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Volume 125 Issue 82 kansan.

com Monday, March 4, 2013


All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
Classifieds 9b
Crossword 5a
Cryptoquips 5a
opinion 4a
sports 1b
sudoku 5a
Afternoon showers with a
40 percent chance of rain.
NE wind at 12 mph.
Support your seniors tonight at the
mens basketball game.
Its at 6 p.m in Allen Fieldhouse.
Index Dont
forget
Todays
Weather
Bring yo umbrella-ella-eh
HI: 48
LO: 29
ChArITy
Its been a long road filled with
months of planning, preparation
and rehearsals for the more than
70 members of the annual variety
show, Rock Chalk Revue.
The show, which took place
Thursday through Saturday, has been
in the works since planning began
last spring. Auditions occurred in
late fall, and out of 12 entries, five
acts were chosen in November to
compose the program.
Taylor Renft, a senior from Prairie
Village, has been involved with the
annual show for the past four years,
holding titles from chorus member
to, now, co-executive director.
After being a director last year, I
knew that co-executive director was
something I was really interested
in going out for, Renft said. Rock
Chalk Revue has given me some
of the best memories of my college
career, and I wanted to be able to
help people create those memories.
As a co-executive director, Renft
has helped plan the show with the
19 other members of the advisory
board. The board worked to pro-
mote, fundraise and coordinate the
business aspects of the show.
During the last months of
rehearsals, Renft oversaw each of
the five original musicals. While
there werent any major issues, the
process wasnt always smooth, Renft
said.
There were definitely a lot of ups
and downs throughout this process,
and we got thrown a curve ball a
time or two, Renft said. I think
there were times when Katie Lewis
and I were concerned with shows
not progressing at the speed they
should have been.
After a pep talk, however, things
always got back on track. Seeing
the five individual shows evolve was
the most rewarding experience for
Renft.
I saw where each show started,
and the amount that they have all
grown from that point in incred-
ible, Renft said. The directors put
in so much time and work with
each of the shows, and it definitely
paid off.
Renft first saw the shows on stage
during technical rehearsals at the
Lied Center.
I kind of just had a moment
and sat back like, Wow, we did it,
she said.
***
The 50 performers had their
share of the spotlight last weekend,
but the more low-key stage crew was
integral to the shows success.
Members of the stage crew were
responsible for stage setup and
clearing and moving various pieces
on and off the stage throughout the
five acts.
Having previously been in per-
forming roles, Hillary Podrebarac,
a freshman from Lenexa, gained a
different perspective as a member of
the stage crew.
I never realized exactly what
a stage crew actually had to put
into pulling off a performance and
how accommodating they are to
the actors and dancers, Podrebarac
said.
Working around and staying
clear of the performers while mov-
ing cumbersome and heavy pieces
was a challenge for the crew.
Theyre (the performers) the
most important part, and I didnt
want any of the set parts or the crew
to get in their way and mess them
up, Podrebarac said.
While they are a behind-the-
scenes group, the stage crew wasnt
completely hidden from the audi-
ence.
We all act professional, but we
are seen quite a bit in some shows
by the audience, which I dont really
like, Podrebarac said. But we dont
draw attention to ourselves, and the
shows are still amazing, so it isnt a
big deal.
Just like an offstage performer
must keep up with whats happening
on stage, the stage crew had to pay
attention during the shows.
Mostly, the crew needs to lis-
ten and wait for our cues, but it is
important to have a general sense
of what is going on in each show so
that you dont miss something or
come in late, Podrebarac said.
***
Once selected as a Rock Chalk
Revue act, organizations must write
a script and music for a 20-minute
original musical. The groups then
audition for individual roles and
direct, choreograph and rehearse
the show, sometimes for hours a
day.
Having heard about the show
before coming to the University,
Wichita freshman India Cohlmia
was determined to be a part of it
early on.
From the stories I had heard, it
just sounded like it was so much fun
and that it was a great experience,
Cohlmia said.
Cohlmia was cast as Anti Joke
in the one act Jokes On You by
members of Kappa Delta and Sigma
Nu.
Cohlmia said although they had
to focus on staying productive,
being part of an extremely close cast
is something she will treasure.
There havent been many shows
that Ive been in where I look for-
ward to going to practice every day,
but Rock Chalk Revue is definitely
one of them, Cohlmia said. We
came into this as separate cast mem-
bers, but we walked out as great
friends that had an incredible time
together.
As a freshman, Cohlmia said she
was just happy to be a part of the
experience.
The most rewarding thing for
me has been feeling like I am part
of something that people love,
Cohlmia said. Rock Chalk Revue
is such a wonderful tradition that
encourages creativity and forces
people out of their comfort zone.
Claire Inman, a sophomore from
Leawood, performed in Kappa
Kappa Gamma and Pi Kappa Phis
production of The Catcher Gone
Awry.
Music and performing arts play
an important role in Inmans life, so
when the opportunity to compete
in Rock Chalk Revue arose, she
jumped at the chance. She was cast
as Luna Sanderson, a smart yet sassy
young girl constantly working on a
project to help a dream factory.
Rehearsals on top of already
hectic schedules meant sometimes
things were chaotic, but Inman said
the group dynamics and watching
the show come together made the
experience worth it.
By the last show, we were so
proud and so confident in our
show that we could hardly contain
our excitement, and that showed,
Inman said.
Inman won Best Supporting
Actress for her portrayal of Luna
Sanderson, but she said the most
rewarding aspect of Rock Chalk
Revue was the friendships she
made.
I have learned so much and have
come out of this experience with so
much to be proud of, Inman said.
That wouldnt have been possible
without the amazing people I shared
this experience with.
Edited by Allison Hammond
Thoughtful, outgoing and
hard working only begin to
describe Courtney Newmans
legacy. Newman, who passed
away at Ellsworth Residence Hall
Thursday evening, was an enthu-
siastic student who was heav-
ily involved in campus activities,
including her role as a resident
assistant. KU Alerts reported the
death, stating that the campus
police had found no evidence of
foul play.
Courtney was really ener-
getic, very positive, optimistic,
focused, driven, Carynn Smith,
Courtneys cousin and a graduate
student studying higher educa-
tion administration, said. She
knew that the sky was the limit.
She was really destined to do
something with her life.
Smith considered Newman,
who was an only child, like a
little sister. The two grew up
together and continued to share
the University, resident assis-
tant experiences and time spent
together in their sorority.
She was so well-liked because
what she did, she did with a smile
on her face, because she wanted
to do it, Smith said. She never
complained about anything. She
didnt take anything for grant-
ed everything that she did
was something that she felt that
she wanted to do to help people
become better people or to get
involved.
Newman, a senior from
Leavenworth, was expected to
graduate in May with a double
major in psychology and sociol-
ogy. Described as an enthusiastic
student, she worked with profes-
sors and could be found asking
questions and offering insights
from her desk in the front of any
classroom.
As treasurer for Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority, Inc., Newman would go
above and beyond the call of duty
to help organize events. Through
Zeta Phi Beta, which sponsors
the Storks Nest Program, pro-
moting prenatal medical care for
low-income pregnant women,
Newman had organized the Baby
Shower Fundraiser to collect
clothes, toys and other baby items
to donate to women in need. The
event, Thursday from 7-8:30 p.m.
in the Big 12 Room at the Kansas
Union , will now also recognize
Newmans passing.
She loved all ages of peo-
ple, said Newmans mother, Lori
Carrell. From infants to seniors,
she loved every age of a person.
Newman, who was also
involved in groups such as the
Black Student Union and the
National Pan-Hellenic Council,
worked to include students. She
loved her job as a resident assis-
tant, keeping a craft area in her
room devoted to creating door
decorations and posters to help
her residents feel engaged.
People at KU that knew her or
didnt know her, they will see her
as a very generous person, Smith
said. And she loved to smile.
Funeral services open to the
public will be held at the end of
this week at Independent Baptist
Church at 601 Pottawatomie
Street in Leavenworth. A date
and time havent been decided
yet.
Edited by Brian Sisk
emma legault
elegault@kansan.com
UDK
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
ObITUAry
University mourns
loss of student,
celebrates her life
emily donovan
edonovan@kansan.com
Contributed photo
Courtney Newman, who passed away at Ellsworth residence hall last Thursday,
will be remembered by the campus community as a thoughtful, outgoing and
hardworking young woman.
Students perform at annual rock Chalk revue variety show
senior night
a flavorful variety
page 2b
the student voice since 1904
emily wittler/kansan
Alex McElvain and Andrea Schmid, students at the University of Kansas, dance on-stage March 1st during rock Chalk revue: All bets Are Off, at the Lied Center. McElvain
and Schmid played lead characters in Gamma Phi beta and Sigma Chis performance birds of a Feather.
As legislators have failed to enact
a bill meant to balance the bud-
get, 5.1 percent of federal funds
have been cut across the board
amounting to $85 billion, effective
Friday. Congress, long at a stand-
still debating between spending
cuts and revenue increases, agreed
upon sequestration as a penalty
deadline.
This will be a challenge for the
University in terms of research
efforts, said Kevin Boatright from
Research and Graduate Studies.
But we have been making plans.
For education in the state of
Kansas, these cuts translate into
500 children ages 3 to 5 losing
access to early education through
Head Start Services, $5.5 mil-
lion cut from K-12 education, 80
teacher and aide jobs put at risk,
310 fewer college students receiv-
ing financial aid and 140 fewer
students receiving work-study
jobs. All government services lose
5.1 percent of funding, includ-
ing environmental and nutrition
assistance for seniors, job-search
assistance, law enforcement, mili-
tary base operation funding, and
public health.
At the University, federal
research grants help fund stud-
ies conducted by graduate stu-
dents in science and technology.
Those students salaries are writ-
ten into the grant, meaning that
those federal research grants hire
graduate research students. Each
federal agency will distribute fur-
ther information advising how to
negotiate budget cuts.
We do not want the sequester
to cause difficulty for any student
between now and the end of the
semester, Boatright said.
The federal fiscal year ends
Sept. 30. A little more than six
months are left to deflate the entire
fiscal years budget by 5.1 percent,
meaning federal grants will most
likely have to be reduced by 10
percent to balance the year.
We have to proceed as though
there is going to be no change
to this between now and the
end of the federal fiscal year in
September, Boatright said. We
cant just wait and see what hap-
pens. We have to assume that this
is going to continue.
A possible response to the sug-
gested sequester is a decrease the
amount of new grants offered
without reducing existing awards.
Were trying to communicate
to people that this is serious,
Boatright said. Its something that
we cannot ignore as a University
in the research area. We have to
take action to respond to what is
happening in ways that are the
least harmful to faculty, staff and
students.
Sequestration will be in effect
until Congress is able to agree
upon a budget that balances
spending cuts and tax revenue.
Edited by Elise Reuter
Page 2a
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
weather,
Jay?
Partly Cloudy/ Wind.
20 percent chance
of precipitation.
Wind NW at 22mph.
Tuesday
The cold is still here.
HI: 36
LO: 25
Sunny. Wind NNE at
10 mph.
Wednesday
Winter isnt done yet.
HI: 41
LO: 21
Sunny. Wind SE
at 17 mph.
Thursday
Its getting warmer!
HI: 54
LO: 35
Forecaster: weather.com

Whats the
calENdar
Thursday, March 7 Tuesday, March 5 Wednesday, March 6 Monday, March 4
WHaT: KU School of Music Student
Recital Series: Nina Scheibe
WHeRe: Swarthout Recital Hall,
Murphy Hall
WHeN: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
aBOUT: See student bassoon player
Nina Scheibe perform at this free
event.
WHaT: KU Osher Institute present An
Evening With Stan Herd
WHeRe: Lawrence Arts Center, 940
New Hampshire St.
WHeN: 7 to 8:30 p.m.
aBOUT: Internationally known
earthworks artist Stan Herd will share
stories from his career and present
footage from his yet-to-be-released
documentary. Admission is $10.
WHaT: KU School of Music Symphonic
Band and University Band concert
WHeRe: Lied Center
WHeN: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
aBOUT: Hear student musicians jam
out at the Lied Center. Tickets are $5
for students.
WHaT: 2013 Education Interview Day
WHeRe: Kansas Union, 5th foor
WHeN: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
aBOUT: Looking for a job? This free
event provides networking and
interview opportunities with multiple
school districts for openings in teach-
ing careers.
WHaT: Faith Forum: An Attempt at
Spirit
WHeRe: ECM Center, 1204 Oread Ave.
WHeN: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
aBOUT: Join this discussion on the
Christian faith, presented by Rev. Hal
LeMert. All religions are welcome.
WHaT: Murs at the Granada
WHeRe: Granada Theater, 1020 Mas-
sachusetts St.
WHeN: 7 p.m.
aBOUT: Catch rapper Murs at the
Granada. Tickets are $15 for this all-
ages show.
WHaT: Tea at Three
WHeRe: Kansas Union, Level 4 Lobby
WHeN: 3 to 4 p.m.
aBOUT: Hit up the union for your
weekly free tea and pastries. Cheerio!
WHaT: Myths and Mayhem Film Series:
Bats
WHERE: Dyche Hall, Panorama
WHEN: 6:30 to 9 p.m.
ABOUT: Check out this free flm fea-
turing genetically modifed bats. Who
says science has to be boring?
Contact Us
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: UDK_News
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
THE UNIVERSITY
DAILY KANSAN
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
first copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50
cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the
Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human
Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue,
Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967)
is published daily during the school year except
Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and
exams and weekly during the summer session
excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by
mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes
to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue.
2000 Dole Human Developement Center
1000 Sunnyside avenue Lawrence, Kan.,
66045
KaNSaN MeDia PaRTNeRS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
youve read in todays Kansan and other news.
Also see KUJHs website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice in
radio. Whether its rock n roll
or reggae, sports or special
events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
NeWS MaNageMeNT
editor-in-chief
Hannah Wise
Managing editors
Sarah McCabe
Nikki Wentling
aDVeRTiSiNg MaNageMeNT
Business manager
Elise Farrington
Sales manager
Jacob Snider
NeWS SeCTiON eDiTORS
News editor
Allison Kohn
associate news editor
Joanna Hlavacek
Sports editor
Pat Strathman
associate sports editor
Trevor Graff
entertainment and
special sections editor
Laken Rapier
associate entertainment and
special sections editor
Kayla Banzet
Copy chiefs
Megan Hinman
Taylor Lewis
Brian Sisk
Design chiefs
Ryan Benedick
Katie Kutsko
Designers
Trey Conrad
Sarah Jacobs
Opinion editor
Dylan Lysen
Photo editor
Ashleigh Lee
Web editor
Natalie Parker
aDViSeRS
general manager and news adviser
Malcolm Gibson
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
GOVERNMENT
University takes sequestration hits
eMiLy DONOVaN
edonovan@kansan.com
MISSOURI
KUnited releases new
platforms for election
KUnited, a student senate coali-
tion, has released four more platform
initiatives for the 2013 campaign.
Brandon Woodard, a senior from
Topeka, is KUniteds 2013 presidential
candidate. Blaine Bengtson, a junior
from Salina, is KUniteds 2013 vice-
presidential candidate.
NEw AqUAtic cENtER
At thE REc
KUnited plans to work with KU Rec-
reation Services to begin the process
of funding and building a new aquatic
center. This will be an expansion of
the Ambler Student Recreation Fitness
Center.
Woodard said the pool at Robinson
Center is underused and has minimal
availability. He said this addition will
be focused more on a recreational pool
rather than just a lap pool.
iNcREAsEd FREE
PRiNtiNg oN cAmPUs
The ability to print wherever and
whenever is crucial for creating qual-
ity work and meeting deadlines, ac-
cording to a KUnited press release.
KUnited plans to increase the dollar
amount of free printing students re-
ceive at the beginning of each semes-
ter.
cREAtiNg A
smokE-FREE cAmPUs
KUnited plans to work with univer-
sity administration to restrict smoking
on campus. They will also be collabo-
rating with Unfltered, a student to-
bacco-free campus initiative. KUnited
plans to set up designated smoking
areas. They also plan to establish
benefcial cessation services at Wat-
kins Memorial Health Center.
Woodard said a smoke-free cam-
pus is more feasible than increasing
restrictions. He said they want to en-
courage a healthier campus.
FUll-timE lgBtqiA
cooRdiNAtoR
KUnited plans to secure funding to
hire a full-time university coordinator.
They are aiming to create a more in-
clusive campus for the Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning,
Intersex and Asexual students.
Woodard said the university doesnt
have the full-time resources that our
peer institutions have.
Its a necessity for students who
identify with that community, Woo-
dard said.
hannah Barling
CORRECTION
In the story titled University con-
tinues to oppose concealed carry
published in the Thursday, Feb. 28
issue, the Kansan quoted a Student
Senate member on the Universitys
policy regarding concealed carry.
However, only University offcials can
speak to what that the University as a
whole does or does not support.
Jack Martin, the Director of Strate-
gic Communications at the Offce of
Public Affairs, said in an email that
the Universitys law enforcement have
determined that concealed weapons
on campus do not increase safety. He
also noted that, in this case, the Uni-
versity and Student Senate agree.
STUDENT SENATE
SLATER, Mo. Growing
up on the family farm, Anthony
Eddy learned early on not to get
too attached to animals, including
household pets.
His devoted customers are a dif-
ferent story. Pet lovers across the
country count on the Saline County
taxidermist to faithfully preserve
Brutus, Fluffy and other beloved
companions for posterity. Even if
it means shelling out thousands of
dollars and waiting more than a year
for the pets return.
Theyre very distraught, because
their child has died. For most people,
this animal is their life, said Lessie
Les Thurman
Calvert, Eddys office
manager. Some are
kind of eccentric.
But most of them
are just like you and
me. They dont want
to bury or cremate
them. They cant
stand the thought. ...
It helps them feel bet-
ter about the loss.
The front showroom of Eddys
Wildlife Studio in downtown Slater
is a testament to pet owners per-
severance. Life like dogs and cats
of all sizes are scattered along the
floor, from a
perky-looking
Brittany span-
iel to a regal
Persian cat, a
lone iguana
and the stray
cockatiel or
two. Departed
pets of all per-
suasions spend
up to one year
in hulking, freeze-dry metal drums
before they are painstakingly pre-
served and returned to their own-
ers.
Eddy said his business is one of
the few in the country to specialize
in pet taxidermy and has a two-
month waiting list.
A former high school chemis-
try and biology teacher, hog farmer
and Air Force veteran, Eddy started
out in traditional taxidermy, stuffing
great horned owls and pheasants
with the help of a local veterinarian.
He originally used the freeze-dry
technique to preserve mounted tur-
key heads for hunters before real-
izing in the mid-1990s it could also
work with pets.
Eddy, 64, compares his line of
work to the morticians trade. Hell
share broad details about the process
with customers but likes to keep
some mystery to the process and
steer clear of the gross-out factor.
Hes quick to embrace the artistry of
his craft, especially when it comes to
the primping and prepping required
once the internal organs and body fat
are removed and the carcass is fully
dry. Depending on the customers
preference, pets can be posed with
a skyward gaze, an extended paw or
with eyes closed, seemingly asleep.
You just have a knack for it, he
said. Its like an artist painting a
picture.
Taxidermy keeps pets memories alive forever
aSSOCiaTeD PReSS

