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A course in 10x10 draughts for slightly and more advanced players

Written with the goal of draughts promotion

By MN Tjalling Goedemoed
Finished 30-10-2009
Leeuwarden / The Netherlands
The diagram shows a composition of Vuurboom: White plays and wins!

Introduction
Section 1: Judging positions
1. How to judge a position?
2. Formations
3. Locks
4. Development
5. Strategic squares
6. Weaknesses
7. Space
8. Tactics
9. Judging positions
Solutions

10
11
16
24
33
40
45
53
59
67
75

Section 2: Centre play


1. Centre play
2. The power block
3. The strong piece at <21>
4. The left wing attack
5. The piece at <17>
6. Cannon play
Solutions

81
81
89
94
97
102
105
113

Section 3: Classics
1. Tempo-classics
2. Weak pieces
3. Wing control
4. Ghestem lock
5. Tactics
6. Surrounding the centre
7. The surrounding fails
Solutions

115
116
122
128
136
140
146
157
159

Section 4: Right wing attack


1. Right wing attack
2. Going to <19>
3. Playing against the right
wing attack
4. Attacking the outpost
5. Blocking the attack
6. Surrounding
7. The counter attack
8. Isolating the outpost
9. Tactical ideas
Solutions

162
163
168
171
174
180
184
191
194
197
202

Section 5: Attacking systems


1. The centre attack
2. Playing against a centre
attack
3. The classical attack
4. The Highland attack
5. Playing against a
Highland attack
6. Roozenburg
7. Partie Bonnard
8. Springer counter attack
9. Mutual outposts
Solutions

203
204
211

Section 6: Edge pieces


1. Games with piece 15 / 36
2. Playing against
piece 15 / 36
3. Piece 26
4. Piece 16
5. Piece 6
Solutions

249
250
255

7. Epilogue
1. About part III
2. DamMentor
3. Compositions
4. Compositions of the author
5. Links on the Internet

284
284
285
286
290
291

214
221
226
230
237
241
243
247

267
276
280
282

Young draughts players


from the Dutch team, participating at the
European championship 2009 in Beilen (the
Netherlands)

I am going to begin with a warning: this is not an easy course!


The game of draughts is very hard to play without making major mistakes. You have to know
a lot to be able to play at a higher level. In the first part of this course we showed many
tactical ways to win a game. Beginners need to focus on tactics first, before they can play
long-term-plans, or, in other words, successfully perform a strategy.
In this second part we will study the many positional aspects of the game. First we will learn
how to judge positions. Without judging positions correctly it is not possible to make effective
calculations in your game. You should now what aspects of a position are favourable and
which are not.
Once you know what kind of positions you want to reach you can make plans in your game.
For every type of position we show the major strategies. We wont neglect tactical aspects of
positions, because tactics remain dominant in the game of draughts, even at the highest
level. Without considering tactics it is not possible to play a correct strategy.
If the exercises in this course are to difficult to solve, you can check the solutions. You can
try to solve the same exercises later. Maybe this time you do see the solution!
We use some symbols in the text of this course, which I will explain now:
W+
B+
32 28!
32 28?
<14>
Dirod

means white wins.


means black wins.
means that the move 32 28 is a strong move.
means that the move 32 28 is a weak move, a mistake.
means square 14, <39> means square 39.
means difference in rate of development (which will be explained later on)

My hope is that you learn a lot of this course, improving your game. But my greatest hope is
that you will enjoy the rich possibilities of our game of draughts. I wish that the game will
bring you pleasure and you will be inspired by its beauty. This is the corrected version of the
second course.
MN Tjalling Goedemoed
Leeuwarden, 20-09-2011

I want to thank the people who helped me writing this course.


Edwin Twiest checked on the technical part of the course, while Martijn van der Klis checked
the English text.
Frits Luteijns generosity made the issue of this course financially possible. Being a member
of the FMJD-board Frits has done a good job to promote our game!
With the help of a Chinese translator of the course, Zhangyisen, I have corrected some
errors in the first version.
Sources:
Turbo Dambase

K. Bor

TRUUS

S. Keetman

DamMentor

Tj. Goedemoed

Damclub Huizum 75 jaar

R. van der Pal en S. Nagel

Kombineren op een randschijf

H. Hylkema

15/36 Een verzameling


Combinaties waarin de hoge
randschijf een actieve rol speelt

L.J. koops

Strategiekompas

M. Kats

De eerste stap naar het


Wereldkampioenschap

I. Koeperman (translation F. Luteijn)

Trainingsmateriaal

Tj. Goedemoed

You can watch draughts games at http://toernooibase.kndb.nl/

Schotanus Goedemoed 2009


Tjalling Goedemoed is an experienced trainer in the game of draughts, who worked with
many talented young players. Among his pupils were Klaas Hendrik Leijenaar, Gerlof Kolk,
Saskia Veltman, the brothers Maikel, Zainal and Joel Palmans, Mei-Jhi Wu, Boudewijn
Derkx, Stijn Tuytel and many others. Goedemoed also used to train many groups of players,
both young players and experienced club players. In the course of years he produced a lot of
material, which he was able to use for writing this course. Earlier Goedemoed (meaning good
courage) productions are:
Dam Mentor 5 cd-roms at different levels with theory and exercises in Dutch)
Oom Jan leert zijn neefje dammen Issued by Tirion, a book for young, beginning draughts
players in Dutch
De Keller-opening More than 30 articles about the famous Keller-opening in draughts
magazine Hoofdlijn (issued by Herman van Westerloo from Amsterdam)
Friesch Dagblad Since 1994 Goedemoed has written a weekly column about draughts.
Het Damspel Goedemoed published many articles about the endgame and other issues
aimed at beginning players in this magazine issued by KNDB (Royal Dutch Draughts
Federation).
More of his publications you can find at:
http://www.graficelly.nl/klant/tg-web/
Goedemoed is not only interested in playing games and studying games of top-players, he
also likes compositions, especially compositions resembling game situations. In the last
chapter (Epilogue) some of his compositions are shown.
Goedemoed also likes to play many draughts variations like dameo, killer draughts and
Frisian draughts.

Goedemoed won the Frisian championship 3 times and 7 times the Frisian blitz-title. His best
result in a game was his victory over Ton Sijbrands in 2001.
Goedemoed has his own weblog: http://damwereld.web-log.nl/
A new website for draughts-promotion is being created: http://promo.draughts.nl/
Special hint: A website on the history of draughts by dr. Arie van der Stoep:
http://www.draughtshistory.nl/

This site is in English!!!

This course is aimed at strategic play.

Part II of the Course in draughts is aimed at strategic play.


Dont forget to open your heart to feel the beauty of the game, for the eyes cant see whats
essential, only the heart can. (according to the Fox from Le petit prince)

If you want to find the best move in a certain position, you have to be able to judge
positions correctly. Judging skills are the key factor in any calculation. If you make a
calculation in a game and you dont know what the positions you reach, are worth,
how can you ever make a good decision?
In order to make useful calculations you have to compare and judge different
positions and choose the one you have judged as the best.
In this book we judge positions with an equal amount of pieces. If players of a high
level have one piece more they are supposed to win the game. This is not alwaysthe
case. Sometimes the position of the other player is much better. In this case there is
positional compensation for the lost piece.
In this section you will learn different features of a position:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Formations
Locks
Development
Strategic squares
Weaknesses
Space
Tactics

After having introduced the features of a position we will elaborate on each feature
separetely. The last lesson of this sections shows a holistic view on judging positions
in which all relevant features of a position are considered.
After this section you will look with different eyes to a position. You will learn to look
at the relevant features of a position, like who controls the strategic squares ands
who has the most space to play.

S1. Judging positions

10

1.How to judge a position


To be able to build a strong position, you have
to know how to look at a position.
We have to answer the question: How to judge
a position? To answer the question we have to
know what different features a position is
characterized by:

Formations
Whites position is developed well. Pieces 46 /
41 and 50 / 44 are centralized. All pieces are
active. Playing 28 23! 18 x 29 34 x 23 25 x
34 40 x 29 white can develop his position even
more. By playing 45 40 / 40 34 and 34 30
white is building a strong attacking position,
gaining space.
Its important to develop your position to get
space to play.

Formations are constructions of pieces working


together. Whites pieces work together well.
Blacks pieces however are not working
together. Especially the lack of a piece at 15
makes the position vulnerable. Moving piece
14 to 15 and piece 7 to 6 would improve
blacks position considerably.

Locks
Whites left wing is not yet developed. He can
develop his wing by playing 37 31 26 x 37 41
x 32 followed by 46 41 and 41 37.

Strategic squares

Whites right wing is locked. Also see chapter


27 of part 1 of this course.
Because of the lock many white pieces cant
play, while black has enough room to play.
Whites play is severely restricted by the right
wing lock. White has only one move left i.e. 37
31. White risks being frozen out completely.

Development
Developing a position means going forward, by
making changes, gaining space.

White possesses strategic squares 24, 27 and


28. Piece 24 is a very strong outpost keeping
pieces 15 and 25 at the edge of the board. The
piece is defended well against an attack. Piece
28 controls the centre and piece 27 controls
the left wing. The formation 27 / 28 / 32 / 37 (a
fork) is very strong. White has a winning
position.

S1. Judging positions

11

By tactics we mean combinations, forcings and


sacrifices. Tactics is very important to be able
to judge a position. Without looking at tactics
you cant judge positions correctly. Tactics are
needed performing positional plans.

Weaknesses

We can only judge this position correctly when


tactics are considered. It looks like white cant
win: 40 34 17 21 37 32 26 31 34 29
13 19! 23 x 14 15 20 14 x 25 31 37 32 x
41 27 31 36 x 27 21 x 23 =.
But white can use a sacrifice to freeze black
out.
Blacks position contains a couple of
weaknesses. Piece 9 is dangling because
black doesnt have the golden piece at 3. Piece
15 is also not active.
Black doesnt have active formations. His
pieces are not working together well.
White exploits the weaknesses by playing 1.27
22! 15 20 (there is no other move) 2.45
40 and black is frozen out, because 7 12 or
23 29 is answered by 22 18 +.

1.40 34! 17 21
2.23 18!! 13 x 22
3.39 33
Black loses after 15 20 4.34 29 etc.

Types of positions
We can distinguish different types of positions.
For example we can distinguish classical from
modern positions.

Space

Closed classical position


You need space to play. If you lack enough
space you risk being frozen out. In this position
black has no space to play at all. If white has to
play he still has room to play: 32 28.

Tactics

White has squares 27 and 28 in possession.


Black possesses squares 23 and 24.
In this case the position is called a closed
classical position. Closed means that all 4
squares are occupied. If 3 or 2 of the squares
are occupied the position is not closed, but still
called a classical position, like in the next
diagram.

Classical position

S1. Judging positions

12

Classical attack
Modern position
In this case white possesses square 29 while
black has a piece at 22. A century ago people
liked to play classical structures, but in modern
times these type of positions are played more
often.
Thats why this is called a modern position.
If white plays 29 24 19 x 30 35 x 24 we get
an attacking position.

The position is classical, but white has also an


outpost at 22. This is called a classical attack.

Highland attack
There is no piece at 23 in this position.
This type of position is called after Dutch world
champion Herman Hoogland. It is the
Hoogland attack or Highland attack.
Right Wing attack
If there is an outpost at 22, 23 or 24 the
position is called an attacking position. In this
case white has an outpost at 24, supported by
a strong centre, this is called a right wing
attack.

Roozenburg attack
This is a special kind of attack introduced by
Dutch world champion Piet Roozenburg. White
possesses squares 24 and 27, while black is in
possession of central square 23.

Centre attack
In this position white has an outpost at 23. This
is called a centre attack.

S1. Judging positions

13

Piece 20 is on its way to king. Black can play


17 21 26 x 19 23 x 25 but after 29 24 piece
24 cant be stopped.
Take care that if piece 6 is at 8 this method
doesnt work. 24 19 14 x 23 25 20 would
be answered by 28 32 37 x 14 13 x 15 now.
Once again we see that without considering
tactics we cant judge a position correctly.

You should understand by now that names of


positions depend on pieces at the marked
area.

It is good to have your pieces distributed


equally over the centre and wings.

A. Chzihov W. Borogan
The board can also be divided horizontally in
three parts.
We distinguish between the left wing, the
centre and the right wing.
It is important that your pieces are distributed
equally over the wings. Otherwise you get
weaknesses in your position.

You shouldnt interpret this rule to rigidly.


Whites distribution of pieces (left wing, centre,
right wing) is 4 5 2. Because black has the
same 4 5 2 distribution it is a balanced
position.
In the former position the white/black
distribution was 5 6 1 versus 4 5 3, so
no balanced position. In this case you have to
watch for breaking through plans. White profits
from the 3 versus 1 majority at the right wing,
while black cant use his majority at the other
wing.
31.47 42 19 23 32.37 31 20 25 33.40
35 15 20 34.33 28 17 22 35.28 x 17 11 x
22 36.35 30 13 19 37.31 26 22 x 31
38.36 x 27 20 24 39.29 x 20 25 x 14 40.38
33

Black has a right wing attack, but his pieces


are not distributed equally. Black has a
weakness at his left wing. There is only one
piece defending
there! White can take
advantage of the weak wing. He sacrifices a
piece in order to break through.
1.24 19! 14 x 23
2.25 20

White has an ideal 2 4 2 piece distribution,


controlling both wings and the centre.
14 20 41.33 29 12 17 42.43 39 20 25
43.42 38 17 22 44.29 24 22 x 31 45.24 x
2 31 36 46.2 24 36 41 47.34 29 25 x 43
48.38 x 49 23 x 34 49.26 21 16 x 38 50.24 x 4
and black resigned without waiting for 34 40
51.4 22 40 45 52.22 50 etc. +

S1. Judging positions

14

Exercise 1.1 1.8 How do you judge following


positions, white to move.
Do you prefer white or black and why?

White to move in every position

1.1

1.5

1.2

1.6

1.3

1.7

1.4

1.8

S1. Judging positions

15

2. Formations
Formations are constructions of pieces working
together. We give a few examples of well
known constructions.

In the left diagram we see a fork (left) and a


tail.
The right diagram shows a pyramid (left) and
an arrow. A pyramid can be constructed at
various places on the board.

The move white (Shchegolev) is going to play


is easy to predict. White closes the gap at 37
and takes care his pieces are working together
optimally.
1.41 37!
All whites pieces are connected with each
other.
Black has some gaps in his position and
misses active formations.
White is threatening to play 28 23 19 x 28 32
x 12 8 x 17 34 30 25 x 34 39 x 8 2 x 13 W+1.
Black cant fly to the edge of the board 1 24
30 2.35 x 24 19 x 30 because of the simple
3.28 23 18 x 29 4.33 x 35 W+1.
Black should close one of the gaps 12 or 14.
If black plays 1 8 12 white creates a new
weakness in blacks position by attacking 2.31
26! Both after 2 8 26 x 17 12 x 21 and
after 12 17 white wins a piece by 28 23
again.
If black plays 1 9 14 white forces a win by
2.31 - 27 21 26 3.27 22 18 x 27 4.32 x 21
26 x 17 5.28 23 19 x 28 6.33 x 11 6 x 17 7.34
30 25 x 34 8.39 x 10 +.

We see the left and the right pyramid.

I. Kuperman

In the left diagram we see a cross and the


famous Olympic formation. In the right diagram
white has the very solid diamond in his centre.

In this closed classical position whites and


blacks position are nearly symmetrical. The
difference is that white (I. Kuperman) can build
a strong formation to put pressure on blacks
position.
1.50 45!
The formation 40 / 45 is very important in
classical positions. It is called the Olympic
formation. White threatens to perform a coup
Royal by 27 22! The only solution for black is
closing square 9.
1 3 9
Piece 9 is a weakness. It is a dangling piece
and is not active. Now white transforms the

S1. Judging positions

16

Olympic formation into a tail in order to put


pressure on the strategic square 24.
2.39 34! 24 30
White threatened to play 34 29 +. Black fled
to the edge of the board. Black loses control
over the strategic square 24 now!
3.48 42
3.34 29 23 x 34 4.40 x 29 doesnt work
because of 12 17 5.25 x 34 18 23 6.29 x
18 13 x 42 7.48 x 37 =.

T. Sijbrands C. Smith
Former world champion Ton Sijbrands from the
Netherlands shows the power of having strong
formations. White is going to build a pyramid
aimed at the centre. The top of the pyramid is
at square 29.

3. 30 x 39
4.33 x 44 6 11
5.44 39 11 17
6.39 34 17 21

1.34 29! 14 19
2.40 34 10 14
3.44 40

White finishes the job with a combination.


7.27 22 18 x 27
8.25 20 14 x 25
9.34 30 25 x 34
10.40 x 7

Whites position is very compact. All pieces


work together in formations. Black however
has some gaps in his position, which is
dangerous especially for tactical reasons.
White can force a win by burdening black with
another gap (at <14>).
1.34 29! 23 x 34
2.40 x 20 14 x 25
3.28 22!

White controls the centre with the help of his


formations. After 19 23 he would play 29
24 with an advantage, which is still there after
the exchange 23 28.
3 19 24
4.29 x 20 14 x 25
The pyramid is gone. Piece 29 has been
exchanged. White plays consequently by
building the pyramid once more!

White is threatening to take the 27 21 shot


getting a king at square <1> or <5>.
Check that no reply helps.

5.34 29! 13 19
6.40 34 9 13
7.49 44 21 26
8.42 37 3 9
9.44 40

Exercise 2.1 How does white win after 3 19


23?

S1. Judging positions

17

White has two pyramids now! He threatens to


play 29 23 +. At 9 8 12 he will probably
continue 10.33 28! 9 14 11.39 33 2 8
12.48 43 4 10 (threatening 25 30 19
23)
13.29 23! 18 x 29 14.34 x 23 with centre
attack.

Blacks pieces 11, 16, 21 and 26 are not


active. The centre is dominated by white. With
the next moves white takes square 24 in
possession, getting a superior attacking
position.
17.29 24! 19 x 30
18.40 35 9 13
19.35 x 24 13 18
20.42 38 11 17
21.33 28

9 18 22
10.27 x 18 13 x 22
11.48 42!
Building a formation to be able to make the 31
27 exchange reconquering the strategic
square 27.

White controls the strategic squares 27, 28 and


24. Black has no serious defence left.
21 2 8
22.34 29 8 13
23.38 33

11 8 13
Black makes the formation 9 / 13, so that white
cant play an immediate 31 27 x 27 because
of 19 23 B+. Thats why white attacks piece
22 first.
12.32 27! 11 17
Black cant play 12 13 18 because of the
pseudo sacrifice 29 23! 19 x 28 38 32! +.
13.27 x 18 13 x 22
14.38 32
White plays very precise. At 14.31 27? 22 x
31 15.36 x 27 the annoying 19 23! 16.29 x
18 17 22 follows.
14 6 11
15.31 27 22 x 31
16.36 x 27
Now 19 23 29 x 18 17 22 isnt good any
more for white goes to king playing 18 12 22
x 31 12 7.

White has a strategically winning position.


Black cant play 4 9 because of the 24 19 &
28 22 shot.
After 23 17 22 24.28 x 17 21 x 12 25.33
28 4 9 26.39 34 black has run out of
sensible moves: At 9 14 both 27.34 30 and
27.28 23 will do the job.

It is good to build compact positions with a lot


of formations.

16 17 21

S1. Judging positions

18

If black is to move in this position he would like


to play 1 7 with strong tails 1 / 7 / 12 and 9 /
13 / 18. The 13 / 19 / 24 tail can open square
33 to perform a coup Philippe.
1 1 7 however is prohibited by the king
shot 28 23! 19 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 33 x 2
W+.
After 1 15 20 piece 20 is dangling. The
13/19/24 tail is not active anymore.
We will show you a variation form a book about
strategy of manifold world champion Iser
Koeperman.
Exercise 2.2 What would you play (white to
move)? Look at al the answers for black. Can
you punish all moves tactically?

1 15 20
2.45 40 1 7
Now this move is possible, because the king
shot 28 23 19 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 33 x 2 is
punished by 12 17 2 x 30 25 x 45 B+.
3.40 34 18 22
4.27 x 18 12 x 23
Black used his formations to remove the strong
piece at 27. But white can get another piece
over there.
5.36 31 7 11
6.31 27

T. Sijbrands E. de Jong
This position was one of the games during the
world record simultaneous blindfold draughts in
2007. Sijbrands played 25 blindfold games at
the same time. He won 21 games and drew 4
games.
Black was to move and played 17 22? 28 x
17 11 x 22.
Exercise 2.3
How did white win a piece after this big
mistake?

The most logical move for black is 6 9 14


now, creating the 14 / 19 23 tail. When white
plays the logical 7.27 22? 11 16! 8.22 x 11
16 x 7 he has a lost position.

M. Fabre A. Molimard

S1. Judging positions

19

Due to the 14 / 19 / 23 tail white cant play 9.28


22 (23 29 +) and he cant use his own 43 /
39 / 30 tail: 9.34 30 25 x 34 10.39 x 30 is
followed by 20 25! B+. Sacrificing 9.35 30
(Dussaut sacrifice) 24 x 35 10.33 29 doesnt
work here: 13 18 11.28 22 18 x 27 12.32 x
21 23 28! (13.38 33 19 24) B+.
If black plays 6 9 14 white has to take care
we see. Still white can escape using all his
formations!
Exercise 2.4 Look back at the diagram after
6.31 27. How can white escape forcing a
shot after 6 9 14 ?

In the Koeperman book black plays 6 11


16.
White will lose after 7.27 22 9 14! 8.22 x 11
16 x 7 as we have just seen.
Even the famous author of the book missed
the opportunity for white to defend his position
by using his formations!
We will show you the surprising defence, using
a sacrifice to activate formations
6. 11 16
7.27 21!! 17 x 26
8.28 22!

In this situation the king shot 28 23 19 x 37


38 32 37 x 28 33 x 2 fails due to 12 17 2 x
30 25 x 45 B+.
White has no sensible reply to the threatening
coup Philippe 24 29 & 18 22.
2.40 - 34
3.34 x 25
4.33 x 24
5.25 x 34
6.27 x 18

25 30
24 29
19 x 30
18 22
13 x 44

In the next position from Ivanov Dolfing (see


diagram) black has strong formations. White
has to defend his position.

A. Ivanov M. Dolfing
Suddenly the 43 / 38 / 32 tail is very active.
It prevents black from playing 16 21 and 26
31. Black should play 8 9 14.
Exercise 2.5 What strong move does white
play now?

Lets look at the Fabre Molimard position


again.
If white is to play things change dramatically.
Playing 1.36 31 or 1.45 40 allows black to
play 1 7!

Exercise 2.6 Answer the following questions:


A) How is 1.39 34 punished?
B) If white plays 1.44 40? like in the
game he breaks the 33 / 39 / 44 tail
helping blacks attack at 27. Show a
logical variation after 1.44 40
C) Whites best move is 1.41 36! How
does white defend himself after 1.41
36 26 31

1.45 40 1 7!!

S1. Judging positions

20

3.27 22 18 x 27
4.32 x 21 16 x 27
5.37 31 26 x 37
6.42 x 11 6 x 17
7.28 23 19 x 28
8.33 x 11

A. Gantwarg J. Okken
Whites position contains a lot of formations.
He blows up the position by making a couple of
changes, leaving his opponent with no good
moves.
1.34 29! 23 x 34
2.40 x 20 15 x 24
3.27 21 16 x 27
4.31 x 22 18 x 27
5.32 x 21

Many formations allow white to take a


pingpong shot.
1.22 17 11 x 22

White threatens to play 21 16 13 18* 16 x 7


12 x 1 28 23 +.
The remaining moves are:
1) 5 17 22 6.28 x 17 11 x 22 7.33 29 24 x
33 8.39 x 17 +
2) 5 11 16 6.37 31 16 x 27 7.31 x 11 6 x
17 8.28 23 19 x 28 9.33 x 11 +
3) 5 24 30 6.35 x 24 19 x 30 6.21 16 13
18 7.16 x 7 12 x 1 8.28 23 18 x 29 9.33 x
35 +

After 1 12 x 21 2.34 30 etc. W+1.


2.28 x 17 12 x 21
3.34 30 25 x 34
4.40 x 18 13 x 22
5.33 29 24 x 33
6.39 x 26

Having positions with many formations


gives you a good chance for making shots.

R. Wijnker J. Cremers
White just played the dangerous 37 32 move,
creating gaps. Black used his formations
taking a kingshot.
14 23 29!
15.34 x 23 12 18
16.23 x 21 16 x 27
17.31 x 22 14 19
18.25 x 23 13 18
19.23 x 12 8 x 46

White uses many formations to make an Atom


Bomb shot.
1.34 29 23 x 34
2.40 x 20 15 x 24

You can practice some combinational patterns


in exercises 2.7 2.22.

S1. Judging positions

21

Exercises 2.7 2.14

White to play wins with a shot

2.7

2.11

2.8

2.12

2.9

2.13

2.10

2.14

S1. Judging positions

22

Exercises 2.15 2.22

White to play wins with a shot!

2.15

2.19

2.16

2.20

2.17

2.21

2.18

2.22

S1. Judging positions

23

53.39 34 13 19
54.22 17

3. Locks
If there is a lock at the board you have to judge
whether this lock is economic or not.

54.33 28 9 13 is terrible, so in despair


white sacrifices a piece.
54 21 x 12
55.27 22 11 17
56.22 x 11 16 x 7
57.31 27 9 13
58.33 28 12 18
59.36 31 7 11
60.28 22 24 30

A lock is called economic if the number of


pieces locked exceeds the number of
pieces involved in the lock.

White resigned.

A. Gantwarg W. Virny
Whites pieces 27 / 31 / 32 / 36 / 37 are arrowlocked (see lesson 27 and 31 of part I). The
lock consist of 3 pieces: 16 / 21 / 26. However,
we should also consider piece 6, which is not
active.
So, 4 pieces are engaged in locking 5 pieces.
The lock is thus economic.
Black is active at the other side of the board.
This is of major importance to be able to take
advantage from the arrow lock.

In this case 5 pieces are engaged in the lock: 6


/ 11 / 16 / 21 / 26. Since 5 pieces are locking 5
the lock is not economic. Because white
controls the centre the position is better for
white!
38.38 33 19 24?

41.48 42 30 35
42.34 29 35 x 44
43.39 x 50 14 20
44.29 23
The position after 44.42 38 20 24! 45.29 x
20 15 x 24 46.50 44 25 30 also looks very
dangerous, although this would have been a
better choice for white.
6 11
45.23 x 14 20 x 9
46.33 29 15 20
47.42 38 20 24!
48.29 x 20 25 x 14
The less pieces remain at the board the clearer
becomes the strength of the lock.
49.38 33
50.50 44
51.44 39
52.28 22

Ph. Ham M. Raichenbach

Black should have played 38 12 18 39.43 38 20 24 40.29 x 20 25 x 14 25.27 22 18 x


27 26.31 x 22. White has escaped from the
lock and has a better position with a compact
construction, controlling the centre.
39.28 22!!
A tactical blow! White threatens to play 22
17, while 12 18 is punished by the 34 30 33
29 39 x 8 shot.
39 11 17 40.22 x 11 6 x 17 is answered by
41.33 28! 24 x 22 42.27 x 9 +.
Because 39 12 17 40.22 18 13 x 22
41.27 x 18 is terrible too, black sacrificed a
piece and lost.

14 19
12 18
19 24
18 23

S1. Judging positions

24

White forgot the tactical part of the position. He


should have played 41.45 40! 12 17! 42.38
33 17 x 28 43.33 x 22 23 29! 44.39 34 29
33 45.34 29!
Removing the strong outpost at 33.
45 33 38 46.37 32 24 x 33 47.32 x 43
with probably a draw.
41 16 21!
42.27 x 29 24 x 44
43.45 40??
R. Sloot N. de la Fonteyne
White has an arrow lock with 1 inactive piece
at 45. Black also has another problem. His
pieces at the other wing are far behind. These
pieces are not developed well. This helps white
to take advantage of the lock. White has a very
promising position.

Creating a huge weakness at 45. Now the king


can attack whites pieces from behind. 43.22
18 would still give white chances to draw.
43 44 50
44.22 18 50 45
After a few more moves white resigned.

36.33 28! 13 18
37.31 27?
A mistake, which equalizes the position. White
should have eliminated the central piece 18
getting an extremely strong outpost himself:
37.28 22! 18 x 27 38.31 x 22
The piece at 22 pierces into blacks position.
38 6 11 39.22 18! 11 17 40.39 33
White can already win a piece by 18 13, but
he can play on with the idea of building the 28 /
32 / 37 tail with horrible threats.
Another possibility is 36 3 8 37. 22 18 8
12 38.18 x 7 2 x 11 39.39 33 11 17
40.33 28 and 28 23 at the next move.
37 18 23
38.28 22 6 11
39.43 38 2 8
40.42 37 8 12
The 16 21 8 12 shot doesnt work due to
the majority capture 24 x 31.

R. Serf L. King
White is locking more than 5 pieces. Except
the pieces in the right wing lock 6 / 11 / 16 / 17
/ 21 pieces 8 / 12 / 13 / 18 / 19 / 23 / 24 cant
play either.
Playing 23 29 34 x 23 18 x 29 is not possible
because of 28 22 17 x 28 32 x 34 21 x 32 38
x 27 W+1. We see that piece 41 is positioned
well, it is more active than at 36.
Because of the piece at 12 black can never
escape from the lock with 17 22. If piece 12
would be at 9 for example black could escape
from the lock by 17 22.
Black has only 2 pieces left to play with: pieces
14 and 24. Whites task is to take under control
the right wing. He can do this in a special way.
1.45 40!
This move looks ugly, creating a dangling
piece at 40, but white has calculated that he
can freeze blacks position out using a
sacrifice. 1.34 30 wont give the same result,
for after 24 29! 2.30 25 black frees himself
playing 14 20. 1.34 30 24 29 2.45 40 is

S1. Judging positions

25

answered by 29 33! 3.28 x 39 23 28 4.32 x


23 19 x 28 5.30 25 21 x 32 6.38 x 27 28 33
7.39 x 28 17 21 8.26 x 17 12 x 23 =.

All blacks pieces are blocked now.

1 14 20
1 24 29 is best met by 2.35 30! 14 20
3.30 25 20 24 4.40 35 29 x 40 5.35 x 44
+.
2.34 30 20 25
3.40 34 24 29
4.43 39!! 29 x 40
5.35 x 44 25 x 43
6.38 x 49

K. van Amerongen A. Ketelaars

White will be winning after 6 23 29 7.28


22 17 x 28 8.32 x 14 etc.

White uses 5 pieces to lock up blacks right


wing and making the centre inactive. This is an
economic lock. Five pieces are locking more
than five pieces. If piece 3 was at 12 33 28
would be fine. In the game position there is no
weak piece at 12.
White cant go to the centre now: 29.33 28?
17 22! 30.28x 17 11 x 31 31.26 x 17 31 36
B+.
Whites plan is to take control at his right wing.
If he succeeds in controlling the right wing
black will freeze out.
29.35 30! 15 20?

A. Krasnova M. Nogovitsyna
It appears that white is locking 5 pieces using 6
pieces herself. But blacks pieces 8 / 18 / 19 /
23 are not so active, while the pieces locking
blacks right wing are still making an active
formation. In the game 27 22 was played,
breaking the lock. But white had a much better
plan.
1.34 30!
Not good is 1.33 28 because of 18 22 2.27
x 29 24 x 44 3.28 22 17 x 28 4.32 x 25 44
49 5.26 x 17 49 x 45 B+.
1 20 25
2.39 34 8 13
It appears as if black has no problems at all:
3.33 28 24 29! 4.30 24 19 x 39 5.28 x 8
18 22! 6.27 x 18 21 27 7.32 x 12 16 21
8.26 x 17 11 x 2 B+.
But white has a big surprise for his opponent.
3.33 29!! 24 x 42
4.37 x 48

The best defence is 29 14 20. At 30.30


25 black can play 23 29! 31.25 x 12 29 x 36.
29 14 20 30.37 31 20 24 31.30 25
still favours white, but black hasnt lost control
over square 24 yet.
30.33 29! 3 9
31.39 33!
31.30 25? allows 8 12! threatening 23 28
32 x 23 21 x 32 37 x 28 18 22! 39 33 20
24! 29 x 20 17 - 21 26 x 8 13 x 2 28 x 17 19 x
46 B+.
White cant parry the threat by 32.39 33
because of 20 24! 33.29x20 23 29 B+.
After the played 31.39 33 8 12 fails: 32.43
38 Now piece 8 is dangling.
20 24 33.29 x 20 14 x 25 34.33 29 9 14
35.38 33 14 20 36.50 44 20 24 37.29 x
20 25 x 14 38.44 40 14 20 39.33 29 20
25 40.40 35 and black is frozen out
completely.
31 18 22 32.29 x 18 22 x 31 33.41 36 13
x 22 34.36 x 18 8 13 35.43 38 13 x 22
36.33 28 22 x 33 37.38 x 29 doesnt solve
blacks problems, he is still locked: 9 13
38.49 43! Reinforcing whites left wing.

S1. Judging positions

26

13 18 50.43 38 18 22 51.50 44 (or 29


23) 22 27 52.29 23 19 x 28 53.32 x 23 27
31 54.38 32! and black is frozen out.
31 20 24
32.29 x 20 14 x 25
33.50 45 9 14
34.45 40

H. Meijer B. Bies
The lock is not economic. Seven pieces are
needed to lock the wing.
Moreover: white doesnt control the other wing.
Black has chances too in such a case.
31.33 28 24 29
32.28 x 19 29 x 40
33.35 x 44 13 x 24
34.43 39?

34 14 20
35.40 35 20 24
36.43 38
36 8 12 37.33 29 24 x 33 38.38 x 29 is
horrible for black, so he tried 34 23 29
35.34 x 3 25 x 45 36.3 x 25 Black still cant go
to king and lost after a few moves.

Much too slow! White should have hurried


towards the centre: 34.38 33 18 23 35.33
28! with equality.
34 18 23 35.38 33

T. Sijbrands N. Samb

35 23 29!

White needs six pieces to lock up five pieces of


black. But the formation locking the wing, is still
active and can be used for many tactical
options.

The right-wing lock makes many tactical ideas


possible.
Now white cant play 36.44 40?

27 20 24
28.27 22! 17 x 28
29.26 x 17 11 x 22
30.32 27!
White wins a piece, for 30... 13 18 is
punished by 31.31 26! 22 x31 32.33 x 15
W+. Black surrendered.

36.33 28 24 30
37.28 22 leads to self-destruction now!
Still white could have escaped using his own
tactical possibilities: 37.27 22!! after which 21
27 is punished by a king shot to square 2,
while 37 8 13 allows 38.32 27!! 21 x 23
39.44 40 17 x 28 40.26 21 16 x 27 41.31 x
35 =.
37.48 43? 3 9

S1. Judging positions

27

White cant stop a breakthrough anymore.


38.43 38
39.39 33
40.28 23
41.44 39
42.38 x 49

29 34
9 13
30 35
34 x 43
35 40

Black won the game after a few moves.

All whites gaps are closed again and his


pieces work together well. Black however has
a huge weakness in his position. Base pieces
at <2 / 3 / 4> are missing.
We show a variation in which black tries to
escape from the lock:
23 1 6 24.40 34 18 22 25.27 x 18 12 x
23 26.34 30 23 28 27.33 x 22 17 x 28
28.32 x 23 19 x 28 29.26 x 17 11 x 22 30.30
24!
Blacks outpost at 28 is not defended well,
because black lacks a base piece at 2. He will
miss the 2 / 8 / 13 tail as youll see.
30 7 12 31.45 40 6 11 32.40 34 11
17 33.38 33 16 21 34.34 29 21 26
35.42 38
35.43 38? 17 21 35.38 32 isnt good
because of 26 31! B+.
and 38 32 at the next move W+1.
23 18 22
24.27 x 18 12 x 23
25.33 29 23 x 34
26.40 x 29

T. Sijbrands N. Kuijvenhoven
White is forcing a right wing lock by making an
exchange.
14.28 23! 19 x 28
15.29 24 20 x 29
16.34 x 32 25 x 34
17.39 x 30

At left there is a lock, so white takes under


control the other flank.
26 7 12
27.38 33
Not allowing black to play 21 27 x 27.

Black cant play 21 27 x 27 because of 33


28 +, so he cant prevent white from taking the
right wing lock by 31 27 x 27.

27 12 18

17 13 19
18.46 41 9 13
19.41 37 4 9
White is not in a hurry to play 31 27 x27. He
first develops piece 46, closing the gap at 37.
20.30 25 7 11
21.31 27 22 x 31
22.36 x 27 2 7
23.44 39
Blacks position is a mess. He is locked and
the other wing looks ugly with no golden piece
and a non-active piece at 5. The gap at <12> is
awkward too. White could play 29 24 x 24
now because 14 19 is punished by 25 20
43 38 39 34 32 x 14, but whites approach
is even more efficient.
28.45 40! 19 23
28.. 19 24 29.29 x 20 15 x 24 30.40 34 5
10 31.34 29! 10 15 32.29 x 20 15 x 24
33.39 34 18 23 34.47 41! 14 19

S1. Judging positions

28

At 13 19 white doesnt play 32 28 at once,


because of 17 -22! followed by 9 13 and 24
30 B+, but plays 35.43 39 first, followed by
32 28 x 28.
35.32 27! 21 x 32 36.37 x 28 23 x 32 37.34
29 A nice pseudo-sacrifice to attack piece 24
followed by a breakthrough.
29.40 34 1 7
White forces a quick win using his formations
now.

White cant go to square 27 now.


31.28 23 19 x 28 32.32 x 12 8 x 17 33.38
32 17 21! isnt good for white either, although
he can escape from the lock by 34.34 30 25
x 23 35.32 27 21 x 32 36.37 x 30 but the
move 26 31 will give black a breakthrough.
Black also could have played 30 1 6 for
white cant play 31.32 27 because of the 19
23! 6 11 8 12 13 x 42 24 30 20 x 49
kingshot. 30 1 6 31.41 36 12 18! would
then lead to the game position.
31.41 36 1 6

30.47 41! 5 10
31.29 24!
There is nothing black can do about the 24
19 32 27 threat.

Changing 32.28 23 19 x 28 33.32 x 12 8 x 17


will only make the fork-lock stronger: 34.38
32 14 19!
1) 35.32 28 17 22! 36.28 x 17 11 x 22
Black is threatening 19 23 & 24 30. White
cant escape from the lock by 37.33 28 24 x
33! 38.28 x 17 20 24! 39.39 x 28 24 30
40.35 x 24 19 x 50 +. At 37.43 38 of course
there is 22 28 +. White can take a desperate
shot by 37.29 23 19 x 28 38.34 30 25 x 34
39.39 x 8 28 x 50 40.8 2 but 50 28 results
in a lost endgame.

A. Georgiev T. Sijbrands
Black has fork-locked his opponent (see lesson
29 of part I). Usually fork-locks are economic,
but this is only part of the story. How to
consider this situation with black to move?
Black needs six pieces 14 / 15 / 19 / 20 / 24 /
25 in order to lock eight pieces 29 / 33 / 34 /
35 / 39 / 40 / 44 / 45. If there as a piece at 4 we
should also count it as part of the lock, but
black has developed this piece. How to judge
the situation depends on the control over the
other wing. Black can take care white doesnt
get control over strategic square 27. Black also
has enough formations to take more control
over the left wing.
Another good thing is that white cant escape
from the lock. In a fork-lock there are many
possibilities to escape from the lock, but not
here. With no piece at 19 for example, white
could change 34 30 25 x 23 28 x 30, but
black has blocked this square to prevent
escapes like this.
White has few waiting moves left. These are
the reasons why he can be frozen out
successfully.

2) 35.43 38 19 23! 36.29 x 18 13 x 22


Lacking pieces 42 and 43 weaken whites
position. He is in big trouble, for example:
37.34 29 9 13 38.32 28 17 21 39.28 x
17 21 x 12 40.38 32 11 17 41.32 28 17
21 42.36 31 21 27!! 43.31 x 22 13 18
44.22 x 13 3 8 45.13 x 2 12 18 46.2 x 30
25 x 41 B+.
Now black has got his Olympic formation 31.37
31 26 x 37 32.32 x 41 can be met by 18 22!
33.28 x 17 11 x 22 and white has no good
move left.
32.36 31 11 16
33.32 27 6 11

Whites position is lost.


1) 34.38 32 8 12

30 12 18!

S1. Judging positions

29

42.39 x 50 17 21
43.27 22 12 17
44.22 x 11 16 x 7
45.28 22 14 19
46.23 x 14 20 x 9
47.29 24?

1.1) 35.28 23 19 x 28 36.32 x 23 16 21!!


37.27 x 7 12 x 1 38.23 x 12 25 30 39.34 x 25
14 19 40.25 x 23 13 18 41.29 x 20 18 x 49
and after this nice shot white should surrender.
1.2) 35.43 38 3 8 36.28 23 19 x 28 37.32
x 23 11 17 38.38 32 17 21 (or also the
special 13 19!! 39.32 28* 9 13 etc.) B+
2) 34.28 22 18 23! (11 17 and 8 12 fail
due to a combination!) 35.29 x 18 24 29
36.34 x 23 19 x 17 37.40 34 (37.38 32 is
not possible!) 13 x 22 38.27 x 18 8 13 etc.
B+

Stronger was 47.29 23 after which the attack


is decisive. In the game black missed the best
defence and lost the game.

To be able to judge a locking position


correctly you have to consider who controls
the other wing!

T. Sijbrands A. Gantwarg
Six pieces of black are locking only six pieces
of white in this position. The fork-lock isnt
good here because black doesnt have control
at the other wing!
White controls both centre square 28 as the
other strategic square 27. Whites centre is too
strong and black flees to the edge of the board
in a few moves.
34.37 31! 6 11
35.41 37 8 12
36.43 38 21 26
37.31 27
37 11 17 is answered by 38.27 21! 16 x
27 39.32 x 21 24 30 (13 18 40.21 16 +)
40.35 x 24 19 x 30 41.21 16 (threatening a
breakthrough 28 22 x 22) 12 18 42.45 40!
18 22 43.16 11 17 x 6 44.28 x 17 with a
winning position for white.

1.32 27
Seven pieces are locked: 6 / 7 / 12 / 16 / 17 /
18 / 22. The chain consists of pieces 27 / 28 /
31/ 33 / 36. But this is a superficial way to look
at the position. We see that piece 47 is not
active in the lock. If we would move piece 47 to
34 it would be more active.
If piece 5 would be at 11 the lock would be
even stronger of course! White is locking more
pieces in that case.
Usually when being chain-locked you will have
to try to break the chain. Black wants to
remove piece 23. He can do this in two ways,
of which only one is correct.
1 4 10!

37 24 30
38.35 x 24 19 x 30
39.45 40 11 17
39 30 35 is met by 40.27 22! 35 x 44
41.39 x 50 with the simultaneous threat of 22
18 and 34 30.
40.28 23! 30 35
41.32 28 35 x 44

White can put his opponent in a chain-lock


playing

Usually it makes sense to play the more


central 5 10. But after 2.37 32 black cant
change 19 23 3.28 x 19 14 x 23 because of
4.25 20! 15 x 24 5.33 28 22 x 33 6.39 x 30
W+1.
If black plays 1 5 10 2.37 32 19 24 he
will not escape from the lock and gets an
inferior position.

S1. Judging positions

30

2.37 32
3.40 34
4.28 x 19
5.25 x 14

15 20
19 23
14 x 23
10 x 19

Black broke the chain resulting in an equal


position.

Exercise 3.2 Black to move appears to be


able to break the right wing lock, playing 17
22. However white can win the game after 1
17 22? How?

White has fork-locked his opponent. If he must


choose between playing 39 33 and 38 33
what is the best move?
The natural move is 38 33 because at the left
wing there is a lock. So black needs to control
the other wing. This means he should
strengthen the right wing and play to the right.
White should play his pieces away from the
lock. 38 33 is the natural move. The
sequence of moves 38 33 42 38 47 42 is
logical, developing piece 47. Pieces 42 and 38
are positioned well. Later white probably
closes square 32 playing 37 32 and 41 37
like in the Geogiev Sijbrands game.

J. Goudt G. Jansen
White should have played 29.41 36 in this
sharp fork-lock-position. After his wrong
continuation a combinational explosion goes
off.

The law of the lock tells that you should


move your pieces in the opposite direction
from the lock.

29.28 23 19 x 28
30.32 x 23 21 x 32
31.38 x 27
31.37 x 28 13 19 32.41 36
32.41 37 9 13 33.38 32 25 30! 34.34 x
25 24 30 followed by 20 24 B+
32 9 13 33.31 27 17 22 34.28 x 17 11
x 31 etc. B+
31 14 19!
32.23 x 3 24 30
33.35 x 24 18 22
34.27 x 9 8 13
35.9 x 18 12 x 23
36.29 x 18 20 x 49
37.3 x 21 16 x 47

Exercise 3.1 White (to move) can force an


escape from the fork-lock. After which move
white can make an exchange escaping from
the fork-lock no matter what black plays?

Black got two king in this amazing shot. White


resigned.

S1. Judging positions

31

Exercises 3.3 3.10 Judge the position.

Is it better for white or for black? Why?

3.3 Black to move

3.7 White to move

3.4 White to move

3.8 Black to move

3.5 White to move

3.9 Black to move

3.6 White to move

3.10 White to move

S1. Judging positions

32

4. Development

In this position white has developed his pieces


much better than black. In other words: whites
pieces are closer to king than blacks pieces.
Or: white has gained more space.
Development can be measured by counting
the number of temps one has.

White has 20 pieces, all having its own rate of


development. The base pieces 46 50 have
not developed yet and are given rate of
development 0. The same is true for blacks
base pieces 1 5. Pieces 41 45 have
already been developed 1 move, so these
pieces all are counted as one temp.
Pieces 36 40 all are counted as two temps.
Pieces 31 35 are all worth three temps.
Together whites position has rate of
development 5 x 0 + 5 x 1 + 5 x 2 + 5 x 3 = 5
+ 10 + 15 = 30 temps. Of course black s rate
of development is also 30 temps. The
difference in development equals zero in the
beginning position.
This will alter when pieces are changed!
White plays 1.32 28. Black answers 19 23
2.28 x 19 14 x 23 making an exchange.
What happens to the rate of development?

We see that the difference between the left


and the right position is that pieces 28 and 14
are removed.
Piece 28 is rated 4 temps.
Piece 14 is rated 2 temps.
Black loses 2 temps, while white is losing 4
temps.
By changing 19 23 x 23 black wins two
temps.
Lets play 3.33 28 23 x 32 4.37 x 28 now,
which is considered as a sound exchange for
white.

The difference between the left and the right


position is that pieces 23 and 37 are removed.
Piece 23 is rated 4 temps.
Piece 37 is rated 2 temps.
White wins two temps.
Since he was two temps behind, the difference
in development has disappeared now.
4 10 14
5.35 30 4 10
6.30 25 18 23
7.28 x 19 14 x 23
8.25 x 14 10 x 19
Black made a double exchange. Lets
investigate what happened to the difference in
the rate of development.
If the rate of development is positive you are
developed better than your opponent

S1. Judging positions

33

Lets compare the last position to this one.


Piece 45 moved to square 29, gaining 3 temps.
So in this position white has developed even
three temps more.
White has 6 + 3 = 9 temps more now.

Whites pieces 28 and 25 disappear.


Blacks pieces 10 and 14 disappear.
Pieces 28 and 25 are rated 4 + 5 = 9 temps.
Pieces 10 and 14 are rated 1 + 2 = 3 temps.
Black gains 6 temps by the (double) exchange.

The rate of development changes during a


game when exchanges are made.

In this position white has developed another 6


temps! Now the difference is 15 temps.
We see that gaining temps the control over the
position grows!

Gaining temps is advantageous in open


positions.

Gaining temps is good, as long as you have


enough space to play. In closed classical
positions it can be dangerous to be ahead in
development.

Lets show how to calculate the difference in


rate of development in this position.
Blacks rate of development =
4 x 1 + 5 x 2 + 2 x 3 = 4 + 10 + 6 = 20
Whites rate of development =
3 x 1 + 5 x 2 + 3 x 3 + 1 x 4 = 3 + 10 + 9 + 4 =
26
White has developed 6 temps further than
black.
This means white is closer to king. White has
conquered more space.

D. Edelenbos W. Aliar
Black has a nice position! He built a strong
pyramid at his right wing. Moreover he leads in
development: 3 x 2 + 2 x 3 + 4 x 4 (1 x 1 + 4
x 2 + 2 x 3 + 1 x 4) = 28 19 = 9 temps. Being
behind 9 temps is pretty dangerous!
43.37 31 22 28!
44.33 x 22 17 x 37
45.31 x 42 24 30!

S1. Judging positions

34

How did the exchange effect the rate of


development?
Black lost pieces 17 and 28.
White lost pieces 32 and 33 and piece 31 went
to 42.
Black lost 3 + 5 = 8 temps.
White lost 3 + 3 + 2 = 8 temps.
You might expect that the difference in
development would remain unchanged, but as
we look more accurately, we see that usually
after an exchange the move goes to the other
player. For example: In the opening 1.32 28
19 23 2.28 x 19 14 x 23 black changes after
which white is to move.
In this case black changes and keeps the
move! After the exchange black could play 24
30 for free. Therefore we should conclude
that white lost one temp!
So, after the exchange blacks advantage in
development is 10 temps.

Look how much space black has thanks to his


advance in development. Black is still 6 temps
ahead.
2.1) 54.45 40 29 34 55.40 x 29 23 x 34
56.49 44 17 22! +
2.2) 54.49 43 29 33 55.45 40 23 29 (33
38 27 22! would draw the game) and
whites defence is hopeless.
50.38 32?

46.36 31 30 34
47.39 x 30 25 x 34
Black went forwards, but this exchange in fact
loses two temps!
Black lost piece 25.
White lost piece 39.
Black lost 4 2 = 2 temps.
Difference in development = 8 temps now.
The piece at 34 is very strong!
48.49 44 12 17
49.31 27 13 19
More accurate was 49 11 16 50.38 32 13
19 51.42 38 19 24

Example 4.1 How did black win now?

B. Eggens S. Winkel
Semi final Dutch championship 2003
1.32 28 17 21 2.37 32 11 17 3.31 26
7 11 4.36 31 1 7 5.31 27 17 22
6.26 x 17 22 x 31 7.41 37 11 x 22 8.28 x
17 12 x 219.37 x 17 7 12 10.35 30 12 x 21
After this exchange black has won 3 temps.

1) 52.27 21 16 x 27 53.32 x 12 18 x 7 54.26


21 24 29 55.33 28 (21 17 23 - 28 +) 23
28 56.32 x 23 29 x 18 57.21 17 18 23 B+
2) 52.44 39 34 x 43 53.38 x 49 (white is
gaining 2 temps) 24 29

S1. Judging positions

35

This calculation should be as follows:


Black loses pieces 7 / 11 / 12 and 22.
White loses pieces 26 / 27 / 28 and 41 while 35
moves to 30.
White loses 4 + 4 + 4 + 1 = 13 temps versus 1
+ 2 + 2 + 4 = 9 temps for black. The difference
is 4. By moving 35 30 during the exchange
white regains one temp. So he loses only 3
temps.
Exercise 4.2 If white would have taken
6.28 x 17 11 x 31 26 x 37 how many temps
would he lose by this exchange?
11.30 25
12.46 41
13.42 37
14.34 29
15.40 34
16.45 40
17.48 42

8 12
6 11
11 17
18 22
13 18
2 8
9 13

Black is ready to play 20 24 putting pressure


on piece 23. White has no choice but to
change back.
22.29 24 20 x 29
23.23 x 34
Exercise 4.3 Show a calculation that proves
white is losing 4 temps with this retreat.

Black has 7 temps more now.


23 8 13 24.34 29

18.29 23? 19 x 28
19.32 x 23 18 x 29
20.34 x 23
White loses pieces 32 and 34 while black loses
pieces 18 and 19. Nothing changes!
In a few moves white will have to retreat his
outpost at 23 losing a lot of temps. Whites
(lack of) development doesnt allow him to
create a good centre-attack.

24 14 20
25.25 x 14 10 x 19
Another gain of four temps.
Blacks lead in development is 11 temps.
26.39 33 5 10
27.37 32 21 27
28.32 x 21 17 x 26

20 13 18!
A strong move, for white isnt allowed to play
21.39 34 18 x 29 22.34 x 23 because of the
king shot 12 18!! 23.23 x 12 14 19 25.25 x
23 3 9 26.12 x 14 10 x 48 B+.

Exercise 4.4 Why does this exchange not


effect the rate of development?

21.33 29 4 9!

29.41 37 10 14
30.38 32 14 20
31.32 28
Giving his opponent two temps more.
Black is 13 temps up now, a huge lead in
development.

S1. Judging positions

36

31
38
32.28 x 17 12 x 21
33.43 38 19 24
34.38 32 21 27
35.32 x 21 16 x 27

Its dangerous to stay behind in


development!

Both losing 4 temps, nothing changes.


36.47 41?
Weakening the baseline. 36.42 38 should
have been played.
36
9 14
37.41 36 8 12
38.42 38 14 19
39.50 45
W. Thoen T. Sijbrands
White should develop his left wing by playing
46 41 and 41 37. White waited with this
development and black confronted him with
tactical problems.
9.39 33 17 21
From now one 46 41 is punished by the 24
29 arch shot!
10.44 39 21 26
11.50 44 11 17
12.42 37

39 20 25
40.29 x 20 15 x 24
39 12 17 had been even better.
Exercise 4.5 How much temps is black
advanced now?
41.37 32?

12.46 41? is punished by 26 31! 13.27 21


16 x 27 14.32 x 21 17 x 26 15.36 x 27 23 x 21
+.
Now piece 46 stays behind. He should have
tried to solve this problem by playing 47 42
36 31 46 41 36 quickly.
12 8 13
13.30 25 2 8
14.47 42 17 21
15.40 34 1 7
16.34 30 7 11
17.44 40

Gaining back 4 temps, but it is much too late to


be able to gain control at whites left wing. The
result is that white is blown away.
41
19 23
42.32 x 21 26 x 17
43.38 32 17 22
44.32 27 22 x 31
45.36 x 27 12 17
46.44 39 17 22
47.33 28 22 x 35
48.27 21 24 29
49.21 16 29 34
50.16 11 13 19
51.11 7 19 24

White doesnt need to worry about 24 29 33


x 24 26 31 37 x 17 11 x 44 because of 27
22! 18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 43 39 44 x 33 38
x7
17 12 17
18.46 41 10 15
19.39 34 14 20
20.25 x 14 9 x 20

White resigned. Development was the key


factor to blacks victory.

S1. Judging positions

37

White falls victim to a great shot by attacking


piece 20.
21.30 25
22.25 x 14
23.14 x 25
24.28 x 17
25.36 x 27
26.37 x 17
27.35 x 24

Exercise 4.8 White changes 27 22 18 x 27


28 23 19 x 28 33 x 31. How many temps
does he lose?

4 10!
15 20
17 22
11 x 31
26 31
24 30
19 x 46

Exercise 4.9 Calculate the difference in rate of


development (= Dirod) of this position.

Exercise 4.6 White changes 44 40 35 x 44


39 x 50. How does this effect the rate of
development?

Exercise 4.10 Calculate the Dirod of this


position.
Exercise 4.7 How many temps does white win
changing 39 33 28 x 39 44 x 33 35 x 44 50 x
39?

S1. Judging positions

38

Exercise 4.11 How many temps is white


behind? Is this a good thing?

Y. Anikeev L. Baya
Exercise 4.12 A) Calculate the Dirod.
B) White increased his lead in development
even more. What did white play?

I. Koeperman A. Andreiko

S1. Judging positions

39

5. Strategic squares
Controlling strategic squares 27 / 28 / 24
helps building a strong position.

White has the ideal attacking position,


controlling all strategic squares, while black
has no strong formations. First we will show
you how to realize a win in such a position:
1.28 23 8 12
2.40 34
Exercise 5.1 If black changes 14 19 23 x 14
20 x 9, how does white win with a shot?
2 11 17
3.33 - 28 14 19
4.23 x 14 20 x 9
5.28 22 17 x 28
6.32 x 23 9 14
White can choose how to win. Tactically by
7.23 19 14 x 23 8.27 22 etc. or positionally
by 7.38 32 +.

K. Thijssen P. Chmiel
White controls squares 27 and 28. He can also
conquer another strategic square:
1.30 24! 11 17
2.47 42 18 22
There is no use in playing 9 14 3.42 38 14
19 4.24 20! etc. +
3 17 22 4.28 x 17 21 x 12 5.33 28 leads
nowhere for black.

In the game white played 1.37 31? 2.26 x 27


3.32 x 41 8 12 4.41 37 11 17 5.38 32
17 21 6.28 23 14 19 7.23 x 14 20 x 9
8.33 28? 12 17!
Exercise 5.2 White played 9.28 22 and lost
the endgame. If white plays 9.39 33, how
does black reply?

Exercise 5.3 In the beginning position white


could have performed a catapult shot. Why is
this catapult shot not winning?

3.27 x 18 13 x 22
4.28 23! 22 27
5.42 38 27 31
6.23 19 31 x 42
7.38 x 47
White gets back his strong defender at 47, so
whites breakthrough (24 20 19 14 etc.) is
winning easily.
As a matter of fact 1.33 29? was played in
the game, after which black could have played
11 17! because 2.28 22 leads to a draw.

T. Tansykkuzhina A. Chizhov
Tenfold world champion Chizhov has a great
position with black. Black has control over the
strategic squares 23 / 24 and 27. White cant
take back control over one of the strategic
points. The position is very difficult for white.
J. Van Dartelen S. Lochtenberg

S1. Judging positions

32 13 18
33.42 37 23 28

40

34.37 32 28 x 37
35.31 x 42 18 23
36.39 34 3 9

Black has a winning position, still controlling


squares 23 / 24 / 27.
White cant take the shot 37.36 31? 27 x 36
38.33 29 24 x 33 39.38 x 27 since piece 36
breaks through.
White cant play 37.30 25? either, because of
37 23 29 +.
Changing 37.33 29 24 x 33 38.38 x 18 12 x
23 leaves a difficult defence for white.
The most logical reply seems 37.42 37 9
13 38.38.48 42 12 18
We will show you two different continuations.
This variations show the strength of blacks
wing-attack.

55.47 42 11 17 56.42 37 23 28! 57.38


33 28 x 39 58.34 x 43 17 22 59.43 38 22
28 60.30 25 19 23 and white has frozen out
and will lose.
2) 39.37 32 7 12 40.32 x 21 22 28 41.33
x 22 18 x 16 42.42 37
Black has lost control over square 27, but
whites position is lost because of the passive
pieces at his right wing: Pieces 30 / 34 / 35 / 40
/ 45 are not active. White cant play 30 25.
42 12 18 43.37 32 17 22 44.32 27 22
x 31 45.36 x 27 11 17 46.38 32 17 22!
And white has no good move left.
Exercise 5.4 In the game white played 37.48
43? How did black win with a shot?

1) 39.37 31
Black must take care. Playing 7 12? would
be punished by the shot 34 29 33 28 38 x 9
31 x 24 +.
39 23 28!
40.34 29 28 x 39 41.29x 9 13 x 4 42.42 37
27 32! 43.38 x 27 39 43 leads to a
breakthrough for black.
40.42 37 28 x 39 41.34 x 43 7 12 42.43
39 18 23 43.40 34 23 28 44.37 32 28 x
37 45.31 x 42 22 - 28 46.38 33 27 32!
47.33 x 22 17 x 28 48.39 33 28 x 39 49.34 x
43 13 18 50.42 37 32 x 41 51.36 x 47 12
17 52.45 40 17 22
Black is on its way to control squares 23 and
27 again!
53.40 34 18 23! 54.43 38 22 27!

In this position black has a piece at the centresquare 23, but he doesnt control square 24.
This is very dangerous. White controls square
27 and is able to take square 24. Taking 24 will
put pressure on piece 23.
1.30 24!
1 23 29 will give white a free move he can
use for making a shot: 2.32 28! 29 x 20 3.28
23 18 x 29 4.33 x 4
White threatens to win piece 23 by attacking
2.33 28. There is noting black can do about

S1. Judging positions

41

this. 1 10 14 2.33 28 14 19 3.24 20


results in a breakthrough for white.

In this position white occupies the strategic


squares 27 and 28. He would like to conquer
the third strategic square.

It is very dangerous to possess the centresquare 28 without control over square 27


especially in classical positions.

1.34 30!
Not correct is 1.34 29 19 24 2.29 x 20 15 x
24 and black takes possession over square 24.
White still has a plan of attacking square 24:
3.44 39 9 14!
Black cant play 3 13 19 because of 4.35
30! 24 x 35 5.28 23 18 x 29 6.33 x 4 +
4.39 34 3 8! 5.34 29 26 - 31!!
After 5 14 19? 6.29 x 20 19 23 7.28 x 19
13 x 15 8.32 28 8 13 9.33 29 black still
has big problems.
6.29 x 9 31 x 22 7.28 x 17 13 x 4 with a draw.
1 9 14

N. Angela T. Demasure
In a closed classical position it is important not
to lose control over square 27 / 24. Black
should have backed piece 24 by 4 9 30 25
9 14 with equality. He could also have played
47 23 29 gaining space.
47 12 17?
White could have forced a win now:
48.30 25!
Threatening a Harlem shot playing 25 20 33
29 28 22 32 x 3 +.
48 17 21 49.25 20!!
A sacrifice removing piece 24.
49 24 x 15 50.35 30
Black has only one move to avoid the 30 24
threat.
50 23 29 51.33 x 24 4 9 52.38 33 9
14 53.33 29! 14 20 54.30 25! 19 x 30
55.25 x 14 30 35 56.49 44 +
Surprising: In the first position black possesses
square 24, after a few moves white has
conquered this square.

At 15 20 white plays 2.33 29 20 25* 3.30


24 19 x 30 4.35 x 24 conquering 24.
Black plays 9 14 to drive white back after
2.30 24? 19 x 30 3.35 x 24 14 19! (4.44
40 19 x 30 5.28 23 18 x 29 6.33 x 35 =.
White has to prepare changing to 24.
2.44 40!
Piece 40 has the role of defending the outpost
at 24. Black has left only one defence.
2 3 9!
The composer of this composition wanted to
play 3.33 29? here. As a matter of fact black
can make a shot to draw the game now: 19
24!! 4.30 x 17 18 22 5.27 x 18 9 13 6.18 x
20 15 x 31 and black can hold a draw,
although this is no so easy at all.
White can win the position by altering his plan:
3.30 25!!
White takes advantage of blacks weaknesses.
Because 12 17 and 18 23 (35 30!+) are
not playable, black should play 15 20 or 19
24.
1) 3 19 24 4.40 34 13 19 (14 19 is
also answered by 5.34 29!) 5.34 29! And
black has no move left.
2) 3 15 20 4.33 29!
Piece 20 is dangling and black has little space
to play.
4 19 24 5.38 33 12 17 6.37 31!
26 x 37 7.32 x 41 18 22 (17 21 is answered
by 40 34! 21 x 23 34 30 23 x 34 30 x 8 +)
8.27 x 18 13 x 22 9.40 34 9 13 9.28 23!

S1. Judging positions

42

13 19 10.35 30! 19 x 39 11.30 x 10 39 x 30


12.25 x 34 W+
Typical for a draughts position. It looks easy at
first sight, but turns out to be complicated.

A. Shwarzman K. Thijssen
Black controls square 24, but because of a
mistake white conquered this square
43 24 30?
Black faced some problems. He must evade
classics. 43 14 19 44.49 44 18 23?
45.44 39 is very dangerous for black.
After 45 12 18 (or 13 18) 46.45 40 15 20 47.40 35 he is frozen out and cant make
a good sacrifice.
After 45 15 20 (45 24 30? 46.33 29!)
46.45 40 24 30 47.40 35 20 24 48.27
22 12 18 49.22 x 11 16 x 7 50.28 22 18 x
27 51.32 x 21 blacks left wing is locked.
The correct defense for black is 43 14 19
44.49 44 24 30 45.44 39 19 24
(avoiding the 27 22 32 x 21 28 23 33 x 11
threat) keeping control over square 24.

In this position white has no pieces at 27 or 28.


Still white controls both squares. He can go
there if he wants, but it can be an advantage
not to decide to put a piece at a strategic
square yet.
White can play 36 31 followed by 31 27 but
it is much better to fight for squares that you
dont have under control yet. In this case you
had better try to get control over square 24.
1.34 29!
If white would play 36 31 and 31 27 black
would get time to reinforce his left wing playing
13 19 and 8 13 making it harder for white
to get control over 24.
Now white has great control over the position,
close to squares 27 / 28 and 24.

44.34 29 30 35
45.45 40 35 x 44
46.49 x 40 14 19
M.J. Wu S. Veltman
Black controls all strategic squares. Although
she has no piece at 27, it is clear white cant
take 27 because of the strong pieces at 22 and
26. Black to move has a winning position but
has to play the right move.

Exercise 5.5 How did white take control over


square 24 winning the game?

In the game black played the seemingly logical


move 1 13 19? Creating the fork 14 / 19 /
23 / 24. This move however gave white the
chance to defend herself using a sacrifice:
2.35 30! 24 x 35 3.33 29 =.
At 1 6 11 white also escapes sacrificing:
2.35 30! 24 x 35 3.33 29 13 18 4.29 24

S1. Judging positions

43

14 19 5.24 x 13 18 x 9 6.38 33 followed by


33 29 =.
To eliminate this sacrifice black should close
the gap at 18.
1 13 18!
Sacrificing 2.35 30 24 x 35 3.33 29 makes
no sense now because of 35 40 4.34 x 45 23
x 34 B+.
After 2.34 30 14 19 white is frozen out.

If black plays the 16 21 27 x 16 18 22


sacrifice white has a nice stick shot: 37 31!!
22 x 24 25 20 26 x 28 20 x 7 +.

It is not always necessary to have a piece at


a strategic square to have control over it.

49 17 21
50.48 43
White can also play 50.28 22 etc. +
50 12 17
51.28 22 17 x 28
52.32 x 12 21 x 41
53.36 x 47 13 18
54.12 x 23 19 x 28
55.29 24
Whites breakthrough is winning thanks to the
strong defender at 47.

M. Barkel D. Edelenbos
Black has no strong formations and doesnt
control any strategic square.
White controls squares 27 and 28. Possessing
square 29 will give control over <24> too. So
white should have played like this (In the game
he went wrong and the game was drawn):
47.33 29! 7 12
47.. 14 20 can be met by 48.37 31 26 x 37
49.42 x 31 9 13 50.30 25 etc. + or by the 4
x 4 exchange 48.27 22 18 x 27 49.28 23
19 x 28 50.29 24 20 x 29 51.37 31 26 x 37
52.42 x 24 breaking through quickly.
48.30 25 9 13
49.42 38 11 17
49.38 32!

S1. Judging positions

44

severely restricted in his moves now. He can


only play 32 28.

