complex connections as it develops and learns more, amplified communities can achieve organic growth by stimulating innovative interactions. A key point about this process is that the process of transformation is open and transparent, and that the whole community can thus be engaged with it as it develops. 8.13 We believe that this approach could be an important first step in utilising modern technologies and social media to harness the talents and creativity of North East Lincolnshires people to drive the district forward into a modern era where technology plays an increasing part in the everyday lives of all its citizens, and people are able to use it to develop the skills and capacity necessary to shape the districts future. 8.14 We also believe that this approach goes with the grain of the new Governments Big Society initiative, which is dependent on mechanisms to harness local individuals and groups initiative to drive community regeneration. It is vital that such an approach can be underpinned by measures to network initiatives and amplify their products.

Community Technology Initiative


8.15 The second overarching programme is our recommendation that Working Neighbourhoods Fund and other available resources should be used as match funding for a bid to Priority 3, Objective 4 of the European Regional Development Fund for a Community Technology Initiative designed to build the capacities of individuals and communities to use digital technologies for personal and community development, and to gain skills for employment.

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8.16 Elements of this initiative are briefly described below and might include:

the development of community-based social media centres; the development of a community reporter programme; and providing refurbished computers and associated connectivity.

Centres: Community-based Social Media Centres: ommunity8.17 The aim of a Social Media Centre is:

to help community projects, individuals and communities spread their messages innovatively; to form a hub of people sharing skills and exchanging information to create exciting content which can be published and distributed online; to provide access to the equipment needed to create social media; to support the development of community reporters; to act as a communication hub for a local multiplatform content distribution. community providing

8.18 In essence, a social media centre is a place that not only supports the development of content but also provides a social space for people to interact and learn from each other. It acts as a communication hub for the local community by providing a single point of access for the development and distribution of content. A social media centre therefore might not only provide a social space for the development of content but also provide informal and formal accredited programmes. This content could be distributed via a community web site, local blogs, internet TV station (using a youtube channel), Channel 7, community TV, internet radio (podcasts), multimedia online magazine (open source), or a physical newspaper. 8.19 The purpose of the centre is also to develop dialogue and consultation between different agencies, individuals and communities. The centre attracts in funding from a variety of sources to sustain itself.

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Community Reporter Programme


8.20 The Community Reporter Programme is an exciting and innovative way for people to build confidence, learn new skills and tell a story about themselves. 8.21 Everyone has something to say - about where they live, what they're experiencing, and what they want to see happen. The Community Reporter Programme gives people a platform to tell these stories online, and in the process develop their confidence and improve both practical and soft skills. On completion of the programme, reporters receive a Community Reporter accreditation. 8.22 Reporters learn how to produce content on blogs, podcasts, video and images using technology in the pocket devices such as mobile phones, video cameras and webcams. Stories are distributed through an online network, which consists of community web sites, Facebook, Twitter and other social networking sites, ensuring that those voices can be heard by anyone online. There are currently over 350 Community Reporters around the UK, and the BBC has developed a training programme for them with the editor of the regional news programme in the North West.

Refurbished computers
8.23 Despite the widespread availability of fast broadband in the district, it still remains the case that take up of computers and internet access is lower than average. Sero is currently working with DC10plus, Ofcom, and the National Digital Participation Consortium to roll out a national programme to make refurbished public sector computers available to low income people. This programme is based on a local model developed by Milton Keynes Council and Microsoft, which has the following characteristics:

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the PC Loans project is part of Milton Keynes Council's twin-pronged strategy to drive digital inclusion in the city, alongside the deployment of its District-wide WiMAX network. ConnectMK, the council's digital delivery arm has developed a programme over three years which has supplied more than 900 recycled computers, taken from council stock as it becomes redundant at the end of it's 3-year life cycle, to lowincome individuals and families in the district; computers are bought out of the Council's lease agreement, and remain the property of the local authority. They are leased to beneficiaries for a small fee, currently set at 2 per week. Computers are expected to have a 3 - 4 year lifespan within the project as they are generally of a higher spec than those on the domestic market; the majority of computers in the scheme are desktop PCs, but a small number of laptops has been made available to people who can prove a special need for them; at an early stage in the project, Digital Service Centres (DSCs), local community internet cafes, were developed in key localities. These acted as outreach centres drawing people in, engaging them with ICT uses, and identifying potential beneficiaries for computer loans. Centres are run by staff of existing agencies (including Sure Start Centres and voluntary organisations), Connect MK simply supplies the equipment. Some DSCs are open access, others are open to specific target groups; the scheme has been marketed in a variety of ways, including door-todoor delivery of branded mouse mats; Connect MK is a Microsoft Authorised Refurbisher (MAR). This is an internationally recognised and accredited computer recycling process, which ensures that all PCs are refurbished to a high standard, and that all hard disks are wiped of pre-existing data to a standard which meets the requirements of the Ministry of Defence; involvement in the MAR programme has enabled Connect MK to work with Microsoft to develop a social software licensing model, enabling all computers in the scheme to be loaded with Windows XP and Office 2003 at very low cost;

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the Council has negotiated with another software supplier to allowance licenses for its anti-virus software to be extended to participants in the PC Loans Scheme; Connect MK has worked with Microsoft to purchase and further develop a comprehensive Customer Management System for the initiative which is now available for adoption by other authorities and agencies; with over 1,000 PCs loaned to date, cases of loss, theft, mis-use of equipment, and bad debt have been minimal. There is substantial evidence that clients place a high value on the asset and the impact it can have on their lives; technical support is provided by the central ConnectMK team, which consists of 2.5 full-time customer facing & administration posts, and one full-time technician.

8.24 We recommend that North East Lincolnshire partners seek EU funding to develop a local version of this programme ahead of the national roll out, and allowing a more intensive focus on local residents than will be possible in the national scheme.

Connectivity Connectivity
8.25 There is a range of ways that local people can be provided with internet access including:

supply of internet connectivity on a low cost basis to low income and disadvantaged individuals and families, via subsidised connections packaged with: social housing rents; telehealth/telecare packages; educational packages from schools, colleges & universities;

free wifi provision in public areas organised through local ad hoc networks, advertising-funded mesh networks, and publicly subsidised provision, eg: giving away recycled routers to encourage organisations to point one out of a window;

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encouraging schools, public bodies and others to share their wifi; sponsored free access at defined times to paid-for networks.

Additional Recommendations
Programme Programme Workstreams
8.26 We have allocated detailed recommendations into one of the following six workstreams:

public sector (PS); awareness raising (AR); community focus (CF); sector development (SD); education and skills (E & S); capital infrastructure (CI).

8.27 The number of recommendations within each workstream is presented in Figure 8.1 below. .
Figure 8.1: Workstream Recommendations

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Timescales
8.28 We have also indicated a short, medium or long-term timescale for each recommendation:

short-term (S) essentially quick wins that should be able to be achieved within 12 months; medium-term (M) actions that will take two to five years to complete; long-term (L) actions where planning can take place but it is more likely that a five-year plus timescale is realistic.

8.29 The number of recommendations within each timeframe is presented in Figure 8.2 below.
Figure 8.2: Timescale for Recommendations

8.30 The 35 recommendations are presented by workstream in Table 8.1 on the following page. For completeness we have included the two overarching recommendations, Social Media for Civic Renewal (Recommendation 5) and Community Technology Initiative (Recommendation 6). 8.31 For the remainder of this section we briefly explain the rationale behind each action.