Theyre very distraught,


because theyre child has
died. For most people,
this animal is their life.
LESSIE LES THURMAN
Eddys offce manager
Follow
@UDK_News on
Twitter
Follow this link for
sequestration updates and
for more information about
the sequestration and its
possible effects on the
University.
http://bit.ly/15sdeya
Check out this Washington
Post resource for even more
information on how the
sequestration will affect the
state of Kansas.
http://bit.ly/yZgZO4
MORe SeQUeSTRaTiON
iNFORMaTiON
MONDay, MaRCH 4, 2013
PAGE 3A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN moNDAY, mARch 4, 2013
Dr. Seuss had his 109th birthday over
the weekend. There used to be a Dr.
Seuss fan club at KU that would do
a 24-hour reading on Wescoe Beach
each year on his birthday.
Information based on the
Douglas county Sheriffs office
booking recap.
A 26-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on K-10 under suspicion of
possession of controlled substances
and criminal possession of a frearm.
A $3,000 bond was paid.
A 27-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on K-10 under suspicion of
possession of controlled substances.
A $1,000 bond was paid.
A 26-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on K-10 under suspicion of
possession of stolen property. A $500
bond was paid.
A 20-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on the 1300 block of
Vermont Street under suspicion of
possession or use of a fake drivers
license, possession, purchase, or
consumption of alcohol by a minor,
and criminal damage to property. A
$300 bond was paid.
A 21-year-old female was ar-
rested Saturday on the 1200 block of
Kentucky Street under suspicion of
operating a vehicle under the infu-
ence. A $500 bond was paid.
Emily Donovan

police reporTS

@
Want more
information
go to visit us online at
www.kansan.com
or follow us on
Twitter @ UDK_news
nATionAl
Child born with AIDS appears to be cured
4G LtE coverage now
available from At&t
AT&T began offering 4G lTe capabil-
ity in lawrence last week. This makes
AT&T the second telecommunications
company to provide 4G lTe coverage in
lawrence, coming six months after Ve-
rizon announced its lTe services would
become available in lawrence.
lTe, or long-Term evolution, offers
users faster processing speeds. Users
with lTe-compatible devices will beneft
decreased lag time and better use of
AT&Ts WiFi spectrum, according to an
AT&T news release.
4G lTe was already available in Wich-
ita and the Kansas city area, making
lawrence the third area in the state to
gain AT&Ts latest form of mobile cover-
age.
AT&T boasts that its 4G lTe should of-
fer processing speeds close to ten times
as fast as its 3G devices and that AT&Ts
4G lTe technology is faster than that of
Sprint, Verizon and T-Mobile.
Student AT&T customers are excited
about the implications 4G lTe will have
on their mobile communications expe-
riences. Still, some students are con-
cerned with some of the other issues
AT&T needs to address to iron out all of
its service wrinkles.
ill be just as excited as the next per-
son to get lTe coverage. i just hope they
arent expecting us to pay a premium for
it, Ben Tumbleson, a freshman from
leawood said. i feel as though a more
appropriate response for AT&T would be
to fll in the dead zones across the U.S.
AT&T is next looking to increase the
number of customers with lTe-capable
devices so that more customers are able
to take advantage of the technological
advancement.
Reid Eggleston
locAl
ASSocIAtED PRESS
WASHINGTON A baby born
with the AIDS virus appears to have
been cured, scientists announced
Sunday, describing the case of a child
from Mississippi whos now 2 and
has been off medication for about a
year with no signs of infection.
Theres no guarantee the child will
remain healthy, although sophisti-
cated testing uncovered just traces
of the virus genetic material still lin-
gering. If so, it would mark only the
worlds second reported cure.
Specialists say Sundays announce-
ment at a major AIDS meeting in
Atlanta offers promising clues for
efforts to eliminate HIV infection in
children, especially in AIDS-plagued
African countries where too many
babies are born with the virus.
You could call this about as close
to a cure, if not a cure, that weve
seen, Dr. Anthony Fauci of the
National Institutes of Health, who is
familiar with the findings, told The
Associated Press.
A doctor gave this baby faster
and stronger treatment than is usual,
starting a three-drug infusion within
30 hours of birth. That was before
tests confirmed the infant was infect-
ed and not just at risk from a mother
whose HIV wasnt diagnosed until
she was in labor.
I just felt like this baby was at
higher-than-normal risk, and
deserved our best shot, Dr. Hannah
Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at
the University of
Mississippi, said in an
interview.
That fast action
apparently knocked
out HIV in the babys
blood before it could
form hideouts in the
body. Those so-called
reservoirs of dormant
cells usually rapidly
reinfect anyone who
stops medication,
said Dr. Deborah Persaud of Johns
Hopkins Childrens Center. She led
the investigation that deemed the
child functionally cured, meaning
in long-term remission even if all
traces of the virus havent been com-
pletely eradicated.
Next, Persauds team is planning
a study to try to prove that, with
more aggressive treatment of other
high-risk babies. Maybe well be
able to block this reservoir seeding,
Persaud said.
No one should stop anti-AIDS
drugs as a result of this case, Fauci
cautioned.
But it opens up a lot of doors to
research if other children can benefit,
he said.
Better than
treatment is
to prevent
babies from
being born
with HIV
in the first
place.
A b o u t
300,000 chil-
dren were
born with
HIV in 2011, mostly in poor coun-
tries where only about 60 percent
of infected pregnant women get
treatment that can keep them from
passing the virus to their babies. In
the U.S., such births are very rare
because HIV testing and treatment
long have been part of prenatal care.
We cant promise to cure babies
who are infected. We can promise
to prevent the vast majority of trans-
missions if the moms are tested dur-
ing every pregnancy, Gay stressed.
The only other person considered
cured of the AIDS virus underwent a
very different and risky kind of treat-
ment a bone marrow transplant
from a special donor, one of the
rare people who is naturally resis-
tant to HIV. Timothy Ray Brown of
San Francisco has not needed HIV
medications in the five years since
that transplant.
The Mississippi case shows there
may be different cures for different
populations of HIV-infected people,
said Dr. Rowena Johnston of amFAR,
the Foundation for AIDS Research.
That group funded Persauds team
to explore possible cases of pediatric
cures.
It also suggests that scientists
should look back at other children
whove been treated since shortly
after birth, including some reports
of possible cures in the late 1990s
that were dismissed at the time, said
Dr. Steven Deeks of the University of
California, San Francisco, who also
has seen the findings.
This will likely inspire the field,
make people more optimistic that
this is possible, he said.
In the Mississippi case, the mother
had had no prenatal care when she
came to a rural emergency room in
advanced labor. A rapid test detected
HIV. In such cases, doctors typically
give the newborn low-dose medica-
tion in hopes of preventing HIV
from taking root. But the small hos-
pital didnt have the proper liquid
kind, and sent the infant to Gays
medical center. She gave the baby
higher treatment-level doses.
The child responded well through
age 18 months, when the fam-
ily temporarily quit returning and
stopped treatment, researchers said.
When they returned several months
later, remarkably, Gays standard
tests detected no virus in the childs
blood.
Ten months after treatment
stopped, a battery of super-sensitive
tests at half a dozen laboratories
found no sign of the virus return.
There were only some remnants of
genetic material that dont appear
able to replicate, Persaud said.
In Mississippi, Gay gives the child

You could call this about


as close to a cure, if not a
cure, that weve seen.
AnThonY FAUci
national institutes of health doctor
cAMpUS
the Big Event hosts
week of promotions
The Big event is having Spring
Awareness Week this week to promote
the third annual event, is scheduled
on April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thomas plummer, director of ex-
ternal affairs for the Big event, said
the purpose of awareness week is to
register volunteers and to give stu-
dents and faculty information about
the event.
people recognize our brand and
see the Big event logo, plummer
said. its important that we explain
what it is, what we do and how to get
involved.
Big event committee members will
have tables set up on Wescoe Beach
each day this week to allow students
to ask questions and sign up to vol-
unteer.
on Wednesday, students can bowl at
Jaybowl from 7 to 9 p.m. Students can
purchase tickets for $4 at the Union
programs Box office or at the event.
on Thursday, a percentage of the pro-
ceeds from anyone who eats at Fuzzys
Taco Shop and mentions the Big event
will be donated to the event.
Volunteers will distribute fliers to
recruit community members to reg-
ister their homes or businesses as
volunteer sites on March 10 starting
at 1 p.m. in the Memorial Stadium
parking lot.
last years Big event had approx-
imately 2,000 participants volunteer-
ing at 200 sites, and this year, orga-
nizers hope to double those figures.
Kayla Boal, the Big events pro-
gramming co-chair, said the day of
volunteer service is a way to learn
more about the community while
showing lawrence residents the Uni-
versitys appreciation.
Going to a school so big, its easy
to get caught up in other activities
and classes. You sometimes forget
that there are people who make law-
rence their permanent home for more
than four years, Boal said. The Big
event is sort of a way to say thanks for
putting up with us.
Hannah Swank
thebigeventku.com
Leadership & Globalization in Sports Series
Reinventing the Empire
with Sporting KCs CEO/President/Co-owner Robb Heineman
Tuesday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Find out how Robb Heineman combined innovative marketing, technology and fan
kinship to propel Sporting KC into a Major League Soccer powerhouse in America,
with other world teams hot to follow in his footsteps and turn the traditional sports
business model on its head.
Empowering and Sustaining Malawi:
Africa Windmill Project with John Drake
Tuesday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m.
Sustainable agriculture, community development and healthy drinking water are the
fundamental needs that Africa Windmill Project provides Malawian farmers today.
Dont miss this inspiring story of AWPs quest to educate and empower a country
struggling to thrive. Drake will discuss AWP and what you can do to get involved.
Study Groups with Spring 2013 Fellow
Brigadier General Roosevelt Barfeld
U.S. Engagement: Political-Military Afairs
Integrating diplomacy and defense and forging international security partnerships
makes political-military afairs a timeless political topic. Spring 2013 Fellow, Briga-
dier General Roosevelt Barfeld (Ret.), will explore the defnitions, perspectives and
stakeholders responsible for political-military strategy. 4:00-5:30 p.m. Wednesdays
Feb. 13, 20, 27, Mar. 6, 13, 27 & Apr. 3