6.Weaknesses
A position can contain all kinds of weaknesses.
When your opponent has a weakness in his
position you often can take advantage of it.

A. Verovkim B. Derkx
White has fork-locked his opponent. Six pieces
lock six of black. Not very economic.
How is the situations at the other wing?
Well, black controls squares 23 and 24 and
has strong formations. Therefore the fork-lock
is not dangerous at all. Moreover, white has a
huge weakness: Piece 44 is dangling. Because
of the dangling piece white cant play 40 34
or 39 34.
Because white has a lack of space to play he
changed to the edge of the board.
27.48 42? would be punished by 23 28!
28.32 x 23 19 x 28 and 17 21 is a lethal
threat.

35.32 28 3 8

White has no good move left:


1) 36.21 16 17 21! 37.16 x 18 12 x 32
38.38 x 27 29 x 49 +
2) 36.39 34 24 30! 37.34 x 23 20 24
38.25 x 34 24 29 39.33 x 24 19 x 50 +
3) 36.48 42 (game) 22 27! 37.21 x 32 17
22 38.28 x 17 12 x 21 39.26 x 17 24
30 40.25 x 23 19 x 48 +

27.27 21 16 x 27
28.32 x 21 6 11
29.21 16 23 29!
30.16 x 7 12 x 1

W. Ludwig K. Leijenaar

White has only five pieces left to play! This is


an excellent way to take profit of dangling
piece 44.
31.37 32 1 7
32.31 27 22 x 31
33.36 x 27?
It was better to take backwards in order to gain
more space. Now black forces a win using
tactics. He cant take the 24 30 shot because
of 34. 25 x 23 19 x 37 35.38 32! 37 x 28
36.33 x 2 W+, but the 24 30 menace still
plays an important role.

White has a piece at centre square 28, but


whites control over the centre is very poor.
There are only 3 pieces in the centre for white
of which piece 39 is a dangling piece. It makes
the fork 34 / 35 / 40 / 45 that is not so active,
even worse. Black has control over <24> and
<23>. Although black doesnt have a piece at
23 he does control the centre square. At any
time he can play 18 23 taking the centre.
The gap at square 13 is a weakness for black,
but this weakness is only temporary. Black can
close the gap playing 9 13.
Black can profit from whites position, poor for
having some weaknesses and with a lack of
active formations.

33 8 12!
34.27 21 18 22!

33 18 23!
34.38 32 6 11

In the game black played 3 -8 first, but the


immediate 18 22 is better, because white is

S1. Judging positions

45

Threatening 11 16 so whites play is forced


again.
35.21 16 24 29!

G. Jansen - E. Bouzinski

Whites pieces are not working together.


Black restricts the number of moves white can
play severely with his last move.
36.34 30 is followed by 29 33! 37.28 22
33 x 44 38.40 x 49 9 13 (avoiding the stick
move 12 17? 30 24!) and 12 17 at the
next move will gain a piece.
35.35 30 20 25 results in a dangerous right
wing lock: 36.41 37 12 17 37.37 - 31 (white
should give a piece playing 37.30 24) 7 12!
38.16 x 18 23 x 12 39.34 x 23 25 x 43 B+.
White could use tactics to parry the 29 33
threat. 36.41 37 29 33 can be answered by
37.34 29! 23 x 43 38.28 x 48 although black
is till better. The formation 34 / 40 /45 is weak.
This is the best way to try to defend the
position.
36.28 22? 9 13
In the game black played 20 24 and also
won. We show the most clear way to win.

White has a compact position with a lot of


formations. Blacks position contains a huge
weakness. There is no single piece in the 2 / 3
/ 4 / 8 / 9 / 13 zone. This means that his
defence is extremely weak. Black has two
wings that are not connected. It is a split
position. White took profit in a nice way.
30.27 22! 18 x 27
31.31 x 22 17 x 28
32.32 x 23 19 x 28
33.33 x 22 16 21
White would have punished 33 12 17? with
a king shot: 34.34 29! 24 x 44 35.49 x 40 17
x 28 36.38 33 28 x 39 37.40 34 39 x 30
38.35 x 4 W.
34.34 30! 14 19
It was not possible to play 34 21 26 35.30
x 19 14 x 23 for white forces a win playing
36.22 18 23 28 37.39 34! 12 x 23 38.38
33 28 x 30 39.35 x 4 W .
35.30 25 10 14
36.38 33! 19 23

37.41 37 20 24!
At 37 12 17 white doesnt change pieces
32 28 = but plays 34 30 30 24 35 x 22
gaining a piece.

36 12 18 37.22 x 13 19 x 8 will lead to a


lethal arrow lock: 38.39 - 34 8 13 39.34 30
13 19 40.33 28 (threatening 28 23) W.
37.39 34 14 19
38.25 x 14 19 x 10
39.42 38 10 15
40.38 32 11 16

38.47 41 12 18!
39.32 27 29 33
40.39 x 28 23 x 21
41.16 x 27 7 12
Winning piece 22.

40 12 17 is met by the pseudo-sacrifice


41.22 18! 23 x 12 42.34 30 and piece 35
will help to break through.
If black plays 40 21 26 white doesnt play
22 18 immediately because of the 26 31
stick move, but he prepares 22 18 by playing
41.36 31 avoiding the stick move. At 41 12
17 he can play a stick move himself: 34 29
W.

S1. Judging positions

46

41 12 18
42.17 x 26 18 22
43.37 31
Black surrendered.
The Dutch player Otto Drenth was famous for
keeping the construction 2 / 3 / 4 / 8 / 9 / 13
intact. This strong defensive construction was
named after him.

Pieces 2 / 3 / 4 / 8 / 9 / 13 are strong


defending pieces. These squares together
are called the Drent-zone. Pieces at all six
of these squares give shape to the Drent
pyramid.

defence with the pyramidal structure 47 / 48 /


49 / 42 / 43 / 38. Black misses two base pieces
2 and 4. Piece 25 is at the edge and not so
active because white doesnt have a piece at
35.
In the game black would get more weaknesses
in his position.
White starts to take square 27.
17.31 27! 22 x 31
18.36 x 27 19 24
More logical seems to build up a compact
position playing the moves 18 23 12 18 7
12 and 9 14.
19.39 34 13 19
20.43 39 8 13
This results in a weakness at square 8.
21.41 36 18 22
21 18 23 is not without problems either:
After 22.37 31 12 18 23.33 29! 24 x 33
24.39 x 28 7 12 25.44 40 black has to take
care about the 27 22 x 22 move, for example
25 3 8? 26.27 22! 18 x 27 27.31 x 22
(threatening 34 30) 1 7* 28.38 33! And
the 22 18 34 30 threat forces black to
sacrifice a piece playing 19 -24.
22.27 x 18 12 x 23
23.36 31 13 18
24.33 29!

Mac. NDiaye A. Scholma


Black has no pieces in the Drent zone. His
position is split. White won a piece by simply
preventing the 12 18 move.
32.37 31!
At 12 18 there is the 35 30 27 21 31 x 15
shot. Black sacrificed a piece playing 16 21
and later escaped with a draw.

White takes squares 27 and 28 while removing


blacks piece at 24. Without 24 white can use
piece 25 to make shots. Black cant play 1 6
now because of 25.28 22! 18 x 36 26.37 31
36 x 27 27.32 x 1 +.
24 7 12
25.31 27! 9 13
26.44 40 1 6
27.49 44

R. Boomstra A. van Berkel


White has a very clean position with no
weaknesses at all. White has a very compact

S1. Judging positions

47

Positionally black would like to play 27 3 8


but he is afraid of 28.28 22! 17 x 28 29.34
30 25 x 34 30.40 x 29 23 x 34 31.32 x 14 and
piece 14 is a strongly infiltrator in blacks camp.
Black cant eliminate the piece playing 13 19
32.14 x 23 18 x 29 because of 33.27 21 16 x
27 34.38 32 27 x 38 35.42 x 24 after which
he gains piece 34 by 48 43 and 44 39.

breaking through. White has control over


centre and both wings. Black is frozen out
completely.

27 17 21
28.40 35 21 26
After 28 3 9 29.44 40 black has to play
21 26 anyway, because 9 14 is punished
by the 27 22 34 30 shot.
29.44 40!

37 17 21
38.40 34 12 17
39.36 31 17 22
40.28 x 17 21 x 12
41.32 28 6 11
42.37 32 26 x 37
43.32 x 41 11 17
44.38 32 17 21
45.41 36

The 34 / 35 / 40 / 45 fork is finished at last. 29


3 9 can be met by 30.38 33
Threatening 27 22 followed by 37 31 with
king at 3.
30 9 14 31.33 29! with the strong 27 22
threat.
29 15 20
30.47 41 3 9
31.41 36 9 14

Black surrendered already. 45 21 26


46.36 31 26 x 37 47.32 x 41 12 17 48.41
37 is going nowhere and 45 12 17 46.48
42 21 26 47.42 37 17 21 48.36 31 is
another clear finish.

White changes to a situation where piece 20 is


dangling.
33.34 39! 23 x 34
34.40 x 29 19 24

A. Shwarzman L. Kouogueu

Black has no active formations at all.


35.38 33 14 19
Black had to prevent the 35 30 threat.
36.42 38 11 17
37.45 40

Whites position looks fine at first sight. He has


many formations and controls squares <27>
and <28>. But white does have a weakness in
his position: square 42 is not protected. This
makes his position vulnerable for tactics. The
African opponent of threefold world champion
Shwarzman shows the weakness of < 42 > in a
nice way.
31.26 21 10 14

(diagram)
Black cant play 25 30 because of 29 23 18
x 29 28 23 19 x 39 38 33 ad lib. 32 x 14

Black should not play 1 11 17 because of


27 22! 18 x 16 28 23 19 x 28 33 x 2 W+.

S1. Judging positions

48

32.37 31?
White should have played 32.21 16 18 22!
33.27 x 18 13 x 22 34.28 x 17 11 x 22 and
white can only play 34 30 x 30 with quite a
poor position. Other moves fail on shots.
Exercise 6.1 Show the shot to punish the
following moves:
A) 34 29
B) 37 31

S. Ek M. van Gortel
White has occupied both square 27 and 29.
Because white has too many gaps in his
positions and too few formations this is
dangerous. Blacks formations are strongly
aimed at these squares. Pieces 15 / 20 / 25
help control whites right wing. If square 33 is
closed black can play 19 24 making the forklock.
Black was to play and forced the fork-lock:
33 19 24!

C) 32 28

White doesnt have a temp to make an


exchange.

32 11 17!
33.21 16

34.39 33 13 19

Actually this is quite a strange move, because


black can play the logical 24 29! 34.34 x 23
18 x 29 35.33 x 24 20 x 29 with the 7 11
threat. 36.39 33 is punished by the coup
Philippe 12 18 etc. and 36.27 22 is
punished by 7 11 37.16 x 18 19 24 38.22 x
11 13 x 42 B+1.
Black shows a more special way to use the
<42> weakness.
33 25 30!
34.34 x 25 24 29
35.33 x 24 20 x 29
36.27 21 17 x 37
37.32 x 41 12 17

If white plays 42 37 8 13 creates a double


threat: 18 23 and 24 30.
35.44 39 8 13
Look carefully: white has no good move left.

Occupying squares <27> and <29>


simultaneously can be dangerous if you have
too few formations.

Whites move are severely restricted. He can


only play 41 36. Playing with piece 39 is met
by 18 22 while 38.41 37 is followed by 29
33 39.38 x 29 17 21 40.16 x 27 18 23
41.29 x 18 13 x 42 +.
38.41 36 8 12
39.36 31 6 11
We show the most direct way to tactically
freeze white out. In the game black played 7
11 which is also winning.
N. de la Fonteyne H. Veldhorst
A first impression could be that black controls
important strategic squares and therefore has
a good position. He possesses square 24,
while white doesnt control 27. But the huge
weakness of piece 6 spoils it all for black. This
piece isnt active.
White could have played 1.49 43 followed by
43 38 strengthening his position by closing
the gap at 38. After 1.49 43! 13 18 2.43
38! black cant go to square 23, because 18

S1. Judging positions

49

23 is punished by 33 29! 23 x 34 31 26 22
x 33 38 x 9 etc. W+ and if he plays 2 21 26
white will chain-lock him: 3.32 27! 26 x 37
4.42 x 31 +.
Of course one should consider tactics,
because white has a gap at 38.
At 1.49 43 black could perform a
combination: 14 20 2.25 x 23 21 27 3.32 x
12 13 18 4.28 x 17 18 x 47 but after 5.12 8
black has not solved his problems yet.

6.43 39
Changing 35 30 is answered by 27 31.
27 31! And white has no good move left.
2) 5.43 39 17 22!
5 13 18 is a good move too.
6.28 x 17* 21 x 12 7.32 x 21 16 x 27
Black has all strategic squares in possession
now.
8.42 37 27 31 9.26 21 31 x 42 10.38 x 47
23 29 11.21 16 29 x 38 12.16 11 12 17
13.11 x 22 13 18 14.22 x 13 19 x 8 B+.

Inactive pieces make your position


vulnerable.

K. Thijssen N.N.
If we would only put piece 6 at a better square,
like <3> or <8>, black will have a winning
position!
White cant change back now, which was
played in the game N. de la Fonteyne H.
veldhorst and gave white an advantage due to
the weak piece at 6, because it is prohibited:
1.33 29 24x 33 2.28 x 39 14 20! 3.25 x 23
13 18 4.23 x 3 21 26 5.3 x 21 16 x 47 B+.
1.49 43 is answered by 8 12
Threatening 21 27!
2.31 26 22 27! 3.42 38 12 18 4.48 42
4.43 39 18 22! With the lethal threat 24
29.
18 23

1) 5.42 37 23 29!!
5 27 31? 6.33 29!! W+

Blacks right wing is not developed well. The


piece at 5 is inactive. White wants to keep this
wing undeveloped and tries to control the other
wing.
What should white play: 42 38 or 43 38?
Well, from whites point of view he controls the
right wing already and so he should reinforce
the left wing. So white has to move to the left.
42 38 would be weakening his left wing and
giving up on the opportunity to use the 37 / 42 /
48 tail important to remove a black piece at 26.
28.43 38 2 7
29.42 37 7 11
30.39 34 11 17
We will consider two other variations:
1) 30.. 21 26 31.47 42 5 10 32.37 31
26 x 37 33.42 x 31 3 -8 34.31 26 8 12
35.48 42 leads to a very difficult position for
black.
35 15 20 36.34 29! 23 x 34 37.40 x 29
results in a horrible lock.
35 11 17 36.42 37 6 11 gives white the
chance for a shot: 37.34 29 23 x 34 38.40 x
20 15 x 24 39.26 21! 17 x 26 40.28 23 19 x
39 41.30 x 6 (39 44 42.6 1) +.
After 35 23 29 36.34 x 23 18 x 29 37.40
34 25 x 34 38.45 x 34 13 18 blacks left wing
is still weak.

S1. Judging positions

50

2) 30 5 10 31.37 31 3 8 32.47 41 21
26? (32 11 17 33.41 36 favors white)
33.27 21!! 16 x 47 34.25 20 14 x 25 35.32
27 23 x 43 36.48 x 39 47 x 29 37.34 x 5 25 x
43 38.5 x 43 W+.
31.47 41! 5 10
White doesnt need the 37 / 42 / 48 tail
anymore, for black cant play 21 26 anyway
because of 34 29 followed by 27 21.
32.48 42 15 20
Now square 20 is closed, whites pieces at his
right wing become active.
Still this was blacks best move.
32 3 8 is punished by an explosive shot:
34 29 40 x 20 28 22 25 20 38 33 32 x 5
5 x 40 +.
33.34 29
34.40 x 29
35.29 x 18
36.37 x 26
37.42 37
38.45 40
39.26 x 17

Exercise 6.3 Describe the weaknesses in


blacks position.

23 x 34
18 23
13 x 31
9 13
10 15
17 22
22 x 11

White can win already by playing 28 23 19 x


39 30 x 10 15 x 4 25 x 14 followed by 40 34 x
24 and a breakthrough. In the game white
played 40.40 34 and won.

Exercise 6.2 Describe the weaknesses in


whites position.

Exercise 6.4 Describe the weaknesses in


blacks position (white to move).

Exercise 6.5 Describe the weaknesses in


blacks position (black to move).

S1. Judging positions

51

Exercise 6.6 Describe the weakness in


whites position.

S1. Judging positions

52

7. Space

39 13 18
F. Luteijn G. van Aalten
Whites position is much better than blacks
position. White has formations: A pyramid in
the centre and the Olympic formation not
allowing black to play 25 30. Black has an
outpost at 29 but it is not strong for two
reasons:
1) Piece 29 is not covered by a strong
centre.
2) Black doesnt have space to develop
his attack. The Olympic formation 40 /
45 prevents black from moving on.
Blacks central pyramid prevents black
from playing at square 17 reducing
blacks space to play.
Blacks lack of space makes his position
hopeless. He doesnt have any active
formations to change the situation.
Where should black go with his pieces?
33.26 21 13 19
34.36 31

White can gain a piece playing 40.28 23 19


x 28 41.33 x 13 14 19 42.39 34 but decides
to just freeze black out.
40.31 26 18 23
41.27 22 25 30
After 41 12 17 42.39 34 its closing time.
42.40 34 29 x 40
43.45 x 25 23 29
44.26 21 12 18
44 29 34 45.39 x 30 24 x 35 46.22 17 11
x 22 47.28 x 8 is lost for black.
45.22 x 13 19 x 8
46.28 22!
White won in the game playing 46.32 27
followed by 38 32 x 43, but we show the
most direct way to victory.
46 8 13
47.22 18! 13 x 22
48.37 31

White could have attacked piece 29 already


playing 39 34, but white is not hurrying at all
to get the piece. Waiting for black to run out of
sensible moves is a sound strategy.
34 8 13
35.21 16 6 11
36.31 27 9 14
37.48 42 15 20
38.37 31 1 6
38 13 18 39.42 37 18 23 40.39 34
leads to a horrible lock: 12 18 41.27 21 1
6 42.21 17 11 x 22 43.28 x 17 +.
39.42 37

Black to move
Blacks situation is hopeless. There is no
square to go anymore.

The difference in rate of development is -4


temps. Black is developed 4 temps further than
white. You should calculate the difference with

S1. Judging positions

53

white to move, so the calculating must be after


black plays a move, for example 12 17.
White has to play four moves to reach a
symmetrical position after 12 - 17: 38 33 42
38 39 34 and 40 35. This means white is
developed 4 temps less. White has 4 more
moves to make.
Black has a lack of space to play as a result of
his lead in development.

With a lead in development in a closed


classical position you risk being
frozen out!

This closed classical position has emerged in a


game many times. Black to play is lost.
1) 1 12 17 2.38 33!
1.1) 17 21 3.40 35
3.42 38 van be answered by the shot 24 30
25 x 34 18 22 27 x 20 21 27 32 x 21 23 x
41 and black holds a draw.
3 23 29 4.42 38 and 18 23 can be
answered by both 5.35 30 + and 5.27 22
W+.
1.2) 23 29 3.42 38 18 23 4.39 34!
After 4.40 35? 29 34! 5.39 x 30 13 18 its
a draw.
4 13 18
4 17 21 5.27 22 +
5.34 30 24 x 44 6.33 x 11 16 x 7 7.28 x 10
W+

The rate of development (Dirod) in this position


is 2 temps. Although white has 2 temps more
in this closed classical position, black risks
being frozen out. White controls both wings.
He doesnt have formations to remove piece
25 or 26. Black lacks space to play. The only
square to go at the next move is 29. White
prepares a nice shot to prevent black from
going there.
1.49 43!
If black plays 23 29 white takes the shot 2.35
30! 29 x 49 3.25 20 14 x 34 4.28 22 17 x
28 5.32 x 14 49 x 21 6.26 x 39 W+.
Playing a sacrifice is a better defence: 1 16
21 2.27 x 16 23 29 3.43 38 29 34 4.32
27 but after the breakthrough 24 29 5.33 x 24
19 x 30 6.35 x 24 34 40 white plays 7.38
33! 40 44 8.33 29 black cant go to king (44
50 9.37 31! 50 x 22 10.29 23 +) and 8
14 19 9.37 31! 19 x 30 10.25 x 34 13 19
11.34 30 the situation hasnt changed. 11
19 23 12.28 x 19 44 50 13.19 14 will lead
to a loss for black.

2) 1 23 29 2.28 23 19 x 28 3.32 x 34 12
17 4.39 33 will be losing too for black.
3) 1 24 29 2.39 34 12 17 3.40 35 29
x 40 4.35 x 44
Black loses control over square 24.
4.17 21 5.38 33 18 22 6.27 x 20 21 27
7.32 x 21 23 x 41 8.20 15 16 x 27 9.42 37
41 x 32 10.15 10 is winning for example: 19
23 11.10 5 23 28 12.33 x 31 26 x 37
13.44 39 32 38 14.5 x 41 38 42 15.41
47 42 48 16.39 34 W+
A. Betting I. Poepjes
The Dirod is 3 + 2 + 9 + 12 (8 + 9 + 12) = 26
29 = 3. This means white is 3 temps
behind. Therefore black has a lack of space.
Moreover her piece at 15 is not active. White
should take care black doesnt get space. In
the game she played 1.42 37? giving her
opponent space to go to 29.

S1. Judging positions

54

She should have played 1.30 25! and 23


29 is answered by 2.43 39 preventing black
both from going to 34 and playing 18 23. It
will be punished by 35 30! +
2 12 17 3.42 37 leaves black with no
sensible reply.
If black plays 1.30 25 12 17 she is frozen
out by 2.43 39! (preventing the 17 22 23
28 13 18 shot) 21 26 2.42 37 17 21
3.45 40 23 29 4.28 22 18 23 5.33 28
15 20 6.39 33 W+.

12.46 41 4 10
Closing square 18 will lead to a chain lock by
32 27! White should have played 13.50 44
now, but chooses to play the wrong base
piece. In a couple of moves we will see why 50
44 was better.
13.49 44? 14 20
14.34 29 10 14
15.40 34

1.42 37? 23 29!


Now if white plays 30 25 black gets more
space and goes to <34>.
2.30 25 23 29 3.43 39? Is not possible
because the capture is followed by 14 20!
B+. At 2.43 39 black also plays 29 34!
2.45 40? 14 20!
You should remember this move, as it is a very
practical idea in classics. Black threatens to
play 20 25 while 30 25 is met by a stick
move breaking through.
3.30 25 29 34
4.25 x 23 34 x 45
5.23 19?
White should have played 5.27 22!! and
playing at square 18 at the next move, drawing
the game.
5 45 50!
6.19 x 26 24 29
7.33 x 24 50 x 20

The idea to go to <29> was right, but because


of the gap at <49> black could have played a
surprising move: 15 16 21! White cant
take 16.31 27 22 x 31 17.36 x 16 17 22
18.28 x 17 12 x 21 19.16 x 27 19 23 20.29 x
18 13 x 31 21.37 x 26 24 30 22.35 x 24 20 x
49
15 13 18?
16.45 40 8 13
17.31 26!
Exercise 7.1 What is blacks answer to 17.32
27?
17 16 21
Exercise 7.2 White is fork-locked. Why is this
lock not so good?
18.50 45 11 16
19.28 23! 19 x 28
20.32 x 23
A very strong move. White threatens to play 34
30. Black isnt allowed to attack the outpost:
13 19 21.37 31! 19 x 28 22.31 27! with a
king for white.

O. Dijkstra N.N.
11 18 22?
Black goes to square 22 but he doesnt have
any space here. He cant go any further and
risks being locked.

S1. Judging positions

55

Freezing out the opponent

H. Pruim J. Palmans
White has a lack of space. Pieces 31 / 36 / 37
cant play. His pieces at his right wing are not
completely locked, but still have little room to
play. Black blocks the white position. The
game was 1.29 23 but we will look at another
continuation.

We will look at some 4 x 4 position where black


is frozen out and loses.
We ask ourselves the question: Where to put
four white pieces such that black to move loses
by a freeze-out?
In this case several solutions exist.

1.30 24 4 9
Preventing the 29 23 move which would give
white more space.
Exercise 7.3 How did black punish the 2.29
23 move?
Exercise 7.4 In stead of 4 9 white could also
have performed a combination immediately.
Can you spot it?
Lets look at other continuations (diagram).
1.39 33 14 19 2.38 32 21 27! 3.32 x 21
16 x 27 is a disaster for white. 4.29 24 leads
nowhere: 3 8 5.33 29 8 - 12 +.

Piece 48 can be put at several other squares,


like 47, 49, 42, 43, 38, 32, 34.
There are more possibilities. We show 4 more
options. The black centre is surrounded.

The best defence is 1.38 32 3 9


1) 2.39 33 13 19 3.32 28 14 20 4.28 x
17 21 x 12 leads to a nasty lock: 5.33 28 20
24! 6.29 x 20 15 x 24 and after white breaks
the lock by 7.28 23 19 x 28 8.30 x 19 28
32! 9.37 x 28 26 x 37 black breaks through and
wins.
2) 2.30 24 22 27 3.31 x 22 13 19 4.24 x
13 9 x 38 5.29 23 21 27 6.23 18 26 31
7.37 x 26 38 42 8.18 12 42 47 leads to a
difficult endgame for white, for example 9.12
7 (better is 9.26 21) 14 19!
White cant go to king now: 7 2 27 32! 2 x
30* 47 29 34 x 23 25 x 45 B+
10.35 30 47 24 11.40 35 24 20 12.26
21 19 23! 13.16 x 27 23 29 14.34 x 23 25 x
43 and getting a second king results in a
winning endgame for black.

S1. Judging positions

56

We can conclude that the 13 / 18 / 19 / 23


construction is weak. The reason is that piece
13 cant play at all!

In the left diagram black doesnt play 29 34?


39 x 30 23 29 30 24!! 29 x 20 35 30 +,
but 28 33!! 39 x 17 23 28 17 12 28 33
and holds a draw.

This construction is much stronger. Black has


a fork. There is only one solution now!

White needs a piece at <15>.


1) 14 20 30 25 W+
2) 23 29 33 28 14 20 15 10 W+
Piece 15 cant be put at 25. In this case black
escapes playing 23 29 33 28 29 33 28 x
39 24 29 drawing the game.
In the next example there seem to be plenty of
options, but in reality there is only one solution.

In the right diagram black plays 29 34 39 x


30 23 29 and white cant win.

This is the solution! White can counter both


sacrifices:
1) 29 34 39 x 30 23 29 30 24! 29 x
20 44 40 W+
2) 28 33 39 x 17 23 28 17 12 (or 44
39 etc. W+) 28 33 38 32 29 34
32 28 33 x 22 12 8 22 28 8 3
followed by 3 25 W+.
We saw that is it quite difficult to win a freeze
out against a construction with two outposts.
The outposts are close to king. You will have to
consider all kinds of sacrifices which give a
breakthrough.

Examine freeze-out-positions by judging


the possible sacrifices!

Lets examine two examples:

S1. Judging positions

57

Ex 7.5 Put four pieces at the board so that


black to move loses by a freeze out. In this
case there is more than one solution.

Ex 7.8 There is only one solution now!

Ex 7.6 There is only one way to get a winning


freeze out. Try to find it!

Ex 7.9 One solution

Ex 7.7 There is more than one solution now!


Try to find one.

Ex 7.10 One solution

S1. Judging positions

58

8. Tactics

2) 4.25 x 23 16 21 5.27 x 16 6 11 6.16


x 18 13 x 22 7.28 x 17 19 x 48 =

The most important feature one should


consider in any position is tactics.

The role of tactics in draughts is extremely


important. Many games are decided by tactical
means. Also winning strategically can hardly
be done without using tactics.
A well-known Russian draughts trainer, Michail
Kats stated the importance of tactics when
thinking about a position: Tactics first!
Although we discuss tactics as last feature of a
position, it always plays a role. And should
never be forgotten.
Without considering tactics it is usually not
possible to judge a position correctly!

Weve seen this position before in lesson 2


about formations. We have already played the
first move for white and black (50 45 3 9).
After white played 39 34 we had black
respond 24 30. As a matter of fact black has
a better defence.
1.39 34 23 29!
2.34 x 23 18 x 29
3.48 43

W. Thoen Tj. Goedemoed


White has just played 21.36 31 locking his
own left wing. Black tried to use tactics to take
profit of the situation:
21 17 22?

If black plays 3 6 11 4.43 39 he has no


good move left.
If black plays 3 13 18 or 3 12 18 white
forces a win by 4.43 39 18 23* 5.40 35
threatening 35 30 +
29 34 6.39 x 30 etc.
The black position seems lost, but there is a
tactical surprise:
3 24 30!!
Shots with choices are easily overlooked. In
the Koeperman book, the position is from, it
was not mentioned at all

Black calculated that 22.32 28? Is losing: 21


x 32 23.28 x 8 16 21! 24.38 x 16 7 12 25.8
x 17 23 28 26.33 x 22 18 x 49 B+.
White could have won by taking another
combination: 22.30 24!! 19 x 28 23.43 39
23 x 43 24.32 x 23 18 x 29 (other captures also
lose) 25.38 x 49! 21 x 32 26.37 x 10 W+.
The choice of capture for black makes the shot
harder to spot. White didnt discover the shot
and lost.
The tactical approach didnt work here. Black
could just have played 21 2 8 and now for
example 22.33 28 7 11 23.38 33 17 22
24.28 x 17 11 x 22 and the lock is created
without any tactical problems.

1) 4.33 x 35 16 21 5.27 x 16 6 11 6.16


x 18 13 x 31 B+

S1. Judging positions

59

White tried to control the wings, but his plan to


freeze black out failed due to tactics. Threefold
world champion Alexander Schwarzman has
played many astonishingly beautiful sacrifices
in his career. This is another example of a
strong long run sacrifice deciding a game.
39.37 31?

E. Dul T. Tansykkuzhina
Black to move wanted to activate the inactive
piece at 15 in this classical position. White
prevented this using tactics.
41 15 20 42.31 27!
Exercise 8.1 How does white reply to
42 20 25?
42 13 18?
Black should have played 42 11 16.
42 23 29 would also have been a mistake:
43.28 23 19 x 37 44.30 x 10 37 41 45.10
5 41 47 46.5 46 47 x 33 47.27 22 17 x 28
48.33 x 6 W+.
White forces a win using a sacrifice now.
43.26 21!! 17 x 26
44.28 22 20 25
45.22 x 13 25 x 34
46.38 33! 19 x 8
47.27 21 26 x 17
48.32 28 23 x 32
49.43 38 32 x 43
50.48 x 10

Preventing the 17 21 x 21 exchange.


Sometimes this idea is good but now it will
result in a dangling piece at 31.
White could have used a sacrifice himself to
force a draw: 39.48 43!
The Dussaut sacrifice 16 21 40.27 x 16 18
22 is punished by 41.25 20! +
39 24 29 40.26 21! 17 x 26 41.40 34
29 x 40 42.35 x 44 and black has to return the
gained piece: 29 33 43.28 x 39 23 28
44.32 x 23 19 x 28 45.38 32!
45.38 33? Is answered by the shot 16 21!
46.27 x 16 28 32 47.37 x 28 14 20 48.25 x
14 13 19 49.14 x 23 18 x 47
45 16 21 46.27 x 16 26 31 = (This
variation was shown by Schwarzman in
draughts magazine Hoofdlijn 129)
39 24 29!
White can only play 48 42 now, playing the
golden piece to an awkward position.
40.45 40 is met by 17 22! 41.28 x 17 12 x
21 42.26 x 17 29 33 43.38 x 29 23 x 45 +.
40.48 43 would weaken square 42
decisively, offering black the opportunity to
play the Duassaut sacrifice: 16 21!! 41.27 x
16 18 22 and white has no tactical reply.
41.48 42

Tactics refers to combinations, sacrifices


and forcings.

It looks like blacks position suffers from a lack


of space, but in reality black can create more
space by playing a sacrifice after which pieces
31 and 42 are inactive.

A. Domchev A. Shwarzman

S1. Judging positions

41 19 24!!
42.30 x 10 15 x 4

60

40.45 40 35 x 33
41.42 38 33 x 42
42.48 x 10

43.28 x 19 13 x 24
In the game black played 41 14 20 42.25 x
14 19 x 10 43.28 x 19 13 x 24 44.30 x 19 10
14 45.19 x 10 15 x 4, which is a good idea
which eventually resulted in winning the game,
but Schwarzman admitted that 41 19 24
was an even better way to play the sacrifice!

A giant blow! Astonishing


This shot was called coup Stadskanaal after
the game. Stadskanaal is the city the Dutch
championship 1995 was played won by Auke
Scholma.
If black plays 32 13 18 33.29 x 20 15 x 24
the gap at 13 gives white the king shot 31 27
28 22 38 32 33 x 2. although this results in
not more than a draw.
Black could play 32 21 26 33.29 x 20 15 x
24
1) 34.45 40 26 x 37 35.42 x 31 16 21
36.40 34

After 44.45 40 18 23 the threat 23 28 17


21 is lethal.
44.42 37 29 34 45.38 33 4 9 (46.33
28 9 14) doesnt give a better result.

A. Scholma A. van Leeuwen


Black just has played the strong 18 22 move.
32.34 29?!!
At first sight this appears to be a losing move.
Black wanted to force a win now.

Black should not take the 14 20 25 x 23 24


29 33 x 24 22 x 44 shot because white
counters playing 32 27!! 21 x 43 48 x 50 +.
36 8 12 37.31 26
37.34 29 is met by 21 27!
37 24 30 38.35 x 24 19 x 30 39.34 29 30
35 40.39 34 14 20 41.25 x 14 9 x 20 with
small advantage for white.
2) 34.32 27 26 x 37 35.42 x 31 16 21!
36.27 x 16 24 29 37.33 x 24 22 x 44 38.45
40 19 x 30 39.40 x 49 30 34 and both players
will break through with a draw.
T. Sijbrands Sheoratan
Parimaribo 1969
1.32 28 18 23 2.38 32 12 18
3.43 38 7 12 4.31 27 17 22
5.28 x 17 11 x 31 6.36 x 27 12 17
7.33 28 17 21 8.38 33 8 12
9.42 38 20 24 10.34 30 14 20
11.39 34!!

32 8 12?
33.29 x 20 15 x 24
White is confronted by the double threat 21 - 2
7 + & 24 29 B+. But white had seduced his
opponent to play this way. He performs a
devastating combination:
34.31 27!
36.28 23
37.38 32
38.33 x 11
39.35 30

22 x 31
19 x 37
37 x 28
16 x 7
24 x 35

The black player is seduced to lock whites


right wing. After this logical move white had
prepared a giant blow!

S1. Judging positions

61

11 20 25?

3) 1.37 31 24 30! 2.35 x 24 20 x 29 3.33 x


24 19 x 30 4.28 x 8 9 13 5.8 x 19 18 22
6.27 x 18 30 34 7.choice 16 21 8.26 x 17
11 x 44 B+.
4) 1.39 34 24 29 2.33 x 24 19 x 48 3.28 x 8
48 x 22 4.8 3 22 31! 5.3 x 25 15 20 6.25
x 27 31 x 45 B+
5) 1.28 22 The only move to prevent a shot,
but now white is frozen out: 7 12 2.37 31 9
14 3.33 28 20 25 5.40 34 23 29! 6.34
x 23 18 x 29 7.39 33 12 17 8.43 39 29
34 9.39 x 30 25 x 34 +

Unexpectedly white will get a king at the now


still occupied square 3
12.27 22!! 18 x 27
13.33 29 24 x 31
14.44 39 21 x 32
15.41 37 23 x 41
16.46 x 8
3 x 12
17.39 33 38 x 29
18.34 x 3 25 x 34
19.3 x 26
J. Sterrenburg R. Heusdens
Dutch championship 2006
Exactly the same position and same shot was
performed in another game between masters.
Black overestimated his position and played:
38 21 26?
39.42 37 13 19
S. Mensonides Baba Sy
Senegalese grandmaster Baba Sy was famous
for his tactical skills.

An obliged move because of the 27 22


threat.
Black should have been alarmed. He opens
square 13, enabling white to take a shot with
annihilation of the black position.
40.27 21!! 16 x 38
41.37 32 26 x 28
42.39 33 28 x 30
43.35 x 2 23 x 34
44.2 x 22

1 3 9!!
All moves but one are punished by a shot now.
The remaining move loses positionally.
1) 1.40 34 24 29! 2.33 x 24 20 x 40 3.35 x
44 18 22 4.27 x 29 16 21 5.26 x 17 11 x 31
6.36 x 27 19 23 7.29 x 18 13 x 31 (coup
Raichenbach) B+.

Gaps in your position, especially


a gap at square <38> / <13>, frequently
allow the opponent to take a shot!

2) 1.26 21 24 30 2.35 x 24 20 x 29 3.33 x


24 19 x 30 4.28 x 8 7 12 5.8 x 17 11 x 35
coup Royal or 1.26 21 24 30 2.35 x 24 19 x
30 3.28 x 8 7 12 4.8 x 17 11 x 42 5.38 x 47
16 x 49 B+.

S1. Judging positions

62

H. Wiersma T. Sijbrands
World championship 1972

A. van Leeuwen I. Tchartoriiski

Both players have an outpost at 24 / 27. Black


occupies the centre square 23. But blacks
position contains a huge weakness, the
opened square 2! This makes his position
tactically vulnerable. White should have aimed
his arrows at squares 22 and 13. In the game
white didnt discover the surprising way to take
profit of the situation. An unknown Russian
player Makrovich showed that white could
have won playing a double sacrifice!
27.34 30!! 23 x 34
27 25 x 34 is met by 28.39 x 30 23 x 25
29.35 30! 25 x 34 30.24 19 13 x 24 31.33
28 22 x 42 32.31 x 2 42 x 31 33.2 x 39 +

In this closed classical position white is three


temps behind. (Dirod = -3) He also holds the
Olympic formation, so the position must be
good for white. Tactical surprises however
caused white to lose
40.30 25 would have prevented all problems,
as black cant play 12 18 25 x 14 9 x 20 then.
Exercise 8.2 Which combination follows at
40.30 25 12 18? 41.25 x 14 9 x 20 ?
40.30 25 17 21 41.25 x 14 9 x 20 42.44
39 leads to a position that is slightly better for
white. White can also play 42.28 22 because
23 28 will give a better endgame for white
Exercise 8.3 How does white counter the
42.28 22 23 28? 43.32 x 25 21 x 41
breakthrough?

28.26 21!! 17 x 26
29.24 19! 13 x 24
30.30 x 19

40.48 43? 12 18

A strange situation. Black is two pieces up and


to move but cant defend against several
threats. White threatens to play 33 28 or 43
39 after the capture 39 x 30 25 x 34. The best
black can do is to play 30 25 30 31.35 x 24
34 40 32.39 34 40 x 20 33.33 28 22 x 42
34.31 x 2 42 x 31 35.36 x 27 and the king for
two pieces looks winning.

White discovered the threatening coup


Raphael (also called coup Beets [pronounce
this Dutch name like: Bates] in this typical
fashion with the 32 x 25 capture) 17 22 28 x
17 23 28 32 x 25 26 31 30 x 8 3 x 41
He also noticed that 41.30 25 can be
answered by a coup Philippe: 24 30 42.35 x
15 23 29 43.33 x 24 19 x 30 44.25 x 34 18
22 45.27 x 18 13 x 31 but he should have
chosen to play 41.30 25 anyway for this shot
only leads to a draw after 46.32 27! 31 x 22
47.15 10 etc.
41.43 39? 20 25!
42.39 34 16 21!!
43.27 x 16 18 22
Black performs a charming forcing. The logical
16 11 move to avoid the 24 29 threat is
punished by 43.16 11 17 x 6 44.28 x 17 24
29!! 45.33 x 24 23 28 46.32 x14 9 x 49 B+.

S1. Judging positions

63

Black takes advantage of the gaps in whites


position.
There is nothing he can do against the 24 29
threat.
44.34 29 23 x 34
45.30 x 39 24 29
46.33 x 24 22 x 31
White surrendered.
T. Kooistra J. van Buiten
White controls the strategic squares. But how
to win? The only way to force a win is using
tactics.
Exercise 8.6 Can you spot a way to win using
the stick move as a weapon?

A. Georgiev H. Wiersma
Wch rapid 1999
Exercise 8.4 Answer the questions.
A) Describe the relevant features of this
position.
B) Black played 24 22 28? How did white
win?
Exercise 8.7 Answer the questions
A) What is weak about whites position?
B) Whats strong about blacks position?
C) Black to move can force a win using tactics.
What is the winning move for black?

N. Germogenov - G. van Aalten


Black has just played 12 17?
Exercise 8.5 Look for a shot for white!

M. Koopmanschap M. Palmans
Exercise 8.8 Black to move can take a shot.
His king will capture six pieces. How?

S1. Judging positions

64

White wins with a combination, forcing or


sacrifice.

Combination = C; forcing = F; sacrifice = S.

C 8.9

F 8.13

C 8.10

F 8.14

C 8.11

F 8.15

C 8.12

S 8.16

S1. Judging positions

65

8.17 8.24 White plays and wins!

Look for a combination, forcing or sacrifice!

17.G. Valneris P. Rozenboom

21.H. Elenbaas C. Westerveld

18.H. Wiersma J. Van der Wal

22.B. Zwart H. Hoekman

19.A. Scholma R. Clerc

23.A. Georgiev G. Jansen

20.N. Samb A. Georgiev

24.A. Cordier D. van Schaik

S1. Judging positions

66

9.Judging positions

whether white will win or black can make a


draw.

To judge a position correctly we should


consider the positions relevant features. We
have learned all features of a position:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)

32.45 40 17 22
33.28 x 17 12 x 21
Black uses his formation to get rid of piece 28.
This is logical. 32 17 21? 33.31 26
results in losing a piece for black.

Formations
Locks
Strategic squares
Development
Weaknesses
Space
Tactics

34.31 26 2 7
35.26 x 17 7 12
Black cant play 34 21 27 35.32 x 21 16 x
27 because of 36.29 23 W+.
34 19 23 35.26 x 17 25 30 36.34 x 25 23
x 45 37.32 27 is very dangerous for black.
Piece 17 is very strong, just like in the game.
36.37 31 12 x 21
37.31 26 19 23

A. Chizhov I. Kostionov
Lets look at all features of this position:
1) White has good formations, he has a central
pyramid. Blacks only active formation is the 17
/ 12 / 8 tail he can use to change whites centre
piece 28.

Black could have chosen to play a sacrifice: 8


12! 38.26x 8 13 x 2 after which whites left
wing is weakened. White cant play 39.32 28
16 21 40.38 32 then because of a king shot
to 49.
White can play 39.32 27! However, 19 23
40.34 30! 25 x 45 41.38 32 23 x 34 42.39 x
10 15 x 4 but black can probably defend this
worse position.
38.26 x 17 25 30
39.34 x 25 23 x 45

2) White is fork-locked. The lock is economic: 6


pieces (14 / 15/ 19 / 20 / 24 / 25 lock 7 pieces
(29 / 33 / 34/ 35/ 39 / 45/ 50. Blacks control
over the other wing is not so great.
3) White controls squares 28 and 27. Black
has only square 24.
4) The difference in rate of development is -1.
White has one temp less. It doesnt play a
significant role.
5) White has only a small weakness at 42.
Blacks weakness is the lack of active
formations at his right wing.
6) Black has little space at his right wing. White
however has far more space to play.

The situation has changed. White has a strong


position. Piece 17 is strong. It gives white extra
space and it keeps several black pieces busy.
White can build up the 27 / 32 / 38 tail
threatening with a breakthrough.

7) Tactics will play an important role in the


game. Both players should consider tactics
while calculating.

40.32 27 24 29
41.33 x 24 20 x 29
42.38 32 14 19
43.43 38 8 12
44.17 x 8 13 x 2

The most important feature of the position is


the lack of space of black. Tactics must decide

S1. Judging positions

67

57.17 12 20 24
58.12 8! 24 30
59. 8 2 30 34
60.2 11

A logical defence: black changed piece 17.


However, white now takes control over square
24. Whites pieces are working together much
better than the black ones.

The endgame is winning because of whites


control over the trictrac zone. The play went
on:
60 34 40 61.21 16 40 44 62.50 x 39 9
13 63.11 17 and black surrendered.

45.35 30!
Threatening both 39 33 and 30 24.
45. 29 34
46.39 33 34 40
47.30 24! 19 x 30
48.25 x 34 40 x 29
49.33 x 24

A. Shaibakov R. Boomstra
How to judge this position?
1) Black has the central pyramid with an
outpost at <28> on top. White has the right
formations to play against piece 28: the tails 38
/ 42 / 47 and 38 / 43 / 49 are good.
2) There are no locks

Very strong play by Chizhov! White has


squares 27 and 24 in possession. Black still
suffers from a lack of space. The opposition 45
/ 50 is favourable for white in the endgame.
There is no defence left for black.
49 18 23 50.27 21 16 x 27 51.32 x 21 2
- 7 52.21 17 and after 23 28 piece 24 goes
quickly to king.
49 2 7
50.27 21 16 x 27
51.32 x 21 7 12
52.24 19 15 20
53.38 33
Black has to let piece 19 go to king.
53 18 22
54.19 13 22 28
55.33 x 22 12 18
56.22 17! 18 x 9

3) Black has control over square 23 and 24. He


also has an outpost at <28>. Playing against
<28> white needs at least control over <27>
and <26> also helps him. You cant allow a
black piece at 26 because of the 16 21 26
31 threat.
4) The difference in rate of development is 6.
Black has six temps more, which seems to be
fine in an attacking position.
5) Black has a huge weakness at square 7.
this weakness results in a non-playing area at
blacks right wing. He cant play 11 17 nor 12
17.
6) Black lacks space at his right wing due to
the dangling piece at 7. Black should have a lot
of space at the other wing to survive this
situation, but he has not.
7) Black cant play 11 17 because of 27 22
18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 38 32 27 x 38 42 x 2
W+.

S1. Judging positions

68

The weakness at 7 is the most relevant feature


here. It causes a lack of space and gives white
the opportunity to freeze black out. White
wants to control the other wing.
1.50 45 3 9
1 20 25 is answered by 2.39 34! 14 20
3.34 29 25 x 34 4.43 39 34 x 43 5.26 21
25 x 34 6.40 x 29 23 x 34 7.32 x 25 43 x 32
8.40 x 29 11 17 9.37 x 28 17 x 26 10.28 23
with a winning position for white.
Playing 1 20 24 2.40 35 14 20 (24 29
38 33 W+1) 3.30 25 leaves black with no
sensible reply.
2.39 34 20 25
Exercise 9.1 How does white freeze his
opponent out after 2 20 24?

5) Blacks weakness is her blocked left wing.


Square 11 is empty so that she should take
care piece 22 cant be removed making a shot.
White has a weakness at 49. He misses the 38
/ 43 / 49 tail. Whites division of pieces isnt
optimal. At the right wing there are much more
pieces than on the left.
6) Black suffers from a lack of space. She cant
go to 24 or 28. She has only room to play at
her right wing. White has no (blocking) piece at
26, so she might go still be able to go to 21.
Whites plan will be to block the position
completely.
7) White should take care for the opened
square 49, which might allow black to go to
king by a shot. He should also watch the 23 x
41 track.
Playing 35 30 makes no sense. Black
doesnt play 20 24 of course (Check that
white has a king shot after this) but 17 21
and 31 26 loses to 20 24 B+.

3.41 36
28.47 41
Black has no good moves left. He decided to
sacrifice a piece by 28 33 and lost.

White would much rather play 28.47 42


because 7 11 (breaking the 7 / 12 / 18 tail)
can be met by 29.34 30! 23 x 34 30.40 x 29
blocking the position entirely. White however
discovered that 28.47 42 can be answered
by 17 21!! 29.31 26* 20 24!! 30.26 x 17
23 x 41 31.36 x 47 27 32 (or 14 20 first)
30.38 x 27 14 20 33.25 x 23 7 11 34.29 x
20 18 x 49 B+.
28 7 11

A. Scholma M. Nogovicyna
1) Black possesses many formations. White
has a strong construction at his right wing.
White doesnt have the important 38 / 43 / 49
tail anymore. This tail is aimed at the outpost at
<27>, which cant be exchanged anymore.
2) There are no locks, although black is
blocked at his left wing.
3) Black has all strategic squares under
control. At this moment white has control over
square 24. Black cant go to square 24, since
20 24 x 24 is punished by 34 29 and 19
24 by 34 30 W+.

Since square 42 is open the 34 30 23 x 34


40 x 29 can be simply met by 20 24 29 x 20
15 x 24 taking all strategic squares under
control.
29.31 26 27 31!
30.36 x 27 22 x 42
31.38 x 47 11 16
Changing gave black a huge amount of space
to play again! Blacks position is clearly better.
She can simply continue playing 17 21 x 21
controlling square 27 again but with enough
space.
Tactics became dominant and prevented the
total blockage of blacks position.

4) The difference in rate of development is 2.

S1. Judging positions

69

21 39.40 34 24 29 40.33 x 24 20 x 40
41.45 x 34 15 20 42.39 - 33 20 24 43.34
29 23 x 34 44.30 x 39 19 23 45.39 34 13
19 46.34 30 23 29 and white is frozen out.
33.40 34 20 25 results in a horrible lock for
white.

Vivian Moorman Ester van Muijen


1) Both white and black have a central
pyramid.
They both possess the Olympic formation.
Black can make a tail (or fork) by putting a
piece at 17 (12 17). Black also holds the
15/20/24 tail. Blacks pieces are working
together well.
2) There are no locks.
3) White possesses <27> and <28>, while
black has <23> and <24>. The position is
closed classical.

33.36 31 12 17 34.28 22 17 x 28 35.33 x


22 11 17 36.22 x 11 16 x 7 37.39 33 24
29! 38.33 x 24 20 x 29 also looks unreliable for
white.
33.28 22 11 17
Another possibility is to play 24 29 x 29.
34.22 x 11 16 x 7!
Taking backwards has two advantages:
- It doesnt win temps so black keeps
more space to play.
- Black keeps the possibility to build the
Olympic formation again.
35.33 28 7 11

4) The difference in rate of development is 33


36 = 3. White has three temps less, which
is good in late closed classical positions. Late
positions are positions with 10 pieces or less.
5) White has a weak piece at <36>. Because
of gaps at <31> and <42> it is necessary to
check for shots, and especially the coup Royal.
Black hasnt got any weaknesses.
6) White has not much space to play, because
of tactics.
7) The natural move 30 25 fails to a coup
Royal.
Because white cant play 33.30 25 she
suffers from a lack of space. White has two
problems, space and a non-active piece at 36
and also an advantage: three temps less.
Whites problems prevent her from taking
advantage of the three temps less she is
developed.
Lets look at whites moves.
33.39 34 is met by 12 17!
Using the strong 6 / 11 / 17 tail threatening 17
22. White cant play 33.39 34 12 17
34.27 22 because black counters by 13 18
going to king.
34.36 31 17 22 35.28 x 17 11 x 22 36.43
38 6 11 37.30 25 11 17 38.34 30 17

36.39 33?
This gives black the opportunity to use her 6 /
11 / 17 tail. She should have played 36.30 25
after which black could change 24 30! 25 x
34* 19 24 28 x 17 11 x 44 14 19 with an
advantage.
White can also play 36.38 33?! 23 29
37.43 38 20 25 38.39 34 18 23
because she can force a draw by the amazing
shot 27 21!! 26 x 17 28 2217 x 39 34 x 43
25 x 34 38 33 29 x 49 40 x 16 49 x 27 37
31 and the king is caught with a draw.
36 12 17!
In the game 36 24 29 was played first, but
12 17 is even better.

S1. Judging positions

70

At 37.27 21 black gains a piece by 18 22


38.21 x 12 22 27 39.32 x 21 23 x 41 40.36 x
47 26 x 8 B+.
After the forced 37.36 31 17 22 38.28 x 17
11 x 22 white will suffocate: 39.30 25 6 11
40.43 39 11 16 41.40 34 24 30 42.35 x
24 20 x 40 43.45 x 34 15 20 44.33 29 19
24 45.39 33 22 28 B+.

M. Podolski D. Tkachenko
1) Black has formations in the centre. She can
use the 8 / 12 / 17 tail for changing 17 21 x
21.
White has pieces 26 / 31/ 36 (an arrow) meant
to block blacks right wing. Whites pieces work
together in surrounding the black centre.
2) There are no locks.
3) Black has outposts at 27 and 28. He also
controls centre square 23. Piece 15 prevents
black from controlling square 24. White doesnt
control any strategic square, but tries to
surround the black attacking position.
4) The difference in rate of development is 32 33 = 1. Black has one temp more.
5) White has no real weaknesses, although his
centre is not strong. Blacks left wing is a bit
weak. It is defended by only two pieces: 14
and 4.
6) The problem for black is to keep enough
space. White tries to minimize space for black.
This is the strategy of surrounding. White
hopes he can freeze black out or make a
counter-attack at blacks weakened left wing.
7) Tactics are important to judge the position.
Black tries to get more space changing 17 21
x 21 31 26 27 32 etc. White anticipated on
this scenario by tactical means.
To judge the position correctly, a calculation is
needed. You have to spot the relevant tactical
ideas of the position.

35.46 41? 17 21
36.26 x 17 12 x 21
37.31 26 27 32
38.26 x 17 22 x 11
39.33 x 22 18 x 27
40.39 33

Black went to square 32, gaining space. But


now she has a tactical problem due to the gaps
in her position. White threatens to play 33 28.
Black cant prevent this by playing 13 18,
because of the king shot by 41.33 28 32 x 23
42.36 31!! 27 x 47 43.29 24 47 x 20 44.15
x 2 W+.
Still black could have used the weapon of
tactics herself: After 40 16 21!! 41.33 28
32 x 23 42.29 x 20 is countered by 4 10!
43.15 x 4 21 26 44.4 x 31 26 x 46 =.
Black however played 40 4 9? weakening
her defence. White broke through after 41.41
37 32 x 41 42.36 x 47 11 17 43.29 24 11
17
43 14 20 would have been punished by
44.30 25!!
44.24 20 14 x 25 45.15 10 and won the
game.
White could have prevented the black defense
40 16 21 in this variation. He should not
have played 35.46 41? but 48 43 or 49
44.
Lets choose for 40.48 43. Black cant play
17 21 41.26 x 17 12 x 21 42.31 26 27 32
43.26 x 17 22 x 11 44.33 x 22 18 x 27,
because now black has no good reply to 45.39
33!
45 32 37 gives white the 46 41 33 28
shot.
So, if white plays 35.48 43 black has to do
something else. A logical variation:
35.48 43 19 23 36.43 38 13 19 37.46
41 8 13 38.41 37
After 38.49 43 black will take more space
playing 28 32.
38 28 32 39.37 x 28 23 x 43 40.39 x 48 19
23 41.49 44 23 28 42.40 34 28 x 39
43.34 x 43 and only now it becomes clear that

S1. Judging positions

71

whites position is better. If black goes to 32


white will attack this piece. If black plays 43
14 19 44.30 25 19 23 45.40 34 black
keeps a problem with a lack of space while his
left wing is weakened.
It is very hard to judge the position (first
diagram) correctly. For practical reasons it is
most important to spot the outcome of the 17
21 x 21 variation. So tactics governed this
position.

4) The Dirod = 1, almost equal.


5) Missing piece 26 and lack of formations are
whites weaknesses.
6) Black has more space to play. He can play
at both wings, while white has less space to
play at the wings.
7) White cant play 27 22?12 18 31 27
(22 17 18 22 B+1) 16 21! B+.
He also shouldnt play 39 34 20 25 with the
24 29 threat.
The most relevant feature of this position is
black controlling the wings. Therefore white
lacks space.
30.46 41 12 17

T. Wolthers B. van Hoor


Exercise 9.2 Describe the features of this
position. Judge the position!

If white wants to escape from the lock he has


to play 31.27 22 or 31.28 22.
31.27 22 6 11! 32.31 27 20 25 33.45
40 2 7!
Threatening 16 21 26 31 24 30 with a
king at 46.
34.41 36 7 12 35.40 34 12 18 36.48
43 8 12
Whites space to play is decreasing rapidly.
37.34 30 25 x 34 38.39 x 30 23 29 39.30
25 29 34 40.43 39 34 x 43 41.38 x 49 18
23
Or the special 26 31! 42.37 x 26 3 9 B+
42.49 44 17 21
Threatening 23 29 B+
43.36 31 12 18 44.44 39 23 29 B+.
31.28 22
32.33 x 22
33.41 36
34.35 x 24

17 x 28
20 25
24 30
19 x 30

Gaining more space at the right flank of the


board.

P. Lopez K. Thijssen
1) White has the central pyramid, but at his left
wing piece 36 is missing for the 27 / 31 / 36
tail.
At the other wing white doesnt have any
formations to get control back at this wing.
After 20 25 black has the strong 23 / 24 / 13 /
8 fork.

36.48 43

2) Because black has no piece at 36 he should


watch blacks plan to lock his left wing playing
12 17 and 17 21.
3) White controls 27 and 28, black 23 and 24
but also 25. Black has wing control in a closed
classical position.

S1. Judging positions

72

Blacks best move is 36 23 29! now. White


cant attack 37.39 33 30 34! 38.33 x 24 34
40 39.45 x 34 13 18 40.22 x 13 8 x 48 +.
After 36... 23 29 37.22 17 29 34 there is
a complicated but beneficial situation for black
at the board.
36 30 34
37.39 x 30 25 x 34
White cant play 38.38 33 now because of 23
28 32 x 23 13 18 and 8 x 48 B+.
He should have played 38.22 17 with
possible defence, but white went wrong.

Kees Thijssen, 5 times Dutch champion

38.43 39 34 x 43
39.38 x 49 13 19
40.45 40 19 24
41.40 34 3 9
42.49 44 9 14
43.44 40 2 7
44.40 35 24 29
45.22 17 29 x 40
46.35 x 44

A. Shwarzman H. van der Zee


1) Both players have little active formations.
Whites right-wing construction isnt active. He
has a fork at left.

No bad try in time trouble. 46 7 12 is


punished by 47.32 28!! 12 x 41 48.28 x 10 26
x 37 49.36 x 47 W+.

3) White possesses <26>, <27>, <29> and


<30> simultaneously. Black has <22> and
<23>.

46 14 20!
47.44 39
47.27 22 is met by 7 11! 48.44 39 16
21 49.31 27 and 22 18 is punished by the
26 31 stick move.
47 7 12
48.27 22 12 x 21
49.31 27 20 24
50.39 33 8 13
White resigned.

2) Whites fork-lock is combined with a modern


position at right. This isnt good usually. We
know you have to be able to change at the
other wing getting control. But white has no
active formations at right.

4) Dirod = + 6
5) White has weaknesses in his defense, no
base pieces anymore. The two constructions
are not working together well. His centre is
pretty weak. Black misses piece <3>, but he
has more influence on the centre.
6) White has little space at his right wing,
which makes his fork-lock non-efficient.
7) Black to play has to take care for tactics. In
the game he fell victim to a shot.
28 9 14?
29.29 24 20 x 49

S1. Judging positions

73

30.30 24 49 x 21
31.26 x 10

P. Chmiel A. Schwarzman
Exercise 9.3 Describe the relevant features of
this position. Is it better for white or black?

Alexander Schwarzman (Russia) after having


become world champion for the third time in
his career

S1. Judging positions

74

Solutions section 1

Lesson 2: Formations
Ex 2.1 4.33 29 23 x 34 5.39 x 30 25 x 34
6.27 21 26 x 28 7.32 x 1 +

Lesson 1: How to judge a position


1.1 (Pepijn van den Brink Job Arts) White
has fork-locked the black position (also see
lesson 28 of part I) while controlling the other
wing. This is very good for white. A logical way
to play is: 34 - 29! 23 x 34 39 x 30 5 10 30
24 (preventing the exchange 17 21 20 -24 14
x 21 =) 20 x 29 33 x 24 14 19 47 42 19 x
30 25 x 34 with a good fork-lock.
1.2 The absence of the golden piece at 48 is a
weakness. White misses the formation
37/42/48, while black does have this formation.
Therefore black can change 14 20 25 x 14 9
x20 gaining space, while whites piece at 42
stays inactive. Black is better.
1.3 Blacks position is very strong. He has got
formations, is completely developed and
controls strategic squares 23, 24 and 27.
After 43 38 21 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 43 38
23 29 34 x 23 19 x 28 white is frozen out.
1.4 White controls the strategic squares here.
He controls both the centre and square 27,
while not possessing the centre and square 27
yet! White plays 45 40 (threatening to attack
piece 30) 10 14 43 39 14 20 40 34 20
25 36 31 (threatening to attack piece 31) 7
11 31 27 11 16 33 28 All blacks pieces
are inactive. 8 13 28 23 and black is frozen
out.
1.5 Blacks left wing is locked. Therefore white
is much better, although he needs to watch
tactics!
In the game 37 32(?) 6 11 42 37 18 22!
32 28? Was played giving black the 19 23
shot. White should have played 1.38 32 18
22 (at 1 6 11 white plays 2.32 27! and at
1 17 22 2.45 40 +/-) 2.36 31 avoiding
the 19 23 shot and taking the centre.
1.6 White has a superior position, controlling
27, 28 and threatening to take 24 too: 33 29!
3 9 (3 8 29 24!) 49 44 6 11 44 40
15 20 40 34 9 14 34 30 (28 23? 20
24 =) and black has no good move left.
1.7 White is locked at both his left and his right
wing and has no space to play. Black has a
winning position.
1.8 Black has weak pieces 9 and 15. White
has a good classical position with formations
and enough space. White is much better.

Ex 2.2 1.42 37! Threatening 28 22 & 37


31.
1) 1 7 - 12 2.28 22 18 x 36 3.34 30 25 x
34 4.40x 7 2 x 11 5.37 31 36 x 27 6.32 x 5
2) 1 8 12 The same combination gives a
king at 1.
3) 1 18 22 3.34 30 25 x 34 4.40 x 27
W+2
4) 1 17 21 2.31 27 21 26 3.27 21 26
x 17 4.28 22 +
2.3 34 29! 23 x 34 40 x 20 14 x 25 32 28
W+1
2.4 7.34 30! 25 x 34 8.39 x 30 20 25 9.27
21!! 17 x 26 10.28 22 25 x 34 11.22 17
11 x 22 12.32 28 23 x 32 13.38 x 40 =
White can also play 7.35 30 24 x 35 8.33
29 =.
2.5 32 28 23 x 32 38 x 27
2.6 A) 26 31 27 x 36 21 27 32 x 23 19 x 50
B+
B) 1.44 40 17 22 2.41 36 22 x 31 3.36 x
27 11 17 4.47 41 6 11! (black can also
play 20 24! 5.40 34 24 30!! 6.35 x 24 19 x
30 etc. +) 5.39 34 17 22 6.41 36 22 x 31
7.36 x 27 11 17 8.33 28 18 22 9.27 x 18
13 x 33 10.38 x 29 26 31! And because 42
37 x 37 is punished by 19 24 black reaches
square 36 and breaks through.
C) 1.41 36 26 31 2.27 22! 17 x 37 3.36 x
27 21 x 32 4.42 x 31 =.
2.7 27 21 16 x 29 28 23 19 x 28 39 33 28
x 39 43 x 1 +
2.8 28 23 19 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 29 24 20
x 38 43 x 1 +
2.9 34 30 25 x 23 33 29 23 x 34 28 22 18
x 27 31 x 22 17 x 28 32 x 5 +
2.10 29 23 18 x 29 33 x 24 22 x 35 32 28
20 x 29 28 22 17 x 28 38 33 28 x 39 43 x 5
(or 43 x 3) +
2.11 27 22 18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 38 32
27 x 29 30 24 19 x 30 35 x 4 +
2.12 29 24 19 x 39 49 43 39 x 48 38 33
48 x 22 28 x 10 +

S1. Judging positions

75

2.13 29 23 18 x 49 28 22 17 x 28 32 x 25
49 x 21 25 20 15 x 24 30 x 26 +
2.14 34 30 25 x 34 33 29 34 x 23 28 x 19
26 x 28 38 32 28 x 37 42 x 31 13 x 24 27
21 16 x 27 31 x 4 +
Lesson 3: Locks
Ex 3.1 36 31! followed by 35 30 25 x 23 31
27 21 x 32 37 x 30 =.
Ex 3.2 17 22 26 x 17 24 29 33 x 24 22 x 42
24 20 11 x 22 31 26 22 x 31 26 x 48 +.
3.3 Whites right wing is economically locked,
while black is more active at the other wing.
The position is better for black. The game
went:
1 14 20 2.49 44 20 24 3.48 43 2
8 4.44 40 18 22 5.28 23 19 x 28 6.30
x 19 13 x 24 7.38 32 22 27 8.33 x 31 24
29 9.34 x 23 12 18 10.23 x 12 21 26
11.12 x 21 16 x 49
3.4 The lock isnt economic and black controls
the other wing. The position favors black.
The Tsjertok Dybman game went:
36.41 36 15 20 37.27 22 18x27 38.31 x
22 23 29 39.36 31 20 25 40.22 18 17
22 41.18 x 27 3 8 42.26 x 17 11 x 33 43.27
22 19 23 44.32 27 24 30 45.37 32
33 39 46.43 x 34 29 x 40 47.45 x 34 30 x 39
48.22 17 39 44 49.31 26 44 49
3.5 White is fork-locked while black controls
the other wing. The position is better for black.
The G. Jansen Sijbrands game went:
29.37 31 24 30! 30.35 x 24 19 x 30.
Now white has a dangling piece at 31, black
surprisingly stops his play at right and
surrounds the white centre trying to freeze
white out.
31.42 37 30 35 32.29 24 20 x 29 33.34 x
23 13 19 34.40 34 9 13 35.45 40 15
20 36.23 18 13 x 22 37.32 27 12 18
38.38 32 8 13 39.34 29 19 24 40.29
23 18 x 38 41.27 x 9 38 x 36 42. 9 4 14
19 43.40 34 24 30 44. 4 15 19 23 45.15
x 21 16 x 27 46.26 21 27 x 16 47.28 23
16 21 48.23 19 21 27 49.19 14 27 32
50.37 x 28 36 41
3.6 Less pieces than usual are fork-locked.
White controls square 27.
After 1.44 40! Black cant play 19 23
because of 40 34 with the lethal threat 27
22 +. So: 1.44 40 9 14 2.32 28 12 17

3.37 32 17 21 45.42 37 8 12 46.28


22! etc. W+
3.7 The arrow-lock is economic and white is
active at the other wing. 32 28 x 27 gives
white good chances to win.
3.8 White has to inactive pieces at 40 and 45,
which make the arrow lock less economic.
Moreover, black can play the freeing 24 29!
(30 24 fails due to a kingshot to 47)
3.9 1 19 24! gives a winning chain-lock:
2.36 31 13 19! 3.41 36 8 12! and after
27 22 x 22 follows 23 28! gaining a piece.
3.10 Black has a fork-lock but doesnt control
the other wing. The outpost at 27 is vulnerable,
although it cant be attacked immediately: 37
32? Is followed by the 2 7 18 23 24 30 20
x 49 kingshot.
White should have played 1.37 -31! 2 7 2.45
40! 18 23 (9 14 35 30 29 23 x 24 etc.
with king at 2) 3.29 x 18 12 x 32 4.42 37!! 32
x 41 5.36 x 47 27 x 36 6.47 41 36 x 47 7.38
32 47 x 29 8.34 x 1 +
Lesson 4: Development
4.1 50 34 39 51.44 x 33 23 29 52.33 x
24 13 19 53.24 x 22 17 x 48 B+
4.2 White loses pieces 27 and 28, while piece
26 moves two temps back, so he loses 4 + 4 +
2 = 10 temps.
Black loses pieces 11 and 22, so he loses 2 +
4 = 6 temps.
Because black can move again after the
exchange white loses another temp.
White loses 5 temps
4.3 White loses piece 24 (5 temps) while black
loses piece 20 (= 3 temps). Because piece 23
goes back 2 temps, white loses 2 + 2 = 4
temps.
4.4 Black loses piece 17 (=3 temps) while
white loses piece 32 (= 3 temps), so there is
no difference.
4.5 Black was 13 temps up. 20 25 x 24 gains
another two temps: White loses piece 29 (= 4
temps) while black loses piece 15 (= 2 temps).
Black is 15 temps up.
4.6 White loses 2 temps, black loses 6 temps.
White wins 4 temps.
4.7 White loses 1 (44) + 2 (40) = 3 temps but
piece 50 wins 2 temps, so he loses 1 temp.

