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Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis Annotated Bibliography

Primary Resources:

1. Adolf Hitler. Adolf Hitler Biography, Biography Online. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This is a photograph of Adolf Hitler. Hitler was dictator of Germany and in often accused for starting WWII. Hitler joined forces with Mussolini of Italy and Tojo of Japan to try and gain power. We are able to use this photo under the WWII section of our project. 2. BBC. Explosion. BBC News. Wish list for a nuclear world. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of a nuclear explosion. It shows one of the many test explosions that occurred before the final bombs were created. It shows the viewer what the nuclear explosion looked like. 3. Benito Mussolini. Cory Morgan. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of Benito Mussolini. Mussolini was the leader of the Italian forces and was allies with Hitler and Tojo. We can use this in the WWII portion of our site, because it explains the forces during the war. 4. Cowan, George. Interview by Cynthia Kelly. Personal interview. 7 Oct. 2006. This interview provides insight on the importance of the Chicago Met Lab. George Cowan worked with Enrico Fermi to help accomplish creating an atomic reactor. In the interview he stresses how Chicago played a big role in the atomic bomb creation. We can use this in the Benefits section of our site. 5. Einstein's Letter to Roosevelt. Einstein to Roosevelt, Dannen. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This is a picture of a letter that Einstein wrote to Roosevelt. The letter stresses the importance of creating a weapon before enemy forces did. It gives evidence towards The Secret Project portion of our site.

6. End of War Kiss. New York. Target of Ecstatic Times Square Kiss Still adorable After All These Years. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This photograph captures a kiss that occurred right after WWII ended between a sailor and a nurse. It shows how ecstatic the US was after the victory of WWII.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis

7. Enrico Fermi. Argonne National Laboratory, Enrico Fermi. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. In the picture, it shows Enrico Fermi teaching in the front of a classroom. Enrico Fermi led a team of scientist at the MET Lab located at the University of Chicago. We can use this to show the scientists who were involved in the Manhattan Project. 8. Enrico Fermi. Enrico Fermi. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of Enrico Fermi who was the lead scientist at the MET Lab in Chicago. This Lab was the first to create an atomic bomb reactor. Fermi played a leading role in the Manhattan Project. 9. Enrico Fermi. Nobel Prize, Enrico Fermi. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This picture is of Enrico Fermi who won a Nobel Peace prize for his work with Physics; many scientists around the world looked up to him. 10. Enrico Fermi. Enrico Fermi, Nuclear Physicist. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This picture shows Fermi who was a specialized in the field of Physicist. His education helped him to create the first atomic bomb reactor which later led the first atomic bomb. 11. Enrico Fermi. Nobel Peace Prize, The Nobel Prize in Physics 1938 Enrico Fermi. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This is another picture of Fermi who was a worldwide physicist. He worked with Albert Einstein and others to split the atom. 12. Enrico Fermi Letter. The Manhattan Project, Science and the Arts. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This is a government document written by Enrico Fermi. Fermi describes what he saw and felt at an atomic bomb test explosion. We are using this to describe the atomic bomb itself. 13. Fermi Teaching. Enrico Fermi . Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This photograph shows Enrico Fermi teaching. He wrote many papers and gave lectures on different branches of physics. 14. Franklin Roosevelt. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Biography. Web. 10 Mar. 2013.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis

This is a picture of Franklin Roosevelt. Roosevelt was president during the Great Depression and WWII. We can use this photo under the WWII section of our project. 15. Fromm, James. Fourth Anniversary Reunion . 1946. The Story of the Atomic Bomb, U of C, Chicago Illinois. Harnessing of Nuclear Fission . Web. 13 Jan. 2003. This photo was taken on the fourth anniversary of successfully creating a selfmaintaining nuclear chain reaction. Fifteen of the scientists who helped with this project are standing in front of Eckhart Hall (at the University of Chicago). 16. Great Britain Map. Europe, Great Britain, Europe. World Atlas. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This is a map of Great Britain. It shows specific locations in Great Britain and around it. During WWII, Great Britain was led by Winston Churchill. This will be under our WWII section. 17. Guidewiki, Atomic Bomb Explosion. Video. Youtube.com. October 15, 2008. Video Clip. March 6, 2013. This is a video of a practice atomic bomb explosion. The purpose of putting it on the website was to show the power of the atomic bomb. It enhances the experience for the viewer because they can actually see what the explosion looks like. 18. Hiroshima. 1945. Nuclear Darkness, Hiroshima, Japan. Debating Nuclear Deterrence . Web. 6 Mar. 2013. This horrifying picture shows what happened to Hiroshima after the US dropped the atomic bomb on them. One can easily see how Japan had no other choice but to surrender. Not only did the bomb wipe out houses, and scenery, but also most of their population. 19. Iwo Jima Flag Raising. 65th Anniversary of the Iwo Jima Flag Raising Read more: http://nation.foxnews.com/culture/2011/02/23/65th-anniversary-iwo-jima-flagraising#ixzz2MjEfioqG. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of US soldiers. They are raising the American flag on a hill. It is a famous picture that represents the USs strength. 20. James Frank. 1942. Philosophy of Science Portal. Web. 6 Mar. 2013.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis This unique photograph shows a pass for James Frank to enter the Jones Laboratory. Frank was appointed head of the chemical laboratory. It shows how secretive all of the scientists had to be, and they couldnt get into the labs without a pass. 21. Kristof, Nicholas D. A Tojo Battles History, Tokyo Journal. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This photograph shows Tojo who led Japan during WWII. He was a leading force against America, and largely responsible for the Pearl Harbor attack. Tojo died after being hanged to death at the conclusion of WWII. 22. Los Alamos Main Gate. Wartime Lab, Los Alamos, New Mexico. History at Los Alamos . Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This photograph displays the main gate of Los Alamos. We are using this picture to show the different locations of the Manhattan Project. 23. Nagasaki After Bombing, Lessons, Nagasaki, Japan. About Japan. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This photograph displays Nagasaki after US dropped the atomic bomb on them. Although the atomic bomb was horrifying, it was necessary to end the war. 24. Nazi Soldiers. History, Nation States. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This photo was taken during WWII. It shows many Nazi soldiers marching in lines. This picture helps us to explain the intensity of the war. 25. News Article: The War Ends. The War Ends. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This picture of a news paper shows an article telling of the end of WWII. It talks about the atomic bomb and Japan's surrender, which was main goal of the Manhattan Project.