All programs are free & open to the public.
e Dole Institute of Politics is located on West Campus, next to the Lied Center
www.DoleInstitute.org 785.864.4900 Facebook/Twitter
Student
Opportunities
B
uilding your network is
one of the most com-
mon career tips college
students hear. Although this
general advice is common, very
few people know how to actually
do it. I put together three simple
steps you can apply today to start
meeting some of the worlds most
awesome people.
Applying this method, I was
able to connect with fascinat-
ing people, including Fortune
500 executives, a Nobel laureate,
Harvard scientists and startup
entrepreneurs. Of course, I still
have a ton to learn, and was only
able to meet so many cool people
because of help I had along the
way. But having a method has
been useful to me, and I hope it
will be useful to you also.
Networking was a real neces-
sity to me. I arrived in the U.S. a
couple years ago barely speaking
English fluently, and knowing no
one here. Although it took me
a while to learn how to navigate
the new social scene and make
friends, establishing professional
connections was a whole new
beast. To learn how to do it, I
turned to different profession-
als, and more recently to Dale
Stephens, author of the book
Hacking Your Education, and
founder of the brilliant Uncollege.
org. Blending different experts
advice with a bit of my own
experience, here are three of my
favorite steps.
Email and ask onE singlE
quEstion thE first baby
stEp
Here is a truth we are not
always aware of: most profes-
sionals, even the star-level ones,
would love to help and talk to
you. All it takes is making the
first move, and being mindful of
their time. That is why emailing
to ask a single question is our
first step. The best way to do this
is to identify five professionals
you would like to ask for advice,
and email them a short message.
Here is a sample email format:
how you found them, why you
would love to hear from them
and who you are. To increase
the odds of an answer, mention
something you have in common,
such as a potential shared alma
mater. Thats it. The majority of
the time, they will be happy to
advise a college student.
takE pEoplE to coffEE
Establishing strongEr
connEctions
Although email contact is a
great start, real-life connections
are even better. Drinking coffee
has always been a social event,
full of friendship and camara-
derie, and we will use it. Make
a list about some people you
would like to meet and talk with.
Finding people who work in an
industry you would like to work
in, and write them an email ask-
ing if you could meet for coffee to
talk about career advice for that
specific field. More often than
not they will accept, if they have
the time.
closing thE cyclE it is
all about gratEfulnEss and
gEnuinE connEctions
This is a general approach to
networking. Be genuine with the
people you reach out to. Thank
the people who helped you.
Follow up with them on how
their advice aided you in landing
a sweet internship. Help them
when they need you. Networking
is not about being sleazy or col-
lecting business cards. If we think
about people as just a means to
an end, they will feel the same
about us. Networking is always
about relationships, never about
transactions.
In his new book, Dale Stephens
has put together a solid guide
on how to take charge of your
education and career. If you are
interested in taking full control of
your learning experience, rather
than letting someone else decide
for you, I recommend checking
out Stephens new book Hacking
Your Education.
I understand sometimes it is
hard to first write the emails to
reach out to people. I know the
pain, and I want to help to get
you started. So, if you want exact
scripts and wording I use for
these steps, shoot me an email
and I will be happy to share with
you. On top of that, I will send
you one more method, time
consuming but, by far, the most
effective.
I know that the advice build
your network is a huge clich.
But a truth we dont realize often
is that clichs became clichs for
a reason. Working on expanding
your network is worth the time. It
gets easier with practice, and you
will thank yourself for it. It has
worked for me. And if it works
for a foreigner with a weird beard
and a funny accent, it will work
for you, too.
morelix is a junior majoring in
business and economics from belo
horizonte, brazil.
PAGE 4A mondAy, mArch 4, 2013
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Write Letter tO tHe editOr in the e-mail
subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the authors
name, grade and hometown.Find our full let-
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HOw tO submit A Letter tO tHe editOr
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Text your FFA submissions to
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free fOr ALL
Career
tips to build your professional network
New drama brings back
classic serial killer drama
TeleviSioN
By Arnobio Morelix
amorelix@kansan.com
Favorite bar in Lawrence,
and why?
Follow us on Twitter @UDK_opinion. Tweet us your
opinions, and we just might publish them.
@Adamdechtman
@UdK_opinion all of them because #beer
Hannah wise, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
sarah mccabe, managing editor
smccabe@kansan.com
nikki wentling, managing editor
nwentling@kansan.com
dylan Lysen, opinion editor
dlysen@kansan.com
elise farrington, business manager
efarrington@kansan.com
Jacob snider, sales manager
jsnider@kansan.com
malcolm Gibson, general manager and news
adviser
mgibson@kansan.com
Jon schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
tHe editOriAL bOArd
Members of The Kansan editorial Board are Hannah Wise,
Sarah McCabe, Nikki Wentling, Dylan lysen, elise Farrington
and Jacob Snider.
@oliverBabbles
@UdK_opinion louises West
has got to be a one seed in
this.
@GeorgeorWelles
@UdK_opinion The Bar above
Henrys. its chill and groovy.
@JacquePulsfus
@UdK_opinion Da BUll
#labratsfordays
i was up on campus Tuesday trying to
kick snow back on all the cleared side-
walks so we could get another snowday.
Could have used some help guys...
is it bad that when i look at the salt
on the sidewalk it reminds me of the salt
on giant soft pretzels?
im sorry to the person who made
the snowman by Summerfeld. i had a
thermo test that morning. it had to be
destroyed.
Typically people scrape their car
before they drive, not while. Just saying.
My butt looks amazing in my jeans
today. Can i please get at least one
dangggggg gurllll on my way to class?
With great love comes great quanti-
ties of chocolate.
My girlfriend and i are lying together
on our futon about to sleep when she
turns to me and says, Sometimes i
worry im a vampire.
i bet the FFa editor has a rockin body
and i bet i would like to see it!
Dear editor, what would you do for a
Klondike bar? Editors note: klondike
bars suck.
i prefer to test drive things before a
long commitment whether it be mar-
riage or a new car.
What is it called if Bill Self takes a
selfe?
or you could invest in birth control,
because sex is fun.
You know what the best major is...?
The one i picked with my own free will.
How many people checked their fy
when they read that FFa? i did!
Those Big 12 tournament jerseys... did
we just get punkd or something?
Saying you came to KU for the bas-
ketball rather than an education is not
something to brag about... its just lame.
Hi.
i never believed in love at frst sight,
but that cute girl walking around cam-
pus with the Pikachu hat with pokball
tassels defnitely changed my mind.
My hair woke up in the 80s today so
i decided to wear a cut off hoodie and
leggings too.
February sucked on so many levels.
Screw you, February!
i dont care enough about iowa State
for them to be our rivals. another show-
ing like last week, then maybe well talk.
You may be Greek, but im an ameri-
can. #merica
There should be an FFa Hall of Fame.
Some of us just have defective
newspaper-cone-making genes, okay?
Withey, we know you can pull off a
triple double. Show us something new
and get a double triple.
We want Wiggins!
W
ithout looking it up
online, without wan-
dering around cam-
pus, where is the nearest place
to change a babys diaper? Dont
know? Yeah, neither do I.
Its never really been a concern
of mine, and yet a few days ago
the issue was shoved in my face
like well, like a dirty diaper.
What is a mother, or for that
matter, a father, supposed to do
when they want to change their
babys diaper on campus?
I was at The Underground eat-
ing lunch with a friend of mine
who has a three-month-old baby.
Because Wescoe has no diaper
decks (the baby changing sta-
tions located in most womens
bathrooms, although very few
bathrooms at KU) the mother
placed a very thick blanket under
her baby and changed him right
there in The Underground.
Unsanitary? Debatable, but
lets be honest, its probably not
the worst thing thats been on
those tables.
Awoman complained about
the incident, and the manager
came over to talk to my friend.
The manager explained that my
friend would have to change the
baby in the bathroom from now
on the manager, and said that
even though she knew that there
were no changing tables, my
friend would have to make do.
Now, have you ever been in
The Underground bathrooms?
Not only do they lack any place
to safely change a baby, theyre
dimly lit and relatively small.
Where exactly, I wondered, was
my friend supposed to change
her baby in there? Well, the man-
ager didnt provide us the answer,
so I thought Id give it a go. Here
are my top five suggestions for
my friend, and all other mothers,
who need to change their baby in
a campus bathroom.
1. The floor: This seems like
the obvious solution, doesnt it?
Place the blanket on the floor,
then the baby, then proceed with
changing. I mean sure, theres a
pretty good chance that someone
not paying attention could walk
into the mom as she crouches
awkwardly on the floor in front
of her baby, but she can learn to
adjust. Its also likely that some-
one not paying attention could
mistakenly step on the baby, but
these things happen, right?
2. The sink: Sure, it might be
a little wet, but its better than
nothing, right? If you lay the
baby mostly in the sink, with
its head and feet sticking on of
either side, itd probably work
OK. Just make sure its not a leak-
ing sink. Nothings worse than
a wet, smelly diaper and a wet,
crying baby.
3. On the floor, under the sink:
Combinations are great. This
solves the problem of someone
accidentally stepping on the baby,
but it does pose problems for
anyone else using the bathroom. I
mean, you cant wash your hands
very well if a mom is sticking out
from under the sink, trying to
clean up her baby.
4. The toilet: Now this one
could be tricky, and probably a
tad unsanitary, but it could defi-
nitely work. Just place that blan-
ket you have over the toilet stool,
and lay the baby across the seat.
You might want to hold onto
him with at least one hand at all
times, though, or he might fall in.
The first few times he might get
kind of wet, but after a while hed
learn to sit still, Im sure!
5. Midair: This is my personal
favorite. Why put your baby in
dangerous, unsanitary conditions
when you can simply hold him
up with one hand and use the
other to do all of the necessary
diaper changing. Worried your
hands arent big enough? Enlist
the help of whoever enters the
bathroom next. Youll have his
diaper changed out of sight just
like everyone wants, and hell
have a clean diaper. Everyones a
winner, right?
Wenner is sophomore majoring in
English and history from topeka.
University lacks
changing stations
By Anna Wenner
awenner@kansan.com
A
s human beings, I
think we are fascinated
with stories of taboo.
Whether that means canni-
balistic Hannibal Lecter in the
The Silence of the Lambs or
serial killer Dexter Morgan in
Showtimes Dexter, we love our
crazies doing crazy things. So,
Im genuinely curious to see how
audiences respond to A&Es new-
est TV show Bates Motel. The
show, which premieres March
18, is a modern twist and pre-
quel to the movie Psycho. The
movie depicts Norman Bates, a
man suffering from dissociative
identity disorder kills her and her
lover in a fit of jealously. Later
on, he takes on her personality
and starts to kill the women he is
attracted to.
Bates Motel will focus on
Normans teenage years and how
he deteriorated into the insane
serial killer we see in the movie
Psycho.
The trailer for the first episode
promises us a mixture of psycho-
logical thrill and plenty of drama.
The show has everything it needs
to be a success: creepy music,
a sure-fire storyline, executive
producers who have written for
shows like Lost and Friday
Night Lights and a character
who placed second in American
Film Institutes 50 greatest screen
villains category.
But to pull off this unnerving
show, the acting is going to have
to be superb. Freddie Highmore,
who has starred in Charlie and
the Chocolate Factory (2005)
and The Spiderwick Chronicles
(2008) will play Norman. Not
exactly the most provocative of
films, but I was impressed with
his acting in the trailer, which
made Norman seem just a bit
off kilter. Will just a bit be
enough to keep our attention for
long? Nope, but it might keep
us watching long enough to get
hooked on the plot.
Im curious to see how Vera
Farmiga will portray Norma
Bates Normans mother. She
and the writers will have to
forge the complex relationship
between a devoted mother and
an obsessed son a son who
will one day become a famous
serial killer.
How will she do this? I have
no idea. But with all the potential
this show has, I bet she can pull
it off.
Executive Producer Carlton
Cuse revealed on A&Es website
that the city, White Pine Bay,
is going to play a major role in
Normans mental collapse. Most
of his explanation was vague with
words like danger, secrets, and
mysterious, but one thing stood
out to me: the marijuana trade.
This certainly puts a modern
edge to the story, and I cant wait
to see how drugs are incorpo-
rated into the plot.
But whatever secrets the town
is hiding, the focus needs to be
on Norman and his relationship
with his mother. If the producers
and writers want to do Psychos
rendition of Norman Bates jus-
tice, they are going to have to
show how Norman Bates falls.
And he didnt fall because of
drugs or secrets in his town. It
was his obsession with his mom
that ultimately pushed him over
the edge.
Bates Motel premieres
Monday, March 18 at 9 p.m. on
A&E.
brown is a freshman majoring in
journalism from overland park.
HUMor
By Emily Brown
ebrown@kansan.com
@JohnEatsPizza
@UdK_opinion The Hawk, cause all
my freshmen friends can come.
Monday, March 4, 2013 Page 5a
HOROSCOPES
Because the stars
know things we dont.
Crossword
Fashion
sChmidt happens
Cryptoquip
sudoku
check out
the answers
asdfasdfasd
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
aries (March 21-april 19)
today is a 6
keep your feet on solid ground, and
let fantasies dissolve. Figure out what
you really want. a woman you respect
has great advice and numbers to back
it. Gather materials.
taurus (april 20-May 20)
today is an 8
set your imagination free, within
practical limits. Create romance with
thoughtful words and deeds, rather
than expensive gifts. take pride in
your accomplishments without brag-
ging ... its unnecessary. Let your
actions speak for you.
gemini (May 21-June 20)
today is a 6
accept responsibility, not more work.
dont rush off in the wrong direction.
handle disagreements in private. the
possibility of misunderstanding is
high, and patience could get tested.
take it easy.
cancer (June 21-July 22)
today is a 6
a female challenges your opinion.
make sure you have the facts. ask for
more than you think youll get. dont
forget an important job. Family gains
an optimistic view.
Leo (July 23-aug. 22)
today is a 6
dont heed the advice of a skeptic.
Get the facts and make your own deci-
sions. Challenging authority could be
appropriate. there is a lot to do close
to home. Limit spending and decrease
waste.
Virgo (aug. 23-sept. 22)
today is a 5
reassure someone whos anxious.
analysis of the data plus intuition
equals understanding. Get the mes-
sage across. handle local errands.
prepare a unique dinner and a relaxing
evening.
Libra (sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is an 8
a private conversation could be quite
revealing. take the considerations
of others into account. double-check
facts and present them to one who
disagrees. keep costs down by using
resources wisely.
scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
today is a 9
practice being gracious, especially
with someone rude. theres more going
on behind the scenes than you know
now. Consider options carefully, and
travel later. make plans and include
lots of detail. Listen carefully.
sagittarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
today is an 8
keep the most interesting things, and
get rid of clutter. discover a hidden
problem; romance interferes with
business. Find a way to work smarter
by delegating. work toward a goal.
postpone buying gifts.
capricorn (dec. 22-Jan. 19)
today is a 5
dont make expensive promises, and
postpone travel. Get into studies and
organization, which are much better
investments. dont reveal secrets at
the dinner table. Continue to alleviate
loose ends.
aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 6
modify a fantasy and stick to the
practical route. someone close by
doesnt like anything now. dont let
your friends get into your secret treats.
keep your nose to the grindstone.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is a 7
the news today is unsettling. avoid
getting involved in anothers affairs,
financially or otherwise. something
at home gets messed up. decrease
new projects this week, and postpone
expansion. handle chores.
Last weeks Paris Fashion Week
hosted H&Ms first runway show
in eight years. While the cloth-
ing line has recently collaborated
with designers such as Donatella
Versace and Maison Martin
Margiela, this show solely fea-
tured the stores signature label.
Celebrities such as Ashley
Olsen and Emma Roberts attend-
ed the event on the grounds of
the Muse Rodin, which has been
home to fashion shows for Dior,
YSL and Tom Ford. The museum,
which was dedicated to French
sculptor Auguste Rodin, was set
up into a fantasy house. The
runway circled around 15 rooms,
each with its own theme.
The collection, available Sept.
5, consists of over-the-knee
boots, fringe detailing, cape jack-
ets and mohair sweaters. The
color palette was mostly blacks,
whites and tans, with an occa-
sional pop of red, just like many
other designers shows in pre-
vious days. Supermodels such
as Cara Delevingne and Arizona
Muse sported over-sized tops and
structured jackets.
According to Fashiontv.com,
H&M head of design Ann-Sofie
Johansson says of the collection:
We call it modern drama, with a
bit of tailoring, uniform inspira-
tion, and some tomboy inspira-
tion there too.
The show received positive
reviews and major chatter in its
previous weeks. The brand first
raised eyebrows after announcing
that of all fashion week locations,
it chose Paris, which is known
as the home for haute couture.
Not only that, but actress Helen
Hunt was wearing the label at the
Feb. 27 Oscar awards ceremony.
Fashion gurus everywhere won-
dered: just who does H&M think
it is?
Luckily for the everyday brand,
its designs proved fashionable,
even with the labels affordable
price tags. It isnt easy playing
with the big dogs at fashion week,
but H&M overcame the obstacles
and won the hearts and minds of
Parisians.

Edited by Julie Etzler
caLLan reiLLy
creilly@kansan.com
H&M shows off collection
at Paris Fashion Week
Follow
@UDK_Entertain
on Twitter
coMic by MarshaLL schMidt
WITHEY
RElEFoRd
Young JoHnson
associated Press
emma roberts attends the topshop
topman La opening party at Cecconis
in Los angeles, on wednesday, Feb. 13,
2013 in Los angeles.

Actress Sarah Wright stars as love
interest Nicole in the raucous col-
lege comedy 21 and Over, helping
out party boys Miller (Miles Teller)
and Casey (Skylar Astin) as they
wildly celebrate the 21st birthday
of their friend Jeff Chang (Justin
Chon). Here, Wright explains impro-
vising with the guys, playing party
games and the travel experiences
that inspired her character.
UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN:
What sort of behind the scenes high
jinks happen on the set of a movie
about partying in college?
SARAH WRIGHT: I think the
boys partied a lot off set and then
also on set. But while we werent
shooting we went to a lot of concerts,
and we shot in Seattle so we went
to a music festival then art festivals
and stuff like that around town all
the time. It was a wonderful city to
work in. We had a blast shooting the
movie and the boys were hilarious.

UDK: How was working with
them? You have a strong chemistry
with them in the movie, especially
Skylar.
SW: It was great! We did a couple
chemistry reads together, so Miles
was cast and chemistry read Skylar,
then Skylar was cast and he chemistry
read me. So in those scenes, we were
able to sort of play around and get to
know each other. (Co-writers/direc-
tors) Jon (Lucas) and Scott (Moore)
were very open to us improvving
and trying our own stuff in there,
and I think when we did that we
were able to learn what each of us
was capable of. We could sort of pick
at each other, our scenes were sort of
snarky, in a fun way, like be sarcastic
with each other. But it was nice, it
definitely bonded us by doing those
first few chemistry reads together.
UDK: Talk about your 21st birth-
day. Do you have any particular sto-
ries about how you celebrated?
SW: I wish I had some cool story
about my 21st birthday, but I dont. I
lived in Chicago when I was 18, 19,
20, and I traveled to different places
in Europe, and I lived in Greece, and
I lived in Japan for three months. So
I feel like I kind of had those times,
like at a concert all night long, and
then coming home and eating pizza
rolls and ranch dressing, and nurs-
ing a hangover at a diner. Theres this
amazing diner in Chicago called the
Palace Grill, and we would go there
early in the morning after a night
out and we would eat like, french
fries with feta cheese on them, and
hamburgers, and fish sandwiches,
and anything that would help. And
that was sort of my partying experi-
ence when I was living there, but my
21st birthday was very boring! I was
just eating sushi and drinking sake.
It was sort of past the time of my
partying stage.

UDK: What were you doing in
Japan at that time?
SW: I was modeling. I traveled
around modeling when I was young,
like 16, 17, 18 years old. I did Japan,
Greece and a number of other places.
Thats what I was doing in Chicago
as well.

UDK: Okay, so I can definitely see
how that plays into your character
wanting to travel the world.
SW: For sure. I felt like I related a
lot to Nicole because of that. My par-
ents were always very open for me to
do whatever was thrown at me. And
when I told them at 16 that I wanted
to go live in Japan for three months
they were like, Umm...well okay
and they tried to find some sort of
traction with that. So my dad took
me there and was there for four days,
and when he left I was balling my
eyes out. Then I had three months
ahead of me and at 16 thats pretty
scary. So I fell in love with traveling.
I think I spent the first month party-
ing and the second month going to
concerts, and then the third month
I was learning about the culture.
There was a whole transition. Then
that made me sort of fall in love with
Nicole, this character, because I spent
a lot of time when I was growing up
traveling, and sort of trying to find
out who I was and what I wanted to
do with my life out there.