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Table 8.1: Recommendations by Programme Workstream No. Action Point 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Use existing businesses to provide content to publicise the vibrancy of the sector by providing a summary of successes on the new Greater Grimsby website and a link to a creative and digital microsite. Work with existing groups to develop an online Cultural and Arts Programme of Events for North East Lincolnshire. The diary can also be used to publicise forthcoming events. Engage Yorkshire Forward and business intermediary organisations to ensure that the benefits of digital are promoted to local businesses. Ensure that the Transformational ICT (TICT) Programme activities are piloted and delivered in North East Lincolnshire. Develop a programme of regular Social Media Surgeries based on the successful first surgery held at the Fishing Heritage Centre on 29th April on 2010. Consider the adoption of a Social Media for Civic Renewal programme based on the Amplified Leicester model. Engage with the community and voluntary sector to develop a Community Technology Initiative using ERDF funding. The districts social housing stock is being renewed. Advantage should be taken of this opportunity to ensure that tenants are enabled with next generation access. The possibility of using interactive set-top boxes to deliver services should be investigated. Work with the Immage Studios management team to agree sustainable forward strategy and the extent to which Immage is a suitable vehicle to deliver a sub-set of these recommendations. Work with Virgin Media to establish whether North East Lincolnshire can be a test-bed for piloting new Virgin products and services. S/M/L S S S S M M M S M Workstream AR AR AR AR CF CF CF CI CI

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Table 8.1: Recommendations by Programme Workstream No. Action Point 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Market and promote ICT Active as the benchmark that all building space should aspire to. Raise the profile of existing creative facilities in the area, for example, the Gate, Abbey Walk Gallery and the Fishing Heritage Centre. Consider creating an equipment store and loan mechanism to house and hire specialist kit required by creative professionals. Consider where small studio spaces, editing suites and presentation facilities to pitch to potential clients can be located. Ensure that the potential for including flexible space for equipment hire/presentation facilities are considered as part of the specification for the library Tier 1 developments at Alexandra dock. Ensure that the potential for artist studio space is considered as part of Renaissance Cleethorpes planning. Work with the Freeman to ensure that regeneration around the East March area is maximised and reconsider whether equipment can be sourced to support the new studio unit within the Freeman Street Market. A watching brief should be kept in relation to the need for a physical space for creative professionals to work and meet. Work with education and training stakeholder to investigate the potential for delivering the Advanced Apprenticeship in Creative and Digital Media. S/M/L S S S M M L M L S Workstream CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI E&S

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Table 8.1: Recommendations by Programme Workstream No. Action Point 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Work with education and training providers outside North East Lincolnshire to engage in train-thetrainer activity to boost the capacity to deliver accredited ICT vendor training. Promote the USP that North East Lincolnshire has a solid fibre network infrastructure. The report emanating from this study needs to be adopted by the local authority as the first strategic plan for the creative and digital sector. Identify a senior lead officer and lead member who will champion the benefits of the sector and seek to ensure that the strategy is implemented. Ensure that the lead officer for is involved in other sector strategy development. Use the benefits of the new strategic partnership with Balfour Beatty to provide additional sector specific expertise. The lead officer for creative and digital should work alongside the inward investment team to ensure that the creative and digital offer is maximised as part of the pitch to potential investors. Collaborate with local authorities who face similar issues e.g. North Lincolnshire . Create a microsite for the sector which will act as a virtual meeting space for the sector, promote regular monthly events and opportunities for sector businesses. Decisions will need to be made regarding branding e.g. Greater Grimsby/Humber MUD (South Bank).
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S/M/L S S S S S S S S S

Workstream E&S PS PS PS PS PS PS PS SD

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Table 8.1: Recommendations by Programme Workstream No. Action Point 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Secure the ongoing Humber MUD South Bank meetings for a 12 month period, potentially with different branding. Develop case studies featuring returning or relocating creative professionals demonstrating the lifestyle lower costs of living benefits of living and working in Greater Grimsby/North East Lincolnshire. Foster greater collaboration and networking by creating a directory of creative and professional companies using Humber MUD (Southbank) as a starting point. Work with district wide business support agencies to further investigate the need for sector-specific business support. Arrange a meeting of North East Lincolnshire creative and digital stakeholders with their counterparts in Swindon to investigate whether the Swindon wifi model has transferable benefits. The potential of Northern Net should be maximised, for example, by providing opportunities for high profile individuals to speak via video conferencing. Commission Humber MUD (Southbank) to organise a day-long Digital Trade Fair. Develop a regular programme of Girl Geek dinners/event for North East Lincolnshire. S/M/L S M S S S S S S Workstream SD SD SD SD SD SD SD SD