S1. Judging positions

76

Black loses 5 + 6 = 11 temps. White wins 11


1 = 10 temps.

at 4). Black has little space top play because of


the lock.

4.8 You have to look what happens after white


play 27 22. So white loses pieces 22 and 28,
while black loses pieces 18 and 19.
Transporting piece 33 to 31 doesnt change
things.
White loses 5 + 4 = 9 temps, while black loses
3 + 3 = 6 temps. White loses 9 6 = 3 temps.

6.4 Black has no active formations. Black has


very limited space to play. Piece 7 cant play
because of 7 11 32 28 W+. Only piece 9
can play. Black has no base pieces anymore,
making his position tactically vulnerable. White
can play 39 34! 9 14* 22 17 12 x 21 26 x
17 (7 12 48 42 12 x 21 32 28 W+)

4.9 4 x 2 + 3 x 4 + 1 x 4 + 1 x 5 (4 x 1 + 3 x
2) = 29 10 = 19 temps. This is more than
youll probably ever get!

6.5 M. Stempher N. Hoving Black has lost


control over 23 and 24. White has a strong
attack. Piece 9 is dangling making his position
tactically vulnerable. After 6 11 white went to
king playing 23 19 14 x 23 38 32 27 x 20
25 x 3 +.

4.10 3 x 1 + 4 x 2 + 3 x 3 + 2 x 4 (4 x 1 + 4 x
2 + 3 x 3 + 1x 5) = 28 26 = 2. White leads by
2 temps.
4.11 Moving piece 49 to 30 to make the
position symmetrical costs 4 temps. White is 4
temps behind which is a good thing in a closed
classical position.

6.6 White has a dangling piece at 44. If black is


to play he can lock his opponent by playing 23
29!
Lesson 7: Space

Lesson 5: Strategic squares

7.1 32 27? 25 30! 34 x 25 18 23 B+1

5.1 24 19 29 x 20 37 31 33 x 4 W+

7.2 Black doesnt control the other wing.

5.2 9.39 33 17 22! 10.28 x 26 18 23


11.29 x 18 13 x 42 B+

7.3 29 23? 25 30! 34 x 25 14 20 25 x 14


9 x 18 B+1

5.3 1.29 23? 18 x 29 2.28 23 29 x 18 3.39


34 20 x 29 4.34 x 3 and the king is caught by
(for example) 13 18 5.3 x 20 15 x 24 =.

7.4 25 30 34 x 25 15 20 24 x 15 4 10 15
x 4 13 19 4 x 27 21 x 45 B+

5.4 37.48 43? 23 29! 38.34 x 23 19 x 37


39.30 x 10 9 14! 40.10 x 19 27 32! 41.38
x 18 12 x 14 B+

7.5

5.5 47.29 24! 19 x 30 48.40 35! And 30


34 is answered by 33 29 34 x 23 28 x 8 12 x
3 27 21 16 x 27 32 x 23 +.
Lesson 6: Weaknesses
6.1 A) 34 29? 22 28 +
B) 37 31 22 28 32 x 23 (33 x 22 24 29 +)
19 x 28 33 x 22 24 29 34 x 23 25 30 35 x
24 20 x 36 +.
C) 32 28 24 29! 33 x 11 22 x 31 +
6.2 M. Tuik D. de Jong Whites left wing
isnt developed at all. The 34 / 25 / 40 / 45 isnt
active. The distribution of pieces is terrible.
Whites centre is too weak.
6.3 W. Ludwig L. Sekongo Blacks right
wing is locked. The pieces 12 and 1 arent
active either. The other wing isnt developed
properly with an ugly piece at 10 (it should be

7.6

S1. Judging positions

77

Lesson 8: Tactics
8.1 43.27 21 25 x 34 44.32 27 23 x 32
45.21 16 32 x 21 46.16 x 40 +
8.2 42.35 30 24 x 35 43.33 29 23 x 34
44.27 21 16 x 27 45.32 x 25 +
8.3 44.33 29 24 x 42 45.48 x 46 W+1
7.7

8.4 A) White has locked blacks right wing,


while black has locked whites left wing. White
has more control over the centre, because he
can build the 33 / 39 / 44 tail changing 33 28
x 28.
B) 24 22 28? 25.31 x 22 28 x 50 26.22
18 13 x 22 27.29 23 20 x 18 28.38 33 50 x
28 29.37 31 26 x 37 41 x 1 +

Diagram 2: Piece 32 can also be at 31. 13


18 32 27 18 23 27 22 +.
7.8

7.9

29 34 48 43 20 25 50 45
7.10

8.5 27 22 18 x 27 28 22 17 x 30 40 34
24 x 31 34 x 3 27 x 38 3 x 8 +
8.6 1.37 31! 21 26 (White can perform the
same plan beginning 1.24 20.) White
threatens to lock blacks right wing by 31 26.
Blacks reply is forced. 2.24 20! 26 x 37
3.32 x 41 The point of the plan is that 17 21
is answered by the stick move 20 14! +.
3 13 18 is met by 4.20 15! 9 14 5.49
43 17 21 6.28 22 21 x 32 7.22 x 13 W+.
8.7 A) White doesnt have any formations and
doesnt control any strategic square.
B) Black controls squares 27 and 24.
C) 17 22! (In the Krajenbrink Clerc game
18 23? was played) Now 32 28 is punished
by 24 29!! 33 x 4 22 x 31 4 x 22 27 x 18.
1 17 22 2.30 25 wins positionally by
taking all strategic squares: 18 23 3.34 30
and now both 3 23 29 + and 3 9 13
4.39 34 13 18 5.34 29 23 x 34 6.30 x 39
18 23 win.
8.8 24 29 33 x 24 18 22 27 x 20 21 27 32
x 12 23 x 41 36 x 47 26 x 48 24 x 13 48 x 7 (or
48 x 1) +
C 8.9 39 34 28 x 39 48 42 39 x 37 41 x 1 +
C 8.10 27 22 18 x 27 38 33 27 x 29 39
34 23 x 32 34 x 23 19 x 28 30 x 26 winning
piece 32
C 8.11 25 20 14 x 25 37 31 26 x 30 42
37 21 x 32 37 x 6 +

19 23 38 32

C 8.12 28 23 19 x 39 30 x 10 4 x 15 37 31
26 x 28 38 33 21 x 32 33 x 4 +

S1. Judging positions

78

F 8.13 Chizhov Kalmakov 28 22! 20 24


22 18 23 x 12 34 29 24 x 33 32 28 33 x
22 27 x 9

5) Because black occupies square 22 he is


semi-forked and therefore restricted in his play

F 8.14 33 29 24 x 33 38 x 29 13 19 32 28
22 x 24 27 21 16 x 27 31 x 11 +

6) Black lacks space on both wing and the


centre. After 38 32! he cant go to 23
anymore.

F 8.15 40 34 Threatening both 34 30 33


28 and 26 21 34 30 33 29 22 27 32 x
21 16 x 27 34 29 17 22 33 28 22 x 24 44
40 35 x 33 38 x 9 +
F 8.16 27 22 18 x 27 39 34 8 13 34 29
12 18 29 x 9 13 x 4 38 32 27 x 29 30 24
choice 25 x 1 +
C 8.17 32 28 22 x 42 31 26 42 x 31 2 x 17
11 x 22 36 x 9 +

7) Black doesnt have tactical means to


prevent the important 38 32 move. (If piece
11 was at square 12 he would have the 22
28 33 x 22 16 21 kingshot). Black should
take care that piece 35 isnt used for a shot.
(Shots like 42 37 19 23 48 42 8 12? 34
30! 35 x 24 33 29 for example)
White is able to restrict blacks playing room
severely by 38 32. Black risks being frozen
out.

S 8.18 23 18 13 x 22 40 34 +

26.38 32! 8 12

C 8.19 34 29 23 x 32 44 39 35 x 33 31
27 22 x 31 36 x 9
F 8.20 36 31 threatening 24 19 while 22
27 is punished by 31 x 22 28 x 17 24 19 13 x
24 37 32 26 x 28 33 x 2 24 x 33 2 x 16 +

Black cant play 26 19 23 27.33 28 W+


26 20 24 27.34 29! 11 17 28.29 x 20
15 x 24 29.43 38 loses quickly.
26 20 24 27.43 38 3 8

S 8.21 35 30 24 x 44 50 x 39 + was missed


in the game.
C 8.22 37 31 26 x 37 47 41 37 x 46 39
34 46 x 23 27 22 18 x 27 29 x 20 15 x 24 38
32 27 x 29 34 x 5 +
C 8.23 39 34 29 x 49 25 20 49 x 12 20 x 7
+ was missed in the game.
F 8.24 28 22! (31 26? 15 20 26 x 17 18
22 27 x 29 19 24 30 x 19 13 x 11 =) 21 26
34 29 26 x 17 27 21 23 x 25 21 x 12 +
Lesson 9: Judging positions
9.1 3.40 35! 24 29 4.41 36 (or 4.43 39)
29 x 40 5.45 x 34 +
9.2
1) White has strong formations at both wings
and the centre. Black holds fewer active
formations.

28.48 43!
A good move. Also strong would have been
28.34 29! 19 23 29.48 43 23 x 34 30.40 x
29 11 17 31.32 28 with a lethal chain-lock.
The only move for black is 31 6 11, but his
problems only get worse. White can choose
from many winning plans. One of them is 32.45
40 20 24 33.29 x 20 15 x 24 34.40 34
followed by 34 29.
28 20 24
29.34 29 22 28

2) White has a semi-fork which looks good.


3) The DivoD = -2
4) White holds square 27. He also has control
over 28.

Black sacrificed a piece. After 29 15 20


30.32 28 black has no temp to let white take
28 x 17 and thus loses.

S1. Judging positions

79

9.3
1) Black has strong formations. White has no
active formations.
2) No locks.
3) Black possesses <21> / <22> / <23> / <24>,
giving him a strong front. With the active arrow
16 / 21 / 26 black has control over <27>.
4) Dirod = 7. Black has a lead of 7 temps in
development.
5) Black has no weaknesses. White has some
edge pieces that arent active.
6) White lacks space. With no control over any
strategic square he will be frozen out.
7) 33 29 24 x 31 36 x 29 wont save white
because after 26 31 black breaks through at
the left wing.
It is clear that all features are in favour of
black. In the game black finished the job
quickly.
37.49 43 24 30
38.35 x 24 19 x 30
39.33 29 is met by 21 27 and 27 31 B+.
White has no space left at all and sacrificed.
Blacks control over the strategic squares
decided the game. White had no space to play
anymore. The piece at 30 did a good job. We
will see this more often (see Centre play the
strong piece at <21>).

S1. Judging positions

80

Many games show a struggle for the centre.


Centre play consists of building a strong centre, putting pressure on the strategic
squares of the opponent. Often this pressure is aimed at <24>.
In the diagram the attack at <24> is possible with help of the so called power block.
In several games of pupils of mine the power block was used with success to blow up
the opponents position! Sometimes position were reached in games that were
exactly the same positions as the practiced positions at the training. This means you
can profit a lot from studying key positions.
In this section we discuss:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Centre play (general)


The power block
The strong piece at <21>
The left wing attack
The piece at <17>
Cannon play

Usually laying 27 21 is a weak move, but well learn that sometimes the piece at
<21> - especially if put in between black pieces at 26 and 17 - can be very strong.
Attacking at the left wing is another strategy when having a strong centre.
The attack sometimes is continued via <17> which can get quite exciting.
Cannon play is very popular at modern times and is the start of several strategies.
Therefore we discuss the canon play in detail.
After having studied this section you will have insight in the strategies connected with
centre play. Games of grandmasters will give you a hint at how to perform these
plans in your own games.

S2. Centre play

81

1.Centre play
Centre play is aimed at taking strategic
squares under control.

K. Thijssen - H. Borgman
Dutch club competition 2008
1.33 29 19 24 2.39 33 14 19
3.44 39 20 25 4.29 x 20 25 x 14
5.50 44 15 20 6.32 28 10 15
7.37 32 17 22 8.28 x 17 12 x 21
9.41 37 21 26

White takes centre square 28 and builds a


central pyramid. Dirod goes to + 4.
22.32 28! 23 x 32 23.37 x 28 7 12
24.41 37 5 10 25.38 32 13 18
26.43 38 14 19

The DiroD is 0. Black changed back (losing 2


temps) and changed forwards 17 22 x 21
(gaining 2 temps).
27.34 29!

10.35 30!
In the game of a grandmaster against a
weaker player the former wants to complicate
matters, but black refuses to play the most
principal move, 20 25. Black likes to keep
things simple, but white gets rid of a inactive
piece at <35> now.

White takes the other centre square 29.


Although black takes square 24 under control
white has the opportunity to build strong
formations to chase black away from 24 again.
27 19 24 28.29 x 20 15 x 24
29.40 34 9 13 30.49 44 13 19
31.36 31 8 13 32.31 27 18 23
33.48 43 10 14 34.44 40 4 9

10 7 12 11.30 25 11 17
12.34 29!
Without a piece at <35> the chance of a
successful attack at piece 24 after 20 24 x 24
will grow.
12 17 21 13.39 34 21 27
14.31 x 22 18 x 27 15.32 x 21 26 x 17
Black wants to change a lot of pieces. It costs
him 4 temps. White is taking 31 x 22 18 x 27
because exchanging piece 18 weakens blacks
centre a bit.
16.37 32 1 7 17.44 39 19 23
18.29 x 18 12 x 23 19.46 41 14 19
20.25 x 14 19 x 10 21.42 37 10 14

White took square 27 and built strong


formations in the centre and at his right wing.
The 34 / 40 / 45 tail is ready to remove the
opponents piece 24.

S2. Centre play

81

35.34 29! 23 x 34 36.40 x 20 14 x 25


37.39 34
Tactics refrain white from playing 33 29? as it
is punished by a coup Philippe.
37 2 8 38.45 40 19 24
History repeats itself. Black takes 24 again and
is chased away by white once more.
46 22 28 47.33 x 22 16 21
48.27 x 16 18 x 36 49.32 28
White has much more space to play now. He is
only three temps ahead but piece 36 rated 7
temps is isolated from the rest of blacks
pieces.
49 12 18 50.35 30 3 8
51.30 25 8 12
39.40 35!
White prepares the 34 29 move. An
immediate 39.34 29 could have been
answered by 24 30 and white cant attack
piece 30 by 40 35 because 12 18 17 22
18 23 13 x 42 follows.
39 13 18 40.34 29 9 13?
A severe mistake. Black should have changed
40 17 22 preventing white from taking
control over square 24.

52.24 20
White could also have tried 52.38 32 and
black has to defend very precisely.

41.29 x 20 25 x 14

52... 6 11 53.20 x 9 13 x 4
54.16 x 7 12 x 1 55.25 20 4 9?
Badly defended. After 55 4 10! black keeps
control over square 15 which is essential here:
55 4 10! 56.38 33 1 7 57.33 29 7
11! and attacking 28 23 can be answered by
10 15 23 x 12 15 x 33 now.
After 55 4 10 56.38 32 1 7 57.32 27
7 11 58.27 21 11 16 there are two
variations:
42.28 23! 18 x 29 43.33 x 24
White reaches his goal. He now controls <24>.
His lead in development is + 5, which is fine in
an attacking position.

1) 59.20 15 16 x 27 60.15 x 4 and both 27


31 and 36 41 lead to a draw.
2) 59.21 17 18 22 60.28 23 22 x 11 61.23
19 21 27 62.20 15 and again a split:

43 13 18 44.38 33 17 22
45.37 31 8 13 46.43 38

S2. Centre play

82

2.1) 62 27 32? 63.4 15 32 37 64.19


14 37 42 65.47 x 38 36 41 66.14 10 etc.
W+
2.2) 62 11 17! 63.4 x 31 36 x 27 64.19
14 27 32 65.47 42 17 22 66.14 10 22
28 67.10 5 28 33 68.5 x 41 33 39 and
black escapes.
56.38 33 1 7 57.33 29 7 11
58.28 23 18 22 59.23 19 22 27
60.19 14 9 13 61.14 10 27 32
62.10 4 36 41 63. 4 x 6 41 46
64. 6 17!

White has developed his left wing perfectly


already. Pieces 46 en 41 have been
centralized.
10 17 22 11.28 x 17 12 x 21
12.44 39 2 7 13.50 44 7 12
14.33 28 18 23 15.38 33 10 15
16.42 38 5 10 17.47 42 1 7

Putting pressure on <24> is the


beginning of a successful centre play.

Black surrendered because white will become


dominant after 64 32 38 65.17 21 or
64 32 37 65.17 26. After 64 46 37
65.17 26! blacks king will be captured at the
next move.

White built a compact position with a lot of


formations. Whites position doesnt contain
any weaknesses. Black also tries to keep
controlling squares 23 and 24. The next phase
of the game shows a fight for control over
square 23 and especially square 24.

I. Kuperman E. Aman
World championship 1994
1.32 28 18 23 2.33 29 23 x 32
3.37 x 28 20 24 4.29 x 20 15 x 24
5.41 37 12 18 6.39 33 7 12
7.37 32 17 21 8.46 41 21 26
9.31 27

18.34 29! 23 x 34 19.40 x 20 15 x 24


20.39 34 12 18 21.43 39 7 11
22.49 43 8 12 23.44 40 18 23

A well known opening trick is 9 26 31?


10.27 22! 18 x 27 11.32 x 21 16 x 27 12.33
29 24 x 22 13.38 32 27 x 38 14.36 x 16 W+1.

At 23 10 15 white could play the interesting


Ghestem-lock 24.28 22!
After 23 12 17 24.37 31 26 x 37 25.42 x
31 black cant play 21 26 (27 21!) and
therefore is locked by 31 26. Such a lock is
usually hard to play, although in this case black
could have allowed it.

9 11 17 10.41 37

S2. Centre play

83

24.34 29 23 x 34 25.40 x 20 14 x 25
26.45 40 10 14 27.40 34 14 20
Still all whites pieces are working together.
White takes square 29 pushing back black.
28.34 29 20 24 29.29 x 20 25 x 14
30.39 34 14 20 31.43 39 3 8
32.34 29 9 14

39.33 29!!
Very well played! White uses tactics to perform
his plan. Black cant play either 39 26 31?
40.37 x 17 11 x 24 41.34 29! 19 x 37 42.29 x
7 W+ nor 39 25 30 40.34 x 25 26 31
41.37 x 17 11 x 24 42.25 20! 19 x 37 43.20 x
7 W+.
If black changes back 14 19 x 9 white takes
square 24 by playing 29 24.

Black could have chosen 20 24 29 x 20 19


23 28 x 19 13 x 15 39 34 and the position is
still defendable.
33.39 34 20 25

39 13 18 40.27 22! 18 x 27
41.37 31 26 x 37 42.42 x 22 11 17
43.22 x 11 16 x 7 44.38 33 21 26
45.48 43 6 11 46.43 39

Black didnt lose control over 24 entirely. White


cant go there. Instead, he chooses to attack
through the centre.

White transported his golden piece to square


39, threatening 29 24 19 x 30 23 18 12 x
23 28 x 10 +. Black is driven back again.

34.29 23! 4 10 35.35 30 10 15


36.34 29 25 x 34 37.29 x 40 15 20
38.40 34 20 25

46 14 20 47.23 x 14 20 x 9
48.28 23 11 16 49.29 24

38 20 24 is answered by 39.34 29! 24


30 40.29 24 30 35 41.23 18! 13 x 31
42.24 x 2 W+.

It took a while, but after a hard struggle white


finally has occupied square 24

S2. Centre play

49 16 21 50.34 29

84

At 32 4 9 white strengthens his centre:


33.33 28! 8 12 34.30 24 19 x 30 35.35 x
24 2 8!
Black wants to be able to change a piece at
23.
36.28 23 12 18! 37.23 x 12 8 x 17 38.32
28 14 19 39.40 35 19 x 30 40.35 x 24 9
14 41.28 23!
White is just in time to guard his outpost.
41 13 18 42.23 x 12 17 x 8 43.24 19 14 x
23 44.29 x 18 with a big advantage for white.
50 7 11?
Black should have activated his 8 / 12 / 17 tail
By playing 50 21 27! 51.32 x 21 26 x 17
being able to change a piece at <19>.

If black plays 32 3 9 white should prepare


going to 24 by playing 33.32 28! because
33.33 28? is punished by 19 24 30 x 10 9
14 10 x 19 13 x 44 B+.
33.30 24! 19 x 30
34.35 x 24 21 26

51.23 19!

34. 14 19? wasnt possible because of


35.29 23! 20 x 27 36.23 x 5 W+.

Black cant stop a breakthrough now


51 25 30 52.24 x 35 11 16
53.29 24 21 27 54.32 x 21 16 x 27
55.24 20 27 32 56.19 14 32 37
57.14 x 3 37 42 58.20 14 8 13
59. 3 x 17 13 18 60.17 3 18 22
61.14 10 42 47 62.10 4 47 x 29
63. 4 x 27 26 31 64.27 32

35.32 28!

Black surrendered.

Black cant still attack the outpost: 35 14


19? 36.29 23! 20 x 18 37.28 22 18 x 27
38.37 32 27 x 29 39.34 x 5 and white has a
good endgame.
35 13 19
36.24 x 13 8 x 19
I. Koeperman P. Chmiel
White has a good centre position with a lead in
development of +4. His goal is to conquer
square 24, launching a right wing attack. White
cant change to 24 immediately because the
outpost is attacked and gets lost. So white
prepares the 30 24 x 24 exchange.
32.45 40! 4 10?

Blacks dangling piece at 10 looks terrible.


Black doesnt have any active formation.
Whites advantage is enormous.
37.43 38 3 9
38.29 23!
White doesnt allow black to play 20 24 x 24
and attacks. Now his goal is to get a new
outpost at 22.

If black plays 4 9 white shouldnt go to 24


yet: 32 4 9 33.30 24? 19 x 30 34.35 x 24
14 19! 35.40 35 19 x 30 36.35 x 24 9 14
and back conquers the outpost.

S2. Centre play

38 2 8
39.36 31 20 24
40.31 27 9 13
41.27 22 16 21

85

42.23 18 15 20
43.18 x 9 14 x 3
44.22 18!
White surrendered already. The end of the
game could have been: 44.. 8 13 45.18 x 9 3
x 14 46.40 35 10 15
At 21 27 white doesnt play 28 23 but takes
a coup Weiss to 4.
47.34 29 21 27 48.39 34 27 31 49.29
23 31 x 42 50.38 x 47 26 31 51.34 29
31 37 52.49 44 25 30 53.44 39 +.

We will scrutinize the most logical move after


37.43 39: 2 7.
Since base piece 2 has been played white can
change back preparing the 28 23! move.
With no piece at 2 anymore black cant attack
piece 23 by 13 19.
38.37 31! 26 x 37 39.32 x 41 12 17
39 7 11 40.28 23 results in the same
position.
39 13 19 40.28 23 19 x 28 41.33 x 11 24
x 42 42.41 37! 42 x 22 43.11 6 leads to a
bad endgame for black.
40.28 23! 7 12 41.41 36

K. Thijssen R. Zodroviak
White has a centre position with active
formations. He occupies both central squares
28 and 29 and also strategic square 27.
Blacks position is clearly much weaker. He
holds a semi-fork but with pieces 10 / 14 this is
rarely good. Black also misses a piece at <9>,
making the position more vulnerable. Black
has little space. He can only play piece 2, if we
eliminate the awful 13 19 move.
White has a difficult choice to make. Not
possible is 28 23 because of 13 19! (32
28 16 21 27 x 16 18 22 etc.) B+.
Changing 37 31 x 41 gives black extra
space, so white should play 34 30 or 43 39.

Black is lost:
1) 41 17 21 42.27 22 18 x 27 43.23 19
14 x 23 44.29 x 7 W+
2) 41 17 22 42.34 30 22 x 31 43.30 x 19
13 x 24 44.36 x 27 8 13 45.38 32 13 19
46.32 28 W+
3) 41 13 19 42.34 30! 19 x 28 43.33 x 2
24 x 42 44.30 25
Black cant go to king now.
12 18 45. 2 8! And white will win quickly.
In the game black didnt take profit from whites
tactical mistake.
37 2 7?
38.30 x 19 14 x 34
39.40 x 29 20 24
40.29 x 20 15 x 24
41.43 39

37.34 30?
In his calculation the Dutch grandmaster must
have missed the 37 14 19! 38.30 25? 26
31!! kingshot for black. Strong defender 38 is
removed in this combination!
Because 37 14 19 38.37 31* gives white
nothing, he should have considered (in the
diagram!) 37.43 39!
The answer 37 13 19 gives black a weak
position with a lack of formations at his right
wing. White takes advantage by playing 38.28
22 8 13 39.34 30 for example 12 17
40.22 x 11 16 x 7 41.27 22! 18 x 27 42.32 x
21 26 x 17 43.29 23 19 x 28 44.30 x 8 2 x 13
45.29 23 19 x 28 46.33 x 2 W+.

Black cant play 13 19 now because of 35


30 24 x 35 28 23 W+.
Blacks best defence is 41 10 14! 42.39
34 14 19 43.34 29 7 11 44.29 x 20 19
23 45.28 x 19 13 x 15.

S2. Centre play

41 7 11? 42.45 40

86

1) 4.34 29 23 x 34 5.39 x 30 The Chizhov


exchange
2) 5.35 30 The Roozenburg variation
3) 5.32 28 23 x 32 6.37 x 28 Groninger
variation (see section 2 of the third course)
5 17 22! 6.28 x 17 11 x 22

This time 42 13 19 is punished by 43.28


22! 18 23 (8 13 27 21! +) 44.22 18! W+.
Defending 10 14 43.40 34 14 19 doesnt
work now. 44.34 29 11 17 45.29 x 20 19
23 46.28 x 19 13 x 15 gives white the 37 31
kingshot.
After 42 11 17 43.40 34 black has two
possibilities:

Black played the most active move.


5 17 21 6.31 27 would have given white
an easy classical game (7 5 10 fails due to
the arch shot as we learned in part I of this
course).
7.31 27 22 x 31 8.36 x 27 5 10
White takes square 27. Black is building a
compact position with formations aimed at
square 27.
9.39 33 10 14 10.33 28 6 11
11.44 39 11 17 12.39 33 1 6
13.46 41 7 11 14.41 36 2 7

1) 43 17 22 44.28 x 17 12 x 21 45.34 29!


10 15 46.29 x 20 15 x 24 47.39 34 18 23*
48.27 22! 13 19 (8 12 22 17! +) 49.22
18! 23 x 12 50.34 29 with a winning
breakthrough for white.
2) 43 17 21`44.34 30 and black has
similar problems to the game.
As what black plays loses too 41 7 11
turns out to be the decisive mistake.
42 10 15
43.40 34 11 17
44.34 30!
White is aiming his arrows at strong defender
piece 13! 44 17 22 45.28 x 17 12 x 21
46.30 x 19 13 x 24 is followed by 47.37 31!
26 x 28 48.33 x 2 21 x 34 49.2 x 43 +.
44 17 21
45.30 x 19 13 x 24
46.27 22 18 x 27
47.28 22 27 x 18
48.37 31 26 x 28
49.33 x 2

White cant play 15.50 44? due to 17 22 28


x 17 11 x 31 36 x 27 23 29! B+.
Whites most natural move is 15.49 44.
15.34 30 17 22 16.28 x 17 11 x 31
17.36 x 27 20 25! 18.40 34 7 11
19.34 29 25 x 34 20.29 x 40 12 17
While white changes back to break the right
wing lock black continues to build a formation
against 27.
21.47 41 17 22 22.41 36 22 x 31
23.36 x 27

White performed a coup Weiss and won the


game.
M. van Gelderen A. Gantwarg
1.32 28 19 23 2.28 x 19 14 x 23
3.37 32 10 14 4.41 37 14 19
5.33 28

It is better to take 37 x 26, keeping a piece at


36 which gives control over 27.
23 8 12 24.49 44 12 17
25.44 39 15 20 26.50 44 3 8
27.40 34

This is a frequently played opening. White has


more active options like:

S2. Centre play

87

Piece 27 is attacked again.


27 17 22! 28.34 29
Its better to play 37 31 first and then 34 29
x 30.

Whites position is a mess. 41.31 26 is


punished by 22 27 42.32 x 12 23 x 41 43.12
x 23 19 x 48 30 x 8 44.48 x 2 +.
41.33 29 24 x 33 42.28 x 39 can be met by
23 29 +.
41.43 39
43.33 x 24
45.49 43
47.30 25
49.26 21

28 23 x 34 29.39 x 30 22 x 31
30.37 x 26 16 21! 31.26 x 17 11 x 22
Taking centre square 22. Playing 32.32 28
22 27 33.30 24 20 x 29 34.33 x 24 19 x 30
35.35 x 24 is dangerous because of whites
weakened left wing.

10 15 42.31 26 24 29!
22 x 44 44.40 x 49 14 20
20 x 40 46.35 x 44 15 20
23 28! 48.25 x 21 16 x 40
40 44 50.21 17 28 32
51.37 x 28 44 50

Exercise 1.1 1.4 What would you play in the


next four positions? White is to play.

32.44 39 8 12
33.42 37 6 11 34.32 28 12 17

1.1
White played 32 28 taking centre square 28
at last. Black provoked this scenario. Whites
centre is not so strong and black can surround
it.
35.48 42 20 24 36.45 40 4 10
37.37 31 11 16 38.42 37?
Weakening square 42 40 34 gave a better
defence.
38 18 23! 39.38 32 13 18

1.2

White is chain-locked.
40.39 34 9 13

S2. Centre play

88

11111
The same position emerged in the game Tj.
Goedemoed H. Dijkstra 1997 in which 27 8
12 was played. 28.34 29 23 x 34 29.40 x
20 15 x 24 30.27 22 18 x 27 31.37 31! 26 x
37 32.42 x 22 then gave white a huge
advantage (12 18 is met by 28 23 W+).
28.34 29 23 x 34
29.40 x 20 15 x 24
30.27 22 18 x 27
31.45 40

1.3

An important idea to remember when playing


with the power block. White sacrifices 27 22
in order to be able to attack piece 24 again. Of
course black cant play 13 18.
31 27 31
32.36 x 27 13 18
33.28 23! 19 x 39
34.30 x 10 18 22
35.27 x 18 9 13
36.18 x 9 3 x 5
37.40 34 39 x 30
38.35 x 24

1.4

2.The power block

The power block consists of pieces 25 / 30


/ 34 / 35 / 40 / 45. With the power block
you can put pressure on <24>.
A strong attack for white at the right wing
remains.
Black
cant
stop
a
future
breakthrough.
38 8 13
39.25 20 21 27
40.32 x 21 16 x 27
41.38 33
Neutralizing the 27 31 attempt to break
through.

A. Chizhov A. Berot
Black to move
White has built the power block putting
pressure on piece 24.
27 6 11

S2. Centre play

41 11 17
42.20 14 2 8
43.42 38 17 21
44.48 43 27 31
45.24 19 31 x 42
46.38 x 47 13 x 24
47.14 - 9 8 13
48. 9 x 18 26 31
49.18 12 31 37

89

50.12 7 24 30
51.43 39 5 10
52. 7 2
White won after 52 30 35 53.39 34 10
14 54.34 30 35 x 24 55. 2 x 30 21 26
56.30 48 W+.

40 12 17
41.35 30 16 21
42.45 40 6 11
43.40 35 21 26
44.30 24 17 21
45.13 36 28 37
White is building a catching construction for the
black king.

T. Goedemoed W. Winsemius

46.25 20 11 16
47.20 15 3 8
48.48 43 8 12
49.43 38

This position (2003) was also reached in


Goedemoed Klein 1997. The opened <2>
gives white the possibility to blow up the
position. Huisman had already shown this
winning plan against Navarro during the world
championships in 1956.

Black resigned.

29.34 29 23 x 34
30.40 x 20 15 x 24
31.28 23 19 x 39
32.30 x 10
Black cant play 39 44 because of 37 31!
26 x 28 10 5 21 x 43 5 x 40 W+.
32 9 14
33.10 x 19 13 x 24
34.37 31 26 x 28
35.38 33 21 x 32
36.33 x 2 39 44
37. 2 x 30 44 50

B. Zwart G. Jansen
22.47 42? 14 20!

White cant play 30 19? 27 32 B+. Black


gets the main diagonal in possession, but
white can build a catching construction,
chasing blacks king away.

Before building the power block black activates


the 15 / 20 / 24 tail aimed at <29>.

38.42 37 32 x 41
39.36 x 47 50 28
40.30 13!

23.30 25 9 14
24.40 34 12 17

Blacks pieces cant get active since white


possesses the 4 / 36 diagonal.

S2. Centre play

90

23 17 22
24.28 x 17 11 x 31
25.36 x 27 24 29
26.33 x 24 19 x 30

In spite of the inactive piece at 5 black has a


great position because of the overwhelming
pressure at <27>. 25.34 29 23 x 34 26.39 x
30 is answered by 17 22 28 x 17 11 x 31 36
x 27 24 29 33 x 24 20 x 29 45 40 6 11 43
39 11 17 and only the poor 27 22 18 x 27
39 33 remains for white.
25.34 30
26.28 x 17
27.36 x 27
28.33 x 24

The problem for white is that 27.38 33 23


28 28.32 x 12 21 x 41 results in a bad
endgame for white. Piece 5 is suddenly active
in constructions catching the king!
The best move for white is 29.42 37 41 x 32
30.12 7 30 35! and white cant go to king
and white cant go to king.
In the game white played 27.34 29? 23 x 34
28.40 x 29 30 35 29.38 33 and after 18
23 30.29 x 18 13 x 31 black won a piece and
the game.

17 22
11 x 31
24 29
20 x 29

After 29.39 33 black sacrifices the piece


attacking <27> by 6 11 17.
29.39 34 29 x 40
30.45 x 34 6 11
G. Salom M. Coenegracht
31.38 33 is met by 23 28 32 x 12 21 x 41,
so piece 27 is lost. White resigned.
Knowing blacks plan it isnt hard to understand
why white had to play 22.48 42! His left wing
is protected against an attack. Black has to
play 12 17 and 17 22 at some moment
after which whites left wing is developed and
he reaches a good classical position.

28.42 38
With this move white weakens his left flank.
White could also have played 43 38.
In the game black will put pressure on whites
left wing by building the power block. But white
still has enough defence left.
28 12 17
29.47 42 8 12
30.41 36 21 26
31.49 44 17 21
White should have played 32.44 39 12 17
1) 33.28 22? 17 x 28 34.33 x 22 23 29!
35.39 33 18 23 36.33 28 3 8 and the
necessary 37.43 39 is met by a coup
Philippe 11 17 22 x 11 16 x 7 27 x 16 7 11
16 x 7 8 12 7 x 18 13 x 44 B+.

T. van Adrichem T. Goedemoed


The black-player studied the plan of G. Jansen
with the power block the day before this game
was played. 17 22 28 x 17 11 x 31 36 x 26 6
11 33 28 will not yield any positive result.
So black has to eliminate piece 33 first.

2) 33.39 34? 17 22 34.28 x 17 11 x 31


35.36 x 27 23 28! 36.32 x 12 21 x 41 37.42
37 41 x 32 38.38 x 27 14 20 39.25 x 23 13
18 40.30 x 19 18 x 49 with a bad endgame for
white.

S2. Centre play

91

3) 33.27 22! 18 x 27 34.37 31 26 x 37


35.42 x 22 and now 21 26 can be strongly
met by 36.22 18! 13 x 22
36 23 x 12 37.28 23 19 x 37 38.30 x 10
gives white a better endgame.
37.36 31 26 x 37 38.32 x 41 23 x 32 39.38 x
18 with serious advantage for white.
32.43 39? 12 17
33.48 43
V. Kolesnik A. Gantwarg
Black has a huge weakness: the dangling
piece at 9. White proved that the power block
isnt dangerous at all in this situation.
36.27 22 18 x 27
37.37 31 26 x 37
38.42 x 22 21 26
39.48 42!
33 17 22
34.28 x 17 11 x 31
35.36 x 27 23 29!

Black has no good response at the 22 18


threat. 39 24 29 40.42 37 17 21 41.40
34 29 x 40 42.45 x 34 and black has no good
move left (check this yourself!).

Threatening to go to <34>, so whites reply is


forced.

39 17 21
40.22 18 13 x 33
41.38 x 20

36.44 40 18 22
36 6 11 37.33 28 18 23 had also been
a very strong reaction.
37.27 x 18 13 x 22
38.32 28
Only playing 38.25 20 14 x 45 39.35 30 24
x 35 40.33 x 4 45 50 41.4 x 36 50 x 11 42.38
33 11 x 48 43.42 38 48 x 31 44.36 x 18
white could keep on fighting.

Black cant play 21 27 x 27 now because of


36 31! +.
White won after 41 23 28 42.32 x 23 19 x
28 43.20 15 21 27 44.25 20 14 x 25
45.15 10 11 17 46.35 30 25 x 34 47.40 x
29 17 22 48.29 24 28 33 49.24 19 6
11 50.10 5 22 28 51.42 38 33 x 42 52.19
14 9 x 20 53.5 x 48 and black resigned.

38 21 27
39.28 x 17 26 31
40.37 x 26 27 32
41.38 x 27 29 x 47
And black won.

W. Wesselink B. Derkx
It looks like white can force a win.
37.34 29 23 x 34
38.40 x 20 15 x 24

S2. Centre play

92

39.28 23 19 x 39
40.30 x 17 21 x 12
41.45 40 18 23
42.35 30!

A. van Berkel W. Wesselink


Ex 2.4 How did white play to neutralize the
power block?
Threatening 40 34 39 44 34 29 23 x 34
30 x 50 +. Black didnt find the possible
defence and lost.
Ex 2.1 What should black have played?

Ex 2.5 Can black take a winning king shot after


41 36?

Ex 2.2 White forces a nice shot!

R. van der Pal H. Vermeulen


A. Chizhov E. Skliarow

Ex 2.6 White performed a king shot!

Ex 2.3 White can perform a very strong plan


putting pressure on blacks left wing. Can you
find the plan?

S2. Centre play

93

3.The strong piece at <21>


Usually it is not advisable to go to 21 if you
have a piece at 27.

43.28 23 18 x 29 44.33 x 15 9 14 45.38


33 13 18 46.33 28 and black is frozen out.
You can see that the pieces at <21> & <27>
keep three black pieces busy.

Black has a huge weakness at <13>.


27 21? 16 x 27 32 x 21 has two
disadvantages:
-

White loses control over <27>

Black gains more control over the centre.

Ex 3.1 How can white exploit the weakness


forcing a win? Give the first three moves.

J. v.d. Borst P. Tuik


35.27 21 16 x 27
36.32 x 21 18 22

S. Huitema H. Clasquin
White has a strong centre, but also a
weakness at 36. Allowing black to play 17 22
28 x 17 12 x 21 leaves piece 36 inactive.
Whites next move, putting a piece on <21>,
gives piece 36 space to play again. Moreover,
piece 21 is annoying for black, both for
positional and tactical reasons.

369 14 37.40 35
White cant take the 28 22 37 31 33 x 2
kingshot because the king is caught by 13 19
losing a piece.
37 14 19 is met by the shot 28 22 18 x
16 37 31 38 32 33 x 2 W+.
Now white points his arrows at <12>.

37.27 21 16 x 27
38.32 x 21 8 13
The best defence is 38 14 19 39.34 29 9
13 40.29 x 20 19 23 41.28 x 19 13 x 15.
39.48 43 13 19
39 18 22 fails due to 37 31 26 x 37 43
39 17 x 26 28 x 10 W+.
39 6 11 40.36 31 11 16? 41.31 27 is
also losing: 41 14 20 42.34 30 24 x 35

37.28 23 13 18
38.36 31 18 x 29
39.34 x 23 7 11
Black comes up with the best defence. 39 9
14 loses after 40.40 34! 7 11
At 14 20 34 29! is played with the lethal
threat of 23 18 W+.
41.23 18!! 22 x 13 42.21 26 13 18 43.16
x 7 12 x 1 44.37 32 26 x 28 45.33 x 2 W+.

S2. Centre play

94

40.21 16 22 27
41.16 x 18 27 x 36

44.20 x 9 13 x 4 45.33 29 black is frozen out


completely.

42.18 12 8 13 43.12 x 21 26 x 17 44.33


28 17 21 45.38 33 21 26 46.23 18 13 x
22 47.28 x 17 26 31 48.37 x 26 36 41
49.17 11 41 46 50.11 7 46 32 51.40
35 32 x 49 52.7 1 49 32?
Black could have forced a draw playing 52
24 30 53.35 x 24 49 35 etc.
White could have won playing 53.33 29! 24 x
44 54.35 30 25 x 34 55.1 x 4 W+.

39 17 22
40.28 x 17 8 13
41.17 x 8 3 x 12
42.30 24 19 x 30
43.35 x 24 26 x 17
44.34 29
White takes control over <24> and <27>. 44
17 22 is met by 45.29 23! W+.
44. 6 11
45.39 34 17 22
46.37 31 11 17
47.42 37!

N. Mitsjanski A. Chizhov
34.27 22 18 x 27
35.32 x 21 23 x 32
36.38 x 27 11 16
Black has forced moves and will be frozen out.
The lock isnt economic at all. Five pieces are
locking only pieces 21 & 27
37.39 33 20 25
38.43 39 13 18?

47 22 28
48.31 26 17 22
49.37 31 12 17
50.41 36

Black should have taken the centre playing


38 19 23 39.33 29 13 18 40.39 33 8
13 41.33 28 23 x 32 42.37 x 28 26 31
43.27 x 36 16 x 27 =.

White won after 50 13 19 51.24 x 13 18 x 9


52.27 x 18 16 21 53.29 24 28 33 54.24
19 33 38 55.19 13 9 14 56.13 8 38 42
57.34 30! 25 x 34 58.8 3 W+.

39.33 28!

Blacks space to play is reduced seriously,


while white has taken control over <24>.
After 39 8 13 40.30 24 19 x 30 41.35 x
24 3 9 42.39 33 9 14 43.24 20! 6 11

A. Chizhov A. Shwarzman
In this position, we again see some pressure
on <24>. However, it is not entirely clear how
white should profit. Chizhov however shows us

S2. Centre play

95

what he is made of, and calculates that


conquering <21> gives him the best prospects.
24.31 27! 11 16*
A forced move: at 24... 1 7? white manages
to make a quick win: 25.27 21!! 18 23
(what else?) 26.32 28! 23 x 32 27.37 x 28
and the threat 28 23 cant be met.
25.27 21!!
Chizhov causes big trouble for the current
World Champion with this move, which is
considered as passive in millions of other
situations. However, here the circumstances
are perfect: black has little space left due to all
kinds of tactics.

While Schwarzman seems to have managed to


get hold of a strong position when we analyze
it at surface level, big trouble is lurking
underneath. Again, his next move is forced due
to the 37 32 threat. The reply 28... 7 11
would be answered by 29.21 16 and 29... 13
18 then of course is no relief.

25... 16 x 27
26.32 x 21 1 7?

28... 6 11
29.41 36 23 29!

This already is the losing move. Black could


still have fled via 26... 6 11 27.33 28! 24
29 (clearly the best move, as the following
three variations show:
1) 27... 11 16? 28.43 39 16 x 27 29.37 31
26x37 30.42 x 11 18 23 31.38 33 23 x 32
32.41 37 32 x 41 33.46 x 37 and white is
obviously better.
2) 27... 18 23?? 28.21 16! 23 x 32 29.16 x
18 13 x 22 30.38 x 18 W+.
3) 27... 1 6?? 28.21 16! and black has
zugzwang: he must make a move, but each
one would worsen his position.)
28.28 23 19 x 28 29.37 31 26 x 37 30.41 x
34 17 x 26 and black awaits a long defence of
his severely weakened left wing.
26... 18 23 would not really improve the
situation, since after 27.33 28! 23 x 32 28.37
x 28 black is forced to play to the graveyard,
since 28... 13 18 fails due to 36 31!, 41 x
32 and 28 23 with a breakthrough.

The best defence, because after 29... 14 20?


30.25 x 14 9 x 20 31.30 25!! black is again in
zugzwang, check this for yourself!
30.33 28! 29 34
31.39 33! 13 18
It looks like black can save his piece by playing
31... 34 40 32.35 x 44 24 x 35, but then he is
frozen out magnificently: 33.33 29! 13 18
34.38 33 8 13 (at 18 22 always 29 23!)
35.42 38 3 8 36.48 43 and black has no
sensible moves left!
32.30 x 39 18 23
33.38 32
And Chizhov was able to win this brilliant
game, albeit with some complications later on,
because black does have some compensation
for his lost piece.
(The Chizhov Schwarzman game was
covered by Martijn van der Klis.)

27.43 39 18 23
The alternation 27... 6 11? is met by a nice
kingshot: 28.39 34! 18 23 (what else?)
29.33 29! 24 x 33 30.38 x 18 13 x 22 31.30
24 19 x 39 32.48 43 39 x 48 33.42 38 48 x
31 34.36 x 18 12 x 23 35.21 x 1 W+
28.36 31!!

S2. Centre play

96

4.The left wing attack

Black, a gifted and well-known composer, was


hoping for 38.31 27? 18 23! Now:
A. Chizhov V. Swizinski
White built a strong centre position containing
lots of formations. He built his right wing
playing the central 45 40 instead of 44 40.
This means he cant use the Olympic formation
anymore to push 24 away. White wants to get
more space at the left wing. Thats why he
changes to <21>.
26.27 21
27.32 x 21
28.21 16
29.16 x 7
30.37 32
31.31 27

16 x 27
10 15
24 30
12 x 1
2 7
30 35

1) 39.38 32? 23 29 40.34 x 14 13 19


41.14 x 23 12 17 42.21 x 12 7 x 40 B+
2) 39.27 22? 23 x 32 40.38 x 27 24 29
41.34 x 14 13 18 42.22 x 13 35 40 43.44 x
35 25 30 44.35 x 24 12 17 45.21 x 12 7 x
47 B+
3) 39.28 22 24 29 40.33 x 24 19 x 30 with
advantage for black.
White however launches an attack at <17>.
38.21 17 12 x 21
39.26 x 17 18 23?
A more modest reply like 7 12 17 x 8 3 x 12
was needed.
40.34 30! 23 x 32
41.38 x 27 25 x 34
42.39 x 30
The trapped piece 30 (in between 24 and 35)
implies tactical merits like 42 13 18? 43.33
29 24 x 33 44.17 12 35 x 24 45.12 x 14 W+
or 42 3 9 43.31 26 9 14? 44.33 29 24
x 33 45.43 38 35 x 24 46.38 x 18 W+.

White will attack again at blacks right wing.


32.27 22 18 x 27
33.32 x 21 20 24
34.36 31 8 12
One would expect black to play 24 30 with an
arrow-lock. White has great compensation
having control over the centre. Piece 15 is not
active in the lock. With his next move white
eliminates the possibility to be locked.
35.34 29 13 18
36.29 x 20 15 x 24
37.40 34 9 13

After black eliminates piece <17> white again


attacks at the left wing.

S2. Centre play

97

42 7 12
43.17 x 8 13 x 2
44.27 22 1 7
45.31 27 6 11
46.33 29 24 x 33
47.43 38 35 x 24
48.38 x 20 3 9
49.27 21

2) 39 18 23 is followed by a breakthrough
(check that yourself!)
3) 39 12 17 40.32 27 8 12 is punished
by 41.28 23! 19 x 28* 42.33 x 22 17 x 28
43.34 30 25 x 34 44.39 x 6 W+.
4) After 39 9 14 40.34 30! 25 x 34 41.40
x 29 black is frozen out.
39.28 22 24 30
40.35 x 24 20 x 29
41.33 x 24 19 x 30
42.34 29 23 x 34
43.40 x 29 9 14
44.38 33 14 19
45.32 28

White is attacking at both wings. Black cant


escape anymore.
49 7 12
50.21 16 12 17
51.16 x 7 2 x 11
52.20 15 11 x 22
53.15 10
White won after 53 9 14 54.10 4 19 24
55.4 13 14 19 56.13 2 11 17 57.44 39
17 22 58.39 34 19 23 59.2 x 30 28 33
60.30 25 and black resigned.

White has gained space. Black cant play 12


18 because of the kingshot 21 17 26 21 17
11 28 23 33 x 2 W+.
45 19 24
46.29 x 20 15 x 24
46 25 x 14 gives a longer defence, but will
also lose. White immediately goes on to take
<23> in his possession. The 21 / 22 / 23 front
is very strong.
47.28 23 30 35
48.45 40 35 x 44
49.39 x 50 25 30
50.43 39 30 35
51.50 44

M. Coenegracht L. Koops
Black resigned at the right moment.
White is starting a strong attack at the left
wing.
38.27 21 18 23
38 6 11 39.21 16 leaves black with no
good move:
1) 39 11 17 is followed by a kingshot (look
yourself!)

S2. Centre play

98

51 18 x 27 52.32 x 21 6 11 53.38 32
53.21 16 13 18 54.16 x 7 12 x 1 55.38 32
18 23 B+
53 11 16 54.32 27 13 18 55.27 22 18
x 27 56.21 x 32 12 18 57.32 27 18 23 is
winning for black.
47.44 39 11 17 48.27 22 etc. will lead to
the game. At 48.27 21 18 22 follows
threatening 24 29 B+.
47.27 22 18 x 27
48.32 x 21 11 17

Baba Sy T. Sijbrands
Black shows that an attack at whites right wing
can be very dangerous. The aim of this
minority attack is not breaking through but
freezing out the opponent by limiting his
space.

48 34 40 is wrong because of 43 39! 40


x 49 21 16 49 x 23 16 x 20 W+.
49.44 39 13 18

42 23 29!
From a psychological point of view it is hard to
play 43.39 34 19 23 44.28 x 30 13 18
45.34 x 23 25 x 45 46.23 19 although its a
draw after 46 45 50 47.19 13 =.
43.39 33 25 30
44.40 35?
Giving black too much space is a lethal
mistake. White should have fixed pieces 29
and 30 by playing 43 39.
44 12 18
45.36 31 8 12
46.31 26

White is lost. 50.21 16 6 11 51.16 x 7 12 x


1 52.38 32 18 23 53.43 38 34 x 43 44.38
x 49 30 34 leads to a quick freeze out for
white.
Exercise 4.1 How did black win after 50.38
32 ?

Better would have been 46.28 22. Now black


forces a win.
Baba Sy M. Verleene

46 29 34!
After 47.43 39 34 x 43 48.38 x 49 30 34
49.44 39 34 x 43 50.49 x 38 11 17 51.27
22
51.27 21 is met by 18 22 with the decisive
24 29 threat.

An interesting variation in this position is: 1.21


17 19 24 2.39 33 14 19 .
Exercise 4.2 How can white surprisingly
secure a win?

S2. Centre play

99

A. Dibman R. Letsjinski
White has a strong central and compact
position with good formations and no edge
piece at <35>. White begins taking control over
the left wing.
23.37 31
24.42 x 31
25.48 42
26.42 37

26 x 37
6 11
11 17
17 21

White still has the compact centre, while his


opponent is chased away from <23> and <24>.
White has space to launch an attack at the left
wing.
36.28 22 3 8
37.22 17 12 x 21
38.27 x 16 1 7
Black doesnt allow white to go to <11>. At 1
6 white breaks through with 16 11 6 x 17 37
31 26 x 28 33 x 11.
39.40 34 19 23
40.32 27 14 19
41.27 22 20 24

27.27 22 18 x 27
28.31 x 22
White can take more space helped by the
tactical variation 28 12 18? 29.34 29! 23
x 34 30.40 x 29 18 x 27 31.29 23 10 14
32.23 18 13 x 22 33.28 x 26 and white wins
piece 27.
After 28 21 26 29.22 18 13 x 22 30.28 x
8 3 x 12 31.36 31 blacks position is
weakened, having many gaps.

42.37 32!
An excellent move! White can leave the piece
at <26> alone for one move time and
transports the piece to a much better location
at <27>. In the meanwhile centre piece <23> is
eliminated.

28 12 17
29.22 x 11 16 x 7
30.36 31 21 26
31.31 27 7 12

42 10 14
43.32 28 23 x 32
44.38 x 27 8 12

Its time to use the 34 / 40 / 45 tail now putting


pressure on the centre.
32.34 29
33.40 x 29
34.29 x 20
35.45 40

White can play 45.33 28 threatening 27 21


W+, but after 45 12 18 46.43 38 but he
forces a breakthrough in an even smarter way.

23 x 34
20 25
25 x 14
15 20

S2. Centre play

100

45.43 38! 14 20

Baba Sy H. Laros

43 19 23 44.38 32 14 19 45.33 28
Threatening 27 21 W+.
45 12 18 46.22 17! leads to a winning
breakthrough for white.

White uses the little space available at the left


wing to launch an attack.

46.38 32 20 25
47.34 29 24 30
48.33 28 12 18

Exercise 4.3 Black replied 38 11 17.


Which kingshot did white take?

38.26 21!

It is interesting to analyse the position when


black plays the normal move 43. 11 16.
White then plays 44.28 22! 7 11 45.34
30 20 25 46.48 43 25 x 34 47.39 x 30

White has forced a breakthrough. Whites king


will be caught but white breaks through again.
49.29 23 18 x 29
50.27 21 26 x 17
51.22 x 2 19 24
42.2 x 19 24 x 13
53.16 11

1) 47 11 17 48.22 x 11 16 x 7 49.33 28 7
11 50.28 22 11 16 52.38 33 4 9 53.33
28 23 29 54.43 38 18 23 55.45 40 9
14 56.30 25 12 18 57.21 17 with a
wonderful winning position: W+.

After 53 13 18 54.11 7 9 14 55.32 27


14 20 56.27 21 30 34 57.39 x 30 25 x 34
58.21 16 18 22 59.28 x 17 34 39 60.7 1
34 39 61.1 40 39 43 62.40 44 33 38
63.44 49 20 25 64.17 11 25 30 65.11
6 30 34 66.6 1 43 48 67.49 x 32 black
resigned at last.

2) 47 23 29 48.45 40 18 23 49.43 39
4 10 50.39 34! 10 14 51.33 28 11 17
52.22 x 11 16 x 7 53.28 22! 23 28 54.32 x
23! 19 x 26 55.30 x 10 W+.
We didnt review all possibilities, but we
wanted to show some important variations for
this kind of play.

S2. Centre play

101

5.The piece at <17>

Black has taken <24> but white builds the 33 /


38 / 42 tail to conquer control over <24>.

We saw Sijbrands going to <34> while


attacking with black. A piece at <17> or <34>
can be very strong. If you attack the left wing
you sometimes can get control over <17>
which often helps to freeze the opponent out.

M. Korchov W. Giljarov
You wouldnt expect white to get control over
<17> from such a quiet closed classical
position
24.34 29 23 x 34
25.39 x 30 18 23
26.36 31 21 26

36.43 38 9 14
37.48 42 7 11
38.26 21 3 8
39.21 17 4 10

White has conquered <17>. With the next


exchange white gains more space. 33 29 x
29 would allow 16 21 =.
40.33 29 24 x 33
41.28 x 39 10 15
41 14 20 could have been met by 32 28!
23 x 12 34 29 18 x 27 30 24 19 x 30 35 x 4
+.

Playing 26 1 7 27.31 26 7 11 28.26 x


17 11 x 31 29.37 x 26 13 18 would have
prevented whites future attack.

White can choose how to win now. He can


play, for example: 42.39 33:

27.27 22 1 7
28.31 27 8 12

1) 42 15 20 43.33 29 20 25 44.29 24
and its over (8 12 17 x 8 13 x 2 22 x 13 19 x
8 24 20 etc. W+).

White is going to take the left wing under


control now.
29.37 31
30.42 x 31
31.33 x 24
32.40 34
33.45 x 34
34.38 33
35.31 26

26 x 37
24 29
20 x 29
29 x 40
15 20
12 18
20 24

2) 42 14 20 43.27 21! (43.30 25 is also


good enough, but we show the most special
way to win) 18 x 27
43 16 x 27 44.32 x 21 18 x 16 45.33 29 11
x 22 29 x 9 W+
44.33 28 11 x 33 45.38 x 9 27 x 47 46.34
29! 16 x 27 47.9 3 47 x 24 48.3 x 25 and
blacks king is caught at the next move.
42.30 24 19 x 30
43.35 x 24 14 19
43 14 20 44.34 30 20 x 29 45.39 33 29
34 46.30 x 39 15 20 47.39 34 20 24
48.42 37 is winning for white.
44.34 30 8 12
45.17 x 8 13 x 2
46.22 x 13 19 x 8
47.39 33 8 13
48.30 25 23 29

S2. Centre play

102

Otherwise 33 28 would follow.


49.42 37 29 x 20
50.25 x 14 11 17
51.37 31
And white won the endgame.

42.42 38?
The correct way to play had been 42.29 24 6
11 43.24 20 3 9 44.20 15 11 17 45.22
x 11 16 x 7 46.42 37 7 11 47.21 16 11
17 48.37 31 etc. W+.
42 14 20
43.38 33 3 8?

G. Kolk P. Meurs
Black played 41 15 20 in this complex
situation.
Exercise 5.1 How could white have won now?

After 43 3 9! 44.21 17 20 24 45.29 x 20


25 x 14 46.30 25 19 24 47.35 30 24 x 35
48.33 28 14 19 49.25 20 6 11 50.17 x 6
16 21 51.27 x 16 18 x 38 black escapes.
44.21 17 20 24
45.29 x 20 25 x 14
46.33 29

T. Goedemoed S. Doller
Whites pieces surround the black centre. He is
going to gain more space.
36.28 22 20 25
37.43 38 7 11
38.26 21 11 16
38 11 17 39.21 x 12 18 x 7 40.48 42 4
9 41.33 29 24 x 33 42.38 x 18 3 8 43.42
38 8 12 44.38 33 12 x 23 45.27 21! 7
12 46.33 29 12 18 47.22 17 is winning for
white.

Black is lost. He eventually did after 14 20


47.30 25 20 24 48.29 x 20 6 11 49.17
x 6 16 21 50.27 x 16 18 x 38 51. 6 1 38
43 52. 1 x 29 19 - 24 53.29 - 33 24 x 15
54.33 - 44 15 20 55.25 x 14 43 48 56.44
39 48 37 57.39 22 37 x 5 58.22 x 9 5
28 59. 9 18 28 14 60.34 30 14 28
61.30 25 28 33 62.18 23 8 13
63.23 5 W+.

39.48 42 4 10
40.33 29 24 x 33
41.38 x 29 10 14

S2. Centre play

103

M. Dolfing A. Scholma

A. Baliakin N. Samb

White could have played 22 17! After which


black cant play 12 18 because of 44 40 21
x 12 28 22 18 x 27 38 32 27 x 29 34 x 5.

Black just played 13 18 giving his opponent


the opportunity to make the Ghestem-lock (see
the section about classics).

Exercise 5.2 How does white win after 1.22


17! 25 30 34 x 25 12 18 ?

36.28 22 9 13?
Because white has a winning plan now, black
should have played 8 13 in order to be able
to remove a piece at <17>.
37.33 28 1 6
38.22 17!

T. Goedemoed P. Tuik
White has to take care about 16 21. Usually
he can go 17 11 6 x 17 36 31 26 x 28 33 x
11 then. But if you look closer black can
prevent a breakthrough and thereby getting an
advantage.

Black has no defence


threatening 37 31.

left

against

the

38 23 29
39.37 31 26 x 37
40.17 x 26

Exercise 5.3 What is the best move for white,


eliminating the 16 21 possibility?

Black resigned.

S2. Centre play

104

6.Cannon play
To be successful playing in the centre you
need strong formations. A strong construction
that is often used is the so called Chizhov
cannon.

White has gained space. He controls <27> and


<28> while black has inactive pieces at the
edge of the board. Pieces 6 / 11 / 16 / 16 will
not become active in the game. Black probably
didnt play 10 15 because he was afraid of
the attack 29 23 x 23 and piece 15 stays
inactive.
A. Chzihov G. van Aalten
Wch 1990
The cannon consists of pieces 27 / 31 / 32 / 36
/ 37 / 38 / 42. Sometimes the cannon is played
without 42, but this pieces gives more
opportunities like playing 33 29 x 29. White
can also change 27 22 x 22 if he wishes, but
white rather plays towards the centre first.

38 8 13
39.31 27 10 14
40.43 38 20 25?
Black should have played 13 18! 32 28 12
17! = White could have prevented this
drawing variation by 41.35 30! Blacks
defence, changing back, is very poor. White is
going to control all strategic squares.

34.33 28 18 23
35.38 33 21 26

41.32 28 14 20
42.38 32 20 24
43.29 x 20 25 x 14
44.34 29!

More logical is playing 12 18 preventing


white from taking the 33 29 x 27 exchange.
35.40 35
White waits for better conditions to make the
33 29 exchange, breaking the classical
structure. Actually 33 29 would have been
the most correct move leading to an advantage
for white.
35 15 20?
36.48 43
Now 36 12 18 isnt good anymore. White
responds 37.34 30! 5 10 38.42 38 10
14 39.30 25 8 13 40.43 39 11 17 41.39
34 17 21
41 6 11 is punished by 34 29 23 x 34 27
21 16 x 27 32 x 23 W+
42.27 22! 18 x 27 43.31 x 22 and because
the only sensible move left 6 11 is met by 34
29 23 x 34 22 18 13 x 22 28 x 6 black is
lost.

45. 14 20 will result in a winning attack:


46.28 23 19 x 28 47.32 x 23 11 17 48.35
30 20 25 49.30 24 17 21 50.37 32! 6
11 51.23 19! 11 17 52.19 x 8 12 x 3 53.42
37 3 9 54.29 23 9 13 55.23 19 13
18 56.36 31! 17 22 57.19 13 18 x 9 58.27
x 18 9 14 59.31 27 14 20 60.24 x 15 25
30 and going to <5> will give the 37 31 shot,
winning the game.
44 12 17
45.36 31!

36 5 10
37.33 29! 24 x 22
38.27 x 29

S2. Centre play

105

Blacks only formation is worthless now.


45 17 21 46.35 30
Black surrendered. 46 11 17 47.29 24 6
11 48.42 38 is a horror scenario.

H. Wiersma A. Der
24.39 33 20 25

M. Sivtsev A. Chizhov
White has many pieces at the edge of the
board. His centre is weak. He doesnt control
any of the strategic squares and has a
weakness at <42>. Black has nice formations
in the centre and a cannon a his left wing.
Black will attack at whites right wing.
31 24 30!
32.35 x 24 20 x 29
37.33 x 24 19 x 30
38.39 33 14 19
39.31 27 15 20
40.43 39 20 24
41.49 43 23 29!

41.49 43? created a weak piece at 43, it isnt


active. Black has a beautiful construction.
Whites space is limited severely.
42.27 21 1 7
43.36 31 18 22!
Whites position is entirely blocked. 32 27 13
18 is a dead track. 32 28 isnt possible
because of 30 34 etc. W+. Therefore white
gave a piece playing 44.31 27 and lost.

24 20 24 is answered by 25.33 29! 24 x


22 26.27 x 29 with white taking more control
over the centre. If black changes to 24 after
this by 19 24 27.29 x 20 15 x 24 white builds
the 33 / 38 / 42 tail to put pressure on 24. We
will give an example, so you learn what you
have to do with white: 28.38 33 4 10 29.43
38 13 19 30.34 29 10 15 31.29 x 20 15
x 24 32.33 29 24 x 33 33.38 x 29 19 23
34.29 x 18 12 x 23 35.35 30
Piece 23 stands alone, so white can surround
it.
7 12 36.30 24 8 13 37.50 44 3 9
38.24 20 13 19 39.44 40 12 18 40.40
34 21 26 41.42 38 11 17 42.31 27 17
21 43.38 33 6 11 44.33 28 11 17 45.48
42 17 22 46.28 x 17 21 x 12 47.42 38

It is a long way to get the position wanted.


Black to move is lost. At 12 17 white takes
the 34 29 27 21 kingshot.
47.. 9 13 is answered by 34 30 (preventing
the 23 28 13 19 shot) followed by a
breakthrough of piece 20.
25.43 39 15 20
26.50 44 3 9
White was ready to meet 20 24 by 33 29
24 x 22 27 x 29 again. Black plays with his
golden piece, which is weakening his
defensive position. In order to force a decision

S2. Centre play

106

on his opponent white himself waits, playing


his golden piece himself.
27.48 43
We will show you another long term strategy
for white after black plays 27 4 10 28.28
22! 12 18 29.31 26 7 12 30.26 x 17 12 x
21 31.22 17 11 x 31 32.37 x 17 8 12 33.17
x 8 13 x 2 34.32 27 9 13 35.38 32 6 11
36.36 31 11 17 37.33 28 20 24 38.31
26 10 14 39.34 30 25 x 34 40.39 x 30 2 8
41.30 25

30.28 22! 23 29
White was threatening 22 18, while 12 18
would have been punished by the 33 29 27
21 32 x 1 kingshot.
31.33 28! 4 10
31 12 18 32.28 23 19 x 17 33.30 x 19 13
x 24 34.27 21 16 x 27 35.32 x 14 W+.
After 31 12 17 there are multiple ways to
win.
32.44 40 10 14
33.30 25

White has a classical position controlling both


wings. We will show three variations:
1) If black tries to break the classical structure,
playing 41 24 29, hoping for 14 20 x 10 x
24, white plays 42.43 38! and 29 34 27
22 leads to a bad endgame for black.

Black doesnt have any good move left. He


played 33 12 17 34.35 30 24 x 44 and
surrendered without waiting for his execution:
25 20 14 x 25 43 39 44 x 33 28 x 39 17 x
28 32 x 1 W+.