26. Oak Ridge: Manhattan Project. The Manhattan Project, Oak Ridge: Tennessee . Dan the Man Trivia. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This is a picture of a sign right outside of the Oak Ridge location. It emphasizes secrecy among those associated with the atomic bomb. We are using this picture with out locations part of the project. 27. Punting, Scrubby. Stagg Field U of C. 1911. Higher Education and American Society, University of Chicago. Mirror to a Nation. Web. 6 Mar. 2013.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis This picture shows the University of Chicago Stagg Field. Stagg Field is where the Manhattan Project was located. Although the picture has people in it, when it was used for military purposes, Stagg Field was abandoned. The picture is of a football team playing on the field. 28. Purdue University Band Archives. U of C Stagg Field. 1921. Purdue's Big Bass Drum Makes Long-Awaited Return to Chicago, University of Chicago. Purdue News. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. This shot depicts a marching band playing on Stagg Field. This picture was taken in 1921 when Stagg Field was still in use. During WWII, Stagg Field was used to house the MET Lab led by Enrico Fermi. 29. Scarcella, Kate. Manhattan Project Memorial. Art, Chicago, IL. That is All for Now. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This is a picture of the Manhattan Project memorial. Some say the memorial looks like a skull/mushroom cloud. We are using this picture to correspond with the MET Lab in Chicago. 30. The Frank Report. The Atomic Bomb. 1945. Voices Education, Voices Education . Web. 7 Feb. 2013. This picture shows a quote said by one of the scientists involved in the Manhattan Project. It explains the reasoning behind the creation of the atomic bomb. 31. The Manhattan Project Propaganda Poster, Richland, Washington. Imgur. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This poster was located in Richland, Washington. It stresses secrecy among those associated with the Manhattan Project. It is being used in our project under locations. 32. The Nobel Foundation. Enrico Fermi. Nobel Prize, Nobel Prize in Physics 1938 Enrico Fermi. Web. 3 Jan. 2013. This photo was taken in 1938 when Enrico Fermi won the Nobel Prize in Physics. It was presented to him for, his demonstrations of the existence of new radioactive elements produced by neutron irradiation, and for his related discovery of nuclear reactions brought about by slow neutrons. (The Nobel Foundation) 33. Stagg Field Memorial. 2005. Chicago. Stagg Field Memorial. Web. 7 Feb. 2013.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis This photograph shows a plaque in memory of the creation of the atomic bomb. It is located where Stagg Field and the Met Lab used to be located. 34. Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam (pointing finger). Web. 5 Mar. 2013. In this photograph, Uncle Sam is pointing at the viewer of the poster. The poster originally had a caption that said I want you in the US Army. 35. University of Chicago Campus. University of Chicago Campus, Chicago, IL. Tailgaters Handbook. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This picture depicts the University of Chicago campus. The U of C is where Enrico Fermi created the first atomic bomb reactor. The picture is used to show this location. 36. U.S. Soldiers. Oklahoma Education Association. Soldiers Marching With Flags. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. In this picture, U.S. soldiers are marching down a street. They are carrying flags and guns. 37. U.S. National Archives. Fat Man Bomb. U.S. National Archives, Chicago. The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II. Web. 5 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of the atomic bomb Fat Man. It was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9, 1945. 38. Winston Churchill. Winston Churchill, Winston Churchill's Works of Art. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This is a photo of Winston Churchill. Churchill was the Prime Minister of Great Britain during WWII. 39. l80omarlllomar08l, Herbert Hoover announces the bombing of Hiroshima 1945. Video. Youtube.com. Two years ago. Video clip. March 10, 2013. This is a video of Herbert Hoover announcing the bombing of Hiroshima. He explains that it was used to stop the war, and saved many American lives.