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Awareness Raising
8.32 There are four recommendations connected to this workstream, all of which can be achieved within a short timescale:

publicise the vibrancy of the sector - there is an opportunity to use the existing creative talent within the sector to populate the creative and digital section within the Greater Grimsby website; develop an online Cultural and Arts Programme we came across an issue when we delivered the Social Media Surgery at the Heritage Centre, as it clashed with another sub-regional event. programme of events; There are sufficient ongoing activities within the sector to publicise an annual Transformational ICT Programme (TICT) as this Yorkshire Forward programme comes on stream, it is important that businesses in North East Lincolnshire have the opportunity to participate in ICT activities that are designed to lead to a step-change in business performance; social media surgeries the first Social Media Surgery was a success with a number of individuals and businesses expressing interest in attending, although they could not on this occasion. digital sector. Social Media Surgeries are open to all businesses, not just those in the creative and

Community Focus
8.33 There are three actions attributed to the Community Focus workstream which are all medium-term activities, recognising the lead time required in effectively engaging the community:

consider adopting a Social Media for Civic Renewal programme (see earlier); engage with the voluntary and community sector to develop a Community Technology Initiative using ERDF funding (see earlier);

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social housing opportunity there is a win/win opportunity to providing social housing tenants with next generation access. The social housing landlord has significant buying power with a broadband provider plus a new and cheaper consultation mechanism with their client base, and the broadband provider has access to a new unreached market base;

Capital Infrastructure
8.34 There are ten actions within the Capital Infrastructure workstream. Five of these actions could be achieved within a year, three in a medium-term timescale and two in the longer-term:

Immage Studio option appraisal we have been unable to come to a cut and dried decision in relation to Immage Studios. However, we have been able to present a range of scenarios which provides good basis to enable North East Lincolnshire Council and the Immage Studios (including GIFHE) management team to engage in discussions regarding the future of the facility; Virgin Media relationship if one of the USPs of the district is its fibre network, it should be an ideal test-bed for piloting Virgin Media next generation access products and services, for example the recent announcement6 regarding rolling-out a 400 Mbps service by the end of the year; ICT Active although there are adequate business facilities including the e-factor business incubation premises coming on-stream, it is important that they have appropriate connectivity to support both creative and digital businesses and businesses in general in the future. ict Active provides an assessment and accreditation route to a British Standard which should be the benchmark to which business premises aspire. e-factors current premise portfolio have met this standard;

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existing facilities there is a range of facilities that seek to serve the creative and digital sector that are well worth promoting prior to making decisions about any capital new-build or refurbishment projects; equipment store businesses within the sector have identified the lack of professional equipment as a barrier to development. Consideration should be given to developing a mechanism to enable creative professionals to hire equipments at reasonable rates. The equipment store could be hosted by Immage Studios; studio/editing/pitching facilities although there is no discernable excess demand for business facilities, a number of people have cited the need for:

small scale studio/editing facilities: There is an example of the type of facility at the Freeman Street Market. ;

pitching facilities:.

joinedregeneration joined-up regeneration activity there are a range of opportunities to provide facilities that creative professionals can use as part of existing regeneration plans: Alexandra Dock: Consideration should be given to providing flexible space within the Tier 1 Library Facility at Alexandra Dock to either provide a presentation suite which could be hired to present project ideas and proposals to perspective clients and/or as a more central facility for the equipment store. In the longerterm consideration should be given to developing creative space as the Tier 3 developments linked to education; Cleethorpes Renaissance: Consideration should be given to whether there are existing facilities that could be used as artist studio space as part of the Cleethorpes Renaissance Programme; Development: East Marsh Development The Enrolled Freemen of Grimsby have ambitious plans to reinvent the former Freemens Pastures into a model modern eco Urban Village in the medium-term. As part of an overall digital inclusion strategy, The Council should reconsider its decision to not providing equipment for the studio

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space that has been created within the Freeman Street Market. The major risk in terms of capital works has already been completed;