UDK: And the other part of your
character certainly seems to be about
embracing that spontaneous side.
How have you done that in your
own life, besides modeling? In career
and acting opportunities?
SW: I auditioned for my first
show (Quintuplets) when I was
living in Chicago, and they asked
me to come and test in L.A. So they
flew me out to test and they told me
that day that I booked the role in the
room. And our pilot got picked up
for 22 episodes on the air for FOX
and immediately was rushed into
press and red carpets. And Im from
Kentucky, I grew up on a farm, so
it was so weird. I was totally game
though. I went through a transition,
at first, I didnt really know what
I was really in for. So I was never
nervous when I was auditioning, like
I dont know, I guess Im just happy
to be here, and this is great! And
if I get this, awesome! And then
I went into a phase of, Oh Im so
nervous, I know what this means.
But now Im back to more a place of,
Whatever happens, happens. And
I love it. Doing comedy is a passion
and it makes me so happy, and if it
happens, great, and if not, Ill find
something else. So yeah, I definitely
have that spontaneous side where
obviously Ive been able to keep up
with this career and not need a spe-
cific structure.

UDK: Jon Lucas and Scott Moore
have plenty experience as writers
(The Hangover), but theyre first-
time directors on this. And yet it
really seems they knew what they
were going for and how to achieve
their tone effectively. How was work-
ing with them?
SW: Since the first moment I
met them, I knew okay, these guys
are gonna crush it. They each bring
their own thing to the table, and I
think because theyre so close, and
they wrote this together. Theyve
been writing partners for years, and
I think they just knew exactly what
they wanted to do with it. I dont have
this household name from doing
some other movie or something, so
I was surprised that I was given this
opportunity. And so were Skylar and
Miles and Justin. We were all kind of
like, Wow, its so cool we get to do
this movie, and were not really big
name people. Because normally a
movie like this, especially this caliber,
kind of goes to that. But they wanted
to cast who they wanted to cast, and
they were able to do that. It was so
fun to have this experience and be
able to do something that you really
love with two people that you really
respect so much.

UDK: So whats next for you? I
see youre going to be in the comedy
Walk of Shame.
SW: Yeah, we just wrapped Walk
of Shame (last week). So thats whats
been going on for me from December
to just yesterday. And theres a couple
pilots I have my eye on this year so
maybe Ill do a pilot, well see.
Edited by Brian Sisk
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 6a thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
film
academy awards
Sarah Wright discusses production of 21 and Over
aLEx LaMb
alamb@kansan.com
contrIbUtEd Photo
actress sarah wright comes to save the guys in 21 and Over. courtesy relativity media.
First lady takes oscars
criticism in stride
cHicaGO michelle Obama says
it was absolutely not surprising to
her that her satellite appearance at the
academy awards ceremony provoked a
national conversation about whether it
was appropriate, after some conservative
critics accused her of selfshly crashing
the event in an attempt to upstage it.
she attributed the chatter to a culture
shift that has spawned legions of blog-
gers, tweeters and others who talk about
anything and everything all the time.
shoot, my bangs set off a national
conversation. my shoes can set off a
national conversation. Thats just sort of
where we are. weve got a lot of talking
going on, the frst lady said only some-
what jokingly Thursday before an appear-
ance in chicago, her hometown. its like
everybodys kitchen-table conversation
is now accessible to everybody else so
theres a national conversation about
anything.
in what was not the frst-ever Oscar
appearance by a frst lady, mrs. Obama
was beamed live from the white House
into sundays ceremony in los angeles to
unseal the envelope and announce that
the nights fnal award, for Best Picture,
would go to argo. in 2002, laura Bush
appeared at the ceremony on videotape.
americans have long been fascinated
by their frst ladies, scrutinizing every-
thing from their clothes and hair to the
issues they promote and how they raise
their children. mrs. Obama acknowl-
edged that she and President Barack
Obama have added appeal, and perhaps
sometimes are subject to extra scrutiny,
because they are the frst black family in
the white House but also a young couple
(she turned 49 last month; hes 51) with
young children (daughters sasha, 11,
and malia, 14).
she said she doesnt give a second
thought to critical comments about what
she does as frst lady.
Associated Press
YOU AR E ONE
OF MANY FI SH I N T HE SE A.
25 companies in attendance
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6
10 TO 3
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/
psychological_clinic/
Counseling Services for
Lawrence & KU
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 7a thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
School budget cuts, larger class
sizes and a greater use of technol-
ogy all mean University students
returning to the classroom as K-12
educators will see a significantly
different school system as teachers
than they did as students.
While Kansas saw a slight
increase to state K-12 funding
this year, overall state funding for
schools has decreased by 13.2 per-
cent since 2007 when adjusted for
inflation, according to the Center
on Budget and Policy Priorities.
Cassie Absher, a junior from
Kansas City, Mo., said that, as a
result of these cuts, class sizes have
increased. Absher, who aspires
to teach middle school earth and
space science, has observed how
this makes giving attention to indi-
vidual students more difficult.
Students who struggle, who
are lower performers, who have
learning differences or who are
English language learners are the
most hurt by larger class sizes,
Absher said.
Along with greater class sizes,
less school funding results in
decreased materials budgets and
a wider wage disparity between
teachers and fellow professionals,
said Steven Case, director of The
Center for Science Education at
the University.
Long term, school cuts can
drive teachers out, Case said.
The primary reasons people leave
are because of working conditions
and pay gap.
Fifty percent of teachers leave
after their first three years, Case
said.
Students in the Universitys
UKanTeach program can pursue
degrees in STEM science, tech-
nology, engineering, and math-
ematics while becoming certi-
fied to teach these subjects as
part of their degrees. Case said
these students can teach or work
in a STEM field. Teaching posi-
tions can pay between $15,000
to $20,000 less annually than a
STEM job outside the education
field, Case said.
For Neal Doolin, a senior
from Shawnee, teaching science
is still his preference, even with
his degree in physics. Despite a
smaller salary, Doolin thinks find-
ing a job will not be difficult, even
with budget cuts.
School districts pay new teach-
ers less, Doolin said. They will
get a few older teachers to retire
earlier and hire new teachers.
Kyle Consovler, a senior for
Lawrence who is student teaching
mathematics at Lawrence High
School, said he has not seen cuts
drastically affect the classroom.
White boards and dry erase
markers are as available now
as they were four years ago,
Consovler said.
Consovler thinks teaching to
the new standards for state assess-
ments poses the biggest challenge
for teachers. Kristin Capps, a
senior from Lawrence who is stu-
dent teaching mathematics at Free
State High School, said the use of
technology has increased in the
classroom despite budget cuts.
Now we have smart boards
where teachers can prepare the
whole lesson in a notebook file
and have all of the equations or
proofs written out already for the
whole lesson, Capps said. That
greatly cuts down the time the
teacher has their back to the stu-
dents.
Despite a changing teaching
environment, Capps still looks
forward to being a teacher, just
like her grandfather, a University
alumnus, who taught for 50 years.
I saw how easy it was for learn-
ers to understand him and trust
him and I wanted to be able to
have that same impact on learners
too, Capps said.
Edited by Brian Sisk
MarShaLL SchMIdt
mschmidt@kansan.com
jobs
state
nation
Budget cuts to affect students
with futures in K-12 education
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
Doolin explains a board he made for his advanced physics class that he teaches at Lawrence High school.
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
neal Doolin, a senior from shawnee, poses with a board he made for his advanced physics class that he teaches at Lawrence
High school. Doolin teaches two classes every day.
international space station
delivery overcomes diffculty
aSSocIatEd PrESS
Gov. Brownback urges
Kansans to conserve water
toPeKa state officials say the in-
tense drought thats hit Kansas could
continue and force expensive water
production projects and conservation
efforts.
the Wichita eagle reports that Gov.
sam brownback said Friday the state
should work to convince farmers, in-
dustry and Kansans to conserve wa-
ter and that cities will need to work
on developing and improving water
sources.
brownback also suggested starting
publicity campaigns asking farmers to
consider planting less water-intensive
crops.
the governors call to action came
after Wichita officials showed brown-
backs Drought Response team how
the drought could dry out Cheney Res-
ervoir by 2015 if it continues.
state climatologist Mary Knapp
says the drought thats hit Kansas
could continue for several more years.
Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
A private Earth-to-orbit delivery
service made good on its latest
shipment to the International
Space Station on Sunday, over-
coming mechanical difficulty and
delivering a ton of supplies with
high-flying finesse.
To NASAs relief, the SpaceX
companys Dragon capsule pulled
up to the orbiting lab with all of its
systems in perfect order. Station
astronauts used a hefty robot arm
to snare the unmanned Dragon,
and three hours later, it was bolted
into place.
The Dragons arrival couldnt
have been sweeter and not
because of the fresh fruit on
board for the six-man station
crew. Coming a full day late,
the 250-mile-high linkup above
Ukraine culminated a two-day
chase that got off to a shaky,
almost dead-ending start.
Moments after the Dragon
reached orbit Friday, a clogged
pressure line or stuck valve pre-
vented the timely release of the
solar panels and the crucial fir-
ing of small maneuvering rockets.
SpaceX flight controllers struggled
for several hours before gaining
control of the capsule and salvag-
ing the mission.
As they say, its not where you
start, but where you finish that
counts, space station commander
Kevin Ford said after capturing
the Dragon, and you guys really
finished this one on the mark.
He added: Weve got lots of
science on there to bring aboard
and get done. So congratulations
to all of you.
Among the items on board:
640 seeds of a flowering weed
used for research, mouse stem
cells, food and clothes for the six
men on board the space station,
trash bags, computer equipment,
air purifiers, spacewalking tools
and batteries. The company also
tucked away apples and other
fresh treats from an employees
family orchard.
The Dragon will remain at the
space station for most of March
before returning to Earth with
science samples, empty food con-
tainers and old equipment.
The California-based SpaceX
run by billionaire Elon Musk has
a $1.6 billion contract with NASA
to keep the station well stocked.
The contract calls for 12 supply
runs; this was the second in that
series.
This is the third time, however,
that a Dragon has visited the space
station. The previous capsules had
no trouble reaching their desti-
nation. Company officials prom-
ise a thorough investigation into
what went wrong this time; if the
maneuvering thrusters had not
been activated, the capsule would
have been lost.
Ford said everything about
Sundays rendezvous ended up
being fantastic.
There sure were some big
smiles all around here, NASAs
Mission Control replied from
Houston.
Proclaimed SpaceX on its web
site: Happy Berth Day.
In a tweet following Fridays
nerve-racking drama, Musk said,
Just want to say thanks to (at)
NASA for being the worlds cool-
est customer. Looking forward to
delivering the goods!
Musk, who helped create
PayPal, acknowledged Friday
that the problem the first ever
for an orbiting Dragon was
frightening. But he believed it
was a one-time glitch and noth-
ing so serious as to imperil future
missions. The 41-year-old entre-
preneur, who also runs the elec-
tric car maker Tesla, oversaw the
entire operation from Hawthorne,
Calif., home to SpaceX and the
companys Mission Control.
The Dragons splashdown
in the Pacific, off the Southern
California coast, remains on
schedule for March 25.
aSSocIatEd PrESS
the Falcon 9 spaceX rocket lifts off from launch complex 40 at the Cape
Canaveral air Force station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Friday. the rocket, which
contained more than a ton of food, tools, computer hardware and science experi-
ments, transported the Dragon capsule to the international space station.
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 8a thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
Every day, Ben McLemore tries
to get better.
Even before he dropped a
Kansas freshman record 36 points
on Saturday, he bettered himself by
showing up early before the game
against West Virginia.
Around 10:45 a.m., McLemore
walked onto Naismith Court to
join sophomore guard Naadir
Tharpe and Tharpes brother
Tishaun Jenkins, a former player at
Division III Salem State University,
in some ball handling drills.
Jenkins had seen on television
that Tharpe had struggled with ball
handling, so the two brothers were
working things out well before the
coaching staff or the student sec-
tion filed into Allen Fieldhouse.
McLemore wanted to pick up
some more information, especially
since ball handling is something he
continues to develop.
He spent 15 minutes learning
from Jenkins and Tharpe. He lis-
tened. He processed the informa-
tion. By the end of the quick tuto-
rial, he was circling around the
Jayhawk at the center court, drib-
bling the basketball with a smile
on his face and a new-found con-
fidence.
Every day McLemore wants to
improve.
With him working like that its
going to pay off, Tharpe said. Its
defintely paying off this year all the
way around. Hes going to shoot
the ball well. Once he gets it going
weve got to find him as much as we
can. He was stroking the ball well
tonight. It was nice to see.
Tharpe isnt the only one who
notices McLemore punching his
card so much.
Senior guard Elijah Johnson has
his pulse on this team better than
any player, and even he admits
that he can learn from a player of
McLemores caliber and maturity.
I love this kid, man and I never
tell him, Johnson said. I think
he knows, but Ive learned a lot
from him. I could honestly say Ive
learned a lot from him.
You would think hes the worst
player in the gym the way he works
every day. I feel like hes a calm,
cool dude on and off the court. Hes
always in a good mood. Hes always
pumping energy into us.
In Saturdays contest, McLemore
made 12 of his 15 shots and grabbed
seven rebounds. As a testament to
his range, however, McLemore also
recorded four assists.
What separates McLemore from
many players is his effortless flow
on the court. He doesnt force any-
thing. He just plays the game.
You worry about the things you
can control and the uncontrollable
things will be much easier, coach
Bill Self said on Saturday. He was
focused in and he wants to score
and all those things, but he can do
so many other things to help our
team win.
McLemores performance on
Saturday also marked him as the
first freshman in Kansas history
with three games of 30-plus points
in a season.
But the statstics are not the most
impressive part of McLemores rep-
ertoire. He has earned respect from
his teammates, especially since hes
broken Danny Mannings fresh-
man scoring record.
I personally think Ben is the
person who deserves to do that out
of anybody Ive ever played with,
Johnson said. Im happy for him.
And thats the legacy that
McLemore has created. He has
tried to learn as much as he can in
his short college tenure, even if its
15 minutes with a teammate and
his brother.
Bens a guy where hes coachable
at anytime, Tharpe said. He takes
interest in what my brother says.
More importantly, he wants to
savor watching those who have
guided him through his time at the
University take the court for Senior
Night tonight.
We just got to focus on whats in
front of us right now, McLemore
said. My focus is to go out there
and just play ball.
Edited by Brian Sisk
ryan Mccarthy
rmccarthy@kansan.com
Mens basketball
McLemore continues to better himself with extra practice
tara Bryant/KanSan
Freshman guard ben Mclemore pushes his way past a West Virginia defender in saturdays game at allen Fieldhouse. Mclem-
ore scored a career-high 36 points and broke the kansas record for the most points scored in a single game by a freshman.
Danny Manning previously held the record with 35 points.
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan fILE Photo
Freshman guard ben Mclemore gets fouled on his way to the basket during the
game against texas Christian University on saturday, Feb. 23 in allen Fieldhouse
where the Jayhawks defeated the Horned Frogs 74-48.
aShLEGh LEE/KanSan fILE Photo
Mclemore chats with senior forward kevin Young after a foul was called during the
Feb. 11 game against kansas state in allen Fieldhouse where kansas won 83-62.
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
Freshman guard ben Mclemore shoots a 3-pointer during the game against West
Virginia on saturday in allen Fieldhouse where the Jayhawks defeated the Moun-
taineers 91-65. Mclemore was was 5-6 in 3-point attempts.
tyLEr roStE/KanSan fILE Photo
Freshman guard ben Mclemore drives the lane during saturdays game against
texas on saturday, Feb. 16. Mclemore had 13 points in the Jayhawks 73-47 victory.
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
Freshman guard ben Mclemore is fouled as he drives to the basket against West
Virginia on saturday at allen Fieldhouse. the Jayhawks defeated the Mountaineers
91-65. Mclemore was 7-9 on free throw attempts and scored a record-setting 36
points.
UPCOMING SHOWS
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WI T H: P ROF, FA S HAWN,
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HERE COME THE MUMMIES
JB AND THE
MOONSHI NE BAND
KOTTONMOUTH KINGS
WITH: DOGBOY, FREDDY GRIMES,
S A C R U N K K & D E R A N G E D
PAGE 9A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN MoNDAY, MARch 4, 2013
March
Tues. Mon. Wed. Sun. Thurs.
Chalking and
distribution of
materials begin
Fri. Sat.
4 3 5 6
President & Vice
President fling
deadline: 5 p.m.
7
Mandatory
presidential
candidate info
meeting:
7 to 8 p.m.
(place TBA)
8 9
Charter fling
deadline: 5 p.m.
10 11
Passive tabling
and organization
visits begin
12 13 14 15 16
Submission of
signatures to
complete Pres./
VP fling deadline:
5 p.m.
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24
25 26 27 28 29 30
31
Spring Break
Special accom-
modations re-
quest deadline:
5 p.m.
Senators
fling deadline:
5 p.m.
candidate
Slate fling
deadline: 5 p.m.
offcial ballot
available for
public view
April
Tues. Mon. Wed. Sun. Thurs.
Offcial ballot
verifcation
deadline
Mandatory
senatorial candi-
date meeting:
7 to 8 p.m.
(place TBA)
Fri. Sat.
1 2
3
Candidate
coalition resig-
nation deadline:
5 p.m.
Independent
fling deadline:
5 p.m.
Candidate ID
badges available
4
5 6
Elections:
6 a.m.- 10 p.m.
7 8
Active tabling
begins
Write-in
candidate fling
deadline: 5 p.m.
Campaign ac-
tivity & expense
report deadline:
5 p.m.
9 10 11 12 13
Elections:
6 a.m.- 10 p.m.
Write-in Can-
didate activity &
expense reports
deadline: 5 p.m.
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21
22 23 24 25 26 27
28
First pos-
sible day to
certify election
result
29 30
Contested
election com-
plaint deadline:
5 p.m.
Final activity &
expense reports
deadline: 5 p.m.
Campaign ma-
terials removal
deadline
Stay updated with
a day-by-day look
at Senate elections