Secondary Resources:

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis 1. "Biographical Information ." Enrico Fermi. Web. 3 Jan. 2013. http://fermi.lib.uchicago.edu/fermibiog.htm This article is an overview of Enrico Fermis life. It includes his childhood, education, movement to America, and his association with the Manhattan Project. Enrico Fermi played an important role in creating to first atomic bomb. 2. De Angelo, Laura . "University of Chicago, Illinois." Encyclopedia of Earth. 3 July 2008. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. <http://www.eoearth.org/article/University_of_Chicago,_Illinois This article goes into depth on what a nuclear chain reaction actually is. It explains what happens between the atom, neutrons, and energy. This way, one can grasp what Enrico Fermis goal was. 3.D., Steven, and Linus D.. "Manhattan Project." ThinkQuest: Library. Web. 15 Jan. 2013. <http://library.thinkquest.org/17940/texts/timeline/manhattan.html# This website explains what the Manhattan project was and how it affected the world we live in today. It includes quotes of people who helped complete the project and what their feelings were towards it. It also includes information of the sequence of events that followed after the lab was a success. 4.Hewlett, Richard G., and Oscar G. Anderson. The New World: A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, vol. 1, The Encyclopedia of Chicago: 1939 1946. 1962. This piece of evidence explains how Chicago was connected with the Manhattan Project, and where the rest of the bomb was created. It goes further into depth of the actual process used to make the first atomic bomb reactor. 5. Kozlowski, David. American Flag. Panoramas, FlickRiver. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. This picture displays the American flag in panorama form. We are using this picture as the head of our References section. 6. Map of Italy. Tourizm Maps, Italy. Big Italy Map. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This map displays a picture of Italy. Italys leader was Benito Mussolini. Mussolini was a ally with Adolf Hitler as well as Hideki Tojo. 7. Map of Germany. World Travels, Germany. World Travels. Web. 10 Mar. 2013.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis This is a map of Germany. It shows the major locations inside of the country, and some countries around it. The map is used in our project to show where Hitler was dictator. 8. Map of Japan. Japan. Randy's Japan Page. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This picture displays a map of Japan. It reveals various locations inside Japan and the oceans around it. This picture is used in the WWII section of our project. 9. "Manhattan Project." New World Encyclopedia, 11 Mar 2009, 04:14 UTC. 11 Mar 2013, 22:33 <http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/p/index.php?title=Manhattan_Project&oldid= 938667>. This encyclopedia displays a picture of a map of the USA. This picture shows the different locations of the Manhattan Project. It is used on the Home Page of out website.

10.Njlstad, Olav. "Nobelprize.org."Nobelprize.org. 19 June 2003. Web. 17 Jan. 2013. <http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/peace/nuclear_weapons/readmore.html This website tells describes usage of atomic bombs by the USA on Japan. It also tells of the steps that have been taken to prevent further use of nuclear warfare. 11. Robert Latham, "Nuclear Energy." ThinkQuest : Library. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. <http://library.thinkquest.org/3471/nuclear_energy.htem This site provides valuable information on atomic energy. To further understand the Manhattan Project, it is essential to comprehend nuclear energy. It goes in depth on how this type of energy was created, and the science behind it. 12. "TIMELINE of WW2 ***." History Timelines. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. <http://www.history-timelines.org.uk/events-timelines/16-timeline-of-ww2.htm>. This website provides numerous important dates during WWII. It is provided in a timeline form including a date, and what occurred on that specific date. 13. The Atomic Bomb Sign. Nuclear Power is Like a Religion, UTNE. Web. 6 Mar. 2013. This is a picture of the universal atomic bomb sign. This helps viewers of our website further understand nuclear energy. Creating nuclear energy was the main purpose of the Manhattan Project.

Mariah Helm and Anna Dennis 14. "The Manhattan Project." United States American History. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. <http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1644.html>. This site provides information of the different location of the Manhattan Project. It is used under the locations part of our website. 15. "The Secret City - a set on Flickr."Welcome to Flickr - Photo Sharing. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/amse/sets/721576 This website contains three pictures that were used on the Home Page slideshow. The pictures are: Newspapers of WWII, a celebration of the end of the war, and women working during WWII. These pictures help viewers to see what it was like during WWII. 16. USA Map. Where Most Students End Up Attending College,The College Solution. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. This is a map of the USA. During World War II, Franklin Roosevelt led America until he died in 1945. Herbert Hoover then took his place. 17. "World War II: An Overview | Scholastic.com." Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn | Scholastic.com. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. <http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/world-war-ii-overview>. This website provides valuable information concerning WWII. It contains a general overview of the World War and includes information about before, during and after WWII. 18. "World War 2 Leaders." World War 2 Insightful Essays. Web. 10 Mar. 2013. <http://www.2worldwar2.com/leaders.htm>. This particular site goes in depth about the leaders of WWII. Specifically, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Benito Mussolini. It also goes on to talk about the defenders: Winston Churchill, Stalin, and Franklin Roosevelt.