Education and Skills


8.35 There are initially two short-term recommendations in relation to education and skills provision:

there is a gap in provision in relation to the delivery of the relatively new Advanced Apprenticeship in Creative and Digital Media. Education and training stakeholders should consider the viability of delivering this programme: vendor skills training professionals within the sector have identified a lack of locally sourced software training. Consideration should be given to sponsoring train-thetrainer activity to boost the capacity of the district to offer vendor accredited training to professionals and students;

Public Sector
8.36 North East Lincolnshire council has an excellent opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to the local creative and digital sector by leading on the following seven short-term actions:

extensive fibre network although other areas are catching up quickly, and most notably Digital Region, specifically in South Yorkshire, North East Lincolnshire already has a solid, reliable and fast fibre network; strategic plan the importance of a having a vision to indicate not only direction of travel but also a final destination for the creative and digital sector was highlighted from key commentators in Section 4. The action plan emerging from this research should be adopted by the local authority as its key strategic document for the sector;

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senior officer and lead member it is critical that the local authority signals its intent by ensuring that, as for other priority sectors, there is a senior officer who has some responsibility for the digital and creative sector. In addition, a member of the council, who can champion the sector, should be identified to provide the political credibility that the sector requires; development digital and ICT integration with priority sector development the lead officer should ensure that the cross-cutting potential impact of digital and ICT activity is incorporated within strategic planning for the other local authority priority sectors; Balfour Beatty expertise the extent to which additional specific expertise in relation to the creative and digital sector is available via the new public-private partnership with Balfour Beatty should be investigated; maximising the digital and creative offer the lead officer for the sector should liaise with the local authoritys economic development unit and other local inward investment agencies to ensure that the creative and digital sector adds value to potential investors to North East Lincolnshire; maximise collaboration we are aware of a number of local authorities, some of whom are neighbouring councils e.g. North Lincolnshire, who would be open to collaborative action to address digital inclusion and related creative and digital sector issues

Sector Development
8.37 At the moment, there is not an preferred agency or organisation that the local authority could partner with to deliver the following nine sector actions. An open competition to deliver the full suite of actions could be developed relatively quickly, or some of the actions could be individually commissioned via local creative and digital companies:

create a sector microsite this is one of a number of actions designed to bring the sector together and could be used to publicise sector events, contracts, jobs etc based on the successful Hull Digital model;

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secure the continuity of Humber MUD (South Bank) the Humber MUD collective has proven invaluable in identifying the needs of the sector and provides a useful consultation mechanism for the local authority; case study development a number of creative professionals have established their careers outside the region and have since returned to North East Lincolnshire for a number of reasons. A small number of case studies could be developed to highlight the benefits of the local authority area; develop develop an online directory a relatively low cost and easy win would be to commission an online directory that collates the diverse range of creative and digital talent in the local area; sector-specific business support small-scale research should be sectorcommissioned to identify whether the business support needs of the creative and digital sector are different from other sectors, and the extent to which the existing business support offer is meeting the needs identified; investigate the Swindon wifi model a small creative and digital (including local authority representation) delegation should be sent to investigate the transferable benefits of the Swindon wifi model; maximise the use of Northern Net the extent to which Northern Net connectivity can be used more creatively and extensively should be investigated, for example, to network with creative and digital entrepreneurs from overseas using videoconferencing; deliver a digital and creative trade fair the creative and digital professionals we have met are ready to engage in direct activity to support their sector and a relatively small amount of funding could be used to deliver a North East Lincolnshire digital and creative trade fair; Dinners/Events North East Lincolnshire Girl Geek Dinners/Events there are currently regular Girl Geek dinners/events in Leeds, Sheffield and Hull and there is no reason why a North East Lincolnshire event in Grimsby, Cleethorpes or Immingham could not be launched.