2) 41 8 12 42.44 40 24 29 43.35 30
is lost: 16 21 27 x 16 18 22 is punished by
32 27! W+
3) 41 23 29 42.44 40 8 12 43.42 38
18 23 (the Dussaut sacrifice 16 21 27 x 16
18 22 fails to the 25 20! stick move.)
44.43 39 12 18 45.40 34! 29 x 40 46.35 x
44 24 29 47.39 33 29 34 48.44 39 34 x
43 49.38 x 49 W+
27 21 26
28.34 30 25 x 34
29.39 x 30 20 24

W. van der Kooij G. Jansen


39.30 25 9 14!

White forces a win now. Black should have


defended his position with 29 4 10.

Building the cannon.


40.31 26 17 22
41.32 28 23 x 32
42.38 x 27 22 x 31
43.26 x 37
40.40 34 would have been a better defence.
Whites change back is very passive. Black
gains a lot of space.

S2. Centre play

107

P. Oudshoorn H. Wiersma

Black could have forced a positional win by


43 18 22!

Exercise 6.2 Answer the questions!


1) 44.37 31 24 30! 45.25 x 34 22 27
46.31 x 22 13 18 47.22 x 24 20 x 49 B+.

A) How is 46.38 32 13 18 47.43 38


punished?

2) 44.37 32 19 23 45.43 38 13 19 B+.


46.38 33 13 18!
3) 44.43 38 22 27! 45.33 28 13 18!
46.28 22 27 31! 47.37 x 26 18 x 27 48.39
33 19 23 49.40 34 24 29! 50.33 x 24 20 x
40 51.45 x 34 23 28 breaking through.
In the game black played 43 19 23? 44.43
38 18 22 45.40 34
White should have played 37 31 preventing
22 27.
45 22 27! 46.34 30 13 19 47.39 34
23 29 48.34 x 23 19 x 39 49.30 x 10 15 x 4
50.25 x 14 39 44 B+.

B) How is 47.40 34 punished?


47.43 38 17 22
48.40 34 22 x 31
49.26 x 37
C) How does black win after 48.38 32 22 x31
49.26 x 37 ?
49 18 22
50.34 30?
The best defence would have been 50.37 31.
D) Which strong move does black play now?

A. Domchev W. Milshin
Exercise 6.1 Black to move built a cannon.
What is the strongest move for black? Can you
think of a variation that is winning for black?

Cosmos Protein 04
Position from a blitz game at Kurnik, a Polish
online draughts server.
Exercise 6.3 How does white force a win?
Use tactical weapons!

S2. Centre play

108

37.32 x 23 19 x 28 38.34 30 and black is in


trouble. Still he should have chosen this
variation, because the game is even worse.
35.31 26
36.29 x 18
37.36 x 27
38.27 x 18

18 23
13 x 31
17 22
12 x 23

T. Harmsma J.E. de Vries


The conditions for cannon play are good.
1) Black has inactive pieces, a fork, at his right
wing.
2) White has developed his position
completely.
3) White has enough formations to act at the
other wing.
26.48 43!
A psychologically very strong move. White
wants his opponent to make an important
decision. After the immediate 33 29 x 29 he
is chased back by 19 23. However after the
change back form black the exchange to 29
becomes much stronger.
26 14 20?

39.33 29!
The only temp black has got to make the 2 x 2
exchange is 19 24 which leads to a lethal
arrow lock: 19 24 40.29 x 18 16 21 41.26 x
17 11 x 13 42.34 30 13 19 43.32 28 W+.
39 11 17
40.29 x 18 7 11
41.26 21!
Black surrendered after this last tactical move.

26 17 22 would have been more active.


27.25 x 14 19 x 10
28.30 25 10 14
29.33 29! 23 x 34
30.40 x 29 13 19
31.45 40 2 7?
A big mistake. Black builds a tail he cant use
at the next move, and by this weakening his
defence at <2>. White could already have
played 29 24 x 24 strongly now.
J. Krajenbrink L. Sekongo

32.40 34 3 9
32 18 23 33.29 x 18 12 x 23 is punished by
the 27 22 38 33 shot.

White built two pyramids. A cannon and a right


wing pyramid.
36.40 35 20 25
37.29 x 20 15 x 24
38.34 29! 21 26
39.29 x 20 25 x 14
40.33 29! 11 17
41.39 34!

33.43 39 8 13
34.39 33 15 20?
Moves that dont look good usually arent good.
34 18 23 35.29 x 18 12 x 23 can be
strongly met by 36.33 29! 23 28
Obliged, for 13 18 is answered by 27 22 17
x 28 34 30W +

White allows black to lock his left wing. The


attack at the right wing continues anyway.

S2. Centre play

109

41 17 21
42.29 24! 12 17
43.38 33 6 11
44.34 30! 18 22
44 17 22 would have been punished by
45.32 28! W+
45.27 x 18 13 x 22
46.32 28 8 13
47.30 25 13 18
48.43 38 9 13
49.24 20 14 19
50.20 15 22 27
51.31 x 22 18 x 27
52.37 32 26 31
53.33 29!

Exercise 6.5 White can win using a silent


move. Which move is winning and why?

White won.

H. Jansen H. Wiersma

A. Chizhov A. Keisels
Black has many pieces at the edge of the
board. Centre piece 23 is not supported by a
very strong centre due to a lack of formations.
We also spot a weakness at <9>.
On the contrary white has strong formations at
his right wing and is going to build the cannon
at his left wing.

Black has strong formations. White hasnt any


base piece left. Moreover he cant play the
natural 37 32 move because of the 17 22
24 29 kingshot.
27.34 29 21 26
28.37 32 17 22
29.28 x 17 12 x 21

36.48 42!
36 13 19 37.33 28 leads to a very good
classical position for white: 20 24 38.39 33
8 13 40.43 39 21 26 41.42 37 11 17
42.50 44 6 11 43.44 40 35 x 44 44.39 x
50 17 21 45.27 22 18 x 27 46.31 x 22 11
17 47.22 x 11 16 x 7 48.36 31 7 11 49.31
27 11 16 50.27 22 W+.
36 8 12
37.42 37 12 17
Exercise 6.4 How did white force a win now?
We examine the position after black plays the
logical 37 21 26

After 30.32 28 black forces a win by 30 18


22 (or 21 27 first) 31.28 x 17 11 x 22
Threatening 22 28 followed by 21 27
32.41 37 21 27! with a winning position for
black.
After 30.42 37 black again wins playing 30
18 22 31.40 34 21 27! 32.32 x 21 26 x 17

S2. Centre play

110

33.38 32 22 28! 34.32 x 23 19 x 28 35.33 x


22 17 x 28 winning a piece.
Whites best move is 30.41 37
30.40 34? 11 16
31.42 37 21 27
32.32 x 21 16 x 27
33.37 32 19 23
34.32 x 21 26 x 17
White is getting chain-locked.
35.38 32 6 11

J. Krajenbrink H. Vermin

35 17 21 would have been better, but


white makes a big mistake.

Exercise 6.8 White has a very nice plan


forcing a break through by making a sacrifice.
Try to find the winning manoeuvre.

36.36 31?

White is chain-locked and has too many gaps.


A. Chizhov A. van Prinsenbeek
Exercise 6.6 With which move did black force
a win?

Exercise 6.7 Black has a cannon. In Borkowa


Luteijn white missed the opportunity to
perform a nice shot. Try to find it.

Exercise 6.9 What strong move did white


play?

10-fold world champion Chizhov from Russia


posing near his famous cannon.

S2. Centre play

111

A cannon in the opening


In the opening of a game you often can build a
cannon already. We will give some examples
of typical openings for cannon play.

If black plays 9 14 white should weaken


blacks centre a bit and try to get active at the
right wing. Usually he plays 50 45 4 9 34
29 x 30. The 34 29 x 30 exchange is typical
for cannon play. White can make a double
exchange in another way here.

1.34 29 19 23 2.40 34 14 19
3.45 40 10 14 4.32 28 23 x 32
5.37 x 28

13 9 14
14.34 30 20 25

Black can choose from many continuations


now.

Black wants to develop his wing to activate


piece 5. He can also choose 14 4 9 15.30
25 20 24.

5 18 23
6.29 x 18 12 x 32
7.38 x 27 7 12

15.50 45 25 x 34
16.40 x 29 23 x 34
17.39 x 30 19 23
With a more or less equal play.
We give another examples of opening play
with the canon:
1.32 28 18 22 2.37 32 12 18 3.41 37
7 12 4.46 41 1 7 5.31 26 19 23 6.33
28 22 x 33 7.39 x 19 13 x 24 8.44 39

White can begin building Chizhovs cannon


now. We show a normal play in which white is
going to build the cannon.
8.41 37 12 18
At 8 17 21 white can choose from 46 41
21 x 32 37 x 28 with centre play or developing
37 32 21 26 33 28 2 x 37 42 x 31 with the
possibility of building a cannon.
9.42 38 1 7
10.46 41 7 12
11.37 32 19 23
12.41 37 14 19
13.47 42

Black is going to build the cannon playing 10


14 / 5 10 / 9 13 / 14 19 / 10 14. If white
has occupied 28 in the meantime black will
continue playing the typical 17 22 x 21
gaining space (4 temps).

Black cant develop his left wing immediately


by playing 5 10? Because of a Harlem shot.

S2. Centre play

112

Solutions section 2:
Lesson 1: Centre play
1.1 33 29 24 x 22 27 x 29 breaking the
classical structure and getting control over
wings and centre.
1.2 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 39 34
attacking <24>.
1.3 27 22 18 x 27 31 x 22 removing piece 18
such that after 11 17 22 x 11 16 x 7 23 29
23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 39 34 the attack at
<24> succeeds: the black piece at 18
otherwise could go to 23 preventing the next
attack.
1.4 48 43 is even better than 49 43 having
more power at the right wing. The next move
will be 34 29.
Lesson 2: The powerblock
2.1 12 18! 40 34 18 22! 27 x 29 39 44
=.
2.2 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 19 23 28 x 19 13
x 15 25 20 14 x 34 33 29 34 x 23 37 31
26 x 28 27 22 18 x 27 38 32 27 x 38 42 x 4
W+
2.3 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 45 40 13
18 40 34 4 10 34 29 10 15 29 x 20 15
x 24 27 22! 18 x 27 33 28
Black cant play 24 29 now because of 28
22 27 x 18 38 33 29 x 27 37 31 26 x 37 42
x 4 W+.
27 31 36 x 27 24 29 38 33 29 x 38 42 x
33 9 13 47 41 13 18 28 22 18 23 30
24 19 x 30 35 x 24 W+
2.4 37 31! 26 x 37 42 x 31 and because 21
26 is answered by the 27 21 bomb shot white
locks his opponent at the next move playing 31
26.
2.5 41 36?! 17 22 28 x 17 11 x 31 36 x 27
26 3? 37 x 17 23 28 32 x 12 13 18?
Black can escape by giving one piece more by
24 30 =.
12 x 23 19 x 50 17 12! 8 x 17 27 22 17 x
28 43 39 50 x 33 38 x 9 3 x 14 W+1.
2.6 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 28 23 19
x 39 30 x 10 4 x 15 37 31 26 x 28 38 33 21
x 32 33 x 4 W+

3.1 34 29 14 20 (6 11 29 x 20 14 x 25
37 31 26 x 37 43 39 17 x 26 28 23 W+)
43 39 9 13 39 34
18 22 can be met by 37 31 26 x 37 38
32 17 x 26 28 x 8 37 x 30 8 3 24 x 33 3 x 14
W+
20 25 29 x 20 25 x 14 34 29 6 11 (after
18 22 white can neglect the 29 24 37 31
breakthrough and play 45 40 etc. +) 36 31
11 16 31 27 W+
Lesson 4: The left wing attack
4.1 19 23 28 x 19 24 x 13 35 x 24 17 22 39
x 30 22 28 choice 18 x 49 B+
4.2 3.17 11 7 x 16 4.22 17 (8 12 17 x 8
13 x 2 25 20) W+
4.3 34 29 23 x 43 48 x 39 17 x 26 27 22 18
x 27 32 x 21 26 x 17 35 30 (preventing the
king to be caught) 24 x 35 28 23 19 x 28 33 x
2 W+
Lesson 5: The piece at <17>
5.1 22 18 13 x 11 28 23 29 x 18* 36 31
26 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 33 x 4 W+
5.2 22 17 25 30 34 x 25 12 18 44 40 21
x 12 28 22 18 x 27 38 32 27 x 29 37 31
26 x 37 48 42 37 x 48 39 34 48 x 30 25 x 5
W+
5.3 45 40! 16 21? 17 11 6 x 17 36 31
26 x 28 33 x 11 15 20 25 x 12 18 x 16 35
30 24 x 33 38 x 9 W+.
Lesson 6: Canon play
6.1 24 29! 33 x 24 20 x 29
1) 31 26 18 23! 43 38 17 21 26 x 17 29
33 38 x 18 13 x 31 with good chances to win.
2) 43 38 17 21! 31 26 29 33! (even
better than 18 23 & 29 33) 38 x 29 19 23
26 x 17 23 x 43 35 30 18 23!! with good
winning chances after 40 35 23 28 32 x 23
43 49 etc.
3) 43 38 17 21 35 30 19 23 31 26 14
19! 26 x 17 19 24 30 x 28 18 22 27 x 18
13 x 42 W+
6.2 A) 18 22 27 x 29 24 x 42
B) 18 22 27 x 29 19 23 29 x 18 24 30 35
x 24 20 x 49 (19 13 49 35 B+)
C) 23 29 33 28 29 33 28 23 18 x 29 39
x 28 29 34 40 x 29 24 x 22 B+
D) 22 27!

Lesson 3: The strong piece at <21>

S2. Centre play

113

6.3 31 26! 22 x 31 36 x 27 threatening a


coup Philippe with 27 22 etc. At 7 11 white
can neglect the shot and play 33 28 with
positional win. At 17 22 white plays 33 28!
22 x 44 27 22 18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 43
39 44 x 33 38 x 29 W+
6.4 33 28 13 18 38 33 threatening 28
22 while 20 24 is met by 28 22 17 x 28 33 x
13 19 x 8 34 30 25 x 34 39 x 28 W+
6.5 38.50 45! At 11 17 or 12 17 white has
33 28. If white starts with 1.50 44? black
would have the stick move 35 40. The only
other move 38 13 19 is punished by 39.32
28!! 23 x 21 (23 x 41 36 x 47 26 x 37 38 32
+) 40.37 32 26 x 28 41.33 x 15 W+.
6.6 8 12! Threatening 23 28 32 x 23 20
25 + while 32 27 is punished by 23 28 33 x
22 24 x 33 39 x 28 17 21 B+
6.7 29 23! 18 x 29 35 30 24 x 44 33 x 24
44 x 31 36 x 18 13 x 33 24 x 4 W+
6.8 31 26! 22 x 31 36 x 27 17 22 38 3! 22
x 31 32 28!! 23 x 41 26 x 46 followed by the
24 20 x 20 breakthrough.
6.9 45 40! followed by a double attack at
piece 24.

Persian draughts players

S2. Centre play

114

Classics has been played for centuries and it is still being played. For every draughts
player it is important to have knowledge about classical strategy and classical
standard positions.
Several aspects of classical positions will be studied:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Tempo-classics
Weak pieces
Wing control
Ghestem lock
Tactics
Surrounding the centre
The surrounding fails

The key factor in tempo-classics is development. Leading in development is a good


thing in open positions or attacking positions, but in late closed classical positions it is
not. You will learn when and how to freeze your opponent out in classics.
The second lesson will teach you how to exploit weaknesses of your opponent. It is
often the case that certain pieces are not active in classical games.
Controlling both wings in classics is a very important strategy. This strategy is
performed by many modern grandmasters like Chizhov, Georgiev and Shwarzman.
Controlling the wings is getting more and more important in modern draughts.
The Ghestem lock is a very nice strategy to freeze your opponent out. This is done
by taking away space from the opponent.
Many tactics are involved in classical games. Sacrifices are also very crucial for
judging late closed classical positions right. Well get you acquainted with some
tactical patterns and show you some beautiful shots.
Sometimes in classical (but not closed classical) positions it is possible to surround
the opponent. The last two lessons will discuss this charming strategy.
.

Classics

115

1.Tempo-classics
Development is a key factor in late closed
classical positions. With a lead in
development you risk being frozen out.

The Dirod has dropped to +6. White has only


little space to play left.
5.39 34 11 17!
The Dussaut sacrifice 6.35 30 24 x 35 7.33
29 gives nothing after 35 40 B+.
6.34 30 4 10 7.27 22 21 26 8.22 x 11
16 x 7 leads to a quick freeze out.
F. Tiemensma A. Presman
Whites lead in development is 12 temps. This
is a lot. Black can profit from white having few
waiting moves left. In the game he played 1
3 8? 2.37 31! 21 26 3.34 29 23 x 34 30
x 39 26 x 37 32 x 41 and the game was drawn.
3 26 x 37 4.29 x 18! isnt better because of
the 37 41 27 21! 16 x 27 22 x 31 13 x 22
28 x 6 Kung Fu shot.
Black could have won by taking some temps
back and then freezing white out.

6.27 22 3 8
7.22 x 11 16 x 7
Again, the Dussaut sacrifice 8.35 30 24 x 35
9.33 29 21 27! is suicidal.
8.37 31 21 26
9.31 27 4 9

1 13 18!
2.22 x 13 9 x 18
3.28 22 is punished by 23 28! 4.32 x 12 21
x 41 5.22 17 11 x 22 6.12 7 22 28! 7.33 x
22 14 20 8.25 x 23 41 47 9.30 x 19 47 x 25
B+.
If white sacrifices 3.27 22 18 x 27 4.34 29
23 x 34 5.30 x 39 black plays 21 26 6.32 x 21
26 x 17 7.39 34 3 9! 8.34 29 16 21 9.29
x 20 21 27! and white has ran out of good
moves, for 35 30 and 33 29 are met by 19
23 B+, while white is frozen out after 10.20
15 19 24 11.28 23 17 22 B+.
3.37 31 21 26 4.34 29 26 x 37! also
loses.
3.34 29 23 x 34
4.30 x 39 18 23
(diagram)

10.34 30 9 13
11.28 22 7 11! 12.33 28 24 29 is a
dead track for white, so he tries a
breakthrough.
11.27 22 26 31
12.33 29 24 x 42
13.30 24 19 x 30
14.28 x 10 42 47
15.25 x 34 31 37
16.32 x 41 47 x 45
White cant go to king: 17.10 4 7 12 18.4 x
1 8 12 B+ or 17.10 5 13 19 B+.
17.35 30 45 19!

Classics

116

18.10 4
2) 3.35 30 24 x 35 4.39 34 13 18! 5.28
22 23 28 6.28 x 30 28 x 19 B+

Check yourself that 10 5 is losing too.


18.. 23 45
19.4 x 1 13 18
20.1 x 23 45 x 18

3) 3.39 34 13 18 4.34 29 23 x 34 5.28


22 19 23 6.22 x 13 12 18 7.13 x 22 23 28
8.32 x 23 21 x 41 followed by 41 47 B+.

Not until the twentieth move of our analysis it


becomes clear that black really wins!

4) 3.39 34 13 18 4.25 20
This is the second best defence possible in the
Woldouby.
14 x 25! 5.28 22 23 28 6.32 x 14 21 x 41
7.22 x 13 41 47!

The Dirod in this famous late closed classical


position is -1. Despite of this tiny difference
white has huge problems making a draw
1.34 29 23 x 34
2.30 x 39 18 23

Black is threatening 25 30 34 x 25 24 29 33
x 24 47 x 18 +. White has to give a piece.
8.35 30 24 x 35 9.14 10 47 41! 10.10 4
At 10.10 5 black plays 41 36 B+.
10 41 14! 11.38 32 14 x 41 12.13 9 12
17
This is a very bad endgame for white, for
example 13.33 29 41 47 14.29 23 47
20 15.23 19 20 x 3 16.4 36 3 12 17.19
14 12 x 45 White gets two kings but black will
get two kings and four pieces, enough to win.
The best defence of the Woldouby position is
the surprising move 3.27 22!

Woldouby

1) 3 12 18 4.39 34 18 x 27 and now two


variations:

This famous position named after a


Senegalese draughts player who first studied
it, has appeared in many games. Whites
problem is easy to explain. After 3.39 34 13
18! 4.34 30 12 17 he has run out of
moves Players who dont know or recognize
the Woldouby position usually lose.

1.1) 5.35 30? 24 x 35 6.33 29 13 18 and


black wins both after 7.28 22 35 40! 8.22 x
24 40 44 9.29 x 18 26 31! 10.37 x 17 44
49 11.32 x 21 49 x 11 + and 7.29 24 19 x 39
8.28 x 10 39 44 9.10 4 18 22 10.4 15
44 49 etc. B+

We will discuss some losing attempts for white


1) 3.28 22 24 30!
Black cant play 23 28 immediately because
after 32 x 23 21 x 34 33 29! is a saving stick
move.
4.35 x 24 19 x 30 5.25 x 34 23 28 6.32 x 23
21 x 41 B+

Classics

1.2) 5.34 30! 13 18!


5 27 31 is met by 6.33 29!! 31 x 22 7.29
x 27 =
6.28 22 23 28! 7.32 x 12 27 x 7 8.33 28
24 29 9.38 33! 29 x 38 10.37 32 38 x 27
11.30 24 19 x 30 12.35 x 24 27 31 13.28
23 31 37

117

In the game Meijer G. Jansen the first went


wrong playing 14.24 20? losing control over
the main diagonal and white eventually lost the
endgame. White should play 14.24 19! and
by that drawing the game. The difference is
that white will control the main diagonal now.

In the left position white to move can force a


draw by 27 22 18 x 27 32 x 21 23 x 41 (or 23
x 43) 34 29 16 x 27 29 x 7 =.
In the right position the Bomb shot 27 21 16
x 27 32 x 12 23 x 41 12 x 23 19 x 39 30 x 10
39 x 30 35 x 24 draws the game.

2) 3 12 17 4.22 x 11 16 x 7 5.28 22!

Black cant take 23 28 32 x 23 19 x 17


because of 37 31! 26 x 37 38 32 37 x 28
33 x 2 W+.
5 7 12! 6.22 17! 12 18 7.32 28!!
This is the famous triple sacrifice of
Kosminsky.
7 23 x 34 8.17 11 and black cant win, for
example 8 18 23 9.11 7

In the left position white is even better, for he


can play 28 22 8 12 22 17 23 28! 33 x
22 18 23 17 x 13 x 2 22 18 23 x 12 38
33 12 18 34 29 18 22 29 x 9 22 x 42 = or
he can try 34 29 23 x 34 30 x 39 after which
black shouldnt play 18 23 because of 27
22! W+.
In the right position 28 22 7 11 33 28 11
17! 22 x 11 16 x 7 27 x 16 7 12 34 29 24
x 31 30 24 19 x 30 28 x 17 leads to a draw.
The position with Dirod +2 isnt dangerous for
white at all. Lets examine the Dirod = +3 case.

1) 9 34 40 10.35 x 44 24 30 11.25 x 34
23 29 12.34 x 23 19 x 50 13.7 2 14 19
14.2 16 =
2) 9 21 27 10.7 2 27 32 11.37 x 28 23
x 32 12.2 11! 32 37 13.33 28! 13 18
14.11 2! etc. =
We see that this is a very narrow escape for
white
The Dirod in the 10 x 10 position leading to
Woldouby was +1. Lets examine 10 x 10
positions with Dirod +2.

Dirod = +3
In this position white has difficulties finding a
drawing variation. In many games white went
wrong and lost.

Classics

118

1.27 22? 18 x 27 2.32 x 21 23 x 41 3. 34


29 will not draw the game after 3 26 x 17 nor
3 16 x 27.
1.34 29 23 x 34
2.30 x 39 18 23
3.39 34
It is not entirely clear whether black will win
after 3.28 22 23 28 4.32 x 23 19 x 17 5.39
34 12 18 6.33 28.
3 13 18!

Dirod = +3
In Weiss Ottina 1.34 29? 23 x 34 2.30 x 39
was played after which the position seems lost
for white when 18 23 is played.
1.34 29? 23 x 34
2.30 x 39 18 23

This is the Woldouby position with 21 at 11.


White can go wrong in several ways:
1) 4.28 22 23 28 5.22 x 13 28 x 30 6.25 x
34 19 x 8 B+1.
2) 4.34 30 11 17 5.27 22 18 x 27 6.32 x
21 23 x 41 7.33 28 16 x 27 8.28 23 19 x 28
9.30 x 10 41 46 10.10 4 28 32 11.4 x 36
32 x 43 B+
3) 4.27 22? 18 x 27 5.32 x 21 23 x 41 6.34
29 16 x 27 7.29 x 9 41 47! 8.9 3 11 17
and white has to sacrifice two pieces (33 28)
in order to prevent his king from being caught
and thus B+
The only correct defence is 4.25 20!! 14 x 25
4 24 x 15 is followed by 5.34 30 11 17
6.30 24 19 x 30 7.28 x 10 15 x 4 8.35 x 24 17
22 9.24 19 22 x 42 10.38 x 47 and white
holds a draw.
5.28 22 11 17 6.22 x 13 19 x 8 7.35 30!
24 x 35 8.33 29 23 28* 9.32 x 23 and in
spite of one piece less white will hold a draw.

We see that this position is the Woldouby


position with piece 26 at 17. No escape for
white has ever been found.
3.39 34 13 18 4.34 30 21 26 5.27 22
18 x 27 6.32 x 21 23 x 41 7.33 28 16 x 27
8.28 23 19 x 28 9.30 x 10 41 46 as in
Gordijn Baba Sy B+.
3.39 34 13 18 4.27 22 18 x 27 5.35 30
24 x 35 6.33 29 12 18 7.29 24 19 x 39
8.28 x 10 leads to an endgame that was lost in
all 5 recorded games in Turbo Dambase.
(Turbo Draughts base). In Van Huet Drost
the endgame went 8 39 44 9.25 20 44
49 10.20 14 18 22 11.10 5 21 26! 12.32
x 12 49 x 25 B+.
Usually white plays

We now will discuss another famous position


with Dirod +3. It has appeared in many games
of which Weiss Ottina and Gordijn Baba
Sy are the most well-known examples.

Classics

3.28 22 17 x 28
4.33 x 22 21 26!

119

32.45 40 6 11
33.40 34 11 17
34.34 30 14 20
35.25 x 14 9 x 20
36.30 25 4 9
37.25 x 14 9 x 20
Dirod has dropped to -10 now. Black risks a
freeze out.

If white plays 5.38 33 now, you shouldnt


take 23 28 but play 23 29!! White hasnt got
a save temp to make the exchange. 39 34 is
a disaster after 29 x 38 32 x 43 24 30 B+.
5.38 33 23 29! 6.33 28 29 33! 7.39 34
33 38! 8.32 x 43 24 30 9.35 x 24 19 x 48
(10.28 23 48 x 31 11.27 x 36 12 17) B+.
In Verse Malfray black won a nice endgame
after 5.22 17(!) 12 x 21 6.37 31 26 x 28
7.25 20 21 x 34 8.20 x 20 34 39 9.35 30
39 44 10.20 15 44 49 11.15 10 28 32!
12.30 25 32 37 13.25 20 37 41 14.10
4 41 47 15.20 15 47 36 16.4 10 49
27! 17.10 x 21 16 x 27 18.15 10 36 41 B+.

38.39 34
39.43 39
40.28 x 17
41.33 28
42.49 43

20 25
17 22
21 x 12
3 9
9 14

White is ready to reconquer the right wing. The


dirod goes to -6 (black lost two temps by
changing back 17 22 x 12).
43.34 30 25 x 34
44.39 x 30 24 29
44 12 17 45.48 42 isnt any better.
45.30 25 12 17
46.48 42?

White could have avoided these problems by


playing the pseudo sacrifice 1.27 22! 18 x 27
2.34 29 23 x 34 3.30 x 39 27 31 4.37 x 26
12 18 5.39 34 18 23 6.35 30 24 x 35
7.33 29 13 18 8.29 24 19 x 39 9.28 x 10
=.

It was better to play 46.35 30, eliminating the


extra opportunity black gets now: 46 29 34
47.35 30 26 31! and now two variations
both leading to a draw.
1) 48.37 x 26 34 39 49.43 x 34 17 22 50.28
x 17 23 29 51.34 x 12 13 18 52.12 x 23 19
x 48 =.
K. van Lith G. Gaibova
Wch women 1995

2) 48.27 x 36 23 29 49.30 x 39 29 33 50.38


x 29 14 20 51.25 x 21 16 x 49 =

White is trailing in development by 2 temps


(dirod = -2). Moreover she could expect her
opponent to make the 14 20 x 20 exchange
taking another 4 temps. Actually black makes a
double exchange. After 14 20 x 20 30 25 4
9 25 x 14 9 x 20 she gains another 4 temps.
White decided she didnt need the Olympic
formation anymore and played:

46 16 21?
47.27 x 16 18 22
48.35 30! 22 x 33
49.30 24 19 x 30
50.25 x 34 29 x 40
51.38 x 20
and white won quickly.

Classics

120

Exercise 1.1 1.4 Calculate the dirod and


judge the position!

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

Classics

121

2.Weak pieces

The dangling piece at 9 is a very weak piece. It


paralyzes blacks position. He cant play 13
18 because of 28 23 W+.

Dirod = +4
In this position black to move has the choice
between two plans. First we will look at the
wrong plan:
1 12 17?
2.39 34 4 9?

8 11 17
9.27 22 17 21
White can win in two ways. He can neglect the
win of a piece and play on 10.38 32 21 27
(the endgame after 21 26 32 27 is losing)
11.22 x 31 13 18 12.39 34 18 23 13.31
26 9 13 14.34 30 13 18
14 23 29 15.32 27 29 x 38 16.28 23 19
x 28 17.30 x 10 28 32(!) 18.10 5 32 x 21
19.26 x 17 13 18 (otherwise 17 12 etc.)
20.5 37 38 43 21.37 31 18 23 22.31
37 23 29 23.37 42 29 34 24.42 48 34
39 25.35 30 W +
15.32 27! 23 x 21 16.26 x 17 W+.
10.22 18 13 x 22
11.28 x 26 19 23
12.38 32 9 13

F. Ricou J. Garoute
It looks like white is in trouble, because he
cant change back 34 29 23 x 34 30 x 39 24
29! B+
However, white has a major surprise for his
opponent.
3.27 22! 18 x 27
4.34 29 23 x 34
5.30 x 39

White played 33 28 now in the game and


black escaped with a draw.
13.39 34! 14 19
Both 13 13 18 14.32 27 14 19 15.26
21 W+ and 13 13 19 14.34 30 23 29
15.33 28 W+ give little resistance.
14.35 30 24 x 35
15.25 20

Black has to give back the piece immediately.


5 27 31
6.37 x 26 17 22
7.26 x 17 22 x 11
8.32 27!

White wins the endgame as you can analyse


yourself.
Piece 4 should not go to <9>. You should
make two temps with it going to 15. A piece at
15 is not weak in late classical positions if you
trail in development! Blakc will go to the key
position Ricou Bonnard!
1 4 10!
2.39 34 10 15
3.34 29 23 x 34

Classics

122

4.30 x 39 18 23

x 22 16 21 =. In this variation piece 36 is


inactive.
Playing 45 23 29? would have been very
dangerous. After 46.28 23! 19 x 39 47.30 x
10 black has to take care:
1) 47 29 34 48.40 x 29 39 44 49.29 23!
18 x 29 50.37 31 26 x 28 51.38 32 28 x 37
52.10 4 21 x 32 53.4 x 48 W+.
2) 47 29 33 48.38 x 29 39 43 49.10 4
43 48 (43 49 29 23 18 x 29 4 x 6+) 50.27
22 18 x 38 51.4 x 49 48 x 31 52.36 x 27 21 x
32 53.49 x 12 W+

Black is still trailing by two temps, so his piece


at 15 is okay. In fact, the position is completely
winning.
In part I of the course we saw the position after
5.39 34 12 17! was winning for black.
Exercise 2.2 Show the right moves for black
after:

3) 47 17 22 48.36 31! 29 33 49.38 x 29


39 43 50.10 5 43 49 (43 48 40 34 48
x 25 35 30+) 51.40 34 13 19! 52.5 x 6 49
38 53.32 x 43 21 x 41 54.31 27 and black
still hasnt solved all of his problems.
46.28 x 17 21 x 12
47.33 28

A) 6.34 30
B) 6.35 30 24 x 35 7.33 29
C) 6.27 22

Dirod is still -3. If black plays 47 12 17?


48.40 34! We have the same position as two
diagrams back, with exchanged colours.
Exercise 2.1 How does white win after 47
23 29?
T. Goedemoed W. Sytsma
Calculating the Dirod is easy here. Just make
the position symmetrical. Transport piece 36
to 39 will not change the Dirod. You see it will
take white 5 moves to get a symmetrical
position: 45 40 / 40 34 / 30 25 / 34 30 /
39 34. The Dirod is -5. This means the piece
at 36 is strong!

47 24 29
48.30 25 29 34
49.40 x 29 23 x 34
50.35 30 14 20!
51.25 x 23 34 x 25
52.23 19 13 x 24
(diagram)

45.45 40 17 22
Although black doesnt win back a piece after
the sacrifice 45 24 29 46.33 x 24 17 22
47.28 x 17 21 x 12 48.30 25 19 x 30 49.25 x
34 he can still make a draw playing 49 14
20, since 38 33 is always met by 23 28 33

Classics

123

After black changes back 17 22 x 12 the


Dirod will be +1. The piece at 36 will become
weak.
Playing 1.39 33? leads to the famous De
Haas Fabre position: 17 22 2.28 x 17 21 x
12 3.33 28 24 29

53.28 22 18 23?
After 53 24 29! 54.22 x 13 29 34 white
cant win.
54.22 18!
Black discovered too late that the stick move
54 26 31 55.18 x 20 31 x 33 is punished by
56.36 31!! 25 x 14 57.32 28 33 x 22 58.27
x 7 +.
54 25 30
55.18 x 20 30 34
56.20 14 34 40
57.14 10 40 44
58.10 4 44 49

J. de Haas M. Fabre 1921


White has little room to play. We will analyse
this position following the game of the old
masters.
45.28 22 12 17

58 44 50 is answered by 27 22 followed
by 32 28 W+.
59.37 31! 26 x 28
60.27 22

Because 45 12 17 is not winning


analytically, later 45 14 20 46.25 x 14 19 x
10 has also been tried.
46.22 x 11 16 x 7
47.38 33 29 x 38
48.32 x 43 23 29
Black keeps isolating the arrow 25 / 30 / 34.

Black surrendered.
49.43 39
50.37 32
51.39 34
52.35 x 44

When trailing in development a piece at 15


/ 36 usually isnt weak in late closed
classical positions. This piece often has a
defensive task.

19 23
7 12
29 x 40
23 29

White shouldnt play 53.32 28? now, for


black forces a charming win by 26 31!! 54.28
23 55.31 x 22 56.23 x 34 14 20! 57.25 x 14
13 19 58.14 x 23 18 x 49 B+.

Dirod = -1

53.44 40! 29 33

Classics

124

54.32 28?
White can defend the position playing 54.40
34! Only after 13 19 white can play 32 28
33 x 31 36 x 27 18 23 27 22! =.
54.40 34 26 31 55.27 21 31 37 56.32 x
41 33 38 57.36 31 38 43 58.21 16 12
17 59.31 27 43 48 60.27 21 17 x 26
61.16 11 48 42 62.11 7 13 19
White cant go to king now, but an extra
sacrifice will help him.
63.41 37! 43 x 21 64.7 1 18 22 65.1 6
22 27 66.6 50! will draw the game. In the
position from 3 diagrams back 1.39 33 was a
bad move, but even worse is 1.39 34? 17
22 2.28 x 17 21 x 12 3.38 33

White also shouldnt play 1.39 33? (position


4 diagrams ago) 17 22 2.28 x 17 21 x 12
3.38 33

3 23 28!! 4.33 x 22 24 29 5.34 x 23 19 x


17
The stick move 6.30 24 17 22 7.24 19
doesnt work now because after 22 x 42 white
has to capture 19 x 17 B+.
6.32 28 17 21 7.37 32 26 31 8.28 22
31 37 9.32 x 41 21 x 32 B+.

54 18 23!
55.30 24
55.27 22 23 28! 56.22 x 33 26 31 wins
easily.
55 23 28
56.40 34 12 18
57.34 29 28 32
58.27 x 38 26 31
59.38 32 31 36
60.32 28 36 41

The correct way to treat the position is making


a pseudo sacrifice.
1.28 22! 17 x 28
2.38 33 26 31
3.37 x 17 28 x 37
4.36 31 37 x 26
5.39 34 26 31
6.27 x 36 16 21
7.17 x 26 23 28
8.33 x 22 18 x 27
9.34 29 24 x 33
10.30 24 19 x 30
11.35 x 24
After this festival of sacrifices the game is a
draw.

White cant play 28 23 41 47 (or 41 46


followed by 13 18) 23 x 12 13 19 24 x 13
47 x 17 B+, so he must give a piece.
61.28 22 18 x 27
62.24 20 14 19
63.20 15 is met by 19 24! 64.29 x 20 4
46+ so white has to give another piece.
63.29 23 19 x 28
64.20 15 13 19!
65.15 10 41 47!

A. Gantwarg A. van Leeuwen

White surrendered.

Since white is trailing by two temps (dirod = -2)


piece 15 is weak.
51.34 30? 26 31! isnt enough for a win:

Classics

125

1) 52.37 x 26 23 29 and white has to give


back the piece immediately.
2) 52.27 x 36 21 27 53.32 x 12 23 x 34 54.30
x 39 18 x 7 and now for example 55.39 34 7
12 56.34 29 15 20 57.37 32 16 21!
58.36 31 21 26 59.31 27 12 17 60.32
28 17 21 61.27 x 16 26 31 with a draw.
51.28 22! 17 x 28
52.33 x 13 19 x 8
53.27 22! 8 13
54.39 33

J. van den Akker K. Thijssen


White has a dangling piece at <31>. Black still
has the Olympic formation needed for control
over the his right wing.
31 12 17!
White cant play 31 26 now because of 17
22 followed by 24 30 B+.
32.34 30 17 21!
White cant play at his left wing anymore.

Blacks position is split. Moreover piece 15


spells doom over his position.
54 14 19
55.34 30 23 29
56.32 28 21 27

33.43 39 3 8
34.39 34 24 29
35.33 x 24 20 x 40
36.45 x 34
Not possible is 35 x 44 because of the 14 20
Kung Fu shot.

Black is frozen out and must give a piece.


57.22 x 31 16 21
58.28 22 29 34
58 21 27 59.25 20 27 x 36 60.20 14 19
x 10 61.30 x 8 W+

36 15 20
37.38 33 20 24
38.34 29 23 x 34
39.30 x 39 18 23
40.39 34 13 18

59.30 x 39 21 27
60.38 32 27 x 29
61.31 27 13 18
62.22 x 13 19 x 8
63.25 20 8 13
64.20 14
Black is frozen out for the second time. He
gave a piece by playing 64 15 20 65.14 x
25 13 18 and after 39 34 x 44 he
surrendered.
White has a tactical solution for his problems:
41.42 38!!
1) 41 8 13 42.34 29! 23 x 34 43.28 23!
19 x 26 44.25 20 21 x 43 45.48 x 10 W+.

Classics

126

2) 41 21 26 42.34 29! 23 x 34* 43.28


23 26 x 39 44.23 x 1 =.
41.48 43? 8 13
42.43 39 21 26
43.42 37 7 12
44.34 30 6 11

Exercise 2.4 Which move is better: 48 42 or


48 43?

Whites problems are clear. The weakness at


<38> is deadly.
45.39 34
46.34 29
47.30 x 39
48.27 x 16
49.25 x 23

11 17
23 x 34
16 21
14 20
18 x 36

Black won after 50.28 22 17 x 28 51.16 11


28 32 52.37 x 28 12 17 53.11 x 22 36 41
54.28 23 41 47 55.23 19 47 36 56.19 x
30 36 x 18 57.30 24 18 22 B+.

Exercise 2.5 Black to move. What is his best


move and why?

Exercise 2.6 Black has a dangling piece at


11. Should white to move play 31 26 or 34
30 and why?

Black has a weak piece at 15.


Exercise 2.3 How can white force a win?

Classics

127

3.Wing control
Controlling the wings is a mighty weapon in
classics. When you cant go to any of the
two wings anymore you of course risk being
frozen out.

White shouldnt play 6.7 1 yet, because of


the shot 19 23! 7.1 x 29 25 30 8.34 x 25 16
21 9.17 x 37 46 x 23 +.
6 31 36 and both players will get two kings
with an exciting endgame.
Instead of 2 23 28 black can give a piece
back with 2. 35 40! 3.34 x 45 23 29 4.33
x 24 19 x 30, for example 5.45 40 18 23
6.40 35 30 35 and white should give a
piece with 7.22 17 21 x 12, because 7.38
33 or 7.39 33 is met by 23 28 B+. After the
sacrifice 7.22 17 21 x 12 black has good
chances to win, although it isnt easy!

White to move has no space left at all. He is


hopelessly lost. Adding pieces 39 and 13,
while transporting 17 to 26, will make things
more complicated.
K. Veldstra W. Leijenaar
Black to move

It looks like white has only one sensible move


left: 1.28 22 which is losing: 23 28!!
1) 2.32 x 12 21 x 43! 3.39 x 48 24 30 4.35 x
24 19 x 8 B+
2) 2.32 x 14 21 x 41 3.14 10 18 x 27 4.10 5
4 10 4 26 31 5.4 x 22 31 36 B+
41 46 5.34 29 25 30! 6.29 x 20 26 31
7.35 x 24 31 37 8.5 x 41 46 x 14 B+.
White should make a sacrifice.

To understand this closed classical position we


have to spot the relevant features.
Calculating the Dirod has to be done with white
to move, so after a black move like 8 13 we
calculate: 27 28 = -1. Thats a close race.
Two other features are very important here:
White has a weakness at 36. Black doesnt
control square 9, which makes his position
vulnerable to the Dussaut sacrifice. Because
black controls the right flank of the board he
has chances to freeze white out. Black
possesses square 25 and white cant make a
formation to change this piece.
In the game black played 40 8 13? 41.40
34 12 17? After which white could have won
by the Dussaut sacrifice 42.35 30 24 x 35
43.33 29 13 18 44.27 22 18 x 27 45.29 x
18 etc.
Tactics is important in this position: Black can
reduce whites space by playing:
40 12 18!!

1.35 30 24 x 35
2.28 22
After 2 23 28 3.32 x 12!
Thats why white should sacrifice first, for now
he can move to <1>.
3 21 x 41 4.12 7 41 46 5.22 17! 26
31 6.17 11!

Classics

White cant go to 22 anymore. 40.27 22 18 x


27 41.37 31 is punished by 8 13 31 x 22 13
18! 22 x 13 19 x 8 28 x 30 25 x 45 B+.
In this variation a beautiful shot is decisive:
40.28 22 8 13 41.33 28
Both 41 36 31 and 41 37 31 are met
by 23 28! and black wins the endgame.

128

41 2 7 42.40 34 7 12 43.38 33 21
26 44.36 31

Chizhov H. van der Zee


Wch 1988
Chizhov built a flexible classical structure. He
can perform multiple plans. The dirod = -1.
His next move gives more control over the left
wing. The 6 / 11 / 16 / 17 tail becomes weak.
26.37 31! 14 20
27.33 28 17 21

The positional approach doesnt work here.


44 11 17 45.22 x 11 16 x 7 is answered by
46.27 21!! 26 x 17 47.31 27 (gaining
space!) 7 11 48.37 31 11 16 49.31 26
and black has to return his extra piece.
44 12 17 would lose to a Kung Fu shot: 34
29 followed by 33 29 +.
Black can make a beautiful shot however:
44 23 29!! 45.34 x 14 24 30 46.35 x 24
16 21 47.27 x 7 18 x 9 48.7 x 18 13 x 44 W+.

Playing 17 22 28.28 x 17 11 x 22 29.31 26


22 x 31 30.36 x 27 gives white control over the
left wing, while piece 6 cant be played for a
long time. We show a variations that clearly
demonstrates blacks problems: 30 8 13
31.38 33 24 29 32.33 x 24 20 x 29 33.40
34 29 x 40 34.45 x 34 15 20 35.42 38 20
24 36.38 33 9 14 37.48 42!

41.40 34 21 26!
41 8 13 is not right. White can then go to
the graveyard: 42.27 22 18 x 27 43.37 31
and if black plays 43 21 26? 44.31 x 22 16
21 he is punished by the Dussaut sacrifice:
45.35 30! 24 x 35 46.33 29 W+.
42.28 22 8 13
43.33 28

Black has major problems.


1) 3723 28 38.32 x 12 13 18 39.12 x 23
19 x 37 40.30 x 10 leads to a bad endgame for
black.

43 2 7 (threatening 16 21) doesnt work


here, because after 44.27 21! 16 x 27* 45.22
x 31 white escapes.
43 16 21!!
44.27 x 7 2 x 11
A stunning sacrifice decides the game in
blacks favour. We saw that black can use
tactics to reduce whites space to play.

2) 37 14 20 38.43 38 20 25 39.33 29!


24 x 33 40.38 x 29 3 9* 41.29 24! 9 14
42.24 20! W+
3) 37 6 11! and black can defend because
at 32 28 23 x 21 26 x 6 the shot 24 29! 34x
12 13 18 12 x 23 19 x 37 makes a draw,
while after 38.42 38 23 28 39.32 x 12 13
18 black also wont lose.
28.43 39 11 17
29.30 25
White neednt fear 29 18 22 30.27 x 29 24
x 44 31.25 x 23 44 50 because white catches
the king winning a piece.
29 8 13
30.25 x 14 9 x 20
31.39 34! 3 9

Classics

129

A logical move. Black wants to change 18 22


x 22.

White wants to take control over the left wing.


22.37 31! 21 26
23.49 44! 26 x 37
24.42 x 31

32.38 33 21 26
33.34 30 26 x 37
34.42 x 31

Piece 44 is dangling, but it is no weakness in


this position! White doesnt want to play at his
right wing anyway. He keeps on playing at the
left wing. He calculated that he can keep on
playing, controlling both wings.
24 8 12
25.31 26 11 17
26.48 42 3 8
27.36 31 6 11
28.42 37 5 10

We again show some variations that prove


black is in trouble.
1) 34 20 25 35.40 34! 9 14 36.31 26
14 20 37.48 43 24 29 38.33 x 24 20 x 40
39.45 x 34 15 20 40.43 38 20 24 41.38
33 and black is frozen out.
2) 34 9 14 35.40 34 24 29 36.33 x 24
20 x 40 37.45 x 34 15 20 38.30 25 20 24
39.34 30 and black might escape playing 24
29! 40.48 42 17 22! 41.28 x 17 29 33
42.30 24 19 x 30 43.25 x 34 13 19 etc. =
34 24 29
35.33 x 24 20 x 29
36.40 34 29 x 40
37.35 x 44!

White has played all normal moves, but still he


has space to continue playing. White launches
an attack at blacks right wing.
29.28 22! 17 x 28
30.33 x 22 24 29?

Black is tactically frozen out. He cant parry the


30 24 threat playing 23 29 because white
has the 27 22! 18 x 38 48 43 38 x 40 45 x 3
W+ shot, while 37 15 20 is met by 38.27
22! 18 x 38 39.30 25 23 x 32 40.25 x 3 W+.
Black surrendered.

30 11 17 31.22 x 11 16 x 7 would have


been much better. Now white gets time to
reinforce his left wing attack.
31.26 21
32.31 26
33.22 x 11
34.21 17
35.26 x 17
36.17 x 8

20 24
11 17
16 x 7
12 x 21
8 12
13 x 2

R. Clerc H. van der Vossen

Classics

130

Blacks position contains some weaknesses.


White still controls both wings.

5 18 23 6.21 16!
Black cant go to 17 anymore. After 6 8 12
7.31 27 12 18* 8.27 21 7 12 9.21 17
12 x 21 10.16 x 27 its game over.

37.39 33 9 13
38.43 39 7 11
39.33 28 15 20?
Black should have played 11 16 in order to
meet 39 33 with 16 21 27 x 16 18 22 28 x
17 23 28 32 x 34 24 30 35 x 24 19 x 50,
drawing the game.
40.39 33 10 15
41.44 39 2 7
42.39 34!
Black cant escape playing 42.. 24 30
because 35 x 24 turns out to be suicidal for
black.
42. 7 12 43.34 30
Black is frozen out soon: 43 11 16 44.37
31 12 17 45.31 26 W+ and he thus
surrendered.

Exercise 3.1 Black to play is lost. Write down


the way white wins after:
A) 1 23 29
B) 1.. 16 21 2.27 x 16 24 29 3.33 x 24 18
22

G. Mostovoy E. Fanelli
V. Wirny R. Heusdens
Black to move

1.37 31!
Blacks space is minimized. He cant use
his 8 / 12 / 17 tail now.
1 23 29
2.34 x 23 18 x 29
3.27 22 12 18
4.22 x 11 16 x 7
5.26 21!!

Exercise 3.2 Answer the questions.


A) How is 1 17 22 punished?
1 24 29
2.33 x 24 20 x 29
3.35 30 15 20

In a few games this position was reached, but


5.31 27? was played. Even threefold world
champion Schwarzman made this mistake
after which black can escape after 5 7 11.
After 5.26 21!!, due to the 28 23 threat
black is forced to play 18 23 after which
white is able to freeze black out.

Classics

3.. 9 14 4.39 33! 14 20 5.33 x 24 20 x 29


6.43 39 15 20 and white can choose
between 7.39 33 20 24 8.30 25 17 22
9.50 45 etc. and 7.27 21 16 x 27 8.32 x 12
18 x 7 9.39 33 20 24 10.30 25 and white
will win the endgame.
B) How did white force a breakthrough after
the games 3.. 15 20 ?

131

Exercise 3.6 How does white play after 1


15 20 ?

V. Weitsman A. Chizhov
World championship 2003

K. Posthumus S. Doller
Exercise 3.3 White to move. Which move is
best and why?

Blacks piece are distributed evenly over centre


and wings. Black begins a plan taking control
over both wings.
19 20 24
20.43 39 2 7
21.36 31 17 21
22.41 36 7 11
23.49 43 14 20
Its time for black to develop his left wing.
Tj. Goedemoed B. Post
Exercise 3.4 Black played 24 29? White
forced a positional win!

24.25 x 14
25.33 28
26.38 33
27.42 38

10 x 19
18 23
15 20
20 25

Piece <25> controls the wing temporarily.


White changes this piece, but the future 3 / 9 /
14 tail can again challenge control over the
wing in a few moves.
Black to move has no good move left since
white controls both wings. 1 23 29 is met
by a shot.
Exercise 3.5 Write down the shot for white
after 1.. 23 29

Classics

28.47 42
29.34 30
30.39 x 30
31.31 27
32.43 39
33.39 34

5 10
25 x 34
10 14
14 20
20 25
13 18

132

White decides to go to <22> now. It would


have been better to change back 34 29 23 x
34 30 x 39 18 23 45 40 etc.
34.27 22
35.37 31
36.42 x 22
37.34 29
38.30 x 39
39.22 x 11

47.33 28
48.39 33

7 11
12 17

18 x 27
26 x 37
9 13
23 x 34
11 17
6 x 17

White is frozen out. 49.45 40 is met by 13


18 B+. White resigned.

White lost control over <27>. 40.36 31 13


18 41.31 27 is strongly met by 19 23! 42.28
x 30 25 x 43 followed by 17 22 B+.
40.48 42 13 18
41.42 37 8 12
42.36 31 loses after 18 22 43.31 26 12
18 44.37 31 24 29! 45.33 x 13 22 x 44
46.13 x 11 16 x 7 47.26 x 17 44 50 B+.
Therefore he plays 37 31, but piece 36
becomes a weakness now.
42.37 31 18 23
43.31 27 21 26

J. Alfaisi A. Chizhov
World championship 1988
Black has played the 15 20 move in order to
prevent the 34 30 x 30 exchange. The fight
for control over the left wing begins.
29.37 31
30.42 x 31
31.31 26
32.26 x 17

44.45 40 17 21 45.40 34 12 17 46.27


22 3 8 47.22 x 11 16 x 7 48.28 22 7 11
49.33 28 11 17 50.22 x 11 21 27 51.32 x
21 23 x 43 52.39 x 48 26 x 6 B+
44.27 22 3 8
45.22 x 11 16 x 7
46.28 22 8 13

26 x 37
17 21
3 8
12 x 21

White should have solved his problems by


playing 33.34 30 25 x 34 34.39 x 30 20 25
35.36 31 25 x 34 36.31 26 winning the
piece back with equality.
33.48 42 21 26

Classics

133

34.42 37 8 12
Now white has a lack of space to play. Piece
36 has become weak.

40.39 34 29 x 40 41.35 x 44 can be


answered by the cool 41 18 23 for after
42.33 29 24 x 22 43.27 x 7 black makes a
draw playing 14 20 44.25 x 3 6 11 45.3 x
21 16 x 36 46.7 x 16 36 41 .
37 9 13
38.37 31 20 24
39.44 39 23 29
40.42 37

35.28 22 9 14
White cant play 33 28 because of 16 21
B+1, so he sacrificed a piece.
After 36.22 17 12 x 21 37.33 28 1 7
38.28 22 7 12 39.22 17 23 28 40.17 x 8
13 x 2 41.32 x 12 21 x 41 42.36 x 47 2 7
43.12 x 1 19 23 44.1 x 29 24 x 44 white
resigned.

Black has no good moves anymore. The 8 / 12


/ 17 tail isnt active.
40 29 34
41.39 x 30 18 23
Hoping to get more space by giving white extra
temps (39 x 30 gains two temps). But white
goes to <22> getting more space again.
42.27 22 6 11
42 12 18 43.22 x 11 16 x 7 44.26 21 8
12 45.31 27 7 11
45. 6 11 46.28 22 is also no problem for
white.
46.37 31 and white is winning, for example
46 11 16 47.21 17 12 x 21 48.31 26 +.

A. Schwarzman J. van den Akker


An immediate 35 30 would be met by 17 22
(20 24 44 39 24 x 35 28 22 W+) 28 x 17
12 x 21 31 26 20 24 =.
37.31 26!

43.31 27 23 29
44.28 23!
After 44 17 x 39 45.23 x 43 white stays a
piece behind with an inferior position, so he
resigned.

Blacks problem is that he cant change 37


17 21 38.26 x 17 12 x 21 because of 39.35
30! W+
He should have defended his position playing
37 20 24 38.37 31 8 13! 39.44 39 23
29. This defence playing the odd 8 13 in
stead of 9 13 is based on tactics using the 9 /
13 formation.
40.42 37 is met by the coup Philippe 24 30!
25 x 23 18 x 29 33 x 24 19 x 30 35 x 24 16
21 27 x 16 6 11 16 x 18 13 x 44.

Classics

134

Black to move
Black has the podkowa construction (see
lesson 6: Surrounding the centre) 17 / 18 / 19 /
21 / 24 encircling whites centre. Black wont
go to 23 but to <22> freezing the opponent out.
1 25 30!
2.43 38 18 22!

Woldouby

Threatening 24 29 35 x 24 19 x 30 B+. In
spite of whites central pyramid he is hemmed
in completely.
3.28 23 19 x 28
4.32 x 23 13 18
5.23 x 12 17 x 8

Only five pieces each remain, but white is


without a chance Try to convince yourself
that white has no good defence left.

Classics

135

9 40.34 30 25 x 34 41.39 x 30 and black can


defend the position.

4.Ghestem lock

39.44 40! 24 29
In a closed classical position with the
opponent having an arrow (16 / 21 / 26),
white can sometimes play 28 22! with a
Ghestem lock, taking away space from the
opponent.

Black must go to the graveyard, otherwise


white plays 38 33 and black is frozen out
quickly, for example 8 12 38 33 3 9 43
38 9 14 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 29 W+.
40.35 30 20 24
41.40 35 29 x 40
42.45 x 34 3 9

P. Ghestem M. Raichenbach
Wch match 1945
33.34 30 20 25
An immediate 33.28 22? would not have
been correct because black gets a huge
advantage playing 24 29 x 29!
Now white can use his free moves to make the
Ghestem-lock (or sortie Ghestem in French).
34.28 22! 25 x 34
35.40 x 20 15 x 24
36.33 28 10 14

White can play 43.38 33 8 12 44.22 17! 9


14 45.17 x 8 13 x 2 46.43 38 2 8 47.34
29! 23 x 25 48.28 23 19 x 39 49.38 33 39 x
28 50.32 x 3 21 x 41 51.3 x 36 +
43.43 39 9 14
After 43 8 12 white shouldnt play 44.39
33 since after 12 17! 45.22 x 11 16 x 7 46.27
x 16 7 12 it is a drawing position. 43.. 8 12
should be met by 44.22 17!
44.39 33 8 12
45.22 17! 23 29
46.17 x 8 29 x 40
47.35 x 44 13 x 2
48.28 22 24 x 35
49.22 x 24

White has blocked the left wing. Next step is


getting control over the other wing.
37.39 34! 14 20
38.49 44! 2 8?
Black loses control over <25> now. Therefore
he should have played 20 25 39.44 39 3

Classics

A. Gantwarg N. Zadin

136

This position has occurred in several games. If


white plays on 45.34 30 8 12 46.39 34 12
17 we have a symmetrical classical position
which is a draw. White uses the method of
Ghestem to win the game.

Dirod = + 7. White wanted to control both


wings, but black finds space in the centre by
taking the Ghestem-lock.

45.28 22! 8 12

White should have broken the classical


structure by 39 33 23 29 44 39 18 23
28 22 17 x 28 33 x 22. After 12 17 22 x 11
16 x 7 the position then is still better for black.

Best chance for black to draw is 24 29 33 x


24 19 x 30 35 x 24 23 28 etc.
Now 46.22 17 23 29 = or 46.33 28? 23
29= is not sufficient. White has a sacrifice that
appears to be the road to success.

sensible

reply

2.44 40
2.39 33 18 23 3.27 22 is answered by 17
21! 4.26 x 17 12 x 21 5.31 26 1 7 6.26 x
17 7 12 and black has a winning position as
you can investigate yourself.

46.35 30! 24 x 35
47.22 17!
Black had no
surrendered.

1.37 31 23 29!

left

and
2 18 23
White cant play 27 22 because of 16 21!
22 x 11 12 17 11 x 22 21 27 32 x 21 23 x
45 B+, so he is frozen out after 3.39 33 12
18 4.48 43 8 12 5.43 39 1 7 etc. B+.

A. Baljakin B. Ba
Normal play like 39 33 12 17 47 41 17
22 etc. will not yield a positive result. The
Ghestem-lock does guarantee a quick win.
The Ghestem-lock will win the game in an
astonishing way.

1.28 22!
Because 23 29 39 33 18 23 33 28 12
18 47 41 is a dead end, black is forced to
play 1 24 29 2.47 41! 29 34 3.30 24!
Hammering in a second nail at <24>.
34 x 43 4.38 x 49 19 x 30 5.35 x 24 W+.

1.28 22! 9 13
2.33 29! 24 x 33
3.39 x 28 14 20
4.44 39 20 24
5.39 33 24 29
6.33 x 24 19 x 39
7.28 x 8 39 43
8.22 x 13 43 48
It looks like the game will be drawn, but white
has a nice shot, catching blacks king.
9.32 28!! 48 x 25
10. 8 2 35 x 8
11.2 x 13

P. Schellekens B. Messemaker

Classics

137

31.50 44? 8 12
32.38 33? 29 x 38
33.42 x 33 23 29!
34.48 42 29 x 38
35.42 x 33 11 17!
36.22 x 11 6 x 17
White resigned! Black threatens to play 14
20 25 x 23 13 18 30 x 19 18 x 38 32 x 43 21
x 14 B+1. If white had played 31.50 45 things
wouldnt have been as bad, since white can
play to the graveyard in that case. But now
there is a piece at 44, 37.27 22 will be
punished by 37 19 23!!

P. Roozenburg R. Keller
This position has occurred in several games.
1.39 34! 17 21
2.28 22! 24 29?
Black can hold a draw playing 2 14 20
1) 3.38 33 23 29 4.34 x 25 12 17 5.30 x 8
17 x 48 =.
2) 3.30 25 24 29 4.25 x 14 29 x 40 5.35 x
44 19 x 10 6.43 39 10 15! =.
3.43 39 29 x 40
4.35 x 44 14 20

K. Thijssen J.M. Ndjofang


White freezes his opponent out by making a
nice sacrifice.
5.38 33 20 24
6.33 28! 24 x 35
7.39 34

White creates more space by taking the


Ghestem-lock.
31.28 22! 5 10
31 12 17 32.22 x 11 6 x 17 33.27 22 17 x
28 34.33 x 22 5 10 35.32 27 21 x 32 36.38
x 27 gives white a great position. He can try to
exploit blacks weak pieces 10 and 8.
32.33 28 10 15?
This was the right moment to neutralize the
Ghestem-lock playing 12 17 33.22 x 11 6 x
17 =. White cant play 34.27 22? due to 26
31! 35.37 x 26 24 29 36.22 x 11 16 x 7 37.27
x 16 29 33 38.38 x 18 13 x 44 B+.

A. Baljakin A. Chizhov
World championship 1996

33.39 33 12 18
34.43 39 6 11

27 23 29
28.34 x 23 18 x 29
29.28 22 12 18
30.33 28 18 23

Black cant play at his right wing anymore.


Without the Ghestem-lock you can often keep
playing at this wing a long time, getting a piece
at 17 and changing back 17 22 x 12 etc. But
white has taken the space away from black to
play at his right wing.

Both players have played the Ghestem move.


White should have continued 37 31 26 x 37
42 x 31 with an interesting fight, but with his
next two moves he chooses a wrong plan.

Classics

35.41 36 23 29
36.45 40 18 23
37.39 34 3 8

138

38.36 31 15 20

White goes to <23> with a strong centre attack


because of blacks weakened left wing with the
awful, dangling piece at <20>.
39.22 18
40.34 x 23
41.27 22
42.22 x 11
43.11 6
44.37 x 26
45.26 21
46.32 x 21
In time trouble
black escaped
played 47.21
49.30 x 10 37
endgame.

23 x 12
11 17
21 27
27 x 36
26 31
36 41
16 x 27
41 46

In this Ghestem position white can make a


surprising shot, in which black can choose how
to take, but will always lose.
Exercise 4.2 The first move of the shot is 1.34
29!
Write down how white wins after the different
possibilities for black.

white spoilt the endgame and


with a draw. He should have
16 46 37 48.28 22 19 x 17
x 5 50.25 x 3 with a winning

Pierre Ghestem
N. Samb A. Schwarzman
Exercise 4.1 Black played 38 29 34?
Which nice combination did white perform
now?

Classics

139

5.Tactics

3) 39 18 23 40.33 29 24 x 22 41.27 x 7
W+

Sacrifices are very important to look for in


classical positions.

4) 39 9 14 40.34 29 15 20 41.31 26
12 17 42.48 42 17 22 43.26 x 17 22 x 31
44.30 25 (18 22 45.29 23 22 x 11 46.23
18) W+.
5) 39 15 20 will result in the same variation
as above.

Black to move can easily go wrong by playing


the logical 1 13 18. White has a winning
sacrifice: 2.28 22! 17 x 28 3.38 33 26 31
4.33 x 13 31 x 42 5.32 28! W+.
Black can still manage to make a draw playing
1 26 31! Two variations:

A. Chizhov A. Keisels

1) 2.37 x 26 13 18 3.39 34
3.39 33 23 29 4.28 23 =
3 24 29 4.30 24 19 x 39 5.28 x 10 39
44 =

Dirod = -13. White uses tactics to freeze black


out.

2) 2.27 x 36 21 27 3.32 x 12 23 x 34 4.30 x


39 13 18 5.12 x 23 19 x 28 and in spite of
one piece more white cant win.

Black cant take 24 29 33 x 24 19 x 39 28 x


19 13 x 24 because of 37 31! 26 x 28 49
44 21 x 32 44 x 4 W+.

33.39 33! 9 14

34.42 38 14 20
34 8 12 (with the idea to change 23 29 x
29) is met by the coup Raphael 34 29 23 x
34 28 23 19 x 39 37 31 26 x 28 50 44 21
x 43 44 x 22 18 x 27 48 x 6 W+,
35.28 22!
The Ghestem lock! After 35 20 25 36.33
28 black will soon be frozen out.
O. Dijkstra E.J. de Bruijn
Black has just gone astray by playing 37 8
12? White could have forced a win with 38.37
31! 26 x 37 39.42 x 31 and now:
1) 39 21 26 40.28 23! 26 x 39 41.23 x 3
W+
2) 39 12 17 40.28 23 19 x 26 41.30 x 8
21 x 32 42.8 3! W+

Classics

140

Exercise 5.1 How is the logical 34 30 move


punished by black?

H. van der Zee M. Kemperman

White has a beautiful shot in this position.


Black is offered two kings.
1.28 22! 17 x 28
2.37 31! 26 x 46
Black can take in four different ways, but it
doesnt matter how he captures. Black gets
kings at 46 and 48 anyway.
3.25 20 28 x 48
4.20 x 9 13 x 4
5.38 32 46 x 28
6.30 25 48 x 30
7.35 x 2

The position after 47.30 25? has occurred in


many games, like Raichenbach Ghestem
World Championship 1945. Black could have
won playing a double sacrifice in order to
attack piece 27.
47 14 20!! 48.25 x 14 19 x 10 49.28 x 30
17 22 and black wins! But white can use the
same idea to draw the position.
47.37 31! 26 x 37
48.32 x 41 23 x 21
49.34 29 14 20
50.30 25
50 19 23 51.25 x 14 23 x 34 results in a
draw.

Exercise 5.3 How does white force a win?


Black has played the Ghestem-move 23 29.
Exercise 5.2 White takes a shot to <4>! How?

Classics

141

2.31 26 10 15
3.26 x 17 12 x 21
4.28 22
White has several tactical manoeuvres at his
disposal. He threatens to take the next shot: 32
28!! ad lib. 40 x 9 21 x 41 (or 23 x 41) 9 4
18 x 27 4 x 47 +.
This means 6 11, 8 12 and 21 26 cant be
played.
After 4 15 20 5.40 35 two variations:
Exercise 5.4 How does white win after 1 23
29?

1) After 5 6 11 white has the typical idea of


6.37 31 21 26 7.22 17 26 x 28 8.17 x 6
W+.
2) 5 8 12 6.22 17 (this is also played
after 5 21 26) 21 26 7.17 x 8 13 x 2 8.35
30 24 x 35 9.37 31 26 x 28 10.33 x 15 W+
4 14 20
5.25 x 14 19 x 10
After 6.33 28 24 30! 7.28 x 19 13 x 24 8.22
x 2 30 35 9.2 x 30 35 x 22 black can still
fight.
White however has a better way to finish the
game.

Exercise 5.5 White controls both wings! How


does white force a win?

6.39 34! 21 26
C) What kingshot did white perform finishing
off the game?

A. Mogilianski L. Kats

V. Wirny R. Heusdens
37.37 31 8 12
38.31 26?

Exercise 5.6 Answer the questions!