$4 MARGARITAS
$4 MARGARITAS
Jeff Withey was trying hard to
keep Lawrences biggest secret.
Kansas star center knew the
mastermind behind the
@FakeJeffWithey Twitter account
was in Allen Fieldhouse to watch
him play against Colorado on
Dec. 8. He didnt know just how
close he came to blowing his
cover.
Of course Withey knew many
other people in the crowd that
day. Some of his friends had
come up to watch him play and,
as always, his parents were in
the crowd. It was just sheer mis-
fortune for Fake Jeff that he was
seated next to Witheys mother.
My mom is
really nosey,
Withey said.
And obviously
in the Fieldhouse
everyone sits
very close to each
other.
So when the
notorious Twitter
fiend started
typing up his
Halftime Locker
Room Update,
Witheys mom grabbed his arm
to see what her neighbor was up
to. She instantly thought her son
was sending a text message from
the locker room and started to
scold this stranger for breaking
Witheys focus.
It wasnt a coincidence, how-
ever, that Fake Jeff was seated
along with Witheys family and
friends. After all, it was Withey
who got him the tickets.
Hes one of my closest friends
at KU now, Withey said of the
man who controls his alter ego.
But it sure didnt start off like
that.
When the account first began,
and its culprit remained anony-
mous to Withey, the big man
couldnt stand it.
I thought it was annoying,
Withey said. He was the com-
plete opposite of me. I didnt
want people to think of me as
this sex-crazed guy.
The account tweeted lewd
and crude content. Everything
from imaginary sexual exploits
to parodies of Bill Self s pre-
game speeches and even a few
catchphrases Withey Whips
His Hair Back And Forth and
Withey Block Party to name
a few. The latter even became a
website.
But as Withey became a bigger
part of the Jayhawks victories,
the account grew in recognition.
Even Witheys teammates were
getting addicted to his virtual
counterpart. Soon even Withey
couldnt help but check Twitter
after games to see what his biz-
zaro-self was up to.
Conversely, Fake Jeff never
cared about getting thousands of
followers. He was in it for hilar-
itys sake. Two years ago he had
no emotional ties to Kansas cen-
ter and didnt care much about
his feelings. All he saw was a
lengthy man that no one knew
much about. So he decided to
change that. Even if he had to
make it all up.
In September, 2011, Fake
Jeff Withey was born, loud and
proud and with no shame.
Although, it didnt carry the
same weight it does now. In
fact, when his first tweets went
unnoticed, Fake Jeff thought he
might shut it down. It wasnt
until Withey
started get-
ting ample
playing time
that people
started to pay
attention to
his parody.
If he was a
benchwarm-
er it wouldnt
be as popu-
lar, Fake Jeff
said.
Its a little bit of an ironic sen-
timent because Withey doesnt
know where he would be without
the account.
I feel like hes definitely made
me more popular with the stu-
dent body, Withey said. It was
just perfect timing.
No, perfect timing is what took
place at Tonic a little more than
a year ago when Fake Jeff was
given a private room for tweet-
ing about the Lawrence bar.
It was a Saturday night and
we were thinking of stuff to do,
Withey said of the night he met
his Twitter twin.
Witheys girlfriend was a
mutual friend of Fake Jeff. When
she heard he had a private room
at Tonic she pushed the idea of
introducing the two Jeffs in her
life.
Withey ended up at the bar in
what became the beginning ofan
unconventional friendship that
can only be explained in the 21st
century.
They met. They drank. They
tweeted.
I was expecting a crude guy
that just cusses, Withey said.
Fake Jeff is not like the account
at all. Hes a cool guy. Hes really
funny. I was just expecting some-
thing completely different.
Fake Jeff was going over the
finer points of the account, show-
ing off some of his mentions and
looking at direct messages when
he proposed an idea to Withey.
People still thought it was
him, Fake Jeff said of his iden-
tity. I was like You wanna mess
with them?
The result was Withey tak-
ing a self-photo from Fake Jeff s
phone and tweeting it from the
account. Followers went crazy.
Many of Witheys fans fell for
it, claiming they knew it was
Withey all along.
It wouldnt be the last time
Fake Jeff and Withey used the
account to mess with people.
Withey loves playing Fake Jeff s
identity, even going as far as
tricking his friends. When he
first introduces them to Fake
Jeff, he doesnt reveal that he
runs the account until theyre
begging to know.
What started as an obscure
night at Tonic evolved into a
much more complex scenario.
Fake Jeff and Withey keep run-
ning into each other.
But something happened to
Fake Jeff as his friendship with
Withey evolved. He found him-
self tweeting differently.
Where once he didnt worry
about what he was putting out
on Twitter he became a lot more
cautious.
I try to police it myself cause
I know hes not going to say any-
thing, Fake Jeff said.
Even as he watches games,
Fake Jeff cant get into his normal
mind-set. Hes too worried about
watching his friend play. When
Kansas went to double overtime
against Oklahoma State, Fake Jeff
couldnt even look at Twitter.
It is really weird, Withey said
of his friendship. When I first
met him I thought I wouldnt
like the guy. I thought he per-
ceived me the wrong way. I had
to lighten up a little bit. As I got
to know who he was I definitely
trusted him.
Perhaps its Fake Jeff who
should be less trusting of Withey.
Now that he knows his identity,
it makes it harder for Fake Jeff
to reveal himself when he wants
to. He knows he wont continue
tweeting when Withey leaves
Kansas, but his grand finale is
still a mystery.
For now, theres just a bar-
rage of close calls. Fortunately
for Fake Jeff, Witheys parents
never found out who they were
sitting next to while their son
dominated Colorado. Although
Withey isnt sure it would have
mattered.
She would be shocked,
Withey said of his moms prob-
able reaction. I dont think she
would take it too serious. Shed
probably just hit him on the
shoulder and ask why he didnt
tell her earlier.
Edited by Brian Sisk
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 10a thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
BLaKE SchUStEr
bschuster@kansan.com
Withey becomes friends with
@FakeJeffWithey creator
traVIS yoUnG/KanSan fILE Photo
Senior center Jeff Withey goes for the shot during the frst half of the match against TCU Saturday afternoon Feb. 23 at Allen Field-
house. Withey scored 18 total points with six rebounds and two blocks contributing in Kansas 74-48 defeat against the Horned
Frogs.
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
Senior guard Travis Releford and Withey high fve as the come off the court with fve minutes left in the game during the game
against West Virginia on Saturday in Allen Fieldhouse. The Jayhawks defeated the Mountaineers 91-65. Releford and Withey scored
20 points combined.
traVIS yoUnG/KanSan fILE Photo
Jeff Withey drives the ball toward the basket during the frst half of the match against TCU on Feb. 23. aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
Withey hugs coach Kurtis Townsend as he makes his way to the bench during the game against West Virginia.

Fake Jeff is not like the


account at all. Hes really
funny. I was just expect-
ing something completely
different.
JeFF WITHey
senior center
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
Volume 125 Issue 82 kansan.com Monday, March 4, 2013
COMMENTARY
By Pat Strathman
pstrathman@kansan.com
trying for 1,000
Steadfast seniors
to be honored
Releford proves his scoring ability, within reach of 1,000-point goal
Jayhawks go 2-2 against Eastern Michigan
farzin Vousoughian
fvousoughian@kansan.com
ScoRing with SenioRity
baSeball
PAGE 5B
Jayhawks to take
on Texas Tech
on Senior Night
geoffrey CalVert
gcalvert@kansan.com
INSIDE
T
he night is finally here.
The Kansas band dresses
up in tuxedos. Roses and
framed jerseys are placed at the cen-
ter of James Naismith Court. After
the game, a microphone gets passed
around to four different players to
make their last few memories in Allen
Fieldhouse.
Senior night for the Kansas mens
basketball team is truly special.
Tears may be shed. Coach Bill Self
might have to place a time limit on a
speech.
Still, every senior has a chance to
leave their mark.
The thing is, the four seniors not
only have left a lasting impression
with this program, but they exceeded
expectations.
Senior forward Kevin Young
joined Kansas a few years ago. A
transfer from Loyola-Marymount
was undersized. A role player that
was just supposed to relieve former
forward Thomas Robinson when in
foul trouble or keep the seat warm for
freshman Perry Ellis.
He is the straw that stirs the Kansas
drink. Diving after loose balls, getting
offensive rebounds and slam dunking
the ball all compliment the play of the
other senior big man: Jeff Withey.
The 7-foot tall transfer from th
University of Arizona was known as
an athletic big man who needed some
work. Withey wasnt big enough to
bang down low in the post, fouled
plenty, suffered injuries and lacked
offensive prowess.
A big question before the season
started was if Withey could control the
paint after Thomas Robinson left.
The Kansas career shot-block
leader answered that question with a
performance worthy of a spot on the
All-American first team. No other
player will have droves of students
forming their hands into a W after
a block.
Speaking of defense, senior guard
Travis Releford seems like hes been at
Kansas for more than five years.
Releford played right away as a
freshman and showed his defensive
capabilities, but he had no shot-mak-
ing ability and was constantly in Self s
doghouse.
Surely Kansas couldnt succeed this
season if it only had two shooters that
could make jumpshots.
No longer does Kansas have to
worry about those problems, as
Releford has developed into one of the
most efficient scorers in the nation.
Releford is still one of the best defend-
ers, but he compliments the defense
with his terrific transition offense.
And then there is the fascinating
story of senior guard Elijah Johnson.
Johnson always had the ability to
be a great player, but early in his career
transferring was a rumored option.
After coming off a knee injury and a
strong NCAA tournament run, fans
had high expectations for the leader.
The same guard who yelled, Put
your shoes on after sinking a full
court shot struggled to find his groove
during Big 12 play and took the criti-
cism from everyone.
That all changed after the most
clutch road performance against Iowa
State in which he scored 20 points in
the last 5:32 regulation and overtime.
The road is never easy when under
the spotlight of a dominant basketball
program.
Still, these four players never gave
excuses. Instead, they kept working
and left memories that will never be
forgotten.
Thanks for your hard work,
seniors. You might forget us, but we
will never forget you.
Edited by Julie Etzler
Senior guard Travis Releford
thinks it was at the postseason ban-
quet after his second year, which he
redshirted, that coach Bill Self told
him something that surprised him.
He only had 86 points to his
name as a Jayhawk, but Self told
Releford that he could reach 1,000
points in his Kansas career.
I was just like, wow, thats crazy
to think that I can accomplish that,
Releford said. From that point on,
I knew he had faith in me.
As he prepares to play his final
home game Monday at 6 p.m.
against Texas Tech, Releford owns
the most career points in a Kansas
uniform by any of the four mem-
bers of Kansas senior class.
Releford has 880 career points,
five more than senior point guard
Elijah Johnson. Senior forward
Kevin Young has 1,004 points,
but 658 of them came at Loyola
Marymount before he transferred
to Kansas.
About three years after Self
made his prediction to Releford,
the senior finds himself within
reach of 1,000 points. Hes aver-
aging 12.2 points per game this
season. If Kansas makes it to the
Big 12 Tournament final and the
NCAA Tournament final, Releford
can reach 1,000 points by averag-
ing exactly 12 points per game over
that span, starting tonight.
While Releford said he always
felt he had the talent to reach 1,000
points, he didnt believe Self when
he told Releford he could reach the
benchmark.
I mean, not really I didnt
because it was like how can I get
that many points if Im not play-
ing? Releford said. I was young
when I heard him say that so it was
just like, what, you think I can get
that? I always felt that I could go
and play and maybe reach and get
1,000 points. But at the time when
he said that I wasnt playing much
so it kind of confused me.
Releford had plenty of reason
to doubt Self at the time. He aver-
aged seven minutes per game as a
freshman, and decided to redshirt
in 2009-2010 because there werent
going to be any minutes available
for him with the addition of swing-
man freshman Xavier Henry.
But even entering his sopho-
more season in 2010, he had to
wait behind a stacked rotation of
guards, averaging only 3.6 minutes
per game.
When Kansas lost Brady
Morningstar, Tyrel Reed, Josh
Selby and Mario Little, among
other guards and swingmen, before
Relefords junior campaign last year,
he finally had the opportunity to
begin to prove Self right, and show
the fans why he never let the idea of
transferring become more than just
brief flickers across his mind.
I think it would have crossed
any kids mind in my situation,
Releford said. But I told myself
coming into school that if I had
to sit out or didnt play as much as
I wanted to Im going to prove to
the coach, to myself that I belong
here.
Hes more than proved himself
this year. Releford has scored in
double figures in 22 of 29 games
this season, and his 12.2 points per
game are third-best on the team.
Hes shooting 59 percent from
the field, the best in the Big 12
Conference. Discounting his 0-11
streak from 3-point range in the
first three games of the season, he
is making 51 percent of his 3-point
attempts.
Travis has been better than what
I even thought he would be, Self
said. Hes been great, as evidenced
the other night the way he played in
Ames. He was fabulous.
That night in Ames, one week
ago today, Releford contributed 19
points on 6-12 shooting, including
5-9 from 3-point range. In the final
11 minutes of regulation, Releford
showed how valuable his versatility
is to Kansas.
He hit a 3-pointer and missed
another, but then got the assist
when the Jayhawks got the offen-
sive rebound and he passed it to
senior guard Elijah Johnson for a
3-pointer. He assisted on another
Johnson 3-pointer, and hit two free
throws after rebounding his own
missed shot and drawing a foul.
Hes probably the personality of
our team more than anybody else,
Self said. Hes probably the glue
to our team as much as anybody
else. I think he gives us an element
of toughness probably as good as
or better than anybody else.
Hes as valuable to our team as any
of the guys weve had on our team
without question.
Its probably no surprise, then,
that Releford is part of what
Johnson called the toughest group
hes been a part of at Kansas.
I think this is a special group,
Johnson said. Not the most tal-
ented, but definitely probably one
of the toughest. I think that we can
go far. I think we can do something
that a lot of teams werent able to
do. Although weve had three or
four lottery picks on certain teams
I think that this team can do some-
thing that we havent been able to
do before.
The Jayhawks will honor Releford
and the other three seniors value
Monday night after playing the Red
Raiders in the second-to-last game
of the regular season.
Although Kansas can usually
count on Releford for a consistent
basketball performance night in
and night out, he said he has no
idea what hell say during his senior
speech. But he isnt trying to com-
pete with Wayne Simiens 25-min-
ute Senior Day speech in 2005.
I think Im going to break the
record for the shortest speech ever
because I dont like doing all the
talking, Releford said. Its just
going to be a fun, fun, fun, fun
game and fun environment to be
in.
Edited by Tara Bryant
ashleigh lee/Kansan
Kansas coach bill Self yells formation to his players before senior guard travis Releford throws the ball in bound during the
game against west Virginia on Saturday in allen Fieldhouse. the Jayhawks defeated the Mountaineers 91-65.
After sweeping Eastern
Michigan in a doubleheader on
Saturday, Kansas fell behind early
on Sunday and had to play catch
up the entire game in Grand
Prairie, Texas.
Kansas sophomore pitcher
Drew Morovick, who filled in for
senior Tanner Poppe, got off to a
good start with three strikeouts in
two innings. But the tide shifted
after he got into a jam in the sec-
ond inning and could not control
batters early in the fifth inning.
I thought when he had the
ball in the zone, he was really
good, Kansas coach Ritch Price
said. He just kind of got out of
the rhythm and couldnt find his
release on it. That got him into a
lot of trouble.
Morovick, who was charged
with his first loss of the season,
allowed seven hits and four runs.
He was pulled in the fifth inning,
but that did not stop the Eagles
offence from hitting a stride.
Kansas allowed a season-high
11 runs in Sundays loss. The
Jayhawks tried to respond on
offense, but faced problems of its
own as Eastern Michigan sopho-
more pitcher Paul Schaak finished
with six strikeouts in nearly five
innings.
But the opportunities were there
for the Jayhawks. They scored four
runs in the bottom of the sixth
inning to make it a two-run game
going into the seventh inning. In
the end, Kansas left as many as 10
players on base, but was limited in
its attempt to comeback.
We had our stances with guys
in scoring position, senior third
baseman Jordan Dreiling said.
We were maybe a couple of clutch
hits away from tying the game up
and putting us in a good position
to win, but our offense struggled.
After going 2-2 on the series,
Kansas is now 6-5 on the season
with all of its games this season
being on the road. Kansas used
five pitchers from the bullpen and
had to put sophomore right fielder
Dakota Smith as a pitcher in the
ninth inning.
Price said that in the four games
the team played, there were two
innings total from this weekend
that set them back and allowed
Eastern Michigan to prevail. Those
two innings cost Kansas two victo-
ries; now the Jayhawks are looking
to play better at home.
After having to push back its
home opener the past two week-
ends due to winter weather, Kansas
expects to host its first game at
Hoglund Ballpark on Thursday
against Niagara in a four-game
series.
Wed like to come out with at
least three wins, Dreiling said.
We need to get after this week,
then get ready for Big 12 play.
- Edited by Elise Reuter
Kansan file Photo
Junior infelder, Jordan Dreiling, from lawrence, tags his aggie opponent out
at second base during the Kansas Jayhawks game against texas tech.
Jaye Crockett, forward
Despite not
starting, Crock-
ett leads the Red
Raiders with 12
points and 6.8 re-
bounds per game.
Despite only scor-
ing four points
Saturday against
TCU, Crockett has
scored in double fgures in four of Texas
Techs past fve games. He is one of three
rotation players to shoot more than 50
percent from the feld for the season.
PAGE 5B
thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN
MoNDAY, MARch 4, 2013
tExAS tEch
(10-17, 3-13)
StARtERS
DUSTY HANNAHS, GUARD
Of all the Red Raiders who play signifcant min-
utes, Hannahs leads the team by shooting 81 per-
cent from the free throw line. He is also Texas Techs
best 3-point shooter, having made 40 of 106 at-
tempts for a 38 percent mark. He struggled against
TCU on Saturday, contributing only fve points and
three turnovers.


JOSH GRAY, GUARD
Gray was one of three players to score in double
fgures against the Horned Frogs on Saturday, fn-
ishing with 11 points. Hes also the Red Raiders
best ball distributor, as he averages 3.3 assists per
game. His 90 assists are 40 more than anyone else
on the team has.


JAMAL WILLIAMS, JR., GUARD
Although hes a regular starter, Williams hasnt
played more than 16 minutes in any of the past
three games, and he has scored eight points and
grabbed fve rebounds in that span. Against Kan-
sas State last Monday, Williams started but played
only four minutes, contributing zero points and zero
rebounds.


JORDAN TOLBERT, FORWARD
Tolbert led Texas Tech with a game-high 22 points
Saturday against TCU, shooting 9-10. He shoots 54
percent from the feld and averages 9.4 points for
the Red Raiders. He is the teams second-best re-
bounder and has grabbed 60 offensive rebounds
this season.


DEJAN KRAVIC, FORWARD
Kravic contributed 16 points on Saturday against
TCU, hitting seven of his 11 shots. He also grabbed
11 rebounds, the only player from either team in
double fgures in that category. He shoots 52 per-
cent from the feld but only 57 percent from the free
throw line.

KANSAS
(25-4, 16-1)
StARtERS
BEN MCLEMORE, GUARD
What hasnt been written about Ben McLemore?
That line has been used by a lot of people lately,
and its starting to become true. The freshman from
St. Louis continues to be the most talented player
on campus since Paul Pierce, and he might be bet-
ter. Hes unselfsh, gifted and cares about this pro-
gram. He wants to be remembered as someone who
made an impact helped not only himself, but also
his teammate make a memory that will rest in the
rafters for years to come.

TRAVIS RELEFORD, GUARD


Releford continues to be this years version of Nick
Collison. Maybe not putting up the same numbers,
but as far as consistent effort every single game
,there is no one better. Hes the best defender. Hes
great in transition. More importantly, hes an unself-
ish teammate who will do whats best for the pro-
gram. Thats what hes done his whole career, and
thats why it will pay off for him in the long run when
the NBA Draft comes calling in June.

ELIJAH JOHNSON, GUARD


Johnson had another fantastic performance
against West Virginia on Saturday going for 12 points
and 10 assists, but also putting down a one-handed
dunk that brought his second Too Strong moment
of the week. Johnson is playing with supreme conf-
dence at the moment, and it does not look like he will
be stopping anytime soon. Hes a player who drives
the engine of this team. Dont look for that to change
anytime soon.


KEVIN YOUNG, FORWARD
One of the best glue guys in recent Kansas memo-
ry, Young is another fan favorite not just for his Afro,
but also for his love for the game. Theres not another
player on the roster who appreciates the history and
tradition of this program more than him. Hes also
grateful for the opportunity Kurtis Townsend gave
him two years ago. Hes taken advantage of it and
now has a promising future in whatever he decides
to do after this season.


JEFF WITHEY, CENTER
Withey was robbed of a triple-double on Saturday,
so expect him to create another major moment for his
senior night. The native of San Diego, Calif., Withey
continues to show why his candidacy for First Team
All-American is completely legitimate. Withey is a
player who came into Kansas after a diffcult time at
Arizona, but he will leave as one of the best Kansas
centers in the last 10 years. Lets hope the students
enjoy waving the W for the last time at home.

tExAS tEch
tIPoff
No. 6 KANSAS VS. tExAS tEch
6 P.M., ALLEN fILEDhoUSE, LAwRENcE
KANSAS
tIPoff
A (Senior) Night to remember
Jayhawks to face Red Raiders in last home game
coUNtDowN to tIPoff
GAME
DAY
McLemore
PREDIctIoN:
Kansas 83, texas tech 65
At A GLANcE
QUEStIoN MARK
PLAYER to wAtch
crockett
With its 72-63 victory against TCU on
Saturday, Texas Tech broke a nine-game
losing streak and a skid where it lost
13 of its last 14 games. Junior forward
Jaye Crockett leads the Red Raiders in
scoring at 12 points per game, even
though he comes off the bench. No other
player averages in double fgures scor-
ing for Texas Tech. The Red Raiders have
secured the ninth seed for the Big 12
Tournament
Can the Red Raiders take
care of the ball?
Kansas struggled to take care of the
ball for the early part of conference play,
but the exception came at Texas Tech in
early January. Kansas committed only
nine turnovers while coercing the Red
Raiders into 16 turnovers. The Jayhawks
outscored Texas Tech 12-4 on the fast
break that game. If the Red Raiders
want to at least hang around in Allen
Fieldhouse, it cant concede transition
baskets.
At A GLANcE
PLAYER to wAtch
QUEStIoN MARK
Kansas welcomes the Texas Tech Red
Raiders to town who are 10-17 overall
and 3-13 in Big 12 play. Kansas won the
frst matchup in Lubbock with a score of
60-46. Kansas had four players score
in double fgures, led by senior forward
Kevin Young with 14 points. Kansas
leads the overall series record with a
23-4 record.
Travis Releford, Guard
Its hard to
pick one player
to watch on a
night like Senior
Night, but it feels
appropriate to
choose the local
guy from Kansas
City, Mo. Rel-
eford has put in
an immense amount of work and effort
to get where he is now. He will savor this
moment, but will remember that theres
much more for this team to accomplish
before everything is said and done.
What are you expecting from
the Senior Night speeches?
Like every senior night, no one actu-
ally knows, none of the players are big
speakers, but expect some thoughtful
words and, of course, some tears. Its a
special senior night with all four players
spending the majority of their season as
starters, which is not always the case.
It will be a memorable moment for any
Kansas fan thats been following the
players closely the last four years.
Releford Releford
Johnson
Young
withey
hannahs
Gray
williams
tolbert
Kravic
BABY JAY WILL WEEp IF...
Senior Night emotions affect the Jay-
hawks. Kansas has played some of its
best basketball of the year during its
current six-game winning streak. Texas
Techs best opportunity to win the game,
or at least make it a closer game than
Kansas wanted, is to hope that the Kan-
sas seniors will be distracted by the fact
they are playing their last home game.
BIG JAY WILL CHEER IF...
Kansas keeps doing what they do.
The Jayhawks are in a serious rhythm
right now, expect them to continue to be
that way until they are challenged by a
talented group of players. Expect these
Jayhawks in this game; just too much
emotion for any team to come in and win
at Allen on Senior Night.

GAMEDAY
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 2B thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
SaLUtInG SEnIor StarS
travis releford
Jeff Withey
Elijah Johnson
Kevin young
At KAnsAs
YeArs: 2008-2013
At KAnsAs
YeArs: 2009-2013
At KAnsAs
YeArs: 2009-2013
At KAnsAs
YeArs: 2008-2013
tara Bryant/KanSan
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
tara Bryant/KanSan
aShLEIGh LEE/KanSan
K
evin Young will be remembered as one of the
most liked players on the Universitys campus
in recent memory. A member of the 2012 na-
tional championship title game team, Young made a
name for himself this year as the starting power for-
ward. Hes averaged 7.7 points and 6.9 rebounds while
helping Kansas as they move toward a ninth straight
conference title.
accoLadES
Kevin Young scored his 1,000th point as a Divi-
sion I player on Saturday.
He scored 342 points at Kansas and 658 points at
Loyola Marymount.
Played on the Puerto Rico U19 World Champi-
onship team in 2009.
Earned a spot on the Finish All-Star team at the
Reebok All-American camp in 2008.
He scored 11 points in the All-Star game.
His career high for points was against Temple on
Jan. 6 when he 16 points.
His career high for rebounds is 12 points against
Iowa State last Monday.
BEforE KanSaS
As a senior at Perris High in Perris, Calif., in 2008,
Young averaged 16.1 points, 10.8 rebounds and 3.7
blocks his senior season. His freshman year at Loyola
Marymount, he broke the school freshman record for
rebounds and rebounds per game. Afer a difcult
sophomore season, Young transferred to Barstow and
San Bernardino College before becoming a Jayhawk
in 2011.

dEfInInG MoMEnt
One of Youngs biggest contributions during his
Kansas career was Ohio State game on December 10,
2011. Taking advantage of an absent Jared Sullinger,
Young found an open matchup against the Buckeyes
and lofed up a season-high 14 points including a
couple 3-pointers that brought Kansas fans to their
feet. Young was not a big contributor to last seasons
team, but when they needed him to step up he did just
so several times throughout this season and the last.
Ryan McCarthy
E
lijah Johnson has crafed a reputation as a clutch
player for Kansas late in the year during the past
two seasons. In the Round of 32 in the 2012
NCAA Tournament against Purdue, Johnson gave
Kansas its frst lead of the game with a 3-pointer with
3:04 lef, and put Kansas up for good with a layup with
23 seconds lef. He converted a layup against North
Carolina State in the next round to put Kansas up
by three points with 13 seconds lef and secured the
Jayhawks spot in the Elite Eight. Despite struggling
ofensively during most of conference play this season,
Johnson scored a career-high 39 points, including 23
points in the fnal eight minutes of the game, to help
Kansas defeat Iowa State 108-96 in overtime.

accoLadES
Scored a career-high 39 points in an overtime vic-
tory at Iowa State last Monday,
helping Kansas overcome a fve-point defcit with 45
seconds lef in regulation.
Came to Kansas as the No. 24 recruit nationally
according to Rivals.com.
Was named frst-team all city, state and region
during his sophomore,
junior and senior seasons of high school.
Scored in double fgures in all eight of Kansas
postseason games last season.

BEforE KanSaS
Helped Cheyenne High School in Las Vegas fnish
21-3 in his senior season while averaging 15.9 points,
4.8 assists and 4 rebounds per game. Cheyenne fn-
ished as the Nevada state runner-up during his junior
season. Rivals.com, Scout.com and ESPNU all rated
Johnson as one of the nations top 30 prospects coming
out of high school.

dEfInInG MoMEnt
With Kansas trailing Iowa State 87-82 Feb. 25,
2013 at Iowa State, Johnson buried a 3-pointer with 29
seconds lef to close the margin to three points. Afer
two Iowa State free throws, he hit a second 3-pointer
and made the game-tying free throws on Kansas next
possession to send the game into overtime. He scored
12 of Kansas 18 points in overtime and fnished with
a career-high 39 points as Kansas defeated Iowa State
108-96 to remain tied for frst place in the Big 12.
Geoffrey Calvert
senior night
T
ravis Releford is one of the best, if not the best,
glue guy during Bill Self s tenure at Kansas. He
entered the starting lineup at the beginning of last
season and his defense was one of the key reasons Kansas
reached the national title game. Tis season he averages
12.2 points per game and leads the Big 12 conference
with 59 percent shooting from the feld. His improved
outside shooting has helped compensate when other
guards have struggled ofensively.

accoLadES
Scored a career-high 28 points at Oklahoma on
Jan. 7, 2012, a 72-61 victory
Started for USA Basketballs Mens U18 National
Team in the summer of 2008. He averaged 7.2 points
and 2.2 rebounds per game for the silver-medalists at
the 2008 FIBE Americas U18 Championship.
Joined Tyshawn Taylor and Tomas Robinson as
the only Jayhawks to score in every game for Kansas last
season.
Has fouled out only three times in his Kansas
career.

BEforE KanSaS
Releford attended Bishop Miege High School in
Roeland Park, Kan., where he averaged 24.1 points
and six rebounds per game as a senior. He earned high
school All-American honors twice. He was named the
Gatorade Kansas boys basketball player of the year in
2008 and was the Eastern Kansas League player of the
year in 2007 and 2008.

dEfInInG MoMEnt
In the ffh game of the season this year against Saint
Louis, Releford scored 21 points in the frst half, fnish-
ing with 23 points as senior center Jef Withey took over
the ofensive load in the second half. Relefords 23 points
are the second most in his career for a single game.
He made four of seven 3-pointers that day, helping to
establish his rhythm behind the arc that has continued
all season.
Geoffrey Calvert
J
ef Withey will go down as one of the best big
men to come through Kansas. Tats not easy in a
program that boasts a top front court every year
in college basketball. No other Jayhawk can claim to
equal Witheys transformation. He came to Kansas a
scrawny 7-footer that seemed afraid to touch the ball
and leaves as the Jayhawks all-time shot blocker. It was
once a struggle for Withey to get on the foor, now its
impossible to imagine him of it.

accoLadES:
Kansas All-Time Leading Shot Blocker (281 and
counting)
NCAA Tournament Record For Blocks In A Single
Tournament (31 in 2012)
2012 Big 12 Defensive Player of Te Year
Four-Time Big 12 Player Of the Week


BEforE KanSaS:
Afer averaging 20 points, 13 rebounds and seven
blocks per game his senior season at Horizon High
School in San Diego, Withey began his college career
at the University of Arizona, but not under the
regime he signed up for. When UA coach Lute Olsen
retired, Withey was already committed to play for the
Wildcats. Afer staying at Arizona for only one season,
Withey transferred to Kansas where Bill Self was able
to turn his career around.

dEfInInG MoMEnt:
Teres no question Withey was still a work in
progress during his junior year. He had only averaged
6.2 minutes per game before taking over the starting
role at center. But all doubt seemed to wash away when
Withey went to Manhattan and smacked around the
Wildcats. His 11 rebounds, nine blocks and 18 points
solidifed him as a force for the Jayhawks and his con-
fdence and playing ability was never again questioned.
Blake Schuster
Monday, March 4, 2013 the UnIVerSIty daILy KanSan PaGe 3B the UnIVerSIty daILy KanSan
MenS BaSKetBaLL rewInd
Kansas 91, West Vi rgi ni a 65
Key stats
the last season Kansas scored 90 or more points in
two-consectuive Big 12 games.
08-09
the number of assits Kansas had against West
Virginia. the most since a win against towson on
nov. 11, 2011.
the number of games Ben McLemore has scored
more than 20 points this year. six of the eight have
been inside allen Fleldhouse.
29
9
JayhawK stat Leaders
Points rebounds assists
JohnSon
10
McLeMore
36
wIthey
10
i love this kid, man and i never tell him. i think
he knows, but ive learned a lot from him. i could
honestly say ive learned a lot from him.
senior guard elijah Johnson on
freshman guard Ben McLemore
45| 46 91
Kansas
31 | 34 65
west Virgina
Quote of the gaMe
Johnson
west Virginia
Kansas
Player
Deniz Kilicli
Kevin noreen
Juwan staten
eron Harris
Matt Humphrey
Dominique rutledge
Jabarie Hinds
aaron Brown
totals
Pts
7
2
3
11
3
17
0
0
65
FG-FGa
3-5
1-4
1-4
4-17
1-3
4-10
0-5
0-1
22-67
rebs
5
5
3
5
0
13
2
0
41
a
4
1
7
1
0
0
0
0
13
tos
5
2
1
0
1
3
2
0
15
Player
Kevin Young
Jeff Withey
elijah Johnson
Ben McLemore
travis releford
naadir tharpe
rio adams
evan Manning
totals
Pts
6
14
12
36
6
8
2
3
91
FG-FGa
3-4
7-8
4-8
12-15
2-8
3-5
1-2
1-2
34-60
rebs
2
10
5
7
0
0
0
0
36
a
4
0
10
4
2
6
0
0
29
tos
1
0
4
2
2
0
0
0
11
It was one of those games where,
at some point, all the baskets just
start to look the same.
Freshman guard Ben McLemore,
who is already squared up to the
basket, receives the ball some-
where behind the 3-point line.
Nominally, McLemore shoots the
ball, but really he creates art with
that smooth jump shot. Allen
Fieldhouse is just his canvas.
He did a good job reading
screens today, but we also did
a good job screening for him,
coach Bill Self said. We ran some
stuff to make sure to get Ben
the first opportunity to get some
looks and we need to probably do
more of that. Weve done it, but
hes starting to understand more
how to free himself.
McLemore broke Danny
Mannings freshman single-game
school record of 35 points, besting
the Jayhawk legend with a jumper
with 5:37 left that gave him 36
points in Kansas 91-65 victory
over West Virginia Saturday. He
became the first Jayhawk fresh-
man to score 30 points three times
in a season.
Elijah just kept feeding me and
I made open shots, McLemore
said. Johnson did most of the
feeding Saturday, finishing with
10 assists to complement his 12
points.
On Thursday, coach Bill Self
said one of the things he likes
about this Kansas team is how
unselfish it is. The seniors are
more than happy to let McLemore
get his points because hes the
Jayhawks most skilled player.
After the game, Johnson rein-
forced Self s point.
I personally think that Ben is
probably the person who deserves
to do that out of anybody I ever
played with, Johnson said. You
would think that he was the worst
player in the gym the way he
approaches it every day.
Unlike the last time the Kansas
freshman scoring record was bro-
ken, Self got to enjoy this one.
Manning scored 35 points in
1985 in an 88-79 victory over an
Oklahoma State team that fea-
tured Self, a senior at the time.
Coincidentally, both Manning
and McLemores freshman records
came on March 2.
I played the backline of the
2-3 zone, Self said. I think he
got like 20 on me, but not all 35.
McLemore finished with 19
points in the first half. Seven
of those points came from free
throws. His half was visually quiet
until a tomahawk dunk along the
baseline with a minute left in the
first half. The dunk was almost
identical to the one he had the
previous Saturday against TCU.
No one could accuse him of a
quiet second half, however. He
shot 7-8 from the field and 3-3
from behind the arc in the final
half. For the game, McLemore
shot 12-15 and 5-6 from 3-point
range to improve Kansas record
to 25-4 and 13-3 in the Big 12.
Im sure you guys thought he
looked a lot more aggressive, but
he still only took 15 shots, Self
said. Thats as efficient as Ive
seen a guard be.
But McLemore wasnt the only
Jayhawk to put on an offensive
show. Kansas wore down West
Virginia on the fast break, where
they outscored the Mountaineers
18-4. Kansas finished with six
alley-oops, three of them in tran-
sition.
Perhaps the most memorable
one came long after the game had
already been decided. Sophomore
point guard Naadir Tharpe found
Johnson in transition, and he pun-
ished the rim with a one-handed
dunk while getting fouled. Once
he landed on the ground, Johnson
flexed his muscles.
I didnt even realize I did it,
Johnson said. Thats just how I
felt at the time. It dawned on me
like that was too strong.
edited by tara Bryant
unselfsh play allows McLemore to break record
GeoFFrey caLVert
gcalvert@kansan.com
tara Bryant/KanSan
Freshman guard Ben McLemore is fouled as he drives to the basket against West Virginia on saturday in allen Fieldhouse. the
Jayhawks defeated the Mountaineers 91-65. McLemore was 7-9 on free throw attempts and scored a record-setting 36 points.
aShLeIGh Lee/KanSan
senior guard elijah Johnson demonstrates that hes too strong after an alley-oop
in saturdays game against West Virginia. Johnson scored 12 points and had 10
assists in the 91-65 win.
After three dominating per-
formances to start the weekend,
the Kansas softball team split
their final two games to finish
the weekend 4-1 in the Wolfpack
Challenge.
The Jayhawks hit a stride on
the first three games of the tour-
nament. The Jayhawks had every-
thing working for them as they
notched a 17-0 victory against
North Carolina A&T, a 12-0 vic-
tory against
Stony Brook and
a 20-0 victory
against Lafayette.
The offense was
explosive and
the pitching was
solid throughout
the first three
games of the
tournament.
Maggie Hulls second grand
slam of the season and freshman
Kelsey Kesslers career high 11
strikeouts was the story against
North Carolina A&T. The 17
runs were the most by a Kansas
team since a 2011 17-7 win over
Bethune-Cookman. All but one
of the Jayhawks starters recorded
a hit in the game. Junior Ashley
Newman and freshman Alex Hugo
both recorded three hit games,
while Hugo blasted her fifth home
run of the season. Kessler was
dominant in the circle with 11
strikeouts while only allowing one
hit en route to her first career
shutout.
The Jayhawks kept the domi-
nant pitching and hot bats going
against Stony Brook in their
second game on Friday. For the
second time the Kansas pitching
staff came just one single shy of
throwing a no hitter. Sophomore
Alicia Pille tossed her 10th career
shutout while the offense was still
potent, leading to a 12-0 victory.
I thought we were phenomenal
today, said coach Megan Smith.
Both pitchers did extremely well
and controlled the game from the
beginning to the end, and our
offense put on a display today. It
was fun to watch.
Pille tossed a season high 10
strikeouts while allowing no walks
and carried a no-hitter into the
fifth inning. The Jayhawks pos-
sess the capability to have huge
innings, and thats exactly what
they had in an eight-run second
inning. Alex Hugo belted her sec-
ond homerun of the day and sixth
of the season, and senior Maggie
Hull went 3-for-4 and collect-
ed two RBIs. That brings Hulls
career total to 124 RBIs, which is
11 shy of the current record.
The hot bats carried over to
the first game on
Saturday. Senior
right fielder Rosie
Hull crushed two
home runs and
grabbed four
RBIs en route to
a school record
of 20 runs for
the Jayhawks.
Alex Hugo went
3-for-3 while hitting her third
homerun in as many games to give
her a team-leading seven home
runs on the season. Sophomore
catcher Maddie Stein got into the
power hitting swing by knocking
her first home run of the season,
giving KU five home runs for
the game. The pitching was still
solid as the Jayhawks received
a combined shutout from Alex
Jones and Morgan Druhan. Jones
pitched the first two innings and
Druhan came in and completed
the shutout.
The Jayhawks played North
Carolina State on Saturday eve-
ning, the teams third meeting of
the season. Four home runs by
the Wolfpack gave NC State the
advantage and a 5-2 victory over
Kansas.
The first three games we played
extremely well in every aspect and
we came up against NC State on
Saturday night, a really good team
with a really good pitcher and we
battled them, Smith said. Even
though it was a 5-2 game, it was
close, and we also left 14 runners
on base.
Although five Kansas players
had two hits in the game, the
14 runners left on base hurt the
Jayhawks in their attempt to come
back from a 5-0 deficit through
four innings.
Junior second baseman Ashley
Newman and senior Mariah
Montgomery drove in the only
runs for Kansas and Pille gave
four hits over three innings, with
three of them being home runs.
Kansas scored a run in the fifth
and seventh innings, but were
unable to match the home runs
by NC State.
After losing a tough game to
NC State, the Jayhawks rebounded
on Sunday morning and defeated
Stony Brook 7-1 in the teams sec-
ond meeting of the weekend.
Pille was sensational on the hill
for Kansas, striking out a season-
high 12 batters and giving up only
one earned run over a complete
game. The only earned run given
up by Pille came in the top of
the fourth when she gave up a
solo homerun to Shayla Giosia of
Stony Brook.
Maggie Hull and Stein led the
way offensively with two RBIs
apiece and Pilles performance
prevented Stony Brook from gain-
ing any offensive momentum.
Smith said that the Wolfpack
Challenge was a success for her
team.
Obviously we are disappointed
because we werent able to defeat
NC State, but it was a successful
weekend because we dominated
all the other opponents and we
were extremely competitive in the
NC State game, Smith said. I saw
a lot of improvement from the
team this weekend and I hope to
see that as the season continues.
Kansas travels to Boca Raton,
Fla., next weekend for the Florida
Atlantic Tournament where
they will play against Eastern
Michigan, Michigan State, Ball
State, Louisiana-Monroe and
Florida Atlantic.
Edited by Julie Etzler
Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 4B thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
Kansas mens golf coach Jamie
Bermel only had a few things to
be happy about after his teams
12th-place finish at the Wyoming
Desert Intercollegiate last week,
and sophomore transfer Stan
Gautier who recorded his best
performance of the 2012-2013
season was one of them.
Im real happy for Stan from
last week; he played good, Bermel
said. Chris Gilbert played well,
and we were just hit and miss with
the last three.
Gautier led the Jayhawks with
a top-16 finish and a two over
score for the tournament. Gautier
shot below his season average in
each of the tournaments rounds, a
result of offseason training.
A big part of his performance
is what he did in the weight room,
Bermel said. He is a little stronger
than he was in the fall. He hits the
ball eight to 10 yards farther. His
consistency is a little better, and I
think his frame of mind is much
better.
Gautier didnt exceed Bermels
expectations last fall, but Gautier
is on track to do so this spring.
He didnt have too many good
finishes last fall, Bermel said.
It was OK, but nothing like he
finished in Palm Desert. So Im
thinking hell build on that and
give himself more confidence. It
just seems like he has a lot more
confidence in his game, and I
think itll carry over into the tour-
nament as well.
Gautier and the Jayhawks get
their second crack at the 2013
schedule today in Lafayette, La., at
the Louisiana Classics Invitational.
Bermel has changed the lineup
again for this week, replacing last
weeks tournament participants,
juniors Bryce Brown and Ryley
Haas, with senior Alex Gutesha
and sophomore Dylan McClure.
Gautier, senior Chris Gilbert and
freshman Jackson Foth will round
out the Kansas five.
The Jayhawks will be one of 14
tournament participants, four of
which are ranked in the Golfweek
Top 50.
I like playing against as many
different teams as we can, Bermel
said. It helps you see how you
stack up against all the teams and
not just a certain area of teams in
the country.
Kansas arrived in Lafayette on
Saturday to begin preparation for
Monday and Tuesdays 54-hole
event at Oakbourne Country Club.
The courses bermuda grass is an
uncommon playing surface for the
Jayhawks, but Bermel thinks the
early arrival will help.
We are actually playing a little
Saturday and a practice round on
Sunday, and I think thatll help
us get used to the grass that we
dont typically putt on very often,
Bermel said. The more you play
it, the more you get to know the
nuances and the breaks.
The Jayhawks will begin with 36
holes on Monday.
Edited by Allison Hammond
The Kansas 400-yard relay
team earned second place to
lead the Jayhawks on the last
day of the Big 12 Swimming
and Diving Championship.
The team, which consists of
seniors Brooke Brull and Sveta
Golovchun, junior Morgan
Sharp and freshman Haley
Molden, shaved more than six
seconds off its time from the
preliminaries to earn 34 points.
Kansas freshman Chelsie
Miller was also named Big 12
Newcomer of the Year after the
meet. In addition to Fridays sec-
ond place finish in the 400-yard
individual medley, she placed
fourth in Saturdays 1650-yard
freestyle and 200-yard butterfly
events.
Chelsie pulled off an amazing
double, finishing fourth in the
1,650-yard freestyle and then 45
minutes later hopping up on the
blocks and having a season-best
time in and finishing fourth in
the 200-yard butterfly, Kansas
coach Clark Campbell said in a
news release. She really showed
the conference how tough of an
athlete she is.
This effort from the relay
team, combined with the 10
other top-eight finishes from
the team, helped Kansas climb
from last place into fourth place.
Texas won with 1051 points,
West Virginia finished in sec-
ond with 576 points and TCU
finished third with 574 points,
while Kansas finished fourth
with 540.5 points. Iowa State fell
to last place with 486.5 points.
Texas once again took home
most of the first place hon-
ors, winning five out of seven
events. West Virginia senior
Rachael Burnett won her third
freestyle race in as many days,
with this one coming in the
1650-yard freestyle event. West
Virginia senior Mandie Nugent
earned a first-place finish in the
200-yard butterfly. This event
was an anomaly though, as the
top-finish in the race for Texas
was 13th.
Kansas had a strong perfor-
mance in the 1650-yard freestyle
with three swimmers placing in
the top eight. Miller led the
charge with a fourth place finish
and a time of 16 minutes, 26.33
seconds. Junior Alison Moffit
finished in seventh place with
a time of 16 minutes, 38.83 sec-
onds. Senior teammate Rebecca
Swank finished in eighth place
with a 16 minute, 53.15 second
time.
The members of the 400-yard
freestyle relay team produced
strong individual performances
as well. Brull took home sev-
enth place in the 200-yard back-
stroke. In the 100-yard free-
style, Golovchun placed sixth,
Molden placed in ninth and
Sharp finished in 11th place.
Other strong swimming per-
formances for the Jayhawks
came in the 200-yard breast-
stroke. Junior Alison Lusk
placed sixth and freshman Bryce
Hinde was seventh. In the 200-
yard butterfly, Miller finished
in fourth place and sophomore
Deanna Marks finished behind
her in fifth.
On the boards, senior Christy
Cash earned a career-high
242.85 points in the platform
event to earn a fourth place
finish. Texas divers once again
placed first, second and third.
The final day of competition
meant eight collegiate careers
are coming to an end. The sea-
son concluded with the team
matching its fourth-place finish
from last year, and regaining
ground from an early disquali-
fication on the first day.
We were better than we ever
have been and we finished on a
very high note, Campbell said
in a news release. I am so
proud of the team and how
resilient they were at bouncing
back from the first day disqual-
ification. We definitely built
momentum and finished on a
really high note.
Edited by Morgan Said
StELLa LIanG
sliang@kansan.com
mens golf
Kansas golfer has best play
of season in Wyoming tourney
Kansas earns 4-1 record in
weekend Wolfpack Challenge
softball
sWimming and diving
Relay places second at
Big 12 Championship
chrIS hyBL
chybl@kansan.com
EMILy WIttLEr/KanSan
Junior alison mofft, swims at a feb. 2 meet against arkansas. mofft fnished seventh place in the 1650-yard freestyle at the
big 12 swimming and diving Championships on friday.
chrIS ScaEdEr
cschaeder@kansan.com
JoE daUGhErty
jdaugherty@kansan.com

i thought we were phe-


nomenal today. both pitch-
ers did extremely well and
controlled the game...
megan smith
Kansas coach
Follow
@UDK_Sports
on Twitter
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The deadline for applications is Monday, March 11, 2013.
Visit our website at
www.hallcenter.ku.edu/grants/undergrad_support
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Jaye Crockett, forward
Despite not
starting, Crock-
ett leads the Red
Raiders with 12
points and 6.8 re-
bounds per game.
Despite only scor-
ing four points
Saturday against
TCU, Crockett has
scored in double fgures in four of Texas
Techs past fve games. He is one of three
rotation players to shoot more than 50
percent from the feld for the season.
PAGE 5B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN MoNDAY, MARch 4, 2013
tExAS tEch
(10-17, 3-13)
StARtERS
DUSTY HANNAHS, GUARD
Of all the Red Raiders who play signifcant min-
utes, Hannahs leads the team by shooting 81 per-
cent from the free throw line. He is also Texas Techs
best 3-point shooter, having made 40 of 106 at-
tempts for a 38 percent mark. He struggled against
TCU on Saturday, contributing only fve points and
three turnovers.

JOSH GRAY, GUARD


Gray was one of three players to score in double
fgures against the Horned Frogs on Saturday, fn-
ishing with 11 points. Hes also the Red Raiders
best ball distributor, as he averages 3.3 assists per
game. His 90 assists are 40 more than anyone else
on the team has.

JAMAL WILLIAMS, JR., GUARD


Although hes a regular starter, Williams hasnt
played more than 16 minutes in any of the past
three games, and he has scored eight points and
grabbed fve rebounds in that span. Against Kan-
sas State last Monday, Williams started but played
only four minutes, contributing zero points and zero
rebounds.

JORDAN TOLBERT, FORWARD


Tolbert led Texas Tech with a game-high 22 points
Saturday against TCU, shooting 9-10. He shoots 54
percent from the feld and averages 9.4 points for
the Red Raiders. He is the teams second-best re-
bounder and has grabbed 60 offensive rebounds
this season.

DEJAN KRAVIC, FORWARD


Kravic contributed 16 points on Saturday against
TCU, hitting seven of his 11 shots. He also grabbed
11 rebounds, the only player from either team in
double fgures in that category. He shoots 52 per-
cent from the feld but only 57 percent from the free
throw line.

KANSAS
(25-4, 16-1)
StARtERS
BEN MCLEMORE, GUARD
What hasnt been written about Ben McLemore?
That line has been used by a lot of people lately,
and its starting to become true. The freshman from
St. Louis continues to be the most talented player
on campus since Paul Pierce, and he might be bet-
ter. Hes unselfsh, gifted and cares about this pro-
gram. He wants to be remembered as someone who
made an impact helped not only himself, but also
his teammate make a memory that will rest in the
rafters for years to come.


TRAVIS RELEFORD, GUARD
Releford continues to be this years version of Nick
Collison. Maybe not putting up the same numbers,
but as far as consistent effort every single game
,there is no one better. Hes the best defender. Hes
great in transition. More importantly, hes an unself-
ish teammate who will do whats best for the pro-
gram. Thats what hes done his whole career, and
thats why it will pay off for him in the long run when
the NBA Draft comes calling in June.

ELIJAH JOHNSON, GUARD


Johnson had another fantastic performance
against West Virginia on Saturday going for 12 points
and 10 assists, but also putting down a one-handed
dunk that brought his second Too Strong moment
of the week. Johnson is playing with supreme conf-
dence at the moment, and it does not look like he will
be stopping anytime soon. Hes a player who drives
the engine of this team. Dont look for that to change
anytime soon.

KEVIN YOUNG, FORWARD


One of the best glue guys in recent Kansas memo-
ry, Young is another fan favorite not just for his Afro,
but also for his love for the game. Theres not another
player on the roster who appreciates the history and
tradition of this program more than him. Hes also
grateful for the opportunity Kurtis Townsend gave
him two years ago. Hes taken advantage of it and
now has a promising future in whatever he decides
to do after this season.

JEFF WITHEY, CENTER


Withey was robbed of a triple-double on Saturday,
so expect him to create another major moment for his
senior night. The native of San Diego, Calif., Withey
continues to show why his candidacy for First Team
All-American is completely legitimate. Withey is a
player who came into Kansas after a diffcult time at
Arizona, but he will leave as one of the best Kansas
centers in the last 10 years. Lets hope the students
enjoy waving the W for the last time at home.

tExAS tEch
tIPoff
No. 6 KANSAS VS. tExAS tEch
6 P.M., ALLEN fILEDhoUSE, LAwRENcE
KANSAS
tIPoff
A (Senior) Night to remember
Jayhawks to face Red Raiders in last home game
coUNtDowN to tIPoff
GAME
DAY
McLemore
PREDIctIoN:
Kansas 83, texas tech 65
At A GLANcE
QUEStIoN MARK
PLAYER to wAtch
crockett
With its 72-63 victory against TCU on
Saturday, Texas Tech broke a nine-game
losing streak and a skid where it lost
13 of its last 14 games. Junior forward
Jaye Crockett leads the Red Raiders in
scoring at 12 points per game, even
though he comes off the bench. No other
player averages in double fgures scor-
ing for Texas Tech. The Red Raiders have
secured the ninth seed for the Big 12
Tournament
Can the Red Raiders take
care of the ball?
Kansas struggled to take care of the
ball for the early part of conference play,
but the exception came at Texas Tech in
early January. Kansas committed only
nine turnovers while coercing the Red
Raiders into 16 turnovers. The Jayhawks
outscored Texas Tech 12-4 on the fast
break that game. If the Red Raiders
want to at least hang around in Allen
Fieldhouse, it cant concede transition
baskets.
At A GLANcE
PLAYER to wAtch
QUEStIoN MARK
Kansas welcomes the Texas Tech Red
Raiders to town who are 10-17 overall
and 3-13 in Big 12 play. Kansas won the
frst matchup in Lubbock with a score of
60-46. Kansas had four players score
in double fgures, led by senior forward
Kevin Young with 14 points. Kansas
leads the overall series record with a
23-4 record.
Travis Releford, Guard
Its hard to
pick one player
to watch on a
night like Senior
Night, but it feels
appropriate to
choose the local
guy from Kansas
City, Mo. Rel-
eford has put in
an immense amount of work and effort
to get where he is now. He will savor this
moment, but will remember that theres
much more for this team to accomplish
before everything is said and done.
What are you expecting from
the Senior Night speeches?
Like every senior night, no one actu-
ally knows, none of the players are big
speakers, but expect some thoughtful
words and, of course, some tears. Its a
special senior night with all four players
spending the majority of their season as
starters, which is not always the case.
It will be a memorable moment for any
Kansas fan thats been following the
players closely the last four years.
Releford
Releford
Johnson
Young
withey
hannahs
Gray
williams
tolbert
Kravic
BABY JAY WILL WEEp IF...
Senior Night emotions affect the Jay-
hawks. Kansas has played some of its
best basketball of the year during its
current six-game winning streak. Texas
Techs best opportunity to win the game,
or at least make it a closer game than
Kansas wanted, is to hope that the Kan-
sas seniors will be distracted by the fact
they are playing their last home game.
BIG JAY WILL CHEER IF...
Kansas keeps doing what they do.
The Jayhawks are in a serious rhythm
right now, expect them to continue to be
that way until they are challenged by a
talented group of players. Expect these
Jayhawks in this game; just too much
emotion for any team to come in and win
at Allen on Senior Night.

Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 8B thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
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PAGE 9b thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN moNDAY, mARch 4, 2013
!
?
Q: How many quarterbacks have
started for the Chiefs since 2007?

A: 7

nf.com
tRIVIA of thE DAY

Its about winning. Alex is a guy whos


been there and has what it takes. Alex
can beat you a lot of different ways.
Hes a lot more athletic than people
give him credit for.
Chiefs offensive tackle Eric
Winston, USA TODAY
Alex Smith was the No. 1 player
selected in the 2005 NFL Draft.
nf.com
fAct of thE DAY
thE moRNING bREW
QUotE of thE DAY
This week in athletics
Monday Tuesday Friday Thursday Saturday Wednesday Sunday
Chiefs acquire quarterback from San Francisco
W
hen Jay Glazer of FOX Sports
announced last week that
the Kansas City Chiefs and
San Francisco 49ers agreed to send Alex
Smith to Kansas City in a deal that will be
official on March 12, the Chiefs became
the center of attention in the NFL.
Its no secret that the Chiefs were des-
perate for a quarterback. General man-
ager John Dorsey came away with Smith
in a trade in which the Chiefs will send
a 2013 second-round pick and another
pick in the 2014 draft. But some football
fans in Kansas City arent sold and think
Dorsey gave up too much for Smith.
Smiths first four seasons in the league
dont even come close to his last four
seasons. Smith improved in 2009 and
flourished in 2011 and 2012 under Jim
Harbaugh. His performance in 2011
played a part in helping the 49ers reach
the NFC Championship that season.
Unlike the trade for Matt Cassel in
2009, the Chiefs traded for Smith based
off his success from the past four years.
Cassel was brought for having just one
good year with the New England Patriots
and a connection with the general
manager at the time.
In Smiths last two seasons with the
49ers, he threw 30 touchdowns and com-
mitted only 13 turnovers in 25 starts.
With Smith under center, the Chiefs have
a chance to be one of the top offenses in
the league in 2013.
Smith will work with running back
Jamaal Charles, who led the AFC in rush-
ing yards last season. If the Chiefs re-sign
Dwayne Bowe, he could go back to his
2010 form if he can establish a strong
rapport with Smith on the field.
Along with Charles and Bowe as top
offensive weapons, Smith has tight end
Tony Moeaki and wide receiver Dexter
McCluster in his arsenal of offensive
weaponry. And with Kansas City owning
the No. 1 pick in the draft, it is likely that
Texas A&M offensive tackle Luke Joeckel
will defend Smiths blind side.
To top off all the great things Smith
has in Kansas City, Andy Reid will be
his head coach. Although Reid never
won a Super Bowl with Philadelphia, hes
compiled an impressive 140-102-1 record
since 1999, including postseason games.
The Chiefs front office thought it
wasnt worth the risk to take a quarter-
back in the draft, because of the lack of
talent. But they see a lot of promise in
Smith, who will be 29 when the season
begins, and think he can help turn the
Chiefs around.
Despite winning only two games, the
Chiefs have a lot of pieces in place. The
biggest piece missing from the puzzle was
a quarterback. Smith will take advantage
of the talent surrounding him in Kansas
City, where the Chiefs will go from being
the worst team in the league to one of the
most exciting teams to watch in 2013.
Chiefs fans may not be excited now,
but when football season is underway,
Dorsey will be praised for pulling the
trigger and trading for Smith.
Edited by Elise Reuter
Mens Basketball
Texas Tech
6 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Mens Golf
LA Classics Invita-
tional
All Day
Lafayette, La.
Women's basketball
TCU
7 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
men's Golf
LA Classics Invitational
All Day
Lafayette, La.
No events
scheduled.
baseball
Niagara
3 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Softball
Eastern Michigan
12 p.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.
baseball
Niagara
3 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Womens tennis
Oklahoma
5 p.m.
Norman, Okla.
Softball
Michigan State
5 p.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.
track
NCAA Indoor Championships
TBA
Fayetteville, Ark.
Womens basketball
Big 12 Championship
TBA
Dallas, Texas
Womens Golf
Notre Dame Clover Cup
All Day
Mesa, Ariz.
Womens Rowing
Oklahoma Invite
All Day
Oklahoma City, Okla.
baseball
Niagara
1 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Softball
Ball State
3 p.m.
Boca Raton, Fla.
mens basketball
Baylor
5 p.m.
Waco, Texas
Softball
Florida Atlantic University
5 p.m.
Boca Rota, Fla.
Womens Golf
Notre Dame Clover Cup
All Day
Mesa, Ariz.
Womens Rowing
Oklahoma Invite
All Day
Oklahoma City, Okla.
track
NCAA Indoor Championships
TBA
Fayetteville, Ark.
Womens basketball
Big 12 Championship
TBA
Dallas, Texas
Softball
Louisiana-Monroe
8 a.m.
Boca Rota, Fla.
Womens tennis
Oklahoma State
12 p.m.
Stillwater, Okla.
baseball
Niagara
12 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Womens Rowing
Oklahoma Invite
All Day
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Womens Golf
Notre Dame Clover Cup
All Day
Mesa, Ariz.
Womens basketball
Big 12 Championship
TBA
Dallas, Texas
By Farzin Vousoughian
fvousoughian@kansan.com
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Monday, March 4, 2013 PaGE 10B thE UnIVErSIty daILy KanSan
pga mlb
Michael Thompson
wins frst PGA Tour
Royals undefeated in spring training
aSSocIatEd PrESS
aSSocIatEd PrESS
aSSocIatEd PrESS
Kansas City Royals third baseman mike moustakas throws during baseball spring training Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, in Surprise, ariz.
PALM BEACH GARDENS,
Fla. Michael Thompsons
dream of winning his first PGA
Tour event was walking up the
final fairway with a big lead and
very little stress.
The reality was much different
Sunday in the Honda Classic.
He had a one-shot lead as he
stood in the 18th fairway, some
240 yards from the flag with trou-
ble in the way in the shape of
large lake. The motto from his
golf team at Alabama was to fin-
ish strong, and Thompson did
just that.
Instead of laying up, he drilled a
5-wood into the bunker left of the
green, setting up a simple sand
shot and a birdie he didnt even
need. He closed with a 1-under
69, one of only five rounds under
par on a punishing day at PGA
National to finally become a PGA
Tour winner.
That for me kind of sealed the
deal, Thompson said. It allowed
me to walk up the fairway and
enjoy the experience, see the
crowd and ... just finish strong.
The start wasnt bad, either.
Thompson holed a 50-foot
eagle putt on the third hole, relied
on a superb short game around
the toughest part of the golf
course to build a four-shot lead,
and hung on for a two-shot win
over Geoff Ogilvy that takes him
places he always wanted to be.
He gets into his first World
Golf Championship next week at
Doral, and qualifies for two more
WGCs this year at Firestone and
in Shanghai. Hes in the PGA
Championship, gets to start next
year in Hawaii and earned a
two-year exemption on the PGA
Tour.
And to think just two weeks
ago he was so down after a 78-80
performance at Riviera that he
wondered if he would ever make
another cut.
This week was magical,
Thompson said. Just had a
groove and kept feeling it.
It turned out to be a big week
for Ogilvy, too.
The former U.S. Open cham-
pion missed his past four cuts and
had plunged to No. 79 in the world
ranking. He already missed the
Match Play Championship and
was ready to miss another WGC
next week at Doral until putting
together four solid rounds.
He chipped in for birdie behind
the 16th green and two-putted for
birdie on the 18th for a 69 to fin-
ish alone in second, moving him
up to No. 47 to get into Doral.
I kind of penciled in a week
off, Ogilvy said. So its nice, and
it gets me back in the mix for the
Masters.
Ogilvy has to stay in the top 50
by the end of the month to return
to Augusta National. For now, he
has smaller problems he only
packed enough for this week.
Im going to have to go do
some laundry, Ogilvy said.
I havent got a hotel room for
tonight. But half the tour lives in
this area, so Im sure I can find
somewhere to stay.
Luke Guthrie, tied with
Thompson for the 54-hole lead,
fell behind with a bogey on the
second hole and closed with a 73
to finish third.
Tiger Woods was never in the
picture. He started the final round
eight shots behind, and whatever
hopes he had of a rally ended on
the sixth hole when he hit his
drive so far to the right that the
ball was never found.
Woods took double bogey, and
only an eagle on the final hole
kept the damage to a minimum.
He closed with a 74 his first
time since the Masters last year
that he failed to break par in any
round of a 72-hole tournament
and tied for 37th.
It was the second straight year
Woods closed with an eagle at
PGA National the difference
was last year, it gave him a 62 and
a tie for second.
I think I passed 62 somewhere
around 12, Woods said.
Despite a bogey on the final
hole, Erik Compton had a 70 and
was part of the five-way tie for
fourth. Compton, who already
has had two heart transplants,
earned his first top-10 finish on
the PGA Tour.
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Alex
Gordon insists his swing still needs
refining even though his spring
training statistics indicate it is just
fine.
Gordon homered, Mike
Moustakas stroked two doubles
to raise his average to .579 and
the Kansas City Royals beat the
Cincinnati Reds 8-1 Sunday to
remain undefeated in 10 spring
training games.
Gordon is hitting .500, but the
home run to right-center off Tony
Cingrani was his first extra-base
hit.
I was taking a lot of pitch-
es early on, Gordon said. I just
decided if I get a first pitch fastball
I was going to go after it, and I put
a pretty good swing on it. It feels
good to get a good swing.
I really havent been swinging it
too well even though my numbers
might show it, but I really havent
felt that good, Gordon added.
That definitely felt better to have
a result like that.
Gordon, who has won back-to-
back Gold Gloves, led the majors
with 51 doubles last season.
Results do matter, but every
spring training stats are always a
little bit higher than they should
be, Gordon said. So its just about
feeling good and feeling comfort-
able and thats where Im trying
to get. Im not there yet. We still
have a month left, so Ill just keep
going at it.
The Royals improved to 9-0-1,
the only undefeated team in the
majors this spring.
Thats pretty impressive,
Gordon said. We might as well go
out and try to win a game and thats
what were doing. Hopefully we can
continue it and carry that over.
Moustakas doubled in the fourth
and scored on Max Ramirezs sin-
gle. Gordon led off the fifth with a
single, stole second and scored on
Moustakas one-out double.
Royals right-hander Wade Davis
pitched three scoreless innings,
allowing two hits and striking out
three. He has pitched five scoreless
innings in winning his first two
starts.
Im throwing my changeup
more, Davis said. I probably
threw 10 today and I had a cou-
ple of ground balls and some bad
swings on it. Thats a good thing.
Im definitely encouraged by that.
The Royals got three consecutive
pinch-hit singles from Christian
Colon, Xavier Nady and Brandon
Wood in a four-run sixth.
Reds starter right-hander Homer
Bailey allowed one single in two
scoreless innings, logging five of
his six outs by strikeout.
It could be six out of six. Bailey
said and laughed. Strikeouts kind
of come and go. I dont worry about
those too much. I like outs. I still
try to strike everybody out. If they
happen to put it in play in the first
couple of pitches, I dont quite get
there.
Id like to have a few first pitch
strikes, a couple of them missed by
a little bit, Bailey said. But I guess
overall, pretty good. Other than
that once we got into the at-bat, it
came back. I pitched well.