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Appendix A: Sector Definition

and Figure 1 Media and New Media: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 2211 : Publishing of books 2212 : Publishing of newspapers 2213 : Publishing of journals and periodicals 2214 : Publishing of sound recordings SOC 3431: Journalists, newspaper and periodical editors 3432: Broadcasting associate professionals 3433: Public relations officers 3434: Photographers and audio-visual equipment operators 2215 : Other publishing (50%) 2231 : Reproduction of sound recording (25%) 2232 : Reproduction of video recording (25%) 2233 : Reproduction of computer media (25%) 7440 : Advertising 7481 : Photographic activities (25%) 9211 : Motion picture and video production 9212 : Motion picture and video distribution 9213 : Motion picture projection 9220 : Radio and television activities 9240 : News agency activities 9272 : Other recreational activities nec (25%) Figure 2 Music, Visual and Performing Arts: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 9231 : Artistic and literary creation etc 9232 : Operation of arts facilities 3411: Artists 3412: Authors,writers 3413: Actors, entertainers 3414: Dancers & choreographers 3415: Musicians 3416: Arts officers, producers, directors Figure 3 Design: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 7420 : Architectural/engineering activities (25%) 7484 : Other business activities nec (25%) 3121: Architectural technologists and town planning technicians 3421: Graphic designers SOC 2431: Architects SOC

3422: Product, clothing and related designers Figure 4 Electronics: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 3001 : Manufacture of office machinery 3002 : Manufacture of computers etc 3210 : Manufacture of electronic valves etc 3220 : Manufacture of TV/radio transmitters etc 3230 : Manufacture of TV/radio receivers etc 3320 : Manufacture of instruments for measuring etc (50%) 3330 : Manufacture of industrial process control equip (50%) 6420 : Telecommunications Figure 5 ICT: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 7210 : Hardware consultancy 7220 : Software consultancy and supply 7230 : Data processing 7240 : Data base activities 7250 : Maintenance/repair: office machinery etc 7260 : Other computer related activities professionals 2132: Software professionals 3131: IT operations technicians 3132: IT user support technicians 5245: Computer engineers, installation and maintenance SOC 2131: IT strategy and planning SOC 2123: Electrical engineers 2124: Electronics engineers 2126: Design and development engineers 3112: Electrical/electronics technicians 5242: Telecommunications engineers 5244: TV, video and audio engineers 5249: Electrical/electronics engineers NEC

Figure 6 Print & Packaging: SIC/SOC Codes SIC 2221 : Printing of newspapers 2222 : Printing nec 2223 : Bookbinding and finishing 2224 : Composition and plate-making 2225 : Other activities related to printing 7482 : Packaging activities 5422: Printers 5423: Bookbinders and print finishers 4242: Screen printers SOC 5421: Originators

Appendix B: Creative & Digital Qualifications

Qualifications available through the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) and qualifications that are still live in the National Qualifications Framework (NQF7)

OCR Level 3 Diploma in Creative and Digital Media Competence (QCF) EDEXCEL Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Digital Communication (Pilot) City & Guilds Level 1 Award in Digital Image Manipulation (QCF) NCFE Level 3 Certificate in Creative Craft using Digital Imaging (QCF) SQA Entry Level Certificate in Digital Literacy (Entry 3) (QCF) City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Digital Image Manipulation (QCF) City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Digital Image Manipulation (QCF) NCFE Level 2 Award in Creative Craft using Digital Imaging (QCF) OCR Entry Level Award in Digital Literacy (Entry 3) (QCF) City & Guilds Level 2 Award for Digital Home Technology Integrators (QCF) BCS Level 2 Certificate in IT User Skills (Digital Creator) (ITQ) (QCF) NCFE Level 1 Award in Creative Craft using Digital Imaging (QCF) BCS Level 1 Certificate in IT User Skills (Digital Creator) (ITQ) (QCF) City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing DVD Portfolio of Digital Composite Imagery (QCF) City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing Captioned 2D Digital Drawing (QCF) City & Guilds Level 3 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing - Concept Art, Digital Gallery (QCF) City & Guilds Level 3 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing - 2D Digital Drawing and Text (QCF) City & Guilds Level 3 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing - Interactive Portfolio of Digital Composite Imagery (QCF) City & Guilds Level 1 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing 2D Digital Drawing (QCF) City & Guilds Level 1 Award in Creative Techniques in Creative Computing Digital Collage and Montage (QCF)

N.B. NQF qualifications will be closed for new candidate registrations at the end of 2010 unless

redesigned and input into the QCF.