A) Which piece of black is weak?

White could have played 38.39 34! Black


then cant take the 24 29 or 24 30 shot,
because his own king will be trapped (check
this yourself!). 38.39 34 21 26 39.34 29
23 x 34 40.40 x 29 26 x 37 41.32 x 41 gives
white an advantage.

1.42 37
B) White threatens with a shot. Which shot?

38 12 17 39.27 22?

1 17 21

Classics

142

Exercise 5.7 How did black win now?

B. van Straaten R. Wijpkema

Exercise 5.8 White has a winning shot at his


disposal. After whites king is caught opposition
remains.

White can take a kingshot 34 29 23 x 45 28


23 19 x 28 33 x 2 but the king is caught by 25
30 2 x 19 24 x 13 =. Giving a couple of
pieces more will make the shot winning. White
didnt look at this possibility and missed the
shot.
1.27 21! 16 x 36
2.34 29 23 x 45
3.47 41 36 x 47
4.28 23 19 x 28
5.33 x 2 47 x 44
6. 2 x 49

L. Slobodskoi W. Chogoliev
Sacrifices can be a strong weapon in classics.
36.25 20! 24 x 15
37.35 30 3 8?
Black should have given back the piece
playing 17 22 38.28 x 8 13 x 2. White cant
play 39.33 28 because of the 18 22 19
23 16 21 7 12 2 x 44 shot. After 39.33 29
he has an advantage.

In this game situation white didnt take the


possible king shot to <2> because it looks like
the king is caught and white loses a piece.
Another player, G. Boom walked by and later
showed a surprising idea:
21.28 22
22.39 33
23.38 33
24.27 21
25.42 x 2

38.34 29 23 x 25
39.27 22 18 x 27
40.32 x 21 16 x 27
41.28 23 19 x 28
42.33 x 2
White won the game after 25 30 43.2 16 30
35 44.16 x 32 35 40 45.39 34 40 x 29
46.43 39 15 20 47.32 41 20 24 48.41
47! 29 34 49.39 x 19 13 x 24 50.47 29 12
17 51.26 21! 17 x 26 52.32 27 W+.

Classics

17 x 28
28 x 39
39 x 28
16 x 38
11 16

It looks like the king is caught, bit white makes


a brilliant shot.

143

26.25 20! 14 x 25
27.35 30 24 x 44
28.2 x 30! 25 x 34
29.49 x 7

Exercise 5.11 How can white take advantage


of the gaps in blacks position?

Position from a blitz game form the famous


tactical player and world champion Andris
Andreiko. After his opponent played 24 29?
Andreiko took a nice shot.
Exercise 5.9 What did he play?

W. van der Wijk F. Guseynov


Exercise 5.12 White tried to get a left wing
attack from the classical position. But after 21
16 black took a shot!

White played 35 30 24 x 35 33 29
Exercise 5.10
sacrifice?

How did black punish this

M. Viel D. Smidstra
Exercise 5.13 How did white win with a shot?

Classics

144

A. Marterere L. Lurosso
Exercise 5.14 Black to move forced a win.
How did the Italian player win?

Piet Roozenburg (1945)

P. Roozenburg
Exercise 5.15 Black has no control over <24>.
White can force a win!

T. Sijbrands J. Simonata
Exercise 5.16 Black has no control over <24>.
White can force a win!

Classics

145

34 14 19! black takes all strategic squares


because 34 29 is punished by 19 23! B+.

6.Surrounding the centre

43.44 40 9 13!
44.39 34 will be answered by the kingshot 24
30 35 x 24 19 x 39 33 x 44 22 x 33 38 x 29
14 20 25 x 14 4 9 14 x 3 21 26 3 x 21 16
x 47 B+.
44.40 34 14 20!
45.25 x 23 24 29
46.33 x 24 22 x 44
Black won after a couple of moves.

J. Metz H. Wiersma
White has just changed back 34 29 x 39.
Playing 18 23 with a closed classical position
again will not yield any positive result for black.
Black switched to the plan of surrounding his
opponents centre using the tactics available.
40 3 9!
This is better than 4 9 for tactical reasons.
Moreover, piece 4 protects blacks left wing.
41.39 34 is answered by the kingshot 24
30! 35 x 24 19 x 39 33 x 44 18 22 27 x 18 13
x 33 38 x 29 14 20 25 x 3 21 26 3 x 21 16 x
47 B+.
White cant play 42 37 because of a coup
Philippe. Sacrificing 41.27 22 18 x 27 42.42
37 is answered by 27 31 43.37 x 26 13 18
44.39 34 18 23! and black wins for
example after 34 30 9 13 49 43 13 18
43 39 23 29 etc. B+.

Podkowa
This diagram shows a well-known structure to
surround the centre. Podkowa (or podkova) is
the Russian word for hoof (horse shoe). The
central structure 13 / 18 / 19 / 23 is weak.
White always has two important plans: Playing
33 29 or 33 28. 33 29 surround the
centre, 33 28 leads to a classical position.

41.49 44 18 22!
42.27 x 18 13 x 22
Helped by the shot after 39 34 by 21 27! 32
x 12 9 13 28 x 17 13 18 12 x 23 19 x 50 17
12 45 50 B+ black begins the surrounding
of whites centre.

R. Vogelaar D. Merkus
Black built a nice hoof. Piece 25 gives extra
control over the right wing. White has lost
control over <27>.

42.42 37 9 13 (even better than 24 29) is


losing for white too: After 43.28- 23 19 x 28
44.32 x 23 13 18 45.23 x 12 17 x 8 46.39

Classics

44.38 32 18 22!
45.33 29
White is lost:

146

1) 45.48 43 8 12 46.31 26 12 18 47.33


29* 24 x 33 48.28 x 39 19 24 49.39 33
(49.45 40 18 23 50.40 34 24 29!
followed by 22 28 B+) 18 23 50.43 38 23
29! 51.45 40 25 30! 52.32 28 21 27!
B+

After 3 14 20 4.25 x 14 19 x 10 5.28 x 19


13 x 24 6.34 30 3 9 7.30 x 19 9 13 white
wins by 8.43 39 13 x 24 9.37 31 W+.
3 15 20 4.33 29! leads to a deadly chainlock.
4.43 38 17 22
5.28 x 17 21 x 12

2) 45.48 42 8 12 46.42 37 12 18
47.33 29 24 x 33 48.28 x 39 19 24 49.45
40 18 23 50.39 34(!) (50.40 34 24 29
B+; 50.39 33 25 30 B+) 22 28! 51.31
27 (51.31 26 17 22 52.26 x 17 22 x 11
53.32 27 28 33 54.37 32 11 17 +) 21
26 and now two variations:
2.1) 52.27 21 17 22 53.21 16 28 33!
and because 54.16 11 loses to 22 27 white
has to give too many pieces.
2.2) 52.27 22 17 21! 53.22 x 33 21 27
54.32 x 21 26 x 17 55.37 32 17 22 ! and
with one piece less black wins, for example
56.33 28 22 x 33 57.32 27 33 38 58.27
22 38 43 59.22 17 43 49 B+.
45 24 x 33
46.28 x 39 8 12!
47.48 42?!
After 47.31 26 12 18! 48 42 19 24
white wins as shown before. White is setting a
trap for his opponent, but he is smarted out.
47 25 30!!
48.35 x 13 21 27
49.32 x 21 17 x 48
50.39 33 48 31

Since piece 28 is gone, white can use the


podkowa-plan, surrounding the centre.
6.33 29!
Threatening 27 22, while 23 28 32 x 23 19
x 28 enables white to force gaining a piece by
38 32! 13 19 32 x 23 19 x 28 37 31! 26 x
37 42 x 31 and the threat 27 21 cant be
parried.
6 12 17
7.37 31! 26 x 28
8.27 22 18 x 27
9.29 x 20 15 x 24
10.25 20 24 x 15
11.38 33 28 x 30
12.35 x 2
A nice and very practical combination.

J. Lemstra A. Zandberg
Exchanging piece 29 is the beginning of a
good, tactical podkowa/plan.
1.40 34! 29 x 40
2.45 x 34 10 14
3.38 33! 11 17

F. Fennema C. van Leeuwen


Black to move can take profit of the gaps in
whites position.
1 16 21!

Classics

147

White cant attack piece 21 by 31 27?


because of 20 24 29 B+.
2.43 38 18 22
Black takes the podkowa. White has lost
control over 27. A Piece at <16> isnt
necessary in this situations.
3.44 39 12 18!
D. Edelenbos J. Haga
An immediate 33 29 doesnt work, because
black simply replies 19 24 x 24. Therefore
white prepares this move.
1.35 30! 9 14
2.33 29! 6 11

Threatening to take a chain-lock by 18 23.


A logical reply would be 4.34 29 20 24!
5.29 x 20 15 x 24 6.39 34 14 20 7.31 26
After 7 34 29 20 25 8.29 x 20 15 x 14
9.35 30 14 20 followed by 18 23 with a
deadly chain-lock.
7 22 27! 8.34 29 18 23 9.29 x 18 13 x
22 10.40 34 20 25 11.34 29 25 30!!
12.29 x 20 30 34 and after this brilliant
sacrifice white is frozen out completely.
4.28 23 18 x 29
5.34 x 23 19 x 28
6.32 x 23 13 19!
7.38 32 19 x 28
8.32 x 23 20 24
9.40 34 14 19!
10.23 x 14 9 x 20

In the game black played 23 28 32 x 23 19 x


28 38 32! 13 19 32 x 23 19 x 28 37 31 26
x 37 42 x 31 W+. It is interesting to analyse the
position. Black doesnt need to fear 27 22
yet.
3.50 44 11 17
4.44 39 17 21
After 4 17 22 5.39 33 22 x 31 6.36 x
27 black has no good move left.
4 14 20 is punished by 5.37 31 & 6.27
22 W+.
5.38 33 12 17
5 14 20 is met by 37 31 26 x 28 33 x 22
21 x 32 42 37 etc. W+.

Black gets a very strong attack. White cant


stop a breakthrough.
11.34 30 24 29
12.33 x 24 20 x 29
13.37 32 29 34
14.32 28 22 x 44
15.30 x 50 17 22
White surrendered.

6.48 43 17 22
7.43 38 22 x 31
8.36 x 27 8 12
9.30 25 12 17
10.27 22 17 x 28
11.33 x 22 18 x 27
12.29 x 20 15 x 24
13.39 33 19 23
14.25 20 24 x 15
15.33 29
And white will be winning.

Classics

148

Flits J. Krajenbrink

J. Okken J. Sysel

In order to surround blacks position white has


to stop both 23 28 and 21 27.

White is going to build a typical construction:


the 30 / 34 / 35 arch combined with the 33 / 38
/ 42 tail.

1.38 32!
1.34 30! 15 20
2.39 34 20 25
3.48 42! 6 11

Exercise 6.1 Answer the questions:


A) How does white win after 1 15 20?
After 1 13 19 2.42 37! 15 20 3.37 31
21 26 white wins tactically.

Piece 47 is needed for defending the piece at


27.

B) How is white winning?

After 3 3 9 4.33 29 24 x 33 5.38 x 29


18 22 6.27 x 18 23 x 12 7.29 23 19 x 28
8.32 x 23 13 18 9.23 19 white keeps
attacking at the right wing.

1 8 12
2.30 24 12 17
3.47 41 17 22
4.41 36

4.33 29! 24 x 33
5.38 x 29 11 17
6.43 39 3 9
7.29 24!
Not allowing black to retreat by playing 18
22.
7 21 26
8.39 33 8 12?

Blacks position is over-developed. Therefore


he loses control over <27>. Three variations
suffice to show this:
1) 4. 22 28 5.42 37 21 26 6.34 30
W+
2) 4 22 27 5.42 38 21 26 6.32 x 21 26
x 17 7.38 32 17 22 (17 21 36 31 21
26 31 27 +) 8.32 27 22 x 31 9.36 x 27 23
28 10.34 30 W+

A better defence would have been 17 22


9.47 41 22 x 31 10.41 36 8 12 11.36 x
27 12 17 12.33 28 9 14 13.42 38 16
21! 14.27 x 16 18 22 15.38 33 22 27
16.32 x 12 23 x 41 etc.
9.33 28 17 21
10.28 22! 9 14
11.22 17
And white won.

3) 4 21 26 5.32 27 22 x 31 6.36 x 27 23
28 7.34 30 W+

Classics

149

13. 1 6 39 43
13.37 32! 26 x 28
14.6 x 48 13 19
15.48 34
And black surrendered.

V. Tomass J. Depaepe
Wch Youth. 2002
1.48 42 14 19?
This is a bad move, building the weak 13/ 18 /
19 / 12 construction. Much more flexible is 14
20 after which piece 13 can still play.

E. van Hierden S. Buurke


Exercise 6.2 Black to move has a winning
plan to freeze white out. Try to find it!

2.33 29! 24 x 33
3.38 x 29 6 11
4.35 30 3 9
5.29 24!
A typical podkowa-move, preventing the 18
22 retreat.
5 9 14 6.42 37!!

L. Schnieders M. Sanders
1.33 29 2 8
A brilliant move, freezing black out in a very
special way. 642 38? 11 16! 7.38 33
16 21! 8.27 x 16 18 22! would have led to
no more than a draw.
6 11 17
7.41 36 17 22
8.36 31 22 28
White has calculated this position. In the
endgame he benefits from the locked piece at
26 which will be used for a shot.
9.34 29 23 x 25
10.32 x 12 19 x 30
11.12 7 30 34
12. 7 1 34 39

Classics

More flexible is 1.30 25 and hoping for a


future moment to play the 33 29 surroundingmove.
2.39 33 20 24?
This is a classical mistake in such positions.
Black changes much too early to <24>. It is
better to wait playing 20 24 x 24, because
white has to make difficult decisions.
After 27... 21 26 28.41 36 6 11 white
cant wait any longer and should play 29.30
25! After 11 17 30.25 x 14 black cant take 9
x 20 because of the 29 24 19 x 28 27 22
18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 37 32 28 x 37 42 x 2
W+. She should take back with 30 19 x 10
and the game goes on.

150

33.31 26! 22 x 31
34.36 x 27 20 25

29.33 29! 24 x 33
30.38 x 29 9 14
31.42 38!

Blacks centre isnt strong. Piece 15 is weak


and he has no control over <9> and no active
formations. White builds the characteristic 30 /
34 / 35 arch.
35.34 30
36.39 x 30
37.45 40
38.40 34

Escaping the podkowa by playing 31.. 23 28


32.32 x 23 19 x 28 is not satisfactory for black
after 33.29 24! 21 x 32 34.38 x 27 with
advantage for white, for example 3 9 35.30
25 14 19 36.34 30 9 14 37.43 38 7
11
After 6 11? 38.48 42! white has a winning
position, for example 18 23 39.27 21! 16 x
27 40.38 32 27 x 38 41.42 x 22 W+.
38.48 42 11 17 39.27 22! 18 x 27 40.24
20! 13 18! 41.20 x 9 19 24 42.30 x 19 27
32! 43.38 x 27 8 13 44.19 x 8 12 x 14 45.35
30 with a better endgame for white.
After 31.3 9 white gets a terrific podkowa:
32.38 33 21 26 33.43 39 7 11 34.30
24! 19 x 30 35.35 x 24
Threatening 24 19 followed by 37 31 etc.
35 14 19 36.24 20 11 17
36 9 14 37.20 x 9 13 x 4 is punished by 37
31! W+.
37.20 15 9 14 38.29 24 19 x 30 39.34 x
25 17 21 40.39 34 6 11 41.34 30 11
17 42.33 28 W+.

25 x 34
2 7
15 20
20 25

39.38 32!
A perfect move. White doesnt hurry to play 33
29 x 29 after which black can escape the
podkowa buy 23 28! Therefore she first
eliminates the possible 23 28 escape.
39 6 11
40.43 38 11 17
41.33 29 24 x 33
42.38 x 29 17 21
43.26 x 17 12 x 21
44.29 24 8 13
45.42 38 7 12
46.38 33

In spite of whites podkowa, black can still


defend the position playing 46 21 26!

Alchul Michailovskaja
A semi-fork is often used as a means to get a
podkowa surrounding. The surrounding plan
starts with breaking the semi-fork.

Classics

1) 47.33 28 16 21! 48.27 x 16 26 31


49.41 36 31 37 50.32 x 41 23 x 32 51.41
37 32 x 41 52.36 x 47 12 17 and in spite of
one piece less black holds the draw.

151

2) 47.41 37 12 17 48.33 28 17 21
49.34 29 25 x 34 50.29 x 40 19 x 30 51.28 x
8 18 23 52.35 x 24 23 28 53.32 x 23 21 x
41 =.

36.31 26 22 x 31
37.36 x 27 6 11
38.33 28 11 17

46 12 17
47.33 28 21 26
With the next manoeuvre white takes al
strategic squares.
48.34 29! 23 x 34
49.30 x 39 19 x 30
50.35 x 24
Exercise 6.3 White performed a kingshot. Try
to find it!
Lets play 38 5 10 for black and continue
with 39.38 33
Exercise 6.4 How does white win after 39
10 14 or 39 11 17?

50 16 21
51.27 x 16 18 22
52.39 33 26 31
53.41 37! 31 x 42
54.33 29 22 x 33
55.29 x 47
Black surrendered.

T. Goedemoed P. Hoopman
White can play 31 26 22 x 31 36 x 27 17 22
33 29 etc. but he has an even stronger plan,
after which black can hardly escape from
losing.
37.48 42 1 6
The best defence consists of 20 25 followed
by 3 9.

N. Mistsjanski V. Zvirbulis

38.33 28 22 x 33
39.38 x 29 6 11

After piece 29 is exchanged white can


surround blacks centre.
30.40 34 29 x 40
31.45 x 34 10 14
32.39 33 14 19
33.33 29! 12 18
34.38 33 11 17
35.42 38 17 22

Its too late for 20 25 now: 40.31 26 3 9


41.29 24! 9 14 42.42 38 23 29
42 17 22 43.38 33 22 x 31 44.36 x 27 is
a dead end for black.
40.42 38 20 25

Classics

152

40 17 22 41.31 26 22 x 31
42.36 x 27 3 9 43.30 25 19 24 44.25 x 3
24 x 42 45.32 28 23 x 21 46.26 x 6 gives a
bad endgame for black.

White breaks his own semi-fork in order to


surround blacks centre. After 23 28 48.30
24 19 x 30 49.35 x 24 17 22 50.43 38 22 x
31 51.26 x 37 white wins piece 28.

41.38 33

47 17 22
48.43 38 22 x 31

The podkowa is like a cord around blacks


neck.
41 17 22
42.31 26 22 x 31
43.36 x 27 11 17
44.33 28 3 8
White finishes the game with a manoeuvre
known from the Alchul Michailovskaja game.
45.29 24 8 12
46.34 29 23 x 34
47.30 x 39 19 x 30
48.35 x 24
White has taken all strategic squares and black
has no chance to defend. After 16 21 27 x 16
18 22 39 33 12 18 32 27 22 x 31 26 x
37 black resigned.

Hans Jansen alias The Mystic

49 15 20?
H. Jansen J. Stokkel
49 16 21 50.38 32 21 26 51.32 27 23
28 52.30 24 19 x 30 53.35 x 24 looks lost
for black, but after 53 15 20! 54.24 x 15 13
19 white cant win!

43.41 36 17 21
44.42 38 21 x 32
45.38 x 27 12 17
46.31 26 22 x 31
47.36 x 27

50.38 32 20 24

Classics

153

50 16 21 51.37 31 21 26 52.31 27 20
24 53.29 x 20 25 x 14 54.30 24 19 x 30
55.35 x 24 14 19 56.34 30 W+.
51.29 x 20 25 x 14
52.32 27 14 20
Exercise Show how white wins after 52. 23
28.

2.36 31! 29 x 40
3.35 x 44 26 x 37
4.42 x 31 15 20
5.31 26
After 20 25 6.48 43 25 x 34 7.27 22 18 x
27 8.32 x 12 23 x 32 9.38 x 27 19 24 10.27
22 white has good chances to win.

53.37 32
Both 53 20 24 54.39 33 W+ and 53 20
25 54.30 24 19 x 30 55.35 x 24 lose. Black
resigned.
Sometimes in a podkowa position
instead of playing 33 29 you can play
33 28 with wing control!
R. Cousijnsen T. Goedemoed
In the next diagram we will see an example of
this strategy.

After 38.31 26 12 17 39.39 33 black


would have played 39 20 24 (39 18 23
is also good) 40.41 37 18 23!! 41.42 38
13 18 42.45 40 14 20 43.25 x 14 9 x 20
44.40 34 20 25 45.37 31 3 8 and white
is frozen out completely. A nice way to win!
38.42 37 21 26
39.39 33

G. Kolk K. Posthumus
White has built the podkowa structure.
Because of the weak piece at 15 and the lack
of formations at blacks other wing, white has
several plans. The plan to go to <29> doesnt
work here. 1.33 29 24 x 33 2.38 x 29 17 22
gives white nothing. Black will attack <27>
again.
Much better is 1.27 21 which forces black to
play 3 9 2.21 x 12 18 x 7 3.33 29 24 x 33
4.38 x 18 13 x 22 6.34 29 with a good
attacking position.
But there is another important plan: taking
control over the wings in a closed classical
game.
1.33 28! 24 29
1 26 31 2.27 22 simply wins a piece for
white. After 1 15 20 2.48 42 the 27 22
threat cant be parried anymore.

Classics

39.41 36 20 24 40.45 40 3 8 also loses:


white cant play 41.40 34 because of the
coup Philippe while after 41.39 33 3 8
42.45 40 12 17 white must flee to a bad
endgame with 43.33 29 24 x 22 44.32 28
22 x 33 45.27 21 16 x 27 46.31 x 11, since
43.40 34 fails due to 24 30 44.35 x 24 19 x
39 45.33 x 44 18 22 B+.
39 12 17
40.45 40 20 24
41.41 36 17 21
The arrow lock is decisive here.
42.28 22 18 23
White resigned already. After 43.33 28 both
43 3 8 44.40 34 24 30 etc. B+ and
43 14 20 44.25 x 14 9 x 20 45.40 34 24
29!
45 20 25? fails to 22 17 & 34 29 W+
46.34 30 20 24!
46 20 25? fails to 47.22 17 & 28 22
18 =
47.30 25 3 9 B+ win.

154

42.45 40 23 29
43.40 35 20 25
44.48 43 3 9
The march of the golden piece will be decisive.
45.46 41 9 14
46.41 37 14 20
47.37 31 25 30
48.43 39
C. van der Tak J. Krajenbrink
The black player in the former game
recognized a strategy performed in the game
we are going to see now, by famous draughts
trainer Johan Krajenbrink. This shows how
much you can profit from studying games and
strategies of other players!
35 13 19
36.34 29 8 13
37.29 x 20 15 x 24
38.31 26

Black could have finished the job making the


pseudo sacrifice 48 30 34! 49.39 x 30 20
25 +. In the game he won the endgame after
48 20 25 49.28 22 etc.

38 18 23!
Black gained space at his left wing after the
weak 36.34 29. Because white misses
pieces at 37 and 39 his centre has no power at
all. Therefore black can freeze out his
opponent, using the locked pieces 16 / 17 / 21
for his own benefit. Because piece 46 stays
behind this lock is not economic.

Exercise 6.5 How can white force a win?

39.36 31 14 20
40.25 x 14 9 x 20
Taking more and more space at his left wing.
41.31 27 13 18
42.48 43 23 29 43.43 39 29 34! 44.39 x
30 24 x 35 45.33 29 19 24 46.38 33 24
30 47.28 23 20 25 48.23 x 12 17 x 8 49.26
x 17 35 40 50.45 x 34 30 x 37 B+.

Classics

Exercise 6.6 How can white force a win?

155

Classics

156

7.The surrounding fails


A podkowa will not always lead to a successful
surrounding of course. Especially if the
opponents centre is strong, sometimes things
work against the podkowa-player.

T. Goedemoed D. Slotboom

M. Korenevski V. Agafonov
Blacks centre is too strong to be surrounded. If
he plays 1 14 20? white gets his
surrounding by 2.33 29!
At 1 11 17 white plays 2.33 28!
Black however uses an important sacrifice to
strip down whites position:
1 23 28!
2.33 x 22 19 23
After this sacrifice black threatens to make a
breakthrough by 11 17 22 x 11 16 x 7 27 x
16 23 28 32 x 23 18 x 40.
White could have escaped miraculously
playing 37 31 26 x 48 16 11 48 x 19 11 x 2
40 45 36 31 45 50 38 32 19 x 26 2 x 10
=.
3.36 31 11 17
4.22 x 11 16 x 7
5,27 x 16 23 28
6.32 x 23 18 x 40
7.39 34 40 x 29
8.31 27
In the game 8 13 18? was played, but we
show the strongest play for black.

Black has built the pokdowa in order to


surround whites centre, but the centre is too
strong. Pieces 36 / 37 / 42 / 48 give control
over <27>. White wanted to play 45 40
followed by 34 29 but spotted a tactical
possibility for black: 31.45 40 15 20! 32.34
29 21 27! 33.32 x 23 4 10 34.28 x 17 19
x 39 35.30 x 19 14 x 45 36.25 x 14 10 x 19
B+ .
31.45 40 15 20 32.37 31 18 23 leads to
a dangling piece at <40>.
31.34 29 5 10
32.29 x 20 15 x 24
33.45 40 22 27
Black still wanted to win the game. He should
however have defended his position however,
playing 33 18 23 34.40 34 21 27 35.32
x 12 23 x 43 36.48 x 39 22 28 37.33 x 22 24
29 38.34 x 23 19 x 8 with a small advantage
for white.
After the dangerous 33 9 13 34.40 34
black shouldnt play 3 9? 35.34 29 10 15
36.29 x 20 15 x 24 37.28 23 19 x 39 38.30 x
8 and 39 44 is punished by 25 20 14 x 25
35 30 25 x 34 32 28 22 x 33 38 x 49 +.
34 4 9 is also better for white after 35.37
31 3 8 36.31 26.
The timing of 22 27? is wrong. Blacks wings
are not backed by pieces in the centre. It takes
too long to transport piece 3 to <18>.
34.37 31 18 22

8 13 19
9.37 32 14 20
10.30 25 20 24
With a winning breakthrough for black.

Classics

157

White can perform a simple plan by 35.40 34


3 8 36.34 29 10 15 37.29 x 20 15 x 24
38.33 29! 24 x 33* 39.28 x 39 8 12 40.31
26 and his position is superior. After 22 28
11.32 x 23 19 x 28 12.38 33 28 32 13.33
29 blacks attack is stopped.
White chose tactical variation in order to
surprise the opponent, who had little time left.

M. Kroesbergen J. van den Akker


Black to move
Exercise 7.1 Describe the relevant features of
this position. Is it better for white or for black
and why? What moves could black play and
which move will he NOT play?

35.42 37 3 8
36.48 43 8 12
37.43 39

37 12 18?
Black should have played 37 21 26 38.32 x
21 16 x 27. White cant take the 39.37 32 26
x 37 40.32 x 21 17 x 26 41.28 x 8
breakthrough, because of the nice 19 23
reply: 42.30 x 28 9 13 42.8 x 19 14 x 45 B+.
37 21 26 38.32 x 21 16 x 27 38.39 34!
Prevents the 19 23 change back by 28 x 19
24 x 13 33 28 W+.
38 12 18 39.25 20 24 x 15* 40.33 29 2
x 42 41.31 x 24 42 x 31 42.36 x 27 14 19
43.24 x 13 9 x 18 44.29 23 18 x 29 45.34 x
23 and black can defend his worse position.
38.28 23!
Black is caught in a prepared trap. After 38
18 x 29 39.39 34! black has no good temp
and loses! In the game 38 19 x 28 39.32 x
12 17 x 8 40.30 x 19 14 x 23 was played and
after 41.31 26 black resigned.

Classics

158

B) 30 24 19 x 30 39 33 20 24 33 28 13
19 27 22 W+

Solutions section 3
Lesson 1: Tempo-classics
1.1 Dirod = -4. White has more waiting moves
and thus has the better position.
1.2 Dirod = -1 However, more important than
development here is that black has a weak
piece at 15 and white can use the Olympic
formation. The position is better for white.
1.3 Dirod = -10. Sometimes this is too much,
because the opponent can break open the
classical structure. In this case black cant
break open the position, so this position is very
good for white.
1.4 Dirod = -4. Both players have no
weaknesses, so it is better for white.

3.3 After 1.34 30! black must give up his


Olympic formation, because 7 11 would be
met by the coup Springer with 27 22! 18 x 27
32 x 21 23 x 41 21 17 ad lib. 42 37 41 x 32
38 x 7 W+. 1.34 30 24 29 2.30 25 6 11
3.35 30 11 17 4.37 31 26 x 37 5.42 x 31
7 11 6.31 26 11 16 7.48 42 (16 21
8.27 x 16 18 22 9.32 27+) W+
After 34 30 6 11 37 31! 26 x 37 42 x 31
white controls both wings.
3.4 34.39 33 10 14 33 x 24 14 20 27
21! 20 x 29 21 16! 11 17 48 42 8 1245
40 18 22 30 24! etc. W+
3.5 28 23 19 x 48 30 x 8 12 x 3 27 21 16 x
27 32 x 34 48 x 30 35 x 24 W+

Lesson 2: Weak pieces

3.6 27 21 16 x 27 32 x 21 23 x 32 38 x 27
and the arrow lock is decisive.

2.1 27 21 followed by 28 23 W+.

Lesson 4: Ghestem lock

2.2 A) 34 30 13 18 B+
B) 35 30 24 x 35 33 29 17 22 B+
C) 27 22 21 26 22 x 11 16 x 7 34 30 13
18 B+

4.1 29 34 25 20 14 x 25 22 18 13 x 31 28
22 34 x 43 38 x 49 25 x 34 33 29 24 x 33
42 38 33 x 42 48 x 8 and white won (Diouf
memorial 1981)

2.3 25 20! W+

4.2 34 29 and now:


1) 24 x 33 38 x 29 23 x 34 37 31 26 x 37 32 x
41 21 x 23 44 40 18 x 27 40 x 20 W+.
2) 23 x 34 37 31! 26 x 37 32 x 41 and now:
2.1) 21 x 23 44 40 18 x 27 40 x 29
2.2) 21 x 43 48 x 30 18 x 27 28 23 19 x 28
30 x 10 W+

2.4 48 42? leads to Ricou Garoute (24


29! 33 x 24 17 22 28 x 17 21 x 12 etc. B+).
Therefore white should play 48 43!
2.5 15 20! like in Alfaisi Tsjizjow.
2.6 White shouldnt play 31 26? because the
sacrifice 16 21 becomes strong in that case,
and white would lose control over <27>. White
should play 34 30! 25 x 34 39 x 30 3 9 43
39 9 14 45 40 23 29 30 25 and now:
1) 18 23 31 26 13 18 28 22! 17 x 37 27
21 16 x 27 35 30 24 x 44 33 x 42 44 x 33
38 x 7 W+.
2) 17 21 31 26 11 17 28 22 17 x 37 26
x 8 13 x 2 27 21 16 x 27 35 30 24 x 44 33 x
42 44 x 33 38 x 29 W+

Lesson 5: Tactics

Lesson 3: Wing control

5.4 27 22 18 x 40 45 x 3 W+

3.1 A) 23 29 28 23 19 x 39 30 x 8 12 x 3 27
21 16 x 27 32 x 43 W+
B) 16 21 27 x 16 24 29 33 x 24 18 22 24
20 22 x 31 20 x 7 W+
3.2 A) 17 22 26 21 22 x 31 33 28 16 x 27
32 x 21 23 x 32 38 x 36 +

Classics

5.1 34 30? 25 x 34 39 x 30 17 22 28 x 26
23 28 32 x 12 13 18 12 x 23 19 x 48 30 x
10 48 x 47 W+.
5.2 28 23 19 x 39 30 x 10 4 x 15 36 31 26 x
37 38 32 37 x 28 40 34 ad lib. 35 x 4 W+
5.3 31 27 21 26 27 22 12 18* 34 29
23 x 43 48 x 39 18 x 27 32 x 21 26 x 17 28
23 19 x 28 33 x 2 +

5.5 39 34 8 12 32 28! 23 x 21 26 x 8 13 x
2 34 29 W+
5.6 A) The piece at <10>
B) A Coup Royal by 27 22 37 31 32 x 21
40 x 7 W+

159

C) 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 27 21 16
x 39 38 33 39 x 28 32 x 3 W+
5.7 24 29! 22 x 11 16 x 7!
1) 26 x 17 7 11 33 x 24 11 x 42 B+
2) 33 x 24 20 x 29 26x 17 29 34 40 x 18 13 x
44 B+
5.8 28 22 18 x 27 33 29 24 x 31 41 37 27
x 49 36 x 9 3 x 14 37 31 26 x 37 48 42 37 x
48 40 35 49 x 40 45 x 34 48 x 30 35 x 2 25
30 2 x 35 20 24 35 x 10 5 x 14 50 44
(Goedemoed 2009) W+
5.9 38 33 29 x 47 36 31 26 x 37 32 x 41 47
x 30 35 x 2 W+

6.3 28 22 17 x 37 47 42 37 x 48 27 22 18
x 27 29 x 18 13 x 22 30 25 48 x 30 35 x 4
W+
6.4 30 24 19 x 39 28 x 8 39 x 37 8 2 W+
6.5 33 28! and now:
1) 5 10 (or 14 20) 28 x 19 13 x 35 37 31
26 x 28 27 21 16 x 27 38 32 ad lib. 42 x 4
W+
2) 14 19 30 24 19 x 30 28 x 19 13 x 24 37
31 26 x 28 40 34 30 x 39 44 x 4 W+
3) 13 19 30 24 19 x 30 28 x 10 15 x 4* 40
35 30 34 48 43 winning piece 34.
4) 23 29 28 23 W+1

5.10 17 22 26 x 28 19 24 28 x 30 35 x 44
B+

6.6 33 28! threatening both 29 24 and 28


22 34 30 32 x 3 +. At 18 22 29 x 18 both
after 22 x 33 27 22 W+ and 22 x 31 28 22
W+ white takes a winning kingshot.

5.11 28 22 9 13 32 28 (creating free


moves) 35 30 21 x 32 33 29 18 x 27 29
24 20 x 29 34 x 5 25 x 34 5 x 46 W+

Lesson 7: The surrounding fails

5.12 21 16? 4 9 16 x 7 18 22 27 x 20 15
x 43 48 x 39 8 12 7 x 18 13 x 42 +
5.13 27 21!
1) 16 x 27 32 x 21 23 x 41 21 17 ad lib. 42
37 41 x 32 38 x 7 W+
2) 26 x 17 25 20 24 x 15 33 29 23 x 34 28
22 17 x 28 32 x 5 W+
5.14 24 29 33 x 24 14 20 25 x 14 9 x 29
39 34 19 24 28 x 17 11 x 33 34 x 12 6 11
30 x 19 11 17 12 x 21 16 x 40 B+.
5.15 Only the Dussaut sacrifice 1.27 22! 18 x
27 2.33 29 (13 18 3.29 24) wins. Not
good are neither 1.33 29? 19 24! B+ nor
1.34 30? 18 22 2.27 x 20 21 27 3.32 x 21
13 x 14 B+.

7.1 White controls <27> and <29>. Black


possesses <23>. He hasnt lost control over
<24> yet, because he can fight for this
strategic square by playing 20 24 x 24 at any
time. White has a weakness at <45> and also
few waiting moves. Black should thus wait with
playing 20 24 x 24. If he makes this
exchange too early, white changes back with
33 29 x 29 and has a good surrounding
position. Because white cant keep control over
<29> blacks position is much better.
So black will certainly not play 22 20 24?
22 4 9 23.41 37 1 6 24.43 39 Since
the 33 / 38 / 42 tail isnt active anymore black
can take over <24>.
24 20 24 25.29 x 20 15 x 24 26.30 25 17
21 27.33 28 2 7 28.34 30 9 14

5.16 1.39 33! (threatening 34 30 and 30


24) 14 20 2.27 21! 26 x 17 3.33 29 13
18 4.28 22 17 x 28 5.34 30 23 x 25 6.32 x
3 W+
Lesson 6: Surrounding the centre
6.1 A)2.32 28 23 x 32 3.30 25 W+
B) 4.32 28 ad lib. 5.30 25 ad lib. 25 x 3 W+
6.2 20 25 41 36 11 16 34 29 19 24 29
x 20 25 x 14 28 23 22 27 (taking a lethal
fork lock) 33 29 12 18 23 x 12 17 x 8 etc.
B+

Classics

Black has a good position, while whites left


wing is weak with an inactive piece at <46>.
Whites position isnt hopeless yet, but after
29.38 33? black won with a coup Weiss (you
should find out how it goes yourself!).

160

The right wing attack is a popular way to play. The right wing attack is characterized
by an outpost at <24>, supported by a strong centre. Sometimes you can put another
outpost at <23>.
Piece 24 keeps pieces 15 and 25 at their place. In the diagrammed position white
also holds strategic squares <27> and <28>, the ideal attack. Black to play is
completely lost.
In this section we show you what is important when attacking. We show some games
from strong players, to get a feeling how to play an attack.
After this we show the special Samba-swing, going to <19>.
The next lessons treat the way you can play against an attack, especially if the attack
contains weaknesses.
The following items will be featured in this section:
1.The right wing attack
2. Going to <19>
3. Playing against the right wing attack
4. Attacking the outpost
5. Blocking the attack
6. Surrounding
7. The counter attack
8. isolating the outpost
9. Tactical ideas
After having studied this section you will have learned many useful plans you can
perform in your own games. You also have learned important tactical ideas and
combinational patterns.

Right wing attack

11.4 x 36 23 29
12.28 23 29 x 18
13.36 x 4

1.Right wing attack

White will become dominant and win the game.

D. Edelenbos B. Nuijs
White has strategic squares 27 and 28 in
possession. To be able to win white has to
conquer <24>. In the game white played 1.44
40? 13 19 2.40 35 7 12 3.29 24 19 x
30 4.35 x 24 12 17 5.24 20 14 19 6.20
15 19 23!! 7.28 x 19 17 22 =.
You should remember this sacrifice to make a
draw. It is something you should take care of
when possessing <27>.
It is better to occupy square 24 immediately.
Black will have to make a double sacrifice to
be able to attack 27!

White has reached a position possessing <27,


28 and 24>. Exact play is needed to win the
endgame.
1.41 37 8 13
1 8 12 can be met by 2.28 22! 16 21
3.27 x 16 18 x 27 4.16 11 +
2.37 32

1.29 24! 7 12
2.44 39 12 17
3.39 33 14 19
3 17 22 4.28 x 17 21 x 12 5.33 28 leads
to an easy win for white.
4.24 20 19 23
5.28 x 8 17 22
6.9 3 ! 22 x 42
7.3 9 !!

If white plays 2.37 31? black makes a draw


after 2 25 30! 3.24 x 35 13 19.
If 2.37 32! is answered by 25 30 3.24 x 35
13 19 then 4.35 30 18 23 5.28 22 23
29 6.32 28 follows, and now there are two
variations:
1) 6 19 24 7.30 x 19 29 34 8.19 14 34
39 9.13 9 39 43 10.9 3 43 48 11.28
23 and white has a winning endgame.

Black cant take a king at <47>: 7 42 47


8.9 x 36 47 x 15 9.25 20 15 x 27 10.36 x 18
W+.
7 18 23
8.20 14 42 48
8 42 47 9.9 3! W+. White plays a nice
patient move now. He shouldnt hurry by
playing 9.14 10? 48 42 10.33 28? 42
15 B+.
9.9 4!
48 42
10.33 28 26 31

J. Ambags R. Sloot

2) After 6 19 23 7.28 x 19 29 33 8.19


14 33 38 9.14 9 38 43 10.30 25! 43
48 11.22 18! white also wins. Notice that
especially whites last two moves are very
precise. Other moves lead to a draw! We show
you an example:
If white plays 10.9 3 black holds a draw
playing 43 48 11.30 25 48 34!! (48 39?
22 18 39 22 3 14! 22 x 20 25 x 14 +)
12.25 20 (otherwise black keeps playing 34
29 34 29 34 etc.) 34 39! 3 17 16
21!! 27 x 16 39 25 20 15 25 9 = and
black escapes...
2 13 19
3.24 x 22 25 30

10 23 29 11.28 23 W+

Right wing attack

162

In the game white didnt succeed in winning


the endgame. We show you the best play for
white.

White can go to <24> because black broke the


12 / 18 / 23 - tail.

4.22 18 30 34
5.18 1 3 34 39
6.13 9 39 44

9.29 24! 19 x 30 10.35 x 24 7 12

7.9 3 44 50 8.27 22 (28 23 50 45 23


19 45 18 =) 50 45 is a draw because
whites pieces cant go to second king. So
white needs to play very precise again. He
should advance another piece towards the king
row.
7.28 23! 44 50

Because blacks right wing will get weak it is a


better idea to play 8 12 and 3 8.
Not possible is 10 14 20? 11.32 28 W+.
At 10 14 19 white simply defends the
outpost playing 40 35 19 x 30 35 x 24.
11.32 28 23 x 32 12.37 x 28 14 20
13.34 29 16 21 14.41 37 6 11
15.50 44 11 16?
Black allows white to lock his weak wing.
In combination with a dangling piece at 10 this
is a bad idea.

If 7 44 49 then 8.9 4!
8.23 19! 50 45
9.9 4!

16.31 26! 1 7

White has protected his pieces and is able to


get a second king soon. This example is meant
to make you aware that although you might
have a winning position, actually winning isnt
easy at all!

17.28 23!

White intensifies the attack by taking another


outpost. Blacks best response is 17 10 14
18.37 31!
Black cant take 13 19 24 x 13 8 x 28 now for
white breaks through by 31 27 etc.
18 7 11 19.33 28 22 x 33 20.39 x 28 21
27 21.31 x 22 18 x 27 but the dangling piece
at 11 still makes blacks position vulnerable.

Always stay concentrated until the end of


the game! Even if you have a winning
position: stay alert!

K. Thijssen R. Heusdens
Bijlmer 2008
1.32 28 20 25 2.33 29 17 22
3.28 x 17 11 x 22 4.37 32 19 23
5.39 33 14 19 6.44 39 10 14
7.41 37 5 10 8.46 41 12 17
Blacks last move allows white to start a right
wing attack. If black plays 7 11 or 14 20
white can start the attack playing 9.32 28
10.37 x 17 followed by 11.29 24.

17 21 27? 18.37 31
Threatening 33 28 W+.
18 7 11 19.42 37!

Right wing attack

163

26.42 37 7 11 27.50 44 9 14
White uses the Kung Fu shot to blow up
blacks position. Blacks position collapses
because of the 26 21 24 19 38 32 x 42
39 x 6 threat.
The critical line is 19 16 21 20.40 34 10
14 21.45 40 13 19 22.24 x 13 8 x 28 23.29
23! 18 x 29* 24.34 x 32 9 13 25.47 42 12
18 26.33 28 22 x 33 27.39 x 28 winning a
piece, for example 4 9 28.31 x 22 18 x 27
32.37 31 (or 36 31 28 22 etc. W+) W+.
A. Cordier K. Thijssen
Dutch Club competition 2005
1.32 28 17 22 2.28 x 17 12 x 21
3.34 29 7 12 4.40 34 19 23
5.45 40 14 19 6.33 28 23 x 32
7.37 x 28 10 14 8.41 37 5 10
9.37 32 11 17 10.39 33 19 23
11.28 x 19 14 x 23 12.44 39 6 11
13.42 37

Black has a strong centralized position. He


holds the central pyramid and the outpost at 27
is completely safe.
28.33 29 3 9 29.48 42 23 28!
Black prevents an attack at his outpost. 29 2
7 would allow white to play 30.37 32 11
16 31.32 x 21 16 x 27 32.42 37 7 11 33.37
32!
Black cant reply 19 24 32 x 21 24 x 42 43
38! 42 x 33 39 x 6 W+.
33 11 16 34.32 x 21 16 x 27 35.38 32 27
x 38 36.43 x 32 breaking down the attack.
30.38 33 11 17
There is also nothing wrong with the normal 20
24 31.29 x 20 15 x 24 32.42 38 18 23.
31.42 38 20 24 32.29 x 20 14 x 25

Black took centre square 23 and has built the


so called fist. The fist is formation 11 / 16 / 17 /
21 which is often used to go to square 27.

Black captures to 25, avoiding chances after


37 32 x 42. Piece 25 indirectly controls
square 24.

13 17 22! 14.31 26 21 27
15.32 x 21 16 x 27

33.37 32 28 x 37 34.31 x 42 9 14
35.34 30 25 x 34 36.39 x 30 19 23
37.44 39

Black starts a right wing attack. His outpost is


supported by a strong centre.
16.37 31 10 14 17.46 41 13 19
18.29 24 19 x 30 19.34 x 25 8 13!
Blacks pieces are moving in the right direction,
strengthening the left wing.
20.40 34 14 19 21.25 x 14 9 x 20
Black takes four more temps. He has a lead in
development of 6 temps now. Such a lead in
development is a good condition to play an
attack.

37 2 8

22.41 37 4 9 23.47 42 1 7
24.37 32 11 16 25.32 x 21 16 x 27

If white plays 38.30 24 black should not play


38 23 29? 39.42 37! 29 x 20 40.37 32

Right wing attack

164

9.41 37 11 17 10.37 31 17 22
11.46 41 14 19 12.35 30 19 23
13.30 24 9 13 14.42 38 10 14
15.48 43

= but 38 23 28! 39.33 29 14 20! 40.35


30 20 25 41.39 34 17 22 42.26 x 17 22
x 11 with a superior position.
38.39 34 14 20
39.33 29 20 25 40.29 24 22 28
41.42 37 17 22 42.37 31 12 17

15 23 28!
Whites space is more and more reduced.
White can make a shot 24 19 23 x 14 (or
also 13 x 24) 26 21 17 x 37 38 32 27 x 38
43 x 3 but the king is caught 13 19 3 x 20 15
x 24 and black wins.

Black doesnt allow white to weaken his central


position by 34 29 x 29 and takes a second
outpost. Whites next move is obliged, because
black threatens to take the kingshot 28 33!!
For example: 41 37 28 33 39 x 17 12 x 21
26 x 17 5 10 (or 14 19) 31 x 22 13 18 22
x 13 8 x 48 B+.

43.43 39 8 12 44.38 33 13 19
45.24 x 13 18 x 9 46.33 - 29 12 18

16.34 29 13 18!

Changing back 34 29 wont help white.


Blacks attack will grow too strong.

Black obstructs the 41 37 move by 27 32


38 x 27 28 33 39 x 17 12 x 41 B+.

47.29 24 9 13 48.49 43 27 32!

17.38 33 6 11 18.41 37 11 17

While whites space is shrinking, blacks


gradually gets more space

White has to do something against blacks


outposts. He changes one of them.

49.43 38 32 x 43 50.39 x 48 28 32
51.48 42 22 28 52.42 37

19.37 32 28 x 37 20.31 x 42 14 19
21.24 x 13 8 x 19 22.42 38 7 11
23.38 32 27 x 38 24.33 x 42

52.34 29 23 x 34 53.30 x 39 25 30! B+.


White also changes the other outpost. It would
have been more logical to take forwards: 24.43
x 32 22 27 25.32 x 21 11 16 26.33 28 16
x 27 27.28 22 17 x 28 28.29 24 19 x 30
29.39 34 30 x 39 30.44 x 31 and black has a
clearly better position, but white can defend.

52 32 x 41 53.36 x 47 28 32
White resigned..
B. Ba A. Schwarzman
World Challenge 1997
1.32 28 18 23
3.31 26 21 27

2.38 32 17 21
4.32 x 21 16 x 27

24 2 8 25.36 31 5 10
26.43 38 8 13 27.38 32
10 14 28.42 38

Black takes a right wing attack right from the


opening. Usually 3.31 27 is played.
Another variation sometimes played is 5.42
38 23 x 32 6.37 x 28 19 23 7.28 x 19 14 x 23.
5.37 31 23 x 32
7.43 x 32 13 18

6.31 x 22 32 38
8.22 x 24 20 x 27
Right wing attack

165

Black built a strong centre position. Whites


pieces on his right wing are inactive.
Black performs a brilliant combination, losing a
piece, but reaching a breakthrough.

Blacks piece at 27 is not backed by a strong


centre.
Exercise 1.1: How can white (to move) force
a win?

28 22 27!! 29.32 x 21 11 16!


30.31 27 18 22!! 31.27 x 20 15 x 42
32.47 x 38 16 x 27 33.40 34 19 23!
34.39 33 3 8!

Exercise 1.2 Why is 29 24 x 24 a bad idea


for white?
Black built the crucial 8 / 12 / 17 tail. White
cant stop black from playing 17 21 x 21 and
breaking through. Piece 4 is a strong defender.
Whites distribution of pieces is terrible.
35.33 29 23 28 36.29 24 17 21
37.26 x 17 12 x 21 38.24 19 27 31
39.34 30 31 36
Black won after 40.30 24 36 41 41.19 14
41 46 42.14 9 4 x 13 43.24 20 21 26
44.20 15 26 31 45.44 39 31 36 46.45
40 36 41 47.38 33 41 47 48.33 x 22
8 12 49.40 34 47 41 50.50 45 41 5.
An outpost at 27 should be supported by a
strong centre. The next exercises suffice to
prove that point.

S. Buurke W. Van der Braak


Exercise 1.3 White has a good attacking
position. How would you continue?

Right wing attack

166

2.Going to <19>

25.23 19 18 22
26.28 23 21 27

Sometimes it is possible to take more space


while attacking by moving to <19>. After Samb
was successful with this strategy against
Baljakin in the World Challenge 1997 this was
dubbed in the Samba-swing.

Black has still a good position locking whites


left wing.
27 6 11!
White has to take care about the 22 28 threat
now, so he closes <39>.
28.43 39 17 21
29.19 14!
It is necessary to go to <14>, because
otherwise 12 18 23 x 12 8 x 17 19 x 8 2 x 13
would have followed and whites position is
completely blocked.

N. Samb A. Baljakin
Whites right wing attack contains a few
weaknesses. Piece 40 isnt really active and
whites left wing isnt developed. Black has a
good construction without weaknesses. Normal
moves for white arent a success:
1) 25.38 33? fails to the Trap shot 17 22
28.28 x 17 21 27 29.31 x 22 12 x 21 30.23 x
12 8 x 30 B+
2) 25.43 39? 18 22! and now:
2.1) 26.38 33 12 18! 27.23 x 12 2 7 28.12
x 1 8 12 29.1 x 27 21 x 23 30.29 x 18 20 x 47
B+
2.2) 26.39 33 9 14 and now:
2.2.1) 27.38 32 12 18! 28.23 x 12 21 27
29.32 x 21 16 x 27 30.12 x 32 13 18 31.28 x
17 18 23 32.29 x 18 20 x 47 B+.
2.2.2) 27.37 32 26 x 37 28.42 x 31 12 18!
29.23 x 12 21 26 30.12 x 21 26 x 37 31.28 x
17 37 x 19 B+
2.2.3) 27.40 35 21 27! White cant play 37
32 because after the capturing black has 13
19 +. After the ugly 28.35 30 13 19!
29.24 x 13 8 x 19 B+ follows and the
necessary move 37 32 still doesnt work.
3) 25.37 32? 26 x 37 26.42 x 31 18 22 and
black wins because 38 32 is met by 12 18
21 26 16 x 49 etc. B+
White chose a surprising move to take more
space.

29 12 18?
Black had too little time to calculate this
complex situation. After 29 22 28 30.33 x
22 27 x 18 the position would still have been
better for black.
White has two plans: developing his left wing
or sharpening the position even more.
1) 31.31 27 21 x 32 32.37 x 28 11 17 33.39
33 18 22 with a good position for black, for
example: 34.41 37 13 18 35.37 31 26 x
37 36.42 x 31 16 21 37.31 26 9 13 38.14
10
White might save himself giving a piece with
38.46 41 20 x 9 39.41 - 37
38 15 x 4 39.24 x 15 3 9 40.40 35 9 14
41.35 30 21 27 42.48 43 27 32! 43.28 x
37 13 19 44.43 39 19 x 28 followed by 17
21 x 21 with an irresistible attack.
2) 31.42 38 11 17
31.. 18 22? 32.34 30! W+
32.38 32 18 22 33.48 42 22 28?! and
now:
2.1) 34.23 19 13 18 35.37 x 28 9 13 and
white has to give back the piece with
advantage for black.

Right wing attack

167

34 27 32
35.38 x 27 17 21
36.26 x 17 12 x 32
37.34 29 8 12

2.2) 34.14 10 28 x 30 35.10 4 and the


position isnt clear because 35 30 35 would
be met by 36.29 23 35 x 33 37.34 30 25 x
34 38.23 19 13 x 24 4 x 6 with a good
endgame for white.

Black still has little space and it appears he got


on a dead end, but black prepares a nice plan
to continue the attack.

30.23 x 12 8 x 17
31.42 38 2 8
32.40 35 8 12

38.35 30 12 17
39.30 25 14 19
39 17 21 isnt answered by 31 27 but by
40.43 38! 32 x 23 41.31 26 28 x 39 42.26 x
8 W+.
40.50 45 19 x 30
41.25 x 34

White could have forced an even more


convincing win by playing 33.48 42! now:
33 12 18 34.24 19 13 x 24 35.33 28 24
x 44 36.35 30 22 x 33 37.31 x 4 20 x 9 38.4 x
50 W+.
33.48 43 12 18
34.24 19 13 x 24
35.33 28 24 x 44
36.35 30 22 x 42
37.31 x 4 42 x 31
38.36 x 27 21 x 32
39.41 37 32 x 41
40.46 x 37 20 x 9
41.4 x 50

41 17 21!!
White sacrifices a piece to get the attack
moving again!
42.31 27 22 x 31
43.36 x 38 18 22
44.48 42 21 27

Whites position is winning. After the time


scramble that followed black resigned.

A. Gantwarg A. Schwarzman
Black has a right-wing-centre-attack with little
space to play. 34 18 23 35.34 29! would
lead to a blocked right wing attack. White
continues his attack to <32>.

After 45.42 37 13 18 46.45 40 9 13


Threatening 27 32 B+
White has to give back a piece playing 29 23
anyway, so he decides to return it immediately.

Right wing attack

45.29 23 28 x 19
46.34 29 13 18

168

47.45 40 16 21
48.42 37 21 26
49.39 34 19 23
50.43 39

S. Doller B. Visser
Exercise 2.1 Black is to move. What is the
best way to continue his attack?
50 27 31!
Going for the breakthrough at whites left wing.
51.29 24 31 x 42
52.38 x 47 26 31
53.24 20 22 27
54.34 30 27 32
55.30 25 31 36
56.20 14 9 x 20
57.25 x 14

Black cant take the fastest way to king: 57...


32 37 is met by 58.14 9 4 x 13 59.47 42
37 x 48 60.33 28 48 x 45 61.28 x 8 and white
escapes with a draw.
Black played
57 18 22? and white
escaped narrowly. Black could have won by
making another sacrifice. 57 36 41! 58.47
x 36 32 37. If white gives back the piece
59.36 31 37 x 26 there are two scenarios:
1) 60.40 34 26 31 61.34 30 31 37
62.30 25 37 41 63.25 20 4 10! 64.14 x
5 41 46 B+
2) 60.39 34 26 31 61.34 30 31 37
62.30 25 37 41 63.25 20 23 29!
63 4 10 64.14 x 5 41 46 65.5 x 32! 46 x
25 66.20 14 leads to no more than a draw!
64.33 x 24 41 46 B+.
Right wing attack

169

3.Playing against the right


wing attack

The only chance for survival is 25 23 28


26.41 37 10 14. After 27.38 32 27 x 38
28.43 x 23 9 13 black will win back the
piece.

There are several strategies playing against a


right wing attack:

Attacking the outpost

26.41 37 7 11
27.50 44
It was also good to attack immediately: 27.37
32 11 16 28.32 x 21 16 x 27 29.38 32 27 x
38 30.43 x 32 for example 9 13 31.31 27
22 x 31 32.36 x 27 13 18 33.27 21! 12 17
34.21 x 12 18 x 7 35.39 33 3 8 36.33 29!
8 12 37.29 x 18 12 x 23 38.45 40 and the
threat to play 50 45 and 34 30 cant be
parried.
27 10 14
28.37 32 11 16
29.32 x 21 16 x 27
30.38 32 27 x 38
31.43 x 32

T. Goedemoed K. Posthumus
White is going to attack the outpost as many
times as possible in order to attack blacks
right wing, eventually resulting in a
breakthrough.
15.37 32
16.32 x 21
17.42 37
18.48 42

11 16
16 x 27
7 11
2 7

Black cant defend the outpost horizontally by


23 28. White plays 38 33 and 42 38 and
black has no time to build the necessary 13 /
18 / 22 tail to defend the outpost against the 37
32 41 x 21 threat.
19.37 32 11 16
20.42 37 7 11
21.32 x 21 16 x 27
22.41 37 6 11
23.37 32 11 16
24.32 x 21 16 x 27
25.46 41

White played 17.50 44 because 32 28 23 x


32 34 30 is now a serious threat. After 31 5
10 32.39 33! white is threatening 33 28
34 30 44 39 while 32 12 18 33.26 21
leads to a breakthrough for white.
Black is thus forced to play 22 28, but a
breakthrough cant be stopped anymore.
31 22 28
32.32 27 14 19
33.27 21
Black sacrificed a piece playing 33 12 17
34.21 x 12 25 30 35.35 x 13 9 x 7 and lost
soon.

25 1 7?
Right wing attack

170

Blocking the attack

Surrounding

H. Verdoolaege P. Meurs

K. Thijssen T. Brouwers

Whites right wing attack is blocked. He cant


play at <27> or <23> because of blacks strong
formations.
21.34 30 25 x 23 22.28 x 10 20 x 29 23.33 x
24 loses a piece to 9 14 24.10 x 19 22 28
25.32 x 23 18 x 20 B+1.
White therefore suffers from a lack of space to
play.

Black has a weakness at <13>. Therefore


white can exchange piece 27, surrounding the
centre.

21.40 35 4 10
22.45 40 14 19
23.50 45 19 x 30
24.35 x 24 9 14
25.40 35 14 19
26.35 30 10 14
27.45 40 2 7
28.40 35

32.37 32 27 x 38
33.43 x 32 4 10
34.31 27 22 x 31
35.36 x 27 10 15
36.47 41
Avoiding the kingshot after 46 41? by 23 28
33 x 24 14 19 24 x 13 12 18 13 x 22 17 x
46.
36 15 20 37.41 36

White might have thought he had the last


temp, but the next move of black destroys all
hope.

White is threatening 26 21 17 x 26 36 31
etc. After 37 17 22 white can force a win
by 38.26 21! 22 x 31 39.36 x 27 always
followed by 33 28 with the lethal threat of 30
24.
In the game black collapsed by playing 2 8.

28 17 21!
29.28 x 17 11 x 22
After 30.31 27 22 x 31 31.36 x 27 7 11! Its
over, because 33 28 is met by 26 31! B+.
29.32 28 7 11
30.28 x 17 11 x 22

Right wing attack

171

Because of the 27 32 threat white has a


forced reply.

Counter attack

33.38 32
34.43 x 32
35.32 x 21
36.28 x 17
37.24 x 22
38.17 x 19

27 x 38
22 27
17 22
14 19
8 13
26 x 50

And perplexed by this combination white


surrendered much too early. He should off
course have fought on.
L. Tsipes A. Gantwarg

A mixture of plans
White has locked pieces 5 / 10 / 14 / 15 / 20,
but his distribution of pieces isnt optimal. He
has too many pieces at the right side of the
board. Black builds a strong construction at the
other wing.
36 13 18!

Of course many times you have to use more


than one idea at the same time. Attacking the
outpost can help blocking the attack. Tactics
can support your surrounding strategy.
We will now discuss all plans in more detail.

White had no defence against the plan 21 27


37 32 27 x 38 43 x 32 26 31 36 x 27 22 x
31.

Tactical means

J. Wielaard T. Sijbrands
White has a centre-wing-attack, occupying
both <23> and <24>. White thought he could
develop his right wing. Black showed a
surprising tactical way to benefit from this
mistake.
29.30 25 21 27!
White cant take 32 x 21 at any time because
after the capturing, 27 32 follows.
30.25 x 14 10 x 30
31.35 x 24 9 14!
32.32 x 21 16 x 27

Right wing attack

172

4.Attacking the outpost

White uses a sacrifice to launch a winning


attack.
White can attack the outpost twice. Black can
defend with both piece 11 and piece 23. But
white uses tactics to prevent the latter defence.

1.37 32 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27

1.37 32! 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27
3.41 37 23 28

3.41 37 7 11 will not yield any results.


White uses a sacrifice to attack the vulnerable
spot at 22.
3.34 29! 23 x 34
4.41 37 7 11
5.37 32 11 16
6.32 x 21 16 x 27
7.38 33!

Black defends horizontally now, but white uses


the gap at 18 taking a shot.
4.39 33 28 x 48
5.26 21 27 x 16
6.31 26 48 x 31
7.36 x 7
Often black can use tactics himself to protect
the outpost.

White threatens to play 33 28. Black cant


play 27 32 because of 43 39 W+. If black
gives back a piece first and then plays 27 32
he loses by a shot:
The 37 32 attack would be punished by 22
28! 31 x 24 28 x 46 B+.
What about 38 33 threatening 33 28 ?
1.33 28 can be met by 19 23!! 2.33 28 19
x 28! 3.37 x 28 22 x 33 4.31 x 13 33 38 5.43
x 32 12 18 6.13 x 22 17 x 46 B+.

Right wing attack

7 34 39
8.43 x 34 27 32
9.25 20! 14 x 25
10.34 30 25 x 34
11.44 39 34 x 43
12.49 x 7

173

1.37 32 11 16 2.32 x 21 16 x 27 3.39 33


19 23 4.33 29 23 x 34 5.38 33 34 39
6.43 x 34 27 32 7.49 43 2 7 8.48 42 7
11 9.44 39 12 18!

R. Keller D. Van der Staaij


Manifold Dutch champion Keller showed a
nice sacrifice with the objective to attack the
vulnerable piece at <22>.
Black is just in time to build the 11 / 17 / 22 / 18
/ 13 construction to defend piece 32, since
10.42 38 is answered by 10 22 27 11.31
x 22 18 x 27.

1.37 32 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27
3.39 33
Black isnt allowed to activate piece 2. At 2 7
white takes the 33 28 22 x 42 31 x 2 42 47
2 x 30 endgame, gaining two pieces.
3 19 23
4.33 29! 23 x 34
5.38 33 34 39
An immediate 27 32 is met by 43 39 W+.
6.43 x 34 27 32
7.49 43 2 7
8.48 42 7 11
9.44 39

F. Raman L. Duitz 1934

Of course white should avoid the 22 27


threat. At the next move white plays 42 38
winning a piece.

In this position white can attack the outpost


three times. Black can defend two times
vertically. White hopes to use tactics against
the horizontal defence 23 28.
Blacks pieces are developed well and he
controls the centre. In these cases black
usually can defend the outpost. In this case he
uses tactics in quite a surprising way.
1.37 32 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27
3.41 37 6 11
Black cant play 3 23 28? because of the
4.35 30 5.25 20 6.38 32 7.43 x 5
kingshot.

The pieces at blacks left wing werent


developed well. They have stayed behind and
cant go to the centre quick enough.
This is nearly the same position, but piece 9 is
at <13>. the difference of one single temp
brings about a successful defence for black:

White can attack the outpost in two different


ways now. In the game white played:

Right wing attack

4.37 32 11 16
5.32 x 21 16 x 27
6.46 41

174

Black shouldnt play 23 28 now: white forces


a shot by 7.41 37 threatening 35 30 25
20 38 32 W+, while 7 19 23 is punished
by 8.39 33 28 x 48 9.26 21 27 x 16 10.31
26 48 x 31 11.36 x 7 (capturing 7 pieces).
6 12 17!

Black has to take care for shots. White has


reactivated the 35 30 25 20 38 32 shot.
9 18 23? still allows a king shot by 35 30
25 20 34 29 39 x 30 38 32 43 x 5.
Because 9 24 30 10.35 x 24 19 x 30 11.38
32! etc. also loses a piece, black should play
9 19 23 10.38 32! 27 x 38 11.43 x 32
and the position is about equal.

Now 7.41 37 is answered by 17 21! 8.26 x


28 23 x 41 9.36 x 47* 27 x 36 with a better
position for black.
R.C. Keller claimed that white should have
played 4.46 41. The idea then is to prepare a
double attack at the outpost, for example 13
18 37 32 11 16 32 x 21 16 x 27 41 37
and 23 28 fails again.
However, black can prevent 37 32 by a nice
shot playing 4 12 18!!

The piece at 30 often gives the attacker


chance to defend the outpost using tactics.
1.37 32 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27
3.42 37 7 11
Black cant defend horizontally by 23 28?
since 30 24 followed by 38 32 wins a piece
for white.
At 5.37 32 black now plays 5 14 20!!
6.25 x 5 23 28! 7.5 x 16 28 x 46 8.16 x 32 46
x 50 with good chances to win. This is the so
called Nagel shot.
White should play 5.45 40
Losing the opportunity to tactically punish 23
28.
5 8 12 6.37 32 11 16 7.32 x 21 16 x 27
8.41 37 23 28! 9.40 34!

4.47 41 20 24
5.37 32
Black can choose from two shots now:
1) 5 4 9 6.32 x 21 14 20 7.25 x 14 19 x
10 8.30 x 28 22 x 42 9.43 38 42 x 44 10.49 x
40 9 13 with small advantage for black.
2) 5 22 28! 6.31 x 33 24 29 7.33 x 13 12
18 8.13 x 22 17 x 46 with a good chance to
win.

Right wing attack

175

E. Heslinga J. Terpstra

The 39 / 44 / 50 is very active. It helps in


preventing the horizontal defence of the
outpost.

Ex 4.1 Answer the questions.


38.28 23? 9 14!

1.37 32 11 16
2.32 x 21 16 x 27
3.48 42

A) Black threatens with a shot. Which shot


follows at 32 28 x 27?
B) How should white have defended his
outpost (in the diagram)?

3 23 28 is answered by 4.39 33! 28 x 39


5.44 x 33 18 23 6.42 37 23 28 7.49
44 28 x 39 8.44 x 33 9.37 32 and white
wins the outpost.
3 10 15 shouldnt be answered by 42
37? for black breaks through by 27 32 37 x
19 18 23 19 x 28 22 x 42, but 3 10 15 is
met by 4.39 33! 15 20 5.25 x 14 9 x 20
5.42 37 23 28 6.35 30 (6. 44 40 28 x
39 7.40 34 39 x 30 8.35 x 15 also wins) 28 x
39 7.44 x 33 18 23* 8.37 32 20 25 9.32
x 21 25 x 34 10.33 29 W+1.

Ex 4.2 How does white win attacking the


outpost combined with the use of tactics?

M. Raichenbach B. Springer
White attacks the outpost in order to reach a
breakthrough. White begins by eliminating
blacks centre piece. The chance for a
horizontal defence will thus now disappeared.
Ex 4.3 Black has two outposts. White can force
a 40 x 16 shot. Try to find the forced win!

Right wing attack

17.34 29! 23 x 34
18.40 x 29 13 18
19.37 31 9 13
20.41 37 5 10
21.37 32 11 16
22.32 x 21 16 x 27
23.42 37 7 11
24.48 42 2 7

176

25.37 32
26.32 x 21
27.42 37
28.47 42
29.37 32
30.32 x 21
31.42 37

11 16
16 x 27
7 11
15 20
11 16
16 x 27
6 11

Threatening to play 38 32 followed by 21


17 etc. Black needs to play 12 17 so he can
change after 38 32 12 17 =.
41 8 13 42.21 16 12 17 43.26 21 17
x 26 44.16 11 18 22 45.27 x 20 26 31
46.11 7 31 36 47.7 2 etc. W+

T. Goedemoed A. Kuyken
32.37 32! 11 16
14.29 24 19 x 30
15.34 x 14 10 x 19

Black cant play 32 19 24 33.32 x 21 24 x


42 34.43 38! 42 x 33 35.39 x 6 W+.

Black should have taken 14 20 x 29 15.33 x


24 19 x 30 17.35 x 24 23 28! 18.38 33 10
14 19.42 38 5 10 with an equal position.

33.32 x 21 16 x 27
34.38 33!!
Black cant do anything about the 29 23 18 x
38 43 x 21 exchange with a future break
through. Playing 34 19 23 35.44 40 23 x
34 36.40 x 29 doesnt solve blacks problems.
Removing piece 18 weakens blacks defence,
while white is at <21> very fast due the 2 x 2
exchange 29 23 18 x 38 43 x 21.

Now white removes his own piece at 33, so


that the attack at 27 can begin. With a piece at
33 the attack by 37 32 is never successful
because black can simply change: 37 32 5
10 32 x 21 22 28 33 x 22 18 x 16.
16.33 29! 23 x 34
17.40 x 29 15 20
18.37 32 11 16
19.32 x 21 16 x 27
20.46 41 6 11
21.41- 37 2 7
22.37 32 11 16
23.32 x 21 16 x 27
24.42 37 7 11
25.47 42

34.. 8 12
35.29 23! 18 x 38
36.43 x 21 13 18
37.31 27 22 x 31
38.36 x 27 3 8
39.39 33 19 23

The best way to play this position is reinforcing


the attack by 49 43 38. As soon as black
plays 8 13 white plays 21 16 12 17 26
21 17 x 26 16 11 breaking through.
For example: 40.49 43! 20 24 41.43 38

After 25 5 10 26.37 32 11 16 27.32 x


21 16 x 27 28.39 33! black cant parry the 33
28 threat.

Right wing attack

177

25 11 16
Hoping for 26.37 32 19 23! 27.32 x 21 23 x
34 28.39 x 30 16 x 27 29.42 37 18 23
30.37 32?
Much better is 30.30 25!
30 13 18 31.32 x 21 20 24 32.30 x 28 22
x 42 33.43 38 42 x 33 34.43 38 =.
26.39 33!
White prepares the 37 32 move. Black
sacrifices a piece playing 20 24 27.29 x 20
18 23 28.37 32 and lost.

Draughts promoter Henk de Witt

A. Kooistra T. Goedemoed
Ex 4.4 Black to move. What plan should black
perform best?

Shakirov I. Koeperman
Ex 4.5 Black to move can win a piece. How?

Right wing attack

178

5.Blocking the attack

The following attack on 27 weakens blacks


position even further. White takes care the 7 /
12 / 18 tail is broken, so that black cant go to
the centre anymore.

R. van der Pal J. Adema


Blacks outpost is defended only three times
(pieces 1, 2 and 11) while white has four
attacking pieces (37, 42, 47, 48). White can
use this threat to block blacks pieces at the 4 /
36 diagonal.
15.34 29! 23 x 34
16.40 x 29 14 19
17.35 30!
At 1 6 white plays 18.30 24 19 x 30 19.29
23 18 x 29 20.33 x 35 followed by an attack at
27, for example 11 16 21.37 32 6 11
22.32 x 21 16 x 27 23.42 37 2 7 24.47 42
13 18 25.37 32 11 16 26.32 x 21 16 x 27
27.42 37 7 11 28.37 32 11 16 29.32 x
21 16 x 27 30.39 33! 18 23 31.33 29! 23
x 34 32.38 33
The sacrifice from Keller v.d. Staaij! But
black hasnt even got a piece at 2 anymore, so
the piece at 32 is simply lost.
32 34 39 33.43 x 34 27 32 34.49 43 12
18 35.34 29 followed by 48 42 and 42
38 winning a piece.
17 19 23
18.30 25 23 x 34
19.39 x 30 9 14
After 19 18 23 20.33 29 23 x 34 21.30 x
39 white is going to attack piece 27 again.
20.33 29 2 7
At 37 32 black can make a 2 x 2 change
playing a temp and then 22 28 33 x 22 18 x
16 =. Without piece 33 this defence isnt
possible anymore. Thats why after some
preparation, white clears <33>. The piece at
<29> blocks the 18 23 move.

21.37 32
22.32 x 21
23.42 37
24.37 32
25.32 x 21
26.47 42
27.42 37

11 16
16 x 27
7 11
11 16
16 x 27
1 7
10 15

Black can answer 37 32 by 14 19 32 x 21


19 24 now.

28.38 33! 7 11
Aiming his arrows at the vulnerable spot <22>.
After the forced 7 11 the 18 / 12 / 7 tail is
definitively broken and black cant change 18
23 x 23 anymore.
39.45 40 4 9
After 39 14 19 40.40 35 black cant play
4019 23 because white takes the kingshot
30 24 24 19 33 28 31 x 2 W+.
40.40 35
Blacks position is completely blocked. 4014
19 is answered by 41.30 24 19 x 30 42.35
x 24 and white has a kingshot at the next
move.

Right wing attack

179

44.42 38 17 22

Black sacrificed a piece by 40. 27 32 and


lost.

Now 45.29 23 18 x 29 46.24 x 33 13 19!


results in a winning position for black (47.34
30 19 23 48.30 25 20 24 etc.)
45.39 33 is not answered by 45 14 19
46.26 21 W+, but by 45 27 32! 46.38 x
27 22 x 31 47.26 x 37 18 23 48.29 x 18 20 x
38 49.18 12 13 18 50.12 x 23 38 43 B+.
45.35 30 or 45.34 30 is strongly met by 20
25 followed by 14 20 and white is frozen
out.
I. Stegeman E. van Muijen
Whites attack isnt strong, because its
blocked. White misses active formations to
break the blockage. She especially lacks the
38 / 43 / 49 tail to exchange the strong piece at
27 which is keeping two pieces (26 / 36) busy.
<49> is a weakness.
The game was 38 14 19 but we will show
the best way to exploit whites weaknesses.
38 14 20! 39.45 40
Y. Anikeev A. Hanssens
Black would like to play 39... 12 17 here,
threatening 27 32 followed by 18 23 and 20
x 49, but white has a spectacular shot after
39 12 17? 40.38 32! 27 x 49 41.35 30
49 x 35 42.30 25 35 x 19 43.25 x 21 W+.

14.39 33 11 17?
Black allows his position to be blocked. He
should have played 14 23 28 15.44 39
18 23 16.29 x 18 12 x 23.

39 9 14 40.39 34
15.44 39 7 11
16.37 31 11 16
17.41 37 2 7
18.37 32 7 11
19.32 x 21 16 x 27
20.47 41 11 16
21.41 37 6 11
22.49 44

Now 12 17 is prevented by the 33 28 42


38 Kung Fu shot.
40 4 9
41.43 39 12 17
42.38 32 27 x 38
43.33 x 42 22 27

The weakness at 49 is not important here. It is


all about the last temp.
22. 4 10
23.37 32 20 24

44.29 23 is answered by 20 x 29!! 45.23 x 32


13 19! 46.34 x 23 19 x 48 B+.

23 16 21 24.34 30! 23 x 34 25.40 x 29


19 23
25 20 24 26.29 x 20 15 x 24 27.33 29!
24 x 33 28.39 x 28 22 x 33 29.31 x 22 17 x 37
30.26 x 6 W+
26.44 40 23 x 34 27.40 x 29 20 24 28.30 x
19 14 x 34 29.39 x 30 10 14 30.33 28 22 x
33 31.31 x 22 17 x 37 32.26 x 6 W+.
24.29 x 20 15 x 24

Right wing attack

180

25.34 29 23 x 34
26.40 x 20

16.35 x 24
17.40 35
18.44 40
19.35 x 24
20.49 44

P. Chmiel R. Misans
1.32 28 17 21
2.37 32 11 17
3.34 29 20 25
4.41 37 7 11
5.29 24 19 x 30
6.35 x 24 21 26

10 14
14 19
19 x 30
7 11
12 18

21.50 45 9 14! 22.31 27 22 x 31 23.36 x


27 4 9!
1) 24.33 28 14 19 25.40 35 19 x 30
26.35 x 24 18 22 (or 9 14) B+1.
7.33 29?
Better is to keep <29> open. The standard way
to play is 40 34 44 40 50 44. If black
attacks 14 20 white just plays a temp and
takes 20 x 29 33 x 24.
Closing <29> in such an early stage of the
game is very dangerous, because black gets
the plans of attacking the outpost and blocking
the attack.
7 1 7
8.38 33 14 20
9.42 38 18 22!
10.39 34 10 14
11.43 39

2) 24.46 41 18 23 25.29 x 18 13 x 31
26.41 36 20 x 29 27.36 x 27 26 31! 28.37
x 17 11 x 31 29.33 x 24 31 36 30.42 37 16
21 B+.
21.33 28
22.39 x 28
23.28 x 17
24.31 27
25.36 x 27

22 x 33
18 22!
11 x 22
22 x 31
9 14

Black has a winning attack at the outpost.

11 17 21!
12.28 x 17 11 x 22
Blocking the ugly looking attack.
13.47 42 5 10
14.40 35 14 19
15.45 40 19 x 30

Roberts Misans
Right wing attack

181

26.44 39 14 19
27.40 35 19 x 30
28.35 x 24 4 9
29.50 44 9 14
30.44 40 14 19
31.40 35 19 x 30
32.35 x 24

Ex 5.2 Black finished the game with a strong


move. Which move did six-fold world champion
Wiersma play?

C. van Dusseldorp Baljakin


13 18!
Ex 5.3 How can white win after 1 23 29?
Attacking <29> while 24 19 is met by 26 31
8 12 2 x 44 B+.
Black won after 33.27 22 18 x 27 etc.

Ex 5.4 White to play can use tactics to leave


black without moves soon. How?
R. van der Pal R. van Velzen
Ex 5.1 Whats the best move for white?

A. Georgiev A. Chizhov
A. Georgiev H. Wiersma

Right wing attack

182

White has a right wing attack with a weakness


at <42>. Black takes advantage of this
weakness by attacking and changing the
outpost starting the surrounding-plan.

6.Surrounding

31 14 19
32.40 35 19 x 30
33.35 x 24 13 19
34.24 x 13 8 x 19
35.45 40 20 24
36.29 x 20 15 x 24
Black plays a pokdowa. He could also have
chosen 19 23 28 x 19 20 24 29 x 20 25 x
23 with a strong centre.

G. Kolk A. Schotanus

37.40 34
38.38 32
39.34 29
40.29 x 20

The black attack contains some weaknesses.


He has only one piece in the Drent-zone 2 / 3 /
4 / 8 / 9 / 13. Pieces 15, 16 and 25 arent
active.

16 21
4 10
2 8
25 x 14

39.37 32! 27 x 38
40.43 x 32 2 7
41.31 27! 22x31
42.36 x 27
The black position is surrounded. His position
is hopeless. The attack at <27> is met by a
counter attack at <23> followed by a
breakthrough.
42 7 11
43.30 24! 17 22
44.49 44 22 x 31
45.33 28 31 37
46.28 x 19 37 x 28
47.19 14 28 32
48.14 - 9 32 37
49.44 39 18 22
50. 9 4 22 28
51.4 9
Black resigned.

41.43 38
You would expect black to use his tail to
change 19 23 x 23, but black persists in
surrounding the centre.
41 10 15 42.49 43
42.41 37 loses to 19 24! 43.39 34 14
20! 44.34 29 20 25 45.29 x 20 15 x 24
White cant play either 44 39 or 44 40
because of the reaction 18 23!
46.49 43 21 26 followed by 24 29 B.
42 14 20

H. Klaassen H. Spanjer

Right wing attack

183

Black cant go to <28> again, for after 38 22


28 39.42 37 (threatening 38 32) black
simply loses a piece.
38.38 32 27 x 38
39.43 x 32 19 23
Black didnt want to allow 30 24 x 24, but
now his centre is surrounded.
40.42 37
After 43.39 34 19 24 44.34 30! 24 x 35
45.28 23 18 x 29 46.33 x 24 20 x 29 47.44
40 35 x 44 48.43 39 44 x 42 49.41 37 42 x
31 50.36 x 7 white can still fight for a draw.

40.39 33 isnt good because of 22 28 33 x


13 12 18 13 x 22 17 x 48 B+.
The best move for black is 40 22 28!
40 2 8? 41.39 33!

43.41 37 19 24
44.39 34?
The best defence is 44.28 23! 18 x 29 45.44
40 12 18 46.37 31!
44 21 26
Black could already have played 24 29 and
the endgame is winning. Now white could try
the shot 34 30 24 x 35 28 23 18 x 29 33 x
24 20 x 29 44 40 35 x 44 43 39 44 x 31 36
x 7 with drawing chances again.
45.34 29 20 25
46.29 x 20 15 x 24

41.. 8 13 is punished by 26 21 17 x 26 33
28 22 x 24 30 x 6 + now.
41 4 9 42.47 41!

There is no defence against the threat 24 29


anymore. After a few moves white resigned.

The 26 21 32 28 threat forces black to play


the weakening 42 11 16.
42 11 16
43.37 31 9 13?
A better defence is 43 9 14 44.30 24 14
20, although white has a very strong attack
after 45.31 27 22 x 31 46.26 x 37!
46.36 x 27 is met by 18 22! 27 x 18 7 11 18
x 7 11 x 2 29 x 18 20 x 27 18 12 27 32 12 x
3 32 37 3 x 21 37 x 46 =
46 17 22* 47.32 28 23 x 32 48.37 x 17
12 x 21 49.33 28.

G. Heerema J. Knipper

44.30 24! 7 11

Black has a good right wing attack after 4 9


but his next mistake gives white the
opportunity to surround blacks centre
successfully.

After 44 25 30 45.34 x 25 23 x 34 46.32


27! the fork-lock is decisive.

35 23 28?
36.37 32! 28 x 37
37.31 x 42 13 19
Right wing attack

45.31 27 22 x 31
46.36 x 27 25 30
47.34 x 25 23 x 34
48.33 28

184

35 13 19
36.24 x 13 8 x 19!

After 34 39 48.25 20 black is frozen out


completely so he resigned.

Threatening 20 24 29 x 20 15 x 24. White


cant play at <33> because of the 24 29 shot,
so black wins a piece by 24 29.
37.34 30 9 13!
After 37 20 24 38.29 x 20 black has to take
14 x 43 and white wins.

A. Schotanus M. Kroesbergen
White has a right wing attack. Blacks defence
is fine, having an intact pyramid of Drent.
White goes to <23> much too early and will be
surrounded. He should simply have played 37
31 26 x 37 41 x 32 developing his left wing.
After 38.42 38 combinations dont work for
black, but he infiltrates <27> strongly by 21
27! 39.30 25 13 18 40.48 43 4 9 41.39
33 9 13
Even better than 18 22 etc.
42.43 39 19 24!

28.28 23? 6 11
29.42 38 11 17
30.38 33 17 21
31.41 36 18 22
32.33 28 22 x 33
33.39 x 28 9 14

Black is ready to change piece 24.


34.44 39 3 9
Black threatens to play 13 19 24 x 13 9 x 18
34 30 (otherwise 20 24 follows!) 12 17 23
x 3 20 25 3 x 20 15 x 44 25 x 45 B+. White is
obliged to play either 35.36 31 or 35.47 42
35.47 42
Now 35 13 19 36.24 x 13 9 x 18 is met by
37.28 22 18 x 27 38.37 31 26 x 37 39.42 x
22 =.
Black thus changes piece 24 in another way.

Having possession of both <27> and <24>,


black surrounds the white centre. Black can
use the weapon of tactics while trying to freeze
white out.
43.49 44 is punished by 24 30 25 x 34 20
24 29 x 9 18 x 49 9 x 7 49 x 1 B+.
43 28 22 is met by 26 31! 44.37 x 26 13
19 45.22 x 13 19 x 28 46.33 x 31 24 x 42 B+.
We continue this interesting variation: 43.46
41 13 19 44.49 44
44.37 32 18 22! 45.28 x8 19 x 46 46.8 3
24 30 47.25 x 34 20 25 48.3 x 20 15 x 24
49.29 x 20 25 x 14 B+
16 21 47.44 40 2 8 and at the next move
18 22 will decide the game.
38.30 25 13 18?

Right wing attack

185

Black could have forced a kingshot taking


advantage of the weakness at <38>: 19 24!
39.39 33 12 18! 40.23 x 12 14 19 41.25 x
23 13 18 42.29 x 20 18 x 47 and after 43.20
14 15 20 44.14 x 25 21 27! black has a
winning endgame.
The best defence for white after the played
38 13 18 is 39.49 44 4 9 40.44 40 20
24 41.29 x 20 15 x 24 42.39 34 18 x 29
43.34 x 23 9 13 44.36 31 13 18 45.42
38 18 x 29 46.38 32 and white can still fight
for a draw.

27 13 19!
28.24 x 13 8 x 19

39.36 31? 19 24!


Without waiting for 40.39 33 24 30! 41.25 x
34 20 24 42.29 x 9 18 x 47 43.9 3 2 7
44.3 x 17 21 x 12 white resigned.

After 29.47 42 25 30 white is in trouble.


1) 30.40 35 19 24! 31.39 33 30 34
32.29 x 40 24 30 33.35 x 24 20 x 47 B+
2) 30.42 38 30 34 31.39 x 30 20 24 32.29
x 20 15 x 44 33.49 x 40 9 13 34.38 33 19
24 35.28 22 6 11 36.31 27 14 19! 37.23
x 14 4 9 38.14 x 3 12 17 39.3 x 21 26 x 39
and the plan 24 29 13 19 24 30 results
in a winning breakthrough for black.

L. Rosendaal A. Baliakin
White has many gaps in his position. Black has
nice formations in his defence like 2 / 8 / 13
and 4 / 9 / 13.

3) 30.40 34! 30 35 31.39 33 9 13 32.31


27
Preventing the chain-lock 13 18 by 27 22
18 x 27 37 31 26 x 37 42 x 22.
32.. 4 9 33.49 44 6 11 with a very difficult
position for white, for example 34.37 31 26 x
37 35.42 x 31 11 17
Threatening 17 22! B+
36.27 22 20 25 37.22 x 11 7 x 16 38.31
27 13 18 with a deadly chain-lock.

20 12 17!

29.31 27 25 30!
30.27 22?

Threatening 17 22 28 x 17 8 12 17 x 19 14
x 45. White is forced to take a crucial decision.
21.39 34 20 25
22.29 23
22.44 39 7 11 23.38 33 17 22 24.28 x
17 11 x 22 25.47 42 14 19 26.40 35 19 x
30 27.35 x 24 10 14 and white must flee
playing 28.24 20 15 x 24 29.29 x 20 16 21!
with a big advantage for black.

White couldnt play 30.40 35 26 31! B+


either. Obliged was 30.39 33 9 13 and the
fight goes on.
30 30 34
31.39 x 30 20 24
32.29 x 20 14 x 45
33.23 x 3 12 17
White resigned.

22 17 22!
23.28 x 17 16 21
24.38 32 21 x 12
25.32 28 14 20
26.34 29 10 14
27.44 39

Right wing attack

186

Threatening 17 21 B+.
31.43 39 9 13
32.45 40

T. Sijbrands J.M. Ndjofang


Wch 2003
Ex 6.1 Black to move played 34 13 19?
35.24 x 13 18 x 9. How did white force a
winning shot ?

Now black takes <24>, blocking whites right


wing. The next step is to conquer <27>.
32 19 24!!
33.46 41 13 19!
34.41 36 16 21
35.38 32 11 16
36.42 38 6 11

P. Roozenburg A. Scholma
White has a right wing attack with a weakness
at <48>. Piece 47 could be better at <48>.
White wants to take more space. Without the
37 / 42 / 48 tail white has no control over the
left wing.

Black now controls <27>. If he takes this


square white risks being frozen out.

23.28 23 7 11
24.32 28?
It was necessary to change 33 28 22 x 33 39
x 28. Now black can surround whites centre by
exchanging piece 24.

37.40 35 2 8
38.39 34 21 27
39.32 x 21 16 x 27
40.34 30 11 16
41.44 39 8 13
42.37 32 13 18
43.32 x 21 16 x 27

24 9 13
25.40 34 10 14
26.49 43 13 19
27.24 x 13 9 x 18
28.34 30 25 x 34
29.39 x 30
It looks like white gets more space, but black
will take over <24>.
29 4 9!
30.30 25 21 26
Right wing attack

187

White has nowhere to go and is frozen out


beautifully.
44.47 41
45.36 x 27
46.41 37
47.38 x 47

27 31
22 x 31
31 x 42
26 31

48.28 22 fails to 17 x 28! 33 x 13 24 x 44 13


x 24 20 x 18 B+
48.47 41 18 22
49.39 34 22 27
50.41 36 31 37

A. Uutma A. Scholma
19.44 39?
White should have played 43 39 keeping a
piece at <44>. After 19.43 39 14 20 white
can play 20.34 29.
19 14 20!
Now 20.34 29 isnt possible.
Exercise 6.3 How would black punish 20.34
29?
The best move for white is 20.34 30 25 x 34
If 20 20 x 29 then 21.33 x 24 25 x 34 22.40 x
29 =.
21.40 x 29
No good is 21.39 x 30 20 x 29 22.33 x 24 18
23 23.28 x 19 15 20 24.24 x 15 13 x 44 B+.

The picture is clear. White lost.

20.47 41? 20 x 29
21.33 x 24
The dangling piece at 41 is a serious
weakness.

Sijbrands Shwarzman
Exercise 6.2 Black to move has a nice plan to
force white being frozen out. Can you find it?

Right wing attack

21 17 22
22.28 x 17 12 x 21
23.32 28 11 17
24.39 33 6 11
25.33 29 8 12
26.38 32

188

By infiltrating <27> black begins surrounding


the white centre position. The infiltration is
made possible by the terrible 47 41 move
26 21 27
27.32 x 21 16 x 27
28.31 x 22 18 x 27
29.43 38 9 14
30.29 23 3 8
31.34 29 11 16
32.40 34

Threatening 18 22 28 x 17 19 x 28 32 x 23
27 31 etc. B+ while giving the opponent the
opportunity to take a shot, which, however, will
be punished by a counter-shot.
39.37 31 26 x 30
40.35 x 31 12 18!
41.23 x 3 21 26
42.3 x 20 15 x 42
And black won soon.

Exercise 6.4 How would 32.37 32 have


been punished?

Black changes piece 24 to take control over


<24> himself.
32 13 19
33.24 x 13 8 x 19
34.37 32 is punished by 17 22 35.28 x 8 19
x 46 now and the king at <3> is caught.

Indian draughts player in Thailand

34.45 40 4 9
35.40 35 9 13
36.48 43 17 21
37.37 32 2 8
38.41 37

Black can play 12 17 39.43 39 26 31


40.37 x 26 17 22 etc. B+, but he chooses
another way.
38 13 18
Right wing attack

189

Exercise 7.1 What shot did white take after


34 2 8?

7.The counter attack

K.H. Leijenaar C. Remeijer


Black has some weaknesses at his right wing.
White is able to attack the other wing with the
help of tactics.
30.30 24! 19 x 30
31.35 x 24
Black cant change piece 24, because 3 8 is
punished by 24 19 13 x 24 34 30 24 x 35
33 29 23 x 34 39 x 30 35 x 24 26 21 17 x
37 38 32 27 x 38 43 x 3 (14 19 47 41!)
W+.
After 6 11 32.47 42! white is threatening 24
19 followed by 34 29, so black has to play
14 19 then.

T. Sijbrands A. Kuyken
Black has an attack with two outposts, but his
division of pieces isnt optimal. White launches
a counter attack at blacks left wing.
28.30 24 19 x 30
29.34 x 25 8 13
30.42 38 13 19
Exercise 7.2 How would white have played
after 30 12 18?
31.33 29! 23 x 34
32.39 x 30 2 8
33.30 24! 19 x 30
34.35 x 24 8 13

31 14 19
Weakening his left wing even more.
32.24 20! 3 9
33.20 15 9 14
34.34 30

The outpost at <24> gets company after the


next exchange:
35.26 21! 17 x 37
36.41 x 23 11 17
34 2 8?
After 34 6 11 35.46 41 2 8 36.41 37 8
12 37.37 32 28 x 37 38.31 x 42 23 28
39.30 25 18 23 white breaks through 40.25
20 14 x 25 41.15 10 W+.

36 13 18 will lead to a breakthrough for


white after 37.23 19! 14 x 23 38.38 33
followed by 25 20 14 etc.

Right wing attack

37.38 33 13 18
38.33 29

190

White can also play 38.23 19! 14 x 23 39.25


20 W+.

The 24 20 x 20 exchange isnt attractive,


because black gets too much space.

38 6 11

25.41 37
26.43 38
27.46 41
28.50 44
29.41 36
30.38 32

16 21
8 12
13 18
3 8
14 20
9 13

39.43 38 27 31
40.36 x 27 22 x 31
41.25 20! 14 x 25
42.23 19 17 21
In stead of going to king with piece 19 another
surprise follows:
43.19 13! 18 x 9
44.24 20 15 x 42
45.48 x 6
White won after 45 25 30 46.6 1 30 34
47.49 44 9 13 48.1 6 13 19 49.6 28
19 24 50.28 32 12 18 51.32 49 34 39
52.44 x 33 24 30 53.49 35 30 34 54.33
29 34 x 23 55.35 44 23 29 56.44 39 W+.

31.49 32 isnt met by 18 23? And white


catches the king with equality, but by 31 4
10!
Preventing 28 23 by 13 19. This is why 4
10 in this case is stronger than 5 10 in this
case.
32.43 38 10 14 33.28 23 5 10 34.32
28 21 27! 35.37 31 13 19! 36.24 x 13 18
x 9!! 37.40 35 8 13 38.45 40 20 24!
39.29 x 20 15 x 24 40.34 29 13 18 41.29 x
20 18 x 29 42.33 x 24 22 x 42 43.31 x 11 12
17 44.11 x 22 42 48 B+.
You see different plans for black in this game.
After 30.49 43 he surrounds the position,
now he launches a counter-attack.
31.28 23 22 27
32.32 28 21 26
33.37 32
After 33.49 43 4 9! the 27 31 17 22
threat is decisive.
33 27 x 38
34.33 x 42 17 21
Threatening 13 19 21 27 26 x 48 +.

Nikhila Wiersma
Black has a nice position to play against the
attack. He still has all formations in the Drentzone. Whites left wing is a bit weak. Black
wants to counter-attack at this wing.

35.42 37 21 27
36.49 43

22.37 31 21 26
23.38 32 26 x 37
24.32 x 41 10 14

Right wing attack

191

36 27 32!
37.39 33 32 x 41 38.36 x 47 26 31! 39.43
38 fails to 39.. 31 37! 40.38 32 18 22!
41.32 x 41 25 30! 42.34 x 14 4 10 43.28 x
17 10 x 50 B+.
37.43 38 32 x 41
38.36 x 47 18 22!
39.28 x 17 12 x 21

Both 39 33 and 38 32 are punished by the


25 30 13 19 shot.
40.23 19 13 18
41.29 23
White loses a piece now, but his position was
already was very difficult.
After 41 18 x 29 42.24 x 33 4 9 43.38 32
21 27 44.32 x 21 26 x 17 45.33 28 9 13
white lost a piece and the game.

Right wing attack

192

Black isolates the outpost now.

8.Isolating the outpost

30 18 23!
31.31 27 5 10
32.48 43 4 9
33.40 35

R. Clerc H. Wiersma
Wch rapid 1997
Whites right wing attack contains weaknesses:
piece <46> isnt active and the gap at <34>
makes his position tactically vulnerable. Black
doesnt have the usual piece at <25>. Usually,
this makes the attack less strong.
23 17 22!
24.28 x 17 11 x 22

White has prepared the repeated 14 20


attack at <24> in order to take <28> in
possession. This plan is very strong since
white does not
have any base pieces
anymore. Moreover, pieces 41 and 36 are
weak.
33 14 20!
34.39 33 20 x 29
35.33 x 24 10 14
36.43 39 14 20
37.39 33 20 x 29
38.33 x 24 9 14
39.44 39 14 20
40.39 33 20 x 29
41.33 x 24 23 28!

Black uses tactics to perform his plan. The


natural move 25.33 28 22 x 33 26.39 x 28? is
punished by 15 20! 27.2 x 15 4 10 28.15 x
4 18 22 29.4 x 27 21 x 45 B+.
Exercise 7.1 How is 25.46 41 punished?
Because white cant take forwards, white
makes the change backwards, losing space.
25.33 28 22 x 33
26.29 x 38 18 22
Taking care the pieces at whites left wing cant
get active.
27.46 41 21 27
28.39 33 22 28
29.33 x 22 27 x 18
30.43 39

Blacks position is really superior! White has


nearly no space left.
Piece 28 is extremely strong.
White sacrificed a piece by playing 38 32 28
33 38 32 and lost.
In this game whites outpost wasnt supported
by a strong centre and six-fold world champion
Wiersma took advantage of this in a very nice
way.

Right wing attack

193

The next step in blacks plan is starting a


centre attack by taking <28>. Black hopes to
get <27> as well.
42.39 34 11 16
43.43 39 18 22
44.31 27 22 x 31
45.26 x 37 16 21
46.40 35 17 22
47.39 33 28 x 39
48.34 x 43 13 18
49.43 39
W. Bremmer K. Thijssen
Whites outpost isnt supported by a strong
centre. In this case isolating the outpost is the
right plan.
26 12 18
27.48 42 18 23
28.42 37 8 12
29.40 35 16 21
After 29 12 18 30.37 32 2 8 31.39 33
black lost his advantage (23 29? 31 27
21 W+)
30.37 32 23 28
31.32 x 23 21 27
32.31 x 22 17 x 30
33.35 x 24 12 18

White has changed piece 28, but is still in


trouble.
49 14 20 50.24 19
The right defence, for after 50.39 33 20 x 29
51.33 x 24 9 14 piece 35 stays inactive.

After this exchange black follows the same


plan again, occupying <23>.
34.45 40 18 23
35.40 35 11 17
36.36 31 6 11
37.35 30 2 8
38.49 44 8 12
39.44 40 4 9
40.47 41 12 18
41.41 36

50 20 25 51.30 24
A better defence is 51.39 34. Now black
infiltrates at <30>.
51 25 30 52.39 33

Black should have played 21 27! now with a


winning position:
41 23 28!

1) 52 21 27 53.33 29 22 28 54.37 31
18 22 55.29 23 28 32 56.38 33 30 34
57.23 18 (what else?) 22 x 13 58.19 x 8 3 x
12 59.31 x 22 32 37 and black wins, for
example 60.33 28 37 42 61.28 23 42
Right wing attack

194

48 62.22 18 34 40! 63.35 x 44 (63.18 x 7


48 30! 35 x 44 30 x 50 +) 48 34 18 x 7 34 x
1 B+
2) 52 21 27 53.37 31 9 14 54.19 x 10
15 x 4 55.24 19 30 34 56.19 14 18 23
57.33 29 34 39 58.29 x 18 22 x 13 59.31 x
22 39 44 60.22 17 44 50 62.17 12 50
45 B+

A. Andreiko T. Sijbrands
Exercise 8.1 White has a weak attack with no
strong centre and no black piece at 25. Black
to move performed a strong plan. Can you
predict the next three moves of black?

T. Sijbrands A. Andreiko

Right wing attack

195

Black has just played 18 18 23 19.29 x 18


12 x 23. White makes a sacrifice you should
remember.

9.Tactical ideas

20.36 31! 27 x 36
21.33 29
Black cant play 13 18 nor 22 27 because
of a kingshot for white. The stick-shot 36 41
also fails. So white won a piece and the game.

T. Goedemoed A. Schotanus
White supposed his opponent would build the
2 / 8 / 13 tail by 9 13 and 3 8.
37.48 43?
At 37 40 35 black plays 14 19 38.24 x 4
20 24 39.29 x 20 18 x 49 40.4 x 36 49 x 5
with a bad endgame for white.
White should have played 37.37 32 21 27
38.32 x 21 16 x 27 39.38 32 27 x 38 40.33 x
42 22 x 33 41.39 x 28 18 22 42.23 18 12 x
32 43.24 19 14 x 23 44.29 x 38 =.
37 2 8!
After this surprising move white cant escape
anymore! 38.40 35 is answered by 21 27!
39.37 32 27 31! 40.26 x 37 22 27 41.32 x
21 16 x 27 and white has no good reply
against the 27 32 17 22 threat.
38.37 32
39.32 x 21
40.40 35
41.26 x 37

G. Tigchelaar T. Sijbrands
31.39 33?
White has too many gaps in his position now.
Black took advantage of this situation by
making a stunning sacrifice.
Exercise 9.1 How did black force a win?

21 27
16 x 27
27 31!
22 27

Black won.

B. Zwart E. Dul
White can play 30 24, 40 34 or 39 34.
Exercise 9.2
and why?

Which is the only good move

J.M. Drent M. Barkel

Right wing attack

196

Sometimes a little detail can make a big


difference. In the left diagram white can force
the game: 1.37 32! 28 x 37 2.31 x 42 18 23
3.39 34! and black has no good move left:
3 23 28 is answered by the stick-move 24
19! W+.
3 12 18 is met by 4.24 19 13 x 24 5.34
29 23 x 34 6.33 28 22 x 33 7.38 x 9 W+.
Exercise 9.3 Why is the forcing not good in
the right diagram?

36 19 24!!
37.30 x 19 25 30
38.34 x 25 20 24
39.29 x 9 22 x 33
40.38 x 29 22 x 42
41.31 x 11 42 47
42.26 x 8 47 x 6
White resigned (too early!).

R. Heusdens Z. Golubeva

H. Wiersma A. Presman

25 11 17?

White overestimated his position and played:


33.37 32
33.38 32? 27 x 38 34.33 x 42 16 21 35.42
38 13 19 36.24 x 13 8 x 28 37.38 32 21
27! wins a piece for black.
White could have made a sacrifice by 33.33
28! 22 x 42 34.31 x 11 42 x 31 35.26 x 37 16 x
7 36.37 32 =.

Black possesses all strategic squares, but this


is only part of the story. Blacks position
contains some weaknesses. She has no base
pieces anymore, making her position tactically
vulnerable. Piece 15 isnt active. White has
strong formations to exploit the weaknesses. In
the game he went wrong playing 26.34 29
and black eventually won. We show the way
white should have played.

33 16 21
34.32 28?

26.47 42!

Whites last chance for a draw was 33 28 =.


But white wasnt aware tactics would be
against him in this situation.
34 13 19!
35.24 x 13 8 x 19
36.35 30
Presman performs a spectacular combination
now.

Threatening 37 32 28 x 37 25 20 14 x 25
34 29 23 x 34 39 x 19 13 x 24 33 28 22 x
33 31 x 4 W+.
Black cant take the kingshot 27 32 38 x 27
17 21 27 x 16 23 29 34 x 32 22 28 32 x
23 18 x 47 because the king is caught by 43
38 47 x 44 50 x 39 W+1.
After 26 14 19 white chances 27.34 29
followed by a winning attack at the outpost.

Right wing attack

197

White can also play 27.49 44 in preparation


of 28.34 29 etc.
Black should thus have played 25. 14 19
26.25 20!
Black cant play 24 30 because of 34 x 25 15
x 24 35 30 24 x 35 33 29 23 x 34 39 x 30
35 x 24 38 32 27 x 38 43 x 3 W+.
26 24 29 27.33 x 24 19 x 30 28.35 x 24 10
14 29.38 33 14 x 25 30.43 38 11 17
30 9 14 is punished by 24 19 13 x 24 26
21 27 x 16 31 27 22 x 42 33 x 2 42 x 44 2 x
35 W+.
31.48 43!!
31.49 43 allows 17 21 26 x 17 12 x 21 31
26 28 32 26 x 19 32 x 41.
This move gives white many tactical ideas.

1) 31 9 14 32.14 19 13 x 24 33.34 29
23 x 34 34.39 x 10 28 x 48 35.38 33 15 x 4
36.33 28 22 x 33 37.31 x 2 48 x 31 38.36 x
27 W+
2) 31 17 21 32.26 x 17 12 x 21 33.33 29!
Threatening 34 30 followed by 38 32 +
33 8 12 34.39 33!! 28 x 19 35.47 41 23
x 34 36.43 39 34 x 32 37.37 x 8 3 x 2 38.31 x
4 W+
3) 31 6 11. White can take a shot
immediately by 34 29 23 x 34 39 x 30 28 x
48 38 33 25 x 34 24 19 13 x 24 33 28 22
x 33 31 x 2 48 x 31 2 x 4 W+1, but after 32.50
45 11 16 the shot is definitely winning: 34
29 23 x 34 39 x 30 28 x 48 38 33 25 x 34 24
19 13 x 24 33 28 22 x 33 31 x 2 48 x 31 2 x
11! 16 x 7 36 x 27 W+.
Black can fight on by playing 32.50 45 27
32! 33.38 x 27 11 16 with still a good position
for white after 34.47 41.

R. v.d. Pal Bedinovs


Ex 9.4 This combination was shown in part I
of the course. Do you remember (or just
discover) how white wins taking a shot?

N. Samb G. van Aalten


Ex 9.5 White could have taken a kingshot, but
he missed it. Can you spot it?

Ex 9.6 White to move can take a tremendous


combination. If you dont see the idea, watch
Wielaard Sijbrands again.

Right wing attack

198

M. de Block L. Huitema

Ndiaga Samb

Exercise 9.7 White can force a tactical win


taking advantage of the gaps at <12>, <14>
and <17>. How?

Z. Palmans D. Reszka
Black has an attacking position with no clear
weaknesses. Still white performed a surprising
kingshot.
Exercise 9.8 Can you find the great kingshot
white performed?

In the next exercises (9.9 9.16) white plays


and wins by a shot in the first four examples. In
the other examples black to move wins.

Right wing attack

199

White to move wins!

Black to move wins!

9.9

9.13

9.10

9.14

9.11

9.15

9.12

9.16

Right wing attack

200

5.3 37 32 29 x 20 32 x 21 16 x 27 33 29
W+

Solutions section 4
Lesson 1: Right wing attack
1.1 34 29! threatening 29 23 while 12 18
is punished by 29 24 19 x 30 39 34 30 x 28
38 32 27 x 38 43 x 1 W+.
1.2 18 23! Threatening 23 29 33 29 23
x 34 44 40 9 14 40 x 29 14 19 44 40 19
x 30 40 35 3 9 35 x 24 9 14 winning
piece 24.
1.3 33 28! 22 x 33 39 x 28 and 18 22 is
punished by 37 31! 22 x 33 29 x 38 20 x 29
38 33 29 x 27 31 x 11 W+.
Lesson 2: Going to <19>
2.1 17 21 26 x 17 12 x 21 31 26* 27 32
26 x 17 22 x 11 33 x 22 32 37 43 38 12
18 winning back the piece and breaking
through soon.
Lesson 4: Attacking the outpost
4.1 A) 13 18 23 x 3 25 30 24 x 35 20 25 3
x 20 15 x 42 B+
B) 44 40 (or 39 34 & 44 39) 9 14 40
34 14 19 27 22 (or 28 22) 19 x 30 32
27 21 x 23 29 x 9 8 13 9x 18 10 14 18 12
with advantage for white.

5.4 44 40 14 19 40 35 19 23 29 24
and both 13 19 x 9 and 23 28 are met by
26 21 17 x 37 25 20 (or 24 20) 30 x 6 W+
Lesson 6: Surrounding
6.1 32 27 12 18 39 33 28 x 39 37 32 26
x 28 49 44 22 x 31 44 x 4 W+
6.2 21 27 37 31* 13 19 24 x 13 18 x 9 40
35 8 13 44 40 (or 35 30) 13 19 (31
26 2 8) B+
6.3 18 23 29 x 7 20 x 29 33 x 24 8 12 7 x
18 13 x 35 B+
6.4 27 31 36 x 27 16 21 27 x 16 17 22 28
x 17 12 x 21 12 x 21 16 x 27 13 19 24 x 13 8
x 46 B+
Lesson 7: The counter attack
7.1 33 29 23 x 25 26 21 17 x 37 15 10
(preventing the king to be caught) 14 x 5 38
32 27 x 38 43 x 3 W+.
7.2 25 20 15 x 24 (14 x 25 33 29 etc.) 35
30 24 x 35 33 29 23 x 34 39 x 30 35 x 24 26
21 17 x 37 41 x 1 W+
Lesson 8: Isolating the outpost

4.2 37 32 11 16 32 x 21 16 x 27 42 37 6
11 47 41 and the 35 40 43 39 37 x 6
threat is lethal.

8.1 25 2 7 26.34 30 18 23 27.29 x 18


12 x 23 (28.30 25 8 12 29.36 31 11 17
30.31 27 13 19 31.24 x 13 9 x 18 with
advantage for black who won the game.

4.3 34 30 (threatening 30 24 & 38 32


W+1) 19 23 37 32 28 x 48 38 32 27 x 38
43 x 32 48 x 34 40 x 16 W+

Lesson 9: Tactical ideas

4.4 14 19 40 35 19 x 30 35 x 24 13 18
followed by 22 28 8 x 30 and breaking
through.
4.5 14 19 34 30 (otherwise black keeps
attacking until white plays 34 30) 25 x 34 39
x 30 18 23 & 23 29 B+1.
Lesson 5: Blocking the attack

9.1 15 20 24 x 15 17 22 28 x 26 13 19 +
9.2 White should play 39 34 in order to catch
the black king after 22 28! 33 x 2 14 19 2 x
32 19 x 46 29 23 46 x 40 49 x 40 =.
9.3 37 32 28 x 37 31 x 42 18 23 39 34 23
29! 34 x 23 13 19 24 x 2 14 19 2 x 32 19
x 48 B+
9.4 38 32 27 x 29 39 33 29 x 38 49 43 38
x 49 31 27 49 x 24 27 x 16 W+

5.1 39 34 28 x 30 35 x 24 W+
5.2 13 18 threatening 18 23 and 27 31
while 33 28 22 x 33 39 x 28 is met by 26 31
37 x 26 27 32 28 x 37 18 23 29 x 18 20 x
49 B+.

9.5 30 25 19 x 30 38 32 27 x 38 39 33 30
x 28 n48 43 23 x 34 43 x 1 W+

Right wing attack

201

9.6 34 30 23 x 34 30 24 19 x 30 38 32 27
x 29 26 21 17 x 26 43 39 34 x 32 37 x 10 4
x 15 25 x 1 W+.
9.7 47 41! Threatening 34 29 23 28* 26
21 27 x 17 38 32 +
9.8 38 32 27 x 38 49 43 38 x 49 29 24 49
x 35 24 19 35 x 38 19 x 17 22 x 11 42 x 4
W+
9.9 38 32 27 x 47 24 20 15 x 33 48 42 47
x 38 43 x 3 W+
9.10 34 29 23 x 34 39 x 30 28 x 48 38 33
25 x 34 24 20 15 x 24 33 28 22 x 33 31 x 2
48 x 31 2 x 8 3 x 12 36 x 27 W+
9.11 34 29 23 x 34 39 x 30 28 x 48 38 33
25 x 34 24 19 13 x 24 33 28 22 x 33 31 x 2
2 x 17 11 x 22 36 x 18 W+
9.12 25 20 14 x 25 39 33 28 x 19 37 32
23 x 34 32 x 3 W+
9.13 3 19 24 x 13 23 29 34 x 23 2 8 1x 2
14 19 2 x 32 19 x 46 B+
9.14 13 19 24 x 13 15 20 25 x 14 23 29
34 x 23 2 8 13 x 2 5 10 2 x 32 10 x 46 B+
9.15 15 20 24 x 15 25 30 34 x 25 23 29
33 x 24 28 32 37 x 28 22 x 35 31 x 11 35
40 45 x 34 12 17 11 x 22 13 18 22 x 13 8 x
48 B+.
9.16 28 33 38 x 29 22 28 31 x 33 9 14 20
x 9 13 x 4 24 x 22 17 x 50 B+

Right wing attack

202

In section 4 we reviewed the right wing attack. In this section we will look at some
other attacking systems. We begin by looking at the centre attack, with an outpost at
<23> (see diagram). After having studied how such an attack should be played we
look at the chances when playing against a centre attack.
When attacking with an outpost at <22> we have both the classical attack (the
opponent has <23> in possession) and the Highland attack (the opponent has no
piece at <23>.
In a Roozenburg attack the outpost at <24> is combined with a piece at <27> while
the opponent occupies <23>. An even more complex situation is the Partie Bonnard.
Sometimes the threat of taking a Roozenburg attack is met by a counter attack, the
so-called Springer counter attack. This can lead to a centre attack.
The systems in this section are pretty complex. After having introduced these
systems you probably will need both experience and more game studying to really
come to master them.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

The centre attack


Playing against a centre attack
The classical attack
The Highland attack
Playing against a Highland attack
Roozenburg
Partie Bonnard
Springer counter attack

203

1.The centre attack

L. Sekongo A. Chizhov
Wch 1996
1.33 29 17 22
2.39 33 11 17
3.44 39 6 11
4.50 44 1 6
5.31 26 16 21
The start of the fascinating Keller opening.
6.32 28 19 23
7.28 x 19 14 x 23 8.35 30 10 14

A. Domchev Valuzhis
Black is trailing 3 temps in development. He
should play 35 18 23 with a good closed
classical position. He probably feared the
36.27 22 move but after this move black can
play a brilliant sacrifice: 36 24 30!! 37.34 x
25 12 17! (threatening 26 31 followed by 15
20 and 17 x 48 +. 38.22 18 13 x 22 creates
a new threat: 22 27 B+.
In the game black allowed his opponent to
launch a centre attack, breaking the classical
structure.

The Keller opening usually is continued 9.30


24 and black chooses from 9 21 27, 9 23
28 and 9 5 10.
9.40 35 14 19

10.37 32

This poor move gives black the opportunity to


change and build a strong centre. Black gains
one temp.
10 21 27
11.32 x 21 22 28 12.33 x 22 18 x 16
13.29 x 18 12 x 23 14.41 37 7 12

35 4 9?
36.28 23! 19 x 28
37.32 x 23 18 x 29
38.34 x 23
38 13 19 39.23 x 14 9 x 20 is bad because
the inactive piece at 15.
After 38 9 14 39.37 32
Threatening 23 18 32 27 33 29 39 x 6
W+.
39 11 16 40.33 29 24 x 33 41.39 x 28
white has a good attack.

Black starts building a central pyramid.


Changing the piece at 25 will give black 4 more
temps, changing the Dirod to - 5.
Black will thus be 5 temps ahead in
development.
15.46 41 13 18 16.30 25 8 13
17.25 x 14 9 x 20 18.37 32 5 10
19.41 37 10 14 20.44 40 4 9
21.47 41 2 8 22.39 33

38 13 18?
Exercise 1.1 How did white now win with a
shot?

204

22 23 28!
Black built the central pyramid. The next step
is to launch the attack. Because of 21.47 41
white cant exchange the outpost easily.
23.33 x 22 17 x 28 24.32 x 23 19 x 28
25.38 32 13 19 26.32 x 23 19 x 28
27.35 30 18 23 28.43 38 14 19
Now black reinforces the attack by building a
strong centre behind the outpost. Notice that
black puts many pieces in the 11 20 zone.
29.30 25
31.41 37
33.44 39
35.45 40

9 14
8 13
20 24
3 8

30.37 31
32.49 44
34.40 35
36.34 30

11 17
12 18
6 11
8 12

Blacks position is superior. He has all strategic


squares + <28>. Dirod is still 5.
47.38 32
49.42 38
51.26 21
53.36 31
55.31 26
57.21 17

28 x 37
24 29
29 x 40
28 32
38 42
12 x 21

48.31 x 42
50.38 32
52.35 x 44
54.44 39
56.48 x 37
58.26 x 17

15 20
27 x 38
23 28
22 28
32 x 41
41 46

White surrendered.
We can summarize blacks strategy as follows:

Step 1: Building a strong centre position


Step 2: Taking an outpost
Black built a compact position, both controlling
23 and 24. Squares 11 until 19 are all
occupied. The next step is getting control over
square 27. Dirod is still 5.
37.40 34 16 21 38.39 33 28 x 39
39.34 x 43 21 27 40.31 x 22 18 x 27

Step 3: Reinforcing the centre behind the


outpost
Step 4: Conquering strategic squares
Step 5: Finishing off the game

A. Chzizhov A. Verchovich
Russian championship 1990
1.33 29 17 22 2.39 33 11 17
3.44 39 6 11 4.50 44 1 6
5.31 26
5 16 21 leads to the Keller opening, but
black chooses another continuation.
Black took all strategic squares. The outpost
can be defended horizontally.
41.37 32 11 16 42.32 x 21 16 x 27
43.42 37 23 28 44.43 39 13 18
45.39 34 18 23 46.37 31 17 22

5
7.32 28
9.36 31
11.44 40

20 25 6.35 30 19 23
23 x 32 8.37 x 28 13 19
9 13 10.40 35 3 9
19 23 12.28 x 19 14 x 23

White centralizes his pieces, getting ready for


an attack. The 41 / 37 / 32 tail is built.

205

13.31 27 22 x 31 14.26 x 37 10 14
15.37 32 17 22 16.41 37 16 21
17.46 41 21 26

Piece 23 is gone. White wants to take square


24 now in order to keep attacking.
34.45 40! 5 10 35.40 35 12 18
36.30 24 19 x 30 37.35 x 24 10 14

White makes a couple of exchanges getting an


outpost at 23. White plays 20.29 23
immediately, giving black no time to block the
centre-attack by 14 19.
18.32 28
20.29 23
22.40 x 29
24.38 32

23 x 32
18 x 29
13 19
9 13

19.37 x 17 11 x 22
21.34 x 23 25 x 34
23.41 37 19 x 28
25.32 x 23 4 10

White has got his outpost at <24>. He invented


a smart way to get centre square 28.
38.49 44! 8 13 39.33 28! 22 x 33
40.39 x 28

25 13 18 26.35 30 4 9 27.30 24
preventing 9 13 gives white a promising
attack. Therefore black decides to change the
outpost in a few moves and for that matter he
builds the 5 / 10 / 14 tail.

A brilliant move! White uses tactics to get


control over the centre. Black cant attack the
outpost by 14 19.
Exercise 1.2 How does white win after 40
14 19?
26.35 30
28.38 32
30.42 38
32.32 x 23

13 19
8 13
19 x 28
14 19

27.43 38 19 x 28
29.32 x 23 13 19
31.38 32 2 8
33.23 x 14 10 x 19

40 7 12 41.28 23! 6 11
42.44 39 18 22 43.39 34 13 18

206

White has a good attacking position, but


doesnt control all strategic squares. Therefore
he must still battle to win the game.
44.34 30 22 27 45.30 25 11 17
46.48 42 17 22 47.37 32 27 x 38
48.42 x 33 22 27

G. Berends G. Kolk
Black started a strong centre attack.

White transported a piece to <25> in order to


breakthrough with a sacrifice. Piece 47 is a
strong defender of the other wing.

22 23 28!
23.33 x 22 17 x 28
24.34 30 18 23
25.38 32 13 18
26.41 36 9 13
27.43 38 4 9

49.25 20! 14 x 25 50.23 19 12 17


51.19 14 17 22

White controls <27>. Black has <23> and <24>


in possession. Blacks central pyramid
supports his central outpost.
White cant go on to king by 52.14 9 because
of 18 23 B+. After changing back there is no
defence left for black.
52.33 28 22 x 33 53.29 x 38 25 30
54.24 x 35 15 20 55.14 x 25 26 31
56.25 20 31 37 57.38 33 27 31
58.20 14 31 36 59.14 10 37 42
60.47 x 38 36 41 61.10 4
Black surrendered.

28.38 33 12 17
Black could have played a strong pseudo
sacrifice: 28 11 16! 29.33 x 22 16 21
30.27 x 16 18 x 38 31.42 x 33 23 29!
White cant play 33 28 because of a coup
Philippe. This means black gets a very strong
outpost at <38>.
29.33 x 22 17 x 28
30.49 43 7 12
31.43 38 2 7
32.40 34 11 17

207

54.30 x 39 22 28

33.38 33 17 21!
34.27 x 16 3 8
35.33 x 22 18 x 38
36.42 x 33 13 18
Black uses a similar idea to reach <38>!
37.36 31
38.34 x 23
39.31 27
40.37 32
41.32 x 43
42.45 40
43.40 34
44.43 38
45.39 x 48

23 29
18 x 38
12 17
17 21
21 x 32
9 13
8 12
32 x 43
13 18

Black wins the endgame in a charming way.


55.35 30 28 32
56.39 33 32 37
57.33 28
57.33 29 37 42 58.30 24 42 48 59.24 x
15 48 37 60.29 24 14 20 61.25 x 14 37 x
5 B+.
57 37 42!
58.28 23 42 48!

White cant play 23 19.


Black has complete control over the centre.
Piece 15 is not bad in a situation with many
pieces at whites right wing. The game shows
why.

59.23 18 48 26
60.18 13 26 3!
61.13 9 is followed by 14 19 25 x 23 3 x 18
B+. White surrendered.

46.47 42 18 23
47.42 38 15 20!
Threatening to gain a piece by 24 29
followed by 20 24. White is obliged to go to
33 after which black calculated that the 2 x 2
change results in a winning endgame.
48.38 33
49.33 x 22
50.34 x 23
51.48 43
52.39 33
53.33 29

23 28!
24 29
19 x 17
18 23
17 22
23 x 34

R. Smedinga P. Leijenaar

208

White has strong formations in the centre and


occupies <27>, <28> and <29>. Black has no
active formations, nor does he possess any
strategic square. White can finish the job with a
centre attack, but he needs to be patient.
If white attacks immediately by 1.28 23? 19 x
28 2.32 x 23 black still has a defence left: 13
19! 3.38 32 19 x 28 4.32 x 23 and now:
1) 4 16 21? 5.27 x 16 18 22 6.16 11 22
27 7.11 6 27 31 8.23 19! 14 x 34 9.6
1 31 x 42 10.1 x 47 W+
2) 4 14 20! 5.44 39 16 21 6.27 x 16 18
22 7.16 11 22 27 8.11 6 27 31 and
black will escape with a draw.
1.44 39! 14 20
2.28 23! 19 x 28
3.32 x 23
And now black is without a serious defence.

Whites space to play is minimized. He has to


give back the piece at 22 sooner or later.
15.42 38
16.50 45
17.36 31
18.27 x 16

10 15
5 10
16 21
18 x 36

White gave back the piece but black has a


better position now with a strong piece at
<36>. He won the game after white had also
missed a winning shot

H. Wiersma A. Gantwarg
Wch match 1979
10 11 17!
In this game black performs an important plan,
by sacrificing a piece after white attacks piece
28 by 38 33.
11.38 33
12.33 x 22
13.29 x 20
14.34 30

V. Doumesh T. Tanchikuzhina
Exercise 1.3 White to move has a winning
plan. Which two moves should she begin with?

17 21
20 24
15 x 24
21 26

S. Nagel B. Post
Exercise 1.4 White can perform a shot getting
a king at <2> Try to find it!

209

A. Schwarzman E. Dul
World championship 2003
Exercise 1.5 White took a great shot. Try to
find it!

Harm Wiersma

T. Goedemoed O. Dijkstra
Exercise 1.6 White won a piece with a shot.
How?

P. Jonkers B. Baksoellah
Exercise 1.7 Black to move performed a shot,
gaining a piece. How?

210

2.Playing against a centre


attack
A centre attack is not always good. Sometimes
the opponent has a strategy to play against the
attack.

Black gets more and more control over the


position.
37.30 24
Black forced a kingshot now.
Exercise 2.1 How did he do that?
R. Boomstra R. Okoneshnikov
White has a sound centre attack, but
underestimates the chances of his opponent.
He can already play 30 24 18 22 39 34
13 19 24 x 13 8 x 28 38 32 =. White
probably wasnt satisfied with a draw.
33.45 40 11 17
34.40 35 17 22
White can still play 35.30 24 7 11 36.38
33 11 16
36 13 19 37.24 x 13 8 x 28 38.36 31!
followed by 31 27 yields a draw.
37.37 31! 26 x 37 38.42 x 31 13 19
38 16 21? 39.31 26 21 27 40.23 19!
13 x 24 41.29 x 9 18 x 38 42.9 3 W+
39.24 x 13 8 x 28 40.31 27 22 x 31 41.38 x
18 31 37 and white can defend the position,
but still not really satisfying. The best move
was 35.38 33! If black plays 13 19 white
changes 37 31 followed by 31 27 with
small advantage. If black plays 35 7 11
36.37 31! 26 x 37 37.42 x 31 white has a
good position:
1) 37 11 16 38.31 27 22 x 31 39.36 x 27
taking all strategic squares.
2) 37 11 17 38.30 24! 17 21 and as we
saw before 31 26 followed by 24 19 is
winning.
3) 37 22 27 38.31 x 22 18 x 27 39.30 24
and white has a good attacking position.
35.30 25 7 11
36.35 30 11 16

A. Gantwarg S. Winkel
White has a centre attack, but little space to
play, due to blacks strong formations. White
has no control over <27> and cant go to <24>
either: 30 24 13 19 24 x 13 8 x 28 38 32
14 20 32 x 23 20 24 loses a piece for
white.
35.30 25 13 19
Black shouldnt play 17 21 because of 29
24 18 x 20 33 28 22 x 31 36 x 9 14 x 3 25 x
14 W+.
The 36.25 20 stick move fails to 14 x 25
37.23 x 14 15 20! B+
36.38 32 19 x 28
37.32 x 23 8 13
38.43 38 11 16
39.49 44?
A terrible mistake. White should have
defended his position by playing 39.37 32 22
27 40.32 x 21 16 x 27 41.33 28. The timid

211

49 44? gives black absolute control over the


left wing.
39 17 21
40.44 40 21 27
41.38 32 27 x 38
42.33 x 42 16 21
43.40 35 13 19
44.42 38 19 x 28
45.38 32

51.39 34? 2 8
52.38 32 41 47?
52 15 20! 53.24 x 15 41 47 was winning.
53.24 19! 47 x 13
54.25 20 18 x 40
55.20 x 7
Draw.

45 21 27
A. de Hoon S. Winkel
This continuation is very logical, but 45 2 8
46.32 x 23 8 13 might be even better!
1) 47.47 42 13 19 48.42 38 19 x 28 49.35
30 21 27 50.38 33 14 19 51.30 24 19
x 30 52.25 x 34 15 20 53.34 30 20 25
54.30 24 27 31 55.36 x 27 22 x 42 56.33 x
13 42 48 57.39 33 48 31 +.

Black has a centre attack but in this case it is


very weak. Why? Black controls 28 and 23, but
has no control over 27 nor 24. If we take a
closer look, black suffers from a lack in space.
If black is to play, what should he play? The
only possible move is 9 13. Playing piece 2,
4 or 14 is punished by 21 17 W+. If white
succeeds in punishing 9 13, he will win.

2) 47.39 33! 21 27 48.47 42 15 20


49.35 30 13 19 50.30 24 19 x 39 51.24 x
15 39 44 52.29 24 with a difficult endgame
for white.

Exercise 2.2 What is the winning move for


white?

46.32 x 23
47.36 x 27
48.47 x 38
49.35 30
50.30 24

27 31
22 x 42
16 21
31 36
36 41

F. Tiemensma A. van Berkel


White missed the chance to force a tactical win
exploiting the weaknesses at <13> and <18>.
51.39 33 will bring white a draw: 41 47
52.23 19! 14 x 34 53.33 29 47 x 33 54.29 x
40 33 x 20 55.25 x 14 =.

Exercise 2.3 Can you find the forcing?

212

B. Sjkitkin A. Schwarzman
Exercise 2.4 How did black win after the
played 26.29 24?

White cant make the 34 30 x 30 change, for


black wins a piece by playing 13 19.
36.40 35 21 27
Now at 35 30 13 19 wins a piece for black.
White needs the 29 / 34 / 40 tail to defend his
central outpost.
37.45 40
38.37 32
39.32 x 21
40.35 30
41.30 24

17 21
21 26
26 x 17
17 21
21 27

G. Valneris A. Georgiev
Wch barrage
29.28 23 19 x 28
30.32 x 23 15 20
31.44 40?
White should have played 34 30 x 30 and
after the 20 24 exchange the game would
have been drawn.
31 4 9!
Whites position is blocked. He cant play 40
35 20 24 B+1. White wont get an extra
outpost at 24. White lacks space to play.
32.43 38
33.49 43
34.50 45
35.47 41

White has finally reached <24> but still his


position is blocked
42.41 37 14 19
43.23 x 14 20 x 9
44. 40 35 2 8
Black won the game.

10 15
17 21
9 13
11 17

213

3.The classical attack


Going to the graveyard, <22>, can be
dangerous, as the word graveyard already
suggests.

K. Overes A. Idrisova

A forcing to remember! White has no good


reply against the 19 23 threat. White
sacrificed a piece with 22 18 13 x 22 and
lost.

A. Baliakin R. van Marle


Black has an outpost at the graveyard <29>.

Black controls the right wing with strong pieces


at both <24> and <25>. 45 40 and 43 39
are impossible because of 19 23 B+. Black is
threatening to play 18 22 B+.
White went to the graveyard. This isnt a
mistake, but she now must upmost take care!

Exercise 3.1 How can white force a win?

32.27 22 18 x 27
33.37 31 26 x 37
34.42 x 22 9 13
If black is in a hurry and plays 34 6 11
35.48 42 12 17 white can change 33 29 x
29 or even better take a kingshot: 33 29 24 x
33 28 x 39 17 x 28 38 32 28 x 48 39 34 48
x 30 35 x 4.
35.48 42 6 11
36.42 37?
Giving up the 33 / 38 / 42 tail is a grave
mistake. White should have kept the tail active
and play 36.36 31. In that case 36. 12 17
is answered by 37.33 29 24 x 33 38.38 x 29
and white is okay.

Baba Sy E. Biscons
1.27 22! 18 x 27
2.31 x 22 23 29
2 16 21 is met by 3.22 18 13 x 22 4.32
27 W+.
Also possible (but less strong) is 33 29 23 x
25 22 18 13 x 33 38 x 9 W+.
3.30 25 16 21
3 29 34 4.33 29 34 x 23 5.22 18 13 x
33 6.38 x 9 W+.

36 12 17!

4.22 18 12 x 23
5.35 30 24 x 35
6.33 x 24 19 x 30
7.28 x 10 30 34
8.43 39 34 x 43
9.38 x 49 35 40
10.49 44 40 x 49

214

11.10 4 49 x 27
12.4 x 31

Taking an outpost at <22> can be very


strong, especially if the piece at <22> cant
be attacked.

Black still cant play 12 18 now because of


43 38 18 x 36 34 29 23 x 34 37 31 36 x
27 32 x 1 +.
30 3 8 gives white another kingshot
Exercise 3.3 Write down the kingshot for
white!

H. Jansen J. Bastiaannet
White is going to take advantage of blacks
weak right wing with a dangling piece at <7>.
25.33 28! 13 19
26.27 21! 16 x 27
27.31 x 22

30 9 14 31.43 38
31 3 8 is strongly met by 48 42!
31 3 9 32.48 42 14 20 white wins by
playing 33.22 18! 13 x 22 34.26 21 17 x 26
35.28 x 8 7 12 36.8 x 17 11 x 22 37.33 29!
+.
In the game black gave a piece by 17 21 and
lost.

The classical attack is very strong, because


piece 22 can never be attacked, nor
exchanged.
27 8 13 28.34 30 3 8 29.30 25 leads
to a hopeless position for black:
29 17 21 30.26 x 17 12 x 21 is met by
31.22 18! 13 x 33 32.38 x 20 and piece 20
will go to <15> and break through by a 25 20
sacrifice.
29 24 29 gives white the opportunity to
make a kingshot.
Exercise 3.2
white!

Write down the kingshot for


A. Bulatov J. Krajenbrink
27 14 20
28.38 33 8 13

28 9 13 29.43 38 3 9 30.48 43! leads


to a very unpleasant position for black, for
example 30 20 25 31.33 29! 24 x 33
32.38 x 18 12 x 23 33.42 37 9 14 34.26
21 17 x 26 35.22 17 11 x 33 36.34 30 25 x
34 37.43 39 33 x 44 38.49 x 20 +
29.42 37! 20 25
30.36 31

21 18 23!
22.29 x 18 12 x 23
Threatening 20 24 followed by a 24 30 23
29 coup Philippe. Therefore white closes <42>
and <44>. The only way to survive was playing
49 43 20 24 40 35. But white wanted to
use the formations at his right wing.
23.47 42 20 24
24.49 44 7 12
25.48 43

215

The variation 35.36 31 24 29 36.33 x 24 20


x 29 37.43 38 18 22 is hopeless for white.
White thus gave a piece playing 35.34 30 24
x 35 and lost.

Black plays some strong moves, giving white


forced replies.
25 16 21!
26.26 x 17 12 x 21
27.37 31 21 26
28.31 27 11 17
Threatening 23 29 17 22 while 42 37 is
met by the coup Philippe 17 21 24 30 23
29 19 x 30 6 11 8 12 13 x 31 B+.
29.27 22 26 31
30.22 x 11 6 x 17
Threatening 23 29 17 22 again.
31.42 37 31 x 42
32.38 x 47 14 20

Usually it is good to build a compact position


with all pieces in contact. This is not always the
case, like in this example. If black plays 1 8
12? 2.33 28! 3 8 white can attack
strongly playing 3.27 22 18 x 27 4.31 x 22
1) 4 16 21 5.22 18! 13 x 44 6.43 39 44
x 33 7.38 x 27 W+
2) 4. 17 21 5.22 17 11 x 44 6.43 39 44
x 33 7.38 x 7 W+
3) 4 14 20 5.39 33! and black has no
good move left.
4) 4 23 29 5.39 33 16 21 6.42 37 12
18 7.28 23! W+
Exercise 3.4 If black plays 1 8 12 2.33
28 17 21 white can win in a surprising way.
How?

33.50 45 will be answered by the classical


attack 24 29! 34.33 x 24 20 x 29. White cant
escape anymore: 35.43 38 8 12 36.34 30
12 18 37.39 33 18 22 38.33 x 24 22 x 42
39.47 x 38 17 22 40.44 39
40.30 25 19 x 30 41.25 x 34 is met by 22
28 32 27 28 33 B +
40 9 14 41.40 34 3 8 42.45 40 8 12
43.40 35 22 28 44.32 27 14 20 B+.

J.M. Ndjofang H. Wiersma

33.47 41 8 12
34.41 36 12 18

17.49 44?

Black threatens to play 24 29 x 29 followed


by 29 33 now.

Carelessly played, underestimating blacks


classical attack. White could have prevented
the 24 29 x 29 attack by playing 17.41 37.
In that case 17 24 29 18.33 x 24 20 x 29 is

216

met by 19.28 22 17 x 28 20.27 2 16 x 27


21.31 x 24 19 x 30 22.34 x 25 W+1.
17 24 29!
18.33 x 24 20 x 29
19.35 30 9 14
Exercise 3.5 How does black win after 20.39
33?

20.47 42 17 21
21.41 37 21 26

29.25 x 34 18 22
30.27 x 20 15 x 44
31.32 x 23 44 50?
A grave mistake. Black should have played
31 44 49 32.31 27 12 18! 33.23 x 12
49 40 34.34 30 40 x 1 with a very good
endgame.
32.23 18 12 x 23
33.37 32 26 x 28
34.43 39 50 x 33
35.38 x 18
The game was drawn.

22.39 33
A. Getmanski A. Georgiev
Instead of defending his outpost, black makes
a positional sacrifice. He uses the time white
spends on taking piece 29, to occupy <22>,
leaving white with no space to play at his left
wing.
22 12 17!
23.33 x 24 17 22
24.28 x 17 11 x 22
25.44 39 8 12

White gives back the piece aiming his arrows


at <18>. But black will show that this is not a
good solution for white by making a
breakthrough shot.
26.30 25 19 x 30
27.34 29 23 x 34
28.30 x 29 22 28

21.49 43 24 29!
22.33 x 24 20 x 29
This strong classical attack reduces whites
space to play.
23.35 30
24.39 33
25.33 x 24
26.43 39

10 14
14 20
20 x 29
9 14

After 27.39 33 14 20 28.33 x 24 20 x 29


29.48 43
29.44 39 is met by 29 33 38 x 29 19 24
B+.
29 4 9 30.43 39 9 14 31.39 33 14
20 32.33 x 24 20 x 29 the attack at <29>

217

comes to an end, for 44 39 is met by 29 33


38 x 29 19 24 again.
27.48 42 21 26
28.39 33 14 20
29.33 x 24 20 x 29
30.30 25 7 12
White decides to get rid off piece 29, but the
exchange will spoil his central position.

37.27 22
38.22 x 11
39.28 22
40.32 27
41.22 17
42.17 x 8

11 17
16 x 7
8 13
12 18
7 12
3 x 12

Although the amount of pieces stuck at whites


left wing, has lowered, it still is weak.
43.44 39 1 6

31.38 33 29 x 38
32.42 x 33 6 11

Piece 47 is the only piece left in the Drent


zone He cant play 47 42 because of the
Coup Weiss 23 29 34 x 14 13 19 14 x 23
18 x 47 +.
Whites left wing is very weak. Black will exploit
this weakness efficiently.
33.34 29 23 x 34
34.40 x 29 19 24
34.29 x 20 15 x 24
Patience is needed. Black first takes back
<24> under control. Now hes going for <23>.
35.47 42 13 19
36.42 38 18 23

Whites left wing looks ugly. At his right flank


white has little power too. He decides to gain
space by moving to <22>. Black centralizes
piece 16 in response.

White suffers from a lack of space.


44. 27 22 18 x 27 45.31 x 22 cant be played
because of 45 12 18! 46.22 17 18 22
B+.
44.38 32 23 29
45.45 40 29 x 38
46.32 x 43 6 11
47.39 33 18 23
48.43 39
48.43 38 11 16 49.38 32 12 18 50.33
28 4 9 51.28 22 9 14 52.22 17 24
29 is losing for white too.
48 11 16
49.27 22 16 21
50.40 35 12 18

White has no sensible move left and he


resigned.

218

Mutual outposts at the graveyard

4 10 11.49 44 21 26 12.47 41 24 29
13.33 x 24 20 x 29
White launches an attack at piece 29.
14.39 33
15.33 x 24
16.44 39
17.50 44

14 20
20 x 29
10 14
5 10

17 17 21 18.39 33 14 20 19.25 x 14 9
x 20 20.33 x 24 20 x 29 21.44 39:

Both white and black have a classical attack.


Exercise 3.6 How can white to move win a
piece?

1) 21 15 20 22.39 33 20 24 23.22 18!


13 x 22 24.28 x 17 11 x 22 25.35 30 24 x 44
26.33 x 11 6x 17 27.43 39 44 x 33 28.38 x
16 W+
2) 21 12 18 22.39 33 18 x 27 23.33 x 24
19 x 30 24.35 x 24 26 31 25.37 x 17 11 x 33
26.38 x 9 27 x 47 27.9 4 47 x 20 28.43 38
20 x 47 29.36 31 47 x 18 30.4 x 36 W+
17 14 20 18.25 x 14 9 x 20 is met by 19.32
27! 23 x 21 20.35 30 17 x 28 21.37 31 26
x 37 22.41 x 25 winning piece 29.
17 12 18 18.39 33 loses a piece for
black.
18.35 30
18.39 33 is met by 19 24 B+.

Schokman F. van Amersfoort


Both players have an outpost at the graveyard.
Black to move thought he could win a piece by
playing 21 27.

18 17 21
19.40 35 12 18
20.39 33 18 x 27
21.33 x 24

Exercise 3.7 Why is 21 27 losing?

A. Kuyken V. Agafonov
Position after 1.33 28 18 23 2.39 33 12
18 3.31 27 7 12 4.44 39 20 24 5.37
31 14 20 6.41 37 2 7 7.27 22 18 x 27
8.31 x 22 10 14 9.34 30 16 21 10.30 25

Black will lose a piece after 21 8 12 22.37


31 26 x 37 23.42 x 22 12 18 24.41 37 18
x 27 25.37 31 7 12 26.31 x 22 12 18
27.32 27 21 x 32 28.28 x 37 18 x 27 29.37
31 W+1.
21 7 12
22.28 22 27 x 18

219

23.32 28 23 x 32
24.38 x 7
Black resigned.

A. Schwarzman J.M. Ndjofang


Exercise 3.8 How did white win with a shot?

Jean Marc Ndjofang

220

4.The Highland attack

Exercise 4.1 How does white punish 12 17?

If you take an outpost at <22> while the


opponent has no piece at <23> the position is
called a Hoogland or Highland attack.

D. Tsinman A. Novikov
Black has a good central position with strong
formations, possessing both <23> and <24>.
A. Ermakov J. Bastiaannet
Black has a weak position without any base
pieces and no active formations. His position is
split. Blacks wings are not connected well.
White launches a strong Highland attack.
32.27 22 9 13
33.31 27 13 19
Black cant play 3312 18 34.34 30 nor
33 12 17 34.27 21 16 x 18 35.28 22
W+.
34.36 31!

44 17 22
45.34 30 22 x 31
46.26 x 37 23 29!
The Highland attack gives black more space.
47.38 32 18 23
48.42 38? 11 17
White should have played 43 38, for piece 43
is becoming inactive in the game.
49.39 33 12 18
50.37 31 7 11
51.31 27 11 16

Preventing 8 13 35.22 17! 11 x 33 36.38 x


29 24 x 33 37.32 28 33 x 22 38.27 x 9 W+
34 20 25
35.38 33
Now 35 8 13 is met by 22 17 (or 22 18)
12 x 21 33 29 24 x 22 27 x 9 W+.
35 12 17 is punished by the 33 29 Kung
Fu shot.
35 15 20 36.48 43!
52.43 39
52.33 28 is punished by the 16 21 27 x 16
18 22 Dussaut sacrifice.
52 16 21!
53.27 x 16 18 22
A nice sacrifice in order to freeze white out.
Black also could have played 53 17 22
54.27 21 16 x 27 55.32 x 21 22 27! 56.21 x
32 18 22 57.39 34 29 x 40 58.35 x 44 24 x
Black has no good move left.

221

35 50.44 39 19 24 51.39 34 23 29
52.34 x 23 35 40 B+.
54.39 34
55.35 x 44
56.44 39
57.32 x 23

29 x 40
24 x 35
23 28
19 x 28

And black won.

M. Dolfing D. Kleinrensink
White has
formations.

strong

centre

with

active

18.34 30! 3 9

Lighthart R. Keller

After 18 14 19 white can build a very


strong construction at his right wing: 19.39
34 4 9 20.49 43 10 14 21.43 39 18 23
22.30 25 1 7 23.34 30 12 18 24.39 34
7 12

The immediate 14 20 shot will not bring more


than a draw.
51 18 22!
52.37 31 14 20!
Tsjizjow showed the same win in a game
against Rybakov.
53.25 x 14 19 x 10
54.30 x 28 10 14
55.33 x 24 22 x 42
56.32 28 42 47
57.31 27 47 x 15
58.27 22 17 21
59.22 18

59 15 29!
60.28 23 29 34
61.35 30 34 x 25
62.18 13 14 19!
63.13 x 24 25 9

Look at the power block at whites right wing!


25.34 29! 23 x 34 26.40 x 20 15 x 24 27.47
42!
Black cant play 18 23? now, due to 33 29!
27 11 17 28.27 22 18 x 27 29.31 x 11 6 x
17 30.45 40
White is attacking piece 24 again. At 13 18
he 12 18 he plays 28 23!
30 17 21 31.28 22! 2 7
31 12 18 32.32 28 18 x 27 33.37 31 26
x 37 34.42 x 22 21 26 35.40 34 8 12
36.28 23! W+
32.22 17 21 27 33.32 x 21 16 x 27 34.40
34 12 x 21 35.37 31 26 x 37 36.42 x 22 8
12 37.33 28! and the 28 23 threat is lethal.
19.30 x 19 13 x 24
20.40 34 9 13
21.49 44 4 9
22.34 30 14 20
23.30 x 19 13 x 24
25.45 40 9 13

222

Giving away control over <9>. Therefore 8 13


would have been more logical.
26.40 34 11 17

37.36 31 6 11
Of course white shouldnt allow black to retreat
edge piece 26 with the centralizing 21 27 x
17. White takes <27> in possession again.
38.31 27 11 16

27.34 30!
White hits at <13> again and weakens the
heart of blacks defence, before he launches
an attack.
27 17 22
28.28 x 17 12 x 21
29.30 x 19 13 x 24
30.27 22! 18 x 27
31.31 x 22 8 13
32.39 34 2 8
33.32 28 1 7
34.38 32!

34 7 12 is strongly met by 35.22 18 13 x


22 36.28 x 17 20 25
36 12 18? 37.44 39 21 x 12 38.37 31
W+
36 21 27 37.32 x 21 16 x 27 38.34 30 12
x 21 39.30 x 19 gives white a huge advantage.
37.44 39! 10 14 38.48 43 14 19 39.36
31 with a winning position for white, for
example: 21 27 39.31 x 22 12 x 21 40.32
28 6 11 41.22 18 8 12 42.18 x 7 11 x 2
43.28 23 19 x 28 44.33 x 22 and the 34 30
threat cant be parried.
34 7 11
35.44 39 11 17
36.22 x 11 16 x 7

39.28 22!
Launching another Highland attack. This time a
closed attack (piece 27). Black cant get rid of
piece 22 anymore.
39. 20 25
40.48 43 15 20
41.33 28 10 15
42.34 30 25 x 34
43.39 x 19 13 x 24
44.43 39

Blacks pieces are shattered over the board.


His only formation 15 / 20 / 24 isnt active,
because 24 30 365 x 24 20 x 29 loses to 28
23 +. Whites position is thus winning.
44 8 13
45.39 34 20 25
46.47 42 7 12
47.42 38 15 20
47 12 18 48.38 33 15 20 49.34 29 13
19 50.22 x 13 19 x 8 51.27 22 8 12 52.28
23 12 17 53.22 x 11 16 x 7 54.23 18 W+.
48.38 33 13 19

223

49.34 29 12 17
50.22 x 11 16 x 7
51.27 x 16 19 23
52.28 x 30 25 x 23
53.35 30
Black surrendered.

The best chance for black to win is to play a


Highland attack. Because piece 15 isnt active
white should be able to defend.
45 23 29
46.37 31 18 23
47.31 27
Safer is 47.31 26! For example 47 13 18
48.32 27 11 16 49.42 37 17 22 50.27
21! 16 x 27 51.37 32 =
47 13 18
48.42 37 17 22
49.37 31?
A huge mistake! 49.27 21 11 16 50.40
34! 29 x 40 51.35 x 44 24 x 35 52.44 39 16 x
27 53.32 x 21 22 27 54.21 x 32 18 22
55.37 31 would have let to a draw.

H. Jansen S. Kalinov
Black has weak pieces at 9 and 15. White
could have profited by launching a closed
Highland attack:

49 11 17
50.31 26 22 x 31
51.26 x 37

1.28 22!
Exercise 4.2 How does white win after 1 19
23?
1 12 18
2.33 28 24 29
2 18 23 3.39 34 24 29 4.35 30 29 x
40 5.30 24 19 x 30 6.28 x 10 15 x 4 7.25 x 45
W+.

Without pieces 40 en 15, this position is the


same as Lighart Keller.

3.35 30
Threatening 39 33, while 29 34 39 33 (34
40 30 24 W+) also loses too for black.

51 14 20?
52.25 x 14 19 x 10
53.30 x 28 18 22
54.33 x 24 22 x 31
55.32 27 31 x 22
White lost the endgame after 56.35 30? 22
28 57.40 34 28 32 58.34 29 32 38
59.29 23 38 43 60.23 18 17 22 61.18 x
27 43 48 and white resigned.
White could still have drawn the game by
playing 56.40 34! and piece 34 will go to
king!
However, black could have avoided this
drawing opportunity.

R. Clerc A. Chizhov
Wch match 1997

Exercise 4.3 How should black have played


st
on the 51 move?

224

A. Bulatov S. Nosevich
Exercise 4.4 White to move could have taken
a breakthrough shot. Can you find it?

Herman Hoogland

J. Krajenbrink H. Jansen
Exercise 4.5 White took a winning king shot.
How?

Exercise 4.6 White forces the win of a piece.

225

5.Playing against a Highland


attack

35.36 31 14 20
37.48 43 20 25
38.43 39
Whites weakness, the gap at <39> is now
resolved. Blacks space is minimized.
38 8 12
39.42 37 9 14
40.47 41 13 18
41.41 36 3 8

Baba Sy A. Slaby
Black has a compact, central position with an
outpost at <29>. Whites pieces are
surrounding the centre. The best move for
black is 28 17 22 attacking <27>. Black
cant use the 9 / 13 / 18 tail at once, for 18 22
27 x 18 13 x 22 is punished by a shot.
Exercise 5.1 Which shot do we mean?
28 15 20
29.42 37 20 24
Now <24> is closed white can try to build a
chain-lock, getting pieces at <33> & <34>.
30.27 21

There is a huge weakness at <13>, so white


should take tactics into account. He finished
the game with a great shot.
42.26 21 17 x 26
43.16 11 7 x 16
44.35 30 24 x 44
45.33 x 2 44 x 42
46.37 x 48 26 x 37
47.48 42 37 x 48
48.2 35 48 x 30
49.35 x 10

A normal move when playing against the


Highland-attack. White wants to take control
over the left flank.
30 17 22
31.21 16 22 28
32.37 31 28 x 37
33.31 x 42 12 17
34.39 33! 18 22
White takes the chain-lock!

H. Wiersma Baba Sy (1963)

226

F. Gordijn W. de Jong
Black uses tactics in order to prevent the
strategically correct 33 29 x 29 exchange.
1 3 9!
33 29 x 29 is now punished by 25 30 34 x
25 15 20 25 x 21 16 x 40 B+.
2.36 31
It is better to play 34 29.
2 8 12
3.31 26 2 8!
After 4.34 29? 16 21 5.29 x 20 15 x 24
white has no good move left (check this
yourself!). White makes the change to <29>
but black will respond in a very strong way,
taking over <24> again and using tactics.
4.33 29 24 x 33
5.38 x 29 19 24
6.29 x 20 15 x 24
7.39 33

R. van Eijk W. Bremmer


Several tactical
position.

possibilities

govern

this

1.37 31 26 x 37
2.32 x 41?
Giving black the opportunity to take a shot:
24 30!
3.35 x 15 25 30
4.34 x 25 4 10
5.15 x 4
9 14
6.4 x 18 12 x 45
It would have been much better to play 1.36
31! 12 18:
1) 2.31 27 7 12 3.48 43 4 10 (?) 35
30! 24 x 35 22 17 11 x 31 28 23 making
king at <4>.
2) 2.33 29! 18 x 36 3.37 31 24 x 22 4.32
27 26 x 37 5.27 x 18 13 x 22 6.42 x 31 36
x 27 7.38 32 27 x 38 8.39 33 38 x 29
9.34 x 1 with a good endgame for white.

7.43 38 16 21 followed by 12 18 wont


solve whites problems.

R. Twilhaar - D. de Voogd
Black took a shot.
Exercise 5.2 Try to find the winning shot for
black.

Whites attack is not strong. He has a huge


weakness at <42>, making his position
tactically vulnerable. Black controls the other
wing.

227

37 20 24!
38.34 30 25 x 34
39.40 x 20 15 x 24
40.41 36 3 9!
41.45 40

5.16 x 18

O. Dijkstra W. Lep

41 6 11?

1 24 30?
2.27 22 18 x 27
3.31 x 22

Black should have played 24 30 42.35 x 24


19 x 30 43.37 31 (what else?) 26 x 37 44.32
x 41 12 17! 45.22 x 11 6 x 17 and black wins
a piece (38 33 17 21).

Black has no good move left.

Exercise 5.3 How could white have escaped


after 41 6 11 ?

2) 3 19 24 (or 12 18) is followed by 4.32


28! 23 x 43 5.34 x 23 43 x 34 40 x 18

6.40 34

3) 3 3 8 or 3 3 9 are met by 4.22 18


13 x 22 5.40 35 29 x 40 6.35 x 2 (or 35 x 4)
+.

1) 3 30 35 4.47 42 35 x 33 5.36 31 29
x 40 6.38 x 20 25 x 14 7.45 x 34 W+1.

Exercise 5.4 How did black win now?


3) 3 6 11 (or 7 11) 4.22 18! 13 x 22
5.40 35 29 x 40 6.35 x 13 12 18 7.45 x 34
18 x 9 8.34 30!! 25 x 43 9.32 27 43 x 21
10.26 x 10 +.
The answers to other moves you can try to find
yourself.

T. Sijbrands
In this composition of Sijbrands white can force
a win in a beautiful way.
A. Mogiljanski A. Chizhov
1.38 32! 9 14
Forced because of the 32 28 threat.
2.27 22! 18 x 49
3.26 21 49 x 24
4.21 16 29 x 40

Blacks pieces are positioned well to play


against the Highland attack. He can take
control over the right wing.
35 14 19

228

Threatening 25 30 34 x 25 15 20 25 x 23
12 18 23 x 12 8 x 48 so white has to close
the <39> gap.
36.43 39 12 18
White cant go to <17> because of 37.22 17
16 21! 38.17 12
38.17 11 21 27 loses a piece for white.
38 8 x 17 39.31 27 18 22! 40.27 x 16 19
23 and because of whites lack of both
formations and space, he is frozen out
completely.
37.31 27 8 12
38.33 28 18 23
39.39 33 12 18

62.38 32?
White collapses. 62.37 31 30 34 63.31 27
is the best defence, for after 35 40 64.38
32 white threatens to make a draw both by
playing 22 18 13 x 31 32 27 31 x 22 28 x 8
and by 33 29 34 x 23 45 x 34 =.
62 30 34
63.32 27
63.37 31 12 18 64.22 17 19 24 is also
very bad for white.
63 12 18!

Because 50.22 17 leads to a bad endgame


after the coup Philippe 25 30 34 x 25 23 29
33 x 24 19 x 30 25 x 34 2 18 22 27 x 18 13 x
31, white decides to make a pseudo sacrifice
which indeed is whites best defence. Black
cant keep the piece, but will use the time white
spends on gaining the piece back, for
launching an attack at whites weakened right
flank.
40.34 29
41.50 44
42.44 40
43.40 x 29
44.29 x 20
45.37 31
46.32 x 41
47.27 21
48.21 x 32
49.32 27
50.27 22
51.41 37

23 x 34
25 30
30 35
19 24
15 x 24
26 x 37
3 8
18 x 27
13 19
8 12
9 13
24 30

Weve already seen that 63 35 40? 64.37


32 leads to no more than a draw, but black has
more arrows on his bow.
64.22 17 35 40
65.27 21 16 x 27
66.17 11 40 44
67.11 7
Black could have finished the game with 67
18 22! 68.28 x 17 44 50 (7 1 50 x 6 1 x
40 27 32 37 x 28 6 x 35) B+.
In the game he played 44 50, but after a
long, complicated endgame white couldnt find
the draw and black won after all.

229

6.Roozenburg attack

P. Roozenburg B. Springer
White possesses <24> and <27>, while black
occupies <23>. Black always has a piece at
<25>, and usually also a piece at <20>. In this
case, without a piece at <20>, it is an open
Roozenburg attack. In 1945 when the game
was played - the Roozenburg attack was not
known yet, so both Roozenburg and Springer
had little experience with this system.

26 21 26 27.38 33

27 7 12
Also after 27 4 9 28.33 28 9 14 29.28 x
19 14 x 23 30.39 33 black loses piece 23.
28.33 28 12 17
29.28 x 19
White won a piece and later the game.

White shouldnt play 16.42 38? 23 28!


17.33 x 11 18 23 18.29 x 18 13 x 33 19.39 x
28 1 6 B+. A logical move for white is 16.43
38, after which a possible variation is: 17 21
17.44 40 1 6 18.49 44 6 11 19.33 28
21 26 20.28 x 19 18 22 21.27 x 18 12 x 14
22.32 28 and white has a right wing attack, a
common switch in the Roozenburg system. .
16.41 36 17 22?
Black should have played 17 21. Now white
can launch an attack at 23 without black being
able to take a 2 x 2 change after 33 28,
because the piece at 27 is gone.
17.43 38 22 x 31
18.37 x 26 1 - 6
19.33 28!
The attack on 23 begins. Without a piece at
<27> this is very dangerous for black.
19. 9 14
20.28 x 19 14 x 23
21.38 33 16 21
22.26 x 17 12 x 21
23.33 28 3 9
24.28 x 19 9 14
25.42 38 14 x 23
26.49 43
26.38 33 would allow black to change 21
27 32 x 21 23 28 33 x 22 18 x 16 =.

After 1.33 28 black can take the 2 x 2


exchange in three different ways, of which only
one way is correct:
1) 1.33 28 17 21? 2.28 x 19 18 22 3.27 x
18 12 x 14 4.34 30! 25 x 23 5.24 19 13 x
24 6.32 27 21 x 32 7.37 x 10 W+
2) 1.33 28 6 11? 2.28 x 19 18 22 3.27 x
18 12 x 14 4.34 30 25 x 23 5.32 27 20 x 29
6.27 21 16 x 27 7.38 33 29 x 38 8.43 x 1
W+
3)1.33 28 4 10! 2.28 x 19 18 22 3.27 x 18
12 x 14 =
White can take a kingshot like in variation 2,
but after the shot black plays 13 18 and the
king is caught for only one piece. The
difference with the second variation is that
piece 6 is still there. In the former variation
white can escape with his king to square 6!

230

So white rather plays 4.38 33 after which


black shouldnt play 14 19? because of 29
23! 20 x 27 23 x 5 W+.

T. Sijbrands A. Gantwarg
1.32 28 19 23 2.28 x 19 14 x 23
3.37 32 10 14 4.35 30 20 25
5.33 29 14 19 6.40 35 5 10
7.41 37 10 14 8.46 41 17 22
9.31 27 22 x 31 10.36 x 27 11 17
11.30 24 19 x 30 12.35 x 24 14 20

M. Monteba S. Wijker
Tactics are very important in the Roozenburg
system. Black successfully tried to trap his
opponent playing 22 11 17 23.37 31? 26
x 28 24.33 x 11 21 x 32 25.38 x 27 12 17
26.11 x 22 23 28 27.22 x 33 18 23 28.29 x
18 20 x 49 B+.

From a well-known opening a Roozenburg


attack for white emerges. 12 14 19 13.45
40 19 x 30 14.40 35 is okay for white.
13.45 40 6 11

White should have played 23.50 45 17 22


22 x 31 24.36 x 27 12 17 25.24 19! 13 x 24
26.34 30 24 x 44 27.39 x 50 23 x 34 28.27
22 17 x 39 29.39 33 39 x 28 30.32 x 1 W+.

13 25 30 14.34 x 14 23 x 45 15.14 10
leads nowhere for black.
14.38 33 17 21 15.42 38 21 26
16.41 36 11 17 17.48 42

M. Lepsic R. Clerc
Clerc played the beautiful silent move 17 4
10! Although black has no threats, all whites
moves are met by a shot.
1) 18.34 29 18 23 B+
2) 18.34 30 27 32 19.38 x 27 24 29 20.33
x 24 22 x 33 21.39 x 28 18 22 22.27 x 18 12
x 41 B+
3) 18.47 41 27 32 19.38 x 27 24 29 B+
4) 18.37 32 17 21! 19.26 x 8 3 x 12 20.28 x
8 18 22 21.32 x 21 22 28 22.33 x 22 24
29 23.34 x 23 19 x 48 24.8 x 19 14 x 23 B+

17 4 10 18.50 45
Now black should play 17 1 6! 18.33 28
9 14! 19.28 x 19 14 x 23 20.38 33 6 11
21.33 28 26 31 22.37 x 26 13 19 23.24 x
22 3 9 24.29 x 18 12 x 23 25.28 x 19 17 x 48
26.36 31 11 17 27.19 14 10 x 19 28.47
42 48 x 37 29.31 x 42 7 12 30.42 38 with a
bad position for white, since his distribution of
pieces is not good. His left wing is severely
weakened.
Playing 18.33 28 would have prevented this
problems for white.
If black plays 17 1 6 white cant play 18.33
28 because of 25 30! 19.34 x 14 23 x 45

231

20.14 10 18 23! 21.28 x 19 17 22 22.27 x


18 12 x 5 B+1.
17.. 1- 6 should be met by 18.40 35 like in
Sijbrands Gantwarg 1990: 17 1 6 18.40
35 6 11 19.33 28 4 10
19 26 31 isnt good, for after 20.37 x 26! 13
19 21.24 x 22 4 10 22.28 x 19 17 x 48
white replies 23.19 14! 10 x 19 24.29 24 20
x 40 25.39 34 48 x 30 26.35 x 4 W+.
20.28 x 19 9 14 21.36 31! 14 x 23 22.27
22 18 x 36 23.29 x 9 20 x 40 24.9 4 16 21
25.4 27 11 16 26.50 45 3 9 27.27 x 4
21 27 28.32 x 21 16 x 27 29.45 x 34 10 14
30.4 x 31 36 x 27 and after a few moves the
game was drawn.
18
17 21 19.33 28 1 6
20.28 x 19 18 22 21.27 x 18 12 x 14
Now white simply gets a good right wing
attack.
22.32 28 14 19 23.40 35 19 x 30
24.35 x 24 10 14 25.45 40 14 19
26.40 35 19 x 30 27.35 x 24 9 14
28.44 40 14 19 29.40 35 19 x 30
30.35 x 24 7 12 31.38 33

White cant do anything positive against whites


attack. Therefore he decides to get rid of piece
24. Whites position remains better centralized.
31
33.42 38
35.34 29
37.36 31
39.31 27
41.43 39

13 19
20 24
12 17
17 22
2 8
3 9

32.24 x 13 8 x 19
34.29 x 20 15 x 24
36.29 x 20 25 x 14
38.28 x 17 21 x 12
40.39 34 8 13
42.37 32 12 18

White has a nice position controlling both <27>


and <28> and still two base pieces. To prevent
black from playing 18 22, white goes to
<28>. The game becomes classical, but black
has problems because his wings arent
connected well. Blacks pieces dont really
work together well.
43.33 28 18 23 44.34 30 14 20
45.30 25 20 24 46.49 44 6 11
47.47 42

Black is in trouble. He should play 47 11


17 48.42 37 9 14 49.44 40 13 18 50.39
33
50.38 33 is met by the double sacrifice 14
20 25 x 14 19 x 10 28 x 30 17 22 =.
50 17 21 51.40 34 24 30 and white
cant win.
13 18? 48.42 37!
48 11 17 is punished by the Bomb shot:
49.27 21 16 x 27 50.32 x 12 23 x 34 51.12 x
3 W+ . Black cant escape from losing
anymore.
48 9 14 49.28 22! 23 29
Black cant play 11 17 because of 22 x 13!
19 x 8 27 21 16 x 27 32 x 3 W+.
50.22 x 13 19 x 8 51.44 40 14 19
52.39 33! 19 23

232

After 52 8 13 53.33 28 black has no


sensible move left.

18.40 35 19 x 30
19.35 x 24 17 21!

53.25 20! 24 x 15 54.33 x 24 8 12


55.40 34 11 17 56.38 33 12 18

After a long struggle white has managed to


reconquer <24> and is winning the endgame.
57.33 28 17 21 58.28 x 19 18 22
59.27 x 18 21 27 60.32 x 21 16 x 27
61.19 13 27 31 62.37 32 31 36
63.13 8 36 41 64.32 27 41 46
65. 8 2 46 - 5 66.34 30

Black just waits for white to play 33 28 now.


Now black would punish 33 28 by 18 22
etc. B+. White has just a few moves before he
is forced to play 33 28. He cant play at his
right wing, because 45 40 25 30 is bad for
him.
Of course, 49 44? is not possible because of
18 22! This is a situation you should avoid
when playing Roozenburg'. Piece 29 is always
vulnerable in a Roozenburg attack.
20.48 42 11 17

Black resigned.
After 21.33 28 21 26 22.28 x 19 18 22
23.27 x 18 12 x 14 white cant take the
kingshot 34 30 25 x 23 32 27 20 x 29 27
21 16 x 27 38 33 29 x 38 43 x 1 for after 13
18 the king is caught B+1.
24.45 40 is met by the attack at 24 again: 14
19 25.40 35 19 x 30 26.35 x 24 9 14
27.36 31 7 12! and 14 19 at the next
move.

T. Doekbrijder R. Heusdens
White not always gets a good right wing attack
after the 2 x 2 exchange. Sometimes the
opponent can successfully attack the outpost
at <24>.

21.36 31 21 26
22.33 28 17 21
23.28 x 19 18 22
24.27 x 18 12 x 14
25.45 40 14 19
26.40 35 19 x 30
27.35 x 24 9 14
White lost piece 24 and the game.

15 4 10!
16.38 32 10 14
Black threatens to play 14 19 40 35 19 x 30
35 x 24 16 21! 27 x 16 25 30 34 x 14 23 x
34 39 x 30 9 x 27 B+.
After 17.33 28 14 19 18.40 35 19 x 30
19.35 x 24 17 21 20.28 x 19 18 22 21.27 x
18 12 x 14 22.45 40 14 19 23.40 35 19 x
30 24.35 x 24 9 14 white loses his outpost.
17.42 38 14 19

233

T. Sijbrands J. van der Wal

29.28 x 17 14 19

White has no base pieces at 47 and 49


anymore. After the break of the Roozenburg
he has to defend his outpost by tactical means.

This sacrifice is also punished by a king shot.

17.33 28 4 10
18.28 x 19 18 22
19.27 x 18 12 x 14
20.32 27 21 x 32
21.38 x 27
Threatening 27 21 37 31 41 x 1 W+.

30.33 28 19 x 30
31.17 12 8 x 17
32.28 22 17 x 28
33.29 23 28 x 19
34.39 33 30 x 28
35.36 31 26 x 37
36.41 x 5
Instead of fighting on black resigned much too
early.

21 7 12

R. Keurentjes T. Goedemoed
22.39 33!
17 9 14!
22 14 19 will be met by the kingshot 23.29
23! 19 x 19 24.27 22 17 x 28 25.37 31 26
x 37 26.41 x 5 and after 26 12 17 27.5
41 9 14 28.41 x 5 13 19 29.5 x 11 6 x 17
its a draw. Black however wanted to win
22 17 21
23.43 39 21 x 32
24.37 x 28 14 19
25.40 35 19 x 30
26.35 x 24 9 14
27.42 38

Exercise 6.1 How does black win after 18.33


28 ?
Black hoped to trap his opponent: 18.24 19
13 x 24 19.34 30 23 x 34 20.30 x 10. My
opponent thought black would then play 4 9
=. However, In this latter position, black had
prepared a great shot!
Exercise 6.2 Try to find this shot.

Hint: The shot begins with 20 25 30

27 14 19 is met by 28.29 23 20 x 49
29.23 x 5 49 x 23 30.5 x 37 W+.
27 12 18
28.44 40 18 22

234

Drost gambit

1) 25 12 17 26.37 31 26 x 28 27.33 x 11
16 x 7 28.27 x 16 9 14 with equality.
G. Valneris V. Wirny
White has just moved 16.30 24. Black
answers by playing a system called after Dutch
player Frank Drost, who was the first who
sacrificed piece 23 with the objective to attack
piece 27 in a game against Gantwarg.
16 14 19!

2) 25 2 7 26.42 38 7 11 27.40 35 11
17 28.35 30 17 22 29.19 14 22 x 42
30.14 x 5 with a complicated game.
22 18 x 27
23.29 23 13 18
24.34 29 9 13
25.39 33 27 31
26.32 28 31 26

Later we will get back to this position and


explain why one shouldnt play the Drost
gambit combined with a closed square 20.
17.33 28 19 x 30
18.35 x 24 7 12
19.28 x 19 17 22
20.41 36 22 x 31
21.36 x 27

White has a lack of space. He cant develop


his attack and risks being frozen out. With his
next move he allows his opponent to make a
breakthrough shot.
27.44 39?

If black plays 21 12 17 and white answers


with 22.29 23? 18 x 20 23.19 14 10 x 19
24.27 22 17 x 28 25.32 x 14 white loses a
piece after 25 20 24 26.14 10 25 30!
27.34 x 25 15 20 28.25 x14 4 x 15 B+.

Exercise 6.3 Show the breakthrough shot for


black!
Lets go back to move 16 for black now. Lets
see what would have happened if he played
16 14 20 17.33 28 7 12 18.28 x 19
17 22.

21 6 11 22.27 22?
White should simply play 22.38 33 11 17.
White can never defend piece 27 horizontally
by 33 28 because of 15 20. This is one
reason there should be no black piece at <20>.
23.47 41 17 22 24.41 36 22 x 31 25.36 x
27

235

J. van der Wal J. van den Borst

19.29 23!
1) 19 20 x 29 20.41 36 22 x 31 21.36 x 27
13 x 24 22.37 31!! 26 x 19 23.34 x 5 21 x 32
24.5 x 37 W+
2) 19 22 x 31 20.41 36 18 x 29 21.24 x 33
13 x 24 22.36 x 27 with a better position for
white.

20.33 28 1 7
21.28 x 19 17 22
22.40 35 22 x 31
23.36 x 27 7 12
Exercise 6.4 How did white break through to
king?

J. v.d. Borst A. Baksoellah


Without a piece at <10> the gambit usually
isnt good either.
1 12 17
2.33 28 7 11
3.28 x 19 17 22
4.41 36 22 x 31
5.36 x 27 11 17
6.46 41 17 22
Now white has the combination 45 40! 22 x
31 19 14 9 x 20 32 27 21 x 43 42 38 31 x
33 29 x 49 20 x 29 34 x 3 W+, and 6 6 11
7.45 40 17 22 would have been met by
8.19 14 9 x 20 9.24 19 13 x 33 10.39 x 6
W+.

Jannes van der Wal

236

7.Partie Bonnard

Blacks troops are annihilated by a devastating


combination.
V. Agafonow Soerkov
20 17 22
21.35 30 22 x 31
22.36 x 27 10 14
By closing <30> white makes a Partie
Bonnard, creating a very complicated game.
22 11 17 23.37 31 26 x 28 24.33 x 11
looks bad for black.

27.37 31 26 x 39
28.38 33 39 x 28
29.27 22 18 x 27
30.29 x 7 20 x 29
31.34 x 5 25 x 34
32.40 x 29
Exactly the same combination was performed
in Domchev Lovcik 2000.

23.33 28 4 10?
Black should have played 23 14 19 24.39
33 11 17 25.37 31 26 x 37 26.42 x 31 17
21 27.31 26 9 14 28.26 x 17 12 x 21 with
about equal play.
24.28 x 19 14 x 23
25.39 33 11 17
After 25 10 14 white forces a win playing
26.33 28! 14 19 27.27 22! 18 x 27 28.29
x 18 13 x 33 8.24 x 4 20 24 9.33 x 20 15 x 44
10.32 x 21 16 x 27 11.4 x 36 44 50 12.42
38! and blacks king will be caught at the next
move.
26.46 41 7 11
26 10 14 27.33 28 14 19
White shouldnt play 28.27 22? 18 x 27 29.29
x 18 13 x 33 30.24 x 4 20 24! 27 x 36 =
28.41 36 17 21
28 17 22? 29.28 x 17 12 x 21 30.27 22!
18 x 27 31.29 x 18 etc. +
29.40 35 9 14 30.43 39 12 17 31.27
22 18 x 27 32.29 x 9 20 x 40 33.45 x 34 14 x 3
34.37 31 26 x 37 35.42 x 31 +.

A. Schwarzman R. Heusdens
27 17 22?
Black should have played 13 19 24 x 22 17 x
30 35 x 24 23 x 34 40 x 29 14 19 24 x 13 8 x
19 simplifying the game.
In the game white gets a very strong Partie
Bonnard.
28.35 30! 22 x 31
29.37 x 26!
Exercise 7.1 Why didnt white take with 29.36
x 27 ?
39 14 19
40.33 28! 1 6
41.49 43!

237

20!! 30.25 x 12 13 18 31.12 x 23 24 29


32.33 x 24 22 x 44 33.49 x 40 8 13 34.31 x
22 17 x 46 35.26 x 17 11 x 22 B+.
27.49 44 10 15?
28.34 30
After 28 8 12 29.39 34! the answer 18
23 is punished by 30.44 39 23 x 32 31.33
28 22 x 44 32.31 x 22 17 x 28 33.38 x 18 13 x
22 34.40 x 49 W+.
Using the gap at <14> tactically:
Exercise 7.2 Why is 16 21 not good for
black?
41 3 9 42.43 38!
Exercise 7.3 What about 42 16 21 now?
42 11 17 43.42 37
28 18 23
White could also have played 43.36 31 2 7
44.42 37! 9 14 45.31 27 7 11 46.26
21! 17 x 26 47.27 22 18 x 27 48.29 x 9 20 x
29 49.32 x 21 16 x 27 50.34 x 23 14 x 3 51.23
x 14 25 x 34 52.40 x 29 W+.
43 16 21
44.37 31 17 22
45.26 x 17! 22 x 42
46.47 x 38
Whites piece at <17> is very strong.
After 46 9 14 47.31 27 black resigned.
47 2 7 can be met by 48.27 22 18 x 27
49.29 x 9 20 x 29 50.32 x 21 14 x 3 51.40 x 29
25 x 34 52.40 x 29 W+.

White missed the chance to win the game


playing 29.42 37!! 23 x 32 30.37 x 28 and it
turns out that 24 29 works like a boomerang:
30 24 29 31.33 x 24 22 x 42 32.31 x 22 17
x 28 33.26 x 17 11 x 22 34.41 37 42 x 31
35.36 x 18 13 x 22 36.24 x 4 W+.
30 13 18 fails to 31.33 29 etc. W+
30 8 12 is punished by 31.28 23 19 x 28
32.30 x 8.
This means only the poor 30 11 16 is
possible with a terrible position for black after
31.40 34.
29.40 34 23 x 32
30.33 29 24 x 33
31.39 x 37 13 18
Piece 28 is gone. What remains is an open
Bonnard. White doesnt have any base pieces
anymore. Black has no weak pieces at the 1 /
18 diagonal. The position is slightly better for
black.
A logical variation: 32.37 32 8 13 33.41
37 18 23 34.34 29 23 x 34 35.30 x 39 19
23 and black has a good position.
32.38 33 8 13

G. Merceron T. Goedemoed
26 16 21
Black creates the Bonnard, hoping for 27.34
29 10 15 28.29 x 20 15 x 24 29.40 34 14

White should play 33.43 39 19 23 34.33


28 23 x 32 35.37 x 28 22 x 33 36.39 x 28 17
22 37.26 x 17 22 x 33 38.31 x 22 18 x 27
39.17 12 =.
In the game he makes a big mistake by
keeping the gap at 39 intact.

238

since 18 24 30 19.35 x 24 20 x 18 20.33


28 22 x 33 21.31 x 13 etc. leads to equality.
17.34 29 20 25
18.29 x 20 15 x 24
19.40 34 4 10

33.34 29?
Exercise 7.4 Look for the winning shot for
black!

H. Wiersma T. Sijbrands
15 14 20
Improving on a former game against Wim van
der Sluis, in which black played 15 9 13?
16.34 30! 5 10 17.40 34 3 9
17 2 7 is met by the typical combination
18.28 23! 18 x 40 19.33 28 22 x 33 20.38 x
18 12 x 23 21.31 x 22 17 x 28 22.26 x 17 11 x
22 23.36 31!
White cant attack at once with 50 45
because of the 6 11 22 27 23 28 23 x 41
breakthrough.
After 23.36 31 both 24.32 27 and 24.50
45 are threatening. Moreover, after 23 7 12
white can also take the 39 34 31 27 37 x
26 44 x 2 shot.
18.28 23! 18 x 40 19.33 28 22 x 33 20.38 x
20 14 x 34 21.31 x 22 17 x 28 22.32 x 5 and
black resigned.

19 5 10 could have been answered by


20.44 40 and black cant take 25 30 21.34
x 25 24 29 22.33 x 24 22 x 44 23.31 x 22 19
x 30 24.35 x 24 44 x 35 25.43 39 18 x 27
26.38 33 27 x 20 27.25 x 5.
After 19 4 10 20.44 40 isnt possible, but
20.45 40 followed by 28 23 is a serious
plan.
20.34 30 25 x 34
21.39 x 30 18 23
22.43 39

Playing 22 12 18? would allow white to


remove piece <28> by playing 23.39 34 10
14 24.33 29 24 x 33 25.28 x 39. This open
Bonnard is better for white. Pieces 2 and 8
arent active. Black doesnt close <18> and
thus keeps white from changing via 33 29 x
39.
22 3 9!
23.39 34 2 7
24.33 29 leads nowhere after 24 x 33 38 x 18
12 x 23 etc.
23.44 39 12 18
25.49 44 7 12
26.30 25 9 14
27.34 30 10 15
28.39 34 5 10

16.50 45 9 13
White could have played 16.28 23 19 x 28
17.32 x 23 18 x 29 18.34 x 23 if he wanted,

239

29.44 40
White built the power block, but black has
anticipated on that.

Ron Heusdens (2007)

29 23 29
30.34 x 23 18 x 29
31.40 34 29 x 40
32.45 x 34 15 20

33.34 29 12 18 leads to a freeze out, but


white saves his ass with a drawing
combination.
33.33 29!
33 22 x 33 34.31 x 22 17 x 28 35.26 x 17 11
x 22 36.30 x 19 33 x 24! 37.19 x 30 also leads
to a draw. After 36 13 x 24? 37.29 23 28 x
19 38.38 x 29 24 x 33 39.42 38 33 x 31
40.36 x 7 white would win.
33. 24 x 33
34.38 x 29 22 x 24
35.31 x 22 17 x 28
36.32 x 23 19 x 28
37.30 x 19 13 x 24
38.26 x 17 11 x 22
39.34 29 24 x 33
40.42 38 33 x 31
41.36 x 7
and after fifteen more moves the game was
drawn.

240

8.Springer counter attack


1.32 28 19 23 2.28 x 19 14 x 23 3.37 32
10 14 4.41 37 5 10 5.35 30 20 25
6.46 41 14 19 7.33 29 9 14 8.40 35 3
9 9.45 40 leads to this position:

Kolk Faas
12.28 23! 13 18?
Exercise 8.1 How did white win a piece?
9. 17 22 10.31 27 22 x 31 11.36 x 27 11
17 12.30 24 19 x 30 13.35 x 24 leads to a
Roozenburg attack for white. Black can
prevent this by playing the Springer counter
attack: 9. 23 28 10.32 x 23 19 x 28.

Exercise 8.2 How is 12 14 20 punished?

11.50 45? is a theoretical mistake now. Black


plays 11 16 21! 12.31 26 21 27!

V. Wirny M. Sjulman
Before white could play 38 32 black launched
a strong Springer counter attack.
White has to take care for tactics:
1) 13.37 31? 28 33! 14.31 x 22 18 x 27
15.39 x 28 17 21 16.26 x 17 11 x 24 17.30 x
19 14 x 23 B+1.
2) 13.38 33 27 32 14.33 x 22 18 x 27 15.37
x 28 17 21 16.26 x 17 11 x 24 B+1.

19 23 28!
White cant attack piece 28 via 38 32? due to
18 23 29 x 18 13 x 22 32 x 23 20 x 18 B+1.
20.38 33
31.33 x 22
32.42 38
33.36 31

7 11
17 x 28
1 7
12 17

3) 13.30 24 28 33! 14.39 x 28 14 19


15.43 39 19 x 30 16.35 x 24 15 20 17.24 x
15 25 30 18.34 x 25 27 31 19.36 x 27 18
22 20.27 x 18 12 x 23 and black has a better
position.

After 34 30? 25 x 23 31 27 20 x 29 27 22
18 x 27 38 33 29 x 38 43 x 1 13 18! whites
king is trapped.

4) 13.38 32 27 x 38 14.43 x 23 13 19 black


is winning back the piece with an advantage.

34.41 36 8 12
35.31 26 3 8

White should thus choose between 11.30 24


and 11.39 33 28 x 39 12.44 x 33.

241

41 8 12
After 42.38 33 16 21 31 26 21 27
blacks position is superior.
42.38 32 loses a piece to 7 11 43.32 x 23
22 27 44.31 x 22 17 x 30 45.40 35 12 18
46.35 x 24 18 23 B+1.

Whites pieces at his right wing are quite


passive. White has little room to play. Black
has built strong formations.
36.48 42 11 16
37.37 31 18 22

42.40 35
43.39 x 28
44.37 x 48
45.44 40
46.29 x 18
47.34 29
48.40 x 29

28 33
22 x 42
13 18
18 23
12 x 23
23 x 34
9 13

Black will gain a piece at the next move by 25


30, so white resigned.

After 37 16 21 38.42 37 18 22? 39.38


32 black would lose a piece! But 38 17
22 39.26 x 17 22 x 11 would still be okay for
black.
38.31 27 22 x 31
39.26 x 37 12 18

A Springer contra attack often leads to a


strong centre-wing-attack.

Preventing 38 32 by 18 23 B+ again.
40.37 31 18 22

41.42 37?
Black forces the gain of a piece now. White
already had a difficult position. After 41.31 26
7 12 42.38 33 16 21 43.42 37
1) 43 21 27 44.37 31(!) 13 18
44 9 14 45.24 19! 13 x 24 46.29 23 28
x 19 47.33 29 24 x 33 48.39 x 28 22 x 33
49.33 x 11 =
45.24 19 9 14 46.19 x 10 20 24 47.29 x
20 25 x 5 with advantage for black
2) 43 9 14 and white must flee into a bad
endgame with 44.34 30 25 x 23 45.24 19
13 x 24 46.33 29 24 x 33 47.37 32 28 x 37
48.39 x 10 37 42 etc.

242

9.Mutual outposts
When both players have an outpost at <24>
and <27> we get complex situations. It is
possible to write an entire book about this
subject. We will discuss some typical ideas
that are important in this type of play.

17.33 28 22 x 33 18.39 x 28 isnt good


because of 27 32 19.38 x 27 18 22 20.27 x
18 13 x 33 21.29 x 38 20 x 18 B+.
17.34 30 25 x 34 18.39 x 30 is simply
punished by 13 19 B+.
17.40 35 13 19 18.24 x 13 8 x 28 19.38
32
19.44 40 20 24 20.29 x 20 15 x 24 B+1
19 27 x 38 20.43 x 23 20 24 44.29 x 20 18
x 38 45.42 x 33 15 x 24 loses a piece for white.

A. Chzizhov P. Chmiel
Both players have an outpost at their right
wing. White holds the centre. He now takes
another outpost at <23>, which is pretty
dangerous in this situation.

P. Hoogteijeling G. Kolk

This is a severe mistake in this position, for


white is tactically frozen out! White could have
escaped from a loss, by playing 16.40 35
because after 13 19 17.24 x 13 8 x 28 18.44
40 white wins back the lost piece.

After having studied the Tsjizjow Chmiel


game I showed my draughts pupil Gerlof Kolk
that 9-14 is even better than 5-10 in this
position that comes from the opening: 1.33
29 19 23 2.35 30 20 25 3.40 35 14 20
4.44 40 10 14 5.38 33 14 19 6.30 24
19 x 30 7.35 x 24 17 22 8.42 38 11 17
9.50 44 6 11 10.32 28 23 x 32 11.37 x 28
16 21 12.41 37 21 27 13.46 41 9 14
14.48 42 1 6.

16 3 9!

15.28 23?

15.28 23 9 14
16.31 26?

The mistake we hoped for. White should play


15.31 26 or 15.40 35. Black forces the win
of a piece now.
15 3 9!

White has no good move left. 17.37 31 is met


by 27 32 18.38 x 27 22 28 19.23 x 32 13
19 (another important idea is 18 22 27 x 18
12 x 23 29 x 19 20 x 27 31 x 22 17 x 28 B+1)
20.24 x 22 17 x 46 B+.
17.37 32 is punished by 22 28 18.33 x 31
13 19 19.24 x 22 17 x 46 B+.

Contrary to the former game, white cannot


escape playing 16.40 35 13 19 17.24 x 13
8 x 28: At 18.44 40 20 24 19.29 x 20 15 x
24 follows and 18.35 30 is met by 4 10!!
19.38 32 27 x 38 20.43 x 23 9 13
Threatening 22 27 B+
21.31 27 22 x 31 22.26 x 27 14 19! 23.23 x
14 10 x 19 and at the next move black plays 20
24 winning a piece.
16.31 26 5 10!
The same situation as in Chzizhov Chmiel
arose. Black won the game.

243

30 23 x 34 26.24 19 13 x 35 27.39 x 30 25
x 34 28.33 28 22 x 33 29.31 x 4 but the
situation isnt clear after 33 39 30.44 x 33 34
40.
Black can also play 24 11 16 25.37 31 6
11 26.32 x 21 16 x 27 27.42 37 23 28
etc.
24... 23 28
25.44 40 4 10
26.40 35 2 7
A. Tolchikau M. Slezak
Blacks best move is 23 28! Playing 38 32
27 x 38 43 x 23 is not good for white because
of 22 27 etc.. Therefore white has little space
to pay left: 17 23 28 18.44 40 1 6 19.40
35 10 14 20.24 20 15 x 24 21.29 x 20 11
16! And because of the 27 32 17 21
threat white has to play the ugly 47 41,
creating a dangling piece at <41>.

After 26 9 14 white can (also) play 27.26


21
1) 27 27 x 16 28.24 20 15 x 24 29.29 x 9
13 x 4 30.31 27 22 x 31 31.33 x 13 8 x 19
32.36 x 27 with a small advantage for white.
2) 27 17 x 26 28.38 32 27 x 38 29.43 x 23
14 20 30.31 27 22 x 31 31.36 x 27 with a
good position for white.

17 1 6
18.37 32 10 14
19.32 x 21 14 19
Black makes a counterattack at whites
outpost. After 19 22 28 20.33 x 22 18 x 16
21.29x 18 black shouldnt take 12 x 23 off
course (22.24 19 13 x 24 23.34 29 W+) but
13 x 22
20.45 40 19 x 30
21.40 35 11 16
22.35 x 24 16 x 27
23.42 37 7 11
24.48 42

Base pieces 2 and 4 are gone, which gives


white extra tactical possibilities.
27.26 21! 17 x 26
Its not possible to take 27 27 x 16 because
of 24 19 followed by 31 27 W+.
28.38 32 27 x 38
29.43 x 23 11 17
30.47 41
White took over the attack and now is aiming
arrows at <27>.

Playing 24 4 10 allows black to take a


combination after 25.37 32?
Exercise 9.1 Try to find this kingshot!

24 4 10 opens the base square <4>, giving


white the opportunity to take a kingshot: 25.34

30 6 11
31.31 27 22 x 31
32.36 x 27
< Diagram >
Black should attack piece 27: 32 17 22
33.41 36 22 x 31 34.36 x 27 11 17 35.27
21 17 22 36.21 16 9 14, for example
37.42 38 14 20 38.49 43 22 27 39.33

244

In one of Sijbrands famous blindfold games


the master showed a devastating combination.
15.28 23!
Black cant attack the outpost at <23> with 13
19 because of 31 26 19 x 28 29 24 20 x
29 34 x 21 W+1.
15 3 9
28 27 31 40.39 33 31 x 42 41.38 x 47 13
19! 42.24 x 11 20 24 43.29 x 20 18 x 49 =.

White can play 16.30 24 13 19 17.24 x 13


8 x 28 18.29 24 20 x 29 19.34 x 21 17 x 26
20.31 27 22 x 31 21.36 x 27 with an
advantage for white, but white wants more!

32 18 22?
33.27 x 18 13 x 22
34.49 43 11 16

16.31 26 11 16?

White gets to much space for his attack. With


the next strong exchange white takes even
more space.
35.34 30 25 x 34
36.39 x 30 8 13
37.30 25 7 11
38.43 39 10 14
39.42 38 13 18?

Black should have played 20 24. White


forces a win in an astonishing way now.
17.37 32! 7 11
18.32 x 21 16 x 27
19.30 24 11 16

White could have finished the game easily


now: 40.37 31! 26 x 46 41.35 30 46 x 19
42.24 x 4 +.
40.39 34 16 21
Black should have tried 40 22 27! 41.34
30 14 19!! 42.24 x 31 12 18 43.23 x 21 16
x 47 and black can still fight on.

20.33 28! 22 x 33
21.38 x 28 18 22

41.34 30
After 41 15 20 42.24 x 15 9 13 43.23
19 14 x 34 44.40 x 39 black resigned.

After 22.43 39 22 x 33 23.39 x 28 13 19


24.24 x 13 8 x 19 black would do okay, but
white prepared a great surprise for his
opponent.
22.34 30!!
The beginning of a beautiful shot. White can
also play 22.41 37 22 x 33 23.34 30 etc.
22 25 x 34
23.41 37 22 x 33
24.23 19 14 x 23

T. Sijbrands A. Anderson

24 34 x 23 25.38 x 7 2 x 11 loses due to


26.42 38 20 x 29 27.37 32! 13 x 24 28.32 x
3 11 17 29.3 x 21 16 x 27 30.38 33 29 x 38
31.43 x 21 W+.
25.29 x 7 2 x 11

245

26.38 x 29 34 x 23
27.44 39 20 x 29
28.39 33 29 x 38
29.43 x 5

C) He should play 47 41 as a waiting move

Exercise 9.4 Why is it a mistake to defend the


outpost with 34 30 25 x 34 39 x 30?
Sijbrands playing blindfold against 28 players
(Amsterdam 2009)

Exercise 9.5 Show the way black wins after


the following moves:
Exercise 9.2 What should white pay in this
position: 12.31 26 or 12.40 35 and why?

A) 41 37
B) 42 37
C) 38 32 27 x 38 42 x 32

Exercise 9.3 How should white play. Choose


from the following options:
A) He should play the attacking move 28 23
B) He should take a kingshot with 24 19

246

Solutions section 5
Lesson 1: The centre attack
1.1 37 31 26 x 48 27 22 48 x 45 22 x 4 45 x
18 4 x 6 W+
1.2 44 39 19 x 30 37 31 26 x 37 48 42 37
x 48 28 23 48 x 34 23 x 1 34 x 18 1 x 25 W+
1.3 28 23 7 12 32 27 and black is
tactically frozen out: 17 22 29 24 W+ and
13 19 25 20 W+
1.4 37 31 26 x 37 27 21 17 x 26 28 22 ad
lib. 34 30 ad lib. 30 x 8 2 x 13 33 x 2 W+
1.5 28 22 19 x 17 32 28 21 x 23 37 31 26
x 46 38 32 46 x 28 33 x 2 24 x 33 39 x 17
W+
1.6 37 31 26 x 37 32 x 41 21 x 32 28 x 37 19
x 28 33 x 22 17 x 28 35 30 25 x 45 44 40
45 x 34 39 x 6 +
1.7 14 20 23 x 14 3 8 14 x 3 24 30 35 x
24 20 x 29 33 x 24 8 13 3 x 17 11 x 35
followed by 25 30 B+1.

Lesson 2: Playing against the centre attack


2.1 13 19 24 x 13 8 x 28 38 32 4 9 32 x
23 22 28 23 x 32 14 20 25 x 3 12 17 3 x
21 16 x 47 B+
2.2 49 44 9 13 37 32 38 x 37 33 28 22
x 24 34 29 ad lib. 39 x 17 W+

3.4 31 26 3 8 (12 17 leads to a deadly


right wing lock) 26 x 17 11 x 44 27 22 18 x
27 32 x 21 16 x 27 43 39 44 x 33 38 x 7 W+
3.5 17 21 33 x 24 18 22 27 x 20 21 26 24
x 13 26 x 46 28 x 19 46 x 25 B+
3.6 37 31 26 x 37 32 x 41 23 x 32 38 x 27 17
x 28 34 x 32 W+
3.7 21 27 32 x 12 23 x 41 36 x 47 8 x 28 47
41 26 x 37 41 x 34 W+
3.8 32 27 ad lib. 46 x 37 ad lib. 36 x 47 17 x
28 38 33 ad lib. 43 x 23 19 x 28 30 x 10 W+

Lesson 4: The Highland attack


4.1 34 30 25 x 34 43 39 34 x 43 33 29 24
x 33 28 x 48 17 x 28 32 x 25 W+
4.2 22 17 14 19 17 x 8 13 x 2 25 20 23
29 35 30 24 x 35 33 x 4 W+
4.3 18 22 37 31 14 20 25 x 14 19 x 10 30
x 28 10 14 33 x 24 22 x 42 B+
4.4 39 33 30 x 39 22 17 11 x 22 28 x 17 39
x 28 32 x 14 9 x 20 27 21 16 x 27 31 x 22 18
x 27 17 11 6x 17 37 31 26 x 37 42 x 11 W+
4.5 28 23 19 x 17 34 30 35 x 24 37 31 26
x 28 33 x 2 24 x 42 2 x 47 W+
4.6 39 33 14 20 25 x 14 9 x 20 33 x 24 20 x
29 32 28 22 x 33 40 34 29 x 40 38 x 9 3 x
14 45 x 34 W+1

2.3 43 38 7 12 49 44 12 18 (12 17 37
31 27 x 36 33 29 W+1) 37 31 27 x 36 38
32 28 x 48 33 29 24 x 33 39 x 17 48 x 30
35 x 22 W+

Lesson 5: Playing against a Highland attack

2.4 14 20 23 x 3 20 x 29 33 x 35 13 18 3 x
17 11 x 44 B+

5.2 13 18 22 x 2 12 18 2 x 35 9 13 35 x
21 16 x 47 B+.

Lesson 3: The classical attack

5.3 27 21 16 x 27 (18 x 27 28 22 26 x 28
32 x 3 W+) 22 x 31 =

3.1 34 30 21 26 46 41 and black has no


good move left, since 8 12 is met by 38 33
29 x 38 30 24 19 x 30 28 x 17 W+
3.2 25 20 14 x 25 32 27 23 x 21 42 37 17
x 28 26 x 17 ad lib. 38 33 ad lib. 43 x 3 W+

5.1 26 21 17 x 26 36 31 26 x 28 39 33 28
x 30 35 x 11 W+

5.4 16 21 27 x 7 18 x 27 32 x 21 26 x 17 7 x
18 x 31 36 x 27 B+
Lesson 6: The Roozenburg attack
6.1 7 11 28 x 10 26 31 37 x 26 13 19 24
x 22 17 x 46 26 x 17 11 x 31 36 x 27 46 x 5 B+

3.3 33 29 24 x 33 28 x 39 17 x 28 34 29 23
x 34 32 x 3 W+

247

6.2 24 19 13 x 24 34 30 23 x 34 30 x 10 25
30 35 x 24 20 x 29 ad lib. 3 9 ad lib. 9 14
10 x 19 15 20 24 x 15 26 31 37 x 26 4 10
15 x 4 7 11 4 x 22 17 x 50 26 x 17 12 x 43 49
x 38 50 28 B+
6.3 12 17 23 x 12 2 7 12 x 1 8 12 1 x 9 3
x 41 B+
6.4 27 22 18 x 27 38 33 27 x 38 24 20 25
x 23 29 x 7 38 x 40 7 1 and white eventually
won the game.

Lesson 7: The Partie Bonnard


7.1 18 22 =
7.2 16 21 26 x 17 11 x 33 29 x 38 20 x 29 32
28 23 x 32 34 x 14 25 x 34 40 x 29 W+

2) 18 23 28 x 19 14 x 23 29 x 18 12 x 23 33
29!
2.1) 13 18 24 19 23 x 14 29 24 20 x 29
34 x 32 W+
2.2) 8 12 29 x 18 12 x 23 42 37 20 x 29 38
33 29 x 38 43 x 1 +
2.3) 23 28 34 30 25 x 23 42 37 20 x 29
38 33 29 x 38 43 x 5 +
3) 11 16 28 23! 7 11 41 37 16 21 24
19! 13 x 24 33 28 W+
9.4 34 30 25 x 34 39 x 30 27 31 36 x 18 12
x 32 38 x 27 13 18 24 x 22 17 x 50 B+
9.5 A) 41 37? 27 32 38 x 27 22 x 31 36 x
27 17 22 28 x 17 12 x 41 47 x 36 18 23 29
x 18 20 x 47 B+
B) 42 37? 18 23 28 x 19* 27 32 38 x 18
12 x 34 39 x 30 20 x 38 43 x 32 13 x 35 B+1
C) 38 32? 27 x 38 43 x 32 17 21! 26 x 17
12 x 21 28 x 26 18 23 29 x 18 20 x 27 B+1

7.3 16 21 26 x 17 11 x 33 32 28 23 x 43 29
x 49 20 x 29 34 x 23 W+
7.4 18 23 29 x 18 14 20 25 x 23 13 19 23
x 14 22 x 13 31 x 22 17 x 48 26 x 17 48 x 25
B+

Lesson 8: The Springer counter attack


8.1 24 19 18 x 29 33 x 24 14 x 23 34 30 25
x 34 40 x 27 21 x 32 37 x 28 W+1
8.2 23 18 20 x 29 33 x 24 12 x 23 34 30 25
x 34 40 x 27 21 x 32 37 x 28 W+1
Lesson 9: Mutual outposts
9.1 25.37 32? 17 21 26.26 x 19 18 22
27.32 x 21 22 28 28.33 x 22 11 17 29.22 x
11 6 x 48 +
9.2 12.31 26? 3 9!! will leave white with no
good move (13.37 31 27 32! 14.28 x 37 18
22 15.27 x 18 12 x 23 16.29 x 18 20 x 27
17.31 x 22 17 x 28 Z+1), so he needs to play
12.40 35 (after 13 19 13.24 x 13 8 x 28
14.44 40 white will win the lost piece back).
9.3 28 23? Is followed by 27 32! 38 x 27
22 28! 23 x 32 18 22 27 x 18 12 x 23 29 x
18 20 x 27 31 x 22 17 x 28 B+1.
Taking the kingshot 24 19 14 x 32 34 30 25
x 23 33 28 22 x 33 39 x 19 13 x 24 31 x 4
leads to an equal amount of pieces after 10
14 38 x 27 12 18 4 x 22 17 x 28 =.
White should play 47 41!
1) 14 19 34 30! 25 x 32 33 29 19 x 30 29
23 18 x 29 40 34 29 x 40 45 x 5 W+

248

Edge pieces often give the game an extra dimension. Edge pieces influence the
game both tactically and strategically. A piece at <36> can be used by the opponent
for making shots. On the other hand piece <36> can take space away from the
opponent.
We discuss strategies when playing against an edge piece at <36>. Games with this
edge piece are very popular. Players hwo excel in playing against <36> are Harm
Wiersma, Alexander Shwarzman en Alexander Baliakin.
The question concerning edge pieces always is: is the edge piece weak or strong?
For example, having an edge piece at <26> often helps controlling the left flank, but
the opponent could also use it for tactical purposes.
A piece at <16> is rarely strong. We focus on how to exploit situations when you
have a strong centre while your opponent has several pieces at the edge of the
board, like a piece at <16>.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Games with piece 15 / 36


Playing against piece 15 / 36
Piece 26
Piece 16
Piece 6

After having studied this section youll know what kind of strategies are important
when edge pieces are involved. Youll also get acquainted with typical tactical ideas
for these types of positions.

S6. Edge pieces

249

1.Games with piece 15 / 36


Piece 15 is a special piece. It often helps
surrounding the opponents centre, but it can
also become inactive. The opponent can use
the piece for tactical means.

Black has a centrepiece 23 which is dangerous


if the opponent has a piece at 15. He needs to
take care white cant take control over <28>.
1.35 30 12 17?
A crucial mistake. Black should have played
1 11 17!
1) 2.33 28 14 19!
At 17 21 or 17 22 white takes a kingshot.
3.39 33 17 22! 4.28 x 17 12 x 21

M. Sjulman Ermakov
At his left wing white has a strong cannon. He
controls the other wing with pieces 15 and 30.
Black hasnt got enough formations to be able
to control strategic squares. If he plays 1 3
8 with the idea of changing 19 24 x 24, white
responds 2.33 29! with a great position for
white. 2 19 23 3.39 34 leads to the lethal
threat 27 22 W+.
1 19 23
2.49 44 6 11
3.30 25 10 14
4.33 28 13 19?
4 14 19 would have been a better defence.
Now <19> becomes extremely weak.
5.44 40 9 13
6.40 35 3 9
7.38 33 12 17
8.39 34 17 21
9.34 30

1.1) 5.33 28 23 29! Black activates his


formations. 6.28 23 is better for black
while 6.30 25 is strongly met by 19
23! 7.28 x 19 13 x 24 8.45 40 10 14
with an excellent play for black. Whites
left wing is inactive. After 9.48 43 14
20! 10.25 x 14 9 x 20 black has a winning
position.
1.2) 5.45 40 9 14!
6.33 28 is punished by 14 20 23 29 19
23 13 x 44 B+.
6.40 35 23 28! 7.32 x 12 21 x 43 8.48 x 39
8 x 17 with advantage for black.
2) 2.45 40 14 19 3.40 35 9 14

Threatening 30 24 W+. Black sacrificed a


piece by playing 23 29 and lost.

I. Kuperman N. Sretenski

At 4.33 28 black plays 17 22 5.28 x 17 12 x


21 6.39 33 23 28! etc. with an advantage.
At 4.30 25 black acquires space to play with
19 24.
4.39 34 17 21 5.33 28 23 29! 6.34 x 23
18 x 29 gives a great game for black.

S6. Edge pieces

250

The best way to play for white is waiting with


going to <28>: 4.46 41 17 21 5.48 43
5.33 28 18 22!! 6.27 x 20 21 27 B+
5 12 17 6.33 28 17 22 7.28 x 17 21 x
12 8.39 33

V. Wirny N. Samb
Black has a piece at 36 combined with a strong
centre.
32.33 29
If white could play 33 28 at the next move he
would have a very good position, but black has
a strong pseudo sacrifice:
8 23 29! 9.33 x 24 14 20 with equality.
2.33 28!

32 28 x 27 might be better. For example


32.32 28 23 x 32 33.38 x 27 8 12
Threatening 24 30 B+.
34.43 38 1 7 35.33 29 24 x 33 36.38 x
29 with equality.
32 24 x 33
33.38 x 29 10 14
34.43 38 8 12
35.49 43 17 22
36.32 27 22 x 31
37.26 x 37 11 17
38.37 32 17 22
39.41 37 1 7

Black cant play 2 17 21 3.28 x 19 13 x 35


due to 4.37 31 26 x 28 5.38 33 21 x 32
6.33 x 2 W+. As a result of this black has to
close <19>. Black misses the 8 / 12 / 17 tail to
remove piece 28.
2 13 19
3.30 25 17 21
4.38 33 9 13
5.48 43 8 12
6.42 38 3 8
7.46 41 23 29

Black kept on reinforcing his centre. Thats why


white changes piece 22.
40.32 27 22 x 31
41.37 x 26

G. Jansen G. Valneris
Wch 2003
41 23 28!
Exercise 1.1 Black to move. How do you
judge this position?

Power play! Black starts a forcing.


42.34 30 28 33!
White cant play 43.29 24 33 39 +.

S6. Edge pieces

251

43.30 24 19 x 30
44.35 x 24 12 17

3.37 32 12 17
Black invites his opponent to play the Korchow
opening.
4.31 26 6 11 5.36 31 8 12
6.32 27

45.38 32 will be punished by 7 11 29 x 38


14 19 24 x 22 17 x 39 B+.
45.26 21 17 x 26
46.38 32 14 20
47.24 x 15 33 x 24
48.25 20?

6 16 21! 7.27 x 16 22 28
8.33 x 22 18 x 36

White should have played 48.43 39 3 8!


Prevents 25 20 8 12 36 41 26 31 18
22 12 x 43 +
49.42 38 18 23! 50.25 20 23 28! 51.32
x 23 26 31 52.20 x 29 31 37 and although
white is in trouble he can still defend.
48 24 30
49.20 14 30 35
50.14 10 35 40
51.10 5 40 45
52.32 27 45 50

This opening has been played many times and


it usually gives an exciting games with many
tactical possibilities, especially for white. Black
however has a good centre position, so it is
interesting for both players. If you want to know
more about the strategy in this Korchowopening you can check the website of Frits
Luteyn.
White can also play differently at the fourth
move.
4.41 37 6 11 5.46 41 8 12
6.32 28 16 21 7.31 26 21 27

The endgame is very bad for white.


53.43 38 3 9
54. 5 19 7 12
55.19 2 50 28
56. 2 30 12 17
57.30 48 17 22
58.27 21 26 x 17
59.48 25 36 41
60.25 x 21
60.25 x 26 41 46 is also losing. Now the
white king is simply caught by 28 5 47 x 36
22 27 +, so white resigned.
Sometimes there are even more pieces at the
edge of the board. This makes the situation
even more interesting. This type of position
usually is reached after some one taking a 2 x
2 exchange to <6> or somebody making an
exchanges to <36>. We will give an example of
both.
1.32 28 17 22 2.28 x 17 11 x 22

White can now play 8.36 31 27 x 36 9.26


21 17 x 26 10.28 x 6 with a very interesting
game.
White can also choose: 8.35 30 2 8 9.30
25 27 31
Black can also play 1 6 or 19 23 taking a
right wing attack with a weakness at <2>.
Tsjizjow has played this way many times and it

S6. Edge pieces

252

results in exciting games, because the attack


isnt without risk.
10.36 x 27 22 x 31 11.34 29
White has other options like 11.33 29 or
11.37 32
11 31- 36 and white can try to play against
piece 36.

Black has no weaknesses and possesses both


<23> and <24>. Pieces 26 and 36 make it
nearly impossible for white to take control over
<27>.

In the next game we see that pieces 26 and 36


can be very strong. These pieces control over
the left wing of the board.

27.45 40 12 17
28.46 41 17 22
29.37 32 13 18
30.42 37 22 27
31.32 x 21 26 x 17
32.33 28 23 x 32
33.38 x 27 19 23
34.37 32 14 19
35.41 37 9 13
36.37 31

A. Chizhov R. Clerc
Masters 1998
Position after 1.34 29 19 23 2.40 34 14
19 3.33 28 10 14 4.38 33 17 22 5.28 x
17 11 x 22 6.43 38 6 11 7.48 43 12
17 8.45 40 5 10 9.50 45 8 12
10.32 28 23 x 32 11.37 x 28 16 21 12.31
26 21 27 13.36 31 27 x 36 14.26 21
17 x 26 15.28 x 6 20 24 16.29 x 20 15 x 24
White is restricted in his play at the left wing by
pieces 26 and 36. Whites next move is a bit
passive. Better is to keep the 34 / 40 / 45 tail
intact and play 41 37 and 46 41.
17.34 30 18 23

White took <27> but this is only temporary.


Black chases him away with powerful moves.

Black keeps piece 10 at his spot and doesnt


play 10 15. he hopes that he can later
centralize piece 10 to <19>.

36 17 22!
White has to change back, for 37.39 33 is
punished by 38 24 29! 39.33 x 24 19 x 30
40.35 x 24 22 28! B+.

18.40 34 12 18
19.30 25 7 12
20.34 29 23 x 34
21.39 x 30 2 7
22.41 37 18 23
23.33 29 23 x 34
24.30 x 39 19 23!

37.31 26 22 x 31
38.26 x 37 18 22!
39.39 33 13 18!

While centralizing piece 10 black builds a


strong centre.

Black has activated a deadly threat. He uses


piece 6 as an object of combination.

25.39 33 14 19
26.44 39 10 14

S6. Edge pieces

253

C 1.1
40.40 34 22 27!
41.32 x 21 7 11
42. 6 x 17 18 22
43.17 x 28 23 x 41
44.34 29 41 46
45.29 x 20 46 37
Black won after 46.20 15 19 24 47.43 38
3 9 48.21 16 9 14 49.16 11 37 46
50.49 44 46 3 51.44 39 37 23 52.11
6 14 19 53.39 34 23 x 45 54.38 32
45 50.
C 1.2

H. Meijer H. Jansen

C 1.3

30.43 38 14 19 31.24 20 15 x 24 32.29 x


20 9 14 33.20 x 9 3 x 14 or 30.43 38 14
19 31.49 44 19 x 30 32.29 23 18 x 29
33.33 x 35 leads to equality. However, white
wanted to maintain his outpost at 24, but
overlooked blacks tactical possibilities
30.49 44 14 19
31.44 40?19 x 30
32.40 35 17 22!
33.35 x 24 13 19
34.24 x 4 22 27
35. 4 x 31 36 x 49

C 1.4

In the next exercises white wins using his own


piece at <15>.

S6. Edge pieces

254

2.Playing against piece 15 / 36


A piece at 36 can often be used in tactical
ways.

This position has occurred in several games


usually after a different move order. Black
should play 24 29 or 23 29. In Mitsjanski Brouwers the following was played:
21 17 22?
22.26 21! 22 x 31
23.21 17 12 x 21
24.42 37 31 x 42
25.32 28 23 x 32
26.38 x 27 21 x 32
27.47 x 27 36 x 47
28.39 34 47 x 29
29.34 x 1

From the Korchov opening the game went 9.41


37 19 23 10.39 33 14 19 11.44 39 10
14 12.46 41 20 24 13.38 32 5 10
14.42 38

In the Korchov opening the game went 9.41


37 19 23 10.34 29 23 x 34 11.39 x 30 14
19 12.44 39 10 14 13.50 44 19 23?

Black should play 15 20 followed by 10 15


In a Goedemoed D. Kootstra game (and
probably many others) black played:
14 14 20?
15.47 42! 36 x 47
16.32 28 23 x 41
17.42 37 41 x 32
18.38 x 27 47 x 29
19.34 x 5
and white won the game.

This combination was performed at least seven


times in an official game!
14.30 24 20 x 29
15.47 41 36 x 47
16.26 21 17 x 26
17.37 31 26 x 37
18.42 x 31 47 x 33
19.39 x 6

Now lets look at the correct move:


14 15 20
15.34 30 10 15
16.30 25 12 18
17.48 42 7 12
18.16 x 7 2 x 11
19.50 44 1 7
20.32 27 11 16
21.37 32

S6. Edge pieces

255

M. Monteba J. Okken

G. Jansen T. Goedemoed

39 17 22?
40.37 31! 19 23

White has a classical position possessing 26,


27 and 28. Black has just built the 6 / 11 / 17
tail in order to play 17 22. White forced a win
using the weakness at <14>.

40 15 20 is strongly met by 41.40 34! 19


23* 42.35 30 24 x 35 43.34 30 35 x 24
44.47 41 36 x 47 45.43 39 47 x 29 46.39
33 29 x 21 47.26 x 10 W+.

30.27 22! 18 x 27
31.32 x 21 23 x 32
32.38 x 27 19 23
33.47 41 36 x 47
34.21 16 47 x 29
35.16 x 9 8 13

41.47 41! 36 x 47
42.43 39 47 x 29
43.39 33 29 x 21
44.26 x 8

What else? 35 29 47 is answered by 39


33! 47 x 29 40 34 29 x 40 45 x 34 W+.

and white won the endgame.

36. 9 x 18 23 x 12
37.40 34 29 x 40
38.45 x 34
and black resigned

M. Kouam H. Spanjer
Black has just played 5 10? increasing the
number of weaknesses. White forced a win in
a surprising way:
29.38 33!!
Threatening both 28 22 and 27 22 28 23
while 29 18 22 (or 17 22) 30.27 x 18 12 x
32 is punished by 31.41 37 32 x 41 32.42
37 41 x 32 33.47 41 36 x 47 34.39 34 47 x
29 35.34 x 5 W+.
Black thus sacrificed a piece and lost.

.
Alexander Baliakin
In the next exercise you can practice your
tactical skills.

S6. Edge pieces

256

Exercise 2.1 2.8:

5
1

2
19 23?

White plays and wins!

S6. Edge pieces

257

24.44 39 19 23
25.28 x 19 14 x 23

B. Messemaker F. Guseynov
White has a strong position with many active
formations. Black has a couple of weaknesses.
Piece 5 isnt developed yet and <13> is
opened. . Black should thus have reinforced
his position with 9 13.

Black has a nice attack and is controlling the


centre, while white has a weakness at <49>. In
the next phase black strengthens his centre.
26.40 34 13 18
27.34 30 25 x 34
28.39 x 30 10 14
29.50 44 8 13
30.44 39 2 8
31.39 34 17 22
32.30 25 13 19
33.34 30 8 13
34.43 39

20 11 17?
White shows that <12> becomes vulnerable
due to the piece at 17 combined with piece 36.
21.33 29! 12 18
21 1 7 22.29 x 18 12 x 23 is met by 23.30
24! 24.37 31 25.38 33 26.43 x 1 W+.
22.29 24
23.37 31
24.38 32
25.42 x 11

20 x 29
36 x 27
27 x 38
6 x 17

Winning a piece and the game.

Blacks piece are all working together. Piece 6


moves to <17> now.
34 11 17
35.30 24 19 x 30
35.25 x 34 6 11
36.33 29 11 16
37.37 31 23 28
H. Vermin A. Chizhov
The construction Messemaker built is more
often used to play against a piece at 15 / 36.
Tsjizjow built the same construction with black.
19.45 40
20.33 28
21.39 33
22.31 x 22
23.32 x 21

13 19
9 13
21 27!
18 x 27
16 x 27

S6. Edge pieces

258

38.47 41?
The only good move was 38.29 24. . After
this weak move, black now forces a win.

It looks like black controls the position entirely.


But white had already anticipated on this
situation, spotting a beautiful sacrifice.
26.30 24!! 19 x 30
27.35 x 24

38 16 21!
39.38 33 28 32!
40.31 26 32 38
41.42 37 27 32
42.37 x 28 21 27
43.33 x 42 22 x 44

A brilliant move! White sacrifices a piece but


after this white gets a tremendous attack at the
left wing.
27 23 29
28.34 x 23 18 x 20
29.26 21! 13 18
30.49 44! 9 13
31.33 28 22 x 33
32.39 x 28 5 10

And white surrendered after a few moves.

A. Shwarzman A. Bezwersjenko
White has built the well-known construction.
Black has taken a lot of space, but his piece
distribution isnt perfect.
22.37 32 11 17

Now it becomes clear how strong whites left


wing attack is. Piece 21 will be supported by
more troops soon. Blacks pieces at the right
wing of the board are inactive.

After 23.41 37 17 21 white cant play at his


left wing anymore. Therefore he makes a
pseudo sacrifice to get some space.
23.32 27 22 x 31
24.41 37 20 25
25.37 x 26 17 22

S6. Edge pieces

33.38 32
34.32 27
35.42 38
36.38 32
37.40 35

10 14
20 24
25 30
15 20
30 34

259

right wing. Therefore <29> is a strategic


square in these types of positions.
24.34 30 7 12
25.40 35 13 18
26.44 40 9 13
27.49 44 20 24
26 23 29 27.33 x 24 20 x 29 might be
better.

Before breaking through white neutralizes the


counter attack by black.
38.43 38 13 19
39.44 39 34 x 43
40.38 x 49 24 29
41.21 17 12 x 21
42.27 x 16
White won after 29 34 43.16 11 34 39
44.11 7 3 9 45.35 30 18 23 46.30 25
23 29 47.7 1 29 34 48.1 x 40 39 44 40
1 W+.

28.33 29! 24 x 33
29.38 x 29 23 x 34
30.40 x 29 4 9
31.43 38 12 17
32.38 33 17 22
33.42 38 21 27
34.48 42

N. Mitsjanski G. Jansen
16.36 31 27 x 36
17.26 21 17 x 26
18.28 x 6 7 11
No a strong response. The piece at 21 isnt
active. More active is 18 23 12 18 and 8
12 building strong formations to keep control
over the centre and especially <29>.

All whites pieces are active and work together.


Piece 44 defends <29>.

19.6 x 17 12 x 21
20.41 37 8 12
21.33 29 1 7
22.39 33 18 23
23.29 x 18 12 x 23

34 19 23
35.44 40 23 x 34
36.40 x 29 13 19
37.29 24 9 13
38.45 40 18 23
39.40 34!

The battle about control over <29> has began.


White is going to build strong formations to
reconquer <29>. White needs space at his

S6. Edge pieces

260

48 23 29 49.34 x 23 19 x 39 50.38 33 39
x 28 51.24 20 15 x 24 52.30 x 10 leads to a
bad endgame for black.
39 13 18
40.24 x 13 18 x 9
41.34 29 23 x 34
42.30 x 39 9 13
43.39 34 13 18
44.34 29 18 23
45.29 x 18 22 x 13
46.33 29 3 8

A. Baliakin G. Valneris
Black has occupied <22> and <24>. White
takes advantage of this by tactical means.
38.33 29 24 x 33
39.39 x 17 7 11
40.26 21 11 x 22
41.21 16
White is going to play 42 37 threatening 16
11 37 31 etc.
41 19 23
42.42 37 20 24

White still has <29> under control. Now he has


space to advance piece 35 threatening to take
<24>.

42 20 25 43.37 31 36 x 27 44.32 x 21 22
28 45.21 17 13 19 46.16 11 18 22
47.44 40 19 24 48.38 32! etc. W+.

47.35 30! 13 19
A poor defence. Black should have played
47 8 12 48.30 24 14 19 etc.

43.47 41! 36 x 47
44.34 30! 47 x 50
45.30 x 17 50 x 11
46.16 x 7
Black resigned.

48.29 23! 19 x 28
49.38 32 27 x 38
50.42 x 22
After 50 8 12 51.30 24 its game over for
black. He played 50 8 13 51.30 24 and
resigned.

F. Drost - W. van der Sluis


Black played 7 11? but could have forced a
beautiful shot by 31 6 11!!
Exercise 2.9 How does black win after 32.30
25?

S6. Edge pieces

261

Black has just played 24 18 23.


Sometimes it is possible to play a classical
position after the opponent has gone to <15>.
Black controls both wings, while whites left
wing isnt developed well (piece 46). White
played 25.40 35?, after which black could
have forced a beautiful shot.
25.40 35
26.44 40
27.28 x 17
28.36 x 27
29.34 x 23
30.15 x 13
31.32 x 23

B. Derkx M. Palmans

24 29!
19 24!
11 x 31
3 8
4 9
8 x 28
21 x 45

Black showed a beautiful forcing using pieces


15 and 25.
27 25 30!
28.34 x 25 23 x 34
29.39 x 30 35 x 24

T. Brouwers A. Gantwarg
Blacks position is very solid. White, on the
other hand, has a weak defence. There is only
one piece in the heart of his defence <38 / 42 /
43 / 47 / 48 / 49>.
Black is threatening 24 30 14 20 22 27 8
x 48 B+. At 30.32 28 black also takes the 24
30 shot! If white takes 28 x 17 12 x 21 25 x
34 14 20 15 x 24 piece 31 is transported to
13 by 21 27 B+.
Closing <39> wont help because 30.43 39
(or 44 39) is met by 30... 4 10!! 31.15 x 4
24 29 32.33 x 24 3 9 32.4 x 13 8 x 30
33.25 x 34 22 28 34.32 x 23 18 x 49 B+.
White gave a piece playing 30.15 10 and
eventually lost.

34.33 28
There are no other sensible moves. 34.49
43? 19 24! 35.29 x 20 23 28 B+.
34 25 30!
35.34 x 25 23 x 43
36.49 x 38 19 24
37.36 31 13 19
38.31 27 9 13
Threatening 24 30 25 x 34 14 20 15 x 24
19 x 48 +.
39.44 39 18 23

A piece at 15 / 36 gives many tactical


possibilities

M. Koopmanschap M. Palmans

S6. Edge pieces

262

34 11 17
35.30 25 9 13
36.45 40 17 22
37.28 x 17 21 x 12
38.33 28 3 8

Black has made the position classical. Piece


41 is a weakness.
40.41 36?
White should have played 40.38 33 7 11
41.41 36 with advantage for black.
After 41.45 40? 35 x 44 42.39 x 50 black can
force a win by 23 29! and after capturing 24
30 25 x 34 14 20 15 x 24 19 x 48 follows.
40 35 40!
41.45 x 34 4 10
42.15 x 4 14 20
43.4 x 29 24 x 44
44.25 x 23 44 49

39.40 34 isnt possible now because of the


Harlem shot 16 21 27 x 16 18 22 28 x 17
12 x 21 16 x 27 26 31 37 x 26 23 29 34 x
23 19 x 48 B+.
49.38 33 12 17
50.35 30 24 x 44 51.33 29 23 x 34 52.28
22 17 x 28 53.32 x 3 leads to a bad endgame
for white after 53 44 50 54.3 x 20 34 39
55.20 38. However, since the game doesnt
give white any chance to survive, he should
have chosen this variation, which gives him an
endgame in which he can still fight.

White resigned.

50.42 38 8 12
51.40 34 17 21
52.34 30 12 17
53.36 31 17 22
54.28 x 17 21 x 12
55.33 28

M. van IJzendoorn M. van Gortel


Black created a closed classical position.
Whites main problem is that he has a weak
piece at <36>. White also has to take care he
isnt frozen out.
34.47 42?
A severe strategic mistake! Whites piece at 36
is staying behind, while piece 42 is dangling at
the moment. This gives black the opportunity
to freeze his opponent out. White should have
played 47 41, 36 31 and 41 36 to activate
piece 36.

White has no way to escape from the freeze


out anymore. After 55 12 17 56.38 33 17
21 57.28 22 23 29 58.33 28 18 23
white had to sacrifice and lost soon.

S6. Edge pieces

263

A. Chizhov Diakit
It seems a quiet classical position, but in a few
moves black will go to 36 White wants to
take <27>.
24.36 31 17 22
25.46 41 16 21

White is threatening 28 22 47 41 43 x 1.
Changing back wont help because after 28
22 47 41 43 x 12 piece at 12 is extremely
strong. Because 33 18 22 is punished by
34.30 24! 22 x 33 35.29 x 38 20 x 29 36.37
31 36 x 27 37.38 33 29 x 38 38.43 x 1 black
doesnt have any good move any more and
surrendered!

Black doesnt allow white to take <27> after


25... 13 18 26.31 27 22 x 31 27.41 36.
However, the next exchange gives white a lot
of space.
26.31 27! 22 x 31
27.33 28 23 x 32
28.38 x 16 31 36
White wants to control square 29. A piece at
29 is very strong combined with the active
arrow 25 / 30 / 35. In this way white gains
control over blacks left wing.

Vermeulen M. Podolski
The presence of pieces 15, 25 and 45 brings
about many tactical possibilities. Black played
36 23 29 but even stronger was building
the 6 / 11 / 17 tail.
36 6 11
37.42 37 1 6
38.28 22

29.37 32 13 18
30.39 33 8 13
31.33 29! 11 17
32.41 37 6 11?

38.37 31 18 22 39.31 27 22 x 31 40.26 x


37 17 22 41.28 x 17 11 x 22 42.37 31 24
30! 43.25 x 34 22 28 44.33 x 22 23 29
45.34 x 23 19 x 26 B+
38 18 x 27!!
39.32 x 12 3 8
40.12 x 3 23 29
41.3 x 20 29 34
42.20 x 40 45 x 41

A decisive mistake. White forces a win.


33.32 28!!

All of a sudden piece 45 becomes the hero by


making an unexpected shot.

S6. Edge pieces

264

A. Baliakin W. Van der Kooij

White changes in order to get an active game


at his right wing.

Black has pieces at <26> and <36> while white


has an edge piece at <6>. White needs active
play at the right wing, otherwise he will have
too little space to play. This explains the next
move.
15.33 29 24 x 33
16.38 x 29 14 20
17.39 33 4 10
18.44 39

25.30 24
26.34 x 14
27.49 44
28.40 x 29

19 x 30
10 x 19
23 x 34
5 10

White takes <24> now, although there is no


black piece at <25>.
29.29 24 19 x 30
30.35 x 24 10 14
31.37 32 22 27
White makes a pseudo sacrifice in order to get
rid of piece 24. A little better would have been
to do this with 31 22 28 32.33 x 22 18 x 27
33.32 x 21 14 19 etc.
32.32 x 21 14 19
33.32 x 21 19 x 30
34.33 28 9 14

The position after 18 12 17 arose in a


Dibman Clerc game (Kislovodsk 1981). Both
grandmasters missed a kingshot: 19.37 31!
26 x 46 20.47 41 36 x 38 21.43 x 32 46 x 28
22.33 x 2 with good chances to win for white.
18 7 11
19.6 x 17 12 x 21
20.37 32 8 12
21.42 38 21 27
22.32 x 21 26 x 17
23.41 37 17 22
24.48 42 1 7

White will strengthen his centre first, and then


launch a left wing attack.
35.38 32
36.40 34
37.42 38
38.39 33
39.43 39

14 19
30 35
15 20
19 24
13 19

39 3 8 40.32 27 7 11 41.28 22 20
25 42.38 32 11 16 43.32 28 (24 30
44.33 29) leads to a complete freeze out.
40.32 27 3 8

S6. Edge pieces

265

41.28 22! 8 13
42.22 17!
Gantwarg (l) and Wiersma in Salou (Spain)
Black cant stop a breakthrough anymore.
42 20 25
43.17 x 8 13 x 2
44.21 17 18 23
45.17 11
After 45 24 30 46.21 16 19 24 47.17
11 7 12 48.11 6 2 7 49.38 32 24 29
50.33 x 24 30 x 19 51.32 28 23 x 32 52.6 1
black resigned.

A. Gantwarg M. Balcerowicz
Whites right wing is locked, but he still has a
lot of formations. White uses them to break the
lock and start a centre attack.
19.33 28! 3 8
20.28 23 19 x 28
21.32 x 23 24 29
22.23 18 13 x 22
Black cant take 12 x 23 because of 37 31 36
x 27 38 33 29 x 38 43 x 3 W+.
23.34 x 23 25 x 34
24.40 x 29
With a strong centre attack for white, who won
the game.

S6. Edge pieces

266

3.Edge piece 26
Depending on the situation at the board an
edge piece at <25> / <26> can be either strong
or weak. Sometimes the piece can be used for
tactical purposes. If no formation is aimed at
the edge piece its usually strong.

Black is winning the fight for control over the


right wing. The fork lock is doing a good job.
43.33 29
44.29 x 20
45.38 33
46.32 27

19 24
15 x 24
13 19
30 34

The piece at <34> is very strong.

A. Baliakin A. Dibman

47.48 42
48.42 37
49.37 32
50.36 31

Black can use piece 26 tactically. His own


piece at <25> is strong.
35 25 30!
36.45 40 will be answered by 36 24 29

24 30
30 35
3 9
9 13

White sacrificed a piece playing 22 18 13 x


22 27 x 18 17 21 26 x 17 11 x 13 and lost.

1) 37.33 x 24 17 21 38.26 x 17 11 x 44 39.40


x 49 30 34
1.1) 40.49 44? 19 x 30 41.35 x 24 23 29!
42.24 x 33 34 39 B+.
1.2) 40.24 20 34 39 and the infiltrated
piece at <39> gives black an advantage.
2) 37.35 x 24 29 x 20
Threatening 23 29 17 21 B +
After 38.40 34 20 24 there is no way to
stop the 24 30 23 29 threat.
38.39 34 17 21 39.26 x 17 11 x 31 40.36 x
27 20 24 and white cant parry the plan 3 8
followed by 24 29 B+.
36.27 22 23 29
Whites left wing is fork-locked now. This
economic lock is a good one, because black is
going to control the other wing.
37.45 40
38.40 34
39.35 x 44
40.44 40
41.39 x 50
42.50 45

4 10
29 x 40
30 35
35 x 44
10 15
24 30

M. Dolfing C. van Dusseldorp


38 3 8?
Black should have played 38 6 11. Now
white can use tactics against piece 25 in order
to get space at the left wing. Note that piece 25
is weak while piece 26 is strong!
39.27 21!
Because of the 28 22 threat black has a
forced reply.
39 24 30
40.35 x 24 19 x 30
41.28 x 19 13 x 24
42.21 17 12 x 21

S6. Edge pieces

267

57.21 17 18 23
58.17 12 23 28
59.12 8

43.26 x 17
As a result of blacks forced play white is able
to take the strong square 17.

White goes to <3>. Both after 59 28 33


60.8 3 33 38 61.3 25! 30 35 62.25 48
W+ and 59.28 32 60.8 3 32 37 61.3 14
37 42 62.14 37! 42 x 31 63.26 x 37 white
wins.

43 30 35
44.38 33 35 x 44
45.39 x 50 18 23
46.43 39 24 29
47.33 x 24 20 x 40
48.45 x 34 15 20
49.50 44 20 24

Another example of a Dolfing game in which


piece 26 is strong while the edge piece of his
opponent at <25> is weak.

The next exchange results in a winning 3 x 3


position for white.

M. Dolfing A. Kosior

50.32 28 23 x 32
51.34 29 24 x 33
52.39 x 37 25 30

Both players have a fork at their right wing.


Whites fork is much more active, because of
the piece at <25>.
28.43 39 9 14
29.48 43 17 22
After 29 17 21 white constructs a strong
chain lock with 30.33 29! 3 9 31.39 33
etc.
30.28 x 17 11 x 22
31.31 26 22 x 31
32.36 x 27

White played 53.37 32? 8 13 54.17 12 6


11 55.32 27 11 17 56.12 x 21 13 18
57.21 17 30 34 58.17 11 18 23
59.11 - 7 23 29 and the players agreed on a
draw.
White should have played:
53.37 31 8 13
54.17 12 6 11
55.31 26 11 17
55 30 34 56.26 21 11 17 57.12 7 17
x 26 58.7 2 13 18 59.2 19 wins easily.
56.12 x 21 13 18

Whites edge piece at <26> is very strong.


White controls the left flank of the board. Piece
6 cant be played because of 32 28 W+.
Black has a weakness at <9>. White is
threatening to play 27 22 (coup Philippe). So

S6. Edge pieces

268

black has to close the gap at <9> weakening


the golden square 3.

46.43 39! 2 8
47.28 22

32 3 9
33.33 28 20 24

A good plan with the goal of freezing black out.


8 13 48.33 28

After 33 8 12 34.34 30 25 x 34 35.39 x


30 black pieces <9> and <15> are kept
inactive.
34.28 22!
Prohibiting both 6 11 and 8 12 (35.32 28
W+ or 35.27 21 W+). Black flees to the edge
of the board. 34 14 20 would have been a
better defence.
24 24 30
35.35 x 24 19 x 30
36.38 33 14 19
37.40 35 9 14
38.35 x 24 19 x 30
39.45 40 30 35

48 6 11
49.26 21 24 30
50.50 44 11 17
51.22 x 11 16 x 7
52.21 16 30 35
53.39 33

After 39 14 19 40.40 35 black has no


sensible move left.
40.22 17
41.39 x 50
42.33 28
43.42 38
44.17 x 8

Black is frozen out completely so he resigned.


35 x 44
14 19
15 20
8 12
13 x 2

The strong piece at <26>

Georgiev Watoetin
45.38 33 20 24
45 6 11 should not be answered by 46.28
22? 23 28! etc. =, but by 46.43 38!
Making 11 17 impossible because of 47.34
29 & 48.27 21 W+
and now:
1) 46 20 24 47.28 22 2 7 48.22 x 13
19 x 8 49.33 28 with a winning breakthrough
for white.
.
2) 46 2 8 47.28 22 8 13 48.26 - 21 11
17 49.21 x 12 18 x 7 50.33 29 W+

Piece 26 cant be exploited. Black needs a lot


of pieces to make a formation. At this moment
piece 8 is dangling. Black needs to play 3 8
at some time. Six pieces are aimed at the
piece at <26> which isnt economic at all.
White strengthens his right wing. His strategy
is to keep pieces 26 / 31 / 36 in place and get
active at the right flank.
35.39 33 15 20
After 35 3 8 36.34 30 piece 15 stays
behind.
36.44 39 20 25

S6. Edge pieces

269

Black might have been afraid to be surrounded


after 36 18 23 37.34 30 20 25 38.39
34 12 18 39.33 29 24 x 33 40.38 x 29 etc.

49 20 25 is met by the stick move 50.27


22 25 x 23 51.22 x 24 W+.
After 49 18 23 50.29 x 7 11 x 2 51.30 25
black resigned.

37.34 29 3 9
38.29 x 20 25 x 14
More logical would have been 37 3 8 38.29
x 20 25 x 14 of course, but after 39.33 29
white also has a big advantage.
39.33 29

E. Merins A. Gantwarg
Having pieces at both <25> and <23> is
dangerous but can also be strong.
26 24 29!

Piece 12 is dangling now. The next move


doesnt solve blacks problems.

27.34 30 25 x 34 28.39 x 30 18 22 29.27 x


18 13 x 33 30.40 34 29 x 40 31.38 x 18 12 x
23 32.45 x 34 gives black a small advantage.
In the game black will get great wing control.

39 18 22
40.31 27 22 x 31
41.36 x 27

27.39 33
28.33 x 24
29.43 x 34
30.28 x 19

White has a winning position. The weakness at


<8> is horrible.

14 20
19 x 39
17 21
13 x 24

41 14 20
42.35 30 9 14
43.39 34 20 25
44.42 37 14 20
45.48 42 13 18
46.32 28 20 25
47.29 x 20 25 x 14
48.33 29

Blacks 15 / 20 / 24 / 25 fork is much stronger


than whites 34 / 35 / 40 / 45 fork. Whites both
wings are disconnected. Black controls both
wings.
31.37 31 21 26
32.42 37 9 13
Preventing 32 28 by 18 22 27 x 9 8 13 9
x 18 12 x 41 36 x 47 26 x 37 B+.
The 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 front looks
impressive.

43.48 43 13 19

48 14 20 49.37 32

S6. Edge pieces

270

Black connects his both wings. 44.27 22 18 x


27 45.31 x 22 is punished by 45 8 13
(threatening 24 30) 46.43 39 16 21
(threatening to win the outpost) 47.22 17 12
18 48.17 12 18 23 49.12 x 1 21 27 and
black wins.
44.43 39 8 13

Tiemensma Oudshoorn
Black occupies both <23> and <25>. Since
white misses a piece at <43> the edge piece is
strong. Black pushes his opponent away from
<27>.
29 17 22
30.28 x 17 11 x 22
Whites space to play is severely restricted by
blacks wing control.

White should defended by playing 31 26 x 37


with an advantage for black.

45.32 28 18 23
46.28 22

31.42 37? 6 11

After 46.38 32 12 18 white is frozen out


completely.
46 12 18
47.22 17 16 21
48.27 x 16 18 22
49.17 x 28 23 x 41
50.36 x 47 26 x 37

White already resigned. After 32.47 42 11


17 33.31 26 22 x31 34.36 x 27 17 21
34 23 28 35.32 x 23 19 x 28 is also very
strong.
35.37 31
35.38 33 or 35.39 33 is punished by 23
28!! B+
35 21 26 36.42 37 8 12 37.33 28 20
24 and white can resign.

White is completely lost. After 51.38 33 both


51 19 23 and 51 24 30 52.35 x 24 20 x
38 53.39 33 38 x 29 54.34 x 14 25 30 win
for black.

Exploiting the edge piece

A. Schotanus V. Agafonov

R. Heusdens R. Van der Pal


Exercise 3.1 Black to move. Would you play
14 19, 13 18 or 17 21 and why?

Piece 26 is weak. Black can use it for tactical


purposes. Piece 31 is weak because it is
dangling. Black could simply play 40 3 9
41.40 34 9 14 42.42 37 (only move) 24
29 43.33 x 24 17 21 44.26 x 17 11 x 33

S6. Edge pieces

271

(45.31 26 6 11 46.37 31 11 17 B+) but


he forces a win in a surprising, tactical way.

Exercise 3.3 What winning shot could white


take?

40 23 29
41.42 38 3 9
42.28 23
Since 42.30 25 9 14 is losing because 40
34 x 44 is punished by a coup Philippe, white
has to play like this. Black has a big surprise
for his opponent.
42 19 x 39
43.30 x 8 9 13
44.8 x 19 29 34
45.40 x 29 18 22
46.27 x 18 17 21
47.26 x 17 11 x 42

White forces a win:

Having pieces at both <25> and <23> can be


dangerous. There are many tactical ideas to
exploit this situation.

1.33 28! 13 19
1 14 19 is met by a Harlem shot: 2.28 22
17 x 28 3.34 30 25 x 34 4.40 x 29 23 x 34
5.32 x 25 W+.
1 23 29 2.34 x 23 18 x 29 loses a piece
after 3.28 22 of course.
2.48 42 9 13
Threatening 28 22 17 x 28 27 21 16 x 38
42 x 4 W+.
2 17 21 is met by 3.37 31 26 x 30 4.35 x
4 W+.
3.28 22 17 x 28
4.27 21 16 x 38
5.42 x 22 18 x 27
6.34 30 25 x 34
7.40 x 7

Exercise 3.2 White can force a win. What is


the winning move for white?

G. Westerveld T. Sijbrands
(1962)
Black occupies <25> and <23> at the same
time while having a weakness at <9>. White
could have exploited this by taking a coup
Raichenbach.

1.28 22 17 x 28
2.33 x 22 18 x 27
3.31 x 22
White is threatening 22 18 13 x 22 34 30
25 x 34 40 x 27 W+. Of course, black cant
play 3 12 17, because of a Harlem shot to
<5>. After 312 18 4.37 31 18 x 27 5.31 x

S6. Edge pieces

272

22 black cant parry the 22 17 34 30 threat


anymore.

Tsjizjow Valneris
1.43 39!
Threatening with an arch shot: 27 22 38 33
37 31 with king at <5>.

During the Mind Games Olympiad in Beijing


(China) Tsjizjow fell victom to a combination,
which happens rarely. Removing piece <38>
gives black the opportunity to take a kingshot.
1 24 29!
2.33 x 24 17 21
3.26 x 17 11 x 33
4.38 x 29 14 20
5.25 x 23 12 18
6.23 x 21 16 x 47

1. 10 14 2.39 33
Threatening with a pingpong shot: 27 22 34
30 40 x 18 28 x 6 W+. After blacks forced
reply white has another pingpong shot.
2 11 17
3.27 22 18 x 27
4.37 31 26 x 37
5.42 x 11 16 x 7
6.34 30 25 x 34
7.40 x 18 13 x 22
8.28 x 26

and black won the game.

1.37 31! 26 x 37
2.32 x 41

Guntis Valneris

Threatening 27 21 16 x 27 38 32 27 x 29
34 x 5 +.
2 10 14 3.34 30 loses a piece, while 2
18 23 is met by 4.33 29 24 x 31 5.34 30
25 x 34 6.40 x 7 W+.

S6. Edge pieces

273

C 3.4 Why is it wrong to take the 27 22 shot?

C 3.5 Why is the 26 21 shot no good?

F 3.8 How does white force a winning


breakthrough?

F 3.9 White forces a win.

C 3.6 Why does the 27 22 shot fail?

F 3.10 White forces a kingshot!

C 3.7 White wins a piece!

F 3.11 White forces a coup Weiss!

S6. Edge pieces

274

Welling Grisser
Exercise 3.12 Answer the questions!
White has just played 24.39 33. Black took
his opportunity to use piece <26> tactically.
24 23 29!
24.33 x 24 20 x 29
Auke Scholma
A) Black is threatening with what move?
25.35 30 17 21
26.26 x 17 11 x 33
27.43 39
B) How did black force the win of a piece now?
Lets look at what happens if white played
27.40 35 first and then attacks piece 33:
27...12 17 28.43 39 3 9 29.39 x 28 18
22 30.27 x 18 13 x 33 31.48 43 7 12 32.43
39 12 18 33.39 x 28 18 22 34.44 40 22
x 33 35.40 34 29 x 40 36.45 x 34

Wagenaar Heslinga

C) How can black take a winning kingshot


now?

1 1 6!?
2.41 36?
Exercise 3.14 Two questions:
A) How did black win after 2.41 36?

B) How could white have won himself?

Depending on the situation piece 25 / 26


can be strong or weak.
Adema Scholma
Exercise 3.13 Black to move can force a win.
What did he play?

S6. Edge pieces

275

4.Edge piece 16

47 18 22!
Isolating whites edge pieces. White is lost.

B. de Harder A. Shwarzman
Barnsteen 2009
White has some pieces at the edge of the
board, 16 / 21 / 26 which arent very active.
Blacks piece 6 isnt active either but will be
developed soon. Black has control over the
centre possessing <23> and <24> and the
right wing with a strong piece at <25>.

48.40 34 29 x 40
49.35 x 44 19 23
50.44 40 23 29
White cant play 32 28 because of 24 30 +.
51.40 35 25 30
White is frozen out (52.32 28 13 19+) and
lost.

42.31 27 17 22
43.44 40 22 x 31
44.26 x 37
Breaking the 32 / 33 / 38 / 43 fork playing
43.43 39 gives black the opportunity to block
whites position, going to <22>.
44 6 11 45.37 31 11 17 46.31 26 18
22! 47.44 40 13 18 48.40 34 22 27 +.
44 6 11?
Black could have forced a win playing 44 18
22!!
Threatening 12 17 21 x 1 23 29 1 x 34 24
30 35 x 24 19 x 48 +.
45.43 39 12 18 46.40 34 22 28! 47.33
x 22 18 x 27 48.21 17 13 18 49.32 x 21 18
22 50.17 x 28 23 x 41 B+.

F. Fennema R. Boomstra
White has edge pieces at 16 and 26 which are
not active. The next move only makes things
worse.

45.37 31 11 17
46.31 26 23 29
47.43 39?
White should have prevented the 18 22
move by playing 47.32 27!

41.27 21
42.40 34
43.45 40
44.39 33

8 13
20 24
15 20
18 22

A strategically very strong move. Pieces 16 /


21 / 26 are isolated from the rest of whites
forces.

S6. Edge pieces

276

White has a strong centre position. Black fled


to the edge of the board.
32.31 26 7 12
33.26 x 17 12 x 21
After having weakened blacks right wing,
white begins an attack here.
34.28 22 24 30
35.32 28 21 26
36.38 32 14 19
37.22 18 13 x 22
38.28 x 17

45.34 29 13 18
46.40 34 9 13
47.32 28?
After this move white will be completely frozen
out. After 47.49 44 13 19 48.44 40 19
23 49.40 35 20 25 50.29 x 20 15 x 14
51.32 27 22 x 31 52.26 x 37 17 x 26 53.35
30 white still has drawing chances.
47 13 19
48.49 43 20 25
49.29 x 20 25 x 14

Aggressive play! Black cant change the strong


piece at <17> because of the 44 40 threat.
After the played 19 23 he piece at <23>
gives white an object to play against.
38 19 23
39.42 38 15 20
40.48 42

50.34 29 (or 50.34 30) is punished by a


kingshot: 7 11! 51.16 x 7 12 x 1 52.21 x 23 1
7 53.28 x 17 19 x 48 B+.
50.43 38
51.38 32
52.34 30
53.30 25

Black has a hidden defence in playing 23 28!


41.32x23 16 21 now. White could have
prevented this by playing 40..32 27
immediately.
40 8 12
41.17 x 8 3 x 12
42.32 27

18 23
14 20
20 24
23 29

At both the left and the right wing black has


passive edge pieces.
D. Staal R. Sloot

S6. Edge pieces

277

42 12 18 is met by 43.37 32 6 11 44.42


37 20 24 45.37 31 26 x 28 46.33 x 13
W+.

Pieces 16 / 21 / 26 often become


passive.

42 12 17
43.37 32 17 21
44.33 28 20 24
45.28 x 19 24 x 13
46.38 33

W. Wesselink G. Valneris

Because of his two inactive arrows, black has


only two playable pieces left.
46 6 11
47.33 28 11 17
48.28 23 13 18
49.23 x 12 17 x 8
50.34 29 8 13
51.39 33 13 19
52.33 28 19 24
53.29 x 20 25 x 14
54.45 40

The white piece at <21> is more active than it


would have been at <16>. Black would like to
force this piece to go to the edge square. Black
has a good defence at this wing while having
space to attack on the other wing.
47 25 30!
48.45 40?
White should have broken free by 28 22 17 x
28 33 x 22, with a small disadvantage due to
blacks better defence, but still easy to draw.
48 30 35
49.48 43 35 x 44
50.39 x 50

After 54 14 19 55.42 37 19 24 56.28


23 its game over. Therefore black sacrificed a
piece and lost soon after that.

Black played 50 29 34 and won the game,


with some help of his opponent. We show an
even better way to play, resulting in a forced
win.

M. van Dijk K.H. Leijenaar


Exercise 4.1 Black to move. What strong
move did black play?

50 13 18!
Threatening 18-22 followed by 24 30 B+.
Therefore white is forced to play 21 16,
moving to the weak square 16.

S6. Edge pieces

278

51.21 16 29 34
52.38 32 1 7
White is frozen out rapidly. After 53.50 44 3
8 54.43 38 34 39 55.44 40 18 22 56.33
x 44 22 x 42 B+ follows.

H. Stroetinga
Exercise 4.3 How can white force a winning
shot?
B. Hollander T. Goedemoed
White doesnt want to play 21 16, because
his piece at <21> is much more active than at
<16>.
Black played 27 6 11, hoping for 28.21
16? 26 31!! 29.16 x 7 14 20 30.25 x 23 18
x 29 and now:
1) 31.7 x 18 8 13 32.30 x 8 2 x 32 33.38 x 36
29 x 49 B+
2) 31.30 x 19 9 13 32.7 x 9 3 x 32 33.38 x 36
29 x 49 B+

Exercise 4.4 What kingshot can white take?

However, after 27 6 11? white can keep


his piece at <21>. Black could better have
played 27 26 31 after which 28.21 16
fails to the mentioned combination. White
should respond 28.41 36 17 x 26 29.36 x 27
and the annoying piece at <21> for black, is
eliminated.

Exercise 4.5 White can take a break through


shot. How?

Exercise 4.2 How can white to move force a


win?

S6. Edge pieces

279

5.Piece 6
In the first lesson of this section we saw
situations with a white piece at <6> and black
pieces at <26> and <36>.
Sometimes there is only an edge piece at <6>.
From the opening this can happen like this:
1.32 28 18 23 2.38 32 17 21
3.31 27 11 17 4.43 38 21 26
After 5.37 31? 26 x 37 6.42 x 31 black wins
with the Harlem shot.
5.49 43 6 11

A. Groenendijk Trimester
White exploits the weakness at <13> with help
of the edge piece at <45>.
1.37 32 26 x 37
2.42 x 31 8 13

White has two attractive variations: 6.34 29


23 x 34 7.40 x 29 or:

3.27 21 was threatening.

6.37 31 26 x 37
7.42 x 31

3.48 43! 24 30
Black cant parry the 44 40 threat by 3 3
8 because of 4.44 40 35 x 44 5.39 x 19 13 x
24 6.27 21 16 x 27 7.31 x 2 W+
5.39 33 30 35
Forced again, because of the 28 23 threat.
5.33 29!
Threatening 44 40 again.
5 3 8 6.29 24!

7 23 29
8.34 x 23 17 22
9.28 x 6 19 x 26
10.36 31 26 x 37
11.41 x 32

The king after 44 40 45 x 23 28 x 19 13 x 24


27 21 16 x 27 31 x 2 is immediately caught.
Now black cant do anything against the 24
19 27 21 W+ threat.

With an interesting game.


Lets see an opening with this type of play:
1.33 28 17 22 2.28 x 17 11 x 22
3.39 33 6 11 4.35 30 20 25
Exercise 5.1 How does white get a piece at
<6>?

T. Sijbrands R. Jharap
This was one of the blindfold games Sijbrands
played during his world record simultaneous
blindfold of 28 games. Pieces 35 and 45 are

S6. Edge pieces

280

not very active. Whites defence 44 / 49 / 50 is


very solid. His other pieces are active. White
occupies much more space than black.
Before playing 45.34 29 white should have
improved the position of piece 31, by playing
45.31-26!
1) 45 12 17 46.34 29 24 30 47.29 23!
and white wins like in the game.
2) 45 13 18 46.34 29 24 30 47.33 28
30 34 (what else?) 48.29 x 40 45 x 34 and
instead of 49.50 45? 35 40! 50.44 x 35 12
17 = white simply plays 49.28 22 18 23
50.22 18! and white wins (also after 16 21
51.26 x 8 23 x 3 52.50 45 etc.).

Exercise 5.2 White can perform a nice


breakthrough shot, try to find it!

45.34 29 24 30
46.33 28 12 17?
Black could have escaped by playing a
sacrifice: 46 30 34! 47.29 x 40 45 x 34
1) 48.50 45 35 40!! 49.44 x 35 13 18!
50.28 22 will be met by 16 21! Thats why
piece 31 is better at <26>!
50.31 26 12 17 51.49 44 14 19 52.44
40 16 21! 53.27 x 16 18 22 54.40 x 29 22 x
24 =
2) 48.31 26 12 17! 49.27 22 14 19
50.22 x 11 16 x 7 51.50 45 35 40
51 13 18 is also drawing
52.44 x 35 13 18 and white cannot win.

Exercise 5.3 Black played 12 18? 22 x 13


9 x 18. How could white have won now?

47.29 23!
Now black is without a chance. Whites attack
is unstoppable.
47 13 19
48.31 26 19 24
49.27 22 14 20
50.22 x 11 16 x 7
51.23 18 30 34
52.18 13
After 52 34 40 53.13 9 24 29 54.9 3
20 25 55.3 8 7 11 56.26 21 black
resigned after more than 41 hours of play

Draughts art by Zolotnisky

S6. Edge pieces

281

Solutions section 6
Lesson 1: Games with piece 15 / 36
1.1 The position is very good for white! Black
has a lack of space. The game was:
14 14 19 15.48 43 8 12 16.33 28 23
29 17.39 33 Black lost a piece and the
game.
C 1.1 39 33 16 x 29 28 23 19 x 28 20 14
9 x 20 15 x 2 W+
C 1.2 28 23 19 x 37 39 34 30 x 28 35 30
24 x 35 15 x 2 W+
C 1.3 15 10 4 x 15 (15 x 4 26 21 17 x 37 41
x 3 +) 38 33 28 x 39 30 25 39 x 30 35 x 4
W+
C 1.4 32 28 7 11 28 x 17 11 x 22 37 31
36 x 27 38 32 27 x 38 29 24 38 x 20 15 x 2
W+
Lesson 2: Playing against piece 15
2.1 27 22 18 x 27 32 x 21 26 x 17 28 23 19
x 28 37 31 36 x 27 38 32 27 x 38 42 x 2 +
2.2 34 30 25 x 34 28 22 17 x 39 38 33 39
x 28 47 42 36 x 38 43 x 5 +
2.3 27 22 18 x 27* 39 33 25 x 34 33 29
24 x 33 38 x 18 12 x 23 47 41 36 x 38 43 x 1
+
2.4 47 42 36 x 47 32 28 23 x 32 38 x 27 47
x 16 43 38 16 x 30 35 x 2 +
2.5 47 41 36 x 47 27 22 47 x 50 22 x 4 50 x
22 4 x 36 +
2.6 47 42 36 x 47 26 21 17 x 26 37 31 26
x 28 33 x 22 18 x 27 29 x 20 15 x 24 38 33
47 x 29 34 x 5 +
2.7 19 23? 30 24 23 x 34 24 20 15 x 24
47 41 36 x 47 43 39 47 x 44 50 x 10 +
2.8 47 41 36 x 47 32 28 23 x 32 38 x 27 47
x 40 45 x 3 +
2.9 31 6 11 32.30 25 4 10 33.15 x 4 19
23 34.28 x 10 9 14 35.10 x 19 13 x 24 36.4
x 22 17 x 30 37.25 x 34 16 21 38.26 x 6 7
11 39.6 x 17 12 x 43 B+.

3.1 13 18? is met by 27 21 16 x 38 39 33


38 x 29 34 x 21 =.
17 21? Is met by 39 33! 24 30 35 x 24 20
x 38 32 x 43 21 x 23 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 20
15 x 24 =.
The winning move is 14 19! 39 33 (27 22
17 21 +) 16 21 27 x 26 24 30 35 x 24 20
x 27 B+.
F 3.2 37 31 26 x 37 32 x 41 (threatening 28
23 19 x 28 34 30 W+) 18 23 39 33 23 x
32 33 28 32 x 23 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 7 W+
3.3 22 17 21 x 12 33 29 24 x 22 35 30 25
x 34 40 x 9 (10 14 9 x 20 15 x 24 32 28 22
x 33 38 x 20) W+
C 3.4 27 22? 18 x 27 32 x 21 16 x 27 34 30
25 x 34 40 x 7 27 32 37 x 28 24 29 33 x 24
19 x 30 35 x 24 8 12 7 x 18 13 x 44 (or 13 x
42) B+
C 3.5 26 21 17 x 26 28 22 18 x 27 32 x 21
26 x 17 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 9 8 13 9 x 18 19
23 18 x 29 24 x 44 B+
C 3.6 27 22 18 x 27 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 7
24 29 33 x 24 19 x 30 35 x 24 8 12 7 x 18
13 x 33 38 x 29 27 x 47 B+
C 3.7 27 22 18 x 27 31 x 11 16 x 7 33 29 24
x 22 35 30 25 x 34 40 x 16 W+1
C 3.8 27 22 20 24 22 17 21 x 12 33 29
24 x 22 35 30 25 x 34 40 x 7 W+
C 3.9 48 43 and black has no good move
left:
1) 7 11 27 21 17 x 26 34 30 25 x 34 40 x
18 13 x 22 28 x 6 W+
2) 20 24 34 29 23 x 34 40 x 20 15 x 24 28
23 19 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 33 x 2
3) 8 12 27 22 7 11 34 30 W+
4) 23 29 34 x 23 17 22 27 x 18 13 x 22 28
x 17 19 x 37 17 12 ad lib. 38 32 37 x 28 33
x 2 W+
F 3.10 44 40 12 17 27 21 16 x 27 32 x 12
18 x 7 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 18 13 x 22 37 31
26 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 39 34 28 x 30 35 x 4
W+
F 3.11 34 30 25 x 34 40 x 18 13 x 22 32 28
22 27 (after 7 12 28 x 17 12 x 21 36 31
followed by 38 32 and 31 27 white wins
piece 21) 43 39 19 24 28 22 27 x 18 36
31 26 x 37 38 32 37 x 28 33 x 11 W+

Lesson 3: Edge piece 26

S6. Edge pieces

282

3.12 A) 29 34 40 x 29 17 21 26 x 17 11 x
24
B) 18 23 39 x 28 14 20 25 x 14 19 x 10 28
x 19 13 x 35 (Kung Fu shot)
C) Black plays either 6 11 38 x 29 14 20 25
x 21 16 x 47 or 15 20 38 x 29 19 23 29 x
18 9 13 18 x 9 14 x 3 25 x 14 3 8 14 x 21
16 x 47 B+
3.13 15 20! threatening 17 21 26 x 17 11 x
33 38 x 29 24 x 33 39 x 28 25 30 35 x 15 14
20 15 x 24 19 x 50 (or 19 x 48) B+.
15 20 34 30 25 x 34 39 x 30 is met by a
pingpong shot with 17 21 etc.
At 38 33 black plays 24 29 33 x 15 17 21
26 x 17 11 x 33 39 x 28 14 20 15 x 24 19 x
50 B+
3.14 A) 17 22 28 x 17 11 x 31 36 x 27 23
28! 32 x 1 13 18 1 x 20 14 x 41 B+
B) 27 22 18 x 27 32 x 1 23 x 25 33 29! 24 x
33 44 39 33 x 44 26 21 16 x 27 35 30 25
x 34 1 x 7 W+
Lesson 4: Piece 16
4.1 25 30 reducing blacks space even more!
White will be frozen out.
4.2 34 29 24 30 43 38 (40 34? 12 17
34 x 25 17 21 isnt enough to win!) 30 35
40 34 9 14 28 22 (or also 34 30 35 x 24
29 x 9 13 x 4 28 23 ad lib. 33 x 13 W+) 17 x
27 34 30 35 x 24 29 x 7 W+
4.3 31 27! threatening with a coup Weiss: 37
31 27 21 28 22 38 32 33 x 4 W+. After
31 27 9 13* white wins with a shot: 44 40
35 x 44 37 31 26 x 37 27 21 16 x 27 28
23 19 x 28 33 x 42 44 x 33 38 x 7 W+
4.4 34 30 35 x 24 32 28 21 x 45 22 17 12
x 21 44 40 45 x 34 39 x 10 15 x 4 25 x 1 W+
4.5 21 17 11 x 22 32 28 23 x 32 34 30 35
x 24 33 29 24 x 33 39 x 8 3 x 12 31 27 32 x
21 26 x 8 W+
Lesson 5: piece 6
5.1 34 29 25 x 23 32 28 23 x 32 38 x 6
5.2 44 40 45 x 34 28 23 19 x 39 37 31 26
x 28 50 44 21 x 43 44 x 11 16 x 7 48 x 10
W+
5.3 28 23 18 x 29 32 27 21 x 34 44 40 29
x 38 40 x 9 4 x 13 15 x 4 W+

S6. Edge pieces

283

Online draughts servers:


Vinco Online Games
http://www.vogclub.com/

1.About part III


This course elaborated on several types of
play. You have learned many plans and tactics
typical for these types of games. However, this
course isnt finished yet. Part III will dwell on
some interesting subjects like:

Using tactics as a weapon

More advanced tactics make the game of


draughts very attractive. You will learn how to
recognize different patterns and when to be
alarmed that tactics come into play

Calculating

You need to calculate variations in order to find


the best move sometimes. Youll learn how
and when to calculate

Strategy

Long term planning is called strategy. We will


show you strategic play by top-players.

After registering you can choose from many


mind games.
Kurnik
http://www.playok.com/en/
Without downloading anything or registering
you can play at this Polish server.

Watch the Course online!!!

http://www.damvids.comoj.com/
At this site you can watch different videos from
Peter Schuitema about draughts.
You can watch A course in draughts part I
live!

Watching games

Psychology

Draughts is a psychological game. We will


discuss several psychological matters and talk
about fair play.

igoogle game center


http://www.iggamecenter.com/info/nl/main.html

The thinking process

How should a player think to be able to find the


best moves? This is a very complicated, but
important matter.
We will also address the question how much
time one should take in different situations

At this site you have to register to be able to


play draughts or other mind games.

You can watch draughts games of many


players at Toernooibase (Tournament and
games database). You can learn a lot from this!
http://toernooibase.kndb.nl/

Finishing off a game


See partijen (games).

Winning a winning position is not easy at all.


We will discuss late middle-game positions and
the conversion to the endgame. We will also
study some standard dominance endgames.

Practising

Questions?
Write an email to
tjalling.goedemoed@gmail.com

If you want to work on your game, experience


of course is very important. For example, you
might consider to play online draughts on one
of the following servers.

284

2.DamMentor

For children:
Order DamZ! for free!!
You can order this cd-rom for free at:
www.bondsbureau@kndb.nl
Send an email and you will be sent the cdrom.
You only have to pay the sending fee.
At this cd-rom :

Many exercises

Videos

Interviews

Games

KNDB Course level 1&2:

Van der Wal Course

Sijbrands Course

For more advanced players there are cdroms, each containing 1.000 exercises and
instructions.
You can order KNDB Course level 3 until 7
on cd-rom as well ( 9,50 each):

For advanced players:


Level 3: Sijbrands course
Level 4: Roozenburg Course
Level 5: Springer Course
Level 6: Hoogland Course
Cant afford to miss it!

285

7.35-30 24x35 8.49-43 38x40 9.45x3 15x24


10.3x49 6-11 11.49-44 11-16 12.44-49 +

3. Compositions
Draughts can be practised in different ways.
1. Sports: Playing competitive games
2. Science: Analysing games and
positions
3. Art: Compositions
Compositions show the beauty and the
unlimited often very surprising possibilities of
the game.
I will show you some famous compositions and
some compositions I made myself, sometimes
helped by others.
My favourite composition is this one:

F. Hermelink
1.48-42 37x48 2.47-42 48x18 3.21-16 11x22
4.49-43 38x49 5.36-31 49x35 6.31-27 ad lib.
7.26x8 18x40 8.8-3 25x34 9.3x2 35x19 10.2x44
+

G.L. Gortmans
This magnificent pingpong shot was shown in
the first part of A course in draughts.
1.38-33 28x48 2.50-44 25x34 3.44-39 34x43
4.42-38 48x31 5.36x27 22x31 6.11x22 18x27
7.32x21 43x32 8.26x17 with a beautiful motive:
both getting a king and sacrificing first lose.
The introduction
composition:

shows

this

F. Hermelink
1.32-28!! 23x43 (A) 2.45-40 35x44 3.31-48 4450* 4.48x26 49x21 5.26x17 50x11 6.16x7 +
A) 1 23x21 2.31x4 etc. +

Vuurboom

L. de Rooij

A. Vuurboom

1.40-34 29x49 2.27-21 49x29 3.39-34 16x18


4.34x5 11x22 5.5x2 24-29 6.2-24 29-34
7.24x15 34-39 8.15-38 39-44 9.45-40 44x35
10.38-49 6-11 11.49-44 11-16 12.44-49 +

1.38-33 29x38 2.39-33 38x29 3.27-21 ad lib.


4.43x32 ad lib. 5.37-31 ad lib. 6.25-20 ad lib.

286

J. van der Wal


A. Timmer
1.21-17 12x21 2.44-40 35x44 3.28-23 19x48
4.30x8 21x43 5.22x4 2x13 6.4x35 48x30
7.35x8 +

1.30-24 10-15* 2.33-28 14-19* 3.39-33 19x39


4.28x19 39x37 5.47-42 13x33 6.42x2 33x42
7.2x47 20-24 8.47x20 15x24 9.45-40 24-29
10.40-34 29x40 11.35x44 +

D. van den Berg


M. Douwes
1.31-27 22x31 2.37x26 10-14 (A) 3.33x22
18x27 4.26-21 27-31 5.48-43 16x27 6.38-32
27x49 7.39-33 49x35 8.33-29 24x33 9.34-30
35x24 10.42-37 31x42 11.47x7 19-23 12.7-1
23-28 13.1-29 28-32 14.29-42 +
A) 2 18-22 3.26-21 16x27 4.38-32 27x29
5.34x5 +

1.40-34 37x46 2.29-24 20x40 3.39-34 40x29


4.33x11 22x42 5.11x31 26x28 6.48x37 46x32
7.16x38 +

L. Faber

H. Spanjer

1.49-44 40x49 2.39-34 29x40 3.32-28 49x47


4.21-17 ad lib. 5.50-45 ad lib. 6.45x3 12x21
7.3x15 35x24 8.15x46 +

1.35-30 24x42 2.34-29 23x34 3.45-40 34x45


4.44-40 45x34 5.39-33 28x39 6.43-38 42x33
7.48-43 39x48 8.30x10 15x4 9.31x13 48x9
10.25x3 21-27 11.3-14 4-9 12.14x3 27-32 13.320 32-37 14.20-14 37-42 15.14-37 42x31
16.36x27 +

287

A. Stuurman

M. Fabre

1.21-17 12x21 2.34-30 23x34 3.32x12 21x41


4.46x37 36x27 5.33-29 24x44 6.30x50 7x18
7.16x7 1x12 8.15x24 19x30 9.25x34 40x29
10.37-31 27x36 11.47-41 36x47 12.43-38
47x33 13.45-40 35x44 14.50x10 29-33 15.10-4
18-23 16.4-10 23-29 17.10-15 29-34 18.15x38
34-40 19.38-33 40-45 20.33-50 +

1.46-41 37x46 2.39-34 46x23 3.22-18 23x12


4.47-41 36x47 5.44-39 33x35 6.48-42 12x40
7.42x33 47x29 8.45x1 +

H. van Meggelen

A.P. de Zwart
1.47-41 17x48 2.23-19 14x34 3.25x1 31x22
4.16x7 36x47 5.49-43 48x39 6.44x33 47x29
7.1-6 29x1 8.6x45 1-6 9.45-34 6-22 10.34-39
22x44 11.50x39 +

1.28-23 19x37 2.38-33 40x49 3.33-28 49x21


4.26x6 18x27 5.47-41 37x46 6.6-1 46x19(A)
7.1x21 16x27 8.35x2 27-32 9.2-24 32-37 10.2447
A) 46x14 1x31 (1x24x20x9x31) +

J. van den Boogaard

A.J. de Jong

1.24-19 23-28* 2.44-39 14x23 3.34-30 23x32


4.49-43 28x48 5.37x6 48x46 6.6-1 35x24 7.1x5
+

1.37-31 36x49 2.31-27 49x24 3.29x9 18x38


4.9x7 22x44 5.21x3 2x11 6.27-21 26x17 7.3x16
+

288

V. Bulat

S. Yuskevich

1.42-38 20-24* 2.38-33 9-14* 3.26-21 17x26


4.22-17 11x42 5.47x38 36x47 6.28-22 18x27
7.32x21 26x17 8.38-32 47x29 9.32-28 23x32
10.34x23 19x28 11.39-34 30x39 12.44x2 35x44
13.2x20 25x14 14.50-44 +

1.46-41 28x50 2.48-42 37x39 3.26x6 36x47


4.6-1 47x33 5.1x20 24x15 6.49-44 50x39 7.4034 39x30 8.35x24 33x20 9.25x14 +

A. Kuyken
J. Ermakov
1.36-31 27x36 2.47-41 36x47 3.38-32 47x35
4.34-29 23x34 5.32x23 18x20 6.25x3 35x46*
3x5 +

1.27-22 18x47 2.16-11 28x48 3.11x4 47x33


4.39x19 48x50 5.4-27 35x44 (A) 6.27-49 24x13
7.49x6 +
A) 5 24x13 6.27x21 35x44 7.21-49 +

A. Rom

E. Zubov

1.18-13 19x8 2.28-23 17x48 3.33-28 29x18


4.47-41 36x47 5.28-23 47x44 6.23x3 48x39
7.49x29 24x33 8.3x17 11x22 9.45-40
35x44 10.50x17 +

1.42-38 36x47 2.38-33 47x29 3.48-43 39x48


4.15-10 48x17 5.22x2 13x33 6.2x20 4x24
7.23x34 +

289

4.Compositions of the author

1.17-11 7x16* 2.22-18 13x31 3.38-33 16x40


4.33x2 15x24 5.2x28 40-45 6.28-50 +
Tj. Goedemoed
1.39-34 35x44 2.32-28 ad lib. 3.16-11 ad lib.
4.11x2 26x37 5.33-29 24x33 6.34-30 25x34
7.22-18 13x22 8.2x47 +

1.35-30 24x44 2.22-18 12x23 3.27-21 ad lib.


4.47-42 ad lib. 5.42x2 36x27 6.2x46 +

1.16-11 7x16 2.27-21 ad lib. 3.39-34 23x41


4.34x3 18x27 5.3x15 35x24 6.15x9 4x13 7.4944 +

Timmer / Goedemoed

1.37-31 18-22* 2.34-30 35x24 3.47-41 36x47


4.38-32 27x40 5.50-45 47x29 6.45x3 22x33
7.31-27 21x32 8.3x4 +

1.32-28 29x49 2.28-23 49x21 3.26x8 9-13


4.8x19 14-20 5.19-14! 10x28* 6.50-45 20x29
7.45x32 16-21 8.41-37 1-7 9.32-28 21-27
10.28-23 7-12 11.23-19 12-18 12.19-14 18-23
13.14-9 4x13 14.15-10 23-28 15.10-4 28-32
16.4x36 32x41 17.36x47 +

290

5.Links on the Internet


Eric van Dusseldorp:
http://www.euronet.nl/users/evdussel/favoriete_
problemen.htm
Compositions of Leen de Rooij:
http://www.pldb.nl/cms/index.php?option=com_
content&view=article&id=10&Itemid=11
Composite:
http://www.deventerdamclub.nl/index.php?optio
n=com_content&task=view&id=233&Itemid=49

Draughts in China

Oscar Lognon
http://damlog.over-blog.com/
Wieger Wesselink 10 x 10
http://10x10.dse.nl/

Painting by draughts artist Henk de Witt

291