City & Guilds Level 1 Award in Digital Image Modification BCS Level 2 Award in Creative Digital Media (Digital Cre8or Full Award) BCS Level 2 Award in Creative Digital Media (Digital Cre8or) City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Digital Broadcast and Composition EAL Level 3 Diploma in Digital Electronics EDEXCEL Level 2 Extended Certificate in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 1 Extended Certificate in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 2 Diploma in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 1 Diploma in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 2 Award in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 1 Award in Digital Applications for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 1 Certificate in Digital Applications for IT Users ABC Level 3 Award in Digital Photo-Imaging ABC Level 3 Award in Digital Illustration ABC Level 3 Double Award in Experimental Digital Media ABC Level 3 Award in 3D Digital Animation Techniques ABC Level 3 Diploma in Digital Media ABC Level 3 Award in Digital Modelling for Architectural Environments ABC Level 3 Diploma in Digital Origination ABC Level 3 Award in Digital Video Editing ABC Level 3 Diploma in Digital Design ABC Level 3 Certificate in Digital Graphics ABC Level 3 Award in Digital Typography City & Guilds Level 2 NVQ in Digital Print Production City & Guilds Level 3 NVQ in Digital Print Production

GCSEs

WJEC Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design OCR Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design EDEXCEL Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design (Short Course) EDEXCEL Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design AQA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design

CCEA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Moving Image Arts WJEC Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Media Studies AQA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Media Studies CCEA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design OCR Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Media Studies AQA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Media Studies (Double Award) AQA Level 1/Level 2 GCSE in Art and Design (Short Course)

AS Levels

WJEC Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design WJEC Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Media Studies OCR Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Media Studies EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design OCR Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design CCEA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design CCEA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Moving Image Arts AQA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Media Studies OCR Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) OCR Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Applied Art and Design EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Media: Communication and Production

A Levels

EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE with Advanced Subsidiary GCE (Additional) in Applied Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE with Advanced Subsidiary GCE

(Additional) in Applied Art and Design

EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design

OCR Level 3 Advanced GCE in Media Studies WJEC Level 3 Advanced GCE in Media Studies WJEC Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design CCEA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design OCR Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Computing CCEA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Moving Image Arts AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Media Studies OCR Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design OCR Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design (Double Award) EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design AQA Level 3 Advanced GCE in Applied Art and Design EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE in Media: Communication and Production

1414-19 Diplomas

14-19 Diploma in Creative and Media 14-19 Diploma in Information Technology

NVQs

City & Guilds Level 3 NVQ in Production for Television City & Guilds Level 2 NVQ in Photo Imaging City & Guilds Level 4 NVQ in Photo Imaging (Original NQF Level) City & Guilds Level 3 NVQ in Photo Imaging City & Guilds Level 4 NVQ for IT Professionals (Original NQF Level) BCS Level 2 NVQ for IT Users BCS Level 3 NVQ for IT Users BCS Level 1 NVQ for IT Users City & Guilds Level 2 NVQ for IT Practitioners City & Guilds Level 1 NVQ for IT Practitioners EDEXCEL Level 2 NVQ for IT Practitioners

EDEXCEL Level 1 NVQ for IT Practitioners OCR Level 4 NVQ for IT Professionals (Original NQF Level) OCR Level 3 NVQ for IT Professionals OCR Level 2 NVQ for IT Practitioners OCR Level 1 NVQ for IT Practitioners EDEXCEL Level 3 NVQ for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 2 NVQ for IT Users EDEXCEL Level 1 NVQ for IT Users OCR Level 3 NVQ for IT Users (ITQ) City & Guilds Level 3 NVQ for IT Users (ITQ) City & Guilds Level 2 NVQ for IT Users (ITQ) City & Guilds Level 1 NVQ for IT Users (ITQ) EDEXCEL Level 2 NVQ in Design Support EDEXCEL Level 3 NVQ in Design EDEXCEL Level 4 NVQ in Design Management (Original NQF Level)

Apprenticeships

IT User apprenticeships ITQ Apprenticeships: