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WILKES-BARRE, PA SundAy, MARch 17, 2013 $1.50
THE TIMES LEADER
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How big can
a tree be?
One man finds out. OUTDOORS, 12C
Are you up for
an Irish pub
crawl?
SUNDAY EXTRA, 1B
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World: 5A
Obituaries 7A, 10A
Weather 14A
INSIDE
Badgered
Wisconsin tops IU
for shot at title.
SPORTS 1C
B SUNDAY EXTRA: 1B
Birthdays: 10B
Books: 13B
Travel: 14B
C SPORTS: 1C
Outdoors 12C
D BUSINESS: 1D
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Editorials: 6D
E CLASSIFIED: 1E
WILKES-BARRE — A man was fatally shot
early Saturday morning on Poplar Street, Wilkes-
Barre, authorities have confirmed.
Renold Julien, 26, was pronounced dead at 3:38
a.m. at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township, succumbing to multiple gunshot
wounds, said Luzerne County Coroner William
Lisman. The cause of death has been ruled homi-
cide, he said.
After the incident around 2:10 a.m., friends
drove Julien to Wilkes-Barre General Hospital,
Lisman said. The gunshot victim was then trans-
ferred to Geisinger Hospital.
Luzerne County District Attorney Stefanie Sala-
vantis confirmed that the incident happened near
the Locals 88 bar, formerly the Poplar Inn, and, by
all accounts, it seems the crime was committed
with intent. “We do not believe this was random,”
Salavantis said.
No one was in custody as of Saturday afternoon,
Salavantis said. She could not provide details on a
suspect because the investigation is ongoing, she
said.
Pennsylvania Liquor Control Boardrecords indi-
cate Robert Nicoletti Jr. holds a restaurant’s liquor
license for the Poplar Street establishment; how-
ever, Nicoletti could not be immediately reached
for comment.
Charlotte Raup, head of the Wilkes-Barre Crime
Watch Coalition, said police previously have re-
sponded to the site for various incidents. “The
police are called there often. Fights. Music,” said
Raup. “It’s not the first time shots were fired. It’s
the first time somebody was killed, though.”
In November, two people were injured in a
shooting outside Locals 88, and in February 2012,
a Burgitt’s City Taxi driver reportedly was robbed
at gunpoint while waiting for a fare outside the
bar, according to published reports.
“I don’t knowwhat the answer is, but it’s getting
bad for people in the neighborhood,” Raup said.
Homicide
confirmed
in W-B
Renold Julien died of multiple gunshot
wounds near the Locals 88 bar.
By JON O’CONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
Many steering clear
of Pa. turnpike’s
60/40 scandal
HARRISBURG — Supposedly, it was an open
secret.
Of the allegations emerging from a sweep-
ing grand jury investigation into corruption at
the Pennsylvania Turnpike
Commission, one of the most
damning was witness testi-
mony that lucrative contracts
were guided by politics: 60 per-
cent were awarded to support-
ers of the governor’s political
party and 40 percent to those
of the other.
The perversion of the turn-
pike commission’s process of
hiring environmental, design and engineering
consultants to reward political contributors
was a familiar subject in Harrisburg’s circles of
Witnesses allege contracts awarded by
secret protocol; officials claim ignorance.
How many nurses should a
hospital maternity ward have?
How about the intensive care or
neonatal units? Should they be
the same numbers at rural and
inner city hospitals?
The correct answer now de-
pends upon each individual hos-
pital’s best practices. But state
l e g i s l a t o r s
want to take
the guess work
out of staffing.
A pair of
De mo c r a t i c
state legisla-
tors have intro-
duced bills in
both the House
and Senate that
would mandate
a minimum
number of reg-
istered nurses
to patient ratio
at all hospitals
in the state.
The concept
embraced by
nursing unions but is not being
warmly received by hospitals
and related organizations.
The companion bills, intro-
duced in the House by Rep.
Phyllis Mundy, of Kingston, and
in the Senate by Sen. Daylin
Leach, of Wayne, call for a ratio
that would vary, depending on
the nature of the care. For ex-
ample, there would be one regis-
tered nurse for every two neona-
tal patients, and one registered
nurse for every four patients in
a pre-surgical unit, under their
legislation.
Mundy: patient safety
Both Mundy and Leach tout
patient safety as the driving
force behind their bills.
“Studies show that patients in
hospitals with higher registered
nurse staffing levels are less
likely to get an infection during
their care, and as a result, health
care costs can be reduced by as
much as 30 percent,” Mundy
said.
“There is compelling sta-
tistical evidence that patient
safety is improved dramatical-
ly, and the costs to hospitals
are reduced as malpractice
claims fall and unnecessary,
uncompensated care is avoid-
ed,” said Leach. “Hospitals
should make this investment
in patient care that will pay
dividends in overall savings.”
Kim Klinger, a registered
nurse at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley and the vice president
of the SEIU local t hat repre-
sents more than 400 nurses at
the Plains Township hospital,
said the union supports the
bill “strongly.”
Nursing
by the
numbers
considered
Legislation introduced for
patient/nurse ratios at
Pennsylvania hospitals
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See NURSES, Page 14A
Mundy
Baumgarten
See TURNPIKE, Page 11A
Mellow
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
As Northeast Pennsylvanians
celebrate the feast of St. Patrick
with parades, spirits, traditional
foods and dance, one might
wonder if it was the luck of the
Irish that brought the traditions
to Luzerne County.
That depends on how you
look at it, according to John
McKeown, one of the Friendly
Sons of St. Patrick and an area
expert on Irish history.
The 92-year-old resident of
the East End of Wilkes-Barre – a
traditionally Irish section of the
Our area’s rich Irish history
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
John McKeown of Wilkes-Barre, holds a
statue of a 19th-century Irish immigrant
and siblings as he discusses Irish history. See HISTORY, Page 12A
There’s a LoT of WeaTher on
A MArcH DAy
WILKES-BARRE - The headgear
offered some protection for drum
major Ron Foy during the city’s St.
Patrick’s Day Parade, but his kilt was
a bit drafty.
Foy marched
at the front of the
Wyoming Val-
ley Pipe & Drum
Band as a steady
snow fell Satur-
day afternoon
and coated the
players’ uniforms and caps. “It’s a
little more challenging in the snowin
a kilt,” he said as the band finished
the route on North Main Street just
off Public Square.
None of the snow accumulated on
the streets; instead it melted quickly
and wet the ground as well as the
clothes and blankets under which
spectators sought cover.
“It’s a good time,” said Jeff Dicker-
son of Wilkes-Barre. He held Freya,
Flurries can’t
stop holiday
celebration
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Bagpipers of the Black Diamonds from Scranton march through snow flurries in Saturday’s St. Pat-
rick’s Day parade in Wilkes-Barre. The brisk weather didn’t prevent a turnout of the faithful.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
A member of the Goodwin String Band in Philadelphia steadies his
hat as it snows downtown during the city’s Irish-themed festivities.
See PARADE, Page 12A
INSIDE: For-
mer U.S. Navy
military police-
man David Mor-
gan is honored
Saturday. 13A
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
DENNISON TWP. — State
police reported 20 vehicles
crashed Saturday afternoon
when portions of Interstate 80
became slick during a snow-
fall.
The crashes occurred
around 12:30 p.m. near mile
marker 267.4 in the west-
bound lanes. Several people
were transported to area hos-
pitals for treatment of injuries.
The crashes caused a long
backup on the interstate.
NANTICOKE — City police
reported the following:
• Danielle Becker, of East
Grand Street, reported that
someone entered her resi-
dence and stole a Pro Scan 50-
inch, fat-panel television.
• Robin Jones, of Loomis
Street, reported that someone
recently damaged the wind-
shield of her parked vehicle.
• Jonah O’Brien, of South
Hanover Street, Nanticoke,
was taken into custody and
cited with public drunken-
ness after police observed a
suspicious person in the 300
block of Maple Street running
through backyards, police
said.
O’Brien was found lying in
the backyard of a home after
he tried — unsuccessfully —
to jump a fence, police said.
BERWICK — Police
charged four people in connec-
tion with investigations into
the sale of heroin.
David Fenton, Courtney
Fairbanks and Timothy Roden-
haver were arraigned Saturday
and committed to the Colum-
bia County Prison for lack
of bail, police said. Bail for
Fairbanks was set at $150,000.
For Fenton and Rodenhaver, it
was set at $100,000.
Police and members of the
Columbia County Drug Task
Force served a search warrant
at an apartment on West Front
Street Friday night and seized
cash and drug paraphernalia.
Police made controlled buys of
heroin at the apartment earlier
this month, they said. During
the search two children were
found hiding underneath a
bunk bed, police said. The
children were left in the care
of family members.
Fenton, Fairbanks and
Rodenhaver each was charged
with delivery of a controlled
substance, conspiracy to
deliver a controlled substance
and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Also on Friday police served
a search warrant at residence
on Ferris Avenue after a
month-long investigation.
Police seized 73 packets of
heroin, cash and drug para-
phernalia, they said. Stephen
Sitler was arrested and
charged with possession with
intent to deliver a controlled
substance, possession of a
controlled substance and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
police said. He was arraigned
and committed to the county
prison for lack of $75,000 bail.
DINGMAN TWP. — State
police reported more than 20
pounds of processed mari-
juana was seized Friday after
a drug investigation of an
indoor growing operation in
the Pocono Woodland Lakes
development.
State police arrested Fer-
nando Valdez Jr., 30, of Miami,
Fla., and jailed him for lack of
$200,000 bail.
Another occupant of the
residence on Buckeye Lane,
Paul Bolivar, also of Miami,
was arrested on a felony drug
warrant from Florida, state
police said.
Newsroom
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013
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PAGE 2
A season of renewed opportunities for genealogists
IT’S SHAP-
ING uP as
a very busy
spring for
genealogists.
Let’s get
started.
Genealogy
conference: Don’t forget “Find-
ing Our Ancestors at Home and
Abroad,” a genealogy confer-
ence offered by the Northeast
Pennsylvania Genealogical
Society and the Genealogical
Society of Pennsylvania. It’s
set for 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on
April 20 in the Educational
Conference Center at Luzerne
County Community College,
Nanticoke. A strong lineup of
speakers will offer professional-
grade advice. I’ll be participat-
ing in the Living Library event.
Registration form, costs and
travel directions are available
on the local society’s website
at www.nepgs.com. Also on
the website is a complete list
of speakers and the agenda for
the day. The conference center
is just off Prospect Street. Don’t
delay: All registrations must
be made by April 11. Online
registration is available at www.
genpa.org.
Genealogy seminar: I’ll
offer my “Getting Started in
Genealogy” program at the
West Pittston Library 10:30
a.m.-1 p.m. on April 13. It’s free,
but because of limited seating
you have to call and reserve a
place. Call 654-9847 and leave
a message. The library is at 200
Exeter Ave.
Civil War program: The
united States is at the midpoint
of its observance of the 150th
anniversary of the Civil War
(1861-1865). The Wyoming
Valley Civil War Round Table
sponsors a series of presenta-
tions in which experts on that
confict bring their knowledge
to the group’s members and
guests. It meets at the Daddow-
Isaacs American Legion Post,
Memorial Highway, Dallas.
Recently scheduled speakers
included Ryan Lindbuchler,
author of “Gone But Not
Forgotten,” a study of the area’s
contribution to the war and a
listing of burials. For informa-
tion on schedule, membership
and activities, visit its website
at www.wvcwrt.wordpress.com.
Open house: Here’s your
chance for a guided tour of the
research library of the North-
east Pennsylvania Genealogical
Society. On April 23 from 4 to
8 p.m. the library will offer the
public a chance to see the vast
amount of material available
there to help with family his-
tory research. The library is in
the caretaker building of the
Hanover Green Cemetery, Main
Road, Hanover Township.
Incidentally, volunteers are
needed to help the society
continue its project of digitizing
local historical and genealogical
records. So many institutions
have responded to calls for re-
cords preservation that the soci-
ety has been “overwhelmed,”
according to a recent newslet-
ter. Anyone wishing to help in
the project, which is of vital
importance to the area’s gene-
alogists, can contact the group
at nepgsmail@gmail.com.
Computer classes: If you
haven’t yet entered the com-
puter age, take heart. The West
Pittston Library will offer basic
computer classes in April. The
classes ($50 fee) are set for
6:30-7:30 p.m. April 4 to April
25 at the library, 200 Exeter
Ave. Space is limited. Call 654-
9847.
News Notes: Margery Saw-
yer, one of the founding mem-
bers of the Northeast Pennsyl-
vania Genealogical society, died
in February. She and her late
husband Dean led the society
for years and got its records
preservation project under way.
In recent years she served as a
board member emeritus.
Issues of the old Sunday
Independent newspaper
from1913 to 1957 are now
available for reading online at
the website of the Osterhout
Free Library. The Independent,
which ceased publication in
1993, was known for its inten-
sive coverage of area news,
particularly in the suburban
and rural communities, and
of politics. The complete files
are available on microfilm at
TOM MOONEY
OUT ON A LI MB
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader
genealogy columnist. Reach him at
tmooney2@ptd.net.
Tom Mooney’s column is normally
published in the Sunday Extra sec-
tion. Because of a production error
it is in the A section this week.
SOME REAL MARch MAdNESS
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
h
ardy souls braved the 39-degree water of Harveys Lake Saturday afternoon at the
Polar Bear Plunge to benefit the American Cancer Society. Maura Kresge, 14, of Plains
Township, left, and Lauren Austin, 13, of Bear Creek Village, were among the participants.
VATICAN CITY — The focus
of Pope Francis’ papacy began to
emerge Saturday as he offered
some intimate insights into the
conclave that elected himpontiff,
describing how he was immedi-
ately inspired to name himself
after St. Francis of Assisi because
he wants to see a church that is
“for the poor.”
His comments provided fur-
ther evidence that this frst Latin
American papacy would be one
that looks beyond the confines
of the church itself to the most
disadvantaged, named for a 13th-
century friar who renounced a
wealthy, dissolute lifestyle to
embrace a life of poverty and
simplicity and go out in the coun-
tryside to preach a message of joy
and peace.
“Let me tell you a story,” Pope
Francis began in a break from his
prepared text during an audience
for a few thousand journalists
and Vatican communications offi-
cials in the Vatican’s auditorium.
Francis then described how
during the conclave he was com-
forted by his friend, Brazilian
Cardinal Claudio Hummes, as
the votes were going his way and
it seemed “a bit dangerous” that
he would reach the two-thirds
necessary to be elected.
When the threshold was
reached, applause erupted in the
frescoed Sistine Chapel.
“He (Hummes) hugged me.
He kissed me. He said, ‘Don’t
forget about the poor!’” Francis
recalled.
“And those words came to
me: The poor. The poor. Then
right away, thinking of the poor,
I thought of Francis of Assisi.
Then I thought of all the wars
as the votes were being counted,
until the end. Francis is also the
man of peace. That is how the
name came into my heart: Fran-
cis of Assisi.”
The pope said some have won-
dered whether his name was a
reference to other Franciscan
fgures, including St. Frances de
Sales or even the co-founder of
the pope’s own Jesuit order, Fran-
cis Xavier. But he said the inspi-
ration was Francis of Assisi.
Sitting in the vast Vatican au-
ditorium, Francis continued: “For
me, he is the man of poverty, the
man of peace, the man who loves
and protects creation. These
days we don’t have a very good
relationship with creation, do
we?” he said. “He is the man who
gives us this spirit of peace, the
poor man.”
“Oh how I would like a church
which is poor and for the poor!”
Francis said, sighing.
He then joked that some other
cardinals suggested other names:
Hadrian VI, after a great church
reformer — a reference to the
need for the pope to clean up the
Vatican’s messy bureaucracy.
In one of his frst acts as pope,
Francis phoned the Vatican am-
bassador in Buenos Aires and
told him to put out the word that
he didn’t want ordinary Argen-
tines focking to Rome for his
installation Mass, urging them to
use the money instead for char-
ity.
Pope explains name, elevates poor
new pontiff took his name
after St. Francis of Assisi, who
renounced wealth.
By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Pope Francis greets archbishop Claudio Maria Celli during a
meeting with the media at the Vatican Saturday. He offered
intimate insights into the moments after his papal election.
POlicE blOTTEr
Pa. gov. plan would freeze pension benefits
HARRISBuRG — Gov. Tom
Corbett and his legal staff are
hoping fine distinctions in Penn-
sylvania case law will allow $12
billion in cuts to future pension
benefts for more than 370,000
current state and school employ-
ees.
Corbett and state legislators
are grappling with Pennsylva-
nia’s unfunded pension liability
of $41 billion, and the governor
is taking an approach never be-
fore tested in state courts in
hopes it will help the benefit
reductions pass constitutional
muster.
“We’ve designed our proposal
in a way we believe it is con-
stitutional, knowing that the
likelihood is that that issue will
ultimately be litigated in the
courts,” state Budget Secretary
Charles Zogby said.
More than a month after Cor-
bett announced his plan, draw-
ing threats of lawsuits from
labor unions, the legislative re-
sponse has been cool and no bill
has been introduced.
The benefit cuts are the main
source of savings in Corbett’s
multi-pronged pension reform
package and are expected to save
an estimated $12 billion over 30
years. The package also would
require new hires to enroll in a
401(k)-style plan, instead of the
traditional plan and temporarily
limit annual increases in taxpay-
er contributions.
The governor proposes freez-
ing benefits for current employ-
ees and replacing them with
reduced benefits in 2015. When
workers retire, they would re-
ceive the combined value of
both sets of benefits.
By PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
WILKES-BARRE –
Long flowing coral taffeta
and sleek black sequin
gowns were only some of
the promdresses available
for the taking during the
Prom Dress Sale Spectac-
ular in the Henry Student
Center on Wilkes Univer-
sity’s campus Saturday.
The promdress sale, fea-
turing gently used gowns,
was open to the public
from9 a.m. to 2 p.m. They
were being sold for a mini-
mum donation of $20. In
addition, accessories such
as shoes, purses and jew-
elry were available for $5.
All proceeds raised ben-
efited senior environmen-
tal engineering student,
Katie Cirone’s Relay for
Life Team. Relay for Life
is a fundraiser for the
American Cancer Society
in which teams walk all
day and into the night to
raise money to fight can-
cer and raise awareness
about disease prevention.
Wilkes University will
hold its Relay to Life start-
ing at noon April 20 on
the greenway behind the
Stark Library; it is sched-
uled to end at 6 a.m. on
April 23 in the gym.
Cirone, of Middlesex,
N.J., said the idea for the
prom dress sale came
from a friend. Prom dress-
es are the type of thing
that hang in a closet and
are never used again, she
said. Many girls were hap-
py to give their dresses a
second chance to shine
and give someone else an
opportunity for a glam-
orous prom experience.
Many university students
brought their dresses
WESTPITTSTON—Visitors walk-
ing through the West Pittston Library
on Saturday could bump into Marilyn
Monroe, Mother Teresa, Rosa Parks,
Marie Antoinette, Catherine the
Great, Cleopatra and Hillary Clinton.
Life-sized cutouts of those and 24
other famous women stood in the
library, each displaying a synopsis
of the individual’s accomplishments
for viewers to read. They were there
as part of the library’s celebration of
Women’s History Month, said library
director Anne Bramblett Barr.
The display also will be available
for viewing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday. Participants can spend time
learning “little-known facts about
very fascinating women” Barr said.
In addition, they can see what the li-
brary has to offer as part of an “open
house tour,” she said.
“We pride ourselves as an educa-
tional and enrichment organization,”
said Barr. “We want our visitors to see
the library in a different way.”
Saturday’s event represented the in-
stitution’s continuing comeback from
the 2011 flood that stifled last year’s
programs. After $200,000 worth of
renovations, the library is alive and
well, offering the newest educational
tools, she added.
Barr expects more than 500 visitors
to the library, including members of
the local community and students
fromthe Wyoming Area Montgomery
Elementary School. In addition to the
displays, the library offered children’s
games, information scavenger hunts
and other activities tied to women’s
history.
Summer Belles, the library’s youth
services coordinator, conducted the
research on each of the selected wom-
en. Editing their accomplishments
down to a summary was difficult be-
cause they all had so many interest-
ing facts about their lives, she said.
She marveled at how some of them
made their marks almost accidental-
ly. Astronaut Sally Ride, for example,
joined the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration after answer-
ing a newspaper advertisement, and
Julia Childs eventually became in-
terested in cooking after finding she
was too tall for service in the army or
navy.
About 50 area students
spanned the distance from
design to realization when
they took part in the 2013
Northeast Pennsylvania
Regional Bridge Contest
Saturday at the Viewmont
Mall in Dickson City.
Students from 20 area
high schools took part in
the annual event.
The contest gave par-
ticipants opportunity to
design and present model
bridges for judging and
allowed them to develop
planning, execution and
problem-solving skills.
Participants got a bet-
ter understanding of what
it is to do the work of an
engineer, designing the
bridges to certain specifi-
cations for a specific func-
tion.
The bridges were tested
with a stress machine to
determine efficiency —
the load it can carry rela-
tive to its weight.
Simply, the most effi-
cient bridges won.
Robert Taylor, director
of engineering manage-
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
timesleader.com
PAGE 3A
LOCAL
HARRISBURG
Students win art awards
Two students from Luzerne County
are among 22 from across the state
that have been selected as division
winners in the Pennsylvania Depart-
ment of Transportation’s aviation art
contest. The contest theme was “50
Years of American Space Flight.”
Brayden Rampulla, a second-grader
at Drums Elementary-Middle School
in Butler Township, won in the first-
through third-grade category.
Mastura Rakib, a fourth-grader at
Dr. David Kistler Elementary School
in Wilkes-Barre, won in the fourth- and
fifth-grade category.
The students competed with oth-
ers attending participating schools in
PennDOT’s District 4, which encom-
passes Lackawanna, Luzerne, Pike,
Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming
counties.
Winners will receive an enlarged
copy of their entry and a certificate
signed by PennDOT Secretary Barry
J. Schoch. The students’ schools also
will receive a mounted copy of the art-
work for display.
For more information or to see all
of the winning entries, visit www.dot.
state.pa.us and click on “Aviation &
Rail Freight,” then “Bureau of Avia-
tion” and follow the links.
NEWPORT TWP.
3 towns get DEP grants
Three communities in the 119th
Legislative District will receive grants
totaling more than $31,000, according
to state Rep. Gerald Mullery, D-New-
port Township.
Mullery said Plymouth will receive
$28,834 from the state Department
of Environmental Protection to repair
flood-damaged sections of a stream
bank on Coal Creek. Newport Town-
ship and Larksville have received re-
cycling performance grants from DEP.
Newport Township received $1,146,
and Larksville received $1,927.
Newport Township’s grant is based
on the municipality recycling 198.6
tons of material in 2010 and its popula-
tion. Larksville’s grant is based on the
community recycling 261.3 tons of ma-
terial in 2010 and its population.
DALLAS TWP.
Are these games legal?
In an effort to provide the most up-
to-date information to holders of small
games of chance licenses, state Rep.
Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake, will
host a small games of chance seminar
from 6-9 p.m. April 18, at the Lem-
mond Theater at Walsh Hall on the
campus of Misericordia University,
Dallas Township.
Because of recent changes made to
the Small Games of Chance Act, many
organizations have contacted Boback’s
offices with concerns about new re-
quirements, and the seminar is a good
way to address questions that nonprof-
its still might have, Boback said.
A representative from the state po-
lice Bureau of Liquor Control Enforce-
ment will discuss the changes to the
law and how it will be enforced.
Those interested in attending
should RSVP by April 4 by contact-
ing one of Boback’s district offices in
Tunkhannock, 836-4777, or Hunlock
Creek, 477-3752. For more legislative
information, including updates to the
Small Games of Chance Act, visit Bo-
back’s website at www.RepBoback.
com.
I N B R I E F
See DRESS, Page 8A
WI NNE RS
1st place – Joseph DalSanto,
Wyoming Valley West
2nd place – Kiana Sladicki,
Abington Heights High School
3rd place – Bradon Frigoletto
-- Honesdale High School
Excellence in Architecture
Award – Seneca Probst -- Hon-
esdale High School
Prom dress sale is a real beauty
By EILEEN GODIN
Times Leader Correspondent
Wilkes student organizes
sale of donated gowns to
benefit Relay for Life.
AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER
Cassidy Strickland, of the Relay for Life team called Cap-
tain Planet, fills in a chart showing the team has raised
$1,000 in the first hour of Saturday’s prom-dress sale.
UGI finds
new spot
for its gas
operation
By JON O’CONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
Washington Township gives
conditional OK to compressor
rejected by West Wyoming.
When plans for a gas pipe-
line compressor station in
West Wyoming soured for
UGI Energy Services, project
managers sought a new sta-
tion site to supply propulsion
for their Auburn Pipeline.
Taking their plans farther
north up the line, company
representatives proposed a
compressor station in Wash-
ington Township.
The town-
ship supervisors
there granted
conditional ap-
proval for station
construction last
month at a site
near the Procter
& Gamble manu-
facturing complex.
Dan Huff, the supervisors’
vice chairman, said UGI repre-
sentatives showed up readier
than most at the township
meeting.
“Of all the companies we’ve
dealt with so far, they were
the most prepared,” he said.
The supervisors’ conditions
are that the company finalizes
outstanding permit applica-
tions for the station, provides
a more thorough emergency
response plan outlining pro-
cedures in case of leaks or
blowouts, and keeps the noise
down once the station is up
and running.
“We kind of have a reputa-
tion for being sticklers (about
enforcing conditions),” Huff
said with a chuckle.
The pumping station will be
smaller than the one proposed
for West Wyoming, but will be
sufficient to move gas nearly
30 miles from the Tennessee
interstate pipeline in Susque-
hanna County to the Transco
interstate pipeline in Luzerne
County, according to Kevin
Kelleher, the company’s pro-
ducer services manager.
In an email statement,
Kelleher said with this pipe-
line construction, the com-
pany hopes to relieve natural
gas costs for individuals while
keeping an eye on the environ-
ment.
“We are hoping to lower
these costs further by reduc-
ing the cost to transport gas
Area’s students test their bridge to knowledge
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Judges Aaron Holzman of Scranton Prep and Marywood
University student Caitlyn Wroblewski test a bridge.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
Model bridges constructed
by students were part of
engineering competition.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A display at the West Pittston Library of 30 lifesize cutouts of famous women includes Lucille Ball and Marilyn Mon-
roe. They kept Chloe Andricks, 7, of Duryea, company as she read a book in the library.
Famous women in the spotlight
By RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
West Pittston Library displays cutouts
to mark accomplishments as part of
Women’s History Month.
These drawings by Kistler Elemen-
tary School fourth-grader Mastura
Rakib, top, and Drums Elementa-
ry-Middle School second-grader
Brayden Rampulla, above, were
among 22 winners in a state aviation
art contest.
See UGI, Page 9A
See WOMEN, Page 9A
See BRIDGES, Page 8A
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CARLISLE — A tour bus
carrying a college’s women’s
lacrosse team to a game went
off the Pennsylvania Turnpike
on Saturday and crashed into
a tree, killing a pregnant coach
and the driver and sending
others to hospitals, authorities
said.
Lacrosse players from Seton
Hill University and three coach-
es were among the 23 people
aboard when the bus crashed at
about 9 a.m., turnpike spokes-
woman Renee Colborn said. It’s
not clear what causedthe crash,
but state police were investigat-
ing, said Megan Silverstram of
the Cumberland County public
safety department.
Kristina Quigley of Greens-
burg, 30, was flown to a hospi-
tal and died there from injuries
from the crash, Cumberland
County authorities said Sat-
urday that. They say Quigley
was about six months pregnant
and her unborn child did not
survive. The driver, 61-year-old
Anthony Guaetta of Johnstown,
died at the scene of the crash.
Two other victims were
flown by helicopter to Penn
State Hershey Medical Center,
hospital spokeswoman Dani-
elle Ran said. She did not give
their conditions. Officials said
all other passengers were taken
to hospitals as a precaution.
The bus came to a stop up-
right on the side of the road
with part of its left side shorn
off, photos from the scene
showed, though it’s unclear
whether that was from the im-
pact or rescue operation.
The lacrosse team was head-
ed to play Saturday afternoon
at Millersville University, about
50 miles from the crash site in
central Pennsylvania, for its
fourth game of the year. The
Griffins were off to a promising
start at 3-1 in the young season.
Both Saturday’s game and a
Sunday home game were can-
celed after the crash, and Seton
Hill, a Catholic school of about
2,500 students near Pittsburgh,
said a memorial Mass was
planned for tonight on campus.
Quigley, a native of Balti-
more, was married and had a
young son, Gavin, the school
said.
The bus operator, Mlaker
Charter & Tours, of Davids-
ville, Pa., is up to date on its
inspections, which include bus
and driver safety checks, said
Jennifer Kocher, a spokeswom-
an for the state Public Utility
Commission, which regulates
bus companies.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 N A T I O N & W O R L D PAGE 5
SAN FRANCISCO
Judge bars security letters
T
hey’re called national security let-
ters and the FBI issues thousands
of them a year to banks, phone compa-
nies and other businesses demanding
customer information. They’re sent
without judicial review and recipients
are barred from disclosing them.
On Friday, a federal judge in San
Francisco declared the letters unconsti-
tutional, saying the secretive demands
for customer data violate the First
Amendment.
She ordered the FBI to stop issuing
the letters, but put that order on hold
for 90 days so the U.S. Department of
Justice can pursue an appeal to the 9th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
CAIRO
Government opponents riot
Police fired tear gas to disperse thou-
sands of supporters and opponents of
President Mohammed Morsi during
clashes that erupted on Saturday as
he launched development projects in
southern Egyptian where residents
have long complained of being ne-
glected by the central government.
Morsi was in Sohag province to
unveil a housing project and new
education complex when thousands
of anti-government protesters tried to
storm the hall where he was meeting
with local officials. The rioting came
as Morsi was trying to reach out to
residents of Sohag, one of Egypt’s
poorest southern cities.
Under long-time ruler Hosni
Mubarak, who was ousted in a popular
uprising two years ago, the southern
area known as al-Saeed was underde-
veloped and impoverished. Business-
men close to Mubarak’s family were
blamed for orchestrating economic
reform that liberalized the economy.
BISMARCK, N.D.
Oil could fuel legal fight
As oil-rich North Dakota moves to-
ward outlawing most abortions, it’s in
a better position than most states for
what could be a long and costly court
battle over its restrictions.
Lawmakers on Friday sent the
Republican governor two anti-abortion
bills, one banning the procedure as
early as six weeks into a pregnancy
and another prohibiting women from
having the procedure because a fetus
has a genetic defect, such as Down
syndrome. They would be the most
restrictive abortion laws in the United
States.
The state actually has a budget sur-
plus nearing $2 billion, thanks to new-
found oil wealth. Record oil production
has made North Dakota the nation’s
No. 2 oil producer behind Texas.
OLYMPIA, WASH.
Assisted suicide backer dies
Booth Gardner, a two-term Demo-
cratic governor who later in life
spearheaded a campaign that made
Washington the second state in the
country to legalize assisted suicide for
the terminally ill, has died after a long
battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was
76.
Gardner died Friday at his Tacoma
home, family spokesman Ron Dot-
zauer said Saturday. He was the state’s
19th governor.
The millionaire heir to the Weyer-
haeuser timber fortune led the state
from 1985 to 1993.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Emergency and rescue crews respond to the scene of a
deadly tour bus crash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike on Sat-
urday near Carlisle. The driver and a passenger were killed.
AP PHOTO
Celebrating Syria’s revolution
A Syrian boy waves the Syrian revo-
lutionary flag during a celebration in
Amman, Jordan, on Friday to com-
memorate the second anniversary of
the Syrian revolution. Maj. Gen. Mo-
hammed Ezz al-Din Khalouf, one of
the highest-ranking military officers
yet to abandon Syrian President
Bashar Assad, defected to neighbor-
ing Jordan and said in an interview
Saturday that morale among those
still inside the regime had collapsed.
2 die in Pa. Turnpike bus crash
Seton hill university
lacrosse coach, bus driver
fatally injured Saturday.
The Associated Press
Donated
organs
carried
rabies
Public and military health offi-
cials say they’re trying to identify
people in at least five states who
had close contact with an organ
donor who died of rabies or with
the organ recipients because they
might require treatment.
A 20-year-old Air Force recruit
from North Carolina who died of
rabies in Florida had symptoms of
the disease but wasn’t tested be-
fore his organs were transplanted
to four patients, one of whomdied
of rabies nearly 18 months later,
federal health officials said Friday.
The three other organ recipi-
ents are getting rabies shots and
haven’t displayed any symptoms.
Doctors at the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention declined
to speculate on their chances for
survival.
“This case is so unique and atyp-
ical that we cannot make predic-
tions,” said Richard Franka, acting
leader of the CDC’s rabies team.
Dr. Matthew Kuehnert, direc-
tor of the agency’s Office of Blood,
Organ, and Other Tissue Safety,
said investigators don’t know why
doctors in Florida didn’t test the
donor for rabies before offering his
kidneys, heart and liver to people
in Florida, Georgia, Illinois and
Maryland.
The man in Maryland who re-
ceived the transplant died in late
February. The Defense Depart-
ment said he was an Army vet-
eran who had transplant surgery
at Walter Reed National Military
Medical Center in early Septem-
ber 2011.
A rabies test after a death can
take four hours once the tissue
reaches a lab in Atlanta, New York
or California, Franka said. That’s
precious time: A donated kidney
remains viable for less than 24
hours; other organs last for less
than six.
The donor had seizures and
encephalitis — a brain inflamma-
tion that can be caused by rabies
— but those symptoms also can
be caused by a variety of bacterial,
viral and other more common con-
ditions.
Federal rules require organ
banks to disclose “any known or
suspected” infectious conditions
that might be transmitted by the
donor organs.
The donor died in September
2011 at an undisclosed Florida
medical facility. Medical workers
believed at the time that he died
from encephalitis of unknown ori-
gin, Florida Department of Health
epidemiologist Dr. Carina Black-
more said.
health officials conducting
multi-state search for people
possibly exposed.
By DAVID DISHNEAU
Associated Press
Rand Paul favorite at conservative summit
OXON HILL, Md. — The auditions
have begun.
Only two months into President
Barack Obama’s second term, Repub-
lican leaders are lining up to diagnose
the GOP’s ills while courting party
activists — all with an eye on greater
political ambitions. They have danced
around questions about their White
House aspirations, but the diehard con-
servatives already are picking favorites
in what could be a crowded Republican
presidential primary in 2016.
Thousands of activists who packed
into suburban Washington’s national
conservative summit gave Kentucky
Sen. Rand Paul a narrow victory over
Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in their un-
scientific presidential
preference poll. Paul
had 25 percent of the
vote and Rubio 23 per-
cent. Former Pennsyl-
vania Sen. Rick Santo-
rum was third with 8
percent.
The freshman sena-
tors topped a pool of
nearly two dozen governors and elected
officials who paraded through the same
ballroom stage over three days. There
were passionate calls for party unity, as
the party’s old guard and a new genera-
tion of leaders clashed over the future
of the wayward Republican Party.
First-term Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Walker, who placed sixth in the straw
poll, on Saturday encouraged Republi-
cans to be aggressive but warned them
to focus on middle-class concerns: “We
need to be relevant.”
Later in the day, the party’s 2008 vice
presidential nominee, former Alaska
Gov. Sarah Palin, mixed anti-Obama
rhetoric with calls for a more inclusive
GOP: “We must leave no American be-
hind,” she said after likening Washing-
ton leadership to reality television.
And former House Speaker Newt
Gingrich, a 2012 presidential contend-
er, charged that GOP leadership “is as
mired in past and mired in stupidity as
it was in 1976.”
But the ballroom stage was embla-
zoned with the words “America’s Fu-
ture: The Next Generation of Conserva-
tives,” making clear the party’s interest
in showcasing a new wave of talent.
The gathering evoked the ending of one
period and the beginning of another.
AP PHOTO
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin drinks from a 7-Eleven Super Big Gulp on stage while speaking at the Conservative
Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., Saturday. Earlier in the week a New York judge struck down a ban
proposed by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg to end the sale of sugared sodas larger than 16 oz.
GOP stars auditioning for 2016
By KEN THOMAS and STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press
Swiss tourist allegedly gang-raped in India
NEW DELHI — A Swiss
woman who was on a cycling
trip in central India with her
husband has been gang-raped
by eight men, police said
Saturday. The attack comes
three months after the fatal
gang-rape of a woman aboard
a New Delhi bus outraged In-
dians.
Authorities detained and
questioned 13 men in con-
nection with the latest at-
tack, which occurred Friday
night as the couple camped
in a forest in Madhya Pradesh
state after bicycling from the
temple town of Orchha, local
police officer R.K. Gurjar said.
The men beat the couple
and gang-raped the woman,
he said. They also stole the
couple’s mobile phone, a lap-
top computer and $185.
A photo showed the wom-
an, 39, walking while being
escorted by police to the hos-
pital. Her face was concealed
with a hood, a common prac-
tice in conservative India,
where lawdoes not allowrape
victims to be identified pub-
licly to protect them from the
stigma attached to rape there.
Police detained 13 men and
questioned them, Gurjar said.
Six of the men were released
after questioning.
Last month, the Swiss gov-
ernment issued a travel notice
for India that included a warn-
ing about “increasing num-
bers of rapes and other sexual
offenses” in the South Asian
nation.
Swiss earlier issued travel
notice, warning of
increased sexual crimes.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
A Swiss woman, center, is escorted for a medical exam
after an alleged gang-rape in India.
Paul
M
arvin Warren Cole Sr., 73, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Thursday morning at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on April
12, 1939, he was the son of the
late Leonard and Lena “Sara”
(Jackson) Cole.
Marvin graduated from Grand
Army of the Republic High
School, Wilkes-Barre, in 1956,
where he was named Athlete of
the Year. He broke several school
records during his time at GAR.
After high school, he joined
the U.S. Army, serving from 1963-
1969 during the Vietnam War.
Upon his return, Marvin worked
for many years at the Westmore-
land Club of Wilkes-Barre. He also
was a member of the 402 Club.
Prior to retiring, Marvin
worked at several businesses in
the Wyoming Valley. Marvin en-
joyed watching sports, with foot-
ball being his favorite; he espe-
cially enjoyed watching the Dallas
Cowboys games.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by his sec-
ond wife, Rodean (Cagigas) Cole,
and his third wife, Marilyn (Cra-
gle) Cole.
Surviving are three sons, Mar-
vin W. Cole Jr., Baltimore, Md.,
Gary M. Cole, San Antonio,
Texas, and Christopher L. Cole,
Danville; a daughter, Candice J.
Cole, Philadelphia; his former
wife, Cynthia (Wallace) Barnes;
four grandchildren, Marvin III,
Jasmine, Pree and Mulani.
Friends and family
may call on Tuesday from
5 p.m. until the time of
the service at the Kniffen
O’Malley Funeral Home Inc. 465
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. A Cele-
bration of Life Service will be held
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, with the Rev.
James Breese officiating and cre-
mation to follow. Interment will
be at the Maple Hill Cemetery
at the convenience of the fam-
ily. Online condolences at www.
BestLifeTributes.com.
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We’ve had 365 mornings, noons, and
nights to miss your smile, hearty laugh,
questions about what we are having for
dinner, and thoughtful, loving advice.
We’ve heard you in a cardinal’s song, and
seen you in the rays of a beautiful, warm
sunset and we knew you were there. We’ve
smelled pizza and cheeseburgers that
made us chuckle and think of you and we
knew you were there. We’ve felt you in a
perfect nighttime breeze and in the hugs
of our loved ones, and we knew you were
there. You are always with us.
Deeply loved and sadly missed by Wife,
Children, and family
ADAMS - Kathleen, celebration of
life 9 a.m. Monday at McLaugh-
lin’s – The Family Funeral
Service, 142 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass
10 a.m. in the Church of Holy
Saviour in East End. Friends
may call 2 to 5 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
ARNOLD - Florine, funeral ser-
vices 11 a.m. Monday at Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke. Friends
may call 9 a.m. until time of
service.
BOGDAN - John, funeral 9 a.m.
Monday at Kopicki Funeral
Home, Zerbey Avenue, Kingston.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30
a.m. in St. Ignatius Church,
North Maple Ave, Kingston.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today.
CHIPOLIS - Joseph, transferal ser-
vice 12:30 p.m. Monday followed
by a Mass of Christian Burial at
1 p.m. in Our Lady of Perpetual
Help Church, Wyalusing. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today at P.
Dean Homer Funeral Home, 1
Grovedale Lane, Wyalusing.
DALE - Robert, friends may call
2 to 4 p.m. today at Kniffen
O’Malley Funeral Home Inc., 728
Main St., Avoca.
DUVALL - Doris, funeral services
6:30 p.m. Monday at Thomas P.
Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517
N. Main St., Old Forge. Friends
may call after the services until
9 p.m.
GRAHAM- Mary Ann, funeral 10
a.m. Monday at Yanaitis Funeral
Home Inc., 55 Stark St., Plains
Township. Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. in St. Maria
Goretti Church, Laflin, with the
bereavement committee saying
the Rosary at 10 a.m. Friends
may call 8:30 a.m. until the
service at the funeral home.
GOMMER - David, funeral ser-
vices 11 a.m. Tuesday at Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke. Friends
may call 10 a.m. until time of
service.
HEFFERNAN - Gertrude, funeral
services 10 a.m. Monday at Dan-
iel J. Hughes Funeral & Crema-
tion Service, 617 Carey Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 2
to 6 p.m. today.
HORNICK - Mae, celebration of
life with funeral Mass 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday in the Church of St.
Mary of the Immaculate Con-
ception, 130 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
PAVONE - Ralph Sr., funeral
services 11 a.m. Monday at
Maple Hill Cemetery, Hanover
Township.
RAY - Sharon, memorial service 2
p.m. March 24 at Forkston Unit-
ed Methodist Church. Friends
may call 2 to 6 p.m. today at the
Harding-Litwin Funeral Home,
123 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.
RITCHIE - Frances, funeral service
10 a.m. Monday at White Ha-
ven United Methodist Church,
Buffalo Street, White Haven.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at Lehman Family Funeral
Service Inc., 403 Berwick St.,
White Haven, or 9:30 a.m. until
time of service Monday at the
church.
ROONEY - Thomas, celebration
of life with a funeral Mass 9:30
a.m. Friday in the Church of St.
Mary of the Immaculate Con-
ception, 130 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
ROWLANDS - Marian, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday
in Gate of Heaven Church, 40
Machell Ave., Dallas. Friends
may call following the service in
the church.
SHANE - Julia, funeral services
10 a.m. Monday at Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
SKAPURA - Celia, funeral ser-
vices 9:15 a.m. Monday at Mayo
Funeral Home Inc., 77 N. Main
St., Shickshinny. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 10 a.m. in Holy Spirit
Parish/St. Martha’s Church,
Fairmount Springs. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
STINSON - Helen, funeral services
10 a.m. Tuesday in Holy Trinity
Lutheran Church, Kingston.
Friends may call 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday at Harold C. Snowdon
Home for Funerals Inc., 420
Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
STONE - Cheri, funeral services 7
p.m. Monday at Kopicki Funeral
Home, 263 Zerby Ave., Kingston.
Friends may call 6 to 8 p.m.
WARNAGIRIS - Barbara, celebra-
tion of life 5 to 7 p.m. Monday
at Michael J. Mikelski Funeral
Home, 293 S. River St., Plains
Township.
ZAVADA - Lucille, funeral 9:30
a.m. Monday at E. Blake Collins
Funeral Home, 159 George Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Benedict’s
Church, Austin Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today.
FUNERALS
The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituar-
ies, which can run with a photo-
graph. A funeral home repre-
sentative can call the obituary
desk at (570) 829-7224, send a
fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail
to tlobits@timesleader.com. If
you fax or e-mail, please call
to confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral home
or crematory, or must name
who is handling arrangements,
with address and phone num-
ber. We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15 typing
fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
THOMAS E. KUSTRIN, 91,
of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Saturday afternoon, March 16,
2013, at Commonwealth Hos-
pice at St. Luke’s Villa, Wilkes-
Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main
St., Plains Township.
MARGARET AIBUKAS,
89, formerly of Luzerne, passed
away on Saturday at Lakeside
Nursing and Rehab, Dallas.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Betz-Jast-
remski Funeral Home Inc., 568
Bennett St., Luzerne.
LARRY M. ZIMINSKY, of
Weatherly, formerly of White
Haven, died Thursday, March
14, 2013, in Weatherwood Nurs-
ing Center and Rehabilitation,
Weatherly.
Born in Hazleton, he was the
son of Fred E. and Arlene Hut-
nyan Ziminsky of Chino Valley,
Ariz, Larry is survived, in addi-
tion to his parents, by brother,
Scott A. Ziminsky, Chino Valley,
Ariz.; four nephews, Michael, of
Massachusetts, Kevin, of Wash-
ington; Steven and David, both
of Arizona; aunts and uncles,
John and Gerri Mandzak, of
Harleigh, Richard and Regina
Ziminsky, of White Haven, Mari-
lyn Ziminsky, of Chadds Ford,
Anna Medash, New Jersey; and
many cousins and friends.
Private services are at the
convenience of family. Arrange-
ments were by the Lehman
Family Funeral Service Inc., 403
Berwick St., White Haven.
STANLEY PEPSIN JR., 44,
and a lifelong resident of Old
Forge, passed away Thursday
evening at Moses Taylor Hospi-
tal in Scranton.
He is survived by his loving
wife, Deborah Nocera Pepsin.
He also is survived by his be-
loved daughter, Ariane Pepsin,
a student at Temple University;
his sister, Rebecca Pepsin and
her fiance, Edward Sweda, of
Hanover Township; his mother-
in-law, Ann Marie Nocera, of
Old Forge; his sister-in-law,
Michele Curmaci, of Bethle-
hem; his two brothers-in-law,
Jeffrey Nocera, of Bethlehem,
and Louis Nocera and wife,
Christine, of Pittston Township;
his nieces, Alisa Curmaci and
Taylor Wheeler; and his nephew,
Matthew Curmaci.
Blessing services are tonight
at 7 in the Thomas P. Kearney
Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main
St., Old Forge. Friends may call
4 p.m. to service time.
ALVIN WHISENHUNT, of
Plymouth, died Saturday morn-
ing, March 16, 2013, at the Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the William A. Re-
ese Funeral Chapel, Plymouth.
MARY ANN QUINN, 91,
of Lanham, Md. and originally
of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Thursday, March 14, 2013. She
was a beloved daughter of the
late Frank and Mary Quinn and
sister of the late John F. Quinn
Sr. and Jean Morgan. Mary is
survived by several nieces and
nephews.
Relatives and friends may
call at St. Mark the Evangelist
Church, 7501 Adelphi Road,
Hyattsville, Md., on Tuesday at
9:30 a.m. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at
10:30 a.m. Interment will be in
St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township.
Beatrice Ryneski
March 15, 2013
B e a t r i c e
Ryneski, 75,
of Kingston,
passed away
peacefully on
Friday, March
15, 2013, at
the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital follow-
ing a brief illness. Her loving
family was by her side.
She was born in Pringle,
daughter of the late Stanley
and Bella Kovaleski Sydlo. She
was a graduate of Edwardsville
High School, attended Wilkes-
Barre Business College and re-
tired from Wyoming Valley West
School District. Bea was also a
lifelong member of St. Hedwig’s
Church until its closing.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her sis-
ter, Lorraine Sabatini, Wethers-
field, Conn.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 56 years, Ed-
ward Ryneski, Kingston; chil-
dren, Elaine Kraynak (Wayne
Brandt), Plymouth; Edward
Ryneski Jr., Kingston; Maureen
Ryneski (Tara Bending), White
Haven; Beth Miller and her
husband, Larry, Jenkins Town-
ship; John Ryneski and his wife
Carol, Wasilla, Alaska; and Brian
Ryneski, Kingston; sister, Bever-
ly Brown and her husband, Bud,
Forty Fort.
She was the proud grand-
mother of 14 grandchildren:
Ryan, Marissa, Rebecca, Kayla,
Matthew, Kelsey, Morgan, Ha-
leigh, Hunter, Madison, Blake,
Jacek, Bailey and Karlee.
Special thanks to the nurses
and staff at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital for their excellent care,
support and compassion.
Funeral will be held Tues-
day at 10 a.m. from the Kopicki
Funeral Home, Zerby Avenue,
Kingston, with Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St.
Ignatius Church. Interment will
be in the St. Hedwig’s Cemetery,
Larksville. Friends may call
Tuesday from 9 to 10 a.m.
The family requests that, in
lieu of flowers, memorial dona-
tions be made to the American
Cancer Society Relay for Life
(South Valley).
James M. Lorah
March 4, 2013
J
ames M. Lorah, 60, of Plym-
outh passed away Thursday,
March 14, 2013, at home.
He was born on Oct. 18, 1952
in Phoenixville, Pa., and was the
son of the late Marvin and June
Painter Lorah. He was a mainte-
nance man for Charlie’s TV until
his retirement.
He is survived by his wife of 40
years, Margaret Warman Lorah;
daughters, Michele Lorah Trot-
ter and Shannon Gabriel Cham-
berlain; grandchildren, Dominic
James Trotter, Samera Mulroy
and Ashton Mulroy; sisters, Don-
na Dutter, Margaret Prestas, April
Gabriel, Judy Fisher and Debbie
Danko; brothers, Daniel Lorah,
Marvin Lorah, Terry Lorah and
Fred Lorah.
James was a man who loved
life and lived it to its fullest. The
greatest loves of his life were his
wife, daughters, and grandchil-
dren; they put a smile on his face
every day. He also cherished every
moment he spent with his friends.
He left this Earth a rich man, and
by “rich” we mean loved.
A Memorial Service will be
held on Tuesday at 7 p.m. from
Williams-Hagen Funeral Home,
114 W. Main St., Plymouth.
Friends may call from 5 p.m. un-
til time of service with the Rev.
Bryan Rosenberg officiating. Me-
morial donations can be made to
the family.
Michael A. Munykowski
March 15, 2013
Michael A.
Munykowski,
71, of Kings-
ton, died Fri-
day, March 15,
2013, in the
Wi l kes- Barre
General Hos-
pital.
Born in
Pringle, he was the son of the
late Mary Munykowski Barsh. He
was educated in Kingston schools
and served in the U.S. Army. For
much of his life he worked as a
plumber, including many years
with the Wyoming Valley West
School District.
Michael also was a member
of the Fraternal Order of Eagles,
Plymouth, and the American Le-
gion Post 655, Larksville.
In addition to his mother, he
was preceded in death by his son,
Michael, in 1996 and his wife, the
former Doris Ritsick in 2003.
He is survived by his daugh-
ters, Doreen Langan and her hus-
band, Pat, Luzerne, and Michelle
Shulskie and her companion,
Floyd Robinson, Larksville; his
companion, Rose Durbin; sister,
Helen Barsh; brothers, Charles
and Tony Barsh; granddaughters,
Maria and Rachel Langan; grand-
sons, Jonathan Shulskie, Floyd
Robinson and Michael Daniel Mu-
nykowski.
Funeral will be held
Wednesday at 9 a.m.
fromthe Kopicki Funeral
Home, Zerby Avenue, Kingston,
with Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church,
Kingston. Interment will be in St.
Mary’s Annunciation Cemetery,
Pringle. Friends may call Tuesday
from 5 to 8 p.m.
Harry Cornell Jr.
March 14, 2013
H
arry Cornell Jr., 65, of Hun-
tington Mills, died Thursday
afternoon, March 14, 2013, at the
Hospice Community Care, Wil-
kes-Barre.
Born Aug. 30, 1947 in Somer-
ville, N.J., he was the son of the
late Harry and Mildred (Van Nos-
trand) Cornell Sr.
He was a graduate of Bound
Brook High School in New Jersey.
He was employed as a welder for
several companies, and his last
employment was with Columbia
Industries, Berwick. He was a
member of the United Sports-
men’s Club, Huntington Mills,
and a social member of the Amer-
ican Legion Post No. 495, Shick-
shinny.
Surviving are his sister, Leda
Carr and her husband, Lawrence
Carr Sr., Huntington Mills; neph-
ews, Lawrence Carr Jr. and his
wife, Kathy, and Richard Carr and
his fiancée, Judy; great-nephew,
Douglas and his fiancée, Mela-
nie, and great-nieces, Danielle,
Brittnie, Rickie Lynn and Desti-
ny; and childhood friends in New
Jersey, Jerry and Howie Parks,
“Crazy Nick” and Al.
Private memorial services
will be held at the convenience of
the family. In lieu of flowers, do-
nations can be made to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, 101 W. Frack
St., Frackville PA 17931 or Hos-
pice Community Care, Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre Hospital,
25 Church St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18765. Arrangements are under
the direction of the Mayo Funeral
Home Inc., Shickshinny. For in-
formation, or to send condolenc-
es, please visit www.mayofh.com.
Donald Vincent McCloskey
March 13, 2013
Donald Vin-
cent McClos-
key, of Lehman
Township and
formerly of
Taylor, died
We dne s da y,
March 13,
2013, at Lake-
side Nursing and Rehabilitation
Center in Harveys Lake. He was
preceded in death by the love of
his life, Ann McCloskey. They
spent 37 wonderful years together
as husband and wife.
Born in Scranton on Oct. 17,
1937, he was the son of the late
Francis and Miriam Whalen Mc-
Closkey. He was a 1957 graduate
of St. Francis Preparatory School,
Spring Grove. He attended Notre
Dame University and St. Francis
University of Loretto.
He was a loving father and
husband. He was employed as a
salesman and manager for many
years, including at Bell Electric,
Scranton, and retiring from Bob
O’Leary Sports Supplements,
Scranton.
He can be fondly remembered
for his love of sports. He volun-
teered many years as a coach and
served as president of Taylor Mis-
sy Softball League. He coached
many teams at the Taylor Com-
munity Basketball League and
was a scorekeeper for the Bishop
Hannan girls basketball team. He
loved his Eagles, Phillies and be-
loved Notre Dame until the end.
He also was deputy district gover-
nor for the Lions Club and spent
many years volunteering his time.
Surviving are a son, Joseph
Kadlubowski, Dickson City; two
daughters, Ann Marie Michlows-
ki, Virginia, and Kelly Sabaluski,
Lehman; a cousin, Patricia Wil-
liams, Scranton, whom he consid-
ered a sister; and many grandchil-
dren whom he loved dearly.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted on Monday at 8:30 p.m.
in the Joseph W. Sznyter Funeral
Home, 1101 Prospect Ave., Scran-
ton, with the Rev. Arthur Davis
officiating. Interment will be
private at the convenience of the
family. Friends may call Monday
from 7 p.m. until time of service.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 10A
Marvin Warren Cole, Sr.
March 14, 2013
LORRIE ANNE ZI-
OLKOWSKI PAISLEY, 50,
of Lincoln Avenue, Nanticoke,
passed away Saturday, March
16, 2013, at home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc.,
Nanticoke.
EDWARD J. SEBOLKA,
64, of Luzerne, passed away
Thursday, March 14, 2013, in
the Hospital of the University of
Pennsylvania.
Arrangements are pending
and will be announced by the
Daniel J. Hughes Funeral &
Cremation Service, 617 Carey
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
back from home when they
returned to campus follow-
ing spring break, she said.
“We hoped for about 50
promdress,” she said. “The
event snowballed. We had
200 dresses.”
Her team of 15 students
sent letters and fliers to
all the high schools in Lu-
zerne County. The uni-
versity’s public relations
department helped too,
by notifying the area news
media, she said.
All the hard work to pro-
mote apparently was worth
it. There were people wait-
ing outside of the student
center at 8:45 a.m., Cirone
said.
“We raised $500 in the
first half hour,” she said. “I
just can’t believe the turn-
out.”
One room of the Henry
Student Center was con-
verted into a “boutique.”
Several girls browsed
with their mothers and
friends. Terry Balint, of
Larksville, was looking
with her daughter.
“There is a nice selec-
tion,” she said. “It is a good
event to benefit the Relay
to Life.”
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ment at Wilkes University in
Wilkes-Barre, a sponsor of
the event, said that efficiency
has become increasingly im-
portant in the field. “It used
to be that engineers were
concerned with simply build-
ing things well,” said Taylor.
“But we are now also now
concerned with the environ-
ment, minimizing waste, re-
cycling and minimizing long-
term costs.”
“I love see to other designs
as they are being tested,”
said participant Everett Ap-
pleby who attends GAR High
School and the Wilkes-Barre
Area Career & Technical
Center.
“It helps me understand
howmy own design might be
improved.”
Appleby, a senior, was es-
pecially excited to partici-
pate in this weekend’s event
because he plans to attend
Penn State University next
school year and major in en-
gineering.
Dave Zaykoski, drafting
and design instructor at the
Wilkes-Barre Area Career
& Technical Center, said
participants worked “many,
many hours” and often took
their bridges home to perfect
them.
“This is a great experi-
ence in critical thinking, in
applying date and analyzing
results,” said Zaykoski, “in
being committed to planning
and executing an idea.”
David Johns, representing
Greenman-Pedersen Engi-
neering, an event sponsor,
said each participant was
able to present something
unique.
“Each model bridge is dif-
ferent in structure and ap-
pearance, each has it own
type of creativity and archi-
tectural style,” he said.
No two bridges in the com-
petition looked alike; types
and features included arch,
beam, laminated beam and
triangle design.
Donald Kieffer, director of
the contest, said he hopes it
encouraged participants to
consider careers in engineer-
ing, science, math and tech-
nology.
The two top winners of the
event will advance to the In-
ternational Bridge Building
Contest, held in Chicago in
April.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 8A SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 N E W S
Continued from Page 3A
BRIDGES
Continued from Page 3A
DRESS
Everett Appleby, RJ Talarico and Joe Brady, students at Wilkes-
Barre Area Career and Technical Center, show off their entries
in the 2013 Northeast Pennsylvania Regional Bridge Building
Competition, held Saturday at the Viewmont Mall in Dickson
City.
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER
Katie DeAndrea, 16, looks at some of the prom gowns on display at the Wilkes student center
Saturday morning. A Relay for Life team arranged the sale. With more than 225 donated
gowns, the group hoped to raise at least $4,500 for cancer research.
to these local markets while
constantly taking care to min-
imize any impacts on our en-
vironment,” he wrote.
While preparing their emer-
gency response plan, UGI
planners invited the town-
ship’s first responders to tour
their existing compressor sta-
tion near Lawton, Pa., Huff
said.
The station will be moni-
tored remotely around the
clock and, once it is com-
pleted, can be remotely shut
down in an emergency.
In addition, one or two engi-
neers will man the station five
days per week, Huff said.
The Auburn Pipeline’s con-
struction is scheduled to be
completed late this summer.
But some of its first stages are
to be completed soon.
Tree-clearing along the
pipeline’s route must be com-
pleted by April 1, Kelleher
said. The state Department
of Environ-
mental Pro-
tection re-
quires this
b e c a u s e
some pro-
tected tree-
d we l l i n g
a n i m a l s
return after
that date.
When the
t own s h i p
supervisors
g r a n t e d
conditional
a ppr ova l ,
Huff said,
they met no
opposition
from the
public.
He said
he did not
think any-
one else had
even attended the meeting.
Generally, there is a peace-
ful co-existence between the
gas companies and township
residents, he said.
“In this area, we’re used to
gas,” said Huff. “We’ve gotten
comfortable with it.”
The women in the library’s
display were organized into
six categories based on their
contributions. Those catego-
ries: human and civil rights,
politicians and royalty, ex-
ploration and adventure,
sports and entertainment,
women of firsts, and famous
epitaphs, Belles said.
The cutouts were donated
by Wilkes-Barre business-
man Stephen Taren, who
sells them via a website, his-
toricalcutouts.com.
He also donated cutouts of
U.S. presidents in 2011. He
sells a significant number of
cutouts of historical figures
because of public interest,
he said. He prefers creating
likenesses of historical fig-
ures because they offer more
than modern pop culture fig-
ures, he said.
Visitors to the library can
“be inspired by the lives of
these women,” Taren said.
bag
Keller’s
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Lambs 4 oz
While Supplies Last
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Dough
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With Your Gold Card
$
2
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$
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All Varieties
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$
1
99
With Your Gold Card
Imported
from Italy
DaVinci
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Pasta
1 lb
79
¢
With Your Gold Card
With Your Gold Card
With Your Gold Card
Gerrity’s
Large
Eggs
With Your Gold Card
2/
$
3
With Your Gold Card
All Varieties
With Your Gold Card
SALE ENDS SATURDAY, MARCH 23rd. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.
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TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE MUST RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE
ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 PAGE 9A
Continued from Page 3A
UGI
Continued from Page 3A
WOMEN
When the Wash-
ington Township
supervisors
granted condi-
tional approval
for the uGI
Energy facility,
supervisors’ vice
chairman Dan
huff said they
met no opposi-
tion from the
public. he said,
generally, there
is a peaceful
co-existence
between the
gas companies
and township
residents.
PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. — The
first female Marine Corps gen-
eral in charge of its tough-as-
nails basic training site on Par-
ris Island says she’s confident
women in the Corps will be able
to handle combat.
Brig. Gen. Loretta Reynolds
says the Pentagon’s lifting of the
combat exclusion against wom-
en earlier this year means com-
manders will be able to “just use
the talent that they have. Just
use it where they need it. That’s
awesome.”
Reynolds was the first woman
to command a Marine base in a
combat zone when she was put
in charge of Camp Leatherneck
in Afghanistan in 2010. As head
of the 1st Marine Expeditionary
Force’s headquarters group, she
oversaw the base in Helmand
province that grew to house
20,000 Marines.
She also commanded a com-
munications battalion in Iraq
from 2004 to 2005 in battle-
scarred Fallujah.
Now, the Marine Corps has
entrusted her with training all
its women and nearly half its
men. She said young Marines
aren’t as concerned about gen-
der as they are about a com-
mander’s ability to lead.
“Anytime you’re going to take
your Marines into harm’s way,
they are looking for leadership
that is calm, assertive, sure of
themselves,” Reynolds said in
her first extended interview
since the ban was lifted. “And
quite honestly, I don’t think that
some of these young Marines
care if it’s a male or a female.
They just want to be properly
led.”
Reynolds said she doesn’t
think the type of basic training
both male and female recruits
endure on the swampy, insect-
filled island outside Beaufort
will change much, given the
Pentagon’s lifting of the ban.
“We already work them pretty
hard,” she said. “We think we
give them a solid foundation.”
As one of only two basic train-
ing sites for the Marines, Parris
Island holds near-legendary sta-
tus in the branch’s lore. After 12
weeks of arduous training, about
17,000 men and 3,000 women
graduate from the tough-love of
some 604 drill instructors who
determine whether the recruits
are worthy of pinning on the Ea-
gle, Globe and Anchor emblem
worn by Marines.
“What we’re looking for here
is character, intellect and poten-
tial to carry forth our legacy,”
Reynolds said.
In January, Defense Secre-
tary Leon Panetta lifted the so-
called combat exclusion that
kept women from serving in
units that engage the enemy,
such as the infantry, tank and
special forces units of the Army
and Marine Corps. Their lead-
ers, the service chiefs, have yet
to determine exactly what the
physical standards are for those
jobs, and some roles might still
exclude women.
Minimum physical require-
ments for many hard-core com-
bat jobs had never been estab-
lished, and the effort to come up
with them is still in under way,
Reynolds pointed out.
“There’s a lot more work to
do to figure it out,” the general
said.
The Corps has proposed
adapting its twice-yearly physi-
cal fitness test to require that
women complete at least three
chin-ups, a standard that men
must currently meet. Data is be-
ing collected to see whether the
standard is appropriate.
In the past decade, men and
women have found themselves
fighting side-by-side when combat
has overtaken support units once
considered behind combat lines.
More than 150 women have been
killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.
About 7 percent of Marines
are female compared to about
14 percent overall for the armed
forces.
The following real estate transactions
have been recorded in the Luzerne
County Office of the Recorder of Deeds
for the week of March 11-15:
• Federal National Mortgage Associa-
tion, Fannie Mae and McCabe, Weis-
berg & Conway to Angela Ann Farkus,
608 Grant St., Hazleton, $55,000.
• Wesley J. and Bonnie S. Bouika to
Brian Sciglano, 145 W. Pettebone St.,
Forty Fort, $87,000.
• Federal National Mortgage Asso-
ciation, Fannie Mae and Udren Law
Offices, P.C. to Thomas and Marguerite
Tarrant, 485 S. Main Road, Wright
Township, $121,900.
• Thomas G. and Mary Erica Keiper
to Thomas G. Keiper, 120 Joan Drive,
Wright Township, $231,100.
• Christopher M. Olian to Husky Assets,
LLC, 541 Rear Hayes St., Hazleton,
$63,871.
• Jill M. Szewczyk to John and Yvette
Ploskonka, 8 Hoffman Road, Exeter
Township, $220,000.
• Kathleen Ann Droskey, Mercedes
Joan Vinsko and Carl A. Leighton III
to Brian M. Vinsko, 5 Marjorie Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, $140,000.
• Walden Estates Inc. to Nancer and
Sadjia Sid Mohand, Woodlawn Avenue,
Fairview Township, $334,582.
• Eagle Rock Resort Co. to Sean F. and
Jennifer M. Lawler, Pine Valley Lane,
Hazle Township, $59,900.
• Luzerne County Sheriff to U.S. Bank,
404 Main St., Avoca, $146,601.
• Eagle Rock Resort Co. to Christopher
and Danette Cassetty, Laurel Valley,
Hazle Township, $51,900.
• Eagle Rock Resort Co. to James
Marius II and Joan Marie McCoy,
Turnberry Lane, Black Creek Township,
$85,900.
• Garfield W. and Susan W. McFarlane,
4 Sunset Drive, Newport Township,
$261,500.
• Franklin C. and Frances C. Messinger,
1823 SalemBlvd., SalemTownship,
$99,000.
• Timothy F. and Carolyn K. Foran to
Anthony J. Banta, 4 Dakota Drive, Dal-
las Township, $257,000.
• Michael R. and Ronald J. Kostelansky
to Vincent and Julie M. Perta, 210
Beechwood Drive, Laflin, $182,000.
• Patricia Schillaci to James J. and
Ann Marie Pizano, 180 First St., Exeter,
$76,760.
• Christopher A. and Kimberly A. Sar-
tini to John R. and Debbie S. Fortune,
240 Mario Drive, Dorrance Township,
$127,000.
• Robert W. and Carole B. Surridge to
Kelly E. Whalen, 580 Meadowland Ave.,
Kingston, $199,000.
• Sean M. McAndrew to Sean M. McAn-
drew and Deirdre Ueberroth, 86 Fire
Cut Road, Kingston Township, $141,414.
• Albin M. Sr. and Margaret F. Mar-
cincavage to Roy Michael Reece Jr.,
16 Charter Drive, Wright Township,
$208,000.
• Alan Cohnen to My Quest Properties
LLC, 14 Manhattan St., Ashley, $61,000.
• Fannie Mae, Federal National Mort-
gage Association and Phelan Hallinan
LLP to Kyle Wesley and Brittany Lynn
Lamoreaux, 400 Warsaw St., Swoyers-
ville, $85,500.
• John Halbing and Donna Klug to
Jacalyn S. Leu, 197 A Firehouse Road,
Lake Township, $175,000.
• Sharon K. Zegda to Holly J. Frary,
36 Walden Drive, Wright Township,
$180,000.
• Sean McAfee to John F. Schutz Sr.,
213-215 Boland Ave., Hanover Town-
ship, $100,000.
• Caffrey-Trimmel LLC to Hazleton
Integration Project Inc., 225 E. Fourth
St., Hazleton, $358,750.
• Laine M. Hoffman to Barbara A. Bon-
ner, 85 Franklin St., Hazleton, $107,000
• Joseph N. and Barry N. Spanial to
Carmen Paulino and George Jennings,
216 Wilson Drive, Hazleton, $140,000.
• Edward Jr. and Shannon Pietroski and
Shannon A. Smurl to Anna M. McTav-
ish, 140 Laurel Drive, Wright Township,
$136,000.
• Estate of Vincent J. Zinkavich to
Lesa M. Giambra, 114 Warren St., West
Pittston, $62,500.
• Mary Sipida and Joan M. Embert to
Angela M. Mussoline, 526 Green St.,
Foster Township, $57,000.
• Federal National Mortgage Associa-
tion, Fannie Mae and Phelan Hallinan
LLP to Michael D. Porpiglia, 105 N.
Main St., Sugarloaf, $158,000.
• Diana, Theodore and Gary Allabaugh
to Plymouth Township, 180 Coal St.,
Plymouth Township, $51,000.
• Michelle Marchetti, Donna Lee Oakes
and Donald Oakes to Pistoria Realty
LLC, 118 Trayor St., Exeter, $58,000.
• WilliamA. and Florence E. Lusher to
Taylor S. Hale, 209 N. Wyoming St.,
Hazleton, $100,100.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page7A
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PA LIC#093230
PUBLIC NOTICE
Adams and Associates Inc., with its prime
contract to operate the Red Rock Job Corps,
Located on Route 487 North, 5 miles north of Route-118,
Sullivan County is soliciting vendors
for the following:
Optometric Services
Propane
#2 Heating Fuel
Boiler/Air Conditioning Repair
Sludge Removal
Trash Removal
Pest control
Linen Services
Floor Mat Service
Bread Distribution
Food Service Dairy
Ink/toner supplies
Water Treatment Test
Medical Supplies
Food Service Beverage (to include soda and juice)
Bid packages are available by contacting
Theresa Insinger, Purchasing Agent,
at Insinger.Theresa@jobcorps.org or 570-477-0203
by March 31, 2013.
Red Rock Job Corps Center endorses the Federal
Government’s Policy that small, and small disadvantaged
business concerns, woman owned small business
concerns and hub zoned businesses shall have the
maximum practicable opportunity to participate in the
performance of government contracts.
Red Rock Job Corps Center conducts its procurement
activities in such a manner as to ensure full compliance
with the government’s policy (public Law 85-507) and
specific provisions of operating with the government.
JANNEY MONTGOMERY SCOTT LLC
PROFESSIONAL INVESTMENT ADVICE
kkleinman@janney.com | www.KeithRKleinman.com
Janney Montgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE FINRA SIPC
KEITH R. KLEINMAN
First Vice President / Wealth Management
570.283.8140 | 800.643.5021
270 Pierce Street, Ste 108 | Kingston, PA 18704
570.963.9203 | 800.638.4417
72 Glenmaura Nat’l Blvd | Scranton, PA 18507
RETIREMENT AND FINANCIAL PLANNING
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIOS REVIEWS
ANNUITY REVIEWS
LIFE INSURANCE REVIEWS
Distinctive
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Professional Eye Care You Can Count On
208-1111
Route 315/Plaza 315, Wilkes-Barre Across from the Woodlands
Open Mon.-Thurs. 10:45-7:00 Fri. 10:45-5:00 Sat. 10:45-3:00
www.engleeyewear.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 10
Betty J. O’Toole
March 13, 2013
B
etty J. O’Toole, 90, of Dal-
las, passed away Wednesday,
March 13, 2013, at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre,
daughter of the late Charles and
Emma Eustice Kishbaugh, and
was a graduate of Meyers High
School, class of 1940. Betty re-
tired as a librarian with the Mill-
burn Public Library in Millburn,
N.J., after 25 years of service.
Betty was preceded in death by
her husband, Thomas J. O’Toole;
brother, Charles Kishbaugh; and
sister, Louise Kishbaugh Kresge.
Surviving are brother, Jack Kish-
baugh, Westmont, N.J.; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be held at the con-
venience of the family. Interment
will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery,
Wilkes-Barre. Arrangements are
being conducted by the Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home Inc.,
2940 Route 309/Memorial High-
way, Dallas.
Jean Habib
March 14, 2013
J
ean Habib, of Mountain Top,
passed away Thursday, March
14, 2013, surrounded by her lov-
ing family.
Born Jan. 31, 1928, she was a
daughter of the late Anthony and
Mary Corcoran Carlin.
Raised in Wilkes-Barre, she
attended GAR Memorial High
School. She was a lifetime mem-
ber of St. Patrick’s Church (St.
Andrew Parish).
She was the wife of the late Sam
Habib, who preceded her in death
on Dec. 26, 1992. She spent their
life together as a homemaker.
She was preceded in death by
her granddaughter, Rebecca Mc-
Callick, on July 24, 2012; broth-
ers, Paul Carlin, Anthony Carlin,
Thomas Carlin and Michael Car-
lin; sisters, Ann Carlin, Loretta
Cowell, Mary Claire Vaughn,
Ruth LeBert, Eleanor Brisk and
Margaret Hollander.
Jean is survived by her daugh-
ter, Judy Pribula and her, husband
Tom, Dorrance; granddaughter,
Claire McCallick, Dorrance; sis-
ter, Sally Carey, Dallas; and nu-
merous nieces, nephews and god-
children.
Jean forever will be remem-
bered as a loving wife, mother,
grandmother, sister, aunt and
friend.
Funeral services were held
Saturday from the Lehman Fam-
ily Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass
of Christian Burial in St. Patrick’s
Church (St. Andrew Parish), 316
Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment was in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made in
Jean’s memory to the Sisters of
Mercy Mid-Atlantic Community,
PO Box 369, Dallas, PA 18612-
0369.
For more information or to
send the family condolences, visit
the funeral home website at www.
lehmanfuneralhome.com.
Francis T. Kumor
March 9, 2013
F
rancis T. Kumor, 72, of Shil-
lington, passed away March 9,
2013, in the Reading Hospital and
Medical Center.
He was the husband of Rose-
ann M. (Chrobak) Kumor, whom
he married almost 45 years ago on
May 25, 1968.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
a son of the late Chester F. and
Leona (Kijek) Kumor. Francis was
a 1958 graduate of E.L. Meyers
High School, Wilkes-Barre, and
earned his engineering degree
from Penn State University.
He was a mechanical engineer,
retiring from the Parsons Corp.
Francis was a member of St. John
Baptist de la Salle Roman Catho-
lic Church, Shillington. He was a
U.S. Army veteran.
Francis was an avid Philadel-
phia Phillies and Philadelphia Ea-
gles fan. He loved spending time
with his family and will be dearly
missed.
In addition to his wife, he is
survived by his son, Dr. Francis V.
Kumor, Kutztown University fac-
ulty member, Mohnton, Pa.; sis-
ter, Alexandra Holmgren, Ashley;
and many nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated
Monday at 10 a.m. in St.
John Baptist de la Salle Roman
Catholic Church, Shillington. A
visitation will be held one hour
prior to Mass in the church. Buri-
al will be in Fairview Cemetery,
Shillington.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the Francis T.
Kumor Music Scholarship Fund,
c/o Kutztown University Founda-
tion, P.O. Box 151, Kutztown, PA
19530.
Edward J. Kuhn Funeral Home
Inc., West Reading, is in charge
of arrangements. Online condo-
lences may be recorded at www.
kuhnfuneralhome.com.
Elsa Dorothea Thum Lutz
Feb. 25,2013
E
lsa Dorothea Thum Lutz, 98,
of Minneapolis, died at home
on Feb. 25, 2013.
Born in Bayonne, N.J., Elsa
graduated from Skidmore College
in 1936. She served two years in
North Africa and Italy as a Red
Cross volunteer during World
War II. Later, as a military wife,
Elsa often moved. With her hus-
band’s retirement she settled in
his home, Cambra, Pa. She was a
child protection case worker for
Columbia County from 1961 to
1974.
Elsa moved to Clinton, N.J., to
live with her sister, Helen, for 10
years. For the last 22 years, she
lived at Augustana Apartments,
Minneapolis, near her daughter.
In each location Elsa found and
was active in a church. She sat
on boards, mowed lawns, shov-
eled snow, taught Sunday school,
raised money to build a new
church, sewed curtains, made
ice cream, swept basements —
everything imaginable. In Min-
neapolis, she was an active mem-
ber of Plymouth Congregational
Church. Elsa once counted that
she set up home in 25 different
places.
She loved travel, visiting much
of the world during her long life.
She also was expert at sewing,
quilting, needlepoint, rug hook-
ing, embroidery and knitting and
had a wonderful eye for both tra-
ditional and modern creations.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, retired Col. Thom-
as Leroy Lutz, and sister, Helen
Lazarus Barrett.
Surviving are her daughter, Ha-
zel Lutz (Thomas P. Anderson),
Corcoran, Minn.; sons, Thomas
(Carol), Anaheim, Calif., and
Charles (Karen), Lakeville, Pa.;
granddaughter, Toni Lutz; niece,
Patti Hoff; nephew, Herman Laza-
rus (Bonnie); and many grand-
nieces and grandnephews.
A memorial service will be
held Friday at 2 p.m. at Plymouth
Congregational Church, 1900
Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis. A sec-
ond memorial service will be held
April 9 at 1 p.m. in the chapel of
Augustana Health Care Center,
1007 E. 14th St., Minneapolis.
Memorial donations are pre-
ferred and may be given to the
American Red Cross or to POR-
TICO Interfaith Housing Collab-
orative, 2610 University Ave. W,
Suite 100, St. Paul, MN 55114.
PROPERTY TRANSFERS
Parris Island leader says women can handle combat
Brig. Gen. says lifting combat
exclusion against women gives
Marines more talent to use.
By SUSANNE M. SCHAFER
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Marine Brig. Gen. Loretta Reynolds answers a question dur-
ing an interview at the Marine Corps Training Depot on Parris
Island, S.C.
O ffering Q u ality I n Perso nal C are
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 11A
power, said Pennsylvania State
Police Commissioner Frank
Noonan.
Still, just one elected official
— former Senate Democratic
floor leader Bob Mellow from
Lackawanna County — is facing
charges, while some top law-
makers and commission mem-
bers, past and present, say they
knew nothing of such allegedly
pervasive corruption.
“I think that this type of ac-
tivity has been well-known
and well-discussed throughout
political circles for a number
of years,” Noonan told report-
ers as he and Attorney General
Kathleen Kane announced the
charges. “But … you have to
have evidence. The people who
were charged are the people we
have evidence against.”
It was not enough to charge an
elected official simply because
they knew about the 60/40 rule:
Evidence was necessary that
someone had worked to rig the
process, Kane said.
On Wednesday, Mellow, three
former top Pennsylvania Turn-
pike Commission officials and
two businessmen were charged
in what prosecutors say was a
long-running scheme in which
contract-hungry vendors gave
lavish gifts and political cam-
paign contributions to improve
their chances of landing a con-
tract.
Contracting decisions at the
Turnpike typically followed the
60/40 rule, according to the 85-
page grand jury presentment.
“According to several witness-
es testifying before the grand
jury, whichever political party
(is) in power gets 60 percent of
the contracts or jobs, and the
minority party receives 40 per-
cent.”
The turnpike commission
might be unavoidably political:
The governor nominates turn-
pike commissioners to four-year
terms and each must be con-
firmed by a two-thirds majority
of the state Senate, giving sena-
tors influence there. Tradition-
ally, three of the five turnpike
commissioners are from the
governor’s political party, and
one must be the state transpor-
tation secretary.
According to the grand jury,
an unnamed former chief op-
erating officer of the turnpike
commission said “typically,
there was always a 60/40 rule”
that was dictated by either the
Senate leadership or the gover-
nor’s office.
Allen Biehler, Rendell’s trans-
portation secretary for eight
years, said he had heard about
the 60/40 split, perhaps even
before he became transportation
secretary in 2003. But he said he
did not know if it was true.
As a commissioner, he voted
on contracts, relying on com-
mission staff to recommend a
firm. He would quiz the staff
about their conclusions, but he
did not have time to review all
the competing proposals for
each job, he said.
Still, the culture at the agency
worried him.
“I always had an uncomfort-
able feeling about the place,”
said Biehler, who said he was
not contacted by law enforce-
ment.
Rendell, a Democrat who
served from 2003 to 2011, as
well as House Speaker Sam
Smith, Senate President Pro
Tempore Joe Scarnati and Sen-
ate Majority Leader Dominic Pi-
leggi, all of whom were in posi-
tions of power during the period
scrutinized by the grand jury,
said through spokespeople that
they knew nothing of the 60/40
split.
Former Senate Majority Lead-
er David Brightbill did not want
to discuss it. One former com-
missioner, Timothy Carson, and
current Commissioner Pasquale
Deon, who joined it in 2002, did
not respond to requests for com-
ment Friday.
Former Senate President Pro
Tempore Robert Jubelirer, who
served until 2006, said rigging
contracts is “completely for-
eign” to anything he or his fel-
low Republicans did while run-
ning the Senate. If a formula to
guide hiring was developed, he
did not know about it, he said.
“We recommended people
who were very competent,” said
Jubelirer, who also said he was
not contacted by law enforce-
ment. “Sometimes they got
hired, sometimes they didn’t.”
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TURNPIKE
Astronauts
return to
Earth from
space station
MOSCOW — A Soyuz
space capsule carrying an
American astronaut and two
Russian cosmonauts landed
Saturday morning on the
foggy steppes of Kazakhstan,
safely returning the three
men to Earth after a 144-day
mission to the International
Space Station.
NASA’s Kevin Ford and Rus-
sians Oleg Novitsky and Yevg-
eny Tarelkin had been sched-
uled to return on Friday, but
the landing was postponed by
a day because of bad weather.
Live footage on NASA TV
showed all three men smil-
ing as they were helped out of
the capsule and into reclining
chairs to begin their acclimati-
zation to Earth’s gravity after
nearly five months in space.
A NASA TV commentator
said only two of 12 search
and rescue helicopters were
allowed to land at the touch-
down site because of heavy
clouds and fog. So instead of
being placed in an inflatable
medical tent for checks, the
astronauts were taken fairly
quickly to one of the helicop-
ters. The temperature at the
time was well below freezing.
The crew was then flown
to Kostanai, the staging site
in Kazakhstan, where they
posed for more photographs.
Ford put on a traditional felt
Kazakh hat and draped a
matching coat over his flight
suit, while holding up a matry-
oshka nesting doll of himself
— all souvenirs of the mission
that began and ended in the
Central Asian country.
The three men blasted off
on Oct. 23 from the Baikonur
cosmodrome, which Russia
leases from Kazakhstan.
The Associated Press
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 12A
the city – became interested
in his heritage as a young man
and has been studying Irish his-
tory most of his life. He and his
wife have visited Ireland about
a dozen times, he said, and he
was involved in running an
Irish studies program at King’s
College for 30 years.
Like many European im-
migrants, residents from the
northern part of Ireland began
coming to the United States in
the early 1800s with hopes of
making their fortunes and leav-
ing behind English rule, McKe-
own said.
But it was famine associated
with the widespread failure
of the potato crop in the mid
1840s that led to the deaths of
about a million Irish and led
another million to emigrate,
seeking work and a better life
in Europe and America.
“The Irish who came to this
area of Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania really came because of
the coal mines and the fact that
there were jobs, even though
the jobs were totally different
than the ones in their culture
(farming),” McKeown said.
Most Irish who settled in this
area came through the port of
Philadelphia because Ellis Is-
land in New York wasn’t open
until 1893, McKeown said.
First wave accepted
The first substantial influx of
Irish immigrants came to this
area in the 1870s and 1880s,
he said, and they were warmly
accepted by employers, unlike
those who settled in big cities
such as New York and Boston,
where they were infamously
greeted by signs in shop win-
dows stating, “Irish need not
apply.”
Unfortunately, work in the
anthracite mines of Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania was hard
and dangerous, and unlike the
Welsh immigrants who were
skilled miners, the Irish were
given the less favorable labor
jobs.
As Eastern Europeans be-
gan arriving, the Irish began
to climb the social and profes-
sional ladders.
“When other immigrants
started coming, the Irish
moved up a notch. They got
jobs as firemen, policemen,
mail carriers,” McKeown said,
noting entry into politics soon
followed.
And then it was Lithuanians,
Slovaks, Polish and Italians who
were the least favored. They did
not assimilate as easily because
they didn’t speak English, as the
Irish did.
Still, all of the ethnic groups
had a shared experience in their
suppression by the coal barons,
and it was an Irish priest – Father
John Curran – who helped them
organize unions and eventually
fight for the rights of workers.
Curran became good friends
with President Theodore Roo-
sevelt, and the two worked to
help the miners negotiate with
the mine owners to gain better
working conditions and a little
better pay.
Curran was pastor at Holy
Saviour Church in the East End.
A famous photograph of Curran,
Roosevelt and Bishop Michael
Hoban outside the church is a
common inclusion in historical
books about coal mining in the
Northeast.
McKeown proudly pointed
out a historical marker outside
the church, which is across the
street from his house.
The reason Wilkes-Barre and
many other communities had
Irish and ethnic sections was
because immigrants from par-
ticular countries came together
in waves and settled near peo-
ple who spoke their language,
McKeown said.
Irish pride apparent
And now — with St. Pat-
rick’s parades in Scranton and
Jim Thorpe one weekend and
Wilkes-Barre the next, Irish beer
and food specials in taverns, and
Irish flags and green clothing
sported just about everywhere
— it’s easy to see that pride in
Irish heritage and a celebration
of the culture is still alive and
strong in Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania.
The grandson of three Irish
immigrants (his mother’s moth-
er was German), McKeown said
that pride in Irish heritage is
most evident today in music and
dance, as step dancing is not an
easily acquired skill, yet there
are no less than four step danc-
ing groups in the area.
President Theodore Roosevelt is flanked by Bishop Michael Hoban, left, and the Rev. John
Curran, in this Aug. 21, 1912 photo taken at Holy Saviour Roman Catholic Church in the East
End of Wilkes-Barre.
Continued from Page 1A
HISTORY
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Q u I c k I R I S h fA c T S
• Pennsylvania boasts a robust
Irish-American population. In
2011, more than 2.2 million
Pennsylvanians claimed Irish
ancestry.
• Pennsylvania ranks third
among the states in total num-
ber of Irish-Americans, behind
only New York and California.
• Pennsylvania ranks seventh in
the percentage of the popula-
tion claiming Irish ancestry.
Overall, 17.6 percent of Pennsyl-
vania’s population claim Irish
ancestry. The national average
is 11 percent. The Irish account
for 20 percent of Luzerne
County’s population.
I R I S h T R I V I A
1. What was the nationality of
St. Patrick?
A. British B. Irish C. American D.
Italian
2. Which Luzerne County town
has the largest percentage of
Irish?
A. Avoca B. Pittston C. Sugar
Notch D. Wilkes-Barre
3. What’s the largest ethnic
group in Luzerne County?
A. Germans B. Irish C. Italians D.
Polish
4. Which municipality in Lu-
zerne County has a section
called Irishtown?
A. Hazleton B. Nanticoke C. Plains
Township D. Pittston Township
5. What is the official emblem of
Ireland?
A. Snake B. Shamrock C. Lepre-
chaun D. Harp
A n S W E R S
1. Most agree that St. Patrick was
British, sold into slavery in Ire-
land, left, was educated, became
a missionary, returned to Ireland
and brought Catholicism to the
isle.
2. Sugar Notch tops the list
with 35.4 percent of borough
residents claiming Irish heritage.
Hughestown, Forty Fort, Avoca
and Black Creek Township round
out the top five.
3. In 2010, 23.5 percent of county
residents — 75,045 — claimed
Polish heritage, making that the
largest ethnic group. The Irish
come in second at 20 percent,
with 63,846 residents claiming
Irish heritage.
4. Irishtown is in the Hudson sec-
tion of Plains Township.
5. The official emblem of Ireland
is the harp.
COURTESY OF THE LUZERNE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Norwegian elk hound, on a leash
along South Main Street. Dicker-
son came to watch his son drum
and march with the GAR High
School band.
“Scranton got the great weath-
er,” said Dickerson. “We got the
short end of the stick.”
The difference from last week’s
parade in Lackawanna County was
stark. Instead of sunshine, blue
sky and spring-like temperatures,
clouds, freezing temps and the pre-
cipitation that goes with it blitzed
the Wyoming Valley. Attendance
appeared to be down compared to
previous years .
Still, Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom
Leighton wore a smile as he
watched from the reviewing stand
on Public Square during the 33rd
annual parade. “People came out.
Downtown’s busy. It’s a very suc-
cessful parade,” he said as a por-
table heater glowed fromthe oppo-
site end of the stand.
“We can’t control the weather,”
he said. “People came out with a
smile on their face.”
The less-than-hardy spectators
flocked to bars and restaurants,
peered fromwindows and the stair-
well of a parking garage.
Wayne Price was not one of
them — and not alone. Price, of
Wilkes-Barre, sat on a bench on
Public Square and rested his cane
next to him. “I’m amazed at how
many people turned out,” he said.
“There’s a few gaps but not much.”
Nearby, Lou Sapolis, a Dur-
yea resident, stood near his cart
stocked with novelties and hats.
Most of his wares collected a thin
layer of snow.
“I’ve worked in the snow before
at St. Patrick’s Day parades,” Sapo-
lis said.
The wet weather dampened his
business. “If it was 70 degrees and
sunny, you wouldn’t be talking to
me now,” he told a reporter.
Bundled up and sitting on his
grandmother’s lap , 4-year-old
Nicholas Daniel Pote of Wanamie
reveled in the festivities. He and
his sister Aubree, 6, were close to
the curb awaiting the goodies and
trinkets to come their way fromthe
floats and marchers.
They came with their mother,
Lauren, and grandma, Kathy Flem-
ing, of Nanticoke. “We usually have
four generations here,” Fleming
said. Her mother, Dot Smith of
Nanticoke, broke her ankle and
couldn’t make it, Fleming said.
Flo Miller andher daughter Lisa,
of the Parsons section of Wilkes-
Barre, took shelter under the over-
hang of the building at 58-60 Public
Square. They awaited the arrival of
Miss Teen Pennsylvania Kaitlyn
Miller, a 17-year-old senior atWyo-
ming Valley West High School.
Continued from Page 1A
PARADE
WILKES-BARRE — The ap-
pointment as one of two grand
marshals of the city’s St. Patrick’s
Day Parade was only the begin-
ning for David Morgan.
The injured veteran — much
to the surprise and delight of he
and his family — was welcomed
by the city police department
Saturday as an honorary mem-
ber.
A police honor guard saluted
Morgan, a city native, as he
watched while seated in a wheel-
chair inside a van near the re-
viewing stand on Public Square.
Officer David Kurutz presented
him with the U.S. flag that had
flown above the police station
earlier in the day. And during
a ceremony at the start of the
parade, Chief Gerry Dessoye
pinned a badge to Morgan’s chest
after tucking a department patch
into the folded flag.
“We had no idea that the Wil-
kes-Barre Police Department was
going to do this,” said Morgan’s
mother Peggy.
“It means everything,” she
said, speaking for her son, a GAR
High School graduate who had
been a corrections officer at the
State Correctional Institution at
Dallas.
“He’s not forgotten,” she said,
adding neither are the service-
men and women who served
their country.
Mayor Tom Leighton earlier
this week visited the Veterans
Administration Community
Living Center in Plains Town-
ship, where Morgan resides, and
named him a grand marshal. He
shared the distinction this year
with Joe Clark of Ashley.
Morgan, 38, suffered a traumat-
ic brain injury in a head-on crash
while serving as a Navy Reserve
military police officer in Kuwait
in November 2009. The driver of
the sport utility vehicle carrying
Morgan, 37-year-old Brian Patton
of Nanticoke, was killed.
After Dessoye read a proclama-
tion from the mayor, David Mor-
gan smiled.
“I think he’s just going,
‘Hooyah,’” said Peggy Morgan,
referring to the military slang
term for approval.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 N E W S PAGE 13A
The St. Patrick’s parade marches on
Kilee Favors, 8, left, and Samantha Chopik, 11, cousins
from Nanticoke, take in event’s sights and sounds.
An umbrella covers, left to right, Aubree Pote, 6, of Nanticoke,
Kenley Shovlin, 7, and Jordyn Shovlin, 5, both of Wilkes-Barre.
Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom Leighton arrives Saturday at the
reviewing stand on Public Square.
TIMES LEADER PHOTOS/PETE G. WILCOX
Members of the Scoil Rince Na Connemara Irish Dancers step high as the group approaches Public Square Saturday.
Hooyah! Surprise honor for David Morgan
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Former U.S. Naval Reserve military police officer David Mor-
gan, left, is saluted by Police Chief Gerry Dessoye.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
The Collie Club of Northeast Pennsylva-
nia is represented in Saturday’s Irish-
themed festivities.
Even a dog can sport a frilly green collar
one day a year.
The hat worn by the drum major of the Ceol Mor band re-
veals some snow accumulation.
Despite the wintry weather, sidewalks were lined several people deep for
the city’s annual celebration of St. Patrick.
Jennifer Stoudt of Wilkes-Barre shields
son William, 4, from the snow.
The Irem String Band brought a colorful flourish to the
march on Main Street.
Irem Temple clowns revel in the applause from parade spec-
tators in downtown Wilkes-Barre.
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on staffing saying, “there’s no
rhyme or reason as to how
much staff or staff mix there
is. It’s something staff feels ev-
eryday of every working hour,”
Klinger said.
Another strong supporter of
the bills is the nursing union
that represents about 5,000
nurses statewide, including
several hundred at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
“Nurses and patients need
this protection,” said Patricia
Eakin, an emergency room
nurse at Temple University
Hospital and president of The
Pennsylvania Association of
Staff Nurses and Allied Pro-
fessionals. “If we don’t have
adequate time to do our work
– assessing patients for change
in condition, administering
medications properly, ensur-
ing that the patient is out of
bed and walking so they don’t
develop pneumonia or life-
threatening blood clots – pa-
tients can die.”
The Pennsylvania Associa-
tion of Staff Nurses and Allied
Professionals has backed en-
actment of similar legislation
previously. An almost identi-
cal bill was introduced last ses-
sion by Mundy. It was referred
to the House Health Commit-
tee and never made it out.
“We will keep fighting,”
Klinger said. She noted that
for seven years nurses fought
for the state to approve a man-
datory overtime law. That hap-
pened and Klinger said that
nurses will keep fighting for
this bill to become law, too.
Hospital statement
Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal issued a statement on the
proposal, pointing out present
best practices work:
“Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital is committed to provid-
ing safe, quality care and a
safe and comfortable hospital
environment for our patients.
We staff our hospital based on
the number of patients in our
care and their medical needs
and greatly appreciate the
many employees who deliver
that care day in and day out.”
California’s legislature ap-
proved a similar mandate to
address the state’s nursing
shortage and patient safety,
and Mundy said an evaluation
of data since the law took ef-
fect shows it’s working.
According to Board of Regis-
tered Nursing data, since Cali-
fornia’s ratio law was signed,
the number of registered nurs-
es in California has grown by
approximately 100,000. Many
of California’s largest hospital
systems have seen their turn-
over and vacancy rates fall
below 5 percent, which is far
below the national average,
Mundy noted.
While that may be what data
show, a Geisinger Health Sys-
tem spokesman said patient
outcomes are not affected.
“In line with the position
of the Hospital Association
of Pennsylvania, at Geisinger,
we believe mandated nurse
staffing ratios have not dem-
onstrated improvement in pa-
tient outcomes,” said Matt Van
Stone, a spokesman for the
health system that operates
facilities in Scranton, Plains
Township, South Wilkes-Barre
and elsewhere.
He said that all hospitals
are “required to ensure safe
and adequate staffing under
their licensure regulations,
Joint Commission accredita-
tion standards and Medicare
Conditions of Participation.”
Geisinger hospitals, Van Stone
said, comply with these re-
quirements.
“Nurse staffing levels are in-
fluenced by multiple factors,
all of which are taken into con-
sideration, reviewed each day
and for each shift to ensure ap-
propriate staffing,” Van Stone
said. Among those factors
are: education of nurses, total
years of experience, number
of patients assigned to each
nurse, number of ancillary and
other licensed staff, patient
acuity and technology support
to the nursing staff.
Association weighs in
Roger Baumgarten, a
spokesman for the Hospital
Association of Pennsylvania,
said “Pennsylvania’s hospitals
are opposed to mandatory ra-
tios, and have been for many
years. There are too many
variables involved with deter-
mining staffing levels, and any
one-size-fits-all policy/ratio ig-
nores those variables..”
While Baumgarten said the
association, and its member
hospitals, “recognize the im-
portance of nurses in provid-
ing high quality care and know
that nurses make a difference
in preventing harm and saving
lives.” But the results in Cali-
fornia have only shown “that
California hospitals did expe-
rience increased labor costs
higher than in other states.”
The House bill has been
sent to the Finance Commit-
tee. The Senate bill has not
moved yet.
Continued from Page 1A
NURSES
PITTSBURGH — AT&T will
close one Pittsburgh call center
and curtail operations at another,
a spokesman said Saturday, and
about 200 western Pennsylva-
nia workers will be affected, the
union said.
“Significant declines in call vol-
umes” at the landline centers as
customers move to wireless ser-
vice led to the cutbacks, AT&T
spokesman Marty Richter said.
The workers are members of
CWA Locals 13500 and 13550
in Pittsburgh and service calls
from AT&T business customers
and consumer sales. Local 13500
President Sandy Kmetyk late Fri-
day called it “devastating news.”
Officials said the decision came
as a surprise to business custom-
er care workers because the office
“has been working overtime for
six months to keep up with the
current workload.”
Union: AT&T to close,
cut jobs at call centers
The Associated Press
Monterrey
93/62
Chihuahua
77/44
Los Angeles
72/51
Washington
46/35
New York
42/30
Miami
78/69
Atlanta
72/57
Detroit
34/26
Houston
82/63
Kansas City
42/33
Chicago
36/28
Minneapolis
29/23
El Paso
79/54
Denver
58/27
Billings
42/20
San Francisco
63/44
Seattle
50/38
Toronto
30/23
Montreal
22/15
Winnipeg
18/9
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
today’s weather.
Temperatures are
today’s highs and
tonight’s lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
MON WED
THU FRI
TUE
SAT
TODAY
38°
22°
Afternoon
snow, 1-2"
38° 34°
Colder
with
flurries
38° 21°
Cold with
some sun
38° 22°
Mostly
cloudy
40° 25°
Showers of
rain and
snow
45° 25°
Mostly
sunny
47° 30°
Partly
sunny
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.
Yesterday 34
Month to date 479
Season to date 4702
Last season to date 4178
Normal season to date 5080
Anchorage 31/14/s 28/15/s
Baltimore 41/33/c 41/38/r
Boston 39/23/pc 36/32/pc
Buffalo 32/21/pc 39/32/sn
Charlotte 68/46/pc 61/56/c
Chicago 36/28/c 40/18/c
Cleveland 34/28/pc 45/28/sn
Dallas 70/54/c 72/44/pc
Denver 58/27/pc 52/23/pc
Honolulu 80/61/pc 79/63/s
Indianapolis 38/33/r 49/25/sh
Las Vegas 78/56/s 73/56/pc
Milwaukee 30/24/pc 40/17/c
New Orleans 76/63/pc 78/57/t
Norfolk 47/38/r 58/54/c
Okla. City 53/40/c 61/34/pc
Orlando 82/60/s 83/63/pc
Phoenix 85/59/s 84/58/s
Pittsburgh 38/31/pc 44/33/r
Portland, ME 34/14/pc 35/27/pc
St. Louis 39/35/sn 50/25/c
San Francisco 63/44/pc 63/44/pc
Seattle 50/38/sh 50/35/sh
Wash., DC 46/35/r 43/42/r
Bethlehem 3.47 -0.31 16
Wilkes-Barre 11.54 -1.98 22
Towanda 6.74 -2.05 16
Port Jervis 4.71 -0.40 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Saturday.
Today Mon Today Mon Today Mon
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Mar 19 Mar 27
Apr 2
First Full
Last New
Apr 10
7:12 a.m.
10:20 a.m.
7:12 p.m.
12:23 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 28-34. Lows: 14-20. Partly sunny today. Some clouds tonight.
Afternoon snow tomorrow, accumulating 1-2 inches.
Highs: 42-48. Lows: 31-37. Intervals of clouds and sunshine today.
Cloudy tonight. A thick cloud cover and becoming rainy tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 29-35. Lows: 14-20. Partly sunny today. Increasing clouds
tonight. Snow tomorrow; breezy in the afternoon.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 42. Low: 30. Partly sunny today. Some clouds tonight. Rain
tomorrow; there can be some wet snowflakes mixed in.
High: 45. Low: 32. Clouds and sunshine today. Overcast tonight. Rain
tomorrow, mixed with a little snow early in the day.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Saturday
High/low 34°/27°
Normal high/low 46°/27°
Record high 76° (1990)
Record low 10° (1992)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.09"
Month to date 1.04"
Normal m-t-d 1.19"
Year to date 4.39"
Normal y-t-d 5.59"
38/22
36/22
45/32
39/26
36/24
38/25
40/30
37/25
39/24
36/17
30/18
32/17
35/15
38/18
42/30
Summary: Chilly rain, with snow along its northern fringe, will spread from the
mid-Mississippi Valley to the southern mid-Atlantic today. Strong winds and
some snow will whip through the northern Rockies.
K
Sunday Extra
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
SECTI ON B
timesleader.com
together at last
love, they attest, really is better the second time around
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL / mbiebel@timesleader.com
F
or David Brace, two short sentences explain the way he feels about his bride. •“I lost you once. I’ll never
lose you again.” • The former Lois Kammerer, who exchanged vows with David on Saturday at the
Luzerne United Methodist Church, cherishes those words and admits they sum up her feelings as well.
Newlyweds David and Lois Brace admire their wedding cake, which is shaped like a top hat and complemented by an Oscar statuette
and film reel.
EDITOR’S NOTE: Vows is an occasional series that tells the story of how a couple found each other. If you would like The Times Leader
to profile your wedding, please contact Mary Therese Biebel at mbiebel@timesleader.com or call 570-829-7283.
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
So, why is TV
such a turnoff
these days?
By VERNE GAY
Newsday
You could call this the winter of
their discontent — but they (ABC,
CBS, NBC and Fox) probably would
use other words, none printable here.
Bluntly speaking, this has been an aw-
ful winter for the broadcast networks.
Don’t bother looking for ABC’s
much-promoted Anthony Edwards
newcomer (“Zero Hour”) — it’s gone.
“Red Widow” limped through Sun-
day’s premiere; CBS’ “Golden Boy”
arrived quietly; NBC’s “Do No Harm”
was whacked after two outings; even
Fox’s “The Following” — which just
earned a full-season pickup — has slid
after a strong start.
What’s going on? I spoke with a few
industry experts — including senior
executives at the networks who re-
quested anonymity — and these are
reasons we came up with for why none
of this winter’s newshows have caught
on with viewers.
Theory 1: The “newnew” paradigm:
Fancy talk for how people are watch-
ing TV differently, particularly young
people (who largely watch streaming
content) and boomers (huge DVR us-
ers.) An example of the new new para-
digm — “Zero TV homes,” Nielsen’s
term for homes with no TV. There are
5 million of them
now, up from 1.27
million only two
years ago. These
“homes” — usu-
ally occupied by
young singles —
are getting their
TV via computer
or tablets. They
are the trendset-
ters, and if they
aren’t watching
new network
shows when they launch, then the
new shows are instantly in trouble.
“Broadcast is old (in terms of viewers),
cable is young, online is younger,” says
Brad Adgate, senior vice president of
Horizon Media, a New York advertis-
ing frm. “That pretty much sums up
where this is heading.”
Theory 2: It’s the show, stupid. Or
put another way, most people don’t
want to watch boring, derivative TV
anymore. HBO, Showtime, FX, AMC
— now Netfix (“House of Cards”) —
have spoiled viewers. “You always start
with the shows,” one veteran says.
“Even here, we can fnd a million ex-
cuses, but at the end of the day if you
make something people want to see,
they will come, and I think this has
been a year where there has not been a
lot of compelling new shows on broad-
cast TV.”
Theory 3: Ferocious competition
from dozens of viewing sources has
eviscerated the networks’ ability to
generate enough “promotional impres-
sions” — industry lingo for tune-in
reminders. Simply put, most people
don’t even know when a new show is
on.
Theory 4: No one knows anything
in Hollywood. Shows arrive that you
think you’ve seen before — and guess
what? You have! Networks recycle
ideas all the time, often in the same
time periods. “There’s a lack of histori-
cal perspective” says an exec. “We’re
the ones in the meetings who look at
the executive and say, ‘We’ve seen this
show 15 times. And you know how
many times it’s failed? Fifteen times.’ ”
Theory 5: Trigger-happy networks
have no patience. Here’s a truism that
is probably true — networks have no
patience if a show starts off poorly
while cable lets a low-rated show ride
for months. There are lots of reasons
for this, but viewers may well end up
thinking, why bother to invest any
time with a series like “Zero Hour” if
the life expectancy can be measured in
weeks?
Theory 6: All of the above.
It’s the show,
stupid. Or put
another way,
most people
don’t want to
watch boring,
derivative TV
anymore.
Vows
After the ceremony, the couple celebrated
their joy with about 35 friends and relatives
during an intimate reception at Vanderlyn’s in
Kingston. The restaurant took on the ambi-
ence of “Old Hollywood,” complete with red
velvet ropes, a red carpet and a cake shaped
like a top hat, because Lois planned the festiv-
ities with an eye toward re-creating the glam-
our of Elizabeth Taylor’s wedding to Conrad
“Nicky” Hilton.
“She’s my idol,” Lois said, adding she’s
often been told she bears a striking resem-
blance to the actress.
When the two celebrities got married in
1950, Taylor was 19 and Hilton was 21.
Lois and David were about that age when
they dated each other during the 1970s. They
drifted apart after about two years, and Lois
married someone else in 1979, then separated
in 1997.
As she recalls, “I was not ready to date.”
But in January 1998 she ran into David by
chance, or, as David calls it, fate.
“How much more ‘fate’ can you get than
the both of us being in the same doughnut
shop?” he asked. “I stopped for coffee, and she
happened to be there.”
Actually, Lois recalls, they had an amusing
little misunderstanding at frst, with her con-
gratulating him because she had seen a birth
announcement that led her to believe he re-
cently had a daughter.
David thanked her, believing she somehow
knew he had added a dog to his household
and was congratulating him about that “baby
girl.”
It turned out the birth announcement re-
ferred to another David Brace. The man des-
tined to become Lois’ David told her, “I’m not
married, never was, nor do I have any kids. I
still live in the same house in Luzerne.”
Lois still didn’t feel ready to enter a new
relationship, yet she “rattled off” her phone
number, and David memorized it. Weeks lat-
er, they went out on their frst “second-time-
around” date, a trip to a local high school to
see a documentary about big-game hunting.
Both avid hunters, Lois and David have
since enjoyed many hours of hunting togeth-
er, for pheasants, chukar partridges and deer,
and cooking what they harvest.
But the next 15 years would not be all fun.
David loaned his strength to Lois when she
she learned she had uterine cancer in 1999.
“Thank God it was ‘contained’ and I didn’t
The bridal couple shares a moment during
their wedding reception.
So the parades and the big run-
up are over. You’ve marched your
marches and worn your green and
perhaps even performed an Irish
jig or two. Maybe you’re already in
a more Easter sort of mindset. But,
lest ye forget, today is St. Patrick’s
Day.
And seeing as Irish pubs in the
greater Wilkes-Barre area have pro-
liferated in recent years, what better
way to celebrate the day than with an
all-Irish, all-the-time pub crawl?
We’re pointing out 10 local pubs
(in alphabetical, not preferential or-
der) that are not just Irish on March
17 but serve Irish food and pour Irish
drinks drinks year round and are
owned — at least most of them —
by someone with Irish blood cours-
ing through the veins. Hence, you
can put these Old Sod-style hotspots
on your list for an Irish pub crawl any
time of year.
1. CAREY’S PUB
Where is it? 147 Division St.,
Kingston
What makes it Irish? Decor and
atmosphere. It bills itself as a neigh-
borhood bar, “where good friends
meet and new friends are made.”
Sounds Irish enough.
Best Irish food on the menu:
Ham and cabbage
Best Irish pour: Guinness (And
Get thee to the pub — and make sure it’s Irish
By JOE SYLVESTER
jsylvester@timesleader.com
Jesse Mendoza hangs the Irish flags out-
side of his friend Mark Flaherty’s bar and
restaurant, CrisNics Irish Pub, on Horton
and Barney streets in Wilkes-Barre on
Wednesday.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
See PUBS, Page 2B
See TOGETHER, Page 12B
by
355 Market Street in Kingston, PA
570. 763.0044 | ArchComfort.com
Tues – Thur 10AM - 7PM Fri, Sat, Mon 10AM - 5PM
The Look You Love
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2B SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 F E A T U R E S
don’t forget, when it comes to
this favored brew, it’s all about
how you pour it.)
Call: 718-1818
•••
2. CAVANAUGH’S GRILLE
Where is it? 163 N. Main St.,
Fairview Township
What makes it Irish? From
the name to the food and drink
to the Irish step dancers, bag-
pipers and acoustic trio who
will entertain today, it’s all pret-
ty green.
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
Corned beef and cabbage with
potatoes and carrots
Best Irish pour: Guinness
Call: 474-1050
Open today? 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
•••
3.CRISNICS IRISH PUB
Where is it? 189 Barney St.,
Wilkes-Barre (The former Bar-
ney Inn)
What makes it Irish? With
an owner named Mark Flaherty,
the shamrock and Irish flag
decor, all the green paint, the
menu and Irish martinis, is it
necessary to ask?
Best Irish food on the
menu: Shepherd’s pie. “We sell
a lot of it,” Flaherty said. (More
than one little bird told us it’s
simply to die for here —and not
at all dry.)
Best Irish pour: Irish marti-
ni, which Flaherty said is made
of creme de menthe, Irish Mist
and half and half. “It comes out
green,” he said.
Call: 823-5199
Open today? 11 a.m. today to
2 a.m. Monday
•••
4. DUGAN’S PUB
Where is it? 385 Main St.,
Luzerne
What makes it Irish? Owner
Charlie Dugan, food and drink
and the decor
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
Irish pipe bombs, a.k.a. spring
rolls stuffed with shredded cab-
bage, Swiss cheese and corned
beef then flash-fried and served
with Thousand Island dressing,
only available the two weeks
leading up to St. Patrick’s Day
Best Irish pour: Guinness
Call: 283-0153
Open today? 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
•••
5. FIDDLER’S GREEN
IRISH PUB
Where is it? 259 E. State St.,
Larksville
What makes it Irish? One
of the owners, John Pike, is an
Irishman from Boston, and one
of the favored drinks is the Irish
car bomb.
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
The homemade fish and chips
is the favorite, but the Reuben
sandwich is very popular, said
chef/partner Wayde Post.
Best Irish pour: Guinness
and the “Irish car bomb - half a
pint of Guinness and three quar-
ters shot of Jameson Irish Whis-
key, and you float Baileys (Irish
Cream) on top,” Post said.
Call: 714-3220
Open today? Noon to 2 a.m.
The Wyoming Valley Pipe &
Drum Band will entertain at 6
p.m.
•••
6. FLAHERTY’S EATING
& DRINKING ESTABLISH-
MENT
Where is it? 275 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston
What makes it Irish? Irish-
man owner Jerry Flaherty
proudly noted today is the es-
tablishment’s 27th annual St.
Patrick’s Day celebration.
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
A toss-up between shepherd’s
pie and Irish stew, Flaherty said.
Best Irish pour: Guinness
with a shot of Jameson Whis-
key and a shot of Baileys, an
Irish whiskey and cream-based
liqueur
Call: 714-0977
Open today? 11 a.m. to 2
a.m.
•••
7. KEENAN’S IRISH PUB
Where is it? Ramada Inn, 20
Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
What makes it Irish? The
name, decor and drinks
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
Well … Here’s where things get
dicey. This list contains mostly
burgers, fries, wings and chees-
esteaks. But the woody look and
dark interior have a decidedly
Irish ambience.
Best Irish pour: Guinness
Call: 824-7100
Open today? No. (Bummer.
How about that for a wee bit o’
Irish irony?)
•••
8. MURPHY’S PUB
Where is it? 347 Slocum St.,
Swoyersville
What makes it Irish? Own-
ers Eric and Jen Murphy, the
food, the drink and the atmo-
sphere
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
Shepherd’s pie, homemade beef-
brisket sandwiches with horse-
radish mustard on soda bread,
traditional ham and cabbage
and Irish beef stew.
Best Irish pour: Guinness.
(Are you sensing a pattern
here?) “You can’t go wrong with
Guinness,” Eric Murphy said.
Call: 287-8685
Open today? 11 a.m. today to
2 a.m.
•••
9. ROONEY’S IRISH PUB
Where is it? 67 S. Main St.,
Pittston
What makes it Irish? Own-
er Gene Rooney, its menu and
drinks
Best Irishfoodonthe menu:
Guinness Irish stew, Yuengling-
battered fish and chips and ham
and cabbage, only available at
certain times of the year, and
chicken curry.
Best Irish pour: Guinness
Call: 602-0419
Open today? 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
•••
10. SAINTS & SINNERS,
AN IRISH PUB
Where is it? 112 Center St.,
Pittston
What makes it Irish? C’mon,
it advertises itself as an Irish pub
where everyday is St. Patrick’s
Day and where menu items are
named after famous Irishmen,
such as former Pittston Mayor
Joe Keating (potato pancakes)
and former Notre Dame coach
Ara Parseghian (fresh dough
pizza).
Best Irish food on the
menu: Perhaps the half-pound
Blarney Burger?
Best Irish pour: Guinness.
“We blow through it,” said bar-
tender Danielle Pieczynski,
who also works at Brews Broth-
ers and other establishments
owned by brothers Andrew and
Michael Partash.
Call: 655-9295
Open today? 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
PUBS
Continued from Page 1B
CrisNics dayside bartender Jessica Karmon pours the staple Irish Guinness at the Wilkes-Barre
bar, formerly the Barney Inn.
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
CrisNics
Irish Pub
on Horton
and Barney
streets in
Wilkes-Barre
is all about
the Irish, and
the decor
reflects it.
JAMES M. COUGHLIN HIGH
SCHOOL
James M. Coughlin High School
recently announced the Honor
Roll for the second quarter.
Grade 12: Highest Honors:
Danielle Adcock, Samuel
Andrews, Cindy Anusiewicz,
Marcia Archibold, Hunter Bed-
narczyk, Kaitlyn Benczkowski,
Andrey Boris, Frank Brandolino,
Jessica Brzenchek, Spoorthy
Challa, Maria Cinti, Atyia Collins,
Julia DeMellier, Steven Dobbs,
Christopher Domiano, Haley
Dudeck, Rebecca Elmy, William
Engle III, Brooke Evans, Zachary
Evans, Shamus Gartley, Bohdan
Gines, Dominique Gurns, Shelby
Hess, David Hontz, Ryan Javick,
Madysen Jones, Michaela Keats,
Danielle King, Skylar Kopeck,
Summer Kubicki, Joseph Lan-
ning, Michael Lewandowski, Bre-
anne Lloyd, Sara Long, Hailley
Malenovitch, Justin Malinowski,
Samantha Maywald, Kylee
McGrane, Matthew Moorhead,
Julia Moskel, Joshua Moules,
Cassidy Moyer, Theodore Myku-
lyn, Jarrod Nee, Justin Okun,
Joseph Ramos, Dylan Robbins,
Jessica Ross, Nathan Sauers,
Alexander Scheuermann, Dany-
elle Schweit, Nicholas Scupski,
Casey Silvi, Jessica Sims, Felicia
Solovey, Alvin Soriano, Sergey
Svintozelskiy, Aaron Tohme,
Joseph Tona, Morgan Wanyo,
Collin Ward, Haley Waslasky,
Nicole Wasmanski, Kaitlynn Wil-
lis, Caitlin Wood, Bryan Wylie,
Catherine Yankowski. High
Honors: Alyssia Allen, Aaron
Andrews, Alexander Beaver,
Cody Cecelon, Amy Cherinko,
Kayleen Collum, Steven Cook,
Shannon Daly, Nicholas Davi,
Joshua Featherman, Nicole
Feola, Lewis Foster, Edward
Gallagher IV, Amanda Goy,
Tyler Hardy, Jocelyn Hillman,
Rachael Javorka, Corey Keen,
Kayla Kelly, Jennifer Kowalczyk,
Alisha Loeffler, Michael Lozada,
Shawn Maiers, Zachery Mamola,
Emily Motsko, Jeffrey Mur-
ray, Mykela Pacurariu, Jordan
Phillips, Austin Popish, Nathan
Sienkiewicz, Aaron Strait, Paige
Tedik, Zamir Vallecillo, Caitlin
Vukovich, Cassandra Vukov-
ich, Kaitlyn Waskiewicz, Sarah
Welles, Joshua Wilk, Amber
Zendzion. Honors: Mujahid
Chesson, Cassidy Cole, Giana
Cruz, Bradley Emerick, Connor
Flaherty, Adam Hutz, Shelby
Kresge, Patrick Malone, Eliza-
beth Martin, Aaliyah Massey,
Andrew McManus, Derek Novak,
David Price III, Jessica Red-
mond, Dennis Shovlin, Rebecca
Steuer.
Grade 11: Highest Honors:
Alex Anderson, Nicolas Bishop,
Yuriy Boris, Ruben Bourdeau,
Kyra Castano, Lauren Castel-
lana, Alexander Cerep, Valerie
Davi, Tyler Davis, Ryan DeCinti,
Christopher Dennis, Emily Du-
pak, Alizabeth Ellsworth, Adam
Giovanelli, Collin Gozick, Marisa
Gribble, Lauren Gryskevicz,
Nandi Harrington, April Haupt,
Corey Hauser, Anthony Khalife,
Sommer Kosko, William Kozub,
Stella Krohn, Daulton Lentini,
Kyle Lupas, Anthony Mala-
cari, Benjamin Manarski, Kyle
McGrady, Kelvin Mejia, Kimberly
Nestorick, Keighlyn Oliver, Yami-
leth Orduna, Michael Osmanski,
Bruce Panattieri, David Parsnik,
Nima Patel, Timothy Pilch,
Thomas Pistack, Evan Popple,
William Poray, Ilham Priyam-
bodo, Jennifer Reynoso, Jessica
Reynoso, Angeline Rubasky,
Daniel Sales, Barry Schiel, Jada
Smith, Alexandria Soller, Saray
Sosa, Kayla Stachokus, Kelly
Tlatenchi, Steven Tlatenchi,
Caitlin Walsh, Rebecca Wilk,
Michael Wozniak, Stephen
Zedolik. High Honors: Paula
Almendarez, Molly Andress,
Courtney Answini, Amanda
Benczkowski, Jessica Benc-
zkowski, Austin Brzozowski,
Alexandra Bukeavich, Charles
Capinas, Erin Chmiola, Noel
Clark, Katelyn Colleran, Nicho-
las Cotillo, Ingrid Da Costa,
Marc Donato, Brooke Dunlap,
Bobby Ent, Dhalia Espinoza,
Randall Faulk, Nora Fazzi, Anait
Guzman, Courtney Hafner,
Samantha Hardy, Lakeisha
Harris, Caroline Hayduk, John
Jones, Maggie Jones, Richard
Kenzakoski, Erica Kline, Meghan
Krumsky, Kimberly Lozada,
David Marriggi, Jade Matusick,
Dalton McHenry, Allison Novak,
Erin O’Day, Kathleen Pascual,
Kaitlyn Pearage, Emily Richards,
Max Rodriguez, Allison Rorick,
Bridget Ryan, Dana Schnei-
der, Tyler Schweit, Anthony
Serpico, Jonathan Sims, Alia
Sod, Rebecca Svab, Kaitlyn
Tredinnick, Lucia Walkowiak,
Kenneth Werkheiser, Eric
Williams, Stephanie Yankoski,
Tiffany Young. Honors: Scott
Alexis, Tyler Antosh, Katlyn
Barber, Kaitlyn Coskey, Bradley
Dunn, Matthew Esser, Elijah
Foster, Farid Hernandez, Megan
Hughes, Caitlin Jaworski, John
Lacomy, Stephanie Lauer, Dani-
elle Lavery, Tristan Mercado,
Taylor Prothero, Marissa Ross,
Kelly Stiner, Nykia Taylor, Tyler
Ulrich, Abigail Viola, Kayleigh
Wardle, David Wodarczyk.
Grade 10: Highest Honors:
Shawn Austin, Teagan Bigelow,
Nathaniela Bourdeau, Matthew
Bruns, Rowan Connelly, Sarah
DeBiasi, Kelsey Eovitch, Adam
Ercolani, Kelsey Gabriele, Emily
Hall, Jacqueline Kline, Thomas
Kozerski, Kourtney Kukowski,
Justin Kuna, Katharine Lan-
ning, Christine Lapsansky, Holly
Lloyd, Tiffany Mayhue, Morgan
McKenna, Julia Miller, Morgan
Novakovich, Carly Ray, Carlos
Rodulfo, Adam Sadvary, Morgan
Sidorowicz, Catherine Silveri,
Nicholas Stavinski, Rachael
Supinski, Victoria Walter,
Grace Weed, Frank Wojtash,
Michael Yanchuck. High Hon-
ors: Kathryn Askew, Kristen
Bailey, Lauren Bailey, Patrick
Barrow, Shelby Bizub, Daniel
Blazejewski, Bailey Brannigan,
Bianca Bullock, Brandon Butry,
Brandon Catone, Kassandra
Cebula, Nicole Ciprich, Dylan
Clewell, Amber Colleran,
Carissa Coolbaugh, Kayla Cun-
ningham, Timothy Elick, Marc
Esser, Jeremy Francis, Rhaelynn
Froncek, Carmen Garcia, Jen-
nifer Goodrich, Ashley Gray-
son, Robert Hawkins, Sydney
Hendrick, Chloe Hutter, Brenden
Jones, Alexander Kane, Travis
Keil, Iyana King, Rachel Kollar,
Megan Lercara, Heather Lloyd,
Kayla Losito, Patrick Lukas,
Kaitlyn Lukashewski, Rachel
Luton, Michael Malacari, Caitlin
McAtee, Lee McCracken, Daren
Miller, Thomas Mitchell, Bethany
Paulukonis, Nicholas Peterlin,
Kimberly Rivera, David Sadvary,
Rebecca Scott, Shelby Shaf-
fer, Zoey Spak, Olivia Vogue,
Victoria Vogue. Honors: Tyler
Bonick, Baylee Bukeavich, Scott
Christian, John Elick, Anthony
Ellis Jr., Jessika Finsterbusch,
Xavier Fisher, Bailey Fox, Ryan
Gorki, Lee Gustinucci, Jessica
Harvey, Mikayla Hoskins, Zach-
ary Johns, Melanie Lezama,
Tommy Marmolejo, Kelly
McGraw, Dominique Miraglia,
Phil Navarrete, Pedro Ramirez
Jr., Heather Reed, Norah
Rosencrans, Melanie Santiago,
Kyle Schneikart, Rayne Shaf-
fer, Edward Slavish, Alexandria
Smith, Kelly Smith, Brianna
Wondoloski, Adam Wylie.
Grade 9: Highest Honors: Jes-
sica Abraham, Robert Anstett,
Zachary Banaszek, Tamar
Bourdeau, Shae Lyn Briggs,
Ashleigh Brzenchek, Tyler Brzo-
zowski, Nicholas Cerep, Maura
Clarke, Ryan Dougalas, Hailee
Dumont, Joshua Gartley, Griffin
Gdovin, Wyatt Hardy, Joshua
Hvozdovic, Sarah Jamieson,
Lizbeth Jaramillo, Stephen
Johnson, Jacob Khalife, Michael
Koury, Vita Kozub, Tyler Kurilla,
Casey Lello, Thomas Lyons Jr.,
Rhea Mamola, Evelina Meshko,
Matthew Monaghan, Kendall
Mosley, Paige Parsnik, Krystina
Prince, Deanna Richards, Ken-
nedy Rinish, Victoria Romiski,
Katrina Sennett, Samantha
Simms, Emma Sukowaski,
Mary Tona, Brigid Wood, Kyra
Wozniak. High Honors: Tif-
fany Amigon, Amie Baboucarr,
Michael Brown, Ryan Christian,
James Conroy III, Khalid Credle,
Christine Evans, Chase Fiske,
Breanne Georgetti, Emily Gly-
cenfer, Stanley Goeckel, Israel
Gonzalez, Katlyn Green, Mera
Holmes, Sabrina Jara, Zachary
Kenzakowski, Hannah Kessler,
Zachary King, Michael Klimek,
Austin Kopeck, John Kozich
Jr., Collin Krokos, Kyle Krueger,
Jocelyn Lee, Mkensie Lee, Amy
Llewellyn, April Llewellyn, Evan
McManus, Samuel Meehan,
Robert Melodick, Jesse Miller,
Kristi Pearage, Austin Popple,
Kalie Reed, Savanna Robin-
son, Thomas Schwab, Hailey
Shields, Alyssa Smalls, Arden
Soriano, Darlene Strouse, Pavel
Svintozelskiy, Jason Voitek,
Rachel Wallace, Jeremy Welles,
Jade Wielgosz, Andrew Wynn,
Nicholas Zalaffi, Robert Zbierski
III. Honors: Elexis Alexander,
Corey Boltz II, Martha Bonilla,
Alexandra Bozek, Kayla Brooks,
Ronniqui Castillo, David Cek-
losky, Amber Dunlap, Brittany
Fernandes, Myuanna Fitzgerald,
Matthew Frankelli, Ashleigh
Frew, Dazonia Gibson, Jessica
Grumblis, Starr Gyle, Chelsea
Hernandez, Jordan Herron,
Emily Karavitch, Ryan Kollar,
Meghan Kosek, Michael Kostak,
Rhea Kross, Raymond Kurt,
Tiffany Kurt, Elizabeth Lester,
Nataya Lowman, Joshua Lo-
zada, Daniel MacIolek, Joseph
Mansfield, Kimmy Martinez,
Kaitlyn McDonald, Breanna
Mildbrodt, William Mills, Carlos
Novelo, Derek Nunez, Salvatore
Purpura, Elisa Rivera, Samuel
Sebia, Cassidy Steligo, Chloe
Stoss, Robert Suchocki, Alberto
Tlatenchi, William Torres, Aaron
Tosh, Bryson Wardle, Kristen
Wilde, Savannah Yohey.
honor roll
WHEREAS, Dallas Area Municipal Authority has expressed
difficulties in the collection of current and past-due sanitary sewer accounts to its
great fnancial detriment; and
WHEREAS, many efforts have been made by the staff and attorneys of
Dallas Area Municipal Authority to collect current and past-due sanitary sewer
accounts; many of which are and will continue to be chronically in arrears.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVEDTHAT:
Dallas Area Municipal Authority adopts as a matter of policy and as an
addition to its Rules and Regulations the provisions of Pennsylvania law
(the Act of April 14, 2006, P.L. 85, 53 P.S. Section 3102. 501, etc.), which
requires a water utility company to shut off water service, upon proper
notice given by Dallas Area Municipal Authority, to the owner or occupant
of property when the rentals, rates, and charges for sewer, sewerage, or
sewage treatment service thereto shall not have been paid for or period
of at least thirty (30) days from the date thereof. All terms and provisions
of the aforesaid statute must be complied with regarding requisite written
notice and the service thereof upon required parties prior to the
termination of water service.
1.
Public notice of this Resolution and the Rule and Regulation hereby
adopted in accordance with it shall be given once annually in a
newspaper of general circulation in the service area of
Dallas Area Municipal Authority.
2.
RESOLUTION
OF
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OF
DALLAS AREA MUNICIPAL AUTHORITY
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with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
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SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page 3B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com F E A T U R E S
Family Service Association planning gala and auction
Family Service Association (FSA) is holding its 11th annual gala and silent auction from 6-11 p.m.
on April 13 at the Westmoreland Club, Wilkes-Barre. The benefit is open to the public and includes a
silent auction and musical entertainment by Groove Train. The theme is ‘Growing Beyond the Valley,’
with all proceeds benefiting the many programs and services that FSA provides to the community.
This year’s auction includes a variety of items including trips, sporting events, sports memorabilia,
children’s game baskets, Disney World Hopper Passes for a family of four, Organic Coffee basket,
jewelry and many retail store and restaurant gift certificates. One person will take away a $1,000gift
certificate fromSimon & Co. Jewelers. Cost is $110 per person and includes hors d’oeuvres, a full din-
ner and valet parking. For more information, or to make a reservation, contact Ruth Kemmerer at
FSA at 823-5144. Members of the Gala Auction Committee, fromleft, first row: Sandy Feldman, FSA
Friends Committee; Robert Warhol, Walmart Distribution Center, community volunteer; Theresa
Langan, chair, Gala Auction Committee; and Paula Jump, chairwoman, FSA Board of Directors and
co-chair of the Gala Auction Committee. Second row: Pauline Carmody, co-chair, FSA 2013 Spring
Gala and Silent Auction Committee; Carmela Yanora, chair, FSA2013 Spring Gala and Silent Auction;
and Mike Zimmerman, chief executive officer, FSA.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4B SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to decide
how your wedding notice reads, with a
few caveats. Wedding announcements
run in Sunday’s People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220 words,
and we reserve the right to edit announce-
ments that exceed that word count. An-
nouncements must be typed or submitted
via www.timesleader.com. (Click on the
“people” tab, then “weddings” and follow
the instructions from there.) Submissions
must include a daytime contact phone
number and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We do not
run first-year anniversary announce-
ments or announcements of weddings
that took place more than a year ago.
(Wedding photographers often can supply
you with a color proof in advance of other
album photographs.)
All other social announcements must
be typed and include a daytime contact
phone number. Announcements of births
at local hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
M
r. and Mrs. Gary Allegrucci,
Plains Township, announce
the engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter, Kaitlyn,
to Tommy Kucuk, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Mile Kucuk, Hanover Township.
The bride-to-be is the granddaugh-
ter of the Joseph and Lydia Colarusso,
Plains Township, and Agnes Allegruc-
ci and the late Elliott Allegrucci,
Moosic.
Kaitlyn graduated from Coughlin
High School. She attended Marywood
University, where she earned a bach-
elor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics
and a minor in science. She is pursu-
ing her master’s degree in health care
administration at King’s College. She
is employed as a registered dietitian
and care coordinator at Blue Cross
and a clinical registered dietitian at
Berwick Retirement Village.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of Zora Okolisan, Pocono;
the late Petar Franjic, Croatia; and the
late Stana Kucuk and Mitar Kucuk,
Serbia.
Tommy is a Hanover Area High
School graduate. He is a graduate of
Luzerne County Community College,
where he pursued a nursing degree.
He is a registered nurse at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center.
The couple will exchange vows on
July 13, 2013, at St. Matthew’s Parish,
East Stroudsburg. An evening cocktail
hour and reception will follow at
Skytop Lodge in the Poconos.
Allegrucci, Kucuk
Muchler, Yurkanin
M
elissa Muchler and Robert
Yurkanin, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Carol and Vince Locascio, Larksville.
She is also the daughter of Michael
Muchler, Kingston. She is the grand-
daughter of Maryellen Petro, Plym-
outh, and the late Edward Petro.
The prospective groom is the son of
Robert and Phyllis Yurkanin, Avoca.
The bride-to-be is a 2008 graduate
of West Side Area Vocational Techni-
cal School. She is employed by CVS/
Caremark. The prospective groom is
a 2001 graduate of Pittston Area High
School. He is employed by American
Food and Vending.
The couple will exchange vows May
31, 2014.
Culkin, Skelton
M
r. and Mrs. Michael Culkin,
Mountain Top, proudly
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Maura LaRue Culkin, to
Shawn David Skelton, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Eric Skelton, South Grafton,
Mass.
The bride-to-be is the grand-
daughter of Agnes Laputka and the
late George Laputka, Hazleton, and
the late Stewart and Marion Culkin,
Scranton.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of Arlie and Yvonne
Skelton, Rocklin, Calif., and the late
Harold and Miriam Watkins, Vallejo,
Calif.
Maura is a 2003 graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School and a 2007 gradu-
ate of Gettysburg College, where she
earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in
English literature with minor con-
centrations in Spanish language and
creative writing. She is pursuing a
master’s degree in speech-language
pathology at Misericordia University.
Shawn is a 1998 graduate of Joel E.
Ferris High School and a 2006 gradu-
ate of Eastern Washington Univer-
sity, where he earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in computer science
with minor concentrations in physics
and mathematics. He is employed as
a software developer by Information
Concepts, Herndon, Va.
The couple will exchange vows
Aug. 17, 2013, at Our Lady of Snows
Church, Clarks Summit.
Casey, Simpson
N
adine Casey and Jonathan
Simpson, along with their fami-
lies, announce their engagement and
upcoming wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Christine Casey and the late Joseph
Casey, Wapwallopen. She is the grand-
daughter of Christine Falcheck and
the late Elmer Falcheck, Sugar Notch,
and the late Sandra and Joseph Casey,
Ashley.
The prospective groom is the son of
Ann Roper, Benton, and Mark Simp-
son, Dalton, Ga. He is the grandson
of Justine Staniszewski and the late
Jerome Staniszewski, Coal Township,
and Bonnie Simpson and the late Fred
Simpson, Dalton, Ga.
Nadine is a graduate of Crest-
wood High School and Luzerne
County Community College, where
she earned an associate’s of science
degree in nursing. She is employed by
Commonwealth Health System as a
polysomnographic technician.
Jonathan is a graduate of Shamokin
Area High School and a veteran of
the United States Coast Guard. He at-
tended Bucknell University, where he
earned a bachelor’s degree in history
and philosophy.
The couple will exchange vows
on Nov. 9, 2013, at Our Lady Help of
Christians, Wapwallopen. A reception
will follow at Appletree Terrace in
Dallas. The couple will honeymoon in
San Francisco, Calif.
Pietrzak, Martin
M
olly Anne Martin and Mat-
thew Edward Pietrzak were
united in marriage on Oct. 20, 2012,
at St. Benedict’s Church, Wilkes-
Barre, by the Rev. Joseph Kearney.
The bride is the daughter of John
and Maureen Martin, Wilkes-Barre,
Pa. She is the granddaughter of Marie
Ciliberto, Pittston, Pa.; the late Peter
Ciliberto; and the late Norman and
Ruth Robinson, formerly of Wilkes-
Barre.
The prospective groom is the son of
Sherri Jones Pietrzak, Dallas, Pa., and
Edward Pietrzak Jr., Scranton, Pa. He
is the grandson of Carol Jones, Dal-
las, Pa.; the late John Jones; Beverly
Pietrzak, Scranton, Pa.; and the late
Edward Pietrzak Sr.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father. She chose her cousin,
Kathleen Clutcher, as her matron of
honor. The bridesmaids were Lisa
Martin, sister-in-law of the bride;
Abby Haddle, friend of the bride;
and Victoria Martin, niece of the
bride. The flower girls were Haley
and Kayce Martin, both nieces of the
bride.
The groom choose his friend, Ryan
Seltzer, as the best man. The grooms-
men were Jack Martin, brother of
the bride; Dan Haddle, friend of the
groom; and Nathan Pietrzak, brother
of the groom.
Readings were given by Caroline
Jones and Chelsea Brauns, both cous-
ins of the groom, and Sarah Robinson
and Allison Bailey, both cousins of the
bride. Gifts were presented by Holly
Brauns and Theresa Jones, both aunts
of the groom.
A cocktail hour and reception were
hosted by the parents of the bride at
the Ramada Inn, Wilkes Barre. A brid-
al shower, hosted by the mother of
the bride and bridesmaids, was held
at the Ramada Inn, Wilkes Barre. The
rehearsal dinner, given by the mother
of the groom, was held at Plains Am-
bulance Hall, Plains Township.
Molly is a 2004 graduate of James
M. Coughlin High School. She
graduated in 2008 from Misericordia
University, Dallas, Pa., with a Bach-
elor of Science degree in medical
imaging. She also earned a certificate
in radiation therapy in 2009 from
Bergen Community College, Paramus,
N.J. Molly is employed as a registered
radiologic technologist at MedEx-
press Urgent Care, Edwardsville, Pa.,
and Geisinger Community Medical
Center, Scranton, Pa.
Matthew is a 2003 graduate of
Dallas Senior High School. He earned
an associate’s degree in automotive
technologies from Luzerne County
Community College in 2005. He is
employed at Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs.
The couple traveled to Montego
Bay, Jamaica, for their honeymoon.
They reside in the Miners Mills
section of Wilkes-Barre with their
two dogs and cat, Riley, Cooper and
Sammi.
Kendra, Dewey
K
ayla Justine Kendra and Mat-
thew James Dewey were united
in marriage on July 21, 2012, at St.
Jude Church, Mountain Top. The
Rev. J. Duane Gavitt performed the
double-ring ceremony.
Given in marriage by her father, the
bride chose her sister, Dallas Erinn
Kendra, as maid of honor. Brides-
maids were Sarah Dewey, sister of
the groom, and Megan Miller, friend
of the bride. Flower girl was Caroline
Austin, cousin of the groom.
Serving as best man for the groom
was his brother, Bryan Dewey. Broth-
ers of the bride, Kevin Kendra and
Zachary Kendra, served as grooms-
men. Noah Kendra, brother of the
bride, was ring bearer.
The bride is the daughter of Kevin
and Deborah Kendra, Mountain Top.
She is the granddaughter of Joseph
and Marie Moran, Mountain Top, and
Michael Kendra and the late Anna
Mae Kendra, Wilkes-Barre.
Kayla is a 2006 graduate of Crest-
wood High School and a 2011 gradu-
ate of Misericordia University. She
holds a bachelor’s degree in special
education and elementary educa-
tion. She is employed by the Caro-
line County Public School District
in Maryland as a special education
teacher.
The groom is the son of Ronald and
Kate Dewey, Mountain Top. He is the
grandson of Betty Austin and the late
James Austin, Mountain Top, and
Doris Dewey and the late Paul Dewey,
Geneva, Ala.
Matthew is a 2003 graduate of
Crestwood High School and a 2008
graduate of King’s College, where he
earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal
justice. He is employed as an employ-
ment specialist for Crossroads Com-
munity Inc. in Cambridge, Md.
The bride was honored at a shower
given by the mothers of the bride
and groom, the bridesmaids and the
grandmother and aunts of the bride
at the Emmanuel United Church
of Christ in Dorrance. The maid of
honor hosted a party for her sister
at her home in Mountain Top. A re-
hearsal dinner, hosted by the parents
of the groom to honor the couple, was
held at Kings Restaurant in Mountain
Top. A cocktail hour, followed by an
evening reception, were held at the
Best Western Genetti Inn and Suites
in Hazleton.
The couple honeymooned at the
Majestic Elegance Resort in Punta
Canta, Dominican Republic. They
reside in Federalsburg, Md.
St. Jude students recognized by Johns Hopkins
The Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth recognized 46 students in grades 3-8 at St. Jude School, Mountain
Top. The students qualified for the talent search by scoring in the 95th percentile or higher on a major part of the TerraNova
test that was administered in the 2011-2012 or 2012-2013 school year. Qualifying students, from left, first row: Evan Wejkszner,
Chloe Pugh, Matthew Banford, William Wolfgang, Jordyn Chepolis, Dominic Alberti, and Chris Papciak. Second row: Chase
Pugh, Matthew Kerstetter, Thomas Mayernik, Connor Moran, Ella Urosevich, Millie Symbula, Ashleigh Button and Anna Ca-
paci. Third row: Colin Wills, George Strish, Alex Rymar, Gabby Tammarine, Sarah Stettler, Jared Bozinko and Morghan Murphy.
Fourth row: Emily Mahler, Jimmy Lavan, Taylor Josefowicz, Tim Gallagher, Ryan Williams, Emily Thomas and Abby Lapinski.
Fifth row: Rachel Jones, Lizzy Kolojejchick, Makenzie Savner, Matthew Hayden and Patrick Curley. Sixth row: Julia Foust,
Autumn Kaminski, Brianna Phillips, Maria Strish, Kaylee Kotsko and Bridget Dugan. Seventh row: AdamAbad, Sean Wills, Ben
Koshinski, Alex Abad, Connor Evans and Christian Koshinski.
Mercy Center
residents celebrate
Valentine’s Day
Residents of Mercy Center Skilled
Nursing and Personal Care re-
cently celebrated Valentine’s Day.
The residents were entertained
by pianist Cathy Donnelly, who
played many of their favorite
melodies. The staff and activity
department provided refresh-
ments and snacks. Some of the
participants, from left, first row,
are Janice Smith, Marie Lauck
and Marion Mac. Second row: Ann
Marie Morgan, activity director;
Donnelly; Katie Payne, activities;
and Deborah Dragon, personal
care coordinator.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 5C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
WO M e N ’ S R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Idaho’s Alyssa Charlston cuts down
the net after her team’s 67-64 win
over Seattle in the Western Athletic
Conference women’s tournament on
Saturday in Las Vegas.
Delaware
beats Hofstra
in CAA semis
The Associated Press
UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — Elena
Delle Donne had 21 points and 13 re-
bounds, and No. 15 Delaware breezed
past Hofstra 75-54 Saturday to earn
a third straight berth in the Colonial
Athletic Association title game.
The Blue Hens (29-3) will bring a
24-game winning streak into a match-
up Sunday against either James Madi-
son or Drexel. The last time Delaware
lost a conference game was in the 2011
CAA championship, against JMU.
Deven Green scored 16 for fifth-seed
Hofstra (14-17), making its first semifi-
nal appearance since 2007.
After struggling in the tournament
opener against UNC Wilmington on
Friday, Delaware took control at the
outset and never trailed.
Delle Donne made the opening
two baskets and Danielle Parker and
Akeema Richards each scored twice for
a 14-3 lead. Minutes later, Delle Donne
hit a jumper to spark an 8-0 run that
made it 25-10.
It was 38-27 at halftime and 52-31
with 15:28 left.
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Central Michigan 86, Akron 68
CLEVELAND — Crystal Bradford
scored 13 points with 10 rebounds and
Central Michigan showed balance and
depth to beat Akron for its first Mid-
American Conference title and NCAA
berth since 1984.
The Chippewas (21-11) lost to
Eastern Michigan in the title game last
year on a basket with 1.5 seconds left.
Central Michigan used the heartbreak-
ing loss as motivation, and the Chip-
pewas played a demanding schedule to
prepare for March.
They upset top-seeded Toledo in the
semifinals and pulled away from the
Zips (23-9) in the second half.
Jalisa Olive scored 14 and Niki
DiGuilio made four 3-pointers in the
final 12 minutes for Central Michigan,
which had six players score in double
figures.
Hanna Luburgh scored 19 to lead
the Zips. MAC Player of the Year Ra-
chel Tecca had 11.
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC
Hampton 59, Howard 38
NORFOLK, Va. — Olivia Allen
scored 16 points and Hampton finished
an unbeaten season in Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference play with a 59-38
victory against Howard in the cham-
pionship game Saturday, the Lady
Pirates’ 19th straight victory.
Hampton (28-5), the top seed, be-
came the first team to go through the
MEAC regular season unbeaten and
also win the conference tournament
since Coppin State in 2006. It also
became the second school to win the
conference tournament four consecu-
tive years; Howard did it from 1987-90.
SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE
Oral Roberts 72,
Sam Houston State 66
KATY, Texas — Kevi Luper scored
26 points and Oral Roberts secured its
first NCAA tournament berth in five
years with a win over Sam Houston
State in the Southland Conference
women’s championship game.
Jaci Bigham had 17 points and five
assists for the Golden Eagles (18-12),
who went 28 for 33 from the free-
throw line and took advantage of 20
turnovers by the Bearkats. Oral Rob-
erts and first-year coach Misti Cussen
finished their first season in the South-
land with the school’s sixth conference
tournament championship.
M e N ’ S R O U N D U P
The Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Dexter
Strickland and Reggie Bullock scored
15 points apiece and North Carolina
held on to beat Maryland 79-76 on
Saturday in the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament semifinals.
P.J. Hairston scored 13 points
despite a heavily wrapped and injured
left (non-shooting) hand for the
third-seeded Tar Heels (24-9), but his
missed free throw with 16 seconds
left gave Maryland a chance to force
overtime.
The Terps called time out with
10.9 seconds left, and Logan Aronhalt
took the inbounds pass and immedi-
ately launched an off-balance 30-foot
airball.
Bullock snatched the ball and
passed to Hairston, who was all alone
near midcourt, and the Tar Heels ran
out the clock to clinch their league-
record 32nd appearance in the title
game.
Next up: a meeting with No. 9
Miami, the tournament’s top seed, on
Sunday with North Carolina’s 18th
league tournament title on the line.
The Hurricanes’ regular-season sweep
included a humiliating 26-point win
last month at Miami.
Alex Len had 20 points to lead sev-
enth-seeded Maryland (22-12), which
knocked off No. 2 Duke less than 24
hours earlier in the quarterfinals and
nearly pulled off another upset.
The Terrapins trailed by 10 with
just over 7 minutes left before rally-
ing to make things tight down the
stretch.
But every time they got too close,
North Carolina had an answer.
Twice in the final 3 minutes, fresh-
man guard Marcus Paige followed a
Maryland basket by hitting a clutch
shot of his own.
His jumper with 2:49 left came af-
ter Len cut the Tar Heels’ lead to 71-
70. And after Dez Wells hit a layup to
pull the Terps to 75-72 with 1:08 left,
Paige drove the baseline for a pretty
layup that put North Carolina back up
by five with 36.5 seconds left.
He and Wells traded free throws in
a 3-second span, and Aronhalt’s stick-
back with 17.3 seconds left pulled
Maryland to 78-76. Hairston then hit
1 of 2 free throws 1.3 seconds later.
Big man James Michael McAdoo
also finished with 13 points for the
Tar Heels, who improved to 8-2 since
inserting Hairston in the starting
lineup and playing with four guards.
Their only losses in that span came
to a Duke team that had already been
knocked out of the tournament by
these Terrapins.
Nick Faust added 17 points with
five 3-pointers for Maryland while
Wells — the Xavier transfer who
emerged as a leading tournament
MVP candidate while averaging 25.5
points in wins over Wake Forest and
Duke — finished with 15 on 6-of-15
shooting.
Miami 81,
North Carolina State 71
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Durand
Scott scored a career-high 32 points
to help No. 9 Miami beat North
Carolina State in the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament semifinals,
earning its first trip to the champion-
ship game.
Shane Larkin added 23 for the
top-seeded Hurricanes (26-6), who
led the entire way and by 19 points
late in the first half. Miami shot 46
percent behind Scott, a senior guard
who went 12-for-18 from the field and
5-for-8 from 3-point range.
Scott also had a couple of big shots
that shut down comeback bids from
the fifth-seeded Wolfpack (24-10),
who got as close as six after halftime
but couldn’t dig out of that big hole.
Miami also controlled the boards to
score 18 second-chance points to go
with 15 points off turnovers.
Now the Hurricanes can turn their
attention to adding a tournament title
to go with their first regular-season
crown in today’s final.
BIG 12
Kansas 70, Kansas State 54
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Kansas
wasn’t about to share this title with
Kansas State.
Jeff Withey had 17 points and nine
rebounds, Perry Ellis and Naadir
Tharpe added 12 points each, and the
seventh-ranked Jayhawks pounded
the No. 11 Wildcats 70-54 on Satur-
day night to win their ninth Big 12
tournament championship.
The top-seeded Jayhawks (29-5),
who shared the regular-season title
with their in-state rival, took a 24-16
lead at halftime and then slowly
stretched it in the second half.
The Wildcats (27-7) struggled to
match Withey and Ellis in the paint,
losing for the third time this season
to the Jayhawks and for the 47th time
in their last 50 meetings.
Rodney McGruder scored 18 points
despite a poor first half, and Angel
Rodriguez had 10 for Kansas State,
which still has not won a conference
tournament in more than 30 years.
BIG EAST
Louisville 78, Syracuse 61
NEW YORK -- Peyton Siva had 11
points and eight assists to lead No. 4
Louisville to a 78-61 victory over No.
19 Syracuse on Saturday night, giving
the Cardinals their second straight
Big East tournament title.
The Cardinals got their third title
by overcoming a 16-point deficit in
the second half -- almost double the
previous record in a championship
game -- and they kept pouring it on
once they got the lead, going ahead
by as many as 18 points.
Second-seeded Louisville (29-
5) -- along with Georgetown and
Marquette the tri-champions of the
regular season -- won its 10th straight
game with its defense, forcing Syra-
cuse into 20 turnovers and keeping
the Orange off balance during the
24-3 run that turned the 16-point defi-
cit into a 56-48 lead with 8:51 to play.
Montrezl Harrell led Louisville
with 20 points.
BIG TEN
Ohio State 61, Michigan State 58
CHICAGO — Aaron Craft came
on strong in the second half to finish
with 20 points and lead No. 10 Ohio
State past No. 8 Michigan State in the
semifinals of the Big Ten tournament.
Craft keyed a seven-point spurt
midway through the second half
that stretched the lead to eight at
55-47, and the Buckeyes (25-7) came
away with the win after the Spartans
(25-8) pulled within one. The victory
avenged a loss in last year’s champi-
onship game
It was 57-56 after Derrick Nix con-
verted a three-point play for Michigan
State with 1:54 remaining, but Craft
hit a free throw. Thomas grabbed
a huge rebound off a missed 3 by
Shannon Scott to keep the possession
going and scored in the paint after a
timeout to make it a four-point game,
sending the Buckeyes back to the
conference final.
They’ll go for their third champion-
ship in four years when they meet No.
22 Wisconsin, a 68-56 winner over
top-seeded and third-ranked Indiana
in the other semifinal.
Craft scored all but two of his
points in the second half. He also
had nine assists and four steals in the
game.
Thomas scored 16 even though
he hit just 6 of 19 shots — 2 of 11
3-pointers.
Nix led Michigan State with 17
points and nine rebounds. Keith
Appling scored 16 points, but the
Spartans came up short in this one.
In a game that was neck-and-neck
for about the first 29 minutes, Craft
gave Ohio State some breathing room
when he scored on a layup and a pair
of jumpers to cap a seven-point spurt
and make it 55-47 with 7:22 remain-
ing.
Michigan State hung in, and things
got real interesting when Nix convert-
ed that three-point play with 1:54 left.
The 6-foot-9, 270-pound Nix was a
handful right from the start. He domi-
nated down low with 10 points in the
first half as Michigan State grabbed a
29-28 lead.
Appling hit two 3-pointers and
scored eight in the half.
Thomas, the Big Ten’s leading
scorer, had 11 points in the first 20
minutes but was just 4 of 13. There
weren’t many fouls called in the first
half, either, with Ohio State attempt-
ing just two free throws and Michigan
State not even getting to the line in
the half.
SEC Florida 61, Alabama 51
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Kenny
Boynton scored 11 straight points
during a 15-0 second-half run as No.
13 Florida rallied from a 10-point,
second-half deficit to beat Alabama in
a Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment semifinal.
The top-seeded Gators (26-6)
advanced to Sunday’s championship
game against either Mississippi or
Vanderbilt. Alabama (21-12), the
tournament’s No. 4 seed, will spend
Sunday waiting to learn its fate from
the NCAA tournament selection com-
mittee.
Held scoreless for the first 25 min-
utes of the game, Boynton finished
with a game-high 16 points. Patric
Young had 13 points and nine re-
bounds for the Gators. Mike Rosario
added 10 points.
Mississippi 64, Vanderbilt 52
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Marshall
Henderson scored 23 points as
Mississippi beat Vanderbilt in the
Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment semifinals, putting the Rebels
just one more win away from making
sure their NCAA tournament berth is
automatic.
The third-seeded Rebels (25-8)
came here needing wins to sharpen
their postseason resume. Now they
will play No. 13 Florida, a 61-51 win-
ner over Alabama, in Sunday’s cham-
pionship game where the winner
advances to the NCAA tournament.
Reginald Buckner also had 15
points, and Murphy Holloway added
12 for Ole Miss. The Rebels now have
won six of seven to reach the cham-
pionship game for the first time since
2001. Another win would give coach
Andy Kennedy his first NCAA berth
and the Rebels’ first since 2002.
No. 10 seeded Vanderbilt (16-17)
lost for only the second time in eight
games. Kedren Johnson had a team-
high 12 points.
ATLANTIC 10
Saint Louis 67, Butler 56
NEW YORK — Dwayne Evans
nearly set a career high in points for
the second straight game, and No.
16 Saint Louis’ defense locked down
Butler in the second half for a win to
reach the Billikens’ first Atlantic 10
title game.
Evans had 24 points and 11
rebounds a day after going for 25
and nine in the quarterfinals against
Charlotte.
Top-seeded Saint Louis beat the
Bulldogs for the third time this sea-
son. Butler may be the bigger name,
but the Billikens have been the class
of the A-10 in 2013.
The Billikens (26-6) held Butler
without a field goal for almost seven
minutes midway through the second
half to pull away. Meanwhile, Evans
went to work inside, showing off his
post moves at 6-foot-5 or earning free
throws to put the Bulldogs (26-8) in
foul trouble.
VCU 71, UMass 62
NEW YORK— Troy Daniels made
six 3-pointers to score 20 points, and
No. 25 VCU advanced to the Atlantic
10 tournament title game in its first
season in the conference with awin
over UMass.
The Rams will face top-seeded
Saint Louis on Sunday in a matchup
of the league’s top two teams during
the regular season. The Billikens won
76-62 at home in their one meeting
Feb. 19.
VCU (26-7) forced 24 turnovers
to hold off a pesky Minutemen team
that upset Temple in Friday’s quarter-
finals.
Rob Brandenberg’s 3-pointer as the
shot clock expired finally gave the
Rams some breathing room, putting
them up 68-61 with a minute-and-a-
half left.
Juvonte Reddic added 18 points
and 12 rebounds.
Chaz Williams ended his A-10
tournament run back home in Brook-
lyn with 62 points in three games
for sixth-seeded UMass (21-11). He
scored 18 on 7-of-12 shooting Satur-
day.
CONFERENCE USA
Memphis 91, Southern Miss 79
TULSA, Okla. — Chris Crawford
scored 23 points, including the go-
ahead 3-pointer in double overtime,
and No. 20 Memphis beat Southern
Miss to win its seventh Conference
USA tournament title in the past
eight years.
Crawford, the league’s Sixth Man
of the Year, connected on a 3-pointer
from the left wing to put the top-
seeded Tigers (30-4) up 78-76 with
2:44 remaining. He also had a jumper
and a pair of free throws in a 9-0 run
by Memphis soon after that finally
put the game away.
Daveon Boardingham scored 19
points and Jonathan Mills had 15
points and 17 rebounds for second-
seeded Southern Miss (25-9), which
nearly clinched an automatic bid
to the NCAA tournament. Instead,
the Golden Eagles must hope to get
their second straight at-large bid on
Sunday.
AMERICA EAST
Albany 53, Vermont 49
BURLINGTON, Vt. — Mike Black
scored 14 points and Albany came
back from an early deficit to beat
Vermont in the America East champi-
onship game and earn its third trip to
the NCAA tournament.
Luke Devlin added 12 points on
6-for-6 shooting as the Great Danes
(24-10) ended an eight-game losing
streak to the Catamounts (21-11).
Jacob Iati hit a pair of 3-point shots
in the final three minutes to seal the
win.
MOUNTAIN WEST
New Mexico 63, UNLV 56
LAS VEGAS — Tony Snell scored
13 straight points for New Mexico
during a second-half run as the No.
15 Lobos pulled away late Saturday
to beat UNLVand add the Mountain
West tournament title to their regular
season crown.
Snell carried New Mexico (29-
5) down the stretch, making three
3-pointers and adding a pair of field
goals as the Lobos took over in the
last 8 minutes of the game.
UNChangs on to beat Maryland in ACCsemis
AP PHOTO
North Carolina’s P.J. Hairston, right, and Reggie Bullock, left, celebrate as
the Tar Heels defeat Maryland in the semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament in Greensboro, N.C., on Saturday.
Elmer L. Meyers High School
Michael D. Elias, principal, Elmer
L. Meyers High School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for the
second quarter.
Grade 12: Highest Honors:
Gregory Adams, William Ames-
bury, Joseph Arnone, Summer
Barrouk, Alicia Blaine, Alexis
Brown, Viviana Castellano, Tif-
fany Castro, Kristen Cease, Daniel
Conrad, Rianna Daughtry-Smith,
Mykeyah Dempsey, Michael
DiMaggio, Sharon Flores, Conor
Gallagher, Stephanie Gallagher,
Kimberly Gorney, Emily Gruver,
Doreen Hossge, Sabrina Kelly,
Michael Kendra, Amilyn Konopki,
Savannah Kratz, Ryan Krawcze-
niuk, Florence Kwok, Teaguen La-
batch, Allison Langhorn, Thomas
Lovecchio, Kayla Luminella, Kelly
Mahalak, Alfian Maulana, Bishop
McIntyre, Cynthia Menges, Alanna
Monte, Rasheed Moore, Mathew
Ocasio, Shaniese Ricketts, Joc-
elyn Robertson, Bethany Romero,
Christina Shonk, Matthew Snyder,
Brendilee Soto, Laura St. Preux,
Taillon Staudenmeier, Christian
Szafran, Nataliya Turyanytsya,
Mackenzie Winder, Stephanie
Witkowski, Brooke Yanovich, Hay-
ley Zelinka. High Honors: Mayra
Adames Torres, Crisleidy Cabada
Taveras, Justin Elick, Brandon
Grohowski, Zashary Guerra
Calderon, Anthony Havard, Ash-
ley Hernandez, Miriam Hernan-
dez, Eilish Hoban, Kevin Hoskins,
Paulina Huhnen, Julie Kenedy,
Amos Lee, Angela Marinelli, Aket-
zali Mejia, Alice Moses, Court-
ney Passikoff, Cathy Quinones,
Percell Wilson. Honors: Brianna
Alba, Breeann Edwards, Debbie
Luciano, Ester Nadeak, Crawford
Smith, Jovanni Tecayehvalt, Sara
Vazquez, Brandon Walker.
Grade 11: Highest Honors: Jacob
Brominski, Mathew DeMarco,
Brianna DiMaggio, Robyn Fannon,
Christa Franckiewicz, Julia Kerr,
Luke Kropp, Emmalie Langan,
Katie Lehnert, Cal Lisman, Sarah
McCann, Kyle McHale, Leah Mer-
rick, Samantha Middleton, Kelly
Morataya, Catherin Morocho,
Phuc Huu Nguyen, Quynh
Nguyen, Morgan Prince, Melissa
Robles, Tanya Roque, Andrew
Umphred, Amy Webster, Karissa
Whitman. High Honors: Ivi Baez,
Cristofer Cabada Taveras, Kiefer
Chavez, Riley Conahan, Marco
Franco, Jacob Greenberg, Juan
Hernandez, Breanna Kaskey,
Jessica Klinefelter, Erin Langdon,
Anna Macko, Nathan Mahalak,
Timothy Markovich, Melanie
Maskowski, Exel Mendoza, John-
tae Nelson, Kierstan Poplawski,
Eric Smith, Bradley Stefanovich,
Kimani Taylor, Hayley Tlatenchi.
Honors: Davante Bonham, Emily
Buford, Alex Burke, Karla Carta-
gena Diaz, Quadea Clinkscales,
Cody Coolbaugh, Miles Davis,
Jocelyne MacHuca, Alexander
Paneto, Sabrina Robertson,
Quatanza Rose, Tyler Smallcomb,
Jacob Vest, Joshua White.
Grade 10: Highest Honors:
Jeremiah Bower, Amanda Brooks,
Ciara Case, Nina Coger, Miles
Hammond, Quince Hutchings,
Kayla Judge, Cassandra Kelly,
Jesse Macko, Adalberto Morales,
Amanda Olszyk, Sydney Rent-
sch, Olivia Richards, Nicholas
Sisko, Anzhela Turyanytsya. High
Honors: Ana Adames Torres,
Sara Bolacker, Sydnee Curran,
Desirae Evans, Nikole Harrington,
Brent Hummel, Samantha Kellar
Emily Kipiel, Kayla Krasnav-
age, Elizabeth Lombardo, Kayla
Lovecchio, Andrew Martinez, Le
Ann McDaniel, Taylor Nargoski,
Melanie Prashker-Thomas, Megan
Price, Bertha Ramierz Herrera,
Erick Soriano, Ysabel Soto Reyes,
Tonia Turak, Shakeerah Walker,
Star Asia Ward, Eddie Warren,
Emily Welles, Jamie Wills. Hon-
ors: Christopher Banas, Allison
Berman, Daniel Chapin, Taylor
Chavez, Emily Cook, Christopher
Edward, Jason Gutkowski, Shakir
Henderson, Erick Hernandez,
Darah Holmes, Alisyia Lombardo,
Genny Manun, Joecelyn Marti-
nez, Hassanah McLendon, John
Mendoza, Jasmine Mitchell, Jose
Ozoria, Lauren Pacurariu, Jessica
Puma, Melinda Ritter, Joshua
Smith, Coty Strausser, Gina Stril-
lacci, Jondry Taveras, Wilhemina
Townes, Edward Vergara, Jailene
Yanez.
Grade 9: Highest Honors:
Hayley Boote, Michael Eichhorn,
Jillian Kopec, Keith Ostrowski,
Rai-Shawn Rinaldi, Cody Robin-
holt, Joshua Schiowitz, Timothy
Snyder, Megan Welles. High
Honors: Ryan Drust, John Dulis,
Michael Emel, Joseph Franck-
iewicz, Barbara Guirin, John
Karavis, Wynter Kelley, Victoria
Kwok, Rosa Lescoe, Cassidy
Lupico, Bailey McDaniel, Zachary
Mendoza, Tiffany Muniz, Elizabeth
Nadeak, Marissa Prince, Gianna
Romanelli, Kasidi Unger, Maribel
Vergara, Matthew Yekel, Kyle Ze-
linka. Honors: Cha’Zuayla Bose-
man, Austin Bynon, Adam Casey,
Eric Hernandez, Haley Jasnoski,
Craig Kepp, Daisy Labatch, Justin
Levanda, Elizabeth Macko, Simran
Mangat, Josselyn Morataya,
Miquan Nowell, Leidy Peralta Nin,
Kelsey Polanowski, Cheyenne
Robertson, Dillan Ryman, Sarah
Smith, Kristofer Tarnalicki, Carlo
Telesco, Jonathan Weaver.
Grade 8: Highest Honors: Scott
Banta, Brianna Billingsley, Elise
Fellerman, Amelia Hammond,
Stanley Kwok, James Langan,
Sydney Lonsdale, Aria Mason,
David Nargoski, Forest Nguyen,
Lauren Owca, Jekyra Risher.
High Honors: Hannah Bolacker,
Samantha Brooks, Michael Emel,
Ryan Gilgallon, Megan Graham,
Guadalupe Guerrero, Christo-
pher Hinds, Rosalee Jodziewicz,
Kendra Krolick, Emily Mangold,
Kelli Meginess, Jacob Nargoski,
Kayley Nilon, William Norton, Sa-
mantha Pursel, Tabitha Schwab,
Yelicia Zamudio-Barajas. Honors:
Lise Beauvil, Caitlyn-Ann Burger,
Ashley Chavez, Madyson Davies,
Andrew Hossage, Devon Keiper,
Alex Kendra, Loidie Magloire, Lily
McFarland, Colin Pasone, Cindy
Peralta Nin, Kelvin Perez-Arias,
Rakim Salaam, Shawnae Stucker,
Jacob Yurko.
Grade 7: Highest Honors: Sarah
Bottger, Alexis Bruno, Victoria
Collum, Nickolas Galey, Kenneth
Macko, Erin Morris, Kyle Os-
trowski, Jennifer Price, Gabrielle
Rodriguez, Elsa Romero, Tyler
Schneikart, Kalie Uzialko, Halle
Zulkoski. High Honors: Najae
Briggs, Hector Cortes, Natalie
Davidson, Taiquan Dobson, Jona-
thon Evans, Julianna Formola,
Je’Tiah Foster, Maria Franckie-
wicz, Nicholas Franze, Jordan Giv-
ens, Izabell Hearst, Paige Hogan,
Devyn Jackson, Kiera Laurent,
Kyle Long, Sara Mongold, Lindsey
McManus, Phuc Hoang Nguyen,
Syndia Perez, Nicholas Pugh,
Zachary Rattigan, Veronica
Romanelli, Kyle Sattof, Emily
Sosa, Selena Soto, Thomas Suy-
dam, Carolyn Walters. Honors:
Aliyah Benjamin, Nancy Castillo,
Jack Conover, Janell Czerpak,
Ivo Gorzynski, Luis Guadalupe
Ramierz, Kaleb Hanson-Richart,
Steven Hernandez, Quamere
Howard, Omar Kelly, Madison
May, Ezra Perez-Basket, Emily
Walters, Janssen Wilborn, Nasir
Williams.
“Your orthopedic, sports injury, and rehab specialists”
Dr. Richard Cohen & Dr. Aaron Haydu
283-1011
417 Market St. Kingston, PA
www.CohenHayduChiro.com
Also Offering: Spinal Decompression
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• Board Certifed Rehabilitation
• Certifed in McKenzie therapy
• ART, FMS, and Certifed
Strength and Conditioning
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• Kinesio-tape and Graston Certifed
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451-2020
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WESTSIDE VETERINARY HOSPITAL
From left: Dr. Donald Sankey, VMD • Dr. Amy Smith, VMD
and Dr. William Rubin, VMD
Owner Dr. William Rubin and associate
Dr. Donald Sankey will continue to
provide personalized medical care for
your pets. We welcome the addition of
Dr. Amy Smith DVM to our staff. She has
a special interest in acupuncture and
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Please visit us at our
new 7,000 sq. ft.
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HONOR ROLL
Cousins perform at recital
Cousins recently performed at a recital at the Suzuki School
for Strings, Plains Township. Lauren Evans, a junior at
Wyoming Valley West High School, performed Minuet in G
by L. Beethoven with her violin instructor, Rachel Galassi.
Sydney Evans, a third-grade student at Schuyler Elementary
School, performed a violin solo, Perpetual Motion and Varia-
tion by S. Suzuki. Hayden Foland, a second-grade student
at Wyoming Area Catholic School, performed a piano solo,
Little Playmates by F.X. Chwatal. At the recital, from left, are
Sydney Evans, Hayden Foland and Lauren Evans.
The Afliate Hospitals of Commonwealth Health: Berwick Hospital Center • First Hospital • Mid-Valley Hospital • Moses Taylor Hospital
Regional Hospital of Scranton • Special Care Hospital • Tyler Memorial Hospital • Wilkes–Barre General Hospital
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Join us to hear Elizabeth Smart’s powerful story of recovery after
a nine-month abduction – a tale of faith, family and love.
The Healthy Woman programis a series of health education events
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Thursday, March28
Scranton Cultural Center • 420 N. WashingtonAve.
5 p.m. – Vendor Expo with hors d’oeuvres, daVinci® Robotic
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29
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69 $
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Regular Price $5.95/sq. ft.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Page 7B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com F E A T U R E S
DALLAS: Gifted students
in third through fifth grade at
Wycallis Elementary School
have been working on a service
learning project in conjunction
with the Philadelphia Zoo’s
UNLESS project. The students
have created a campaign en-
couraging others to save energy
in order to save the habitats of
polar bears and frogs.
People are asked to visit the
Dallas website, www.dallassd.
com, and take the energy
survey to help the students with
their project. Also available on
the website are the students’
logo and PowerPoint presenta-
tions.
DALLAS: Misericordia Uni-
versity Office of Admissions is
hosting a series of open houses
for adult learners interested in
the Expressway Accelerated De-
gree Program and for transfer
students who are interested in
continuing their education.
The first open house will
be held from 4-7 p.m. on April
9 in Room 405, Building 4 of
Luzerne County Community
College, 1333 S. Prospect St.,
Nanticoke.
The second session will be
held from 4-7 p.m. on April
10 in the boardroom of Lacka-
wanna College, 501 Vine St.,
Scranton.
The third session will be of-
fered from 4-6 p.m. on April 18
at the Lackawanna College-Ha-
zleton Center, 145 East Broad
St., Hazleton.
A virtual open house also
will be held via the Internet
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April
11. Adult learners and trans-
fer students are invited to log
onto www.misericordia.edu/
adulted, where they will have
the opportunity to chat with a
representative of the Office of
Admissions.
For more information, con-
tact the Misericordia University
Office of Admissions at 674-
6331 or at www.misericordia.
edu/expressway.
KINGSTON: The Louis
Maslow STEM School at
Wyoming Seminary will present
a free lecture on brain-based
learning at 7 p.m. on Tuesday
in the Upper School’s Stettler
Learning Resource Center,
North Sprague Avenue. The
lecture is open to the public.
Dr. Kathleen Carlisle, Wyo-
ming Seminary school psychol-
ogist, will discuss how a child’s
brain changes between the ages
of 8 and 18; what changes in
the brain as new information
is received and mastered; how
the variety of subjects taught
in middle and high school help
brain development; and the po-
tential impacts of technology on
the collection and integration of
new information. Participants
are encouraged to bring their
SMART technology, such as
smartphones, iPads or tablets
to observe how technology can
be incorporated into an educa-
tional experience.
The lecture is part of a
monthly series presented by
the Louis Maslow STEM (Sci-
ence, Technology, Engineering,
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601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311
COLONIALWILLIAMSBURG&BUSCHGARDENS
April 11–14
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August 3–8 • AboardtheExplorer of Seas
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October 22–November 1
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
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Call 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
Visit www.musicbox.org for a complete list of shows in 2013
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St. Faustina Parish Youth Ministry solemnly presents the
Palm Sunday, March 24th, 2013 - 7:00 P.M.
Doors open at 6:15pm regardless of weather conditions.
www.nanticokecatholic.com
Math) School at Wyoming Sem-
inary and developed by Rachel
Bartron, director of the STEM
School. For more information
contact Bartron at rbartron@
wyomingseminary.org
KINGSTON/FORTY
FORT: Wyoming Seminary
Upper School in Kingston and
Lower School in Forty Fort are
hosting a Visitation Day on
April 1.
At the Lower School, 1560
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort,
the day will begin at 8:15 a.m.
Visiting students are invited
to experience a typical day
at the school by shadowing a
student and joining with other
students for lunch. Parent tours
of school, which will include
information about affordability,
will be available at 8:30 a.m.
and at 2 p.m. Reservations are
requested by March 28. Call the
Lower School Admission Office
at 718-6610 for more informa-
tion and to make reservations
or register on line at www.
wyomingseminary.org.
The Upper School Visitation
Day program will begin at 8:45
a.m. in the Stettler Learn-
ing Resources Center, North
Sprague Avenue, Kingston.
Students and their parents are
invited to attend a welcome
address and presentations
on preparing for college and
co-curricular opportunities at
the school, followed by a tour
of the campus. Prospective
students will join students for
lunch and a sampling of classes.
Parents are also invited to at-
tend a discussion on affordabil-
ity and have lunch. Activities
will end at 2:30 p.m. Admission
interviews will be given upon
request.
Responses are required by
March 28. For more informa-
tion, or to sign up for the
event, call the Upper School
Admission Office at 270-2160
or register on line at www.
wyomingseminary.org.
WILKES-BARRE: The
Jewish Community Alliance,
through several interest-free,
educational grants and en-
dowments, is offering Jewish
undergraduate and graduate
students the opportunity to
help finance their education.
The following criteria must be
met: be of the Jewish faith; live
in or have parents living in the
greater Wilkes-Barre area; have
a grade point average of at least
2.5; and be in financial need.
There are five available
student aid funds in the fall
and spring semesters: Rella
Roth Loan, Betty Lieberman
Sirotkin Loan, Bartikowsky
Loan (graduate students only),
Gelb Scholarship and the Louis
Smith Scholarship (must be a
Wilkes University student and a
member of the JCC).
Applications are available
by contacting the JCA scholar-
ship office at 824-4646. Latest
grades, a copy of the FAFSA
application and college verifica-
tion should be included with
returned application. Deadline
for the fall 2013 semester is
May 31.
Upon receipt of the ap-
plication, the student will be
contacted for an in-person
interview and any additional
information needed. All
information, including name of
applicant, is kept confidential.
Once approved, the student will
be notified and a promissory
note must be signed by student
and co-signer/guarantor, in
the presence of a JCA witness.
Checks are prepared to the
student/college or university
in mid August for fall semester
and mid December for spring
semester. Repayment of loans
begin six months after gradu-
ation.
WILLIAMSPORT: Pennsyl-
vania College of Technology is
hosting an open house from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday on
the main campus. Free trans-
portation will be provided to
and from the college’s Schnee-
beli Earth Science Center near
Allenwood and the Lumley
Aviation Center at the Wil-
liamsport Regional Airport in
Montoursville.
Activities include informa-
tion sessions on admissions,
financial aid and academic pro-
grams, a session on “Choosing
Your Major,” tours of the cam-
pus and meetings with faculty,
school deans and students.
Visit www.pct.edu/open-
house for information, includ-
ing a registration form, a
campus activity guide, travel
directions, a campus map and
a list of lodging available in the
Williamsport area.
Those who cannot attend
the open house may schedule
a campus tour online at the
open house website or call the
Admissions Office at 800-367-
9222. For more info VISIT
www.pct.edu or email admis-
sions@pct.edu.
BRIEF
Continued from Page7B
DALLAS MIDDLE SCHOOL
Dr. Thomas J. Duffy, Principal,
Dallas Middle School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for the
second marking period.
Grade 6: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Haley Fennell, Emily Flem-
ing, Bernard Frantz, Zachary Hill,
Christina Hoidra, Brenden Jesse,
Lindsey Jorda, Erin Kelly, Michael
Luksic, Kyle McAndrew, Elisabeth
Mead, Christian Motley, Steven
Newell, Zachary Palfey, Stephen
Postupak, Michael Quinnan,
Patrick Redington, Tyler Reinert,
Mitchell Rome, Christina Schuler,
Jaelyn Shaver, Eric Weiss, Eric
Williams, Kelly Young, Ethan
Zawatski, Sara Zaykowski, Jack
Ziemba. First Honors: Angelina
Allen, John Betzko, Samantha
Blamire, Emily Bogdon, Brianna
Brennan, Shelby Carr, Elizabeth
Chamberlain, Faith Christman,
Abigail Curtis, Amanda Danis-
hanko, Lauren Delamater, Colin
Dempsey, Ava Dettore, Mia Dixon,
Haydon Edwards-Lewis, Mikayla
Engler, John Falcone, Justin
Finarelli, Mackenzie Fleeger, Erin
Garnett, Joshua Gerstein, Avery
Godwin, Amanda Good, Desta-
nee Good, Andrew Hirko, Nicole
Jacobs, Nicholas Kachur, Alex-
ander Kapral, Darren Kerdesky,
Samantha Kern, Hailee Koytek,
Julia Krawetz, Sydney Kraynak,
Alexis Lanza, Payton Lepore,
Beaudyn Lewis, Kathleen Lydon,
Dante Marianacci, Adison McClain,
Megan McGovern, Molly McGuire,
Courtney Moss, Gianna Musto,
Joseph Nardone, Brian Novicki,
Jacob Novitski, Gabrielle Olengin-
ski, Joshua Orehotsky, Nathan Os-
troski, Alyssa Podskoch, Benjamin
Reavy, Blaine Rex, Madison Riley,
Renee Rinehimer, Evan Sabecky,
Chloe Scott, Megan Sebastianelli,
Jacob Smith, Hailey Sobocinski,
Alexander Solano, Nicholas So-
linsky, Gianna Spaciano, Gabrielle
Sweeney, Caleb Sweitzer, Madelyn
Swire, Hannah Thomas, Laura
Timinski, Andrew Trumm, Kasi
Ulicny, Vincent Vespico, Lukas
Volpetti, Ashley Weinstein, Brandi
Yale, Hannah Yanovich, Grace
Young, Kaitlyn Zimmerman.
Second Honors: Joseph Aliciene,
Maxwell Banks, Kayla Barber, Ry-
ley Blaine, Audrey Blessner, Colin
Bowanko, Elliot Bowden, Christo-
pher Carver, Charles Castellino,
Nichole Conrad, John Costello,
Logan Cote, Sean Cuba, Parker
DalSanton, Catherine Daly, Mor-
gan Davis, Noah Delevan, Victoria
Dent, Samantha Dixon, Matthew
Duffy, Emily Farrell, Lauren Fas-
sett, Dylan Feeney, Justin Fell,
Matthew Ferrara, Vladimir Gingo,
Jada Guthrie, Dylan Hakim, Bailey
Hayden, Daniel Hodle, Elizabeth
Hulbert, Grace Jarden, Heath
Jones, Makenzie Kapitula, Jo-
hanna Kiska, Ethan Kolojejchick,
Charlotte Kovaly, Hunter Landon,
Michael Lee, Sierra Loiselle, Jona-
than Manzella, Andrew Menig,
Ethan Mooney, Alexandra Oster,
Daniella Pace, Brandon Porasky,
John Price, Angelina Rhoades,
Morgan Risch, Vanessa Ryan,
Ryan Schmid, Matthew Schnable,
Ethan Scioscia, Bailey Slacktish,
Khristopher Smiga, David Smith,
Jordan Stoudt, Zachary Straz-
dus, Sydney Strickland, Ethan
Sypniewski, Ondrea Taffera, Alicia
Vincelli, Caitlin Walsh, Connie
Weaver, Rachael Wooditch, Darren
Wyffels, Savannah Zimmerman.
Grade 7: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Audrey Aristeo, Rebecca
Balara, Cassidy Buda, Annalise
Cheshire, Caroline Conrad, Steven
Finarelli, Morgan Jenkins, Olivia
Kimmerle, Alicia Langan, Claudia
Leu, John Macey, Matthew
Metzloff, Benjamin O’Connell,
Rachel Rollman, Logan Tompkins,
Bryce VanDeutsch, Hannah Vitale,
Patrick Yurish. First Honors:
Bradley Adams, Scott Alexander,
Erin Amos, Samantha Banks,
Shania Bearce, Dasha Bidding,
Kayla Bidding, Michael Biesecker,
Christina Blankensop, Adam
Borton, Makenna Bryant, Jeffery
Buscher, Alexander Charlton, Jes-
sica Chinikaylo, Sarah Congdon,
Issa Dahdal, Christopher Dautrich,
Cassidy Deleur, Jenny Dickerson,
Max Dzugan, Morgan Edwards-
Lewis, Andrew Francis, Sydney
Fulton, Emma Hastings, Joshua
Holdredge, Hollie Holthaus,
Michael Huntington, Joshua
Jarden, Hanna Johnson, Olivia
Johnson, Olivia King, Angel Kl-
emunes, Nicholas Kocher, Andrew
Kovalick, Kade Kravits, Nicholas
Krivak, Mikail Krochta, Gianna
Leo, Megan Lyons, Kimberly
Manganella, Thomas Marsola,
Madison McEvoy, Jordyn Miller,
Zachery Minarik, Ryan Nelligan,
Emma Oley, Garrett Pall, Drew
Patton, Matthew Pehala, Caitlyn
Pike, Melinda Ratchford, Hunter
Resavage, Mikayla Reynolds,
Larson Rice, Rayna Roberts,
Peyton Ross, Christopher Sedeski,
Heather Shively, Dalton Simpson,
Kaveri Singh, Samantha Sorokin,
John Stachnik, Kaitlyn Strumski,
Adam Sutton, Rayna Swida, Nnalu
Ukattah, Josh Wyandt, Jennifer
Yencha, Kyle Zern, Abigail Zolner.
Second Honors: Lauren Alves,
Lucas Birdsall, James Bittner,
Michael Caravaggio, Anthony
Caravaggio, Nicholas Carr, Michael
Collins, Harold Dauernheim,
George Davies, Drake Dettore, Ja-
cob Dragon, Sayde Ellsworth, Mya
Enright, Margaret Evanoski, Jo-
seph Fioti, Mason Gattuso, Bridget
Goodrich, Andrew Grabowski,
Kimberly Gruver, Kyle Gurzynski,
Donna Herron, Joshua Kalna,
Zachary Kalna, Samuel Kravitsky,
Alexis LaNunziata, Joshua Lydon,
Ty Madden, Matthew Magnotta,
Nathan Maransky, Nicholas
Matcho, Matthew Mathers, Evan
McClain, Aaron McGuire, Christo-
pher Murray, Margaret Oldeack,
Corey Osborn, Maria Ostrum,
Joseph Parsons, Alex Perry, Zane
Price, Mark Regan, Kyle Ripa,
Mark Roginski, Nicole Russell,
Kaityn Sarday, Ryan Schmitz,
Dylan Shaver, Brody Strickland,
Francesca Treslar, Erika Winter-
steen, Richard Wooditch, Kather-
ine Yablonsky, Jacob Yakus.
Grade 8: Honors with Dis-
tinction: Liam Barrett, Maria
Bednar, Angela Bendick, Paige
Boyle, Zachary Charlton, Maxine
DeRome, Christopher Good, Leah
Gorr, Rachel Habib, Joshua Hunt-
er, Christopher Huntington, Sara
Lojewski, Justin Marshall, Jordan
McLaughlin, Ann Metzloff, Megan
Meyer, David Orehotsky, James
Oschal, Collin Pertl, Connor Phil-
lips, Troy Reinert, Margaret Rine-
hart, Brianna Rinehimer, Arthur
Spears, Allison Stallard, Sarah
Strazdus, Jessica Stuart, Shayla
Stuart, Jordan Wilson. First Hon-
ors: Aloysha Ackerman, Ashlie
Alves, Chase Anderson, Chris-
topher Arvletta, Kyle Besecker,
Jacob Besecker, Kaylynn Bruch,
Daniel Burkhart, Mikaila Chakon,
Nicholas Christman, Brandon
Clemow, Ryan Cohen, Malynda
Cook, Jason Culp, Sarah Daly,
Katelyn DeAnthony, Courtney
Devens, Meghan Donahue, Benja-
min Donahue, Jacqueline Dottor,
Lee Eckert, Maggie Gilbertson,
Savannah Gochoel, Max Gordon,
Elizabeth Grose, Blake Herstek,
Kaitlyn Hill, Emily Howell, Madison
Hurst, Haley Karasinski, Madalyn
Kelley, Ryan Kelly, Elizabeth Ken-
nelly, Connor Kerkowski, Greta
Ketchner, Gabrielle Kosierowski,
Talia Kosierowski, Jessica Kus,
Kate Lazzeri, Anna Lehane, Emma
Lehman, Rachel Maniskas, Stone
Mannello, Carl Markowski, Erin
May, Corey McAndrew, Con-
nor McAndrew, Abigail McCabe,
Megan Miller, Richard Morgan,
Riley Oremus, Ronald Ostrowski,
Emily Pellam, Carley Perloff,
Desire’ Petrikonis, Ryan Phillips,
Sara Reichold, Christian Roberts,
Madeleine Ross, Michael Santora,
Sequoia Saxe, Sara Schwartz,
Joelle Serafin, Jeffrey Simon,
Madison Slacktish, Alexis Spa-
ciano, Jacob Stritzinger, Christian
Sypniewski, Ethan Szczecinski,
Joseph Thompson, Josephina Tre-
slar, James Vitale, Jaydin West,
Alexander Zaykowski, Abigale
Zondlo. Second Honors: Jona-
than Andrews, Hannah Baloga,
Gregory Banks, John Barrett,
Logan Baseski, Jarod Blockus,
Kaura Chavez, Alexa Davis, Teresa
Davis, Nico DeLuca, Robert Emil,
Julia Evans, Michael Farrell, Dal-
ton Gattuso, Charles Giacometti,
Michele Gill, Nicholas Green, Mia
Greenwood, Nickolas Guzzo, Emily
Heltzel, Alyssa Henry, Lauren
Hodle, Ryan Hulbert, Rachael
Kozick, Tori Landon, Nina Leeds,
Kyle Moskaluk, Abigail Noone,
Lexes Palissery, Kaitlyn Pelchar,
James Powell, Emma Ripka, Kaeli
Samuel, Jonathon Scintilla, Mi-
chael Smith, Owen Sprau, Robert
Swida, Andrew Thomas, Justin
Thompson, Erica VanEtten, Victo-
ria Vespico, Isabella VonSchmel-
ing, Andrew Zeyher.
HONOR ROLL
Scholars named at Wyoming Area Catholic
Wyoming Area Catholic School recently announced the Holy Re-
deemer Scholars for the 2012-13 school year. The eighth-grade stu-
dents scored in the top 10 percent of all the eighth-grade students
who took the placement test for Holy Redeemer High School. From
left: Christopher Tigue, principal; James Kosik; Marissa Moran; Molly
Holmes; Brenna Satkowski; and Ann Marie Walsh, eighth-grade
teacher.
Northwest Area Middle School gives awards
Northwest Area Middle School recently held its Depart-
ment Awards assembly for Quarters 1 and 2. Award re-
cipients from grades 7 and 8, from left, first row: Forrest
Callahan, Language Arts Quarter 1; Emily Demco, Reading
Quarter 2 and Social Studies Quarter 1; Ania Williams, Fine
Arts Quarter 1; Brooke Harvey, Mathematics Quarter 2 and
Reading Quarter 1; and Michael Sherrick, Language Arts
Quarter 2. Second row: Sarah Sorber, Wellness Quarter
2; Brian Hardiman, Wellness Quarter 1; Adam Grisham,
Mathematics Quarter 1 and Fine Arts Quarter 2; Arthur
Brobst, Social Studies Quarter 2; Sam Edwards, Science
and Technology Quarter 2; and Angeline Ruckle, Science
and Technology Quarter 1.
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SUNDAY, MARCH 12013 Page 9B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com F E A T U R E S
GREATER NANTICOKE AREA
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Greater Nanticoke Area Education-
al Center recently announced the
Honor Roll for the second quarter.
Grade 6: Honors with Distinction:
Jilann Baron, Michayla L. Brennan,
Madelyn Bugdonovitch, Nicole M.
Butler, Bella G. Czeck, Meghan K.
Duda, Garrett A. Dzugan, James A.
Grabowski, Brendan T. Greene, Ken-
dal A. Grimm, Trevor S. Grohowski,
Andrew M. Gurzynski, Ariyanna K.
Hrivnak, Katelyn M. King, Lauren E.
Krause, Nathan A. Kreitzer, Noah
A. Krubitzer, Dillon A. Kruczek,
Trahjan A. Krupinski, Alyssa L.
Lewis, Amiah M. Lukowski, Leandro
Macias, Jillian N. Maute, Jonathan
M. McDaniels, Cheyenne V. Musick,
Kelsi C. O’Connor, Veronica Penko,
Riley D. Piontkowski, Tyler S. Pok-
rinchak, Seth A. Prestash, Kelsey
J. Prezekop, Ashley Rake, Carly
C. Reakes, Elizabeth M. Redenski,
Emalie M. Rowles, Colin J. Siegel,
Kaylee M. Simmons, Brinley E.
Sobeck, Owen Thomas, Allison E.
Williams. High Honors: Issac M. Ali,
Jarred Balliet, Cheyenne R. Bid-
ding-Pellam, Tyler Bieble, Gabrielle
E. Bohinski, Dylan M. Bonick, Skyla
M. Bouderau, Arieli L. Brabant,
Mackenzie M. Clark, Andrew C. Day,
Jeffrey D. Engle, Mandi L. Figler-
ski, Erin E. Gray, Brookelyn L. Guy,
Emily L. Heath, Haileigh Hendricks,
Bryce A. Hillard, Madison D. Hoover,
Kristen L. Jenkins, Abigail E. Kotch,
Leah Kubasek, Mykayla A. Madjeski,
Aaron C. Marr, Christian Mavus, Jo-
seph E. Mayewski, Christian F. Ma-
vus, Joseph E. Mayewski, Christian
F. Maeney, Daniel A. Mieczkowski,
Rebecca A. Mieczkowski, Elias S.
Miller, Jennifer Orellana, Christo-
pher M. Ormes, Nicholas M. Patton,
Jasmine M. Peters, Kristopher D.
Russin, Alexa L. Rybak, Nautica L.
Seeley, Mary A. Shemanski, John P.
Shoemaker Jr., Colin A. Smith, Lou-
is Stefanski, Christina M. Stephens,
Faith L. Strunk, Collin G. Thomas,
Casandra L. Tolodzieski, Michael B.
Valentukonis, Amber K. Vrotkoski,
Isaac Williams, Amy L. Witts, Dylan
Z. Wysocki, Emily I. Yaksima, Noah
J. Yatsko, Kaeley E. Zatorski, John
M. Zavatsky. Honors: Hailey B.
Adams, Dylan J. Bonczewski, Sean
P. Campbell, Jovany Cervantes,
Austin C. Cheslaw, Justin C. Chopik,
Kyle Cicerchia, Emily A. Conrad,
Mackenzie Crane, Alexis L. Cruz,
Austin Dunn, Matthew Engle, Mi-
chael Frazier, Jacob D. Gall, Shayne
C. Gallagher, Brenda L. Hartman,
K’La A. Jackson, Emily R. James,
Mackenzie Keiderling, Christian
Lackner, Kristoff Landmesser, Merly
T. Marte, Alyssia R. Meany, John
M. Muntz, Dante A. Myers, Austin
J. Norton, Star M. O’Neil, Kayla
Opdyke, Michael N. Panagokos,
Victoria E. Pehala, Maryan Popyk,
Shane D. Repasky Jr., Kyra L.
Rustay, Brianna R. Stritzinger, Erik
M. Tarnowski, Rebecca I.Turak, Erik
Turner Jr., Keith M. Vanderlaan,
Brianna White, Nicole M. Wolfe,
Zakkary J. Wylie, Tristan C. Young,
Christopher T. Zawadski.
Grade 7: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Sarah E. Adkins, Megen R.
Banas, Rebecca H. Bavitz, Kaitlyn
M. Bigos, Miranda N. Bohn, Emily B.
Brzozowski, Katelyn J. Butczynski,
Carlos M. Castillo, Emily A. Ehrens-
perger, Joylynne R. Frie, Madelyn
E. Grilz, Sabrina N. Holevinski, Codi
L. Hornlein , Dawson A. Hughes,
Douglas Hunter Jr., Brandon R.
Karavitch, Rebecca H. Levandowski,
David J. Mash, Lauren E. McHenry,
Dakota J. Millikin, Jarred Millikin,
Cassidy A. Moore, Brandon M.
Murtha, Amanda L. Nichols, Joseph
J. O’Hara, Matthew J. Piontkowski,
Caven J. Pollick, Nathan E. Proleika,
Kasey R. Radginski, Lisa N. Rad-
ziak, Kassandra A. Rinker, Dante
Rodriquez, Kimberly Rodriguez,
Kristopher M. Rynkiewicz, Emily O.
Scott, Michael M. Skamarakus, Evan
J. Stecco, Christopher Thomas,
Devn M. Thomas, Katrina C. Thom-
as, Samantha E. Waichulis, Ryan P.
Whittaker, Hunter R. Yale, Taylor
A. Zabrenski, Tyler M. Zaremba.
High Honors: Cameron M. Balliet,
Nadia L. Cobb, Ian P. Dougherty,
Madalyn R. Gomelko, Colin A. Higgs,
Lynsey E. Maciejaszek, Aaron J.
Miller, Faith A. Moyer, Megan R.
Murphy, Marissa Oncay, Justin T.
Ostopick, Brianna N. Ottensman,
Hunter Peterson, Ashlee M. Przy-
wara, Kristofer M. Seiwell, Emily E.
Spencer, Kyle J. Stratton, Avery E.
Valaitis, Justin A. Watkins, Dylan
White, Matthew J. Wrubel, Emily
I. Yaksima, Noah J. Yatsko, Kaeley
E. Zatorsk. Honors: Zackerri M.
Ali, Damon Beckhorn, Corbyn D.
Bogart, Courtney M. Capie, Bradley
L. Duda, Casey M. Evans, Allen
E. Fowler, Eddie L. Giles, John H.
Guszak, Michelle E. Guziak, Savana
A. Gwynn, Richard K. Hall, Ryan D.
Helmecki, Jose Hernandez, Calvin
T. Herring, Catherine A. Hindmarsh,
Ian M. Jeffries, Olivia R. Kivler, Mi-
cheal J. Krieger, David J. McDonald
Jr., Garbriella A. Montalvo, Daja’
M. Mumford, Brandon M. Murphy,
Alyssa M. Newell, Benjamin M.
Placek, Brian M. Reakes, Ethan J.
Rinehamer, Lindsey M. Rowles,
Nicholas C. Snyder, Matthew H.
Stegura, Mark C. Walters.
HONOR ROLL
WYOMINGVALLEY MONTESSORI
SCHOOL SCHOLAR PROGRAM
About the Scholar Program
Dedicated to high standards for student achievement and helping each
individual reach his or her fullest potential. WVMS offers a unique
opportunity to provide affordable and accessible private education to
talented candidates.
Who Is Eligible:
Students currently in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade who are enrolled in public,
independent, cyber, home school or chart schools for the 2012-2013
school year are eligible. Tese scholarships will cover partial cost of
tuition and will be awarded in consecutive years through 6th grade
as the board approves funding. Families can also apply for
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ng each
que
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851 W. Market St Kingston, PA 18704
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email lynn@wvms.org.
How to Apply
Please obtain a Scholar Program Packet at
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Te application deadline is April 12, 2013.
Applicants will be notified of the Scholar Program Committee’s
decision by May 3, 2013.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 10B SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 F E A T U R E S
Carly R. Kappler
Carly Rae Kappler, daughter of
Chas and Leah Kappler, Dallas,
is celebrating her 10th birth-
day today, March 17. Carly is a
granddaughter of Joseph and
Jean Mikush, Dallas; Nell Ann
Kappler, Saddle Lake; and the
late Charles Kappler III. She has
a brother, Charlie, 7.
Dominic Lingle
Dominic Lingle, son of Gina
and Ted Lingle, Plymouth, is
celebrating his second birth-
day today, March 17. Dominic
is a grandson of Holly and Ted
Lingle, Larksville; Debbie Worth,
Plymouth; and Tom Worth,
Wilkes-Barre. He is a great-
grandson of Joan Malicki and
the late John Malicki, Jennie
Worth and the late Thomas
Worth and June Kreidler and
the late Raymond Kreidler, all of
Wilkes-Barre, and Edward Lingle
and the late Gertrude Lingle,
Larksville.
Alyssa L. Evans
Alyssa Lauren Evans, daugh-
ter of John and Nicole Evans,
is celebrating her seventh
birthday today, March 17. Alyssa
is a granddaughter of Alan and
Karen Sklaney, Glen Lyon, and
David and Ruth Evans, Tyrone.
She has a sister, Olivia Jordyn,
4.
Ava M. Shaffer
Ava Marie Shaffer, daughter of
Luke and Wendy Shaffer, Forty
Fort, is celebrating her fourth
birthday today, March 17. Ava is
a granddaughter of Russel and
Lorain Bilby, West Wyoming, and
William and Maryellen Shaffer,
Exeter.
Klarissa A. Rinker
Klarissa Amber Rinker, daughter
of Jason and Kimberly Rinker,
Wanamie, is celebrating her 15th
birthday today, March 17. Klaris-
sa is a granddaughter of Judith
Rinker, Wilkes-Barre, and Cindy
and George Roushey, Wanamie.
She has a sister, Kassie, 12.
Michael Gober Jr.
Michael Gober Jr., son of Mi-
chael and Millissa Gober, Ashley,
is celebrating his fifth birthday
today, March 17. Michael is a
grandson of Patricia and Gary
French, Larksville, and Raymond
Davenport, Judy Gober and
the late Robert Gober, all of
Luzerne.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Salvation Army plans awards dinner
The Salvation Army will honor Michael and Tina MacDowell and
Conrad and Susan Schintz at the annual awards dinner at 5:30
p.m. on May 16 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center, 77
E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre. Dr. and Mrs. MacDowell will receive
the Salvation Army Community Service Award and Mr. and Mrs.
Schintz will receive The Salvation Army Others Award. The event
is being coordinated by The Salvation Army’s Awards Committee
and Pheiff & Some, Inc. Reservations can be made by contact-
ing Lieutenant Sharon Tressler at The Salvation Army at sharon.
tressler@use.salvationarmy.org or 824-8741. Some of the partici-
pants, from left, are Mike MacDowell, Tina MacDowell, Lieutenant
Ted Tressler and Conrad Schintz.
Keystone Chapter of UNICO hosting charity pig roast
The Keystone Chapter of UNICO National, Dunmore, is commemo-
rating its first Founders’ Day with a charity pig roast from 6-10
p.m. on April 13 at Fiorelli’s, Peckville. Proceeds from the event will
benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center and other local charities.
The event will feature a one-hour open bar with appetizers, a com-
plete Italian buffet, entertainment, and dancing in a casual, fun
atmosphere. A basket raffle will also be held. Cost is $45 per per-
son. Reservations and tickets are required and can be purchased
by calling Jim Mack at 342-7975. Deadline to reserve tickets is
April 5. Some of the participants, from left, first row: Peter Noto,
general chairman; Mary Mack; and Mary DePalma, co-chairman.
Second row: Ray Tropeano, basket raffle; Val Riggi; James Mack,
tickets; and Cathy Gerard, mystery pig raffle.
Cyril and Methodius sponsoring baked haddock dinner
SS. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church, Olyphant, is
sponsoring its second annual ‘Meatless Meal for Lent,’ a baked
haddock dinner, from 5-7 p.m. on Friday at the Regal Room, 216
Lackawanna Ave., Olyphant. Eat in or take out. Dinner includes
baked haddock, potato, vegetable, coleslaw, roll and dessert. Pre-
sold tickets are $12 per dinner. Reservations are due by Monday
and can be made by calling Cheryl at 489-4348. No tickets will
be available at the door. Some of the parishioners and committee
members, from left, are Mr. Bak, Cheryl Matuszewski, Bill Vervon,
Matthew Beckage and Rose Sember.
Lake-Lehman Band Sponsors holding craft show
The Lake-Lehman Band Sponsors annual spring craft show will be
held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday at the Lake-Lehman Jr.-Sr.
High School, Old Route 115, Lehman. Around 100 crafters will be on
site selling handmade Easter candy and fudge, handcrafted silver
and beaded jewelry, matted pictures, soaps and lotions, candles,
pottery, wood crafts, spring floral wreaths and more. A bake sale
and a variety of hot foods will be available all day. Admission is
free and all proceeds benefit the Lake-Lehman band programs.
For more information, call 477-2935, email bandcraftshow@gmail.
com or visit bandcraftshow.wix.com/llbscraftshow. Some of the
participants, from left, first row, are Lacey Carey, Kayleigh Konek,
Lila Szabo, Sierra Titus and Stephanie Konek. Second row: Deanna
Szabo, James Cihocki and Mikayla Kidd.
Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center
Gattini, Lilly and Eric, Drums, a
daughter, Feb. 19.
Cox, Destiny and Cory Frame,
Plymouth, a son, Feb. 20.
Mendez, Paola and Jerry Ruiz,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Feb. 20.
Kundick, Jennifer and Stephen
Clute, Dallas, a daughter, Feb. 21.
Fields, Vicki and David, Falls, a
daughter, Feb. 21.
Savdharia, Radhika and Kunal,
Drums, a daughter, Feb. 21.
Shuleski, Felicia and Matt
Kohler, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter,
Feb. 21.
Whitesell, Erin and Dane, Hun-
lock Creek, a son, Feb. 22.
Schwarztrauber, Julianne and
Christopher Pieszala, Laceyville,
a daughter, Feb. 22.
Zukauskas, Rebecca and Paul,
Kingston, a daughter, Feb. 23.
Powers, Michelle and Joseph
Sutton, New Milford, a son, Feb.
24.
Murphy, Angela and Todd
Geiger, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter,
Feb. 25.
Daniels, Angela and Nathan,
Monroe Township, a daughter,
Feb. 26.
Mahle, Chelsea and Timothy,
Hanover Township, a daughter,
Feb. 26.
Kosdick, Jenny, Hazleton, a
son, Feb. 26.
Glushefski, Erica and Benjamin
Stolarik III, Nanticoke, a son, Feb.
27.
Zimmerman, Lisa and Earl,
Springbrook Township, a son,
Feb. 27.
Ransom, Paula and Jesse
Trusky, Nicholson, a daughter,
Feb. 28.
Breiner, Xena, White Haven, a
daughter, March 1.
Hahn, Kathleen and Adam
Balcziunas, Kingston, a son,
March 3.
Walck, Kristina and Eric, Nesco-
peck, a daugther, March 4.
Hunting, Rachel and Anthony
Cona, Tunkhannock, a son, March
4.
Acosta, Maryann and Kyle
Gilroy, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter,
March 4.
Shull, Jennifer and Bill, Hen-
ryville, a son, March 4.
BIRTHS
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
Photographs and information must be received two full weeks before
your child’s birthday. Your information must be typed or computer-
generated. Include your name and your relationship to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and
birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names and
their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t forget to in-
clude a daytime contact phone number. Without one, we may be unable
to publish a birthday announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return of birthday or occasions photos and do
not return community-news or publicity photos. Email your birthday
announcement to people@timesleader.com or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.
BIRTHDAY GUIDELINES
2011 CHEVY HHR
#19076
$
13,450
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$
203
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PER MO.
2003 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
#19150A
$
10,235
*
OR
$
198
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PER MO.
2012 VW PASSAT
#19108
$
15,965
*
OR
$
241
*
PER MO.
2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS
#19109
$
11,364
*
OR
$
172
*
PER MO.
2011 HONDA CIVIC
#19090
$
14,995
*
OR
$
227
*
PER MO.
2006 CHEVY COBALT LS CPE
#18985A
$
7,450
*
OR
$
144
******
PER MO.
2005 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE
$
278
*******
PER MO.
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.0S
#18943
$
14,995
*
OR
$
227
*
PER MO.
PER MO.
2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN
#19220
$
18,595
*
OR
$
281
*
2007 NISSAN MURANO AWD
#19216A
$
13,265
*
OR
$
214
*****
PER MO.
YOUR POT OF GOLD SAVINGS AWAITS!
2012 KIA SPORTAGE AWD
#19184
$
299
*
PER MO.
2004 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
#19211A
$
6,988
*
OR
$
136
*******
PER MO.
2012 NISSAN XTERRA
#19203
$
21,395
*
OR
$
323
*
PER MO.
2012 DODGE JOURNEY AWD
#19119
$
20,965
*
OR
$
307
*
PER MO.
2011 VW JETTA
#19117
$
15,388
*
OR
$
233
*
PER MO.
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO CREW CAB LT 4X4
$
27,955
*
OR
$
422
*
PER MO.
2008 GMC ACADIA SLT
$
17,890
*
OR
$
282
****
PER MO.
2012 FORD FOCUS
SEL HB W/ ROOF
#19085
$
15,986
*
OR
$
242
*
PER MO.
2012 NISSAN SENTRA S
SPECIAL FLEET PURCHASE, 9 To Choose From
$
13,688
*
OR
$
206
*
PER MO.
2012 FORD FOCUS SDN SEL
W/ ROOF
#19082
$
232
*
PER MO.
2012 NISSAN TITAN CREW CAB SV 4X4
#19095
$
24,998
*
OR
$
377
*
PER MO.
2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS
#18973
$
14,265
*
OR
$
216
*
PER MO.
2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4X4
#19169A, Alloys, Keyless, PW, PL
$
9,895
*
OR
$
192
******
PER MO.
2012 DODGE RAM SLT QUAD CAB 4X4
#19073
$
23,965
*
OR
$
362
*
PER MO.
2011 VOLKSWAGON JETTA
#19117
$
14,986
*
OR
$
226
*
PER MO.
2013 KIA SORENTO 4X4 V6
#19105, 7 Passenger
$
23,560
*
OR
$
355
*
PER MO.
2007 HONDA CRV EX AWD
#19170A
$
10,968
*
OR
$
177
*****
PER MO.
2012 NISSAN ROUGE
#19175
$
18,563
*
OR
$
280
*
PER MO.
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ AWD
$
24,875
*
OR
$
375
***
PER MO.
2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4
$
16,675
*
OR
$
252
*
PER MO.
2012 KIA FORTE
#19042
$
14,688
*
OR
$
222
*
PER MO.
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LT
#19079
$
14,639
*
OR
$
221
*
PER MO.
A
M
E
R
I
C
A

S
N
E
W
C
A
R
A
L
T
E
R
N
A
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I
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2
9
0
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S
T
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,
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-
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A
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0
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-
C
A
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S
*TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ASK SALESPERSON FOR DETAILS OF PROGRAMS. FINANCE RATE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL.
* 2011-12, 2.74% for 72 mos ** 2010, 3.24% for 72 mos *** 2009, 3.79% for 72 mos ****2008, 4.24% for 72 mos *****2007, 4.99% for 72 mos
******2006, 5.99% for 60 mos *******2004, 5.99% for 60 mos ******2003, 5.99% for 60 mos ********2002, 5.99% for 60 mos
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$
14,970
*
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$
266
*
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2007 TOYOTA
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#19055A, 3rd Row Seating
$
13,986
*
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$
226
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2012 KIA
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$
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276
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2011 MITSUBISHI
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2007 CHEVY
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#18182
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SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 11B
TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com
need chemo or radiation,” she
said.
During the past 18 months,
she’s been there for him as they
had to put his mother in a nurs-
ing home and grieve her death.
They’ve also been busy re-
storing his family homestead
in Luzerne.
“Sanding, plastering and var-
nishing together” really helped
the couple bond, David said
with a chuckle.
For Lois, the thought of re-
marriage was “on the back
burner,” but after David’s moth-
er’s death in 2011, he urged
her to make concrete plans. “I
could have done it yesterday,”
he told her. “But you pick the
date.”
“I thought and thought,” Lois
said, “and came up with the an-
niversary of our first date, the
second time around.”
So, on March 9 David, who
is a truck driver, and Lois, who
works at SCI Dallas, officially
tied the knot.
Lois’ daughter, Maria An-
derscavage, was maid of hon-
or, and David’s cousin Corey
Welsh was best man. Junior
bridesmaid was the grand-
daughter of the bride, 7-year-
old Anjel, and groomsmen was
the bride’s son-in-law, Bruce
Anderscavage.
As a surprise to David, Lois
invited his cousin, Nancy Ho-
vis from Emlenton, whom he
hadn’t seen in years, to the wed-
ding, and he was thrilled to see
her and her husband, Tom, in
the front pew at church. “That
was a highlight for David,” Lois
said, adding that a highlight
for her was the presence of her
boss, Joseph Scarantino, who
was sufficiently recovered from
an injury to come and share the
celebration.
During the reception, the
music of Johnny Mathis, Frank
Sinatra, Jerry Vale, Tony Ben-
nett and Dean Martin filled the
air. At the bride’s request, the
DJ explained to the group why
the couple agree with the lyrics
of a Sinatra song that “love is
better the second time around.”
TOGETHER
Continued from Page 1B
David and Lois Brace enter their wedding reception at Vanderlyn’s restaurant on a red carpet,
in the style of a Hollywood wedding.
FRED ADAMS PHOTO/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
OuT-Of-TOwn DEans’ LisTs
Keystone College, La Plume
President’s Lists: Zachary Bell,
Pittston; Neil Elms, Forty Fort;
Samantha Littleford, Nanticoke;
Jaclyn Nat, Wilkes-Barre; Eric
Skelton, Dupont; Robert Staley,
Wilkes-Barre. Dean’s List: Mike
Haduck, Avoca; Hope Krolewski,
Bear Creek; Jared Matteucci,
Pittston; Daniela Smith, Wilkes-
Barre; Brittany Spaide, Nesco-
peck; Matthew Taylor, Avoca.
Honors Lists: Rebecca Drum-
heller, Hazle Township; Taralee
Eastman, Avoca; Ashley Ma-
ciejczak, Sweet Valley; Marena
Ranieli, West Wyoming; Geraldine
Ryder, Forty Fort; Cameron Sav-
age, Harding; Erin Shedlock, Lake
Winola; Laura Theroux, Kingston.
Loyola University, Baltimore,
Md.
Terrence Donnelly, West Pittston;
Julie Langan, Pittston; Gretchen
Mey, Forty Fort; William Mitchell,
Wilkes-Barre.
Villanova University
Deena Prescavage, Hudson;
Nicholas Fonzo, Wilkes-Barre;
Steven Gulotta, Trucksville; Jes-
sica Swoboda, Hanover Town-
ship; Kelly Mericle, Shavertown.
“Sanding, plastering and
varnishing together” really
helped the couple bond.
APRIL 25 - 28, 2013
1-800-745-3000
HERE’S HOWTO ENTER: No purchase necessary. Must be 18 years old or older to enter on behalf of a child. Prizes have
no cash value and are nontransferable. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes Barre office. The winner will
be drawn from all entries received by Friday March 29, 2013. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls
or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter. Winners will be
announced in the Wed., April 3, 2013 edition of the Times Leader.
All Entries must be received by Fri., March 29, 2013. Winners will be announced April 3, 2013 in the Times Leader.
ENTRY FORM
Child’s Name: __________________________Age:_______
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“I Do and I Don’t: A History of Mar-
riage in the Movies,” by Jeanine
Basinger; Knopf (384 pages, $30).
The movies have always had
marriage on their minds — but
not so much in their hearts.
The world of film has depict-
ed the world of marriage from
just about every angle, but, even
after more than 100 years, it still
has trouble keeping the subject
of marriage in focus.
Courtship? Absolutely. Love?
Well, duh. Companionship? Of
course. But marriage —the day-
in, day-out partnership between
two people — well, that’s just
not easy movie material.
The dilemma, Jeanine Bas-
inger relates in her breezily
written, aggressively researched
book “I Do and I Don’t: A His-
tory of Marriage in the Movies,”
is that marriage has “no story
arc” — it just goes on and on.
“A good movie was usually
a story in a hurry… . Marriage
took years to develop and ma-
ture. Novels could be written
about marriages, and plays
could crystallize their tensions
into significant scenes of dia-
logue; but movies … what were
movies to do in ninety min-
utes?”
In “I Do and I Don’t,” Bas-
inger, the chair of filmstudies at
Wesleyan University and a pro-
lific writer of incisive books on
Hollywood history, sometimes
goes on and on, too, as she tries
to make a case for the idea of
what she calls “the marriage
movie.” But, as she keeps re-
minding herself and us, movies
have been far more interested in
getting to point of marriage —
or, increasingly in the postwar
world, getting to what makes
marriage fall apart.
In Hollywood’s golden era,
those hurdles to wedded bliss
were rooted in a reality that au-
diences understood. Basinger
even offers a checklist full of
them. (“When you marry a
murderer,” she writes, “your
marriage is in trouble.” Good
to know.) But for decades, the
end point was nearly always the
same: Husband and wife, wiser
after facing seemingly uncon-
querable obstacles together,
realize the grass is greener on
their side of the fence after all.
It’s amazing how many dif-
ferent types of movies that per-
spective encompasses — from
silent-era expressionist classics
such as “Sunrise” (1927) to
postwar melodramas like “The
Best Years of Our Lives” (1946)
and “modern” domestic dramas
like “Who’s Afraid of Virginia
Woolf?” (1966). Basinger does a
terrific job connecting the dots
and connecting the decades,
showing that the more the
world has changed, the more
movies’ attitudes about mar-
riage stayed the same.
Until the rise of television,
that is. Basinger notes that TV
took over the subject of mar-
riage — contented marriage,
anyway — almost completely
by the 1960s. Movies focused
on big domestic dramas, while
TV nibbled at the little everyday
things that make up a relation-
ship. “In the movies, marriage
was a roller-coaster ride; on
television, it was a merry-go-
round.”
So, where did that leave the
marriage movie? For a long
time, in a rut, shifting attention
to the seemingly endless string
of movies about big weddings
(the “Father of the Bride” re-
make, “27 Dresses,” “Wedding
Crashers,” “My Best Friend’s
Wedding,” “Bridesmaids,”
“Jumping the Broom,” etc.), all
ending at the point where mar-
riage begins — and leaving the
question of how the bride and
groom are going to survive it.
When marriage is the focus
these days, the movies either
go nuclear — think “The War
of the Roses” (1989) or “Mr.
and Mrs. Smith” (2005) — or
go into the kitchen. Basinger
smartly notes the rise in high-
end kitchens as the central fo-
cus in movies about marriage;
remember the long, longing
shots of the kitchens in “Some-
thing’s Gotta Give” (2003) and
“It’s Complicated” (2009)?
Although she sometimes gets
distracted — going on tangents
about domesticity in foreign
films or the home world cre-
ated in the TV version of “Fri-
day Night Lights” — Basinger
manages to map out the terrain
of the world of marriage that
movies cover with the skill of
an experienced cartographer
who isn’t afraid to stop and
enjoy the view once in a while.
Sometimes her sharp focus on
seemingly obscure movies is
diverting, but it also makes up
a good tip sheet for movie junk-
ies interested in the way movies
see the home front.
In the end, Basinger says, the
movies are in the same boat as
the rest of us. After more than
a century of exploring the topic,
they can’t figure out how mar-
riage works either. For the mov-
ies, she notes, “real marriage
remains a locked-room mystery,
and the only people who hold
the key to open it are the two
people inside it.”
Say there’s a flick on how marriage really is; Would you watch?
Mct pHoto
Jeanine Basinger, author of ‘I Do and I Don’t: A History of Marriage in the Movies.’
By Chris Foran
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
By Anne Z. Cooke
And Steve HAggerty
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
M
AIPU, Argentina — Ten min-
utes in the orchard and al-
ready my hands felt raw. How
do they do this all day without
gloves, I wondered, shuffling
my feet for a better foothold in Argentina’s
sandy clay.
It was Thursday, the day we’d expected to
be tasting wine at the Zuccardi family’s fin-
ca (ranch) and winery, in Maipu, Mendoza
Province. Instead, we were clawing through
a tangle of branches, trying to pick enough
olives to feed Zuccardi’s state-of-the-art ol-
ive oil press.
It looked so easy when Torey Novak, Zuc-
cardi’s tour guide, gave a demonstration.
You hang a cone-shaped canvas sack around
your neck and pick a tree loaded with ripe
fruit. Reaching up into a branch, you grab it
with both hands and yank down hard, strip-
ping the olives off and into the sack. When
your neck cries uncle, you empty the sack
into the 40-pound crate handily stacked
nearby. Then you fill the second crate, and
the third, all day every day until the harvest
ends or your hands scream uncle.
But why in blazes were we fooling with ol-
ives when we’d left Buenos Aires three days
earlier on a mission: to smell, savor, taste
and compare Malbec, Argentina’s signature
red wine, at the source? And why was “La
Familia Zuccardi,” a family-owned, three-
generation-old winery and leading Malbec
producer, growing olives?
As it happens, a number of long-estab-
lished wineries here in the Cuyo area, scrub-
by desert land on the sunny east slope of
the Andes Mountains, grow multiple crops.
The soil, irrigated for centuries before Euro-
peans explored the region, is ideal for grow-
ing both grapes and olives; more than 6,000
olive growers and 1,200 wineries are scat-
tered through the two adjacent provinces of
Mendoza and San Juan.
The region’s newer wineries stick mostly
to grapes, concentrating their efforts on
building sales. But for visitors to the region,
the complete farm-to-bodega tour adds an-
other dimension altogether. When you’ve
mucked around in the man’s orchards and
harvested his olives, you feel invested.
After picking the fruit, clumping through
the mud and riding back to the processing
plant with the crates stacked on the golf
cart, we watched our olives macerated into
mush. Tasting the newly pressed oil, we
proudly pasted labels on our take-home bot-
tles. Then we knocked the dirt off our shoes
and headed for the bodega itself.
Here, in the Casa Del Visitante, se-
pia-toned photos serve a slice of late
19th century history, capturing tired-
looking Italian immigrants toting lug-
gage, working the fields, picking grapes
and vegetables and building railroads.
For wine aficionados, Mendoza is a des-
tination in its own right. One way to get
there is by flying through Miami to Santia-
go, Chile, and east over the Andes (a short
flight or drive) into Argentina. But for us,
the winery visits were an add-on, a last min-
ute addition to a family reunion in Buenos
Aires.
What we’d forgotten is that Argentina is
nearly as large as the United States (four
times the size of Texas); Mendoza, 646
miles west of Buenos Aires, is hardly a
weekend getaway. And with limited vaca-
tion time, flying was the only option. We’d
rent a car at the airport, we assumed, and
explore the wine country on a relaxed
schedule, just as we’ve done in California’s
Napa and Sonoma, in Oregon, in Washing-
ton state, even in France.
But that isn’t the way they do it in Men-
doza. Because the wineries are scattered far
apart and road signs are poor, drop-in guests
are non-existent. Instead, you call or email
and make a reservation for a specific time.
Anyone can make a reservation for a visit
and tasting. But there are advantages to
signing up for a one- to five-day tour with
a wine tour company, someone who knows
the industry, the wineries and Argentine
culture. A typical tour generally visits three
wineries each day and includes daily lunch
(with wine), hotels and transportation by
van.
We started in San Juan Province, going
first to Callia Winery and then to Graffigna,
where Chief Wine Maker Gerardo Danitz,
eager to answer even the dumbest question,
fielded a tasting that could have doubled
as Wine Wisdom 101. His patient explana-
tions were an ideal send-off for what would
be three days of tasting, spitting, tasting,
sneaking a swallow here and there — for
the strength to push on — and running out
of adjectives to describe the infinite range of
fruity, nutty flavors.
Heading south to Mendoza, we stopped
first at Vistalba Bodega, wine czar Carlos
Pulenta’s show place, where most visits in-
clude both tasting and lunch at his much-ac-
claimed five-star restaurant, La Bourgogne.
Then it was on to Tupungato Winelands to
see recently planted vineyards and the new
golf course; to Salentein and a culture mu-
seum; and finally to Zuccardi. Which is how
we found ourselves in the dirt, discussing
olive cultivation.
Until then I hadn’t given much thought
to immigrant history and the parallels be-
tween Argentina and the United States.
But in most of the towns we saw, you could
walk down the street and — except for
the signs in Spanish — think you were at
home. Like Argentina’s immigrants, Mal-
bec grapes are also an import, brought
from France. But it took Mendoza’s sandy
clay to create those tongue-tingling per-
fect fruity, nutty, oaky, you-name-it flavors.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 14B SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 T R A V E L
Happy mix of olives and wine
IF YOU GO
GOING THERE: Fly
from Miami to Buenos
Aires, and on a re-
gional carrier to Men-
doza or San Juan. Or
fly LAN Chile Airline
to Santiago, in Chile,
and on to San Juan
or Mendoza.
WHEN TO GO: Any
time of year is lovely
in Mendoza. But
February, March and
April (autumn in the
Southern Hemi-
sphere), when the
harvest is under way
or just completed, is
especially nice.
PLANNING A TOUR:
Our tour guide, a fam-
ily friend, no longer
leads wine tours.
Other recommended
tour guides are listed
below. Before making
reservations, visit all
the websites listed
here, which, taken
together, offer a
wealth of information
on Mendoza, on the
types of tours avail-
able, and the winer-
ies each guide or
outfitter likes to visit.
There are differences.
The listed phone
numbers in Argentina
are preceded by 54,
the country code. The
rest are in the United
States.
The Ampora Wine
Tours: mendozawine-
tours.com
Mendoza Holidays:
www.mendozaholi-
days.com (917)267-
8781
Trout & Wine: www.
troutandwine.com
54-261-425-5613
Uncorking Argentina:
uncorkingarentina.
com (866) 529-2861,
or (916) 396-0456
Aventura & Wine:
www.aventurawine.
com 54-261-429-3014
The Grapevine Wine
Tours: thegrapevine-
winetours.com 54-
261-429-7522
MCT PHOTOS
The snow-capped Andes Mountains rise above the vineyards at Vistalba Winery in Mendoza, Argentina.
Olives soaked in oil and herbs is served
at the Pan y Oliva cafe at the Zuccardi
Winery in Mendoza, Argentina.
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THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 timesleader.com
P E N N S TAT E F O O T B A L L
Five questions loomfor Lions this spring
Bill O’Brien stayed. Ted Roof
did not. Signing day came and
went without any lingering
drama.
By Penn State’s recent stan-
dards, it was a quiet winter in
Happy Valley.
As the Nittany Lions open
spring practice on Monday —
leading up to the Blue-White
Game on April 20 — they find
themselves in the eye of the
storm.
Behind them are the worst
days of the Jerry Sandusky
scandal. Still ahead are the full
effects of scholarship reduc-
tions imposed by the NCAA.
For now, though, the focus is
on recovering from a season un-
like any other in college football
history. Here are five questions
facing the Lions as they get
back out on the field.
1. Who will replace Matt
McGloin?
Ah, yes. For the fourth
straight year, Penn State opens
the spring without a clear-cut
starter at quarterback
McGloin helped matters in
2012 by establishing himself as
the starter by the end of spring
ball, allowing him to get a head-
start on mastering O’Brien’s of-
fense.
The Lions likely won’t have
that luxury this season. Steven
Bench and junior college trans-
fer Tyler Ferguson are the top
contenders at the moment as
rising sophomores.
O’Brien reiterated this week
that he does not plan on picking
a starter in April, as he did last
year. For one thing, none of the
candidates have the experience
of McGloin. For another, prized
recruit Christian Hackenberg
doesn’t arrive on campus until
the summer.
COL L EGE BASKETBAL L
AP PHOTO
Kyle Busch drives through a turn during a morning practice
session for today’s Sprint Cup Series Food City 500 on Satur-
day in Bristol, Tenn.
A U T O R A C I N G
AP PHOTO
Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan reacts during the second half of an NCAA basketball game against Indiana on Saturday in Chi-
cago.
Badgers take a bite out of Hoosiers
CHICAGO — Ryan Evans
jumps when he shoots free
throws. Ben Brust looks as if he
just got his driver’s license, and
Mike Bruesewitz’s shaggy hair
draws snickers every time Wis-
consin goes on the road.
The Badgers may not look
like a top team, but they sure
play like one.
Evans scored 16 points in a
terrific all-around performance
and No. 22 Wisconsin upset
No. 3 Indiana 68-56 in the
semifinals of the Big Ten tour-
nament Saturday.
“We’re playing our best bas-
ketball at the end of the season,
and that’s what you want to
do,” Bruesewitz said.
The Badgers allowed only
seven points after the top-
seeded Hoosiers pulled within
one with 9:45 left. They earned
their 12th consecutive win
against Indiana, tying a record
for any school against the pow-
erhouse program, and will play
Ohio State or Michigan State in
Sunday’s final.
“There are just things in
this game, no matter how you
try to explain them, they defy
explanation,” Ryan said, shrug-
ging away Wisconsin’s long
run against Indiana. “But we
have players who are willing to
work, to listen, to buy in.”
Brust added 12 points for
Wisconsin (23-10), which has
won three straight and six of
eight. Sam Dekker scored nine
of his 11 points in the second
half, including seven in a row
during one impressive burst.
Christian Watford scored 14
points for Indiana (27-6), and
Cody Zeller had 13 points and
11 rebounds. Victor Oladipo
scored 10, but was 4 for 12
from the field.
The Hoosiers, who won the
regular-season conference title,
now have to wait until Sunday
to see if they did enough to
earn a coveted No. 1 seed for
the NCAA tournament.
“Obviously we wanted to
Wisconsin knocks off No. 3
Indiana to advance to today’s
Big Ten finale.
By JAY COHEN
AP Sports Writer
68
WISCoNSIN
56
INDIANA
See BADGERS, Page 7C
U P N E X T
FooD CITy 400
Bristol Motor
Speedway
Noon today
FOX
Short track at Bristol awaits Gen-6 car
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
BRISTOL, Tenn. — There’s
an expectation from fans that a
ticket to Bristol Motor Speed-
way will get thema seat to NAS-
CAR’s version of the Roman Col-
osseum.
They got one of those throw-
back, rock ‘em, sock ‘em races
last August, when changes to
the track surface forced driv-
ers to get aggressive again and
caused tempers to flare. Now, a
month into
a new Sprint
Cup season,
N A S C A R
could use
another race
like that.
Sunday’s
race will be the fourth for the
new Gen-6 car, and the first this
season on a short track. It could
be the spark NASCARneeds at a
time everyone seems to be hold-
ing their breath.
“Everybody is on egg shells.
Drivers are on egg shells. I think
the fans are on egg shells. The
media is on egg shells. The
sanctioning body is on egg
shells,” defending champion
Brad Keselowski said. “You get
the collective sense in this sport
that everyone is feeling a lot of
pressure and if we don’t have a
perfect week every week every-
body just kind of shakes down
See CAR, Page 7C
P I A A S W I M M I N G
Vest saves
his best
for last
WVW diver reaches state
medal stand, while Zawatsky
swims in consolation race.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
LEWISBURG - The individual
standings on the Kinney Nata-
torium scoreboard kept insist-
ing Collin Vest wasn’t going to
be part of any medal ceremony
Saturday.
The Spartans senior diver
simply decided otherwise.
Defying all logic - and at times
the laws of physics - Vest twice
beat long odds and captured a
seventh place medal with his
signature dive on his final at-
tempt of the PIAA Swimming
and Diving championships at
Bucknell University.
“I had bad dives,” Vest said,
“but after it’s all said and done,
I’m happy with where I finished
up, especially after the start I
had.
“To be honest, the only time
I ever looked at the scoreboard
was after the final dive.”
It’s probably best Vest wasn’t
watching the standings.
See SWIMMING, Page 7C
C O L L E G E W R E S T L I N G
Krawchuk
finishes 2nd
at NCAAs
CEDARRAPIDS, Iowa – After
a valiant effort, Wilkes wrestler
Kris Krawchuk finished second
at the NCAA Division III Wres-
tling Championships Saturday
night.
The junior,
157-pounder,
lost the cham-
pionship bout
3-0 to Spring-
field’s Devin
Biscaha, who
entered the
t o ur na me nt
unseeded. Krawchuk, who was
the bracket’s No. 4 seed, is the
second Wilkes wrestler to finish
as runner-up in as many years
following Anthony Dattolo at
149 last season.
After a scoreless opening pe-
riod in the final, Biscaha chose
bottom to start the second.
Krawchuk tried several times to
The Times Leader staff
Krawchuk
See NCAA, Page 7C
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
See LIoNS, Page 7C
A H L
Penguins
overcome
sluggish
beginning
PORTLAND, Maine – The
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Pen-
guins were down early but defi-
nitely not out.
Despite giving up two early
goals the Penguins rallied in
the third for a 3-2 win over the
Portland Pirates Saturday night
at the Cumber-
land County
Civic Center.
The Pen-
guins fell be-
hind 2-0 before
the ice had a
chance to set
but managed
to recover and
slowly chip
away at the
deficit.
“We felt as
though we
were playing
well but we
kind of got
stung there by
the two goals quick,” said Pen-
guins head coach John Hynes.
“We just had to stick with our
game and try to continue to
get better. I thought our mental
toughness tonight was the thing
that really helped us stick with it
and play the right way.”
Trevor Smith capped the
comeback victory with what
turned out to be the game-win-
ner midway through the third
period. Joseph Morrow’s initial
offering was blocked on the way
to the goal and puck dropped to
Smith who wasted little time de-
positing his 18th of the season.
Joey Mormina got the Pen-
guins back on even terms in the
opening moments of the third
period. The Penguins defense-
man jumped into the offensive
zone to get his own rebound and
hammered a shot by Portland
goalie Chad Johnson to tie the
game at 2-2.
The Pirates jumped into the
lead less than four minutes into
the game by scoring twice in 30
seconds.
Andy Miele received a pass in
full stride at the Pens blue line
and distanced himself from the
defense before beating Jeff Zat-
koff with a backhand high to the
glove side.
After giving up two early
goals, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
rallied to defeat Portland.
By MARK JEANNERET
For The Times Leader
See PENS, Page 7C
3
PENGUINS
2
PIRATES
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2C SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 S C O R E B O A R D
Bulletin Board
CAMPS/CLINICS
Anthracite Curling Club will
hold two Learn to Curl clinics on
March 19 and 26 from 6-9 p.m. at
The Ice Rink at Coal St. Park. For
more information, call Joshua So-
phy at 266-7978.
Sandlot Little League will have
a camp for boys and girls fromages
8-12 from 1-3 p.m. Today, March 24
and April 7. The cost is $100. There
will also be a beginner camp for
boys and girls ages 4-7 from 3:15-
4:15 p.m. on the same days. The
cost is $50. Both camps include hit-
ting, pitching, fielding and agilities.
For more information, call 445-1155
or email CDD027@aol.com.
Wilkes University will have a
youth field hockey clinic for girls in
grades 1-8 (beginners are welcome)
on Sunday, April 28, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at the University Center
on Main (UCOM). The focus of the
clinic will be skill instruction and
game tactics and will include skill
drills and small game play. The clin-
ic will be held at the indoor facility
in the UCOMbuilding on the corner
of South and Main in Wilkes-Barre.
The cost is $40 per person, which
includes instruction and a Wilkes
field hockey t-shirt. Registration
runs through April 18 and is limited
to 40 players. For more informa-
tion, call head coach Mollie Reich-
ard at 408-4018 or email mollie.
reichard@wilkes.edu.
MEETINGS
Crestwood Comets Football
Adult Social will be held on Sat-
urday, April 13, at Sand Springs
Golf Club in Drums from 6-9 p.m.
Crestwood football T-shirts and ball
caps will be available for purchase.
A basket raffle will also be held.
For more information, contact Deb
Popson at popsondeb@epix.net.
Crestwood Football Booster
Club will meet on Thursday, March
21 at Tony’s Pizza at 7 p.m. Parents
of players are invited.
Crestwood Comets Boys La-
crosse Adult Social will be held on
Saturday, April 6, at Ice House Pub
in Nuangola from6-8p.m. For more
information, contact Deb Popson at
popsondeb@epix.net.
Wyoming Valley West Softball
Booster Club will have a meeting
Monday, March 18, at 7 p.m. at the
WVW Middle School. Parents of all
players are invited.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Brews Bros Co-Ed Softball
League has openings on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Sunday. For more
information, call Tonay at 693-
0506.
Kingston Recreation Center
has openings for a softball league
to be played on Tuesday and
Wednesday nights, and a Sunday
men’s league and a Sunday co-ed
league. For more information, call
287-1106.
Mountain Top Youth Soccer
Association will hold player reg-
istration for the fall soccer season
Saturday, March 23, from 9 a.m. to
noon at the Crestwood High School
cafeteria. Additional registrations
will be Wednesday, April 3, from
6-9 p.m. and on Saturday, April 6,
from 9 a.m. to noon. Eligible play-
ers must be from 4-18 years of age,
as of July 31. Registration forms
can be printed in advance from the
“Handouts” link on the MYSA web
site: www.eteamz.com/mttopysa.
For more information, contact Kelly
Leicht by email at kelly_leicht@ho-
tmail.com.
Plains Yankees Football and
Cheerleading Organization will
have registrations March 20, from
6-8 p.m. at the Plains American
Legion, 101 E. Carey St., Plains. The
cost is $60 for one child or $75
per family, with additional uniform
fees for first-time players. Bring a
recent picture of the child along
with a copy of his or her birth cer-
tificate.
Sunday Softball League begins
Sunday, April 4. Teams may regis-
ter by contacting John Leighton at
430-8437. Deadline for entry will
be March 31. All Games are played
Sunday mornings and early after-
noon. Teams will play doublehead-
ers each Sunday.
South Valley Softball will hold
practices and sign ups at Luzerne
County Community College gym
Sunday March 17 and Sunday
March 24 from 5-7 p.m.
Swoyersville Slowpitch Girls
Softball will hold sign-ups every
Tuesday and Saturday through
March. Tuesday sign-ups are from
6-8 p.m., and Saturday sign-ups are
from 9 a.m. to noon. All sessions
will be at the softball field on Tripp
Street. The league is for ages 7 and
up, and the cost is $45 for the first
child and $10 for each additional
child. For more information, call
Richard Harned at 991-1415.
West Side United League Club
Registrations will be held on
April 6 and May 6 only. The April
6 sign-up also has a $10 discount.
10am- 1pmin the Edwardsville boro
bldg. $20 this day only. $25 for a
uniform if needed. $50 per fam-
ily fundraiser. For more info, go to
www.WSUSC.org or call Matthew at
779-7785.
The Wilkes-Barre Girs Softball
League will Hold registrations on
Monday, March 18 from 6-8 p.m.
at Rodano’s on Public Square. For
info log onto www.wbgsl.comor call
822-3991.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Rotary Club of Wilkes-Barre
will host its 29th annual George
Ralston Golf Classic to benefit the
Osterhout Free Library in Wilkes-
Barre. The tournament will be held
Friday, April 26, at Mill Race Golf
Course in Benton. Registration be-
gins at 11 a.m. with a shotgun start
at noon. Funds raised from the
classic will benefit children’s pro-
grams held at the library’s three
branches. The cost is $100 per per-
son, which includes 18 holes of golf,
golf cart, lunch, steak dinner and
prizes. There are many sponsor-
ship opportunities available from
$100 to $1,000. To register to play,
be a sponsor or donate a prize, call
Christopher Kelly at the Osterhout
Library at 823-0156, ext. 218, or
email him at ckelly@osterhout.lib.
pa.us.
West Pittston Little League will
host its annual Easter egg hunt for
kids 10-and-under Saturday, March
23, at the West Pittston Little
League fields. Registration begins
at 12:30 p.m., next to the conces-
sion stand. The Easter egg hunt will
be begin at 1 p.m., rain or shine.
Wyoming Area Baseball Meet
the Warriors will be held Sunday,
March 24, at 1 p.m. in the Second-
ary Center cafeteria. All players
from grades 7-12 should arrive by
12:45 p.m. The baseball mass will
be held Sunday, April 7, at 10:30
a.m. at St Barbara’s Church, Exeter.
Wyoming Valley Chapter of
Credit Unions is holding its 27th
annual golf outing and buffet June
7. Format is captain and crew with
a 10 a.m. shotgun start. The event
will feature prizes in four flights
with a special award to the tour-
nament champion. Registration is
$95 per person and includes cart,
green fees and prizes. Registra-
tion is $110 after May 7. All regis-
trations received before May 7 will
receive a free raffle ticket. If paying
by check, make check payable to
Wyoming Valley Chapter of Credit
Unions. For more information, call
Bob Alescyk at 823-6151, John Hay-
duk at 693-0500 or Debbie Peters
at 457-8899.
Wyoming Seminary will have its
second annual Wyoming Seminary
Rusty Flack Open Golf Tournament
and Dinner Party on Monday, May
20, at Huntsville Golf Club, Lehman.
The tournament will begin at 1 p.m.
Proceeds will benefit the Wyoming
Seminary Opportunities Fund, the
Alumni Scholarship Fund and the
Rusty Flack Fund. Registration and
lunch will begin at noon. To register
for the tournament or for more in-
formation on sponsorship opportu-
nities, call Julie McCarthy Strzeletz
at 270-2142.
AMERICA’S LINE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the
Knicks - Clippers circle is for New York forward
Carmelo Anthony (doubtful) and center Tyson
Chandler (doubtful); the T’wolves - Hornets circle
is for numerous Minnesota injuries; the Lakers -
Kings circle is for Los Angeles guard Kobe Bryant
(questionable).
For the latest odds & scores, check us out at
www.americasline.com.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC welterweight
title fght on May 4 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. is -$950 vs. Robert Guerrero at
+$650.
BASEBALL
Favorite Odd Underdog
World Baseball Classic
Japan -$200 Puerto Rico
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
BUCKS 9.5 Magic
Heat 7 RAPTORS
CLIPPERS NL Knicks
Hornets NL T’WOLVES
ROCKETS 7 Warriors
Thunder 4.5 MAVERICKS
NETSS 4 Hawks
LAKERS NL Kings
NOTE: Agame is circled for a variety of reasons,
with the prime factor being an injury. When a game
is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line
could move a few points in either direction, de-
pending on the severity (probable, questionable,
doubtful, out) of the injury.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament
Miami-Florida PK N Carolina
or Miami-Florida 4 Maryland
SEC Conference Tournament
Florida 9 Mississippi
Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament
Saint Louis 1 Virginia Comm
or Saint Louis 9 Massachusetts
Big Ten Conference Tournament
Ohio St 2.5 Wisconsin
or Michigan St 1.5 Wisconsin
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
PENGUINS -$140/+$120 Bruins
SENATORS -$120/even Jets
CAPITALS -$140/+$120 Sabres
OILERS -$125/+$105 Predators
TODAY’S EVENTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
CCAC at LCCC, noon
MEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Bryn Athyn at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Bryn Athyn at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 18
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS
Crestwood at Jim Thorpe, 4 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Dallas, 4 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Keystone at Misericordia, 3:30 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Misericordia at Morrisville State, 5 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS
(All matches 4 p.m.)
Holy Redeemer at Berwick
MMI Prep at Hazleton Area
Pittston Area at GAR
Tunkhannock at Meyers
Wyoming Seminary at Crestwood
Wyoming Valley West at Coughlin
COLLEGE BASEBALL
New England at King’s, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Keystone at Misericordia, DH, 3 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20
COLLEGE BASEBALL
PSU Schuylkill at PSU Wilkes-Barre, DH, 2 p.m.
New England at Wilkes, 3 p.m.
Misericordia at Scranton, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Misericordia at Lycoming, DH, 3 p.m.
Baptist Bible at PSU Hazleton, DH, 3 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE GOLF
FDU-Florham at King’s, 1 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Lycoming at King’s, 4 p.m.
SUNY-Oswego at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Wilkes at Albright, 4:30 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Wilkes at Haverford, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 21
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS
(All matches 4 p.m.)
Berwick at Wyoming Seminary
Coughlin at Tunkhannock
Crestwood at Pittston Area
Dallas at MMI Prep
Meyers at Holy Redeemer
Wyoming Valley West at Wyoming Area
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Scranton at King’s, DH, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 22
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS
Jim Thorpe at Hazleton Area, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
DeSales at Wilkes, 3:30 p.m.
King’s at Delaware Valley, 3:30 p.m.
Misericordia at Manhattanville, 3:30 p.m.
COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD
Misericordia at Washington & Lee, 11 a.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Nichols at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 23
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Delaware Valley at King’s, DH, noon
LCCC at Penn Tech, noon
Wilkes at DeSales, DH, noon
Manhattanville at Misericordia, DH, 1 p.m.
PSU Fayette at PSU Wilkes-Barre, DH, 2 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Misericordia at Manhattanville, DH, noon
LCCC at Ocean Co., noon
DeSales at Wilkes, DH, 1 p.m.
King’s at Delaware Valley, DH, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD
Misericordia at Washington & Lee, 11 a.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
King’s at Bethany, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Elizabethtown, 1 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Albright at King’s, 11 a.m.
Lebanon Valley at King’s, 2:30 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
Rosemont at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
King’s at Scranton, 4 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE TENNIS
Albright at King’s, 11 a.m.
Misericordia at Lycoming, 1 p.m.
T R A N S A C T I o N S
L o C A L S C H E D U L E
H o C K E Y
b A S K E T b A L L
T v S C H E D U L E
AUTO RACING
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Gatornationals, at Gaines-
ville, Fla. (same-day tape)
12:30 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Food City 500,
at Bristol, Tenn.
BASEBALL
9 p.m.
MLB — World Baseball Classic, semifnal,
teams TBD, at San Francisco
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Avantha Masters,
fnal round, at Delhi, India (same-day tape)
1 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Tampa Bay Classic, fnal
round, at Tampa Bay, Fla.
3 p.m.
NBC — PGA Tour, Tampa Bay Classic, fnal
round, at Tampa Bay, Fla.
4 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Founders Cup, fnal round, at
Phoenix
7:30 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour, Toshiba Classic, fnal
round, at Newport Beach, Calif. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
CSN — Preseason, Baltimore vs. Philadelphia
WPIX — Preseason, Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets
4 p.m.
WGN—Preseason, Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland,
at Phoenix
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m.
ABC — Southeastern Conference, champion-
ship, teams TBD, at Nashville, Tenn.
CBS — Atlantic 10 Conference, championship,
teams TBD, at Brooklyn, N.Y.
ESPN — Atlantic Coast Conference, champion-
ship, teams TBD, at Greensboro, N.C.
3:30 p.m.
CBS — Big Ten Conference, championship,
teams TBD, at Chicago
6 p.m.
CBS — NCAA Division I tournament, Selection
Show, at Indianapolis
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABC — New York at L.A. Clippers
8 p.m.
YES —Atlanta at Brooklyn
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC — Boston at Pittsburgh
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Buffalo at Washington
SOCCER
1 p.m.
ESPN2 — MLS, Houston at Dallas
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — ATP World Tour/WTA, BNP Paribas
Open, men’s and women’s championships, at In-
dian Wells, Calif.
BASEBALL
National League
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Optioned LHP Andy
Oliver and C Tony Sanchez to Indianapolis (PCL).
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKET-
BALL
Numbers in parentheses are district and seed-
ing followed by record. District 2 teams are in bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Chester 74, Cumberland Valley 43
Coatesville 52, Lancaster McCaskey 51
Erie Cathedral Prep 79, Seneca Valley 54
Great Valley 39, Wilson 32
Hampton 50, Perry Traditional 41
Harrisburg 87, Central Bucks South 41
Lower Merion 77, Carlisle 36
Martin Luther King 71, Reading 61
New Castle 63, Gateway 43
Norristown 79, Roman Catholic 66
North Allegheny 84, State College 76
Parkland 63, Ridley 53
St. Joseph’s Prep 48, Abington 33
Upper Darby 47, Bethlehem Freedom 45
Williamsport 62, Bethlehem Liberty 60
York 67, Methacton 63
SECOND ROUND
Chester 67, Williamsport 50
Great Valley 64, Parkland 61
Coatesville 58, Norristown 52
St. Joseph’s Prep 72, York 55
Harrisburg 79, Upper Darby 62
Lower Merion 63, Martin Luther King 50
New Castle 57, North Allegheny 46
Erie Cathedral Prep 58, Hampton 50
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday’s results
Chester 55, Great Valley 42
St. Joseph’s Prep 67, Coatesville 43
Lower Merion 63, Harrisburg 62
New Castle 80, Erie Cathedral Prep 70
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Chester (1-1, 27-3) vs. St. Joseph’s Prep (12-
3, 24-5)
Lower Merion (1-2, 28-3) vs. New Castle (7-1,
29-0)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday, March 23
Tuesday’s winners, 8 p.m. at Giant Center, Her-
shey
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Abington Heights 67, Shikellamy 37
Allentown Central Catholic 64, Northeastern 51
Archbishop Carroll 47, Berks Catholic 42
Beaver Area 60, Bradford 46
Chartiers Valley 71, Erie Strong Vincent 54
Donegal 64, GAR 44
General McLane 67, Thomas Jefferson 42
Girard 66, Mars 62
Johnstown 49, Lancaster Catholic 43
Imhotep Charter 79, Salisbury 34
Montour 52, South Fayette 43
Neumann-Goretti 81, Harrisburg Bishop McDe-
vitt 54
Philadelphia Electrical 48, Palmyra 44
Pope John Paul II 59, Bethlehem Catholic 56
Scranton Prep 69, Milton 32
Susquehanna Township 62, Upper Moreland 42
SECOND ROUND
Abington Heights 66, Philadelphia Electrical
63 OT
Archbishop Carroll 57, Pope John Paul II 40
Chartiers Valley 65, Johnstown 38
Donegal 66, Allentown Central Catholic 57
General McLane 69, Beaver Area 54
Imhotep Charter 57, Susquehanna Twp. 48
Montour 48, Girard 38
Neumann-Goretti 51, Scranton Prep 44 OT
QUARTERFINALS
Friday’s results
Donegal 55, Neumann-Goretti 50
Imhotep Charter 61, Abington Heights 50
Archbishop Carroll 49, Chartiers Valley 46
Montour 42, General McLane 40
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKET-
BALL
Numbers in parentheses are district and seed-
ing followed by record. District 2 teams are in bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Archbishop Carroll 54, Upper Dublin 43
Cardinal O’Hara 46, Methacton 34
Central Dauphin 57, Boyertown 39
Central Dauphin East 48, Central Bucks West
46
Chartiers Valley 70, Allderdice 41
Cumberland Valley 35, Mount St. Joseph 34
Dover 54, West Chester Rustin 53
Gateway 50, Erie McDowell 49
Manheim Township 61, Philadelphia Central 20
Mount Lebanon 37, Bethel Park 34
Nazareth 41, Pennsbury 28
North Penn 44, Pocono Mountain West 38
Penn-Trafford 50, Hollidaysburg 41
Spring-Ford 59, Hershey 41
Wallenpaupack 43, Parkland 40
Wilson 41, Garnet Valley 34
SECOND ROUND
Cardinal O’Hara 47, Central Dauphin East 32
Central Dauphin 56, Archbishop Carroll 44
Chartiers Valley 53, Gateway 42
Cumberland Valley 55, Manheim Twp. 39
Dover 42, Nazareth 38
Mount Lebanon 59, Penn-Trafford 36
North Penn 56, Wilson 49
Spring-Ford 58, Wallenpaupack 44
QUARTERFINALS
Friday’s results
Spring-Ford 67, Dover 45
Cardinal O’Hara 60, Central Dauphin 24
Cumberland Valley 53, North Penn 36
Chartiers Valley 48, Mount Lebanon 37
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Spring-Ford (1-1, 30-2) vs. Cardinal O’Hara (12-
1, 24-5)
Cumberland Valley (3-5, 24-6) vs. Chartiers Val-
ley (7-2, 21-7)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, March 22
Tuesday’s winners, 6 p.m. at Giant Center, Her-
shey
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Archbishop Wood 60, Pope John Paul II 39
Bethlehem Catholic 60, Archbishop Prendergast
43
Blackhawk 86, Bradford 46
Elizabeth Forward 51, Central Valley 44
Forest Hills 46, Hampton 43
Franklin 66, Ligonier Valley 46
Gettysburg 45, Merion Mercy 36
Holy Redeemer 40, Athens 38
Honesdale 44, Danville 30
Hopewell 45, Villa Maria 28
Lancaster Catholic 89, Susquehannock 79 2OT
Palmyra 68, Freire Charter 37
Prep Charter 79, Eastern York 51
Scranton Prep 60, Southern Lehigh 57
South Park 71, Hickory 44
Villa Maria Academy 52, West York 40
SECOND ROUND
Bethlehem Catholic 56, Honesdale 42
Blackhawk 82, Forest Hills 52
Franklin 65, Elizabeth Forward 45
Lancaster Catholic 54, Archbishop Wood 46
Prep Charter 77, Gettysburg 49
Scranton Prep 40, Palmyra 36
South Park 50, Hopewell 46
Villa Maria Academy 44, Holy Redeemer 40
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday’s results
Bethlehem Catholic 67, Prep Charter 46
Villa Maria Academy 48, Scranton Prep 30
Blackhawk 78, Lancaster Catholic 52
South Park 61, Franklin 43
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Bethlehem Catholic (11-1, 27-2) vs. Villa Maria
Academy (1-1, 24-5)
Blackhawk (7-4, 27-1) vs. South Park (7-1, 26-2)
Championship
Saturday, March 23
Tuesday’s winners, 6 p.m. at Giant Center, Her-
shey
CLASS 2A
FIRST ROUND
Bishop Canevin 51, Westmont Hilltop 37
Burrell 65, Bellwood-Antis 46
Delone Catholic 72, Holy Cross 48
Dunmore 44, Muncy 32
General McLane 51, Jeannette 34
Greensburg Central Catholic 58, Blairsville 39
Mohawk 52, Everett 44
Mount Carmel 80, GAR 70
Neumann-Goretti 76, Annville-Cleona 37
North East 59, McGuffey 49
Notre Dame-Green Pond 58, Southern Colum-
bia 36
Pine Grove 49, Imhotep Charter 37
Seton-LaSalle 67, Kane Area 16
Sharpsville 38, Brookville 32
St. Basil 69, High School of the Future 29
York Catholic 72, Parkway Center City 30
SECOND ROUND
Bishop Canevin 54, General McLane 36
Burrell 45, Sharpsville 18
Mohawk 56, North East 49
Notre Dame-Green Pond 51, Neumann-Goretti
49 2OT
Pine Grove 50, Mount Carmel 43
Saint Basil 47, Delone Catholic 40
Seton-LaSalle 58, Greensburg Cent. Cath. 38
York Catholic 50, Dunmore 39
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Signed F DaJuan
Summers to a 10-day contract.
NEW YORK KNICKS—Signed F Kenyon Martin
for the remainder of the season.
Women’s National Basketball Association
WASHINGTON MYSTICS—Named Eric
Thibault assistant coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Released QB Kevin
Kolb. Signed DE Matt Shaughnessy.
CHICAGO BEARS—Agreed to terms with CB
Zack Bowman on a one-year contract.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Released S Tom
Zbikowski.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed CB Alan
Ball, RB Justin Forsett and DT Roy Miller.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed OL Geoff
Schwartz and CB Sean Smith.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed TE Dustin Keller
and WR Brandon Gibson to one-year contracts.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed QB Matt Cas-
sel.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed WR Don-
ald Jones.
NEW YORK GIANTS—Re-signed LB Keith Riv-
ers.
NEW YORK JETS—Signed RB Mike Goodson
and FB Lex Hilliard.
OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed LB Nick Roach.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Acquired WR Ar-
relious Benn and a 2013 seventh-round pick from
Tampa Bay for a 2013 sixth-round choice and a
conditional 2014 draft pick.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Agreed to terms
with RB Danny Woodhead on a two-year contract.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Re-signed LB
Bryan Kehl.
Canadian Football League
MONTREAL ALOUETTES—Signed DE John
Bowman to a three-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS—Acquired C David Steckel
from Toronto for RW Ryan Lasch and a 2014
seventh-round draft pick. Reassigned F Patrick
Maroon to Norfolk (AHL).
BUFFALO SABRES—Assigned C Mikhail Gri-
gorenko to Quebec (QMJHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Activated D
John Moore off injured reserve. Assigned D Cody
Goloubef to Springfeld (AHL). Recalled F Sean
Collins from Springfeld.
MONTREAL CANADIENS—Signed C David
Desharnais to a four-year contract extension. As-
signed F Petteri Nokelainen to Hamilton (AHL).
Recalled F Mike Blunden from Hamilton.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Agreed to terms
with F Colin McDonald on a two-year contract ex-
tension, through the 2014-15 season.
OTTAWASENATORS—Signed D Michael Sdao
to a one-year entry-level contract.
ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned D Jani Hakanpaa
to Peoria (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL—Suspended Abbotsford RW Mike Tes-
twuide three games for a charging incident in a
March 13 game at Texas. Suspended Abbotsford
RWAkimAliu one game for his actions in a March
14 game at Houston.
HAMILTON BULLDOGS—Signed D Peter
Merth to a professional tryout contract.
ECHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS—Announced D Jace
Coyle was returned to the team by Texas (AHL)
and DMatt Case was returned to the teamby Man-
chester (AHL). Announced G Tyler Beskorowany
was called up by Texas. Released D William Lac-
asse.
READINGROYALS—Signed F Robbie Bourdon
to an amateur tryout agreement. Announced F Kirk
MacDonald was returned to the team by Houston
(AHL). Announced F .J. Syner was recalled to Her-
shey (AHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Signed F Obafemi
Martins.
COLLEGE
BUFFALO—Fired men’s basketball coach Reg-
gie Witherspoon.
GEORGETOWN (DC)—Promoted Thurston
Childrey to wide receivers coach and Alex Kolt to
defensive line coach.
HUNTINGTON—Named Mike Turk athletic di-
rector.
SOUTH ALABAMA—Fired women’s basketball
coach Rick Pietri.
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Donegal (3-3, 29-2) vs. Imhotep Charter (12-2,
26-5)
Archbishop Carroll (12-4, 22-6) vs. Montour (7-
1, 25-4)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, March 22
Tuesday’s winners, 8 p.m. Friday at Giant Cen-
ter, Hershey
CLASS 2A
PLAY-IN
Conemaugh Township 55, Westinghouse 44
FIRST ROUND
Beaver Falls 92, Bald Eagle Area 48
Bishop McCort 62, Burrell 43
Communications Tech 68, Camp Hill 43
Conemaugh Twp. 53, Brentwood 49
Constitution 66, Notre Dame-Green Pond 28
Delone Catholic 63, Wellsboro 47
Del-Val Charter 63, Conwell-Egan 59
Greensburg Central Catholic 66, Penn Cambria
56
Holy Cross 60, Lewisburg 55
Lakeview 44, Quaker Valley 40
Loyalsock 63, Mid Valley 54
Mercyhurst Prep 56, Brockway 46
Northern Cambria 58, Apollo-Ridge 53
Trinity 57, Meyers 47
West Middlesex 55, Jeannette 50
William Sayre 56, New Hope-Solebury 54
SECOND ROUND
Beaver Falls 53, Mercyhurst Prep 39
Conemaugh Twp. 61, Northern Cambria 46
Constitution 63, Delone Catholic 55
Holy Cross 70, Del-Val Charter 54
Lakeview 49, Greensburg Central Catholic 41
Loyalsock 51, Communications Tech 48
Trinity 74, William Sayre 47
West Middlesex 61, Bishop McCort 54
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday’s results
Trinity 73, Loyalsock 68 OT
Holy Cross 75, Constitution 61
Beaver Falls 56, Lakeview 44
West Middlesex 60, Conemaugh Twp. 46
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Trinity (3-2, 21-7) vs. Holy Cross (2-1, 26-5)
Beaver Falls (7-1, 26-3) vs. West Middlesex (10-
1, 25-3)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday, March 23
Tuesday’s winners, 2 p.m. at Giant Center, Her-
shey
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Bishop Carroll 58, Shanksville-Stoneycreek 32
Church Farm School 58, New Hope Academy
Charter 44
Clairton 76, Cochranton 48
Johnsonburg 62, Eisenhower 30
Lincoln Park Charter 54, Kennedy Catholic 45
Mahanoy Area 58, Muncy 44
Neumann 84, Harrisburg Christian 38
Philadelphia MC&S 86, Gospel of Grace 41
Pius X 50, Old Forge 47
Ridgway 63, Homer-Center 39
Sankofa Freedom 54, Lebanon Catholic 41
Shade 75, Pittsburgh North Catholic 47
Smethport 62, Bishop Guilfoyle 56
Sullivan County 56, Greenwood 32
Vaux 63, Delco Christian 42
Vincentian Academy 82, North Clarion 47
SECOND ROUND
Bishop Carroll 92, Vincentian 85
Church Farm 42, Mahanoy Area 36
Johnsonburg 54, Shade 49
Lincoln Park 51, Ridgway 34
Math, Civics & Sciences 62, St. John Neumann
46
Vaux 76, Sullivan County 41
Sankofa Freedom 61, Pius X 56
Smethport 37, Clairton 35
QUARTERFINALS
Friday’s results
Math, Civics & Science 71, Sankofa Freedom59
Vaux 68, Church Farm 64
Lincoln Park 86, Bishop Carroll 84
Johnsonburg 54, Smethport 43
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Math, Civics & Science (12-2, 26-2) vs. Vaux
(12-1, 22-8)
Lincoln Park (7-4, 22-6) vs. Johnsonburg (9-1,
29-2)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, March 22
Tuesday’s winners, 2 p.m. at Giant Center, Her-
shey
QUARTERFINALS
Friday’s results
Saint Basil 45, Notre Dame-Green Pond 42
York Catholic 49, Pine Grove 44
Bishop Canevin 41, Burrell 29
Seton-LaSalle 73, Mohawk 45
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Saint Basil (1-1, 19-8) vs. York Catholic (3-1,
28-2)
Bishop Canevin (7-1, 25-3) vs. Seton-LaSalle
(8-2, 27-2)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, March 22
Tuesday’s winners, noon at Giant Center, Her-
shey
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
BerlinBrothersvalley 50, Portage 47
Bishop Guilfoyle 47, Johnsonburg 26
Conemaugh Twp. 49, Quigley Catholic 44
Clarion 52, Winchester Thurston 30
Girard College 35, Notre Dame-East Strouds-
burg 33
Halifax 68, Motivation 25
Jenkintown 58, Paul Robeson 27
Kennedy Catholic 45, North Catholic 36
Lourdes Regional 51, Upper Dauphin 29
Old Forge 60, High Point Baptist 26
Port Allegany 52, Penns Manor 45
Serra Catholic 67, Cochranton 43
Southern Fulton 63, Juniata Valley 30
Steelton-Highspire 91, Northeast Bradford 51
Tri-Valley 52, Sayre 27
Vincentian 58, Keystone 31
SECOND ROUND
Bishop Guilfoyle 62, Serra Catholic 50
Clarion 61, Conemaugh Twp. 59
Kennedy Catholic 70, Port Allegany 27
Lourdes Regional 57, Girard College 42
Southern Fulton 73, Halifax 34
Steelton-Highspire 74, Jenkintown 39
Tri-Valley 68, Old Forge 44
Vincentian 44, BerlinBrothersvalley 42
QUATERFINALS
Saturday’s results
Tri-Valley 73, Steelton-Highspire 72
Southern Fulton 47, Lourdes Regional 29
Vincentian 68, Kennedy Catholic 51
Bishop Guilfoyle 45, Clarion 35
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday’s games
(Sites & times TBA)
Tri-Valley (11-1, 26-3) vs. Southern Fulton (5-2,
26-3)
Vincentian (7-1, 28-1) vs. Bishop Guilfoyle (6-1,
27-2)
CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday, March 23
Tuesday’s winners, noon at Giant Center, Her-
shey
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 29 21 8 0 42 106 79
New Jersey 28 13 9 6 32 71 79
N.Y. Rangers 27 13 12 2 28 65 67
N.Y. Islanders 27 12 12 3 27 79 88
Philadelphia 29 13 15 1 27 79 88
NATIONAL BASKETBALL AS-
SOCIATION
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 38 25 .603 —
Brooklyn 38 27 .585 1
Boston 35 29 .547 3½
Toronto 26 40 .394 13½
Philadelphia 24 40 .375 14½
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 50 14 .781 —
Atlanta 36 29 .554 14½
Washington 23 42 .354 27½
Orlando 18 48 .273 33
Charlotte 14 51 .215 36½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 40 25 .615 —
Chicago 36 29 .554 4
Milwaukee 32 32 .500 7½
Detroit 23 44 .343 18
Cleveland 22 43 .338 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 50 16 .758 —
Memphis 44 20 .688 5
Houston 36 30 .545 14
Dallas 31 34 .477 18½
New Orleans 22 44 .333 28
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 49 17 .742 —
Denver 45 22 .672 4½
Utah 33 32 .508 15½
Portland 30 34 .469 18
Minnesota 22 41 .349 25½
Pacifc Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 45 21 .682 —
Golden State 37 30 .552 8½
L.A. Lakers 35 32 .522 10½
Sacramento 23 43 .348 22
Phoenix 22 45 .328 23½
x-clinched playoff spot<
___
Friday's Games
Toronto 92, Charlotte 78
L.A. Lakers 99, Indiana 93
Washington 96, New Orleans 87
Atlanta 107, Phoenix 94
Houston 108, Minnesota 100
Oklahoma City 117, Orlando 104
Dallas 96, Cleveland 86
Miami 107, Milwaukee 94
Denver 87, Memphis 80
Chicago 113, Golden State 95
Saturday's Games
Washington 127, Phoenix 105
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Utah, 10 p.m.
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 26 19 4 3 41 80 55
Montreal 27 18 5 4 40 88 69
Ottawa 28 14 8 6 34 68 61
Toronto 28 15 12 1 31 82 78
Buffalo 28 10 14 4 24 73 88
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 27 15 11 1 31 82 76
Winnipeg 27 14 11 2 30 71 77
Tampa Bay 28 12 15 1 25 92 84
Washington 27 11 15 1 23 73 82
Florida 28 7 15 6 20 67 105
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 27 22 2 3 47 87 59
St. Louis 27 15 10 2 32 83 79
Detroit 28 13 10 5 31 73 73
Nashville 28 11 11 6 28 65 74
Columbus 28 10 12 6 26 63 76
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 27 15 10 2 32 70 68
Vancouver 26 13 7 6 32 75 72
Calgary 26 11 11 4 26 75 87
Edmonton 27 10 11 6 26 66 79
Colorado 27 10 13 4 24 69 84
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
America East Conference
Championship
Albany (NY) 53, Vermont 49
Atlantic 10 Conference
Semifnals
Saint Louis 67, Butler 56
VCU 71, UMass 62
Atlantic Coast Conference
Semifnals
Miami 81, NC State 71
North Carolina 79, Maryland 76
Big East Conference
Championship
Kansas 70, Kansas St. 54
Big Ten Conference
Semifnals
Ohio St. 61, Michigan St. 58
Wisconsin 68, Indiana 56
Conference USA
Championship
Memphis 91, Southern Miss. 79, 2OT
Mid-American Conference
Championship
Akron 65, Ohio 46
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Championship
NCA&T 57, Morgan St. 54
Mountain West Conference
Championship
New Mexico 63, UNLV 56
NCAA Division II
First Round
Ala.-Huntsville 60, Christian Brothers 58
Augustana (SD) 79, Upper Iowa 65
Barton 81, Montevallo 73
Bellarmine 67, Indianapolis 61
Benedict 68, Eckerd 65
Bridgeport 77, St. Anselm 66
Drury 89, Findlay 77
Florida Southern 94, North Alabama 80
Fort Lewis 95, Adams St. 73
Franklin Pierce 90, Bloomfeld 78
Indiana (Pa.) 76, East Stroudsburg 68
Lincoln Memorial 82, UNC Pembroke 80
SC-Aiken 94, Belmont Abbey 76
Slippery Rock 69, Winston-Salem 67
St. Mary's (Texas) 75, Cameron 57
West Liberty 114, Bowie St. 82
Wingate 65, Limestone 60
NCAA Division III
Third Round
Amherst 93, Randolph-Macon 76
Cabrini 70, Wooster 63
Middlebury 73, Ithaca 72
Williams 84, Va. Wesleyan 75
Pacifc Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 26 20 3 3 43 89 64
Los Angeles 26 14 10 2 30 76 69
San Jose 26 12 8 6 30 62 64
Phoenix 27 13 11 3 29 77 77
Dallas 26 12 11 3 27 68 73
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Calgary 6, Nashville 3
Detroit 3, Edmonton 2, OT
Saturday's Games
Boston 4, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
Ottawa 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Minnesota 6, Colorado 4
Tampa Bay 4, Carolina 1
Winnipeg at Toronto, late
Montreal at New Jersey, late
Phoenix at Columbus, late
N.Y. Islanders at Florida, late
Anaheim at St. Louis, late
Chicago at Dallas, late
Detroit at Vancouver, late
San Jose at Los Angeles, late
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 3B TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
PENGUINS SUNDAY
My Hometown
Philip Samuelsson
This week we’re going to change the name
of this feature to “My Hometowns” to accom-
modate Philip Samuelsson’s childhood. When
I asked him to talk about his hometown, he
couldn’t pick just one.
Samuelsson grew up in two different worlds -
the desert and the lake.
Some might say it’s the best of both worlds.
He spent the majority of the year living in the
Phoenix area where his father, Ulf, was a coach
with the NHL Coyotes. In the summer, once
the season was over, the Samuelsson’s would
leave the hot, dry Arizona desert for the lush
forests and clear lakes of Leksand, Sweden - the
hometown of his mother.
So, as you can see Samuelsson grew up in
two different worlds - two different continents.
And each one had its perks. One place afforded
Samuelsson to meet Wayne Gretzky, and the
other allowed him the chance to spend time
with his family and jet ski the day away on an
alpine lake.
But Samuelsson also pointed out plenty of
other perks with each place. One deals with
food, and it’s a delicacy that former Penguin
Janne Pesonen talked about when he was here
a few years ago.
What was is like growing up in Phoenix?
“For me it was awesome. To meet Wayne
Gretzky and other great hockey players over the
years there. They’ve got a nice arena and the
team itself has come a log way since the talk of
relocation.”
Any other benefits?
“It’s a really up and coming place. It’s in
the desert so its always warm – nice in winter.
There’s a lot of money there. Malls always
popping up everywhere and lot of good looking
girls there. That helps. The Grand Canyon is
nearby and the red rocks in Sedona, so there’s a
lot of good scenery. It’s a really nice town.”
How about Leksand?
“It’s a smaller town, right by a lake. They
have a team in the second league over there.
Mom grew up there and dad played there. We
have a lot of family and friends there. Pretty
special place to go back to in the summers. We
go back every summer to Leksand.”
And the benefits to growing up in Lek-
sand?
“It can be nice and it can also be cold and
raining. We spend a lot of time on the lake with
jet skis and boats. I like to play golf and fish on
the lake. Not too much exciting but it’s a nice
place to just relax.”
When JannePesonen, who is from Finland,
played here he raved about a reindeer dish
served with berries back home. Are there
any unique dishes in Leksand like that?
“They do this dish, it’s like pickled herring.
It smells terrible but my grandparents love it.
There are some unique dishes over there. The
berries he was talking about are lingonber-
ries, and it’s big over there. Up north you get
more traditional Swedish stuff. There’s a lot of
reindeer stews. It’s pretty good.”
How did growing up on two continents
benefit you?
“Playing pro hockey, you never know when
you’ll be traded. If you know what its like to
move it’s not a big deal. For me it’s cool to see
new towns and meet new people.”
Can you pick one place over the other?
“I can’t choose. I would like to have both
of them in my life. It’s two totally different
experiences growing up in Sweden and then the
United States. It’s a meshing of cultures.”
Anything about Wilkes-Barre remind you
of Sweden or Arizona?
“There’s obviously good people that you
meet anywhere, including this area. But the
landscape is as far off as you can get from both.
Here it’s pretty with the valley, the mountains
and the river. Sweden it’s all dense forests and
lakes. Phoenix it’s all construction and desert.
Three different worlds.”
STANDINGS
Farnham racking up penalty minutes
Rookie hits one hard
MILESTOnE
NEXT F I VE GAMES
March 20
at Syracuse
7 p.m.
March 23
Norfolk
7:05 p.m.
March 27
Binghamton
7:05 p.m.
March 29
Providence
7:05 p.m.
March 30
at Binghamton
7:05 p.m.
L AST F I VE GAMES
March 9
at Portland
W, 4-3
March 10
at Manchester
W, 5-4
March 13
at Worcester
L, 5-1
March 15
at Worcester
W, 5-3
March 16
at Portland
(N)
W
hen Bobby Farnham
was given a 10-min-
ute misconduct dur-
ing overtime against
the Portland Pirates
on March 9, he accomplished some-
thing that no Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguin had achieved since 2003: he
topped the 200 penalty minute mark.
Heading into Friday’s game against
Worcester, the Penguins rookie ranks
third in the AHL with 210 penalty
minutes in 50 games. The last Pen-
guin to top the 200 mark was Dennis
Bonvie, with 203 in the 2007-08
season.
The day after the Portland game,
Farnham set another milestone when
he dropped the gloves with Man-
chester’s Chris Huxley. The fight was
Farnham’s 18th of the season, break-
ing the Penguins’ franchise rookie
record of 17, set by Daniel Carcillo in
2005-2006.
For a player who never got the
chance to fight while spending the
previous four years playing col-
lege hockey, Farnham has quickly
embraced the fisticuffs as something
that comes with the territory.
And even though he never set out
to top the 200 penalty minute mark
and rank among the league lead-
ers, it’s a milestone that Farnham is
proud to accept.
“If I’m doing my job the right way,
penalty minutes seem to find me, I
guess,” Farnham said. “To finish in
the top five in the league, it would be
an accomplishment I take pride in.
“Not because I took stupid or soft
penalties, but because I played hard
and they simply added up by the end
of the year.”
And as a result, the majority of
Farnham’s penalty minutes are what
head coach John Hynes calls “hard
minutes.”
So far, Farnham has been whistled
for 50 penalties - minors, majors and
misconducts. Of those, 18 were for
fighting, 10 for roughing, three for
goaltender interference along with
seven misconducts for a total of 38.
They are the type of penalties that
usually involve a few punches and
scrums.
“His stats aren’t padded,” Hynes
said. “We recognize, as do other
teams, that this is who he is. This is
how he plays - in your face and under
your skin. Bobby’s done a nice job
of it.”
At 5-10, 180 pounds, Farnham is
far from a heavyweight enforcer. Pos-
sessing good speed, a fearlessness
on the ice and a willingness to yap,
Farnham has thrived in the role of
agitator. It’s a job where playing on
the edge is a requirement and respect
from opponents doesn’t come easy.
The fact that Farnham is not only
willing to agitate, but answer the bell
as well, makes the difference between
a player who is respected for his role
and one who is simply despised.
“Fighting goes a long ways to be-
ing able to stand up for your team-
mates and yourself, while obtaining
that respect as well,” Farnham said.
There are times when Farnham’s
gloves don’t come off, and that usu-
ally leads to a stat that, if it were
kept, he’d likely rank among the
league leaders: penalties drawn.
That facet of the game is one that
evolved for Farnham since he arrived
with the Penguins via a call-up from
Wheeling in early November. At
the beginning of the year, Farnham
didn’t hesitate to drop the gloves at
the slightest urging of an opponent.
Now, he’s a bit more diplomatic
about things. Farnham weighs the
pros and cons before the gloves come
off. That approach has led to numer-
ous instances when a frustrated
opponent skated to the box and Farn-
ham - albeit a bit roughed up, headed
to the bench as his team went on the
power play.
Sometimes it seems as if Farnham
has mastered the art of drawing
penalties, such as when the Penguins
faced rival Binghamton on Feb. 16.
“(Binghamton winger) Darren
Kramer wanted to fight me all game,
and I knew it,” Farnham said. “Behind
the net I took a little whack at their
goalie, he came flying in and I didn’t
do anything. I let him punch me.”
Kramer went to the box for rough-
ing, and the Penguins scored on the
resulting power play.
“When you’re not in the box and
the other team is, that’s the defini-
tion of agitating,” Farnham said.
With 13 games remaining in the
season, Farnham stands a good
chance at not only finishing in the
top five in penalty minutes, but
becoming the first Penguin in seven
years to top the 250 minute mark.
And if the milestones are achieved,
Farnham won’t get there with hook-
ing and holding minors, but the
hard minutes that define his role as
agitator.
“I try to take the hard minutes. I
took a hooking penalty recently - my
first of the year, and I was shocked,”
Farnham said. “I know I have a
couple misconducts in there as well,
and sometimes maybe you do go
a bit far. But because I play on the
edge and play physical, I feel like the
hard minutes show I’m doing it the
right way.”
Bobby Farnham isn’t affraid
to drop the gloves to protect a
teammate.
B R e A k D o W N o F B o B B Y
FA R N H A M ’ S P e N A LT I e S
T H I S S e A S o N
(as of Thursday, March 14):
Fighting majors 18
(tied for 5th in the AHL)
Roughing 10
Misconduct 7
Goaltender interference 3
Cross-checking 2
Slashing 2
Delay of game 2
Unsportsmanlike conduct 1
Tripping 1
Charging 1
Interference 1
Boarding 1
Hooking 1
A H L P e N A LT Y M I N U T e
L e A D e R S
(as of Thursday, March 14):
Player Team Min. G
1. Bobby Robins (PRO) 273 58
2. Nathan McIver (BRI) 245 47
3. Bobby Farnham (WBS) 210 50
4. Radko Gudas (SYR) 207 57
5. Brett Gallant (BRI) 202 42
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Penguins left wing Bobby Farnham has broken the 200-penalty minute mark this season. Included in that total
are 18 majors for fighting.
American Hockey League
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Providence 60 36 19 0 5 77 170 154
Portland 60 34 21 3 2 73 179 181
Manchester 60 29 24 3 4 65 177 165
Worcester 59 28 24 1 6 63 151 166
St. John’s 61 24 32 1 4 53 149 188
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Syracuse 61 36 17 3 5 80 208 166
Binghamton 61 36 19 1 5 78 181 153
Penguins 62 33 26 2 1 69 147 146
Hershey 60 28 24 3 5 64 155 153
Norfolk 60 29 26 4 1 63 151 164
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Springfeld 59 34 16 5 4 77 184 142
Albany 58 27 20 1 10 65 157 162
Connecticut 61 28 25 5 3 64 175 185
Bridgeport 59 25 25 5 4 59 175 197
Adirondack 60 24 31 2 3 53 144 178
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Grand Rapids 59 36 19 2 2 76 194 159
Chicago 58 29 20 5 4 67 158 154
Milwaukee 59 29 24 3 3 64 149 170
Rockford 60 31 27 1 1 64 188 179
Peoria 60 25 28 4 3 57 144 179
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto 58 32 20 2 4 70 182 154
Rochester 59 32 23 3 1 68 191 167
Abbotsford 64 28 27 3 6 65 137 159
Lake Erie 62 27 26 2 7 63 172 180
Hamilton 60 24 30 1 5 54 126 177
South Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Texas 61 35 16 4 6 80 184 158
Charlotte 62 35 22 2 3 75 188 165
Houston 61 31 22 4 4 70 166 158
Oklahoma City 59 29 22 2 6 66 186 195
San Antonio 59 27 26 1 5 60 155 169
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an
overtime or shootout loss.
Friday’s Games
St. John’s 5, Hamilton 0
Texas 7, Charlotte 3
Manchester 3, Bridgeport 2
Providence 3, Springfeld 2, SO
Adirondack 3, Binghamton 2
Albany 3, Rochester 2
Norfolk 4, Syracuse 3, SO
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 5, Worcester 3
Rockford 4, Chicago 3
San Antonio 4, Houston 2
Saturday’s Games
Rochester at Toronto, (n)
Hamilton at St. John’s, (n)
Bridgeport at Hershey, (n)
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Portland, (n)
Manchester at Connecticut, (n)
Providence at Springfeld, (n)
Norfolk at Binghamton, (n)
Albany at Syracuse, (n)
Grand Rapids at Milwaukee, (n)
Peoria at Rockford, (n)
Sunday’s Games
Texas at Charlotte, 3 p.m.
Springfeld at Connecticut, 3 p.m.
Albany at Bridgeport, 3 p.m.
Manchester at Providence, 3:05 p.m.
Rockford at Chicago, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Lake Erie, 4 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Peoria, 4:05 p.m.
Abbotsford at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m.
Adirondack at Hershey, 5 p.m.
ECHL
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Reading 65 41 18 3 3 88 221 170
Elmira 64 34 23 3 4 75 216 196
Wheeling 63 27 25 3 8 65 166 191
Trenton 64 27 29 4 4 62 191 217
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Cincinnati 65 40 17 5 3 88 209 170
Toledo 64 32 23 5 4 73 200 178
Kalamazoo 63 32 26 4 1 69 184 181
Fort Wayne 64 30 31 1 2 63 180 215
Evansville 64 22 36 2 4 50 183 243
South Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Gwinnett 67 39 25 2 1 81 196 179
Florida 64 33 20 4 7 77 225 219
Greenville 65 34 24 2 5 75 206 193
South Carolina 66 34 25 4 3 75 177 160
Orlando 64 26 32 3 3 58 177 222
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
x-Alaska 66 46 13 3 4 99 214 157
x-Idaho 65 41 17 1 6 89 246 184
x-Colorado 65 32 27 3 3 70 219 201
x-Utah 65 25 29 4 7 61 188 253
Pacific Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
y-Ontario 65 42 16 3 4 91 229 179
x-Stockton 67 33 25 5 4 75 211 210
x-Las Vegas 65 31 29 2 3 67 178 180
San Francisco 64 23 34 1 6 53 175 226
Bakersfeld 66 21 40 2 3 47 161 228
x-Clinched Playoff Berth
y-Clinched Divisional Title
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for
an overtime or shootout loss.
Friday’s Games
Toledo 5, Wheeling 3
Trenton 2, Cincinnati 1, SO
Reading 2, Elmira 0
Kalamazoo 3, Fort Wayne 2
Gwinnett 3, Orlando 1
Greenville 3, Evansville 2, SO
Colorado 2, Las Vegas 1
Stockton 5, Ontario 4, SO
Bakersfeld 4, Utah 3, SO
Idaho 4, Alaska 3
Saturday’s Games
South Carolina at Florida, (n)
Wheeling at Toledo, (n)
Cincinnati at Reading, (n)
Greenville at Fort Wayne, (n)
Kalamazoo at Evansville, (n)
Las Vegas at Colorado, (n)
Utah at San Francisco, (n)
Ontario at Stockton, (n)
Idaho at Alaska, (n)
Sunday’s Games
Greenville at Kalamazoo, 3 p.m.
Elmira at Trenton, 3:05 p.m.
Orlando at Gwinnett, 4:05 p.m.
South Carolina at Florida, 5 p.m.
Evansville at Fort Wayne, 5 p.m.
Wheeling at Toledo, 5:05 p.m.
Utah at San Francisco, 5:15 p.m.
Bakersfeld at Stockton, 7 p.m.
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REDUCED
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 5C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
WO M e N ’ S R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Idaho’s Alyssa Charlston cuts down
the net after her team’s 67-64 win
over Seattle in the Western Athletic
Conference women’s tournament on
Saturday in Las Vegas.
Delaware
beats Hofstra
in CAA semis
The Associated Press
UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — Elena
Delle Donne had 21 points and 13 re-
bounds, and No. 15 Delaware breezed
past Hofstra 75-54 Saturday to earn
a third straight berth in the Colonial
Athletic Association title game.
The Blue Hens (29-3) will bring a
24-game winning streak into a match-
up Sunday against either James Madi-
son or Drexel. The last time Delaware
lost a conference game was in the 2011
CAA championship, against JMU.
Deven Green scored 16 for fifth-seed
Hofstra (14-17), making its first semifi-
nal appearance since 2007.
After struggling in the tournament
opener against UNC Wilmington on
Friday, Delaware took control at the
outset and never trailed.
Delle Donne made the opening
two baskets and Danielle Parker and
Akeema Richards each scored twice for
a 14-3 lead. Minutes later, Delle Donne
hit a jumper to spark an 8-0 run that
made it 25-10.
It was 38-27 at halftime and 52-31
with 15:28 left.
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Central Michigan 86, Akron 68
CLEVELAND — Crystal Bradford
scored 13 points with 10 rebounds and
Central Michigan showed balance and
depth to beat Akron for its first Mid-
American Conference title and NCAA
berth since 1984.
The Chippewas (21-11) lost to
Eastern Michigan in the title game last
year on a basket with 1.5 seconds left.
Central Michigan used the heartbreak-
ing loss as motivation, and the Chip-
pewas played a demanding schedule to
prepare for March.
They upset top-seeded Toledo in the
semifinals and pulled away from the
Zips (23-9) in the second half.
Jalisa Olive scored 14 and Niki
DiGuilio made four 3-pointers in the
final 12 minutes for Central Michigan,
which had six players score in double
figures.
Hanna Luburgh scored 19 to lead
the Zips. MAC Player of the Year Ra-
chel Tecca had 11.
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC
Hampton 59, Howard 38
NORFOLK, Va. — Olivia Allen
scored 16 points and Hampton finished
an unbeaten season in Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference play with a 59-38
victory against Howard in the cham-
pionship game Saturday, the Lady
Pirates’ 19th straight victory.
Hampton (28-5), the top seed, be-
came the first team to go through the
MEAC regular season unbeaten and
also win the conference tournament
since Coppin State in 2006. It also
became the second school to win the
conference tournament four consecu-
tive years; Howard did it from 1987-90.
SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE
Oral Roberts 72,
Sam Houston State 66
KATY, Texas — Kevi Luper scored
26 points and Oral Roberts secured its
first NCAA tournament berth in five
years with a win over Sam Houston
State in the Southland Conference
women’s championship game.
Jaci Bigham had 17 points and five
assists for the Golden Eagles (18-12),
who went 28 for 33 from the free-
throw line and took advantage of 20
turnovers by the Bearkats. Oral Rob-
erts and first-year coach Misti Cussen
finished their first season in the South-
land with the school’s sixth conference
tournament championship.
M e N ’ S R O U N D U P
The Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Dexter
Strickland and Reggie Bullock scored
15 points apiece and North Carolina
held on to beat Maryland 79-76 on
Saturday in the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament semifinals.
P.J. Hairston scored 13 points
despite a heavily wrapped and injured
left (non-shooting) hand for the
third-seeded Tar Heels (24-9), but his
missed free throw with 16 seconds
left gave Maryland a chance to force
overtime.
The Terps called time out with
10.9 seconds left, and Logan Aronhalt
took the inbounds pass and immedi-
ately launched an off-balance 30-foot
airball.
Bullock snatched the ball and
passed to Hairston, who was all alone
near midcourt, and the Tar Heels ran
out the clock to clinch their league-
record 32nd appearance in the title
game.
Next up: a meeting with No. 9
Miami, the tournament’s top seed, on
Sunday with North Carolina’s 18th
league tournament title on the line.
The Hurricanes’ regular-season sweep
included a humiliating 26-point win
last month at Miami.
Alex Len had 20 points to lead sev-
enth-seeded Maryland (22-12), which
knocked off No. 2 Duke less than 24
hours earlier in the quarterfinals and
nearly pulled off another upset.
The Terrapins trailed by 10 with
just over 7 minutes left before rally-
ing to make things tight down the
stretch.
But every time they got too close,
North Carolina had an answer.
Twice in the final 3 minutes, fresh-
man guard Marcus Paige followed a
Maryland basket by hitting a clutch
shot of his own.
His jumper with 2:49 left came af-
ter Len cut the Tar Heels’ lead to 71-
70. And after Dez Wells hit a layup to
pull the Terps to 75-72 with 1:08 left,
Paige drove the baseline for a pretty
layup that put North Carolina back up
by five with 36.5 seconds left.
He and Wells traded free throws in
a 3-second span, and Aronhalt’s stick-
back with 17.3 seconds left pulled
Maryland to 78-76. Hairston then hit
1 of 2 free throws 1.3 seconds later.
Big man James Michael McAdoo
also finished with 13 points for the
Tar Heels, who improved to 8-2 since
inserting Hairston in the starting
lineup and playing with four guards.
Their only losses in that span came
to a Duke team that had already been
knocked out of the tournament by
these Terrapins.
Nick Faust added 17 points with
five 3-pointers for Maryland while
Wells — the Xavier transfer who
emerged as a leading tournament
MVP candidate while averaging 25.5
points in wins over Wake Forest and
Duke — finished with 15 on 6-of-15
shooting.
Miami 81,
North Carolina State 71
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Durand
Scott scored a career-high 32 points
to help No. 9 Miami beat North
Carolina State in the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament semifinals,
earning its first trip to the champion-
ship game.
Shane Larkin added 23 for the
top-seeded Hurricanes (26-6), who
led the entire way and by 19 points
late in the first half. Miami shot 46
percent behind Scott, a senior guard
who went 12-for-18 from the field and
5-for-8 from 3-point range.
Scott also had a couple of big shots
that shut down comeback bids from
the fifth-seeded Wolfpack (24-10),
who got as close as six after halftime
but couldn’t dig out of that big hole.
Miami also controlled the boards to
score 18 second-chance points to go
with 15 points off turnovers.
Now the Hurricanes can turn their
attention to adding a tournament title
to go with their first regular-season
crown in today’s final.
BIG 12
Kansas 70, Kansas State 54
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Kansas
wasn’t about to share this title with
Kansas State.
Jeff Withey had 17 points and nine
rebounds, Perry Ellis and Naadir
Tharpe added 12 points each, and the
seventh-ranked Jayhawks pounded
the No. 11 Wildcats 70-54 on Satur-
day night to win their ninth Big 12
tournament championship.
The top-seeded Jayhawks (29-5),
who shared the regular-season title
with their in-state rival, took a 24-16
lead at halftime and then slowly
stretched it in the second half.
The Wildcats (27-7) struggled to
match Withey and Ellis in the paint,
losing for the third time this season
to the Jayhawks and for the 47th time
in their last 50 meetings.
Rodney McGruder scored 18 points
despite a poor first half, and Angel
Rodriguez had 10 for Kansas State,
which still has not won a conference
tournament in more than 30 years.
BIG EAST
Louisville 78, Syracuse 61
NEW YORK -- Peyton Siva had 11
points and eight assists to lead No. 4
Louisville to a 78-61 victory over No.
19 Syracuse on Saturday night, giving
the Cardinals their second straight
Big East tournament title.
The Cardinals got their third title
by overcoming a 16-point deficit in
the second half -- almost double the
previous record in a championship
game -- and they kept pouring it on
once they got the lead, going ahead
by as many as 18 points.
Second-seeded Louisville (29-
5) -- along with Georgetown and
Marquette the tri-champions of the
regular season -- won its 10th straight
game with its defense, forcing Syra-
cuse into 20 turnovers and keeping
the Orange off balance during the
24-3 run that turned the 16-point defi-
cit into a 56-48 lead with 8:51 to play.
Montrezl Harrell led Louisville
with 20 points.
BIG TEN
Ohio State 61, Michigan State 58
CHICAGO — Aaron Craft came
on strong in the second half to finish
with 20 points and lead No. 10 Ohio
State past No. 8 Michigan State in the
semifinals of the Big Ten tournament.
Craft keyed a seven-point spurt
midway through the second half
that stretched the lead to eight at
55-47, and the Buckeyes (25-7) came
away with the win after the Spartans
(25-8) pulled within one. The victory
avenged a loss in last year’s champi-
onship game
It was 57-56 after Derrick Nix con-
verted a three-point play for Michigan
State with 1:54 remaining, but Craft
hit a free throw. Thomas grabbed
a huge rebound off a missed 3 by
Shannon Scott to keep the possession
going and scored in the paint after a
timeout to make it a four-point game,
sending the Buckeyes back to the
conference final.
They’ll go for their third champion-
ship in four years when they meet No.
22 Wisconsin, a 68-56 winner over
top-seeded and third-ranked Indiana
in the other semifinal.
Craft scored all but two of his
points in the second half. He also
had nine assists and four steals in the
game.
Thomas scored 16 even though
he hit just 6 of 19 shots — 2 of 11
3-pointers.
Nix led Michigan State with 17
points and nine rebounds. Keith
Appling scored 16 points, but the
Spartans came up short in this one.
In a game that was neck-and-neck
for about the first 29 minutes, Craft
gave Ohio State some breathing room
when he scored on a layup and a pair
of jumpers to cap a seven-point spurt
and make it 55-47 with 7:22 remain-
ing.
Michigan State hung in, and things
got real interesting when Nix convert-
ed that three-point play with 1:54 left.
The 6-foot-9, 270-pound Nix was a
handful right from the start. He domi-
nated down low with 10 points in the
first half as Michigan State grabbed a
29-28 lead.
Appling hit two 3-pointers and
scored eight in the half.
Thomas, the Big Ten’s leading
scorer, had 11 points in the first 20
minutes but was just 4 of 13. There
weren’t many fouls called in the first
half, either, with Ohio State attempt-
ing just two free throws and Michigan
State not even getting to the line in
the half.
SEC Florida 61, Alabama 51
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Kenny
Boynton scored 11 straight points
during a 15-0 second-half run as No.
13 Florida rallied from a 10-point,
second-half deficit to beat Alabama in
a Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment semifinal.
The top-seeded Gators (26-6)
advanced to Sunday’s championship
game against either Mississippi or
Vanderbilt. Alabama (21-12), the
tournament’s No. 4 seed, will spend
Sunday waiting to learn its fate from
the NCAA tournament selection com-
mittee.
Held scoreless for the first 25 min-
utes of the game, Boynton finished
with a game-high 16 points. Patric
Young had 13 points and nine re-
bounds for the Gators. Mike Rosario
added 10 points.
Mississippi 64, Vanderbilt 52
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Marshall
Henderson scored 23 points as
Mississippi beat Vanderbilt in the
Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment semifinals, putting the Rebels
just one more win away from making
sure their NCAA tournament berth is
automatic.
The third-seeded Rebels (25-8)
came here needing wins to sharpen
their postseason resume. Now they
will play No. 13 Florida, a 61-51 win-
ner over Alabama, in Sunday’s cham-
pionship game where the winner
advances to the NCAA tournament.
Reginald Buckner also had 15
points, and Murphy Holloway added
12 for Ole Miss. The Rebels now have
won six of seven to reach the cham-
pionship game for the first time since
2001. Another win would give coach
Andy Kennedy his first NCAA berth
and the Rebels’ first since 2002.
No. 10 seeded Vanderbilt (16-17)
lost for only the second time in eight
games. Kedren Johnson had a team-
high 12 points.
ATLANTIC 10
Saint Louis 67, Butler 56
NEW YORK — Dwayne Evans
nearly set a career high in points for
the second straight game, and No.
16 Saint Louis’ defense locked down
Butler in the second half for a win to
reach the Billikens’ first Atlantic 10
title game.
Evans had 24 points and 11
rebounds a day after going for 25
and nine in the quarterfinals against
Charlotte.
Top-seeded Saint Louis beat the
Bulldogs for the third time this sea-
son. Butler may be the bigger name,
but the Billikens have been the class
of the A-10 in 2013.
The Billikens (26-6) held Butler
without a field goal for almost seven
minutes midway through the second
half to pull away. Meanwhile, Evans
went to work inside, showing off his
post moves at 6-foot-5 or earning free
throws to put the Bulldogs (26-8) in
foul trouble.
VCU 71, UMass 62
NEW YORK— Troy Daniels made
six 3-pointers to score 20 points, and
No. 25 VCU advanced to the Atlantic
10 tournament title game in its first
season in the conference with awin
over UMass.
The Rams will face top-seeded
Saint Louis on Sunday in a matchup
of the league’s top two teams during
the regular season. The Billikens won
76-62 at home in their one meeting
Feb. 19.
VCU (26-7) forced 24 turnovers
to hold off a pesky Minutemen team
that upset Temple in Friday’s quarter-
finals.
Rob Brandenberg’s 3-pointer as the
shot clock expired finally gave the
Rams some breathing room, putting
them up 68-61 with a minute-and-a-
half left.
Juvonte Reddic added 18 points
and 12 rebounds.
Chaz Williams ended his A-10
tournament run back home in Brook-
lyn with 62 points in three games
for sixth-seeded UMass (21-11). He
scored 18 on 7-of-12 shooting Satur-
day.
CONFERENCE USA
Memphis 91, Southern Miss 79
TULSA, Okla. — Chris Crawford
scored 23 points, including the go-
ahead 3-pointer in double overtime,
and No. 20 Memphis beat Southern
Miss to win its seventh Conference
USA tournament title in the past
eight years.
Crawford, the league’s Sixth Man
of the Year, connected on a 3-pointer
from the left wing to put the top-
seeded Tigers (30-4) up 78-76 with
2:44 remaining. He also had a jumper
and a pair of free throws in a 9-0 run
by Memphis soon after that finally
put the game away.
Daveon Boardingham scored 19
points and Jonathan Mills had 15
points and 17 rebounds for second-
seeded Southern Miss (25-9), which
nearly clinched an automatic bid
to the NCAA tournament. Instead,
the Golden Eagles must hope to get
their second straight at-large bid on
Sunday.
AMERICA EAST
Albany 53, Vermont 49
BURLINGTON, Vt. — Mike Black
scored 14 points and Albany came
back from an early deficit to beat
Vermont in the America East champi-
onship game and earn its third trip to
the NCAA tournament.
Luke Devlin added 12 points on
6-for-6 shooting as the Great Danes
(24-10) ended an eight-game losing
streak to the Catamounts (21-11).
Jacob Iati hit a pair of 3-point shots
in the final three minutes to seal the
win.
MOUNTAIN WEST
New Mexico 63, UNLV 56
LAS VEGAS — Tony Snell scored
13 straight points for New Mexico
during a second-half run as the No.
15 Lobos pulled away late Saturday
to beat UNLVand add the Mountain
West tournament title to their regular
season crown.
Snell carried New Mexico (29-
5) down the stretch, making three
3-pointers and adding a pair of field
goals as the Lobos took over in the
last 8 minutes of the game.
UNChangs on to beat Maryland in ACCsemis
AP PHOTO
North Carolina’s P.J. Hairston, right, and Reggie Bullock, left, celebrate as
the Tar Heels defeat Maryland in the semifinals of the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence tournament in Greensboro, N.C., on Saturday.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6C SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 S P O R T S
N F L R O U N D U P
Still on Jets, Revis earns $1M bonus
NEW YORK — Darrelle
Revis is still with the New York
Jets. And, he’s got $1 million
more to show for it.
The star cornerback, the
subject of trade rumors, earned
a roster bonus as a result of a
clause in his contract with New
York. According to the clause,
the bonus kicked in on Satur-
day since Revis remains on the
Jets’ roster — not traded or cut
— at the end of the business
day.
There has been intense
speculation in the past several
weeks that the Jets will try to
trade their best player, who is
recovering from a torn knee
ligament. Some thought that
move could have come by
Saturday so the Jets could have
avoided the clause, but that
“deadline” was not considered
to be a factor in the team’s
thinking.
Revis will receive the bonus
later in the year and it counts
on New York’s salary cap —
whether or not he remains
with the team. He also has a
$1 million workout bonus that
would kick in in late June and
another $1 million reporting
bonus that would go into effect
in July at the start of training
camp.
The trade talk could pick
up at the NFL meetings in
Phoenix, starting Monday.
While neither side has publicly
said they are interested in a
trade, there has been increased
speculation that that’s how the
situation will unfold.
Revis is entering the final
year of his contract, but wants
to be among the league’s high-
est-paid defensive players. The
Jets are balancing the desire
to keep one of the best players
the franchise has ever had and
being financially prudent.
New York Giants sign
former PSU star Connor
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
— Former Dallas Cowboys
linebacker Dan Connor has
signed with the New York Gi-
ants as a free agent.
The Giants announced the
signing of the former Penn
State product Saturday without
disclosing details.
Connor can play both inside
and outside, so his signing
casts some doubt on whether
New York will bring back
middle linebacker Chase Black-
burn, who is a free agent.
Connor started five games
at middle linebacker for Dallas
last season, making 56 tackles.
He also started three games at
weakside linebacker. He played
his first four seasons with the
Carolina Panthers.
“Being able to stay in the
same division is great,” said
Connor, released by the
Cowboys on Monday. “Talk-
ing to the Giants coaches, the
(4-3) system seems to fit me.
I wanted to get back into a 4-3
look. It’s a great opportunity.
When my agent called me and
said they were interested I
was so thrilled. This is a class
organization with a lot of tradi-
tion. They’re a successful team
with a winning tradition and
it was something I wanted to
be a part of. I’m really looking
forward to it.”
Connor has played in 56
career games with 27 starts. He
has 222 tackles, a sack, a forced
fumble and a fumble recovery.
Connor set a Penn State re-
cord with 419 career tackles in
45 games (37 starts). He also
had 14 sacks and four intercep-
tions.
49ers sign safety Dahl
SAN FRANCISCO — The
San Francisco 49ers have
signed safety Craig Dahl to a
three-year contract, finding a
replacement in the secondary
after Dashon Goldson received
a five-year deal from Tampa
Bay.
The 27-year-old Dahl spent
the past four seasons with the
St. Louis Rams and had 78
tackles and an interception in
2012.
San Francisco’s front office
hosted a handful of defensive
backs for meetings this week,
including veteran free agent
Charles Woodson and Louis
Delmas, who wound up in
Detroit.
Goldson spent the past two
seasons on one-year contracts
for the 49ers and sought a long-
term deal. He signed a $41.25
million, five-year contract
with Tampa Bay — even after
49ers coach Jim Harbaugh said
re-signing Goldson was a top
priority.
San Francisco lost 34-31 in
the Super Bowl to Baltimore.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTOS
Kyle Busch (54) leads Brad Keselowski (22) during the Nationwide race Saturday in Bristol,
Tenn.
Larson gets controversial Nationwide win
The Associated Press
BRISTOL, Tenn. — Kyle
Larson’s first chance to get
a big win in NASCAR ended
with him claiming a controver-
sial win.
With a shot at grabbing his
first Nationwide Series win
Saturday, he wasn’t going to
make that same mistake again.
Especially not against Kyle
Busch.
Larson stalked Busch over
the closing laps around Bristol
Motor Speedway waiting to
make a move. It came as they
closed in on the finish line, and
Larson made a last-gasp push
on the high side that fell just
short as Busch held on for his
second win of the season.
But in chasing the win the
right way, the 20-year-old Lar-
son cleaned up some of the
criticismthat had followed him
from Daytona last month after
spinning C.E. Falk III on the
final lap of the “Battle at the
Beach” late model race.
“You certainly want to try to
win races the right way,” Busch
said. “He played it smart today.
That was good on his end. I
think a lot of people have been
looking at him to try to see if
he’s going to be to a wrecker
or a checker. Today he didn’t
get the checkers, but that’s
how you get them. You drive
into the corner, or drive into
the back of me, I’m going to be
here for a while and if he keeps
coming up through the ranks,
he’s not going to have fun deal-
ing with me every week.
“But right now? I’m going to
race him as hard as he raced
me, but just as clean as he
raced me because he didn’t put
a fender on me all day.”
Larson had his win over Falk
in the back of his head dur-
ing the closing laps at Bristol
as he looked for a place to try
to grab the win. Although he
has received high praise from
Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart and
Kasey Kahne as NASCAR’s
next big star, his move in the
“Battle of the Beach” caused
many top Sprint Cup drivers to
openly criticize Larson.
“I was pretty aggressive at
the “Battle of the Beach” and
I didn’t want to have anything
like that happen again and
have more people look at me,”
Larson said. “I don’t race that
way and didn’t want to move
(Busch). I wanted to outrace
him. I’d gain a little more re-
spect that way, and it made for
a better finish, I think.”
Indeed it did, as both driv-
ers closed in on lapped cars
as they neared the finish line.
Busch chose the low line and
Larson went high, then tried
to squeeze his way past Busch.
Larson’s car bounced off of
both the wall and Busch’s car,
but he was nipped at the finish
line by Busch by .023 seconds.
“He’s got a lot of talent,”
Busch said. “Obviously, he’s al-
ready made a name for himself
and he’s got a lot going for him.
I’m 27 and I feel like I’m getting
old. Every time I looked in the
rear view mirror he caught me,
so I stopped looking. I didn’t
want to know where he was at.”
It was Busch’s fifth career
Nationwide victory at Bristol,
tying him with Kevin Harvick
for the most in the series.
Busch has a series-record 53
wins, and two in the last four
weeks after going winless last
season.
Brian Vickers was third and
was followed by Nationwide
Series points leader SamHorn-
ish Jr. and Harvick.
Kyle Busch celebrates his win in the NASCAR Nationwide
Series race 0n Saturday in Bristol, Tenn.
N A S C A R
P R O G O L F
AP PHOTO
Justin Leonard blasts from the sand trap on the 15th hole dur-
ing the third round of the Tampa Bay Championship on Satur-
day in Palm Harbor, Fla.
Leonard in 3-way tie
for lead at Innisbrook
The Associated Press
PALM HARBOR, Fla. —
Justin Leonard walked toward
the 12th green Saturday at
Innisbrook and saw a score-
board that showed he was tied
for the lead in the Tampa Bay
Championship. He knocked in
his 8-foot birdie putt, assumed
he was ahead, and then never
looked at another board the rest
of the day.
He might do the same Sun-
day.
There’s no point in staring at
scores, not with so many names
separated by so few shots.
Besides, the Copperhead course
at Innisbrook is playing so dif-
ficult even in pleasant weather
that it’s best not to think about
anything except the next shot.
“It is hard,” Leonard said
after his 4-under 67 put him
in a three-way tie for the lead
with Kevin Streelman and
George Coetzee of South Africa.
“There’s not a whole lot of birdie
holes on those last six holes.
With the greens getting firmer
and faster as they did today —
which I’m sure they will again
tomorrow. You have to be pretty
patient out there and really pick
your spots pretty carefully.”
Adam Scott and K.J. Choi set
the tone early for this wild day
by going into full retreat.
That allowed for a game of
musical chairs at the top of
the leaderboard, with nothing
remotely close to being settled
going into the final day. Sixteen
players were separated by only
three shots at a tournament
where the winner has come
from behind to win in four of
the last five years.
Streelman finished his 6-un-
der 65 nearly three hours before
the last group walked off the
18th green.
“I wanted to get to 6 under
today,” Streelman said. “I had
that number in my mind to at
least have a chance going into
tomorrow, so I was happy to get
there.”
He had no idea at the time he
would all the way to the top of
the leaderboard.
Leonard ran off four birdies
in a five-hole stretch around the
turn and had the lead to himself
before a bogey from the bunker
on the 15th. Coetzee bounced
back from his lone bogey with a
birdie on the rowdy 17th hole,
where Hooters waitresses serve
wings in the grandstands. That
gave him a 68.
They were tied at 6-under
207, more evidence that the
Copperhead course is per-
haps the most complete test
in Florida. Even on a warm,
breezy afternoon, it was easier
to go backward that to move
away from the field.
Scott and Choi were proof of
that.
Scott had a two-putt birdie on
the opening hole to briefly take
the lead, and that was the high-
light of his day. He three-putted
from about 15 feet for bogey
on third, made bogey with a
wedge in his hand on the par-5
fifth hole and stumbled to a 76.
Choi, who also was one shot
out of the lead, didn’t make a
birdie in his round of 76.
They still were only five
shots out of the lead.
Shawn Stefani, the 31-year-
old rookie who led by one,
had a 74 and still was only two
shots behind. His day could
have been much worse except
for a tee shot that caromed off
a tree and into the fairway on
the second hole, and a big hook
on the third that hit the tire of
a golf cart and stayed in play.
Instead of hitting his third shot
from the tee, he could reach the
green for a two-putt par.
The group one shot out of
the lead included 2010 winner
Jim Furyk (67) and Ben Kohles
(69), the Virginia grad who last
summer went from college to
two straight wins on the Web.
com Tour to earn a spot in the
big leagues.
Defending champion Luke
Donald had a 67 and was only
two shots behind at 4-under
209, along with 19-year-old
Jordan Spieth of Texas, who is
coming off a runner-up finish in
Puerto Rico and can be set for
the year on the PGA Tour the
rest of the year depending on
how he plays Sunday.
He looks as if he’s good
enough to win.
The group at 3 under includ-
ed Harris English, in a tie for
the lead on the front nine until
he stumbled to a 73, and Sergio
Garcia, who never looked happy
and sounded even worse on his
way to a 72.
English is among 12 players
from the top 16 who are not yet
eligible for the Masters.
Ai Miyazato leads LPGA
Founders Cup
PHOENIX — Ai Miyazato
pulled back in front in the
LPGA Founders Cup on Satur-
day, making three birdies in a
four-hole stretch on the back
nine and saving par with a long
putt on the par-4 finishing hole.
The diminutive Japanese
star shot her second straight
5-under 67 after opening with a
tournament-record 64. At 19-un-
der 197, she had a two-stroke
lead over Stacy Lewis.
Miyazato was as graceful
and efficient as ever, making it
impossible to tell that she’s re-
turning from a whiplash injury
sustained three weeks ago in a
five-vehicle crash in Thailand.
Lewis birdied the last hole
for a 66 in cooler conditions on
the cactus-lined course. After
two days in the low-90s, it only
reached the mid-80s on Satur-
day at Desert Ridge’s Wildfire
layout.
The third-ranked Lewis, com-
ing off a victory two weeks ago
in Singapore, is in position to
take the top spot in the world
from Yani Tseng with a win
Sunday, as long as Tseng —
tied for 63rd at 2 under after a
72 — finishes third or worse.
T E N N I S
Del Potro
knocks off
Djokovic
By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer
INDIAN WELLS, Calif. —
Juan Martin del Potro defeated
top-ranked Novak Djokovic 4-6,
6-4, 6-4 in the semifinals of the
BNP Paribas Open on Saturday,
handing the Serb his first loss in
21 matches dating to last Octo-
ber.
Del Potro snapped his own
four-match skid against Djokov-
ic, who had beaten the Argen-
tine in eight of 10 meetings.
Del Potro’s 133-mph ace
closed out the nearly 3-hour
match in 96-degree heat. Del
Potro raised both arms in cel-
ebration.
At times, the unseasonable
heat seemed to have worn down
Del Potro, who draped a white
towel packed with ice around
his shoulders on changeovers,
his chest heaving from several
long rallies.
It was Djokovic’s first loss since
Oct. 31, when American Sam
Querrey beat him indoors at the
Paris Masters. The Serb had won
17 consecutive matches and two
titles, including the Australian
Open, to start the year.
Del Potro, the second Argen-
tine to reach the final here, will
play Rafael Nadal for the title on
Sunday.
No. 2 seed Maria Sharapova
and No. 8 Caroline Wozniacki
will play in the women’s final.
Nadal rallied to beat Tomas
Berdych 6-4, 7-5 and reach the
final.
Off to the best start of his ca-
reer, Nadal improved to 16-1 —
including 13 wins in a row — on
the year, having won two clay-
court titles and been runner-up
in another since returning from
a left knee injury that idled him
for seven months.
“It’s very, very difficult to
imagine something like this. But
here we are today, and very hap-
py about all what happened the
last month, especially last three
weeks,” said Nadal, who beat
No. 2 Roger Federer in straight
sets in the quarterfinals.
“I don’t have nothing to lose
after seven months.”
It was Nadal’s 12th straight
win over Berdych.
“He looks strong again,”
Berdych said of Nadal, whose
leg is taped just below his left
knee. “He still plays very aggres-
sive, and what he was missing in
his first matches when he come
back after the injury was maybe
a bit of confidence in his game,
but definitely not today and not
anymore.”
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 7C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
this win today,” Zeller said.
“We’ll learn from it, we’ll fig-
ure out what we did wrong.
We’ll make the corrections
and be ready for next week.”
Zeller and Oladipo each
made a couple of big plays
when Wisconsin tried to pull
away in the second half. Zeller
scored the first five points in
a 10-0 run that gave the Hoo-
siers a 41-40 lead with 13:27
remaining. Oladipo soared in
for a big offensive rebound
and made a pull-up jumper
during a quick six-point burst
that got Indiana within one
with 9:45 remaining.
The Badgers then ripped off
eight of the next 10 points to
open a 58-51 lead. Evans had
a layup, Brust went 1 for 2 at
the line, Jared Berggren made
a big 3-pointer and Dekker
dunked inside off a nice pass
from Jackson.
“Just biding my time, pick-
ing my spots,” Berggren said
of his only 3-point attempt in
a 4-for-4 performance from
the field.
BADGERS
Continued from Page 1C
in their boots. So I think, right
now, every week is a big week in
this sport.”
This week, nobody knows
what to expect at a track once
beloved for its action-packed
racing and drama it produced.
But a reconfigured racing
surface in 2007 altered Bristol
into two racing grooves, some-
times three, and drivers could
race side-by-side around the
tight bullring for the first time.
Without a need to forcefully use
the front bumper to navigate
through traffic, the drivers thor-
oughly enjoyed the new Bristol.
Fans absolutely hated it, and
the track that boasted 55 con-
secutive sellouts suddenly had
swaths of open seats.
Track owner Bruton Smith
had seen enough last March
and ordered grinding to the top
groove in an effort to tighten up
the track and recreate the old
Bristol racing. He got some of
that in August, and the drama,
too: Tony Stewart angrily threw
his helmet at Matt Kenseth af-
ter contact between the two
knocked Stewart out of the race.
CAR
Continued from Page 1C
He nearly got lost in the pre-
liminary round, and was out of
a medal spot until his very last
dive of the day before making
two improbable rallies to reach
the medal stand.
“You talk about a comeback!”
yelled retiring Valley West div-
ing coach Rob Jacobs.
It was one for the ages.
Using a triple-somersault pike
on his 10th dive and a crowd-
pleasing 1 1/2 somersault dou-
ble-twister on his final attempt,
Vest rolled up 103.7 during his
final two high school dives to
leapfrog three other competi-
tors and reach the state medal
stand.
His school mate, Spartans
sophomore Ed Zawatski,
couldn’t quite duplicate his
fifth-place medal performance
in Friday’s 50-yard freestyle. But
he did earn a top-10 state finish
in the 100-yard freestyle, taking
second place in the consolation
heat with a time of 46.16 sec-
onds.
“It feels pretty good,” Za-
watski said. “This whole week-
end, with preliminaries and all
the other races, there were ups
and downs. And I got to come
back (for night races). I received
two opportunities and I accom-
plished something with both
opportunities in the 50 and 100
freestyle.”
What Vest accomplished was
improbable and astounding.
Because initially, it didn’t
seem Vest would stand even a
slight chance to secure a state
medal.
After registering a total score
of just 130, Vest sat in 23rd place
- and needed to pass three other
divers to make the state’s top 20
who advanced to the semifinal
round.
“His first two dives are (usual-
ly) two of his best dives,” Valley
West diving coach Rob Jacobs
said. “They were fine, they were
just not phenomenal. They just
didn’t look polished.”
His fifth and final dive of the
first round did.
Vest aced an inward 2 1/2
somersault so flawlessly, it reg-
istered a rare 60 on the judges’
scorecards and staved off early
elimination.
He moved up 12 slots in the
standings to 11th place, with
190.95 points entering the semi-
finals.
“Coaches from all over were
complimenting him,” Jacobs
said.
Vest was just getting started.
He scored a 50.40 on his open-
ing dive of the semifinal round,
which moved him to 10th place
entering the three-dive finals.
Chances of medaling re-
mained bleak for him, though,
since Vest had to make up 15
points on a competitor to reach
eighth place with two dives re-
maining.
His 10th dive moved him
close.
He was the only diver at the
state meet to execute a triple-
somersault pike - landing feet-
first in the water - and it regis-
tered a 46.4 on the scorecards
and about a three on the rich-
ter scale, if rumbling from the
stands was any indication.
“Everybody got a thrill from
that one,” Jacobs said.
The biggest thrill was yet to
come.
Cheered on by fellow diver
and Valley West classmate Kari-
na Zabresky, Vest came through
in the clutch.
Sitting 10 points out of eighth
place, Vest used his patented 1
1/2 somersault double-twister
to finish his day, scoring a 57.2
to earn seventh place in the
state for the second consecutive
year.
“The twister, I’ve ended every
meet with since my freshman
year,” Vest said. “I feel like I did
it pretty well. I’m happy with
how I did it.”
“We’re just thrilled,” Jacobs
said. “What a way to end a ca-
reer.”
SWIMMING
Continued from Page 1C
Quarterback
12 Steven Bench 6-2 205 So./So.
5 Tyler Ferguson 6-3 199 So./So.
Tailback
28 Zach Zwinak 6-1 234 Sr./Jr.
1 Bill Belton 5-10 199 Jr./Jr.
22 Akeel Lynch 5-10 199 So./Fr.
Fullback
35 Pat Zerbe 6-1 241 5th/Sr.
Wide receiver
8 Allen Robinson 6-3 204 Jr./Jr.
85 Brandon Moseby-Felder 6-2 199 5th/Sr.
21 Trevor Williams 6-1 180 So./So.
7 Eugene Lewis 6-1 198 So./Fr.
15 Alex Kenney 6-0 190 Sr./Jr.
80 Matt Zanellato 6-3 193 Jr./So.
88 Jonathan Warner 6-1 196 So./Fr.
19 Richy Anderson 5-11 171 Fr./Fr.
Tight end
87 Kyle Carter 6-3 240 Jr./So.
18 Jesse James 6-7 258 So./So.
84 Matt Lehman 6-6 254 Sr./Sr.
11 Brent Wilkerson 6-3 239 So./Fr.
81 Adam Breneman 6-4 230 Fr./Fr.
Offensive tackle
76 Donovan Smith 6-5 327 Jr./So.
58 Adam Gress 6-6 321 5th/Sr.
77 Garry Gilliam 6-6 290 Sr./Jr.
56 Anthony Alosi 6-4 284 Jr./So.
Guard
64 John Urschel 6-3 300 5th/Sr.
66 Angelo Mangiro 6-3 299 Jr./So.
75 Eric Shrive 6-6 314 5th/Sr.
50 Anthony Stanko 6-4 306 So./Fr.
Center
65 Miles Dieffenbach 6-3 298 Sr./Jr.
60 Ty Howle 6-0 295 5th/Sr.
55 Wendy Laurent 6-2 268 So./Fr.
Defensive end
18 Deion Barnes 6-4 244 Jr./So.
98 Anthony Zettel 6-4 254 Jr./So.
86 C.J. Olaniyan 6-3 256 Sr./Jr.
31 Brad Bars 6-3 251 Sr./Jr.
94 Evan Schwan 6-6 238 So./Fr.
Defensive tackle
91 DaQuan Jones 6-3 333 Sr./Sr.
84 Kyle Baublitz 6-5 292 Sr./Jr.
70 Nate Cadogan 6-5 298 5th/Sr.
99 Austin Johnson 6-4 302 So./Fr.
72 Brian Gaia 6-3 279 So./Fr.
53 Derek Dowrey 6-3 309 So./Fr.
Linebacker
40 Glenn Carson 6-3 235 Sr./Sr.
43 Mike Hull 6-0 226 Sr./Jr.
5 Nyeem Wartman 6-1 236 So./Fr.
38 Ben Kline 6-2 224 Jr./So.
8 Gary Wooten 6-2 235 So./Fr.
Cornerback
4 Adrian Amos 6-0 209 Jr./Jr.
3 Da’Quan Davis 5-10 164 So./So.
39 Jesse Della Valle 6-1 194 Sr./Jr.
2 Jake Kiley 6-0 175 So./Fr.
24 Anthony Smith 6-0 184 Fr./Fr
12 Jordan Smith 5-11 178 Fr./Fr.
Safety
10 Malcolm Willis 5-11 215 5th/Sr.
7 Stephen Obeng-Agyapong 5-10 207 5th/Sr.
23 Ryan Keiser 6-1 209 Sr./Jr.
9 Jordan Lucas 6-0 185 So./So.
6 Malik Golden 6-1 186 So./Fr.
KICKER
97 Sam Ficken 6-2 172 Jr./Jr.
PUNTER
45 Alex Butterworth 5-10 204 Sr./Sr.
turn his opponent and get back
points. Instead, he got himself
in trouble on the last one as
Biscaha got two points for a
reversal with about 20 seconds
left in the period.
Still Krawchuk was in decent
shape holding the advantage
in riding time. He chose down
to start the third and was still
in good position in the match
if he got an escape or reversal.
But his moves didn’t work on
Biscaha, who won four matches
in two days helped by be being
strong on top. In the last 40 sec-
onds, Krawchuk was working
hard on getting a reversal. In the
last 10 seconds, he got close, but
came up short as time ran out.
In Saturday morning’s semi-
finals, Krawchuk advanced to
the finals pinning eighth-seeded
Cade Sarbacker in 4:58. Biscaha
moved to the finals with a 1-0
win over second-seeded Chris
Burdge from Centenary.
Krawchuk, who ends his sea-
son with a record of 29-4, was
trying to become the school’s
eleventh national champion and
first since Gene Ashley and Jim
Weisenfluh each won in 1975.
His performance marked the
fifth straight season that Wilkes
coach Jon Laudenslager has pro-
duced an All-American.
Berwick grad Aaron Karns, a
197-pounder, lost his semifinal
Saturday morning in sudden
victory to fall into the consola-
tion bracket. He still finished as
an All-American and concluded
his season with the Aggies with
a mark of 32-6.
NCAA
Continued from Page 1C
As far as handicapping this race, who bet-
ter to ask than the man who was involved
in more hours of quarterback debate than
he cares to remember.
“The best man will win,” McGloin said
Thursday. “Whatever guy goes home and
reads their playbook instead of watching
TV or playing video games is the guy that’s
going to come out on top.”
It was, after all, McGloin’s work ethic that
quickly won him the job last year, soundly
beating out Paul Jones and Rob Bolden.
O’Brien and the coaching staff hope that
the new crop of signal-callers has the same
level of dedication that McGloin showed by
working diligently with his receivers dur-
ing the offseason.
So far, so good.
“I dropped in on a couple of 7-on-7’s
(the players) organized,” McGloin said.
“They look good. It’s definitely going to be
a tough competition. And there’s another
guy (Hackenberg) coming in the summer,
so we’ll just wait and see.”
2. Which jobs are up for grabs?
Aside from quarterback, Penn State loses
seven other starters from 2012 — two on
the offensive line, two on the defensive line,
two at linebacker and one in the secondary.
Some spots have some clear favorites.
Mike Hull at outside linebacker. Adam
Gress at right tackle.
Without Matt Stankiewitch at center, the
Lions have some decisions to make on the
interior. Miles Dieffenbach, Ty Howle and
Angelo Mangiro are all candidates to start
at center. Any of the three could also end
up at left guard, where Dieffenbach started
last season.
Across the ball, Jordan Hill and Sean
Stanley are gone. Kyle Baublitz and Antho-
ny Zettel are second-teamers from a year
ago who have their shot to step up.
As O’Brien said Friday in an interview
with ESPN, Valley View product Nyeem
Wartman will work with Hull and Glenn
Carson at first-team linebacker this spring.
At cornerback, Da’Quan Davis saw plen-
ty of snaps as a freshman and is looking to
replace Stephon Morris.
3. Who will provide the leadership?
Just as important as filling holes in the
depth chart created by graduation is filling
the void left in the locker room.
Naturally it will be impossible for this
group to match the job done by the 2012 se-
nior class, which held the programtogether
while on the brink of collapse.
Even back in December, O’Brien
preached that the 2013 squad had to start
carving out its own identity. To accomplish
that, Penn State has the help of six return-
ing starters entering their senior season.
That would be John Urschel and Brandon
Moseby-Felder on offense and then Carson,
DaQuan Jones, Malcolm Willis and Ste-
phen Obeng-Agyapong on defense.
Other seniors with experience on the
field include Gress, Howle, Eric Shrive,
Matt Lehman and Nate Cadogan.
Also helping the cause is the group that
broke out in 2012 as underclassmen, return-
ing starters such as Allen Robinson, Adrian
Amos, Deion Barnes, Donovan Smith and
Kyle Carter.
4. How will the defense adapt to John
Butler?
For long-time starters such as Carson and
Jones, this will be the third straight year
they open with a new defensive coordina-
tor.
The Lions have gone from Tom Bradley
to Ted Roof and now John Butler, who was
promoted from secondary coach in January
after Roof left for a job at Georgia Tech, his
alma mater.
Butler said he doesn’t anticipate any ma-
jor overhauls of last season’s system or ter-
minology, so this transition shouldn’t be as
tough for the players.
5. Will the roster stay intact?
Penn State looks to be mostly in the clear
as far as transfers go. Since the season end-
ed, the Lions have lost just two scholarship
players who had eligibility remaining in
running back Curtis Dukes and linebacker
Brennan Franklin.
O’Brien was confident this winter that
the group he has will stick it out. Penn
State players still have until preseason
camp opens in August to transfer without
penalty.
The biggest hurdle remaining could be
at the end of the spring. Players who finish
the session further down the depth chart
than they would like will have a chance to
find a new team to play for in the fall.
LIONS
Continued from Page 1C
P e N N S TAT e S P R I N g R O S T e R
Boris Valabik made it 2-0 on
the next shift when his floating
shot from just inside the blue
line found its way past Zatkoff.
The Penguins actually had a
chance to take over the game in
the second period but failed to
capitalize despite playing more
than half of the period with the
man advantage.
Brian Dumoulin delivered the
lone strike when he finished off
a tic-tack-toe passing play with
a quick shot high to the blocker
side. The goal, scored during a
two-man advantage with just
over seven minutes left in the
period, got the Penguins to
within one, trailing 2-1.
Power-play time continued for
the Penguins when Maxim Gon-
charov was whistled for a board-
ing major and a game miscon-
duct on a hit on Brian Gibbons.
The Penguins managed only
two shots during the extended
man advantage and the period
ended with the Pirates leading
2-1.
“I think the fact that we
scored the goal on the five-on-
three really helped mentally,”
said Hynes. “I think if you go
that long on the power play and
you don’t score it’s a detriment.
Even though we didn’t score on
the five-minute major we still
had scored. I thought I brought
positive energy.”
The Penguins finished the pe-
riod 1 for 4 with the extra skater
in the second and 1 for 6 in the
game.
NOTES: - D Cody Wild, RW
Chris Minella, C Phil Dupuis,
RW Steve Macintyre were
scratched for the Penguins.
Penguins 3, Portland 2
Penguins 0 1 2 - 3
Portland 2 0 0 - 0
First Period: Scoring – 1. POR, Miele 13
(Werek) 3:24; 2. POR, Valabik 2 (unassisted)
3:54. Penalties – POR, Gormley (interference)
7:17; WBS, Grant (fghting) 15:23; POR, Dzi-
urzynski (fghting) 15:23.
Second Period: Scoring – 3. Penguins,
Dumoulin 5 (Reese, Smith) 12:36 power play.
Penalties – POR, Goncharov (tripping) 8:34;
POR, Brodeur (playing with a broken stick)
11:09; POR, Louis (high sticking) 11:38; POR,
Goncharov (boarding major, game miscon-
duct) 13:22; WBS, Peters (interference) 18:50.
Third Period: Scoring – 4. Penguins,
Mormina 3 (Collins, Gibbons) 1:13; 5. Pen-
guins, Smith (Morrow, Holzapfel) 10:23.
Penalties – POR, Valabik (roughing) 11:38;
Penguins, Mormina (elbowing) 16:49.
Shots on goal: Penguins 10-7-10-27;
Portland 10-6-7-23
Power-play Opportunities: Penguins 1-6;
Portland 0-2.
Goaltenders: Penguins – Jeff Zatkoff 10-
6-7-23 (23 shots - 21 saves); Chad Johnson
10-7-10-27 (27 shots -24 saves)
Starters: Penguins – G Jeff Zatkoff, D
Dylan Reese, D Brian Dumoulin, LW Chad
Kolarik, C Trevor Smith, RW Riley Holzapfel.
Portland – G Chad Johnson, D David Rund-
blad, D Mathieu Brodeur, LW Nick Johnson, C
Andy Miele, RW Jordan Szwarz.
Three Stars: 1. Brian Dumoulin (one goal);
2. Andy Miele (one goal); 3. Trevor Smith
(game winning goal)
Referee: Jamie Koharski. Linesmen: Joe
Andrews, Landon Bathe.
Attendance: 6,301
PENS
Continued from Page 1C
The King’s College women’s
lacrosse team defeated host
Cazenovia College 21-11 on
Saturday led by six points from
Emily Foley.
Foley finished with five goals
and one assist while Krystina
Villarreal had five points on five
goals. Mariah Masciarelli also
tallied five points on four goals
and one assist while Chelsea
Manes registered five points
on a goal and a team-high four
assists.
Catherine McMahon and
Alexandra Barbara chipped
in with two goals apiece and
keeper Alisa Marino made three
saves for the Lady Monarchs.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MAC All-Star game tonight
Fourteen local basketball
players will suit up for one
final time this afternoon in the
inaugural MAC Senior All-Star
game being held at Albright
College.
The games pit the Freedom
Conference seniors against the
Commonwealth Conference
with the women’s game tipping
off at 2:30 p.m. followed by the
men’s contest at 4:30.
Katlin Michaels, Celia Rader,
Lindsay Atchinson, Molly Dahl
and Kyley Henry represent the
King’s women, while King’s
men’s team will be represented
by seniors Matt Fiorino and Ian
Oakley. King’s women’s coach
Brian Donoghue will be assis-
tant for the Freedom women’s
team.
Wilkes’ women team have
three all-stars in Megan Ka-
zmerski, Amanda Pawlowski
and Jana Martin. Misericordia’s
Tyann McDaniel round out the
local women competing.
On the men’s side, Wilkes’
Tyler Breznitsky and Cliff Rich-
ardson, and Misericordia’s Sean
Bieski and Justin Grotevant will
play in the game.
King’s women pick up win
The Times Leader staff
L O C A L C O L L e g e S N B A
AP PHOTO
The Charlotte Bobcats’ Kemba Walker (15) shoots over
Boston Celtics’ Brandon Bass in the first quarter of an NBA
game in Boston on Saturday. At press time, the game was
still in progress.
Webster scores 34;
Wizards beat Suns
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Martell
Webster scored a career-high
34 points and became the
Washington Wizards’ first
30-point scorer this season
in a 127-105 victory over the
Phoenix Suns on Saturday
night.
John Wall added 17 points
and 11 assists as Washing-
ton won its fourth straight at
home and third straight over-
all while setting its season
high in scoring.
Emeka Okafor added 17
points and 10 rebounds as
Washington snapped a 10-
game losing streak to Phoe-
nix, dating to 2006.
Michael Beasley scored
21 points and Goran Dragic
added 12 points and 11 assists
as the Suns lost their fourth
straight and their sixth of
eight in March.
Phoenix now owns the
worst record in the Western
Conference, a half-game be-
hind idle New Orleans.
Webster matched a career
high with seven 3-pointers, his
last coming on the left wing
just moments into the fourth
quarter to make it 105-84.
Webster shrugged toward his
bench after the basket, then
followed with a reverse dunk
to push it to 109-86.
Webster has hit four or
more 3-pointers in the last five
games, a Wizards franchise
record, while shooting 55 per-
cent (26 of 47). Wall, mean-
while, has had nine or more
assists in his last four games,
and followed a 12-for-15 effort
in Friday’s win over New Or-
leans with an efficient 8-of-11
shooting night Saturday.
“We felt as though
we were playing well
but we kind of got
stung there by the
two goals quick.”
John Hynes
Penguins head coach
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 8C SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 B A S E B A L L
AP PHOTO
Team USA’s Shane Victorino
reacts after striking out in
the ninth inning of the World
Baseball Classic second round
elimination game between
Puerto Rico and the United
States at Marlins Park in
Miami on Friday. Puerto Rico
defeated the U.S. 4-3.
Team USA
ousted from
WBC by a
journeyman
TAMPA, Fla. — Ryan Braun
and Ryan Vogelsong are out,
Team USA is ruined.
Either that, or a much simpler
reason a club loaded with big
league All-Stars got jettisoned in
the World Baseball Classic: For
one night, a pitcher who is the
very definition of a journeyman
became the best pitcher in the
universe.
“As an American, I wanted
them to win. It’s surprising,”
Cincinnati outfielder Jay Bruce
said. “They had a great teamout
there, but that’s baseball.”
A day after Joe Mauer, Bran-
don Phillips and this latest U.S.
team again failed to reach the
championship game, there was
plenty of talk around the sport
about what Friday night’s 4-3
loss to Puerto Rico meant.
Some wondered whether the
United States should put togeth-
er an even more packed roster
next time. Others say the U.S.
has lost its hold on the game it
invented. Many suggest the for-
mat of the tournament needs to
be tweaked.
“It was a bit of an upset,”
said Milwaukee infielder Taylor
Green, who played for Canada
in the WBC. “Both teams were
good. But with one game in
baseball, you just never know.
It might have been different if it
had been in the regular season.”
Whatever, there was only
one thing for sure — Nelson
Figueroa, who was born in
Brooklyn and has pitched all
over the globe, threw a fastball
that never topped 88 mph and
still put his teaminto the semifi-
nals while eliminating manager
Joe Torre’s side.
Defeated by the Dominican
Republic and Puerto Rico in
Miami, the U.S. team watched
those two clubs advance to the
finals. They’ll join two-time
champion Japan, which doesn’t
have a single major leaguer on
its roster, and a surprising squad
from the Netherlands starting
Sunday in San Francisco.
For Team USA, it was a semi-
familiar result — the club didn’t
reach the semifinals for the ini-
tial WBC in 2006, then lost to
Japan in the 2009 semis.
Nationals pitcher Ross De-
twiler was back at spring camp
Saturday.
“It was kind of cool getting
my first-ever save, but it wasn’t
enough to get to the champion-
ship round and that was the ulti-
mate goal,” he said.
Vogelsong, the winning pitch-
er in Game 3 of the World Series
last October, dismissed talk that
his U.S. teammates treat these
matchups merely as an exten-
sion of spring training.
“These games are intense.
They mean a lot. There’s a lot of
pride at stake. Being in the post-
season and being here is very
similar.”
Plus, the U.S. team had beat-
en Puerto Rico 7-1 three days
earlier behind Gio Gonzalez.
It piques some fans that many
top names were not on the ros-
ter. Justin Verlander, David
Price and Jered Weaver were
among the best pitchers absent,
while Mike Trout, Buster Posey
and Josh Hamilton weren’t in
the lineup.
By BEN WALKER
AP Baseball Writer
Boesch hitless in Yanks’ debut, a loss to Phils
The Associated Press
TAMPA, Fla. — The New York Yan-
kees are hoping Brennan Boesch makes
the most of a big opportunity.
Boesch made his Yankees’ debut,
starting in right field and going 0 for 3
Saturday as a New York split squad lost
7-0 to the Philadelphia Phillies.
New York agreed to a one-year con-
tract with Boesch on Friday.
“Unique circumstance where we can
get a player who’s played in the big
leagues the last number of years,” Yan-
kees general manager Brian Cashman
said. “Comes in here and gets a chance
to compete.”
The Yankees will be without outfield-
er Curtis Granderson until at least May
due to a broken right forearm.
The 27-year old Boesch hit .240 with
12 home runs and 54 RBIs in 132 games
with Detroit last season. Boesch, who
hit a pair of grounders and struck out
Saturday, was released by the Tigers on
Wednesday,
“They did me a favor, and it goes with-
out saying that I’m thankful for them
to have done that,” Boesch said of the
Tigers. “I’ve been in Detroit since 2006,
and it’s all I know. But sometimes it
comes to an end. I just couldn’t be more
excited. What a great organization to be
in your second go around.”
Boesch has recovered from an oblique
injury that impacted him earlier in
spring training.
He receives $377,049 from the Tigers
in termination pay rather than his $2.3
million salary and got a $1.5 million,
one-year deal fromthe Yankees, of which
$500,000 is guaranteed. Boesch can earn
an additional $600,000 in performance
bonuses: $50,000 each for 100 and 150
plate appearances, $100,000 apiece for
200 and 250, and $150,000 each for 300
and 350.
Domonic Brown hit his fourth spring
training homer, a three-drive in a four-
run fourth against Hiroki Kuroda, who
allowed four runs — two earned — and
six hits in six innings.
Philadelphia opening-day starter Cole
Hamels didn’t make the trip and instead
pitched in a minor league intrasquad
game, where he gave up four earned
runs and six hits over five innings dur-
ing an 84-pitch outing.
Phillies left-hander Raul Valdes, com-
peting for a bullpen spot, gave up three
hits over three scoreless innings.
Philadelphia right-hander Roy Halla-
day is scheduled to start Sunday’s game
against Baltimore. The two-time Cy
Young Award winner struggled in last
outing, giving up seven runs in 2 2-3 in-
nings against Detroit on Tuesday.
Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter played
in the field on consecutive days for the
first time since ankle surgery last year.
He doubled in two at-bats.
“I think I’m going to be concerned for
a while just because of what he went
through,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi
said.
New York closer Mariano Rivera,
coming back after knee surgery last
year, struggled with his control during
his third appearance, throwing 8 of 17
pitches for strikes. He walked Steven
Lerud, induced a double-play grounder
from Ben Revere and struck out Michael
Young looking on 3-2 pitch during a
scoreless seventh.
“I’ve got a ton of at-bats against Mari-
ano, and have respect for the man, but
it’s a full count, and the crowd is going
crazy, I took one step out (toward first)
and I’m like, who am I kidding, he’s ring-
ing me up,” Young said with a smile. “I
thought it was down, but too close to
take.”
Philadelphia acquired Young, a 12-
year veteran, in December from Texas.
A career .301 hitter, Young spent the last
two seasons moving among four infield
spots and designated hitter with the
Rangers. He is feeling comfortable play-
ing third base this year.
“I have a good idea of the third base
that I’m capable of playing,” Young said.
“So, everything so far so good. We’ve put
in a lot of good work and I expect to be
putting in more. Preparation is the key
to anything.”
Chad Durbin gave up two hits in three
shutout innings for the Phillies. Lerud
had a two-run homer off Shawn Kelley
in the ninth.
AP PHOTO
The New York Yankees’ Brennan Boesch bats in a spring training game against
the Philadelphia Phillies at Steinbrenner Field in Tampa, Fla., on Saturday.
Mets’ Turner
sprains ankle
NotebooK
The Associated Press
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. —
Justin Turner, the leading
candidate to replace injured
David Wright at third base for
the Mets, left New York’s game
against the Miami Marlins on
Saturday after spraining his
right ankle.
The Mets said Turner was
taken to a hospital for precau-
tionary X-rays.
Turner made a nice play on
a hard-hit grounder by Justin
Ruggiano, and his left leg buck-
led and his right foot turned
awkwardly when he tried to
throw to first. Turner was limp-
ing badly and was replaced by
Brandon Hicks.
“I think just getting up, going
to make the throw, I caught
my front spike on the lip of the
grass and then in order to try to
catch my balance, all my weight
went on my right foot and I
turned it over,” Turner said. “I
don’t think it’s too bad, though.
I was able to walk off on my
own, and it’s not too swollen so,
hopefully, as long as it doesn’t
blow up overnight and get too
bad, it will just be a couple
days.”
Turner said he has sprained
both ankles several times.
“That’s one reason I don’t feel
like this one’s too bad because
I’ve had some pretty bad ones,”
he said.
Wright has a left intercostal
muscle strain and is expected to
rest for up to four days before
he is reevaluated.
Hamels excited about
opening-day start
CLEARWATER, Fla. — Cole
Hamels says it’s an “honor” to
start on opening day and he’ll
“cherish” his first assignment
when the Philadelphia Phillies
begin the season at Atlanta.
Hamels already has a World
Series ring, a pair of postseason
MVP trophies and a lucrative
contract. He’s gone from ace of
a championship team to being
the No. 4 starter in a star-filled
rotation and now back to No. 1.
Even before Roy Halladay and
Cliff Lee joined the Phillies,
Brett Myers got the nod over
Hamels for opening day. Now
it’s finally Hamels’ chance.
”It’s something I will cher-
ish,” he says. “It’s something I’ll
be able to remember for a really
long time. At the same time, it’s
going to be a great season.”
Hamels is coming off his
best all-around season. He set
career-highs in wins (17) and
strikeouts (216), compiled a
3.05 ERA and made his third
All-Star team.
Home plate
umpire Tim
Timmons
(95) watch-
es as the
Minnesota
Twins’ Wilkin
Ramirez (22)
slides into
home to score
on a single
by Brandon
Boggs as
Pittsburgh
Pirates
catcher Car-
los Paulino
jumps for a
high throw
in from the
outfield in the
eighth inning
of an exhibi-
tion game in
Fort My-
ers, Fla., on
Saturday. The
Twins won
2-1.
AP PHOTO
Cole strong in outing, but Pirates fall
The Associated Press
FORT MYERS, Fla. — Top
prospect Gerrit Cole allowed
one run and five hits in four
innings Saturday in the Pitts-
burgh Pirates’ 2-1 loss to the
Minnesota Twins.
Cole, the top pick in the
2011 amateur draft, struck out
four and walked none. He has
a 3.60 ERA this spring training
in three appearances over 10
innings.
Twins starter Cole De
Vries, trying to earn a spot in
Minnesota’s rotation, gave up
one run and three hits in four
innings.
Gaby Sanchez hit a sacri-
fice fly in the first, but Josh
Willingham’s RBI grounder
tied the score in the bottom
half. Brandon Boggs, a non-
roster invitee to Twins camp,
hit a go-ahead single off Kris
Johnson with two outs in the
eighth.
Twins centerfield prospect
Aaron Hicks led off the game
with a single, stole second
and scored on Willingham’s
grounder. Hicks is batting .333
(15 for 45).
Tigers 3, Cardinals 0
JUPITER, Fla. — Shawn
Hill allowed one hit in four in-
nings, and Matt Tuiasosopo hit
a long homer to lead Detroit.
Red Sox 9, Rays 2
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla.
— Alfredo Aceves hit Tampa
Bay’s Sean Rodriguez with a
pitch and the two had a heated
exchange that nearly escalated
into a fight in the fifth inning
of Boston’s victory.
Rodriguez hit his third
home run of spring training off
Aceves in the third inning after
Desmond Jennings reached on
a bunt single. With one out in
the fifth things turned nasty.
After being hit by Aceves,
Rodriguez had to be restrained
near first base.
Marlins 4, Mets 2
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. —
Placido Polanco was 2 for 3
with a double in his return
from an oblique strain that had
sidelined him since March 1 as
Miami beat the Mets.
Chris Coghlan was 2 for 4,
including a RBI triple in the
fourth off Shaun Marcum. Mar-
lins prospect Christian Yelich
added an opposite-field home
run to left in the eighth against
Jeurys Familia.
Orioles 3, Blue Jays 1
DUNEDIN, Fla. — Jake
Arrieta worked into the fifth
inning without allowing a run
as he tries to win the No. 5
spot in the Orioles’ rotation,
leading Baltimore to the win.
In his last two outings, Ar-
rieta has pitched five score-
less innings in 9 2-3 innings.
Arrieta struck out two and
walked three in 4 2-3 innings.
Rockies 5, Reds 1
GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Todd
Helton hit his first home run
of the spring, a two-run shot
off Johnny Cueto, to lead the
Colorado Rockies to a win
over the Cincinnati Reds.
The 39-year old Helton had
one hit in his first seven at-bats
this spring before connecting
for a two-run shot.
Cubs (ss) 8, Royals 3
MESA, Ariz. — Alfonso
Soriano connected for one
of three first-inning homer
against Bruce Chen and a
Chicago Cubs split squad beat
the Kansas City Royals.
David DeJesus led off the
game with a homer to right
field. Then after Brent Lil-
libridge doubled and Anthony
Rizzo struck out, Soriano hit
his second of spring training.
The 20-year-old Javier Baez
followed with another long
ball and also hit one in the
fifth inning off Chen.
Cubs (ss) 5, Rangers 1
LAS VEGAS — Jeff Sa-
mardzija scattered three hits
over five scoreless innings for
a Chicago Cubs split squad
in a victory over the Texas
Rangers.
Mariners 5, Rockies 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. —
Kendrys Morales hit his third
home run of spring training
and Erasmo Ramirez tossed
six strong innings as the
Seattle Mariners beat the Colo-
rado Rockies.
Reds (ss) 9, Brewers 9
PHOENIX — Joey Votto and
Ryan Hanigan homered for
Cincinnati and minor leaguer
Khris Davis connected twice
for Milwaukee, and a Reds
split squad and the Brewers
tied 9-9 in nine innings.
Reds starter Mike Leake
allowed 10 hits and seven
runs — five earned — in 3 1-3
innings of his third start.
Athletics (ss) 13, Angels 13
PHOENIX — Josh Reddick
hit a three-run homer off Jered
Weaver in the first inning,
Luke Montz and Yoenis Ces-
pedes each had two-run drives
in the second off the Angels’
ace and an Oakland Athletics
split squad blew a big lead
before rallying for a tie with
Los Angeles.
Padres 10,
Diamondbacks 6
PEORIA, Ariz. — Diamond-
backs ace Ian Kenndey gave up
consecutive homers then was
hit on knee by a comebacker
on next pitch, and Arizona lost
to the San Diego Padres.
Braves 4, Yankees (ss) 0
KISSIMMEE, Fla. — Paul
Maholm pitched two-hit
ball for six innings and Juan
Francisco homered to lead the
Atlanta Braves to a 4-0 victory
over a New York Yankees split-
squad on Saturday.
Maholm, who struck out
four and walked one, has not
allowed a run over 14 2-3 in-
nings in his past three spring
starts.
Francisco’s two-run drive
in the fifth inning off David
Phelps was his fourth homer of
the spring, and the third base-
man also had a single.
Phelps, who is compet-
ing for a spot in the Yankees
rotation, had a 0.64 ERA in
his previous four starts, but
he allowed seven hits and four
runs in five innings. He struck
out six and walked one.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAge 9C TIMeS LeADeR www.timesleader.com W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
At PLAY
Free throw tournament held
The Knights Of Columbus Pittston Council No. 372
recently held its annual basketball free throw contest at
St. Joseph’s Oblates in Laflin. The contest was open to
all area boys and girls age 10 -14 and winners advanced
to regionals held in Bethlehem. Pictured are contestants.
First row, from left: Jacob Black, champion; James Marsh;
Abigail Gaffney, champion; Brianna Mac Rae, champion;
Theresa Cebula. Second row: Jordan Black, champion;
Griffin Gilroy, champion; Alexis Walsh, champion; and Mat-
thew Marsh.
Yellow Jackets win league
The Yellow Jackets sixth grade boys team recently won
the Wyoming Valley Catholic Youth Center Winter Basket-
ball League with a win over the Hurricanes. The Yellow
Jackets finished the season with an 8-2 record. Pictured
are team members. First row, from left: Frankie Desiderio,
Cole Dewees, Jacob Rokosz, Mick Kabalka. Second row:
Joshua Pandya, Joseph Brennan, Steve Cook, coach; Col-
lin Cook, Chris Banas.
Slovak Club recognized
The North Wilkes-Barre Little League recently thanked
the North End Slovak Citizens Club for their support of
Little League baseball. Pictured are, left to right: Michael
Evans, chairman of governors; Edward Plaksa, recording
secretary; Rich Gdovin, North Wilkes-Barre Little League;
Andrew ‘Butch’ Hvozdovic, club president; Robert Pal-
chanis, board of governors; and George Fristic, financial
secretary.
Berwick team, cheerleaders fight cancer
The Berwick boys varsity basketball team and cheerleaders teamed up to help fight
cancer prior to a home game versus Crestwood. All proceeds raised were given to
Northeast Pennsylvania Coaches versus Cancer Foundation. Pictured are the cheerlead-
ers and players. First row, from left: Krystan Mackert, Kaitlin O’Reilly, Kristin O’Reilly,
Rachel Farrell, Kiersten Shultz, Antonia Brennan, Vanessa Bannon, Courtney Lylo, Kara
Elmes. Second row: Mason Kingery, Kylie Ridall, Rachael Welliver, William Updegrove,
Alison Morey, Gabriella Cicerchia, Alysha Stoker, Kaylee Kachurka, Allison Wyda. Third
row: C.J. Curry, William Morales, Brian Bridge, Brennan Morell, Brittany Fisher. Second
row: Joshua Edwards, Matthew Dalo, Eric May, Jeremy Clausen and Zachary Ladonis.
Wyoming Area wins crown
Wyoming Area’s eighth grade girls basketball team recently won the A Division cham-
pionship. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Lydia Edwards, Sarah Holweg,
Lexi Crossley, Caitlin Butchko, Ariana Pamias. Second row: Sarah Shymanski, Tahira Ses-
soms, referee Bill Monaghan, coach Kristina Williams, Kim Ferrara, Gina Zehner, Megan
Pitcavage, Katie Wolfgang and JoJo Fink.
Mountain Top wins title
The sixth grade girls basketball team from Mountain Top
recently won the Wyoming Valley CYC league champion-
ship. Pictured are team members. First row, from left:
Riley Magin, Sarah Richards, Haley Naperkowski, Evie
Williams. Second row: Coach Pat Magin, Isabella Termini,
Hannah Wiegopolski, Halle Kehl, Kaitlyn Whetstone, Mag-
gie Murphy and coach Tim Williams.
Sailors win title
The Swoyersville Sailors
won the Wyoming Valley
West Youth Football ‘D’
team championship. The
team was coach by David
Wildey. Assistant coaches
were Richard Zekus, Jeff
Zdancewicz and Ray
Chimock. Pictured are
team members. First row,
from left: Tristan Libby,
Raymond Chimock, Cole
Wallace, Brandon Longfoot,
Matthias Ryder, Carson
Brown, Tyler Lavergne,
Carter Isbel. Second row:
David Longfoot, Lucas
Zdancewicz, Matthew Ze-
kus, Joshua Wesneski, Cole
Huspodar, Logan Wildey
and Paul Dierolf.
Wyoming Valley Soccer wins U9 tourney
The Wyoming Valley Soccer
boys recently won first place in
a U9 soccer tournament hosted
by Hubert Herrera at the River-
front Sports Complex in Scran-
ton. Pictured are team mem-
bers. First row, from left: Evan
Corcoran, Marcelo Rodriguez,
Ian Ratchford, Jackson Turner.
Second row: Thomas Iskra,
Ryan Stevens, J.D. Greeley and
Owen Rowlands. Absent from
photo: Ashton Fitzsimmons.
Valley West names MVPs
Wyoming Valley West recently named MVPs for the
school’s football team. Pictured from left: Tony Le , defen-
sive MVP; Brett Good, team MVP; Derrick Simms, offen-
sive MVP.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y
The Times Leader will accept
photos, standings and stories
from readers about youth and
adult recreation activities. We’re
also encouraging anyone in a
league – darts, pool, Frisbee, etc.
– to submit standings and results
to us. E-mailed photos should be
sent in a jpeg format. Those that
are not in a jpeg format might
not be published. All submit-
ted items should have contact
information as well to ensure
publication.
Items will not be accepted
over the telephone. They
may be e-mailed to tlsports@
timesleader.com with “At Play”
in the subject, faxed to 831-7319,
dropped off at the Times Leader
or mailed to Times Leader, c/o
Sports, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711-0250.
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 10C SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 N H L
Penguins beat Rangers for 8th straight win
PITTSBURGH — Marc-
Andre Fleury couldn’t help it.
With the Pittsburgh Penguins’
franchise record for career
shutouts in sight late in the
third period against the New
York Rangers on Saturday, the
talented if occasionally erratic
goalie let his mind drift.
“I wanted it so bad,” Fleury
said. “I tried to not jinx it. I was
touching wood, but yeah I was
looking forward to getting it
finally.”
The reeling Rangers offered
little resistance.
Fleury stopped 23 shots for
his 23rd shutout — one more
than Tom Barrasso — and the
Penguins beat New York 3-0 for
their eighth straight victory.
Beau Bennett, Pascal Dupuis
and Tyler Kennedy scored, and
Dustin Jeffrey added two as-
sists as the Penguins continued
to dominate the series.
Pittsburgh has won seven
consecutive meetings with New
York, which lost for the fourth
time in its last five games.
Henrik Lundqvist made 24
saves for the Rangers, but New
York failed to score for the third
time this season. The Rangers,
the best team in the Eastern
Conference last spring, trail
Pittsburgh by 14 points with six
weeks left in the regular season
and currently find themselves
on the outside of the playoff
picture looking in.
“It’s gut check time pretty
much,” New York defenseman
Dan Girardi said. “We’ve got to
figure out what’s going on here
and play with some serious
desperation. We’re falling in the
standings here.”
The Penguins continued to
head in the opposite direction.
Pittsburgh is in firm control of
the Atlantic Division and in a
race with Boston and Montreal
for the conference’s best record
thanks in part to a suddenly
responsible defense.
Bruins 4, Capitals 1
BOSTON — Nathan Horton
had a goal and two assists,
Milan Lucic set up Boston’s
first two scores on hustle plays
behind the net and the Bruins
beat the Washington Capitals.
David Krejci added a goal
and two assists, Rich Peverley
had a power-play goal and
Andrew Ference scored his first
of the season on the eve of his
34th birthday for the Bruins,
who avenged a frustrating loss
against the Capitals earlier this
month. Bruins backup goalten-
der Anton Khudobin made 32
saves, and Lucic had a career-
high three assists.
Marcus Johansson was
credited with Washington’s goal
when the puck caromed into
the net off Bruins defenseman
Johnny Boychuk.
It was the Capitals’ fourth
loss in five games.
Wild 6, Avalanche 4
DENVER — Devin Setoguchi
scored twice and added the
100th assist of his NHL career
to help the Minnesota Wild
hold off the slumping Colorado
Avalanche 6-4 in a Saturday
matinee.
Ryan Suter started a four-goal
scoring spree in the first period
to help the Wild win for the
fourth time in five games. Cal
Clutterbuck, Kyle Brodziak and
Pierre-Marc Bouchard added
goals.
This was the second half of
a home-and-home between the
two teams, with Minnesota
winning 5-3 on Thursday night.
Senators 4, Sabres 3
BUFFALO, N.Y. — Kyle
Turris scored his second goal
3:54 into overtime to give the
Ottawa Senators a victory over
the slumping Buffalo Sabres.
Patrick Wiercioch had a goal
and assist, and Chris Phillips
also scored for Ottawa, which
won for only the second time
in eight games (2-2-4). Tur-
ris added an assist, and Ben
Bishop made 31 saves in his
first start in four games.
The Senators also extended
their string of games decided
by one goal to 11, which is one
short of matching the NHL re-
cord set by Chicago during the
1997-98 season. Drew Stafford
scored twice, and Mike Weber
also scored for Buffalo, 1-2-3 in
its past six games.
Turris’ goal came on the pow-
er play, after Christian Ehrhoff
was penalized for interference.
Daniel Alfredsson got the
puck at the top of the left circle
and faked a shot before sending
it low to Turris. Turris one-
timed it from a tough angle,
and roofed the shot over goalie
Ryan Miller’s shoulder.
Jets 5, Maple Leafs 4
TORONTO — Zach Bogo-
sian scored in the 10th round of
the shootout to give the Winni-
peg Jets a win over the Toronto
Maple Leafs.
Bogosian beat James Reimer,
who replaced starter Ben Scriv-
ens to start the third period, for
Winnipeg’s second goal of the
shootout after Blake Wheeler
scored to open the shootout.
Tyler Bozak had the lone
shootout goal for Toronto.
Wheeler had two goals in
regulation, James Wright and
Antti Miettinen also scored
for Winnipeg, which earned
its fifth win in six games and
moved into first place in the
Southeast Division.
Winnipeg also clinched the
season series 2-1 after beat-
ing Toronto 5-2 at home on
Tuesday.
Blue Jackets 1, Coyotes 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Sergei
Bobrovsky made 39 saves in
regulation and overtime, then
two more in the shootout to
finish with his second career
shutout — both coming in
the last week — to lift surging
Columbus to a 1-0 victory over
the Phoenix Coyotes on Satur-
day night, extending the Blue
Jackets’ franchise record point
streak to 10 games.
Artem Anisimov and Mark
Letestu scored in the shoot-
out, making nice moves then
firing shots past Mike Smith,
who made 23 saves and also
got credit for a shutout, his
fourth of the season and 23rd
of his career. It was the fourth
straight shootout game for the
Blue Jackets.
Lightning 4, Hurricanes 1
TAMPA, Fla. — Tyler
Johnson and Ondrej Palat both
scored their first NHL goals,
and the Tampa Bay Lightning
beat the Carolina Hurricanes.
Nate Thompson and Teddy
Purcell also scored for the
Lightning, who stopped a five-
game losing streak at home.
Tampa Bay is 3-8 in its last 11
games.
Eric Staal scored the only
goal for the Hurricanes, who
dropped to 3-7 against fellow
Southeast Division games.
Canadiens 2, Devils 1
NEWARK, N.J. — Big
defenseman Jarred Tinordi, in
his NHL debut, set up Tomas
Plekanec’s tiebreaking goal in
the third period, and the Mon-
treal Canadiens extended their
winning streak to five games
with a victory over the New
Jersey Devils.
Plekanec deflected a shot by
the 6-foot-6 son of former NHL
defenseman Mark Tinordi past
Johan Hedberg at 6:49 after the
goalie made an ill-advised clear-
ing attempt from behind his
net. Tinordi got the puck above
the left circle and let it fly.
Islanders 4, Panthers 3
SUNRISE, Fla. — Casey
Cizikas broke a third-period
tie, and the New York Islanders
held on to beat the Florida Pan-
thers after blowing a three-goal
lead in the final frame.
Cizikas took a pass from
Colin McDonald from behind
the net and got it past goalie
Scott Clemmensen from the left
of the crease at 12:55.
Kyle Okposo, Radek Mar-
tinek and Brad Boyes also
scored, and Evgeni Nabokov
stopped 27 shots for the Island-
ers (13-12-3), who are 5-1-1 in
March. New York also jumped
ahead of the rival New York
Rangers into ninth place in the
Eastern Conference.
AP PHOTO
The Pittsburgh Penguins’ Pascal Dupuis (9) scores on New York Rangers goaltender Henrik Lun-
dqvist in the third period of their NHL game on Saturday in Pittsburgh. The Penguins won 3-0.
The Associated Press
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public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice
public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice
American teen tops
Maze for slalom title
By GRAHAMDUNBAR
AP Sports Writer
LENZERHEIDE, Switzerland
— Mikaela Shiffrin delivered an
astonishing second run to over-
take Tina Maze and clinch the
World Cup slalom title with an
improbable come-from behind
victory Saturday.
The American teenager
trailed Maze by a massive 1.17
seconds after the first leg, and
needed to finish ahead of the
Slovenian to win the slalom
crystal globe in her first full sea-
son on the circuit.
Shiffrin, who was fourth in the
morning, had a tentative start to
the second run but blazed down
the bottompart of course for the
fastest time of the afternoon.
When first-run leader Maze
crossed the line in third, Shiffrin
put her hands to her face and
sank to her knees in the finish
area with tears in her eyes. Ber-
nadette Schild of Austria was
second in the race, 0.20 behind
Shiffrin’s combined time of 1
minute, 55.60 seconds. Maze
trailed by 0.35.
“I’m ex-
cited to reach
my goals. It’s
amazing,” said
Shiffrin, who
also won the
slalom world
c h a m p i o n -
ship title last
month. “I am still trying to find
my best skiing but this was my
best run of the season.”
Maze had already clinched
the overall World Cup title
along with the giant slalom and
super-G disciplines but was still
visibly distraught at letting slip
such a big lead to Shiffrin.
Shiffrin was quick to pay trib-
ute to her rival, who set a new
World Cup points record in one
of the most dominating seasons
the sport has seen.
“I actually want to thank Tina
Maze,” Shiffrin said. “She’s
probably going to punch me af-
ter this, but she’s been very in-
spiring.”
Maze led Shiffrin by seven
points in the slalom standings
going into the race.
Shiffrin
Ted Ligety gets 6th
World Cup GS win
LENZERHEIDE, Switzer-
land — Ted Ligety capped his
dominant season in giant sla-
lom with a sixth World Cup win
Saturday, fueling comparisons
with the best GS skier in his-
tory.
The American skier joined
Ingemar Stenmark as the only
men in the 47-year World Cup
history to get six GS victories
in a season. Stenmark’s 10-race
sweep in 1978-79 is the record.
“It’s very surreal for any ski
racer,” Ligety said of being lik-
ened to the Swede. “He is at
another level that’s not really
achievable.”
Ligety’s 17 career World Cup
wins in his specialist event are
a long way from Stenmark’s 46,
though the latest came with
similar authority.
He raced smoothly down the
steep slope in a two-run time of
2 minutes, 14.76 seconds, beat-
ing overall World Cup winner
Marcel Hirscher by 0.37 sec-
onds.
Hirscher was runner-up to
Ligety for the fourth time, and
French prospect Alexis Pin-
turault trailed by 1.16 in third.
The 28-year-old Ligety had
three previous GS discipline
titles, but this was his best
season yet and included three
world championship gold med-
als.
His six World Cup wins came
from eight races, and he placed
third in the other two, won by
Hirscher and Pinturault.
“This year in general has
been a great year. It’s going
to be a difficult one for me or
anyone to achieve,” said Ligety,
who never let up after dominat-
ing the traditional season-open-
er in Austria. “It’s been so great,
just from Soelden at the start
winning by 2.7 (seconds).”
He also broke 1,000 World
Cup points overall and will fin-
ish third in the standings. Both
are career bests.
Ligety completed an Ameri-
can victory double in glorious
sunshine at the World Cup fi-
nals in Lenzerheide. One hour
earlier, Mikaela Shiffrin deliv-
ered a come-from-behind vic-
tory to edge Tina Maze for the
women’s slalom title.
That ensured that “The Star
Spangled Banner” was played
four times in quick succession
for the crowd of 9,000 specta-
tors.
Ligety’s superiority was
helped by his ability to adapt
best to equipment changes in-
troduced for this season with
longer and stiffer skis meant to
make the discipline safer.
Some had predicted it would
also make the GS races less ex-
citing, but Ligety defied those
critics by delivering some of
the most dynamic skiing seen
all season in any discipline.
“I had some of the most un-
believable runs this year,” said
Ligety, who collected a trophy
this week when fellow skiers
voted his first-leg performance
at Alta Badia, Italy, in Decem-
ber as the most exciting all sea-
son. “I was able to keep it going
the whole year.”
A buzz went around the
knowledgeable Swiss fans when
Ligety was in the start gate, and
he was warmly applauded after
completing each run
“It’s cool that people appreci-
ate that,” Ligety said. “It’s be-
coming more exciting, especial-
ly with guys like Hirscher and
Pinturault being so good at it.
There are good story lines and
more rivalries.”
Ligety acknowledged that he
must get closer to his main ri-
vals in slalom, which had nine
scheduled World Cup events
this season, to challenge for the
overall title.
Hirscher, a two-time overall
champion at 24, said Ligety had
told him it was “a big goal.”
“If he feels more confident in
slalom, he can win for sure the
overall World Cup,” Hirscher
said.
By GRAHAMDUNBAR
AP Sports Writer
VEYSONNAZ, Switzerland —
World champion Alex Pullin of
Australia and Mateusz Ligocki
of Poland tied for victory in a
snowboard cross World Cup on
Saturday.
Nelly Moenne Loccoz of
France won the women’s race
for her first World Cup victory.
Pullin, who has clinched his
World Cup season title, and Li-
gocki could not be separated by
a photo finish. Ligocki’s victory
was the second of his career, and
first since 2008.
Austrian Alessandro Haem-
merle placed third.
Pullen, Ligocki tie for snowboard cross win
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Ted Ligety of the United States shows off the crystal globe
trophy of the men’s alpine skiing giant slalom at the World Cup
finals in Lenzerheide, Switzerland, on Saturday.
“This year in general
has been a great year.
It’s going to be a dif-
ficult one for me or
anyone to achieve. It’s
been so great, just from
Soelden at the start
winning by 2.7 (sec-
onds).”
Ted Ligety
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAgE 12C SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 W W W . T I M E S L E A D E R . C O M / S P O R T S
Outdoors
TOM VENESKY
OUTDOORS
Signs of better
things to come
are all over
I
t was a good sign.
I heard the calls emanating from
the middle of a neighbor’s pasture,
shortly before dusk. A sharp series of
whistles meant a killdeer was fussing
about something, but to me it signaled
a return. When the killdeer comes
back, spring weather is not too far
behind.
All it takes is a bit of mild weather to
make the signs of spring explode out
of nowhere.
The killdeer is but one example.
Last week I spied a gobbler strutting
in the corner of a field while a group
of hens pecked the ground, acting un-
interested for now. I’ve gotten reports
that the gobblers are also sounding off,
shattering the early morning woods
with their dominating call.
Very few sounds can match a gob-
bling turkey when it comes to signal-
ing spring. A gobble resounding from
a hollow or on a hilltop commands
attention. Everything else in the woods
goes quiet when an old tom gobbles.
Gobbling is a way for male turkeys to
announce their presence to potential
mates. To me, a turkey gobble is the
definitive sound marking the end of
winter.
Well, one of them at least.
The sounds of spring can be heard
day and night. While birds such as
gobblers and killdeer dominate the
daylight hours, a diminutive frog takes
charge when darkness falls.
In addition to the killdeer, I also head
the first Northern spring peepers call-
ing from a marsh last week. Their call
is just as the name implies, and when
dozens congregate in the same wetland
or pond, the sound can be deafening.
But in a good way.
A chorus of spring peepers provides
the perfect backdrop for an early
spring evening. The calls I heard last
week were a bit early, but it was a
welcome sound.
Like the sharp call of the killdeer
and the booming gobble from a turkey,
the sound of spring peepers is another
sure sign that winter’s grip is giving
way to a new season.
Every year I make a mental note of
when I hear the first signs of spring.
It’s a welcome respite from a winter
season that stubbornly lingers.
But not all of the signs of spring are
sounds.
There are plenty of sights as well.
Clusters of sassafras trees stand with
a bright green hue as swollen buds
appear at the tips of limbs, waiting to
bust out with leaves.
Robins return to the area from their
winter hideouts down south and can
be seen pulling earthworms from
yards. And though I haven’t seen any
yet, bluebirds will be returning for the
summer as well.
The once dormant moss around
spring seeps is quickly transforming
from a lifeless brown to a bright green,
soaking up the light afforded by longer
days.
And almost instantaneously,
crocuses spears are poking from the
ground, soon to be topped by vibrant,
purple flowers.
Not of all the sights of spring center
around beauty, however.
The onset of spring brings plenty
of mud as the winter’s frost thaws.
Heavily used deer trails are churned
into paths of mud and rural dirt roads
heave and swell as the frost beneath
the surface melts.
Perhaps one of the worst signs of the
warmer weather to come was reported
by a friend, who told me ticks were
already attaching to his clothes during
a recent hike.
But in the big picture, the appear-
ance of ticks is only a minor one. After
a long winter, the sights and sounds of
spring are a benefit that all of us who
enjoy the outdoors have been waiting
for.
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach himat 970-7230 or
tvenesky@timesleader.com.
The Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club
will host an open house on April 7
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. If your child is
interested in joining a team to pro-
mote the shooting sports, sports-
manship, teamwork and in learning
safe firearms handling under adult
supervision come join our team.
Parents or guardians with children
from 5th grade through 12th grade
are welcome to join.
The Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club
has chosen to participate in the
Scholastic Shooting Sports Foun-
dation this year by recruiting in-
terested youth members from the
community to join our sporting
clay’s team.
The volunteer coaches will be on the
grounds to meet and greet the
parents and youth. A registration
table will be set up so that interest-
ed youth can fill out the necessary
forms with their parents.
There is a $40 registration fee for
each shooter. If your child is inter-
ested in participating but you are
unable to attend the open house
you may contact John Hegedty
at 881-9288 to get the necessary
forms. Please do so before April 17
as this will be our first scheduled
practice. Athletes must complete
six practice sessions with a mini-
mum of 25 targets shot by June
14 to be eligible for the state cha-
mionship held at Hunting Hills in
Greene County on June 16 or at
the Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club
saturday August 10.
Boat US is accepting applications
for sites to host Life Jacket Loaner
locations. There is no cost to host
a loaner site, but applications
will only be accepted until March
31 and those that meet the pro-
gram’s guidelines will be posted to
the Foundation’s Facebook page
for public voting. “We want ap-
plicants to help spread the word
about keeping kids safe with our
life jackets, and also draw positive
publicity to their business or club,”
said Outreach Manager Alanna Ke-
ating.
After public voting, each location
that is accepted into the program
will receive a life jacket loaner “kit”
- a protective container that holds
various sized life jackets for kids,
signage, promotional materials
and easy-to-use sign-out sheets to
track usage. The programis simple
for those hosting a location as well
as for boaters, anglers and sailors
needing a kid’s life jacket. “All we
ask for in return is that the life
jackets are available for free to
the boating public in a readily ac-
cessible but secure location, and
hosts periodically let us know how
the program is going,” added Ke-
ating. To apply or for more infor-
mation on the program or the life
jacket laws in your state, visitwww.
BoatUS.com/Foundation/LJLP.
The Wildlife Leadership Academy
seeks applicants ages 14-17 for an
educational program focusing on
wildlife conservation and leader-
ship development. The Academy’s
mission is to empower youth to
become ambassadors for wildlife
conservation to ensure a sustained
wildlife legacy for future genera-
tions. Participants attend five-day
field schools and apply their knowl-
edge through year-round service
and outreach in their communities.
Two field schools will be offered
this year: Pennsylvania Bucktails
focuses on white-tailed deer, and
will take place at Stone Valley
Recreation Area in Petersburg
(Huntingdon County) on June 18-
22. Pennsylvania Brookies focuses
on brook trout and coldwater fish-
eries, and will take place at Sieg
Conference Center in Hermitage
(Clinton County) on July 9-13.
The Academy is a cooperative initia-
tive led by the Pennsylvania Insti-
tute for Conservation Education,
with instructors from government
agencies, nonprofits and universi-
ties including Kutztown University,
Pennsylvania Game Commission,
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Com-
mission, Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity, Quality Deer Management
Association, and the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers. “The high
caliber and sheer number of con-
servation professionals who are
involved as instructors in this pro-
gram are beyond impressive, but
more than that is the commitment
of time, energy and passion that
each of these instructors gives to
the students,” said ecologist and
instructor Lisa Smith.
Participants learn about wildlife and
fisheries biology, habitat man-
agement, research techniques
and nature photography through
classroom and field experiences.
They develop communication and
leadership skills through team-
building activities, educational
presentations, and mock town hall
meetings. Brook Martin of York
County described the program as
“life-changing.” He shared, “I was
able to reach my full potential and
find a career path that I feel will be
very rewarding. It was an experi-
ence that I will cherish and remem-
ber the rest of my life.”
The field schools prepare youth to
conduct service and outreach re-
lating to environmental education,
wildlife and conservation biology,
art and/or media engagement.
Each participant commits to com-
pleting at least three service and
outreach activities during the year,
and participants who complete the
most are rewarded with field trips,
opportunities to return as men-
tors the following year, and college
scholarships. To date, Academy
graduates have conducted over
600 service and outreach proj-
ects, engaged in more than 2500
contact hours with the public,
and reached an audience of more
than 10,000 Pennsylvania citizens
across 46 counties in the state.
Field school applications are avail-
able at www.PICEweb.org and must
be submitted by April 1, 2013. For
more information, contact Michele
Kittell at mkittell@piceweb.org or
(570)245-8518.
B U L L E T I N B O A R D
Capture anything interesting on
your handheld or trail camera? A nice
buck, bear, coyote or anything unique?
We’d love to see it. Each week we’ll run
a photo from a reader’s trail camera on
the Sunday Outdoors page. Email your
photo, along with date and area it was
taken (township is fine) and any other
details to tvenesky@timesleader.com.
“Sometimes the biggest surprises
are right outside our windows!” wrote
Diana Berry of Dallas. Fortunately,
Berry had a camera handy to capture
an image of this male ring-necked
pheasant that visited her yard on
Feb. 1 at 2 p.m. Berry took the photo
through her living room window and
said the pheasant has been back sev-
eral times since. “This is the first ring-
necked pheasant I’ve seen in years,”
she added.
Caught on camera
Some of the state’s largest trees are in Luzerne County
TOM VENESKY/THE TIMES LEADER
Rick Koval stands next to an enormous weeping willow tree in Luzerne County.
Giants of our forests
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
N
ot many trees survived the
ax when most of Pennsylva-
nia’s forests were clearcut
more than one hundred
years ago.
But those that did have now reached
enormous proportions, towering almost
15 stories into the sky with trunks as
thick as eight feet.
And many of the centuries-old giants
can be found in Luzerne County.
For several years, naturalist Rick
Koval has been on a mission to find and
document the mammoth trees of Lu-
zerne County. So far he’s found plenty
in areas such as Kirby Park, the Lands
at Hillside Farms and Ricketts Glen
State Park.
But Koval doesn’t just take a photo
and write down their location. He also
measures each giant to determine if
it qualifies as a state champion or co-
champion tree in a listing maintained
by the Pennsylvania Forestry Associa-
tion, as well as the tallest trees in the
commonwealth. Several of Koval’s finds
in the county already have qualified, in-
cluding a champion pin oak in Hanover
Township, which measures 15 feet in
circumference, a tulip poplar in Ricketts
Glen that stands 161 feet high, and
an 143-foot American sycamore along
the Susquehanna River, both being the
second-tallest of their species in the
state.
Luzerne County’s big trees also ap-
pear on the national listing, such as a
staghorn sumac in Plymouth Township
that is the largest in the country.
To find the ancient giants, Koval
searches along the river, around old
farms and cemeteries and in the depths
of state forests where the mammoth
trees have been allowed to grow undis-
turbed for centuries.
“I’m really impressed with the
number of large species I’m finding in
Luzerne County, and that speaks to the
history of this area,” Koval said. “This
county dates back to the 1700’s, and
these trees are relics of the past.”
There are four ingredients needed
for a tree to reach champion size – age,
fertile soil, climate and a lot of luck,
according to Koval. Diseases such as
the hemlock woolly adelgid and the em-
erald ash borer are increasing threats,
he said, as are the elements.
“With the number of severe weather
events and hurricanes we’ve had over
the last few years, we’ve lost a lot of old
trees,” Koval said.
Centuries ago the biggest threat was
man, as countless acres of forest were
consumed in vast swaths. Not many
places were untouched, but those that
were now contain some of the few
places in the state where old growth
forest can be found. Koval said such a
place exists in Ricketts Glen State Park.
“When Col. Ricketts owned the land
a long time ago, he intended to timber
it. But there is one portion that he
never cut,” Koval said. “You can find
ancient white pine, Eastern hemlock,
sugar maple and yellow birch that are
just enormous.”
Old farms are another of Koval’s
favorite places. The Lands at Hillside
Farms in the Back Mountain is home
to the state’s second-largest Norway
spruce, silver maples with a circum-
ference of 20 feet along with massive
sugar maples , white ash and oaks.
“Hillside has the highest concentra-
tion of large diameter trees out of all
the places that I’ve visited so far,” he
said. “Farms in general are good places
because they’re old and some of the
large oaks, maples and hickories were
left standing because they served as
boundary trees for property lines.”
Koval has already nominated 35
Luzerne County trees for champion and
co-champion consideration, and he is
currently searching old cemeteries in
Hanover, Dallas, Plymouth and Forty
Fort along with the banks of the river to
uncover more.
So far, the river has yielded plenty
of impressive finds, particularly the
stretch from Harding to Shickshinny
that is home to towering sycamores and
silver maples with girths exceeding 20
feet.
When Koval discovers a possible
champion tree, he uses an instrument
called a clinometer to measure the
height and angles of the tree, which
is then converted into feet. Criteria
considered for a champion tree include
circumference, height and spread.
“In Luzerne County I have 90 of the
largest species catalogued and about 70
more to go,” Koval said. “It’s just amaz-
ing that for centuries these giants have
survived right here and many continue
to do well.”
RICK KOVAL/THE TIMES LEADER
A 151-foot white pine towers above
the forest in Ricketts Glen State
Park.
Have a big tree
on your property?
Let Rick Koval know
Rick Koval will catalogue the larg-
est of every tree species in Luzerne
County for an upcoming book. He esti-
mates 160 tree species will be included,
and the book will also provide photos
and GPS coordinates for the biggest
trees that can be found on areas open
to the public. Koval will also include
sections on tree identification, how to
measure a tree and the history of the
area’s forests.
If you have a tree on your property
that you would like measured, contact
Koval at pocononaturalist@yahoo.com.
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Navigation, Entune, Leather & Moonroof
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THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
SECTI ON D
timesleader.com
personal finance
gai l marksj arvi s
Could it happen
again? Could your
retirement plans
end up in sham-
bles, and your
college savings
tattered?
As investors see
the stock market repeatedly climb-
ing to new records lately, some
people want to know that they will
be safe this time. they’d like to get
a taste of the action in the stock
market, but they want guarantees
that they won’t get whacked again
like they were from late 2007 to
March 2009 — a 57 percent hit.
if you fear a reoccurrence and
want assurances that it won’t
happen again, you will never get
such certainty. Because the crash
of 2007-09 was one of the worst
in history, it’s unlikely — but not
impossible — that the next plunge
will be as horrific. But some sort
of downturn is a sure thing, even
though it’s not clear when it will
occur or how bad it will be.
Academic studies show that even
professional investors are very poor
at predicting the future. When
times are good, they expect the
trend to continue. When times are
tough, they don’t imagine improve-
ment until it’s far along.
Still, analysts do watch for early
signs of trouble in the market —
signs like oncoming recessions or,
just the opposite, too many people
feeling like they can’t lose.
When people see blue skies ahead,
they naively take excessive risks
buying overpriced stocks. ultimately
that leads to a market plunge because
stocks won’t climb indefinitely if
company profits aren’t strong enough
to warrant the stock prices. the
downturn can be either what’s
known as a correction, or about a 15
percent dip in the stock market, or a
bear market, a lengthy plunge of 20
percent or more.
Now, analysts are comforted
because investors are still skeptical
of the stock market.
“if there is some good news out
there, it is that a lot of the froth in
the recent survey data has receded,”
said Gluskin Sheff economist david
Rosenberg, noting a recent poll of
investors by the Association of in-
dividual investors. only 31 percent
said they were bullish about the
market, or expecting stocks to keep
rising. their curbed enthusiasm
suggests stocks can keep climbing.
investors who want guarantees
need to be aware of the realities of
stock market cycles. Bear markets
happen about every 4 { to 5 years.
the average loss in such a market
is 38 percent, according to the leu-
thold Group.
that’s unsettling, but bear mar-
kets happen only 34 percent of the
time. Bull markets, which plump
up 401(k)s and make investors feel
good, happen 66 percent of the
time.
Although people tend to think of
their gains as keepers that should
belong to them forever, the down-
turns are a natural part of invest-
ing — a result of cycles. in the
cycles, exuberance fuels upturns for
a while, and then stocks fall until
bargain hunters show up and cause
stocks to climb once again.
Since 1900, there have been 23
bear markets and, on average, in-
vestments have recovered in about
2 { years, according to leuthold
Group research. But in the worst
bear markets, like the 2007-09 one,
the pain has lasted a lot longer. it
was March 5, 2013, or more than
five years since stocks started
plunging in october 2007, before
the market recovered its value.
in the 2000-02 bear market,
stocks plunged 49 percent, and
investors didn’t get back to even
until 2007. And after the 1973-74
bear market, investors had to wait
7 years.
that might be enough to scare
you away from the stock market in-
definitely. on the other hand, if you
want to partake in climbs like the
120 percent gain since March 2009,
you can follow a common financial
planning practice: Since neither
sooner or later,
bear market
will growl back
By Benjamin Pimentel
MarketWatch
SAN FRANCiSCo — looking
for a job through Facebook?
Close Facebook friends may
help more than casual acquain-
tances, though these intimate
friends can also cause you some
stress, according to a study by the
social media giant.
the report by Facebook research
scientist Moira Burke was based
on a survey of 3,000 Facebook us-
ers who were asked “about major
events in their lives, their stress lev-
els, and how much support they re-
ceived fromfriends and family,” she
wrote thursday in a Facebook blog.
the study included 169 people
who recently lost their jobs.
Burke noted that sociologists
point to the “strength of weak ties”
in finding work, as acquaintances
may have a broader network that
could aid in job-hunting.
But on Facebook, she added,
that’s typically not the case.
“our research found just the op-
posite,” she wrote. “People who
talked more with strong ties were
twice as likely to find a new job
within three months. And those
who talked more with weak ties
were less likely to find a job.”
that’s likely because of the na-
ture of Facebook interactions.
“one possibility is that people
don’t actually hear about job
openings from their weak ties
on Facebook,” she said. “People
may not reveal their employment
plight to contacts they don’t feel
close to. Weak tie stories might be
about less important topics, like
the Super Bowl or their vacation.”
the Facebook study found that
users generally found “social sup-
port” on the site, and, Burke added,
“their perceived support increased
month-to-month, the more they
talked with strong ties.”
“But there’s a catch,” she added.
“talking with strong ties usually
feels good, but if you’ve recently
lost your job, it may have the op-
posite effect. We found that when
a subset of the group who had re-
cently lost a job talked more with
their strong ties, their stress lev-
els rose.”
the reason apparently has a lot
to do with the typical dynamics in
any friendship or close relation-
ship.
“Strong ties may make the
psychological distress of job loss
worse by offering unhelpful ad-
vice and pushing for recovery too
quickly,” Burke wrote. “People
may feel their independence
threatened by strong ties, increas-
ing resentment rather than relief.
Strong ties also experience anxi-
ety about doing anything upset-
ting, which may cause them to be
more casual and less encourag-
ing.”
facebook
job hunt
helpful,
stressful
HAPPy St. Patrick’s
day.
if you’ve already
had your fill of
corned beef and
cabbage, you should
be thinking Arby’s.
today only, take this
coupon on over to your neighborhood
restaurant and snag a free Reuben or
double-Stacked Reuben when you pur-
chase a Reuben or a double-Stacked
Reuben sandwich: coupon.arbys.com/
MarchArbysStPatricksday03172013/
With one holiday about done with,
grocers are already placing the popular
food fare for the next holiday on sale.
Redner’s Warehouse Market has
their brand whole, boneless smoked
ham on sale for $1.88 per pound. Get
the bone-in, spiral-sliced half ham for
$1.58 per pound.
Shur Save has the Hatfield semi-
boneless whole ham on sale for $1.49
per pound when you use your Gold
Card. thomas’ Foodtown has Hat-
field whole smoked semi-boneless or
boneless hams for $1.69 a pound when
you use your club card. Cook’s spiral
sliced, bone-in, honey hams are $1.99
per pound. if you’re more the fillet
type when it comes to your pork, Price
Chopper has Hatfield marinated pork
loin fillets buy-one, get-one free.
Spring gets underway Wednesday
and Rita’s is celebrating with the
traditional free italian ice served in a
special cup all day long. All locations
will participate and expect long lines
at each of them.
Rite Aid has a nice +up Reward
deal on select restaurant gift cards.
Purchase $50 total in Applebees or
Chili’s gift cards and use your Wellness
+ Card and get $10 in +up Rewards
printed on your receipt for a future
store purchase. you can take advan-
tage of this offer twice, and remember
gift cards like this don’t expire so stock
up now for Christmas, birthday or an-
niversary gifts.
Speaking of nice stocking stuffers you
can start stocking up on now, head to
target where all gaming systemgames
are buy-two, get-one free. Skylander
starter packs are excluded. Mix and
match systems. don’t have a system,
target has the Basic and deluxe Wii u
Systemfor $349.99 and you’ll get a $50
target gift card with your purchase.
JCPenney has free shipping to local
stores if you order at jcp.comwith no
minimumpurchase requirement. order
online today and use the code SPEN-
ditin the ‘code &rewards’ section on
the shopping bag page to save $10 off
your $50 purchase, with some minimal
restrictions. the items typically arrive
within a week and they’ll call you when
your order is ready for pick up.
you’ve heard of having “a brush with
a celebrity?” Well now one company is
letting you brush with a celebrity.
Brush Buddies makes toothbrushes
that play songs from popular singing
stars like: Justin Bieber, lady Gaga,
lMFAo and more. the toothbrushes,
which retail for between $4.99 and
$14.95 play two different songs from
these stars and play for the dentist
recommended time of two minutes so
they’re a great way to get kids to brush
for the proper amount of time.
And the company has sent me a Justin
Bieber Brush Buddy that i’mgoing to
give away to one lucky reader. So here’s
howwe’re going to do this giveaway. if
you want the free toothbrush, send me
an email with your name and mailing
address, include toothbrush trivia in
the subject line and tell me the answer
to this toothbrush trivia question:
doctor West’s Miracle toothbrush was
introduced in 1938. it was the first to
use this material for bristles?
i will select a winner at random
from all the correct entries. Good luck
and thanks for reading.
spring is nigh and rita’s is calling your name for refreshing treats
steals & deals
andrew m. seder
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff writer,
may be reached at 570-829-7269. If you know
of any local steals or deals, email themto
aseder@timesleader.comand followhimon
Twitter @TLAndrewSeder
MCT PHOTOS
ABOVE: Macabeo Murillo, 58, works on a plum orchard in Selma, Calif. California agriculture, struggling with labor
shortages due to immigration enforcement, are left with an increasingly older workforce as laborers in their 50s
and up with legal residency are doing arduous work few others want to do. TOP: Antonio Magdaleno, 59, ties down
branches on a plum tree orcharD. Magdaleno has been working for the farm for 40 years.
farM laBor sHortaGe
still looMs
S
ElMA, Calif. — Vicente
Contreras is 70 years old
— and “no mas,” he insists
with a smile — and he says
he is still fit and hearty
enough to perform the hard labor of
California’s farm fields.
Contreras concedes his knees hurt
when he climbs ladders to pick peach-
es, nectarines and plums for $8 to $9 an
hour, six days a week, during the peak
summer harvest. And during the less
rigorous pruning of grapevines in win-
ter, he can’t move as fast as the young
workers — at least when they happen
to be around.
Amid the verdant fields and orchards
of America’s most bountiful agricul-
tural region, California farmworkers
are graying. A labor shortage deepens
as fewer younger workers arrive from
Mexico and more head home to stay.
increasingly, California’s $44.3 bil-
lion agricultural industry must rely
on the well-calloused hands of older
workers who came many years ago to
fill jobs pruning, planting, picking and
packing.
these days at Chandler Farms, a
fourth-generation family ranch 20 miles
south of Fresno, veteran workers like
Contreras are in the majority.
on a recent weekday, Antonio Mag-
daleno, 59, cut grapevines in a neigh-
boring field. Magdaleno emigrated
from Michoacan, Mexico, in 1973 and
has spent 36 of his last 40 years on Cen-
tral Valley farms.
His features bronzed and weathered,
Magdaleno said he looks forward to the
mid-winter pruning, “a beautiful time
and something special,” marking the
start of the growing season.
“it’s always been us,” Magdaleno
said in Spanish. “time has passed, and
we’re older. the young people want to
work in factories and other places.”
the aging of California’s agricultural
workforce reflects a convergence of
trends.
in many cases, the children of farm-
workers who arrived decades ago have
little interest in field work, leaving
much of the vital labor to their elders.
tighter u.S. immigration enforce-
ment, as well as brutal cartel-driven vi-
olence along the Mexican border, have
deterred many potential workers from
attempting to cross.
And, amid a rebounding economy in
Mexico, Mexican farms are facing their
“it’s always been us. Time has
passed, and we’reolder.
The youngpeople want to work
in factories and other places.”
antonio magdaleno
By Peter HecHt | The Sacramento Bee
See FINANCE, Page 2D
See LABOR, Page 2D
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2D SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 S U N D A Y B U S I N E S S
Ned Smith, host of the St. Martin
de Porres Catholic Worker House,
in Harrisburg, has been awarded
The Susan Merrill Constance Kozel
Award for 2013. Smith is a native of
Wilkes-Barre and resident of Har-
risburg and is well known in both
cities for his decades-long efforts to
promote peace and build communi-
ties. This award is presented to an
individual whose contribution to
society reflects the principles of
justice and peace.
John Dawe, of Kingston, has been
named among “The Top 20 People
to Watch” for 2013 by the Philadel-
phia Gay News,
the largest pub-
lication serving
the Lesbian,
Gay, Bisexual
and Transgen-
der Community
in Pennsylvania.
Dawe, executive
director of the
Northeastern
Pennsylvania
RainbowAlliance, the only fully
incorporated agency dedicated to
serving the LGBT community in the
region, was one of two to be includ-
ed on the list fromoutside Greater
Philadelphia and its suburbs.
The Pennsylvania Office of Ad-
ministration has been recognized
with a 2013 Excellence in Improve-
ment and Innovation Award by the
Shared Services and Outsourcing
Network (SSON) for launching an
online orientation process for newly
hired employees that will generate
an estimated $1 million in annual
savings and productivity.
The SSON Excellence Awards
recognize organizations that have
demonstrated best practices while
generating measurable results
through shared services and
outsourcing. Other 2013 winners
include Intel, Levi Strauss and SAP,
while Unisys, AOL and the U.S. De-
partment of Interior were runners-
up. The awards were presented at
the organization’s North American
conference last week.
Bernard Prusak, associate profes-
sor of philosophy and director of
the McGowan Center for Ethics
and Social
Responsibility at
King’s College,
has writen a
manuscript
titled “Parental
Obligations
and Bioethics:
The Duties of a
Creator.” It has
been accepted
for publication
by Routledge Press in the series
Annals of Bioethics.
Prusak also published the cover sto-
ry titled “A Riskier Discourse: How
Catholics Should Argue against
Abortion,” in the November issue
of “Commonweal.” His reviewof
Michael Walzer’s “In God’s Shadow:
Politics in the HebrewBible” was
published in the November “Com-
monweal.” The reviewwas titled
“On Earth, Not in Heaven.”
Prusak also presented a paper,
titled “Paying for the Priceless
Child,” at the annual meeting of the
American Catholic Philosophical
Association, and participated in a
panel discussion on Marcellus Shale
at Wyoming Seminary.
HONORS & AWARDS
KING’S COLLEGE
Tina Arendash, McAdoo, has been
named a college counselor in the
Counseling Cen-
ter. Arendash
earned a bach-
elor’s degree in
social work from
Elizabethtown
College, and a
master’s degree
in social work
at Marywood
University. She
also completed a
field placement
at Hazleton General Hospital and
has been a Pennsylvania licensed
social worker since 2006.
OREGON HOUSE DEMOCRATIC
OFFICE
Lindsey O’Brien, a Kingston native,
has become deputy communica-
tions director of the 2013 Demo-
cratic Cuacus Staff. O’Brien is a
graduate of Wyoming Valley West
High School; a summa cumlaude
graduate of Skidmore College; and
was a recipient of the 2006 Times-
Leader Best and Brightest Award
in Journalism. She is the daughter
of Ed and Jean O’Brien in Kings-
ton. Prior to this position, O’Brien
served as communications director
for the Portland Public Schools’
bond campaign. Before that, she
worked as a reporter for the Daily
Journal of Commerce in Portland.
LEWITH & FREEMAN
The real estate agency has added
four local agents. Two newagents
for the Kingston office are Annie
Kozlowski-Dreesen, an expe-
rienced Realtor specializing in
residential sales. Kozlowski-Dreesen
received her Real Estate license
fromPenn State’s Wilkes-Barre
Campus. Jeffrey Conway, with
a background in marketing, is a
graduate of King’s College, double
majoring in business administra-
tion and marketing, with a minor in
finance. Dana Distasio will join the
firm’s Mountain Top office special-
izing in residential sales. She is a
graduate of Georgia Institute of
Technology and holds a BS in Indus-
trial Engineering. Beverly Flana-
gan, joins the Clarks Summit office,
and has over 26 years of real estate
experience throughout Lackawanna
County.
CORPORATE LADDER
Arendash
Marywood University will host
the 11th Annual Forum and Con-
ference on Ethical Leadership and
Corporate Social Responsibility,
“Out-behaving Your Competition,”
on Monday, from 9:30 a.m. to
8:30 p.m.
The conference will take place
in the Latour Room, Nazareth
Student Center, at Marywood Uni-
versity. The conference is open to
the public.
At 7 p.m., there will be a keynote
address by Attorney Jane Carlo-
nas of Oliver, Price & Rhodes, fol-
lowed by a Q & A and a network-
ing reception.
For additional information,
contact Gale Jaeger, program
coordinator, at galejaeger@gmail.
com or 348-6274.
Toastmasters International, a
public speaking, leadership, and
self-improvement club is meeting
Tuesday at 5:15 p.m. at Sundance
Vacations (in the Presentation
Room), 264 Highland Park Blvd.,
Wilkes-Barre Township. All are
welcome to attend. Email toast-
masterswb@gmail.com for more
information.
A Human Resources Rountable
will be held from11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Wednesday at the Top of the 80’s,
West Hazleton. The event, spon-
sored by The Northeast Pennsylva-
nia Manufacturers and Employers
Association, will include discussion
on regional and statewide labor
market information. TimMcElhinny,
economic research, customer
service and outreach manager for
the Center for Workforce Informa-
tion & Analysis, will present. He will
discuss high priority occupations,
industries of interest, PA UC Activ-
ity, top employers in the state, and
fun facts.
The cost to register, which includes
lunch, is $37 for members and $74
for non-members. To register, email
Gina Whalen at gwhalen@maea.biz,
or call 622-0992.
U.S. Sen. Patrick Toomey, R-
Zionsville, will be the featured
guest of the Greater Hazleton
Chamber of Commerce Red Car-
pet Breakfast program on Friday
at Genetti’s, 1341 N. Church St.
The program will begin at 8:45
a.m. and conclude at 10 a.m.
Toomey’s comments will focus
on economic issues, specifically
how to improve the job climate,
encourage economic growth and
reduce regulation. A question-
and-answer period will follow the
senator’s comments.
A full breakfast will be served and
the program costs $20 per person
for chamber members and $25
for guests. Chamber members
and guests who would like to at-
tend should contact the chamber
office by the end of Monday at
455-1509 to make a reservation
or by emailing Julie Ferry at
jferry@hazletonchamber.org.
A Business Financing Seminar,
organized by The Northeastern
Pennsylvania Alliance and the
Department of Community and
Economic Development (DCED),
will be held March 26 from 2-4
p.m. at The Woodlands Inn and
Resort, Plains Township.
The topic of the afternoon will
be financing options available
for small businesses in the seven
county Northeast Region which
includes Wayne, Pike, Monroe,
Lackawanna, Luzerne, Carbon,
and Schuylkill Counties.
Jared Lucas, Director of the DCED
Small Business First Division,
and Steve Drizos, Director of the
Pennsylvania Economic Develop-
ment Financing Authority, will be
the feature speakers. They will
present on Small Business and
Tax Exempt Financing options
available through DCED. Other
partners and guests will provide
information on the following:
Small Business Development,
Small Business Micro-Loans, SBA
504 Loans, Revolving Loan Funds,
Small Business Administration,
and Commercial Lending.
To register for free, contact
Donna Brdaric at dbrdaric@
nepa-alliance.org or toll free at
1-866-758-1929.
The Wyoming County Chamber’s
bi-annual legislative breakfast
will be held March 27 from 8 to
9:30 a.m. at Shadowbrook Inn
& Resort, Tunkhannock. Co-
sponsored by First Liberty Bank
& Trust and Cabot Oil & Gas Cor-
poration, the event will include
a full breakfast buffet as well as
the opportunity to address issues
impacting your business.
Among those elected officials
scheduled to appear are U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, State
Sen. Lisa Baker, R-Lehman Town-
ship, and State Reps. Sandra Ma-
jor, R-Bridgewater Township and
Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake.
There is no charge for WYCCC
members to attend this event and
just $10 per person for non-mem-
bers. For reservations or more in-
formation, contact Deborah at the
chamber office at 875-8325 or by
email Deborah@WYCCC.Com.
BUSINESS AGENDA
By Marie G. Mcintyre
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Q: After being promoted to a
deputy director position in my
agency, I initially felt excited
and grateful. However, I have
now become disillusioned, be-
cause the director doesn’t in-
clude me in any activities. I am
supposed to be her back-up, yet
I know nothing about her job.
She also questions any ideas
that I propose.
I have a shy personality and
am not very aggressive, so I’m
not sure how to gain authority
in my new role. So far, this pro-
motion has involved a change
in title and pay, but no real in-
crease in responsibility. How
can I stop being a token deputy?
a: Although you’re feeling
intentionally excluded, it’s un-
likely that the director would
choose you for this job, then
deliberately sabotage your suc-
cess. A more probable explana-
tion is that your “shy person-
ality” is keeping you on the
sidelines.
While having a quiet temper-
ament can be an advantage, ti-
midity will only hold you back,
so you need to display more
self-confidence. If you wish to
be included in a project, explain
why your involvement would
be helpful. When the director
questions your ideas, don’t im-
mediately abandon them.
Because a deputy’s duties are
largely determined by what the
person above decides to del-
egate, these positions are often
poorly defined. Since your cur-
rent job description appears to
have some gaps, take the initia-
tive to draft a new one, then re-
view it with your boss.
People who are afraid to
ask for what they want fre-
quently become unhappy and
disgruntled. Since resentment
never helped anyone’s career,
appropriate assertiveness is a
skill that everyone needs to
develop.
Q: I work with four bullies
who constantly harass me and
slander me behind my back.
One of them is rude, bossy, and
openly hostile. I have discussed
this with my boss and the hu-
man resources manager, but
they defended the bullies and
refused to take any action.
We recently got a new man-
ager, so I would like to tell him
about this problem. I’m not
sure howto approach him, how-
ever, because none of my other
co-workers will complain about
these people. What would you
suggest?
a: Based on your description,
it’s hard to knowwhat’s really go-
ing on here. You obviously feel
that you are being tormented by
a relentless pack of predators,
which has to be extremely stress-
ful. It’s hard to focus on work
when you’re feeling like a target.
On the other hand, no one
else appears to share this per-
ception. Your other colleagues
refuse to back you up, and your
supervisor and HR manager,
who are responsible for inves-
tigating such charges, have dis-
missed them. The new boss is
undoubtedly aware of this his-
tory, since incoming managers
are almost always briefed about
staff issues.
Since no one else sees this
situation as you do, perhaps it’s
time to consider a different view.
So instead of renewing your old
grievances, consider making
a fresh start by asking the HR
manager to help you repair these
fractured relationships.
Office coach: New manager should be aggresive
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of “Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics.” Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at yourofficecoach.com, or followher
on Twitter officecoach.
Dawe
Prusak
you nor your adviser will
know when the market will
dip again, financial planners
simply suggest you hedge your
bets by designing a mixture of
stocks for good times and bad.
If, for example, a person had
invested half of his or her mon-
ey in the stock market (Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500) and half in
long-term government bonds,
their average one-year loss
over the worst five-year period
tracked by Morningstar would
have been just 2.8 percent.
If an investor had been more
daring and invested 70 percent
in stocks and 30 percent in
bonds, the annual loss in the
roughest five-year period
would have been 6.3 percent.
FINANCE
Continued from Page 1D
own labor shortage and have
plenty of work to offer at home.
The upshot, according to the
California Farm Bureau Federa-
tion, is that more than 70 per-
cent of state agricultural produc-
ers anticipate a worker shortage
starting this spring and worsen-
ing though the growing season.
Some officials estimate the labor
force could fall by more than
80,000 farmworkers — down
from the 450,000 workers on
whomfarmers have come to rely
for the peak harvest of late sum-
mer.
“Basically, we’re running out
of low-skilled workers. People
simply are not doing farm work
to the extent they were doing
before,” said J. Edward Taylor, a
University of California-Davis,
economist who has studied the
migration of farmworkers from
Mexico.
Contreras, the 70-year-old
farmhand, says he is happy to
be among those still working
the orchards and vineyards at
Chandler Farms, which produc-
es tree fruit, raisin grapes and
almonds.
“What I like is being out with
people in the fresh air,” said
Contreras in Spanish, his eyes
glinting in the crisp morning
sun. “I’malive, active and ready
for this work.”
Grinning, he contorted to
parody a feeble man shriveling
into a ball. “If I don’t work, I’ll
do this,” he said.
But from California’s Central
Valley to Washington D.C., the
graying workforce adds urgen-
cy to the debate over immigra-
tion reform.
Farm lobbyists and elected of-
ficials are discussing remedies
that include granting legal status
to more than one million un-
documented farmworkers in the
United States and establishing
an expanded guest worker visa
program for agriculture to en-
sure a steady supply of laborers.
“We have to try to find a sys-
tem that is not going to cause a
major disruption to our indus-
try,” said Bryan Little, director
of labor affairs for the Califor-
nia Farm Bureau Federation.
The industry group favors let-
ting undocumented farmwork-
ers stay in the country while ap-
plying for legal status, as well
as drawing in seasonal guest
workers to replenish the labor
force.
California agricultural in-
terests estimate that as many
as 70 percent to 90 percent of
farmworkers in the state may
be here illegally, often present-
ing counterfeit documents to
secure work.
Those who face the least
danger of deportation — and
who are least likely to flee in
immigration raids — tend to
be veteran workers, whose U.S.
residency is more established.
Bill Chandler, 73, runs the
family ranch in Selma with
his son, John, who is 35.
Chandler says his workforce
largely consists of older la-
borers who got permanent
residency or U.S. citizenship
under a 1986 immigration re-
form law signed by President
Ronald Reagan.
“There are always people in
the ag labor force who don’t
have (proper) papers,” Chan-
dler said. “So we’re all scram-
bling for what labor is here.
And they’re older folks.”
He added: “They’re special.
They’re really special.”
LABOR
Continued from Page 1D
By HEATHER SOMERVILLE
San Jose Mercury News
Move over, Barbie; there’s a new girl in town.
She goes by GoldieBlox, and unlike her name-
sake, Goldilocks, she doesn’t get into mishaps in-
volving three bears. This Goldie is a female engi-
neer character who invents, designs and builds to
inspire a future generation of women engineers.
GoldieBlox is the brainchild of Stanford Uni-
versity graduate and engineer-turned-entrepre-
neur Debbie Sterling. She created GoldieBlox
— which includes a construction toy set and
storybook starring the tool-wielding character
Goldie — to teach girls basic engineering skills
and open more pathways for women to pursue
jobs in the male-dominated industry.
“I’m trying to give girls something more than
just dolls and princesses,” she said.
Sterling, 30, hopes that the soon-to-be-released
GoldieBlox will teach more girls to love tech-
heavy disciplines and open their minds to en-
gineering. And if Sterling can shake up the old-
school toy industry, which for years has offered
girls little more than busty dolls and pink Legos,
all the better, she said.
“If you’re a little girl, you have Barbie and Polly
Pocket,” Sterling said. “You have fashion icons
and beauty and spa, and you’re told what’s impor-
tant is what you look like.”
But this isn’t just a plug for girl power; Oak-
land, Calif.-based GoldieBlox has caught the at-
tention of researchers and educators across the
country who say the toy could help engage more
girls in science, technology, engineering and
mathematics, or STEM, an education priority for
the Obama administration.
The GoldieBlox book, written and illustrated
by Sterling, follows Goldie as she invents ma-
chines and solves problems with a cast of animal
friends that includes a Spanish-speaking dog, Na-
cho, and a tutu-wearing pink dolphin. The peg-
board and tool kit allow kids to build whatever
Goldie is building in the book, and learn engi-
neering concepts, like howa wheel and axle work
and the basics of tension, force and friction.
“I can’t wait to have her sitting there on store
shelves in her overalls and her tool belt, because I
think that that sends a strong message,” Sterling
said.
GoldiBlox maker:
Engineering not
just for boys
Top five producers for the year and long time employees were honored at a recent
ceremony. The top five producers were Anita Reber (top producer’s award), Terry
Donnelly, Joan Matusiak, Rae Dziak, and Lisa Joseph. Long-time sales professionals
recognized for years of service included Nancy Palumbo and Corine Sworen for 20
years of service. James Graham, Patricia Genetti, Marcie Petrucelli, Geri Wisnewski
and Terry Nelson were honored for 15 years of service.
In the front row, from the left, are Joseph Butcher, Randy Park, Vince Tas-
sitano and George Fredmonski. In the back row, are Paul Eyerman, Marty
Behm, Gary Slusser, Brian Balutis, Michael Kostelansky, Robert Bull and
Pete Korba.
LEwIth AND FrEEmAN rEAL EStAtE
The Wyoming Valley Country Club has been selected as a recipient of the 5 Star Platinum
Private Club of America Award. This award was established by the Club Leaders Forum,
an organization that promotes excellence in Private Club leadership to over 3,000 Private
Clubs nationwide. One hundred private clubs are selected nationally, and The Wyoming
Valley Country Club was the only golf club in the Northeast region to be awarded this
prestigious award. Wyoming Valley Country Club’s perceived excellence and quality of
services to membership, club facilities, heritage and enlightened leadership were items
surveyed by the Club Leaders Forum. To be selected as one of America’s top 100 Country
Clubs nationwide is a most commendable accomplishment. Other Pennsylvania clubs
which also achieved Platinumstatus were Oakmont Country Club, Lehigh Country Club,
Philadelphia Country Club, Philadelphia Cricket Club and Merion Golf Club, just to name
a few. Additionally, in June 2012, the Wyoming Valley Country Club, designed by A. W.
Tillinghast, was visited by Joe Martin, staff member and golf rater fromGolf Magazine
who said the course is a true “hidden gem.” The Wyoming Valley Country Club is the fifth
oldest golf club in Pennsylvania and the forty-fifth in the country. For more information
or to inquire about membership into this wonderful club please visit their website at www.
WVCC1896.comor call the clubhouse at (570) 824-8241.
COUNtrY CLUB rECEIVES tOP hONOrS
Gail MarksJarvis is a personal
finance columnist for the Chicago
Tribune and author of “Saving for
Retirement Without Living Like a
Pauper or Winning the Lottery.”
Readers may send her email at
gmarksjarvis@tribune.com.
See GOLDIBLOX, Page 5D
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 3D
MarketPulse
HELD ABROAD
The British are coming! And so are
the Caribbean islanders, Canadians
and Japanese. Foreign investors
own 14 percent of the U.S. stock
market, according to the latest
government data. That’s the highest
proportion on record going back 68
years. Much of that belongs to
investors in the Cayman Islands and
elsewhere in the Caribbean. These
tax havens are often home to
professional investors. But nearly a
third of the foreign ownership is
concentrated in just three countries:
the United Kingdom, Canada and
Japan. The interest is heading in
both directions: U.S. investors are
also increasingly going abroad for
their stock investments.
FABULOUS FIFTH
The bull market is entering its fifth year, which has historically been a
strong one for investors. Only five of the 11 bull markets since World War
II have lasted at least five years. Of those that did, the average gain was
21 percent in the fifth year,
according to S&P Capital IQ.
That makes it the second-
strongest gain of the first
five years of a bull market.
A 21 percent jump would put
the Standard & Poor’s 500
index at 1,877 in March
2014.
Extending through a sixth
year is even more rare: Only
three bull markets have
done that since 1947. But
that year has been even
better historically, with an
average gain of 26 percent.
AP
LOOMING HIKE
The Federal Reserve has told investors to expect the feder-
al funds rate to remain exceptionally low until the unemploy-
ment rate falls to 6.5 percent from its current 7.7 percent,
unless inflation threatens to take off in the interim. But many
investors are nevertheless worried about what will happen
when rates do rise.
Citi strategist Tobias
Levkovich looked at the
average performance of
sectors the prior three
times that the Fed began
hiking rates, in 1994, 1999
and 2004. Nine of the 10
industries that make up the
S&P 500 fell in the month
following the first rate hike.
Only energy stocks eked
out a positive gain — one
of 0.03 percent.
Average yearly gain in the S&P 500
for bull markets since 1947
U.S. stock ownership
by geography
Sources: Department of Treasury; Goldman Sachs Source: S&P Capital IQ
17%
12
11
7
7
6
5
29
6
Caribbean
U.K
Canada
Japan
Other
Switzerland
China
Middle East
oil exporters
Luxembourg
Year six
Year five
Year four
Year three
Year two
Year one 38%
13
13
21
26
5
Title: President and CEO of
Putnam Investments, a
Boston-based manager of $133
billion in assets as of Jan. 31.
What he suggests: Most
participants in 401(k) plans should
be saving at higher rates to ensure
they can build up adequate
retirement savings.
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Robert Reynolds
Putnam Investments CEO
Robert Reynolds says policymak-
ers and the financial services
industry need to do more to
strengthen Americans’ retirement
savings.
One of the most pressing
needs, he says, is to boost the
default savings rate of workers
who are newly enrolled in 401(k)
plans. Most employers deduct 3
percent from the paychecks of
“auto-enrollees” who don’t select
their own savings rate. Reynolds
says 3 percent isn’t nearly enough
to put a typical worker on track to
a secure retirement. Before joining
Putnam in 2008, Reynolds helped
build the 401(k) business at
another Boston-based company,
Fidelity Investments.
Why isn’t 3 percent enough?
Many employers have auto-
escalation features that boost
that percentage over time.
Three percent is just what the
government put out as an idea
when the Pension Protection Act
of 2006 became law. People can
always lower their rate if they
want and the starting rate for
auto-enrollment should still be a
company decision.
By starting workers at 3
percent, many of them think that’s
the rate they should be saving
at for the long term. But it’s too
low. They should be saving at
10 percent. Industrywide, the
average participant savings rate
is 7 percent. But the new baseline
should be 10 percent plus. We
don’t serve anyone well by allow-
ing them to believe that saving
3 percent, or 5 percent, or even
7 percent, is enough to ensure
retirement readiness.
You suggest that 6 percent
might be a more appropriate
starting rate. How did you arrive
at that figure?
Not every company makes match-
ing contributions, but you want
every employee to maximize the
match. And usually, that’s at the 5
to 6 percent level.
By starting out at that level,
some workers won’t have
enough for immediate needs
like an emergency fund— and
could end up taking loans from
their 401(k) account. How do
you balance the need to save
for retirement with potential
shorter-term needs?
For most people, you can’t start
saving early enough. The power
of compound interest is enormous
in these types of investment
programs.
But I do favor continuing to give
participants the ability to take out
401(k) loans. Around 20 percent
of participants take loans out. So
if you contributed more than you
would have otherwise by saving
at a higher rate, then 80 percent
are doing great. Keeping the ability
to take out a loan if needed is
important. If you know you’ll have
access to the money if you need it,
you’ll feel more comfortable about
contributing more to your savings.
Emerging
opportunities
InsiderQ&A
AP
Wal-Mart Stores (WMT) $73.22 2.6% 8.0% 17.2%
Exxon Mobil (XOM) 89.83 2.5 4.5 15.3
Coca-Cola (KO) 39.02 2.9 8.4 15.2
McDonald’s (MCD) 99.31 3.1 13.5 14.8
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) 79.10 3.1 13.7 13.5
Procter & Gamble (PG) 77.39 2.9 14.9 13.2
3M (MMM) 106.02 2.4 14.9 11.4
Thursday’s
close
Dividend
yield
YTD
return
30-yr*
return
Investing in these 7 stocks is likely to pay off if their
past records are any indication.
Magnificent 7
11177.222%%%%
11155.333
11155.222
11144..8 88888888888 .8 .8 8 .8 8 .8 88888888 .8 .8 .8 8888 .8 .8 ...
1111111333 111111 ..5 555
13 13 13 113 13 11113 13 1113 13 13 111113 133 111111133 111113 11333333333333333 133333333333.2 2222 .2 222222222222222222222 .2222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
11111.444
30-yr*
return
y
their
Dividend investors often start by looking
for the highest yields. But the smartest in
the crowd also assess whether a
company can sustain the payments it
makes to shareholders.
Although that is not an easy judgment
to make, it’s not difficult to find industry
leading companies that have consis-
tently raised their dividends. Seven of
the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones industrial
average have increased their dividends
for 30 years in a row, according to S&P
Dow Jones Indices. That’s a strong
indicator that they’re likely to continue.
These seven stocks all pay higher
yields than the 2.1 percent offered by the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index.
The yield is how much a
company pays per share per
year divided by the stock price.
Keep in mind that a yield can be
high — say 4, 5 or 6 percent —
because the company is in trouble
and its stock price has declined. If a
company continues to pay the same
dividend, the yield automatically
increases as the stock price
declines. If a company’s troubles
worsen, not only will the stock price
fall further, but the dividend could
be cut as well. It’s what’s known
as a “dividend trap.”
Mark Jewell, Jenni Sohn • AP Sources: FactSet; S&P Dow Jones Indices *annualized through Dec. 31, 2012
Dividend Hunter
The bluest chips
Air Products APD 76.11 9 92.79 90.17 1.07 1.2 s s 7.3 +1.21 4 2.4 19 2.8
Amer Water Works AWK 32.75 0 40.69 40.26 0.15 0.4 s s 8.4+21.51 226.8a 20 2.5
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.00 8 45.52 43.70 -0.10 -0.2 s s 12.8+13.70 3 14.3 \>99 7.3
Aqua America Inc WTR 21.52 0 30.33 30.25 0.36 1.2 s s 19.0+40.08 1 12.3 22 2.3
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.38 9 33.98 33.00 0.46 1.4 s s 20.5 +5.96 3 -3.8 15 2.3
AutoZone Inc AZO 341.98 9399.10 391.89 6.64 1.7 s s 10.6 +3.40 3 28.1 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.44 12.57 0.50 4.1 s s 8.3+36.47 1-16.7 48 0.3
Bk of NY Mellon BK 19.30 0 29.13 28.85 0.33 1.2 s s 12.3+20.96 2 -6.0 14 1.8
Bon Ton Store BONT 3.50 9 14.99 13.79 2.00 17.0 s s 13.4+62.88 1 23.3 ... 1.5
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 43.08 0 53.30 53.58 1.30 2.5 s s 10.8+20.97 2 7.7 18 1.7
Cigna Corp CI 39.01 0 62.30 62.63 2.97 5.0 s s 17.2+33.88 1 9.5 11 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 34.67 7 41.25 38.83 -0.11 -0.3 s s 7.1+13.39 3 8.5 20 2.9
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 28.09 0 42.00 40.71 -0.29 -0.7 t s 9.0+38.79 1 17.7 18 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 25.38 0 29.53 29.70 0.73 2.5 s s 8.6 +8.54 3 8.0 15 3.6
Community Hlth Sys CYH 20.71 0 44.63 44.43 1.52 3.5 s s 44.5+85.55 1 7.0 15 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 34.00 0 58.21 56.90 -1.03 -1.8 s s 25.1+35.89 1 17.8 47 4.5
Entercom Comm ETM 4.74 9 8.42 7.71 -0.21 -2.7 t s 10.5+24.35 2 -4.9 12 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 11.14 7 15.75 14.29 -0.22 -1.5 t s -0.8 -1.72 4 5.3 62 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 5 5.15 4.09 0.01 0.4 t t -4.6 +5.16 3 -4.8 31 9.8
Genpact Ltd G 13.06 0 18.25 17.80 -0.21 -1.2 s s 14.8+24.55 2 9.4 22 1.0
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 5.14 7 9.81 7.98 0.24 3.1 s s 35.3 —8.17 4 -7.7 ... 4.3
Heinz HNZ 51.91 0 72.70 72.50 -0.02 0.0 s s 25.7+39.90 1 12.6 24 2.8
Hershey Company HSY 59.51 0 85.50 83.90 -0.42 -0.5 s s 16.2+41.79 1 20.0 29 2.0
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.98 38.81 -0.50 -1.3 t s 9.3+28.48 2 14.2 23 1.6
M&T Bank MTB 76.92 0105.90 104.35 0.39 0.4 t s 6.0+26.13 2 8.2 14 2.7
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 99.50 99.67 0.96 1.0 s s 13.0 +4.66 3 15.3 19 3.1
Mondelez Intl MDLZ 24.05 0 28.75 28.41 -0.17 -0.6 s s 11.6+16.10 2 10.3 33 1.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 18.92 9 22.89 22.11 0.31 1.4 s s 9.1 +3.55 3 4.4 14 3.6
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 6.00 0 17.50 17.17 0.18 1.1 s s 62.1+100.81 1 23.0 20 2.8
PNC Financial PNC 53.36 0 67.89 66.80 1.78 2.7 s s 14.6 +8.57 3 3.9 13 2.4
PPL Corp PPL 26.68 9 31.35 30.49 -0.15 -0.5 s s 6.5+13.33 3 -4.0 12 4.8
Penna REIT PEI 11.81 0 19.42 19.39 0.12 0.6 s s 9.9+31.91 1 0.2 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 63.01 0 77.41 77.04 -0.16 -0.2 s s 12.6+23.41 2 5.0 20 2.8
Philip Morris Intl PM 81.10 8 94.13 91.37 0.26 0.3 s s 9.2+10.14 325.2a 18 3.7
Procter & Gamble PG 59.07 0 77.77 76.34 -0.84 -1.1 t s 12.4+16.12 2 5.2 19 2.9
Prudential Fncl PRU 44.47 8 65.17 60.41 0.81 1.4 s s 13.3 -1.31 4 -0.7 64 2.6
SLM Corp SLM 12.85 0 20.13 19.92 0.85 4.5 s s 16.3+26.59 2 4.7 10 3.0
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 42.35 0 60.00 59.00 1.01 1.7 s s 11.3 ... 0.0 ... 3.3
TJX Cos TJX 37.65 9 46.67 44.92 0.01 0.0 t s 5.8+18.83 2 23.6 18 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 26.30 0 37.35 37.12 0.60 1.6 s s 13.5+37.51 1 10.6 19 2.9
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 0 48.77 48.02 0.06 0.1 s s 11.0+26.58 2 12.7 \>99 4.3
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 8 77.60 72.50 -0.53 -0.7 s s 6.3+21.12 2 9.7 14 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 37.65 5 45.96 41.65 1.02 2.5 s s 6.3 —.51 4 7.4 14 2.9
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Earnings
season

s
big
winners
StockScreener
*1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell Data through March 12 Source: FactSet
Travelers (TRV) $81.74 $0.72 $0.20 260% 40.7% 2.2% 1.5
NRG Energy (NRG) 25.33 0.33 0.12 175 52 1.4 1.2
Cincinnati Financial (CINF) 46.65 1.11 0.45 147 30.7 3.5 2.0
Applied Materials (AMAT) 13.40 0.06 0.03 100 8.1 3.0 1.6
Goodyear Tire & Rubber (GT) 12.98 0.39 0.20 95 8.8 0.0 1.5
Chesapeake Energy (CHK) 21.49 0.26 0.14 86 -13 1.6 1.7
Consol Energy (CNX) 32.57 0.43 0.24 79 -0.2 1.5 1.3
Edison International (EIX) 50.71 1.79 1.02 75 16.5 2.6 1.4
1-YR STOCK
CHANGE
ACTUAL
EPS
EST.
EPS DIFFERENCE
DIVIDEND
YIELD
AVG. BROKER
RATING* CLOSE COMPANY
Investors got a pleasant surprise
from companies this past earnings
season. Again.
More than 70 percent of compa-
nies in the Standard & Poor’s 500
index reported earnings per share
for the fourth quarter that topped
financial analysts’ estimates,
according to FactSet. It’s become a
habit for companies in recent years.
Since the first quarter of 2009,
when the stock market bottomed, at
least 65 percent of S&P 500
companies have reported earnings
above expectations in every
quarter.
This screen shows S&P 500
companies that beat expectations
by some of the widest margins. All
of these stocks exceeded forecasts
by 75 percent or more. The average
company in the index topped
analysts’ estimates by 3.4 percent.
Insurer Travelers (TRV), for
example, more than tripled
expectations by reporting 72 cents
per share in earnings, compared
with a forecast for 20 cents.
American Funds BalA x ABALX 21.68 +.03 +2.3 +12.5/A +6.8/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.86 +.04 +.2 +4.5/D +4.3/E
American Funds CapIncBuA x CAIBX 54.70 -.03 +1.9 +11.4/A +3.9/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA x CWGIX 39.41 +.06 +2.2 +13.6/B +2.7/C
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 43.10 +.23 +1.6 +10.1/C +1.7/A
American Funds FnInvA x ANCFX 44.20 +.06 +2.7 +14.2/B +4.7/D
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 37.08 +.05 +2.2 +14.0/A +4.7/D
American Funds IncAmerA x AMECX 18.94 -.04 +2.1 +12.5/A +6.4/A
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 32.49 +.09 +2.9 +12.4/C +4.9/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 33.56 +.20 +2.8 +14.4/A +4.8/B
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T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 40.37 -.25 +1.7 +8.3/C +7.2/B
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Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 35.64 +.25 +2.9 +14.2/B +7.1/A
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Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 13.33 +.02 +1.6 +8.3/ +5.0/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+0.8%
+3.8%
Nasdaq
+0.1%
+1.8%
S&P 500
+0.6%
+2.7%
Russell 2000
+1.1%
+3.2%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+10.8%
+7.6%
+9.4%
+12.1%
Mortgage rates rise
The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage
jumped last week to its highest level since Au-
gust, according to Freddie Mac. It climbed to 3.63
percent from 3.52 percent, and the gain of 0.11
percentage points matched its biggest one-week
rise in the last 51 weeks. Mortgage rates have
followed Treasury yields higher on signs that the
economy is improving.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Davis Govt MMF/Cl A 0.16 $ 1,000 min (800) 279-0279
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 1.93 0.00 s s -0.38 2.35 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 4.01 0.05 s s -0.13 4.18 3.22
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 2.82 0.01 s s -0.67 3.51 2.64
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.17 0.05 s s -0.49 4.68 3.89
U.S. high yield Barclays 5.56 -0.06 t t -1.56 8.15 5.56
Treasury Barclays 1.14 -0.02 r s -0.13 1.34 0.80
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.08 -0.01 t s 0.01 0.12 0.01
1-year T-Bill 0.16 -0.01 t t -0.07 0.25 0.16
6-month T-Bill 0.11 0.00 t s -0.03 0.15 0.09
2-year T-Note 0.26 0.01 t s -0.10 0.40 0.21
5-year T-Note 0.83 -0.06 t s -0.26 1.20 0.54
10-year T-Note 1.99 -0.05 t s -0.29 2.38 1.39
30-year T-Bond 3.21 -0.04 s s -0.21 3.48 2.45
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
S U N D A Y B U S I N E S S
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SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 5D TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S U N D A Y B U S I N E S S
The message is this: engineer-
ing isn’t just for boys.
Toys are a crucial entry
point for kids to get exposure
to STEM disciplines, and girls
miss out on some of the early
playtime experiences neces-
sary to develop those skills,
said Yvonne Ng, who heads St.
Catherine University’s National
Center for STEM Elementary
Education.
“We’re not engaging girls.
We’re still thinking in very male
terms,” Ng said.
By the fifth grade, Ng said,
many girls have “checked out”
of math and science, which
they see as a boys’ subjects
where girls can’t succeed. That
self-doubt extends to higher
education, where girls are more
likely to drop out of science- and
math-based majors.
“There’s this belief that
they’re not competent, even if
their grades say they are,” Ng
said. “Women don’t feel like an
engineer. They feel like an im-
postor.”
Sterling, who graduated from
Stanford with an engineering
degree in 2005, developed Gold-
ieBlox with help from Kick-
starter, an online crowd-funding
platform for creative projects.
She raised $286,000 — almost
twice her goal — in about a
month. After her fundraising
video went viral on social me-
dia, she received about 22,000
online pre-orders for the toy,
which brought in money to start
production.
The project was inspired by
the gender inequity Sterling wit-
nessed firsthand as an engineer-
ing student.
“I was one of very few women
in the program,” she said. “In
every class I went into, I was al-
ways one of a handful of girls in
a room of 80 or 90 people. It’s
hard being a minority in a male-
dominated field.”
According to studies by the
American Association of Univer-
sity Women, about 87 percent of
professional engineers are men.
Sterling hopes GoldieBlox will
move that statistic in the favor of
women. The toy lands on store
shelves next month, but the first
18,000 pre-ordered copies are
set to be delivered this week. Al-
ready, Sterling has plans to make
GoldieBlox into a series and says
she’s set to launch an interactive
digital version for the Apple iPad
late this year.
The successes, or failures,
of GoldieBlox will be carefully
tracked by a Pennsylvania State
University professor and gradu-
ate student who will spend the
next couple of years studying
the effect the toy has on girls.
Lynn Liben, a distinguished
professor of psychology who is
leading the research, said that
GoldieBlox is one of the few
toys that breaks the gender ste-
reotypes reinforced by the toy
industry.
“Many toy companies are still
marketing to boys versus girls,”
Liben said. “It tells people that
boys and girls are different when
it comes to playing or building
or getting dirty. That can be
problematic because not every
kid fits that gender tendency
that might be typical.”
But two decades after a talk-
ing Barbie doll was famously
criticized by women’s groups for
saying “math class is tough,” the
$21 billion toy industry is show-
ing signs of change. Last month’s
New York International Toy Fair,
one of the largest industry events
to showcase new products, fea-
tured a handful of girl-focused
toys to teach STEM skills.
Among them was Nancy B’s Sci-
ence Club, a line of science jour-
nals and microscopes, binoculars
and telescopes for girls.
Nancy Balter, who led the
toy’s development for Gardena,
Calif.-based company Educa-
tional Insights, said parents and
grandparents are also losing in-
terest in the old princesses and
dolls.
“There is clearly an interest
in having daughters grow up to
major in not only biology but
in engineering and math,” she
said. “Times have changed in
terms of thinking of women do-
ing these things.”
GOLDILBOX
Continued from Page 2D
MCT PHOTO
Debbie Sterling, founder of GoldieBlox, Inc., demonstrates how to play her new toy for girls called
Goldie Blox and the Spinning Machine at their new office in Oakland, Calif.
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK — There are three jobs
open at Rodon Group, a plastic parts
manufacturer near Philadelphia. But de-
spite the reports of a shortage of skilled
workers nationwide, CEO Michael
Araten isn’t sweating it.
Rodon, located in Hatfield, Pa., works
with local community colleges to make
sure students — the firm’s prospective
employees — get the skills they need
to work at the company making plastic
parts for products suchas bedframes and
machinery. Anyone using its manufactur-
ing equipment needs to have math and
computer skills.
“We’re willing to look at non-tradition-
al methods,” Araten says.
Companies across the country have
been working short-handed because it’s
hard to find workers with the skills they
need. The shortage is harder for small
businesses than it is for larger ones. They
don’t have as many employees to step in
to when there’s an opening. Twenty-one
percent of the owners who recently took
part in a survey by the National Federa-
tion of Independent Business said they
had openings they couldn’t fill.
But some owners are findingsolutions.
Like Araten, they partner with schools.
Some are running in-house training pro-
grams or pair skilled employees with co-
workers who aren’t up on the latest tech-
nology. And others are changing their
recruiting strategy.
The skilled-worker deficit is getting
more attention as the economy im-
proves and businesses hire more. Presi-
dent Barack Obama mentioned the is-
sue in his State of the Union address
last month, calling for more training
for workers.
•••
THE PARTNERSHIP SOLUTION
Araten and other Philadelphia-area
manufacturers have formed a group to
work with local community colleges to
be sure students get the ground in math,
science and computer skills that they’ll
need for jobs like building and operat-
ing robots. When they arrive at Rodon,
they’ll start learning the company’s man-
ufacturing processes. Rodon, which also
makes K’Nex toys, brightly colored plas-
tic pieces that can be combined to form
cars, animals, rollercoasters and other
objects, uses a manufacturing process
called plastic injection molding that’s run
with computers and robots.
Rodon’s workforce of about 100 is get-
ting older. CEO Araten wants to be sure
he has people ready to step in as workers
in their 50s and 60s start to retire.
“That’s why we’ve increased our re-
lationship with schools to be sure we’re
first in line,” he says.
Tailored Label Products’ partner is a
program called Second Chance, which
finds training and jobs for students who
are in danger of dropping out of high
school, says Tracy Tenpenny, a vice
president at the Menomonee Falls, Wis.
company. The students learn how to use
complex computer-operated machines to
create customized labels that go into car
engines and electronic equipment. They
spend two hours each day in class and
six hours at the factory earning slightly
above minimumwage.
•••
THE RECRUITINGSTRATEGY
The super-high-skilled worker that
Burt-Watts needs is going to be hard
to find — and the company knows it,
says Heather Merz, its chief financial
officer.
The Austin, Texas contracting com-
pany has done mostly interior work,
but decided in 2011 it would expand its
division that constructs buildings from
the ground up. It began looking for work-
ers with highly specialized skills: They
had to be knowledgeable about the Aus-
tin construction industry, specialize in
“ground-up” construction and have con-
nections with good subcontractors.
“We started realizing, this may be a
little more challenging thanwe thought,”
Merz says.
So the company decided to search
more aggressively for candidates. It
sends a team of recruiters to Texas col-
leges that grant degrees in construction,
like Texas A&M. They go to job fairs to
interview students in much the same
way that lawfirms and Fortune 500 com-
panies do. The strategy also gives the
company access to experienced job can-
didates through alumni offices.
The company expects that it will take
some time to fill its current opening for
an estimator, someone who works with
customers and subcontractors on a proj-
ect to come up with a price. The search
began in mid-January.
“We don’t usually get too frustratedbe-
cause we know that if we take our time
we will find the right fit,” Merz says.
Small businesses find ways to beat skills shortage
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SunDAy, MARch 17, 2013 S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 8 1 PAGE 6
Editorial
S
TATE SEN. Lisa Baker
continues to be a voice of
measured reason in our hyper-
partisan political world. The
Lehman Township Republican
got it right during a television
panel discussion Thursday on
armed guards in schools.
“We need very well-trained
resource officers and individu-
als who have the proper Act 120
training,” Baker argued. “I’m
very concerned about extend-
ing that to individuals who have
not had the training.”
This seems so obvious it’s a
marvel more people don’t make
the point in our mad rush to fill
schools with guns following the
Connecticut shootings.
It has not been said often
enough since that tragedy:
Schools are and continue to be
among the very safest places
for children. Our youngsters are
far more likely to be injured or
killed at home or on the streets.
And it seems wise for propo-
nents of the “armed officer in
every building” idea to pause
and consider the possibility that
most schools are safe because
they are largely gun free.
This is not an argument
against resource officers pack-
ing heat in every school. Well-
trained resource officers have
proven their worth in many
high schools, often forging posi-
tive relationships with students
that can help prevent violence
outright or cut it short when it
manifests.
But if we are putting guns
in schools, it makes sense to
require a minimum level of
training in both firearm use
and conflict resolution, as well
as rigorous background checks.
Periodic additional training and
testing would be wise as well.
It also requires consensus
among the stakeholders — ad-
ministrators, teachers, school
boards and parents. Armed of-
ficers should not be foisted on
districts that do not want them.
Which is why State Rep.
Kevin Haggerty, D-Lackawanna
— another guest on the show
on WVIA-TV — deserves some
acknowledgment for proposing
a bill that would provide $90
million for guards without re-
quiring them.
One can make a strong argu-
ment that so much money could
be better spent on academic
programs, or on other security
improvements such as two sets
of locked doors at entry points,
but if guards are what districts
truly want, this could be one
way to help provide them.
But Baker provided the true
voice of reason, arguing that
alternatives to armed guards
should be considered first, and
that if armed guards are chosen,
training should be required.
Because in the end protecting
children can’t be about guns; it
has to be about truly caring --
and thoughtful -- adults.
Our OpiniOn: ArMED OFFiCErS
Don’t overreact
to school violence
N
ew budget proposals
this week from influ-
ential members of the
House Republican and
Senate Democratic leadership
are the stuff of political carica-
tures. House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis.,
last year’s Republican nomi-
nee for vice president, reprised
the spending-cut talking points
from his failed campaign with
little change and no apparent
irony. Senate Budget Commit-
tee Chairwoman Patty Murray,
D-Wash., meanwhile, offered the
outlines of a budget that increas-
es taxes and spending, while do-
ing little more than buying time
on the entitlement programs
at the heart of Washington’s
long-term problems. Neither
approach offers a realistic way
forward. Instead, they give Re-
publicans and Democrats yet
another arena in which to fight
their ideological battles over the
size and scope of government.
The spending blueprint Ryan
released Tuesday would balance
the federal budget by 2023, rely-
ing in part on the tax increases
and Medicare savings that Dem-
ocrats championed but Ryan
railed against on the campaign
trail last year. It also recycles
proposals to “strengthen” Med-
icaid, food stamps and Medicare
by capping federal spending on
themand giving recipients more
flexibility. Promoting innova-
tion in those programs would
be welcome, but Ryan’s budget
would cut costs at the expense
of maintaining the federal safety
net and Medicare’s guarantee of
affordable coverage for all se-
niors.
Murray’s proposal, which will
be formally released Wednes-
day, has a less ambitious goal.
It seeks to bring down the defi-
cit over the coming decade so
that the federal debt won’t grow
faster than the economy. That’s
a fine target for the near term.
Unlike Ryan’s budget, however,
Murray’s plan wouldn’t nec-
essarily stop the deficit from
growing rapidly again in later
years as Medicare rolls expand
and the cost of medical care in-
creases. Meanwhile, she would
provide $100 billion in new
stimulus spending and replace
the across-the-board “seques-
ter” cuts with $1.95 trillion
worth of tax hikes, unspecified
reductions in entitlements and
smaller reductions in discre-
tionary programs.
In short, the proposals play to
the polarized extremes of each
party. To Ryan, cutting spend-
ing is crucial to reviving the
economy; to Murray, the key
is pouring federal dollars into
infrastructure projects and job
training. Ryan’s budget would
simplify the tax code in order to
cut tax rates; Murray’s would do
so to raise revenue by almost $1
trillion over the coming decade.
If these ideas sound familiar,
they should — they were re-
peated ad infinitum during last
year’s campaign. Lawmakers
will have to step out of their ide-
ological comfort zones and find
a path they can walk together.
Los Angeles Times
OthEr OpiniOn: FEDErAL BuDGEt
New proposals just
partisan posturing
I’m never going to stop pursuing the
right thing. I don’t know if what I’m
doing is the right thing … but I’m
listening.”
Keving Haggerty
The Republican state senator from Lackawanna dis-
cussed his efforts to fund armed officers in schools.
Editorial Board
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO / Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President / Executive Editor
Here’s to our right to make stupid and foolish decisions
PERHAPS yOU remem-
ber when Dr. Doom
conquered the world.
Or perhaps you don’t.
Sadly enough, even in
this day and age, not
everyone is comic book
literate.
Suffice it to say, then, that back in the
’80s, Marvel Comics published a graphic
novel in which the villainous Victor Von
Doom achieved his dearest goal: to rule
the world. And he made it a better place,
too. Famine ended, the stock market
climbed, crime fell, occupying armies
withdrew, racial oppression vanished.
Doom turned the planet into a paradise
and the only cost of his beneficence was
free will. He created a device that took
away the ability of human beings to de-
cide for themselves.
When the Avengers defeated him, the
world returned to rack and ruin as human-
ity reasserted its right to be as bleeped up
as it wanted to be. The Avenger Hawkeye
wondered aloud if they had done the
right thing. Whereupon Captain America
admonished him, “The world isn’t perfect.
**But people are free to make their own
choices — and that’s the way it should
be.”
He could have been talking to Michael
Bloomberg.
The emperor — beg pardon, the mayor
— of New york City was defeated Mon-
day, not by the Avengers, but by a state
Supreme Court judge, Milton Tingling,
who struck down Bloomberg’s ban on the
sale of extra large, non-diet soft drinks.
Justice Tingling, though not known to
possess superpowers, nevertheless zapped
the forces of overreach. “Arbitrary and ca-
pricious,” he called the restrictions, which
would have taken effect Tuesday.
But Bloomberg’s ban was more than
that. It was the very definition of liberal-
ism run amok, a good idea (people should
limit their intake of sugary soft drinks)
driven headlong into the weeds of over-
kill, over regulation and basic preposter-
ousness. The resemblance to conservative
extremism and its resort to unwieldy laws
to govern behaviors it disapproves (did
someone say transvaginal ultrasound?),
is doubtless unintended, but no less real
even so.
Apparently, if you send two people
venturing out, one to the extreme left,
and the other to the extreme right, of our
political spectrum, they will end up face
to face. Because the distinguishing charac-
teristic of extreme liberalism or extreme
conservatism is the extremism; itself, the
fact that some people just don’t know
when to quit.
Obviously, the state is sometimes
obliged to impose restrictions. One
shouldn’t be allowed to sell Camels to
kindergarteners. Or do 90 on a residential
street. Or discriminate by race, creed,
gender, condition or sexual orientation.
But there is a difference between those
restrictions the state imposes to protect
the health, welfare and property of those
around us from us or defend the vulner-
able from exploitation and those the
state imposes to regulate behavior that is
simply unwise. The latter reflects a lack of
faith in the wisdom of people, their abil-
ity, when properly informed, to make the
right choice.
yes, obesity is a crisis impacting our
health, our economy and even, some have
argued, our national security. We are a
lard butt nation waddling toward demise.
Got it.
yet, if Americans kicked their cigarette
addiction by a public campaign that edu-
cated them to the dangers thereof, what
reason do we have to believe they would
not be able to kick sugary soft drinks by
the same means? None.
So Bloomberg is wrong, and Captain
America was right. If one is not free to
make one’s own bad or stupid decisions,
then one is not free. It is an abiding
truth of which we seem to need constant
reminders.
Perhaps you remember the axiom
about eternal vigilance being the price of
freedom. If so, you will not be surprised
to hear that Dr. Doom, as he escaped, said
he was only defeated “for now.” Or that
Mayor Bloomberg has vowed to appeal.
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer
Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami
Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33132. Readers
may write to himvia email at lpitts@miamiherald.
com.
COMMENTARY
L E O N A R D P I T T S J R .
Snowquester, sequester: They both inspire a yawn
IT IS fitting that we referred to last week’s
storm-that-wasn’t as a snowquestration.
And not just because it was kind of embar-
rassing and shut the government down.
No, the meteorological turbulence —
such as it was — was like the economic
turbulence in another way, leaving us all
wondering: When will it arrive, and how
bad will it be? Or will $85 billion in auto-
matic budget cuts miss me altogether?
This uncertainty was compounded by
confusion when the Dow hit record levels
anyway. It made me question whether I
knew anything at all about economics,
and I answered myself: No.
I have done my darnedest to under-
stand what the sequester is and what it
will do, and my best guess is that it was
put into place because no one could agree
on anything, and it took effect because no
one could agree on anything.
Sort of like three couples trying to de-
cide on a destination for dinner: Nobody
ends up eating where they really want to
eat. Only with a lot more brinkmanship.
It makes you long for the return of George
W. “I’m the decider” Bush.
I’ve decided to do exactly what Presi-
dent Barack Obama does not want me to
do: Ignore it all. He keeps trying to get
my attention from his bully pulpit and by
staging photo ops with potential victims
of the sequester, but I’m not going to bite.
I have my own troubles.
I am also ignoring the chattering class
— Washington big thinkers who have
been reduced to hurling insults at the
politicians, like bettors at a cockfight.
They are part of this tableau, too, making
a nice living as spectators.
A little pork would go a long way about
now. I am not sure why the president
hasn’t handed out a few dams or bridges
or military bases to get this done, but
maybe it will still happen when he goes to
Capitol Hill to meet with the rank and file
this week. Can’t hurt. And there’d be jobs,
the Holy Grail of this administration.
The fiscal ultraconservatives are hold-
ing their ground on the sequester because
they think this crisis is the mechanism
for reducing the size of government, but
I think something quite different will
happen. Government will just be more
irrelevant to those it pretends to govern
than it is now.
We already prefer to get our daily news
from Comedy Central. Perhaps we can
get our government from some other,
more appealing, source than Sen. Mitch
McConnell, with his nasal voice and that
weak chin. I am thinking Jimmy Fallon.
He already gets along great with the first
lady.
Natural and manmade disasters will
continue to threaten. I don’t wish for my
neighbor to be furloughed by the seques-
ter, nor do I want the next snowstorm to
knock a tree onto her roof. But I’m much
more worried about keeping my own
house in order (both literally and figura-
tively). In the end, though, what will be,
will be.
Likewise, I am powerless to force the
president and Congress to act. I am as
meaningless to them as they are becom-
ing to me. That they believe they are
representing me — us — makes me feel
like I am trapped in the Samuel Beckett
play “Waiting for Godot,” waiting for
something to happen. And it never does.
I want to be more like those guys on
Wall Street. Clearly, none of this both-
ers them. They are almost giddy with
optimism. The Dow will easily make
15,000 soon, they say, and will assuredly
hit 20,000.
Wall Street, like me, is ignoring the
doomsday predictions about the seques-
ter. They are also ignoring predictions
that the economy is hopelessly mired in
slow growth and will almost certainly be
for decades.
What a cheerful bunch. you have to
admire them.
In the meantime, I am going to the
Philadelphia Flower Show, the ultimate
escapist fantasy. Spring blooming indoors
while winter carries on outside.
If that isn’t a metaphor for my state of
mind right now, I don’t know what is.
Susan Reimer is a columnist for the Baltimore
Sun. Readers may send her email at susan.
reimer@baltsun.com.
COMMENTARY
S U S A N R E I M E R
A little pork would go a long way about
now.
quOtE OF thE DAY
I saw the new wizard
of Oz movie. I went last
Thursday, the night
before “Oz the Great and
Powerful” was officially
released, to a “preview”
that was open to the
public.
I got there five minutes before it began.
There were nine people in the theater. I
spent two hours behind 3D glasses watch-
ing a $200 million spectacle.
Then I left and went home.
Don’t misunderstand. It was terrific.
Colorful, ambitious, visually stunning and
ultimately satisfying, at least in my view,
with good triumphing over evil and the
Land of Oz safe at last.
But what I saw on that 40-foot screen
can’t compare with what I watched as a
kid on a 14-inch black-and-white TV.
“‘The wizard of Oz’ is coming!” we
would scream when a commercial trum-
peted the annual airing of the 1939 classic
starring Judy Garland. That’s right. an-
nual. as in: once a year. My parents would
buy special ice cream. My grandmother
would line up her rocking chair. It was an
event. a big old deal. The network (CBs
back then) actually had hosts for the
broadcast (I remember Danny Kaye warn-
ing kids not to be afraid when the MGM
lion roared) and you got the feeling all of
america was sitting down to watch the
same magical story.
For a very simple reason: You only got
one chance to see it.
Or you had to wait until next year.
This, of course, is fundamentally dif-
ferent from how we entertain ourselves
today. Today, whether it’s “The wizard
of Oz” or “The Bourne Identity,” you can
buy it, rent it, stream it, save it, DVR it,
download it, borrow it or steal it. who on
Earth would plan an entire week around
watching one movie on TV?
But that’s exactly why there is nothing
as special as “The wizard of Oz” broadcast
once was. Young people reading this, try
to imagine a world without recording,
without downloads, no way to preserve
a showing, no stores selling copies, no
amount of money that could bring a movie
into your home.
Try to imagine that if you wanted to see
something, you had to clear the time to
watch it. One show only. No rewinding.
No pausing. No transferring to a portable
device to view on an airplane.
I know, kids. Horrifying!
But believe it or not, those of us alive in
the 1960s remember a world just like that.
we remember when watching “Peter Pan”
with Mary Martin was a big annual deal,
or “Cinderella” with Lesley ann warren.
Most of all, we remember Dorothy, the Tin
Man, the scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion.
we remember their shining moments and
their famous lines, even though we only
witnessed them once a year.
we remember the munchkins singing,
“we represent the Lollipop Guild!” and the
Cowardly Lion asking “whadda they got
that I ain’t got?” (answer: “courage”) and
we remember Dorothy exclaiming, “Oh,
auntie Em, there’s no place like home!”
Today, there’s no need to remember.
Just go to YouTube and search for the part
of the movie you want to see. Chances are,
you’ll be watching it 30 seconds later.
Instant viewing, missing magic
Consequently, there is nothing impor-
tant about when you watch something
today, unless you like to be the first to see
everything.
Otherwise, whenever you want to see
it, you see it. You can wait until it hits
pay-per-view. wait until it hits Blu-ray and
DVD. wait until apple TV rents it to you
for $3.99 or Netflix eventually shows it for
free.
Maybe this is for the best. I don’t know.
Movies are art, and part of me says, “why
not have great art available at your finger-
tips?”
On the other hand, there was something
magical about the once-a-year viewing,
kind of like the circus coming to town, or
a musical star finally playing a concert in
your city. You made time for it. You sa-
vored it. You didn’t just throw it on a pile
of “things I gotta watch.”
The new wizard of Oz film dwarfs the
original in terms of special effects, color,
sets, costumes. It’s in 3D!
But when it ends, there’s the same feel-
ing you have with all films today. Maybe
I’ll buy it on DVD. Maybe I’ll stream some
clips.
what’s missing are the empty bowls of
ice cream, the rocking chair moved back to
its place, the farewell from a TV host and
the dancing dreams of children wondering
how long a year is, which is when they’ll
see the Emerald City again.
Mitch Albomis a columnist for the Detroit Free
Press. Readers may write to himat: Detroit Free
Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, Mich. 48226, or via
email at malbom@freepress.com.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 7D TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com F O R U M
IN CHOICE
of both topic
and foil, Rand
Paul’s now leg-
endary senate
filibuster was
a stroke of po-
litical genius.
The topic was, ostensibly, very
narrow: Does the president
have the constitutional author-
ity to put a drone-launched
Hellfire missile through your
kitchen — you, a good citizen
of Topeka to whom POTUs
might have taken a dislike —
while you’re cooking up a pot
roast?
The constituency of those
who could not give this
question a straight answer is
exceedingly small. Unfortu-
nately, among them is attorney
General Eric Holder. Enter the
foil. He told a senate hearing
that such an execution would
not be “appropriate.”
appropriate being a bureau-
cratic word meaning nothing,
Holder’s answer was a PR di-
saster. The correct response, of
course, is: absent an active civil
war on U.s. soil (of the kind not
seen in 150 years) or a jihadist
invasion from saskatchewan led
by the Topeka pot roaster, the
answer is no.
The hypothetical being in-
conceivable, Paul’s performance
was both theatrically brilliant
and substantively irrelevant.
as for the principle at stake,
Holder’s opinion carries no
weight in any case. He is hardly
a great attorney general whose
words will ring through history.
Nor would anything any at-
torney general says be binding
on the next president, or for
that matter on any Congress or
court.
The vexing and pressing is-
sue is the use of drones abroad.
The filibuster pretended not to
be about that. which is testimo-
ny to Paul’s political adroitness.
It was not until two days later
that he showed his hand, writ-
ing in The washington Post,
“No american should be killed
by a drone without first being
charged with a crime.” Note
the absence of the restrictive
clause: “on american soil.”
Now we’re talking about a
larger, more controversial issue:
the killing by drone in Yemen
of al-Qaeda operative anwar
al-awlaki. Outside american
soil, the Constitution does
not rule, no matter how much
Paul would like it to. Yet Paul’s
unease applies to non-american
drone targets as well. His quar-
rel is with the very notion of
the war on terror, though he is
normally too smart to say that
openly and unequivocally. Un-
like his father, who implied that
9/11 was payback for our sins,
Paul the Younger more gingerly
expresses general skepticism
about not just the efficacy but
the legality of the entire war.
That skepticism is finding an
audience as the war grinds into
its 12th year, as our hapless
attorney general vainly tries to
define its terms and as the ad-
ministration conducts a major
drone war with defiant secrecy.
Nor is this some minor adjunct
to battle — an estimated 4,700
have been killed by drone.
George w. Bush was excori-
ated for waterboarding exactly
three terrorists, all of whom are
now enjoying an extensive re-
tirement on a sunny Caribbean
island (though strolls beyond
Gitmo’s gates are prohibited).
whereas President Obama,
with thousands of kills to his
name, evokes little protest from
yesterday’s touch-not-a-hair-on-
their-head zealots. Of whom,
of course, sen. Obama was a
leading propagandist.
such hypocrisy is the homage
Democrats pay to Republicans
when the former take office,
confront national security real-
ity, feel the weight of their duty
to protect the nation — and
end up doing almost everything
they had denounced their pre-
decessors for doing. The beauty
of such hypocrisy, however,
is that the rotation of power
creates a natural bipartisan con-
sensus on the proper of conduct
this war.
which creates a unique op-
portunity to finally codify the
rules. The war’s constitutional
charter, the 2001 authoriza-
tion for Use of Military Force
(aUMF) has proved quite
serviceable.
But the commander-in-chief’s
authority is so broad — it
leaves the limits of his power to
be determined, often in secret
memos, by the administration’s
own in-house lawyers — that it
has spawned suspicion, fear and
now filibuster.
It is time to rethink. That
means not repealing the origi-
nal aUMF but, using the les-
sons of the last 12 years, rewrit-
ing it with particular attention
to a new code governing drone
warfare and the question of
where, when and against whom
it should be permitted.
Necessity having led the
Bush and Obama administra-
tions to the use of near-identical
weapons and tactics, a national
consensus has been forged.
Let’s make it open.
all we need now is a presi-
dent willing to lead and a
Congress willing to take respon-
sibility for the conduct of a war
that, however much Paul and
his acolytes may wish it away,
will long be with us.
Charles Krauthammer’s email ad-
dress is letters@charleskrauthammer.
Nations needs a need code
clarifying the use of drones
COMMENTARY
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
It’s ‘The Wizard of Oz’ alright, but it’s just not the same
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
MAIL BAG | LETTERS FROM READERS
Bad regional attitude
spoils shale potential
S
ome years ago I attended a meeting
at Penn state wilkes-Barre campus
to learn about natural gas drilling
in Pennsylvania in the area called
Marcellus shale that runs through
our Northern Tier counties, including
Luzerne County.
I came out of that lecture and ques-
tion sessions with the excitement of
a kid with a new toy. I have gone to
six other meetings but depression
has set in. I have signed a lease in the
meantime and spent over four hours
at two different times in the office of
a company called XTD, based in Fort
worth, Texas, to learn first-hand about
the operation of the actual drilling and
fracking of the shale to obtain gas.
after reading the articles, letters
to the editor, talk show callers, and a
TV show on station wVIa, I cannot
believe the critics, pessimists, the
downers, not one caller or letter writer
was in support of gas drilling in this
state. Here is a chance to bring some
real worth to this state, which as you
know, along with Luzerne County, is
in desperate financial need. what a
spirit-killing area!
Had Tom Edison, Henry Ford, and
the wright brothers done their
work in Pennsylvania, with the
attitude here we would be riding
in horse-drawn wagons, reading
by candle light or whale oil and
the only things flying would be the
pigeons in wilkes-Barre’s Public
square. The middle ages are alive
and well in Pennsylvania.
Fred Murray
Shavertown
This time, ‘dire’ cuts
didn’t hurt that much
P
resident Obama vehemently told
us the sequester cuts, which he
devised in 2011, would cause flight
delays, worker furloughs, laid off
teachers, empty firehouses, tainted
meat, and unsecured borders when
they went into effect on March
1. However, as of March 7 (the
date I’m writing this) nothing has
happened other than the Dept. of
Homeland security releasing 2,000
inmates citing the sequester, the
white House closing its doors to visi-
tors and the Transportation security
administration spending $50 million
on new uniforms. so by starting his
scare tactics so early and so comically,
Obama looks like the Keynesian who
cried “wolf!”.
But don’t be fooled. The game is still
on. a recent U.s. Dept. of agriculture
internal email from Eastern Regional
Director Charles s. Brown to his
subordinates contains this statement
regarding the sequester cuts, “so, it is
our opinion that however you man-
age that reduction, you need to make
sure you are not contradicting what
we said the impact would be.” This
clearly denotes the UsDa is being
told to make sure maximum pain is
inflicted as promised by Obama. and
that Obama’s overall message to his
cohorts regarding the sequester cuts is
“The worse, The Better”.
Obama’s obvious reason for doing
this is because he wants to make the
Republicans the villains in the seques-
tration, which will hopefully enable
his party to regain the majority in
the House of Representatives in the
2014 mid-term elections. That would
give his party majority control of the
three federal branches of our govern-
ment, which would grant Obama his
much sought after freedom to “spread
the wealth” during his last 2 years in
office, and ultimately would put our
great country on the path to becoming
another Greece. Just another blatant
example of Obama putting politics
ahead of solving our country’s prob-
lems.
Unfortunately for Obama, he has
underestimated our intelligence
level, common sense, and awareness.
It turns out the sequester cuts he
designed to be so horrific are actually
pretty popular. The latest washington
Post/aBC News poll shows a 2-1 sup-
port for the spending reductions.
Bill Ostrowski
Exeter
Time to recognize
colorectal cancer
A
re you age 50 or older? are you
under age 50 and have a personal
or family history of colon cancer/
polyps? are you having symptoms,
such as unexplained abdominal pain
or bleeding?
Colon cancer is preventable
and treatable if diagnosed in its
early stages. It affects both men and
women equally.
If you answered yes to any of the
above questions, you should not put
off scheduling a colonoscopy. age is
the single largest risk factor for colon
cancer, so even if you lead a healthy
lifestyle you can develop polyps and
cancer.
Colonoscopy is a safe, effective and
generally well tolerated examination
that can save your life.
You can find more information on
the american society for Gastroin-
testinal Endoscopy’s website at www.
screen4coloncancer.org, or you can
join their Facebook page, “Peter and
Polly Polyp.”
Remember, colon cancer is pre-
ventable and treatable, so don’t put
off scheduling your colonoscopy any
longer. Our physicians and staff will
work together to answer your ques-
tions and get you scheduled for your
colonoscopy.
Thomas J. Castellano, M.D.
Martin B. Fried, M.D.
Suresh Khandekar, M.D.
Gastroenterology Consultants
Edwardsville
SEND US YOUR OPINION
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• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
ANOThER VIEw
For your valor.
For your courage.
For putting service above yourself.
We salute you, and we thank you.
Photo by Don Carey and
words by Mary Therese Biebel
Young people reading this, try to
imagine a world without recording,
without downloads, no way to preserve
a showing, no stores selling copies, no
amount of money that could bring a
movie into your home.
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Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $36,030 MSRP. $299 per month plus 9% sales tax total $326 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $12,714 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $299 first payment plus $995 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1298 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON GM OR GM VEHICLE. That Lease Expires Prior to
December 31, 2013. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear.Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON GM VEHICLE OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER GM VEHICLE THAT
HAS A CONTRACT END DATE SET TO END PRIOR TO DEC. 31, 2013. GM VEHICLE THAT LEASE EXPIRES PRIOR TO DECEMBER 31, 2013
$
459
Cadillac User Experience (CUE), Rear Vision Camera, Stabilitrac, Remote Start,
19” Wheels, 3.6 V6, XM, OnStar Premium Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Down Payment $0
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
Down Payment $999
Security Deposit $0
Term 39 Months
2013 XTS Standard by Cadillac
Lease price based on a Nicely Equipped 2013 ATS Sdn 2.5L $36,030 MSRP. $299 per month plus 9% sales tax total $326 per month. 39 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 39 Monthly payments total $12,714 $.25/mile penalty over
32,500 miles. $299 first payment plus $995 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1298 plus tax and tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON GM OR GM VEHICLE. That Lease Expires Prior to
December 31, 2013. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear.Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
2013 SRX Luxury by Cadillac 2013 CTS AWD by Cadillac
Heated Seats, Memory Settings, All Wheel Drive,
XM, OnStar Premium Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
$399
Lease price based on a 2013 CTS Sdn AWD Luxury $42,660 MSRP $399 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $435 per month. 39 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 38 Monthly
payments total $15,162 $.25/mile penalty over 32,500 miles. $399 first payment plus $999 down payment plus tax and tags, Total due at delivery $1398 plus tax and tag fees.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY,
VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by
3/31/13. Requires US Bank Tier S & 1 credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details.
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO
QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR,
LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR
NEWER GM VEHICLE THAT HAS A CONTRACT END DATE SET TO END PRIOR TO DEC. 31, 2013.
2013 ATS Standard by Cadillac
w w w. r j b u r n e c a d i l l a c . c o m
Down Payment $1,999
Security Deposit $0
Term 36 Months
$429
Lease price based on a 2013 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition $44,360 MSRP. $429 per month plus 9% sales tax total $468 per month. 36 Month lease 10,000 miles per year. 36 Monthly
payments total $15,444 $.25/mile penalty over 30,000 miles. $1999 down payment plus $429 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery, Total due at delivery $2428 plus
tax and tag fees. MODELS TO QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY,VOLVO, JAGUAR, LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN
OR LEASE A 1999 OR NEWER CADILLAC. Leasee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 3/31/2013. Requires ALLY Bank credit approval. Please see sales
person for complete details.
Leather, 3.6 Liter Engine, Heated Seats,
OnStar Premium Car Care 4 years or 50,000 Miles
MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM LUXURY LEASE. MODELS TO
QUALIFY INCLUDE: AUDI, LEXUS, BMW, ACURA, MERCEDES, LINCOLN, INFINITY, VOLVO, JAGUAR,
LAND ROVER, PORSCHE OR LESSEE MUST OWN OR MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR
NEWER GM VEHICLE THAT HAS A CONTRACT END DATE SET TO END PRIOR TO DEC. 31, 2013.
8
0
7
5
4
5
YOU’LL FEEL APPRECIATED
BECAUSEYOUARE
NEW CAR 694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117 USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
$
149
*
Lease
For
Per
Month
MSRP
$19,020
*Tax additional, Reg. additional, 39 month lease, 12,000 allowable miles per year, $2,100 due at
signing. Must be approved through Ally S and A Tier only. 800+ CB score. Offer ends 3/31/13.
NEW 2013 CHEVY CRUZE LS
Automatic
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
AUCTION
ICE CREAM, BAKERY,
RESTAURANT, KITCHEN,
PIZZA and DELI EQUIPMENT
TUESDAY MARCH 26th, @ 10 A.M.
2091 Seaman’s Rd.,
Factoryville, PA 18419
Col. Steve Sitar & Co.
(570) 586-1397
PA.Lic.AU-2124-L
Details: www.sitarauctions.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
W Weekend S eekend Special pecial
$13.95 $13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
* All prices plus tax & tags. All lease payments are plus tax & tags. Prices & lease payments include all applicable rebates - Targeted In-Market Incentive (if applicable); Competitive Lease Ofer (if applicable); Business Choice Rebate (if applicable);VYU Snowplow Bonus Cash (if applicable); All Star Edition incentive (if applicable);Truck Loyalty Bonus Cash (if applicable);
Trade-in Bonus Cash (if applicable); Competitive Lease Private Ofer (if applicable); CRUZE - Lease for $199 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 12K miles per year, $0 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied. EQUINOX - Lease for $279 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 12K miles per year, $0 due at lease
signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied. MALIBU - Lease for $239 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 12K miles per year, $0 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied. SILVERADO - Lease for $269 per mo. plus tax for 39 mos., 12K
miles per year, $2240 (cash or trade) due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied. CAMARO - Lease for $299 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 12K miles per year, $0 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied.
Traverse - Lease for $259 per mo. plus tax for 36 mos., 12K miles per year, $2640 due at lease signing to well qualifed buyers; targeted in-market incentive & any applicable lease incentives have been applied. Not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures for illustration purposes only; † See dealer for warranty details. Prices & payment ofers end March 31, 2013.
VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
821.2772 • 1.800.444.7121
valleychevrolet.com
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
ll l l l l d ll l bl b d k
VALLEY
CHEVROLET
YOU CAN FIND US
ON FACEBOOK &
TWITTER!

SCAN HERE WITH
YOUR SMART-PHONE
2013 CHEVY
CRUZE LS
2013 CHEVY
MALIBU LS
2013 CHEVY
EQUINOX LS FWD
2013 CHEVY
TRAVERSE LS FWD
2013 CHEVY
CAMARO LS COUPE
2013 CHEVY
SILVERADO
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
2013 CHEVY
SPARK LS HATCH
2013 SILVERADO 1500
2-YR/24,000-MILE
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE†
$
199
*
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
OR Lease
For Only
$
15,997
*
Starting At
Only
Stk. #13437, 1.8L 4 Cyl., 5 Speed Manual Transmission, Air
Conditioning, Tilt Steering, PW, PDL, Bluetooth for Phone,
OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, XM Satellite Radio,
Remote Keyless Entry, Stabilitrak, Premium Cloth Seating
$
269
*
PER MO.
FOR 39 MOS.
2013 CHEVY
SILVERADO
1500 EXT CAB 4X4
OR Lease
For Only
$
27,999
*
Starting At
Only
Stk. #13265, Vortec 5.3L V8, 6 Speed Automatic, Locking Rear Differential,
Trailering Pkg., Aluminum Wheels, Dual Zone A/C, Bluetooth, CD w/ USB
Port, PW, PDL, EZ-Lift Tailgate, Onstar, XM Satellite, Cruise & More
MSRP $36,175
Y
O
U

L
L
G
E
T
L
U
C
K
Y
W
I
T
H
T
H
E
S
E
P
A
Y
M
E
N
T
S
ALL STAR
EDITION
Stk. #13555, ECOTEC 2.5L DOHC 6 Speed Automatic, PW, PDL,
Air, P. Mirrors, Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, XM Satellite Radio, Onstar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Compass Display, 16” Aluminum
Wheels, Tilt & Telescopic Steering Column
$
239
*
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
OR Lease
For Only
$
20,961
*
Starting At
Only
Stk. #13556, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cyl., 6 Speed Automatic, A/C,
Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Bluetooth for Phone,
AM/FM/CD, 17” Aluminum Wheels, PW, PDL, Cruise,
Remote Keyless Entry, XM Satellite Radio
$
224
*
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
OR Lease
For Only
$
22,999
*
Starting At
Only
#134107, 3.6L V6 6 Speed Auto., A/C, 2nd/3rd Row Split
Bench Seat, Rear Vision Camera, Onstar w/ turn-by-turn
navigation, XM Satellite, Color Touch AM/FM Radio w/
CD Player, Rear Spoiler, Heated Mirrors
$
259
*
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
OR Lease
For Only
$
28,997
*
Starting At
Only
$
279
*
PER MO.
FOR 36 MOS.
OR Lease
For Only
$
22,999
*
Starting At
Only
Stk. #13020, 3.6L SIDI 6 Speed Manual Transmission, PW,
PDL, Air, Rear Spoiler, Limited Slip Differential,
18” Heritage Steel Wheels, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Bluetooth, AM/FM/CD
$
29,987
*
Sale Price Starting At Only
Stk. #13205, 4.8L V8 Auto., PW, PDL, A/C, XM
Satellite Radio, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
CD, Remote Start, Prep. Pkg., Pwr. Heated Mirrors
$
12,995
*
Sale Price Starting At Only
Stk. #13461, Ecotech 1.2L 4 Cyl., 5 Speed Manual
Trans., Air, PW, Tinted Glass, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, Stabilitrak, Rear Spoiler, Rear Defroster
VALLEY CHEVY
One of the FewSelect
Dealers with SILVERADO
Special Allocation!
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
472 Auto Services
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
310 Attorney
Services
ATTORNEY
MICHAEL KELLY
For aggressive
affordable repre-
sentation in the fol-
lowing matters:
Divorce, Child cus-
tody, Child support,
PFA, Unemployment
hearing, DUI, (no
matter how many
offenses) Credit
card lawsuits, Prop-
erty tax assess-
ment, Landlord/ten-
ant issues, and all
Criminal matters.
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
www.michaelp
kellylaw.com
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
110 Lost
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
civitasmedia.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
145 Prayers
Oh, Holy Saint Jude,
apostle and martyr,
great in virtue and
rich in miracles,
near kinsman of
Jesus Christ, faithful
intercessor of all
who invoke your
special patronage in
time of need, to you
I have recourse
from the depths of
my heart and
humbly beg to
whom God has
given such great
power to come to
my assistance.
Help me in my pres-
ent, urgent petition
(make request). In
return, I promise to
make your name
known and cause
you to be invoked.
Say 3 Our Father’s,
3 Hail Mary’s, and 3
Gloria’s
St. Jude pray for me
and my son and all
who invoke your aid
humbly in need of
your intercession,
Amen
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
WOULD LOVE TO
ADOPT YOUR
BABY!
Will provide a lov-
ing, warm, nurtur-
ing, secure home.
Extended family &
lifetime of opportu-
nities await.
Expenses paid.
1-800-261-8330
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
ADOPTION: A safe,
secure life filled with
forever love awaits
your baby. Wendy
888-959-7660
Expenses paid.
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 3E
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA **
*Sa le Pric es plu s ta x & ta gs . N o tres po ns ib le fo rtypo gra phic a l erro rs . **B a s ed o n N is s a n’s 2 0 12 N is s a n’s Sa les To ta ls . O ffers end 3 /18 /13 .
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
STK# N23014
M O DEL# 12113
V IN# 637506
M SRP $19,090
*$199 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11454; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0. $500 Ho lid a y Bo n u s Ca s h Ap p lied .
B U Y FO R
$
16,499
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
199
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, Prem . Clo th S ea ts , Cru is e Co n tro l, T iltW heel, S ecu rity, F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N S E N TRA 1.8S V
STK# N22839
M O DEL# 13113
V IN# 454268
M SRP $23,880
*$239 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 36 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14566.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0. $500 Ho lid a y Bo n u s Ca s h Ap p lied .
B U Y FO R
$
19,795
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
239
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , Pw rS ea t, PW , PDL , Cru is e, In telligen tK ey, Rem o te S ta rt, F lo o rM a ts , & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S S DN
STK# N23232
M O DEL# 20213
V IN# 215496
M SRP $23,050
*$269 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12908; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0. $500 Ho lid a y Bo n u s Ca s h Ap p lied .
B U Y FO R
$
19,595
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H , $50 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
269
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl T u rb o , CVT ,
A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Allo ys , S p la s h Gu a rd s , F lo o r
M a ts & M u ch M o re
2013N IS S A N JUK E S A W D
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
SA VE $2500 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 SENTR A S IN STO C K
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
SA VE $4000 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 A LTIM A S IN STO C K
SA VE $3400 O R M O R E O N A LL
NEW 2013 JU KES IN STO C K
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
STK# N22954
M O DEL# 22213
V IN# 610647
M SRP $25,000
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14000; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
$1100 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te, $500 Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h & $500 S tPa tty’s Da y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .
B U Y FO R
$
20 ,0 0 0
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
259
*
P ER
M O.
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, AM / F M / CD S tereo , S p la s h Gu a rd s , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N ROGUE S A W D
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
SA VE $5000 O N A LL NEW
2013 R O G U ES IN STO C K
STK# N22606
M O DEL# 16212
V IN# 868687
M SRP $37,525
*$315 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20263.50; m u s tb e a p p ro ved
thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
$1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te, $500 Cu s to m erBo n u s & $1250 S tPa tty’s Da y Bo n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .
B U Y FO R
$
27,525
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $40 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 CU S TO M ER B O N U S , $1250 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
315
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Pw r. S ea t, Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Hea ted
S ea ts & S teerin g W hl, F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s & M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S V S DN
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
SA VE $10,000 O FF M SR P O N A LL
NEW 2012 M A XIM A ’S IN STO C K
STK# N22392
M O DEL# 36612
V IN# 323414
M SRP $46,015
*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs .
B U Y
FO R
$
34,995
*
+ T/T
W / $40 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
V8, Au to , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , Va lu e
T ru ck Pkg, & M u ch,
M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N TITA N S L CC 4X4
O NLY 8 2012 TITA NS LEFT
SA VE $8000 O R M O R E O FF
M SR P O N A LL IN STO C K
EXEC U TIVE DEM O !
SA VE $11,000 O FF M SR P
STK# N21737
M O DEL# 55412
V IN# 039686
M SRP $44,890
*$479 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $21996.10; m u s tb e a p p ro ved
thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
$1425 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed , $500 Cu s t. Bo n u s Ca s h & $500 S tPa tty’s Bo n u s Ca s h.
B U Y FO R
$
34,390
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE, $50 0 CU S T. B O N U S CAS H & $50 0 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
479
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , Na viga tio n , DVD, Po w erDo o rs & Ha tch, Clim Co n tro l,
Blu eto o th, L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts , M u ch, M u ch M o re!!
2012N IS S A N QUE S T L E V A N
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
EXEC U TIVE DEM O S
LA ST O NE @ TH IS P R IC E
SA VE $10,500 O FF M SR P
STK# N22923
M O DEL# 25013
V IN# 609089
M SRP $30,895
*$349 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18537; m u s tb e a p p ro ved
thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
B U Y FO R
$
28 ,495
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
$
349
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , A/ C, Allo ys , 7 Pa s s S ea tin g, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt& M u ch, M u ch, M u ch M o re!
2013N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R S 4X4
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
SA VE $2400 O R M O R E O N A LL NEW
2013 P A TH FINDER S IN STO C K
STK# N21674
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 218284
M SRP $32,850
*$275 p erm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18067.50; m u s tb e a p p ro ved
thru NM AC @ T ier1; 0$ Ca s h o rT ra d e E q u ity (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $0.
$1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te, $1000 Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h & $1250 S tPa tty’s Da y Bo n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .
B U Y FO R
$
26,60 0
*
+ T/T
O R
L EAS E FO R
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 CU S TO M ER B O N U S CAS H & 0 % FO R 70 M O S . & $1250 S T P ATTY’S D AY B O N U S CAS H
$
275
*
P ER
M O.
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Blu eto o th, F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s & M u ch M o re!
2012N IS S A N M URA N O S A W D
$6250 O FF M SR P & 0% FO R 72 M O NTH S!!!
O N A LL 2012 M U R A NO ’S IN STO C K
LEA SE @
“0” DO W N
VALUES
VALUES
G O O D -A S-G O LD
G O O D -A S-G O LD G O O D -A S-G O LD
UP TO $1250 NISSAN ST.PATRICK’S D AY
BONUS
CASH
Th ru
3/18/13 O nly
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
O NLY 4
2012
M A XIM A S
R EM A IN
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E 12 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
2 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS
P R IC E
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
*All Prices plus tax, tags, & fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. 3 Year/100,000 Miles Limited Powertrain Warranty on 2008 models and newer with less than 75,000
miles. 90 day/3,000 mile Limited Powertrain Warranty on 2004 models and newer with less than 100,000 miles. See sales dealer for complete warranty and sale details. Sale Ends 3/22/13.
1-800-223-1111
www.KenPollockCertifed.com
A FULL SERVICE DEALERSHIP
Hours: Monday-Friday 9-8pm ; Saturday 9-5pm
PLATINUM CERTIFIED HIGHLINE
339 HIGHWAY 315
IN PITTSTON
3 YEAR/100,000 MILES WARRANTY ON*
PLATINUM CERTIFIED VEHICLES
Stk# P14846,
Automatic,
Power Windows
& Locks, CD
2012 Fiat 500 3Dr
$
13,399
*
Stk#P14959, SLT
Pkg, Off Road Tires,
Chrome Wheels,
Sharp Truck!
2012 Dodge Ram 1500
Quad Cab Lifted 4x4
$
31,999
*
REDUCED!!
2011 Hyundai
Accent Sedans
$
10,799
*
Stk# P14893, Automatic,
AM/FM/CD/USB, Great Gas Mileage!
2010 Ford Focus
SE Sedan
$
10,999
*
Stk# P14922, Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, CD, A/C
2009 Chevrolet
HHR Panel Wagon
$
11,999
*
Stk# P14902, Rear Cargo Area, Roof Rack,
Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
2008 Pontiac
G6 Sedan
$
12,799
*
Stk# P14924, Only 28K Miles,
Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
2007 Honda CRV
EX 4WD
$
13,399
*
Stk# P14973, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2009 Saturn
Aura Sedan
$
13,399
*
Stk# P14891A, Sunroof, Leather
Seats, Alloy Wheels, Automatic
2009 Nissan
Altima S Sedan
$
13,799
*
Stk# P14896, Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, Only 26K Miles
2004 Cadillac
CTS Sedan
$
11,299
*
Stk# 14861A, Leather, Sunroof,
Only 53K Miles, Nice!
2007 Nissan
Murano SL AWD
$
14,999
*
Stk# P14941, Heated Leather, Sunroof,
All Wheel Drive, Alloys, P. Seat
2010 Suzuki
Kizashi GTS AWD
$
14,999
*
Stk# P14750A, All Wheel Drive,
Sunroof, P. Seat, Alloys, PW, PL
2012 Volkswagen
Passat SE Sedan
$
15,499
*
Stk# P14877, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2012 Ford Focus
SEL Sedan
$
15,999
*
Stk# P14856, Leather, Sunroof, Alloy
Wheels, Fog Lights, Sync
2011 Mitsubishi
Endeavor 4WD
$
17,299
*
Stk# P14842, Power Windows & Locks, Automatic,
CD, Alloy Wheels, 3 Left To Choose From!
2011 Dodge
Journey AWD
$
19,999
*
Stk# P14873, Rear View Camera, All
Wheel Drive, Power Windows & Locks
2011 Toyota
Prius III
$
21,999
*
Stk# P14980, Hybrid! Only 13K
Miles, Power Windows & Locks
2012 Chevy
Traverse LT AWD
$
23,399
*
Stk# P14845, 3rd Row Seating, All
Wheel Drive, Alloy Wheels, 8 Passenger
2013 Kia Sorento
SUV AWD
$
23,999
*
Stk# P14987, 3rd Row Seating, Alloy Wheels,
Power Windows & Locks, 2 Left @ This Price!
2012 Dodge Ram
1500 Quad Cab 4x4
$
24,599
*
Stk# P14829, SLT Package, Power
Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels
2012 Nissan
Pathfinder 4x4
$
24,799
*
Stk# P14952, SV Package, 3rd Row
Seat, Power Seat, Alloy Wheels
2010 Ford Escape
XLT 4WD $
16,999
*
Stk# 14992, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2012 Jeep Wrangler
2Dr Lifted 4x4
$
28,999
*
Stk# P14906, Lift Kit, Off Road Tires, Alloy Wheels,
Automatic, Hardtop, Already Built For You @
2013 Chevrolet Silverado
Crew Cab 4x4
$
28,999
*
Stk# P14950, LT Package, Power Windows &
Locks, CD, Bedliner, 3 Available @ This Price!
2013 Volvo XC60 AWD
Stk# P14994, Leather,
Power Memory Driver’s Seat,
Moonroof, Only 4K Miles
$
39,999
*
2012 Volvo S60 T5 Sedan
Stk# P14962, Sunroof,
Leather Seats, Power
Memory Seats, Alloys
$
25,999
*
2011 Lexus CT 200H Wagon
Stk# P14965,
Hybrid! Leather,
Navigation, Sunroof
$
28,599
*
2011 BMW 328 AWD Sedan
Stk# P14868, X Drive,
All Wheel Drive, Leather,
Sunroof, Automatic
$
28,499
*
2012 Mercedes 300 4Matic Sport Sdn
Stk# P14895, All Wheel
Drive, Leather, Sunroof,
Sport Package, Sharp!
$
32,499
*
2013 Infiniti JX35 AWD
Stk# P14977, Heated Leather,
3rd Row, Navigation,
Rear DVD, & Much More!
$
49,999
*
2011 Escalade EXT Pickup AWD
Stk# P14949, Luxury Package,
Navigation w/ Camera,
22” Wheels, Power Side Steps
$
54,999
*
VEHICLE VALUE OUTLET
2001 Dodge B1500
Cargo Van
Stk# P14970,
53K Miles, Ladder
Rack, Bin Packages,
Automatic
$
5,999
*
2004 Chevrolet
Impala
Stk# P14915A,
Leather, Alloys,
Power Windows
& Locks
$
7,999
*
2007 Saturn
Vue AWD
Stk# P14746,
All Wheel Drive,
Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, CD
$
8,799
*
2009 Toyota
Scion Coupe
Stk# S2252D, Alloy
Wheels, Power
Windows & Locks,
Manual, Sporty!
$
8,799
*
2005 Chevrolet
Impala Sedan
Stk# P14936B,
Only 42K Miles,
Power Windows
& Locks
$
8,899
*
2005 Honda Accord
EX Sedan
Stk# P14989,
Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks,
Alloy Wheels, CD
$
8,999
*
2007 Hyundai
Tucson 4WD
Stk# P14912,
Automatic, Alloy
Wheels, Power
Windows & Locks
$
9,999
*
2007 Honda Fit
Hatchback
Stk# P14991,
Automatic, Power
Windows & Locks, CD,
Great Gas Mileage!
$
9,999
*
2013 Dodge
Grand Caravan
$
21,399
*
Stk# P14988, Stow-N-Go Seats,
3rd Row, Perfect for the Family!
2011 Toyota
Corolla LE Sedan
$
13,899
*
Stk# P14849, Automatic, Power Windows
& Locks, Great On Gas!
*Tax and tags extra. Includes Conquest, Loyalty and Trade-In Assistance. **Tax and tags extra.
www.BerwickChevy.com
“LIKE” us on Facebook
RT. 11
M
a
r
k
e
t
S
t
.
Hinckley
Funeral Home
11th Street
P
i
n
e
S
t
.
B
E
R
W
I
C
K
C
H
E
V
R
O
L
E
T
-
B
U
IC
K
-G
M
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-
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A
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HOURS: Mon.-Tue. 9-8; Wed. 9-5; Thur.-Fri. 9-8, Sat. 9-3 12th & Pine Streets, Berwick, PA
(570)
#B2319
2012 Buick LaCrosse
4-Cyl., FWD, PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Remote Start, XM, OnStar
MSRP
$32,115
* SALE
PRICE
#B3086
#G2220
2012 GMC Acadia SLE AWD
V-6, 7 Passenger, Remote Start, Rear Park Assist
MSRP
$38,180
* SALE
PRICE
#G2229
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS! • PRE-OWNED SPECIALS! • PRE-OWNED SPECIALS!
#C3084A
2005 Chevy Impala Sdn.
V-6, FWD, PW, PDL, Tilt, Cruise,
Keyless Entry, ONLY 60K MILES
#T2090B
SALE
PRICE
#D3109A
** SALE
PRICE
#G3021A
2011 Chevy Silverado Z71 4x4
EXT. CAB, 5.3L V-8, Z71 Pkg., Remote Start,
Tow Pkg., 37K Miles
** SALE
PRICE
#G2308A
** SALE
PRICE
** SALE
PRICE
** SALE
PRICE
2011 GMC Sierra Denali AWD
6.2L V-8, Heated/Cooled Leather Seats,
20” Wheels, P. Sunroof, Chrome Boards
**
2010 Cadillac CTS Sedan
3.0L V-6, White Diamond, Leather, Htd.
Seats, Bal. Fact. Wrrty., ONLY 34K MILES
2008 GMC Envoy SLT 4x4
V-6, Heated Leather Seats, Nav., Sunroof,
Chrome Wheels, One Owner, Bought Here New!
2006 Chevy Malibu Maxx
V-6, AM/FM Stereo CD, Remote Start,
FWD, ONLY 59K MILES
#G3102
2013 GMC Terrain SLE1 AWD
4-Cyl., PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Rear Camera, XM Radio
MSRP
$29,375
* SALE
PRICE
2013 Buick Verano
4-Cyl., PW, PL, Tilt, Cruise,
Remote Start, Sunroof
MSRP
$26,545
* SALE
PRICE
2012 GMC Sierra 2500 Crew Cab
6.0L V-8, Remote Start, R. Camera, Snow Plow Prep Pkg., HD Trailering
ALL GM FRANCHISES AT 1 LOCATION!
FIND NEWROADS SYLVESTER CHEVROLET
8 cyl., Auto, PW, PL, Air,
20K, Certified
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO
EXT. CAB Z71 4X4
$24,995*
2010 AVALANCHE
Z71 4X4
$32,495* $10,995*
v-6 Auto, Air, PW, PL
38,000 miles
2008 CHEVY
IMPALA LT
V-8 Auto, Leather,
Sunroof, 25K
$15,695*
2012 MALIBU LS
6cyl, Auto, Air, PW, PD
74,000 miles
2007 CHEVY
TRAIL BLAZER
$9,995* $16,495*
2009 CHEVY
EQUINOX LT
V-6, Auto, Sunroof, PW, PD
38,000 miles
4 Cyl, Auto, PW,PD,
CD, 14k
Mon.-Thurs 9am-7:30pm
Fri. 9am-5pm
Sat. 9am-3pm
Sunday Browsing
Family Owned & Operated for Over 40 Years
1609 MAIN AVE., PECKVILLE EXIT 190 OFF 1-81
(Right At the Light, Go 4 Miles to Our Door)
Disclaimer: *All prices. Plus tax and tags. All Applicable Rebates Included. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. GoodThru 4/1/13
570-489-7586
www.sylvesterchevrolet.com FIND NEWROADS
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
150 Special Notices
Here comes
Peter Cottentail
right to the
Genetti Easter
Buffet! Free
digital photos
with the Bunny
this year for
kids!
bridezella.net
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
150 Special Notices
IF YOU’RE NOT SELLING
YOUR JUNK VEHICLES AND
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TO
HAPPY HAPPY
TRAILS TRAILS
YOU’RE LOSING MONEY
WEEKL WEEKLY Y
SPECIAL SPECIAL
Extra $150 for
bulldozes
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Happy Birthday
Larry K! Have a
great day and stay
safe. Take some
time for your-
self...Get it all out
of your system. 6
weeks and a day to
a major Pack
meeting...Keep it
on the DL. Go I!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
150 Special Notices
PURSUANT To sec-
tion 128.85 of the
Pennsylvania
Department of Agri-
culture Title 7 regu-
lations Growmark
FS, LLC hereby
gives notice of
ground application
of “ Restricted Use
Pesticides” for the
protection of agri-
cultural crops in
municipalities in
Pennsylvania during
the next 45 days.
Residents of con-
tiguous property to
our application sites
should contact your
local GROWMARK,
FS, LLC facility for
additional informa-
tion. Concerned Cit-
izens should contact
Michael Layton,
MGR. Safety & Envi-
ronment, mlayton@
growmarkfs.com
Growmark FS, LLC
308 N.E. Front
Street., Milford DE
19963. Call 302-
422-3002
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 5E
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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6
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 7E
PAGE 8E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
MOTORWORLD
CADILLAC
*PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 DEALER PROCESSING CHARGE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES.
PRICES ARE AVAILABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY. MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIRED AT TIME OF DELIVERY. TO QUALIFY FOR CONQUEST REBATE YOU MUST BE IN A NON-GM LEASE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 3/31/13.
LEASE FOR
ZERO DOWN $
329
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN PAYMENT.
OFFER INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.
CADILLAC ATS AWD STANDARD COLLECTION 2.0T
NEW 2013
STOCK # - C3776
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR
$1,500 GMLEASE LOYALTY REBATE
ZZZEERRROOO DO
PLUS TAX/T
CADILLAC ATS AWD STANDARD COL
NEW 2013
$1,500 CADILLA
$1,
LEASE FOR
ZERO DOWN $
569
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN PAYMENT.
OFFER INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.
CADILLAC XTS LUXURY COLLECTION FWD
NEW 2013
STOCK # - C3734
ZZZZEEERRROO DDO
PLUS TAX/TA
CADILLAC XTS LUXURY COLLECTION
NEW 2013
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR
$1,500 GMLEASE LOYALTY REBATE
LEASE FOR
ZERO DOWN $
499
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN PAYMENT.
OFFER INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.
STOCK # - C3726
ZZEERRO DO
CADILLAC SRX LUXURY COLLECTION AWD
NEW 2013
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR
$1,500 GMLEASE LOYALTY REBATE
LEASE FOR
ZERO DOWN $
439
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
*LEASE IS BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $0 DOWN PAYMENT.
OFFER INCLUDES $1,500 LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR $1,500 GM LEASE LOYALTY REBATE.
CADILLAC CTS LUXURY COLLECTION AWD
NEW 2013
STOCK # - C3739
ZZZEERO DO
PLUS TAX/TA
CADILLAC CTS LUXURY COLLECTION
NEW 2013
$1,500 CADILLAC LUXURY LEASE CONQUEST OR
$1,500 GMLEASE LOYALTY REBATE
1. 866.356.9383 MOTORWORLDGM.COM MOTORWORLD DRIVE JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81 WILKES-BARRE, PA
SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
North Eastern Pennsylvania’s #1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Drywall and
Paint
ASK HOW A
BUILDING
INDUSTRY
MEMBERSHIP
CAN BENEFIT
YOU.
CALL JANET
570-287-3331
FOR INFO
or go to
www.bianepa.com
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding
Carpentry
40 yrs experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan
570-881-1131
1024 Building &
Remodeling
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 855-2506
(570) 332-7023
GENERAL CONTRACTING
Roofing & siding.
Kitchens, bath-
rooms. Additions.
painting & drywall.
Insured. Free
Estimates
570-831-5510
MARCH MADNESS
$200 cash off
any painting or
drywall job.
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
& LOCAL HOME
BUILDER
30 Years Exp.
Make Your Home
Beautiful Interior /
Exterior.
WE DO IT ALL!
Why pay more!
Pay when you’re
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
FREE
ESTIMATES!
570-899-3123
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Licensed
Handyman
Services
also, Electric,
Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa
call 570-826-0919
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete
& metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
CLEANING WHIZ
GREEN PRODUCTS
For Special Deals
Contact Jaymee at
570-852-7497
Connie’s Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE!
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
DEB & PAT’S
CLEANING
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-371-3857
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
C&C MASONRY &
CONCRETE
Absolutely Free
Estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-840-9913
570-346-4103
PA084504
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drive, steps, stucco,
stone, chimneys and
repairs.
Lic. & Ins.
570-283-5254
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
Mike’s $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
APEX TREE AND
EARTH
TREE REMOVAL
Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
570-550-4535
SPRING CLEAN UPS
•Lawn Cutting
•Shrub Trimming,
•Mulching
•Landscaping
Services
25+ Years Exp.
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
570-287-4780
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SPRING SPECIAL
$100 + materials for
average size room.
18 years experience
Power washing
/deck staining.
570-820-7832
ART NEWTON’S
PAINTING
& Drywall Repairs
Fully Insured
32 Yrs Experience
570-332-0882
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING.
Quality Work,
Reasonable Prices.
Floating Floors
Installed
570-762-6889
JOHN’S PAINTING
RELIABLE, NEAT,
HONEST. WORKING
WITH PRIDE.
INSURED-FREE EST.
570-735-8101
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
JACOBOSKY PAINTING
NEPA’s Finest
Painters
Int./Ext. Painting,
Building Restoration
Don’t worry about
them running off
with your money,
get it done right
the first time!
Free Estimates
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
HARTH & SON’S
General
Contractor
15% off
with this ad.
570-815-8294
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1252 Roofing &
Siding
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
‘til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW SNOW
PLOWING PLOWING
VITO’S & GINO’S
570-574-1275
• Commercial
• Industrial
• Residential
Driveways
Sidewalks
Salting
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Mention this ad
when you call!
ATTORNEY
MICHAEL KELLY
For aggressive
affordable repre-
sentation in the fol-
lowing matters:
Divorce, Child cus-
tody, Child support,
PFA, Unemployment
hearing, DUI, (no
matter how many
offenses) Credit
card lawsuits, Prop-
erty tax assess-
ment, Landlord/ten-
ant issues, and all
Criminal matters.
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
www.michaelp
kellylaw.com
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-220-3984
www.Centura
Online.com
380 Travel
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
CINDERELLA
Sat. May 25th
$169
Orchestra Seats
ANNIE
Wed. June 19
$159
Orchestra Seats
MOWTOWN
ON
BROADWAY
Wed. Aug 7th
$159
Orchestra Seats
WICKED
Wed. Aug. 7th
$179
Orchestra Seats
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS &
SHOW TICKETS
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
___________________
NEW YORK
CITY
SAT. MAR., 23
___________________
12 TH ANNUAL
ARCHITECTURAL
DIGEST SHOW AT
THE PIER
Shop. Be Inspired.
Celebrate Design
With Latest In
Home Furnishings
-------------------------
F.I.T. EXHIBIT
SHOES - SHOES -
An Obsession
BOOTS - BOOTS -
Height of Fashion
A MUST FOR
SHOE LOVERS!!
-----------------------
UNION SQUARE
------------------------
for more info
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
VISIT US
Travel
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 9E
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
Pre-Owned Winter Clearance
• 04 SILVERADO REGULAR CAB
Stock #7500, 7.5ft. Myer Plow, 60K Miles ................. $10,800
• 04 CHEVY 2500 EXT CAB
Stock #13373A, w/ 7.5ft Boss Polly Plow.................. $18,999
• 2012 CHEVY 2500 EXT CAB LONG BOX
Stock #12950A, w/ 8ft Boss Super Duty Plow, 4,000 Miles... $31,850
SAVE BIG MONEY $$$
PLOW TRUCKS • 3 TO CHOOSE FROM
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
WVON¡MO VALLEV
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Cars in
Color
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
EUROTECH
AUTOREPAIRS INC.
The Area’s One
SAAB Shop
is going “Mini”
Cooper that is!
CALL FOR A SERVICE
APPOINTMENT ON YOUR
MINI COOPER, SAAB, OR
ANY OTHER MAKE
& MODEL TODAY
570-822-4665
131 Wood St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
BOSCH AUTHORIZED
SERVICE CENTER
8
0
4
1
9
7
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
2001 Oldsmobile
Silhouette
$
2,995
*
Perfect Running, Clean, Right Price!
2003 Ford
F-150 V6
$
4,500
*
Runs Great, Auto, 4x4, Great Truck!
2004 Saturn Ion
$
4,995
*
Very Nice Condition,
Runs 100% Clean
1999 Ford F-150
Ext. Cab
$
3,895
*
Runs Great, V8, 4x4
1999 Mazda
Millenium
$
4,295
*
Loaded, Low Mileage, 4 Dr, Sunroof,
Leather, H. Seats, 1 Owner, Very Clean
2003 Suzuki
Grand Vitara
$
5,995
*
“Tax Time is THE Time
at Motor Twins Auto Mart”
8
0
3
2
3
8
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
570-825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AAAA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
GAS SAVER SPECIALS!
06 PONTIAC G6 38K, 4 Cyl..................
$
9,450
08 NISSAN VERSA...............................
$
7,950
07 KIA SPECTRA EX 79K..............
$
7,425
02 HONDA ACCORD One Owner.
$
6,950
06 TOYOTA SCION XA...............
$
6,950
07 HYUNDAI ACCENT 75K.......
$
6,950
06 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 88K.
$
6,875
07 FORD FOCUS SE........................
$
6,450
08 SUZUKI FORENZA 81K........
$
6,425
05 FORD TAURUS SE 65K..........
$
5,950
07 SUZUKI RENO 74K.......................
$
5,875
01 HYUNDAI SONATA 51K........
$
5,475
05 SUZUKI FORENZA 88K........
$
4,925
04 CAVALIER LS 83K...........................
$
4,925
01 HYUNDAI ACCENT 72K.......
$
4,495
03 FORD FOCUS.....................................
$
4,450
02 PONTIAC SUNFIRE...............
$
4,250
97 MAZDA 626 46K.................................
$
4,250
99 DODGE NEON 69K.........................
$
3,595
4WD SPECIALS!
03 NISSAN MURANO 83K...........
$
8,950
02 SUBARU OUTBACK.............
$
5,400
01 SUBARU LEGACY....................
$
4,475
380 Travel
FUN GETAWAYS!
SENECA LAKE
Wine & Cheese
Weekend
Apr. 27 & 28
YANKEES
Yankees vs.
Orioles 4/14
Yankees vs
Blue Jays4/28
Yankees vs
Athletics 5/5
Mention code
“BASE” & receive
$5.00 Off!
9/11 Memorial
with free time in
NYC, May 11
Baltimore Inner
Harbor with
National Aquarium
Admission 5/11
Philadelphia
Sightseeing &
Eastern State
Penitentiary
Tour 5/18
1-800-432-8069
NYC BUS $36
Wed. & Sat.
NYC AUTO
SHOW
April 6th $36.
JERSEY BOYS
April 17th
LION KING
May $139
MATILDA 6/29
ORCH. $155
WICKED 4/17
Orch. $142
Only 8 open
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM
PARK & RIDE
Rt. 309 or Rt.
315
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
SPEND THE 4TH OF
JULY IN BOSTON
on board
Cunard’s Queen
Mary II
Travel from NY to
Canada and Boston
July 1 to July 6,
2013
From only $1099.
per person
ALSO OTHER CRUISE
SPECIALS:
Carnival Splendor
from $682. per
person - 8 nights
Royal Caribbean’s
Explorer of Seas
from $642.
per person - 7night
Please Call Now!
First come, first
served!
All rates are per
person, based on
two sharing one
cabin.
First come, first
served!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
SPEND THE 4TH OF
JULY IN BOSTON
on board
Cunard’s Queen
Mary II
Travel from NY to
Canada and Boston
July 1 to July 6,
2013
From only $1099.
per person
ALSO OTHER CRUISE
SPECIALS:
Carnival Splendor
from $682. per
person - 8 nights
Royal Caribbean’s
Explorer of Seas
from $642.
per person - 7night
Please Call Now!
First come, first
served!
All rates are per
person, based on
two sharing one
cabin.
First come, first
served!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
409 Autos under
$5000
4 DODGE
CARAVANS
In stock.
All newly State
Inspected, with
one year war-
ranties included.
Starting at
$2,895
CHEVROLET `97 SIL-
VERADO
Extended cab, 4
wheel drive, all
power, new radia-
tor, new fuel tank
and lines.
99,000 miles,
$3,500, negotiable.
(570)328-2091
409 Autos under
$5000
5 CHEVY
CAVALIERS
In stock. All
newly State
Inspected.
Starting at
$2,995
CHEVY ‘00 BLAZER
4 door, 4 x4 LT
Power windows
& locks. Auto,
2 owners.
Not a Nicer One!
$3,995
CHEVY ‘05 SILVERADO
2WD, 1 owner,
solid steel
locking cap.
Was $5,995.
NOW $4,995.
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
HONDA ‘97 CIVIC
Hatchback, 5
speed. All stock
except for rims.
Looks nice, runs
well, $3200 OBO.
Call or text:
570-407-4541
LEO’S AUTO SALES
93 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
NISSAN ‘99
CENTRA
4 door, 4 cylinder,
auto. Good
condition, excellent
gas mileage.
$2,150
FORD ‘99
EXPLORER
2 door , 6 cylinder ,
auto, 4 x 4 .
$1,950
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SUZUKI ‘03
GRAND VITARA 4X4
93,000 original
miles. Absolutely
Impeccable
Condition!
$5,495
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `97 LESABRE
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $3,200.
570-287-0600
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
silver, V6, 50k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
blue, auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 FORD FUSION SEL
red
06 AUDI A8L
grey, blue leather,
navigation AWD
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
silver
05 AUDI A6
All Road. Green
2 tone, leather
AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS
grey, black leather,
sunroof, alloys
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 SUZUKI AERO
Silver, 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
spd, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
09 DODGE JOURNEY
RT black.
3rd seat, leather,
navigation AWD
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 GMC YUKON 4X4
DENALI black, 3rd
seat, Navigation
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB
truck red, 4x4
06 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
ULTRA white, tan
leather, 3rd seat,
AWD
06 GMC ENVOY XL
silver, 3rd seat
4x4
06 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
06 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA TOURING
silver, grey leather,
navigation, 3rd
seat, AWD
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
gold, V6 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
black, 3rd seat,
entertainment
center, 4x4
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, gold,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
LX WHITE, V6, 4X4
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE silver 3rd seat
4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Red, V6 4x4
05 SUZUKI XL7 EX
gold, V6, 4x4
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
gold, 7 passenger
mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
green, 4 door 4x4
04 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT blue,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 JEEP GRAND 4X4
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SPECIAL EDITION,
black/black leather
04 KIA SORENTO EX
blue, auto, V6 AWD
03 NISSAN XTERRA
silver, V6, 4x4
03 FORD F150 XLT
SUPERCREW 4x4
truck, gold
03 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN EL red,
4 door 7
passenger mini van
02 FORD EXPLORER
XLT white 4x4
02 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XCAB TRUCK
white 4x4
01 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
SLT 5.9 liter,
brown, 8’ box 4x4
truck
01 FORD RANGER XLT
red, super cab,
B6, 4x4 truck
00 JEEP WRANGLER
SPORT blue, 2
door, soft top,
4x4 5 speed
99 FORD F150 SUPER
CAB, silver 4x4
truck
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
BARBUSH
AUTO
SALES
223 Sleepy
Hollow Road
Drums, PA 18222
(570) 788-2883
(570) 233-3360
‘99 CHRYSLER
CIRRUS......$1,999
‘99 MERCURY
TRACER GS
..................$2,499
‘00 GMC JIMMY
SLE ...........$3,599
‘00 FORD TAURUS
LX.......$2,599
‘01 SATURN SL1
..................$3,499
‘01 CHEVY
VENTURA VAN
...................$1,799
‘01 GMC
SOMNOMA
EXCAB 4X4
..................$5,899
‘02 CHEVY
CAvaLIER
..................$3,499
‘02 NEON 95K
..................$2,999
‘03 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN
SE .............$3,999
‘03 FORD TAURUS
SE..............$3,699
‘04 PONTIAC
GRAND AM
..................$4,300
‘05 CHEVY MAIiL-
BU CLASSIC
..................$3,299
CHEVY ‘10
MALIBU LS
Air, all power,
cruise, CD. Like
new. Sporty
Balance of GMs
Warranty
SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
Line up a place to live
in classified!
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
FORD ‘08 FOCUS
SES Coupe. 57,000
miles, AC, leather,
moonroof, sync, 6
disc cd, cruise, tilt,
power group, 1
owner. Very nice
$9900
570-574-0960
FORD RANGER XCAB‘94
4x4, 5-speed
$3,495
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
FORD ‘10
FOCUS SE
Auto, air, power
steering, power
brakes, CD, 4 CYL.
Gas $aver. Sharp!
SALE PRICE
$9,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
FORD ‘10
FUSION SE
Auto, all power,
cruise, tilt, alloys.
43k. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE
$12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
TOYOTA `05 PRIUS
Grey, with tan, new
tires, air, power win-
dows/locks. 118K.
Keyless entry, GPS,
Balance of Toyota
Extended Warranty.
Clean Car Fax.
$8,500, OBO.
570-881-1760
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $8,995
‘94 Jeep
Cherokee V8.
Runs great.
Power windows
& doors.
$2,995
‘96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$2,495
‘96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K. $2,995
‘01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
‘99 Chevy S10
Blazer 4 door,
power windows,
doors & seats.
126,000 miles.
$3,995
‘03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
96,000 miles.
$4,300
‘04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
‘09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
HONDA ACCORD EXL ‘10
Leather and well
Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
JEEP WRANGLER ‘10
Sahara Unlimited,
4X4
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 ‘08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC GRAND AM ‘02
$3,995
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN ‘04 VUE
5 speed. FWD.
4 cylinder.
ECONOMY!
$3,995
570-696-4377
SUBARU OUTBACK ‘11
Station wagon,
AWD.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA ‘03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$3,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition, needs
battary.
NEW PRICE
First $750 takes!
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘04 DAVIDSON
NIGHT TRAIN
Screaming Eagle
Package. Lava Red.
$8,000, firm
570-735-3934
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE `96 DAKOTA
New inspection, 6
cylinder, standard,
runs great! $3,800
(570)288-1981
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,500, OBO.
570-793-5593
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed.
EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995
570-696-4377
DODGE ‘08
DAKOTA SLT
Club Cab, V6, all
power, cruise, tilt,
cloth seats, alloys,
utility cap.
PLUMBERS
/ELECTRICAL
SPECIAL
SALE PRICE
$10,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$11,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
GMC ‘01 SIERRA
4X4. V8. 1 owner.
LIKE NEW!
$5,995
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
GMC ‘03 ENVOY
4X4. V6. DVD.
3rd row seat.
EXTRA CLEAN!
$5,995
570-696-4377
HONDA ‘09 CIVIC
Low miles, 4 door,
4 cylinder, auto.
$14,400
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LEXUS ES 300
One owner, 59,000
miles. Showroom
Condition. Warranty.
$8.999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
MERCEDES ‘01 BENZ
CLK 320
Coupe. Extra clean
& sharp. $10,999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
PERSONAL
TRAINING GYM
FOR SALE
$30,000
Fully equipped, turn
key operation, six
years in business.
Owner is relocating.
570-592-2458
for details
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
704 Alarm &
Security
LOCK by U-Haul.
Stainless Steel, 3”
round, like new, 2
keys. $7. 851-4545
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUES
One item or entire
contents of homes.
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
ICE CREAM SCOOP
Antique, over 100
years old. $25.00 or
best offer. Call
Mary: 779-9464
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
BASEBALL CARDS,
800, 1990 Topps,
$8. Boston Red
Socks, 155 baseball
cards, $5. St. Louis
Cardinals, 170 base-
ball cards, $5.
570-313-5214
570-313-3859
BEDROOM SUITE. 6
piece refinished
antique set. Excel-
lent condition.
Dresser, mirror,
chest, vanity,mirror
and bench, night-
stand, headboard-
footboard and origi-
nal bench (needs
repair. $550 for all
570-592-3657
POPLAR SCIENCE
MAGAZINE-
Antique. 1 dated
Feb. 1965 another
dated Sept. 1968
$20.00 each. Call
Mary 779-9464
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-’75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-’52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-’61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
’68, HANOVER 1951-
’74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
REFRIGERATOR,
Frigidaire, 18 cubic
Ft. Four months old,
$300. 829-0520
REFRIGERATOR,
Frigidaire, brand
new, white, electric
stove top coils, self
cleaning, free
standing, 30”, glass
door with built in
oven light, has two
oven racks. $330.
Range cord, sku-
392-10713, 6’ 50
amp, 4 prong, brand
new, $29.69. Both
items, $350 cash.
570-430-2311
STOVE. U43
Regency Propane
Gas. 38,000 BTU
with thermostat.
Black with gold trim
$500 OBO email
photos available .
570-477-2281
WASHING
MACHINE, Sears,
New in the box, paid
$449, selling for
$250. 822-7752
712 Baby Items
BABY JOGGER,very
good condition, fits
a child up to four
years. Can be acti-
vated by pressing
the handle, straps
for safety. $89.
Call:570-829-3261
716 Building
Materials
SUPPORTS,
wrought iron, for
porch or patio. Sup-
ports 8’ high, black,
four available. $15
each.
570-883-7007
PAGE 10E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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724 Cellular Phones
CELL PHONE
Kyocera for Virgin
Mobile. C5155
Smartphone with
Android 4.0 Charg-
er, case extra
screen protector
and 2 gig SD card.
Fully functional. $65
570-825-6254
726 Clothing
JACKET, Tourmaline
Mink 3/4 Stroller.
Cleaned, glazed and
conditioned as new,
one owner, excel-
lent condition. Fur
origin, USA, 32” in
length, contains 35
pelts, w/65”.
Sweep, size 12,
tourmaline mink hat
included. Appraised
professionally at
$4,500 replacement
value, selling for
$450.
570-881-0569
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PROM GOWNS
Maroon with bead-
ing throughout by
Tiffany size 4 $75.
White with teal
beading by Sean
Mehta size 4 $75.
Strapless royal blue
with black design
size 9/10 by L. A. Glo
$65. Violet color
with beading top to
bottom by Scala
size large $75.
(570) 693-4629
SCRUB TOPS,
women’s, long
sleeve, new, quanti-
ty 10, sizes L-XL, $8
each. Christmas,
Easter and Hal-
loween. 823-1233
VINTAGE WEDDING
GOWN: Over 50
years old. White
with beaded and
jeweled top. 3/4
sleeves. Size 10-
Cleaned and boxed.
$95.00 or best offer
Call Mary 779-9464
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
LAPTOP, Acer,
Aspire. New in box,
Intel 17 processor,
top of the line. Paid
$850, selling for
$550. Great buy.
570-212-2393
ROUTER - wireless,
by Cisco, E 1000.
Like new. $40.
570-851-4545.
732 Exercise
Equipment
HARD CORE GYM,
Plate loaded cable
pulley machine; lat
pull down, chest
press, pec deck, leg
ext, lower pulley for
curling. $150.
570-868-6024
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
734 Fireplace
Accessories
FIREPLACE TOOLS
4 pieces and stand,
bronze, old. $25
570-864-3587
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE Dick-
son approximately
60 years old, gray
with 6 lids & top
warming closet,
bottom oven, very
good condition ask-
ing $450, or best
offer. 570-288-0204
FURNACE. Carrier
oil. Forced hot air
with 2 zone system.
Good condition.
$800. 570-574-1791
HEATER, Electric by
Edison. $15.
570-851-4545.
HEATER, wood
burning, 50 gallons.
Good for garage.
$40. 570-825-8818
TOTAL WOOD HEAT
Safe, clean, efficient
and comfortable
OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C
Outdoor Wood Fur-
naces LLC
570-477-56922
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED FRAME, Gold.
Queen size. $125.
570-735-4385
BEDFRAME, brass,
head board and
footboard. Polished,
54”x75”, full size.
Excellent condition.
Free delivery within
10 miles. $325.
570-824-9049
BEDROOM SET -
double bed with
headboard, double
width dresser with
hutch mirror, 5
drawer hi-boy
dresser & night-
stand. Pecan wood
finish. Very good
condition. $400
OBO. Kathy @
570-654-7847
QUEEN
BEDROOM Set
Beautiful 3 piece
set looks and feels
like new.
Guaranteed cost
875 sell for $95. In
plastic wrapper Will
deliver. Phone or
text 570 614 3877
BUNK BEDS
Solid oak, $250.
Call 570-287-5505.
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CABINET, wooden,
46” high, 25” wide,
with a glass door
and two adjustable
shelves. $50.
570-868-5066
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
CHASE LOUNGE,
With pad-red wood
$25.00
W O O D P I C N I C
TABLE with benches
$25.00, PFALTZ-
GRAF 1 Coffee Pot, 1
Tea Pot both new
$20.00. call
570-639-1975
COUCH & loveseat
blue, beige floral
print. Paid $2800
sell for $250. Must
sell. 570-457-7854
DESK, corner, com-
puter. Great shape.
O’Sullivan-Sauder.
Lots of storage and
shelves. $60 OBO
can email pics.
570-477-2281
D I N I N G S E T .
beveled glass table
top, 4 arm chairs,
$285, DINING SET.
Rattan round, 4
chairs, $285,
TABLE, 2 chairs, rat-
tan, $200, B Call for
further details.
570-474-0514
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
KITCHEN SET- Five
piece. Along with
matching hutch.
Good condition.
Asking for $700.00,
negotiable. Call
570-655-0983 for
details & inquiries.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
KITCHEN TABLE,
1940’s, wood with
Formica top, $10.
Grandfather clock,
6’ tall, $200. Desk
top with drop down
front, $10.
570-674-7692
KITCHEN TABLE- 42
inch, round with 2
extensions (12 inch
each) 6 chairs, dark
wood. $150.00
TABLE-Maple, 4’ x
3’ with 4 chairs and
1 side chair. 2
Extensions for table,
1’ each. $85.00
BUTCHERS RACK-
Gray steel with
glass shelves and 4
stools. $250.00.
Call and leave mes-
sage for Florence.
570-474-5142
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MATTRESS TOPPER
Very thick, brand
new, with gel &
feathers. Full size.
$60. FUTON, white
oak, well built, stick-
ley style, heavy duty
cushion. $300.
570-823-2709
RECLINING, sofa,
love seat, and rock-
er, blue, in good
working condition.
$400 for all three
pieces. 735-6920
SALON
FURNITURE
free standing styling
station, sink with
backwash unit and
shampoo chair, 58x
36 rectangular anti-
fatigue mat, wall
mount mirror with
brackets, 58x36.
Other miscella-
neous items.
570-709-7271
TABLE. Kitchen,
oak, round with Indi-
an tile. 4 chairs.
$175. 283-8420
TABLE. Oval walnut
Pa House coffee
table, $75, DESK,
ice box style oak
computer cabinet
and desk, $100,
DESK, 3 drawer
secretary style, $75.
TV, 42” big screen
floor model RCA,
$200. 417-2382
TABLES, 2 end with
glass tops $20
each, Desk, Sauder
with hutch, $50,
China closet, glass
doors, $125.
570-793-1696
TELEVISION CABI-
NET, blonde finish,
approximately 39”
wide by 65” high,
with one shelf, three
drawers. Excellent
condition, $100 firm.
570-288-0060
NANTICOKE
128 W. Church St.
Sunday
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Dell printer,
Christmas and
household items.
Washer and dryer
$125. electric stove,
$75. much more!
Edwardsville
681 Main Street
Saturday, Sunday
and Monday
9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Four five drawer file
cabinets, $20 each.
Four four drawer
file cabinets, $15
each. Horizontal file
with door, $25. Two
sorters, $10 for
both, metal book-
case, $10. Combi-
nation two drawer
file cabinet and 3
shelf unit, $20,
table, $20.
Line up a place to live
in classified!
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: From
only $3,997.00-
Make/ Save Money
with your own band-
mill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext.300N
SNOW BLOWER:
New Craftsman
electric start. Used
once. 21” path. Sell
$295.00
Call George: 817-
2389
756 Medical
Equipment
BATH TUB TRANS-
FER BENCH. (2) 1
36” and 1 45”. $50
each. 570-288-9180
BED, Hospital semi-
electric. Good con-
dition, works like
new. $250 OBO
Dave 570-991-2797
JAZZY CHAIR, with
charger, arm, head
and foot rests. Must
sell ASAP. $300
OBO.
1-215-436-0987
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
758 Miscellaneous
AUTO PAINT, 1965
to 1967 Corvette
Rally Red, base coat
only. One gallon
$150, paid $395.
570-883-7007
BEER KEGERATOR.
Beverage air, Model
BM23-B. Stainless
steel top and draft
tower. Holds 1/2
barrel of beer.
Needs some work
$250 negotiable.
570-287-9939
CART, for
microwaves, tall
with spice rack and
bottom storage,
$30. Grape fruit
spoons, antique, six,
$5. Picnic basket,
large vintage,
includes inside tray,
$10. Clothing racks,
two, large, chrome,
$10 each. 674-7692
CHAIR, Bunny for
small child, pink fur,
$5, TREADMILL,
$10, SKI/ROWER
$10 RICE COOKER,
$4, TV, 19” $4
570-696-3368
CLOTHES. Boys,
over 50 items, (lg-xl
14-16, $45,
NASCAR, Die cast
collectibles and
many various items,
25 pieces, $125.
T E C H D E C K S
(ramps & skate-
boards, over 50-
$35, DVD’S, chil-
dren, various kids
shows, 12 for $25,
BOOKS, kids 25 for
$20, DVD’s 12 for
$25, WWE DVD’s 4
for $40, Skechers,
womens, size 9, 3
for $30 Call for
details 237-1583
COAT RACK - holds
4 caps, 4 coats,
white floor model
with gold trim. $10.
FLOOR FAN - White,
4’1” high, 18” d. Like
new. $8.
570-851-4545.
DESK, O’Sullivan
light oak, $50,
Assorted hand
drafting tools and
table top drafting
table with straight
edge. $35, Assort-
ed templates, pen-
cils, leads, scales,
etc. $85 for all items
570-822-4762
FIGURINE
Nao/Lladro school-
girl with chalkboard,
$35/Hummels, 5 for
$60 each.
570-457-2496
HOOD 1967
Corvette 427, Big
Block, After market
$795. Good condi-
tion in primer.
570-883-7007
HUMIDIFIER, Sears,
new. $20. Turkey
roasting pan, $10.
Grolight for new
plants, $5. Silver
bread tray, $10. Cof-
fee set, four pieces,
silver, $20.
570-674-7692
JUKE BOX, full-
sized, heavy-duty,
wood facsimile of a
‘50s’ era. Reminis-
cent of “Happy
Days” composed of
plywood and deco-
rative plastics, inter-
nal 12 volt battery
powered lights and
sound system (not
included). Excellent
condition and origi-
nally used as the-
atre prop; can be
adapted for recre-
ational, decorative
or scholastic the-
atre background
use. $250. Call Tom.
570-881-0569
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
PROJECTOR: Slide
in case with 10
carousal, like new.
$100.00 Call George
570-817-2389
TABLE, dining room
with 1 leaf, 4 chairs.
Like new, $400. Din-
nerware, complete
set of 12. Rose Pat-
tern. $45. Chairs,
outdoor lounge
chairs with cush-
ions, set of 2, solid
medal, $50 each.
570-735-7619
TIRES new Good
Year re-tread. 4-
8.50x16.5 mud &
snow $125 for all 4.
(570) 735-3479
TIRES, very good
condition. four,
275/55/20, $280.
Two, 205/50R/17,
$100. Two sets of
two, 225/50R/17,
$220. Two,
205/55R/16, $120.
Two, 265/70R/16,
$120. Two new
215/65R/17, $145.
570-780-9056
TIRES. (4) All sea-
son FIrestone FR
710. 175/65/R14.
$80 all.
570-855-2568
WINDOW SASHES,
from 1925, wavy
type glass in them,
first come first
serve, must take all.
24 count, 12 top and
12 bottom.
570-574-0301
WIRE SET Wells 6
cylinder spark wire
set #q1827 in new
never opened pack-
age $5. 735-6638
762 Musical
Instruments
BANJO, Fender, FB-
59, Gold Hardware,
Hardshell case, like
new condition,
$650. 826-1582
ORGAN, electric,
Thomas Trouba-
dour, 186. Free.
Call: 570-836-4636
762 Musical
Instruments
PIANO. Richmond
upright. 100 years
old, dark wood,
beautifully carved,
good condition.
Needs tuning. $150
negotiable. Buyer
must remove.
570-310-1110
TRUMPET-Buescher
Super Aristocrat. 45
years old, excellent
condition. $500.
570-883-0265
766 Office
Equipment
ATTACHE CASE
aluminum, hard shell
with combination
locks. $20.
570-851-4545.
774 Restaurant
Equipment
SIX BURNER
STOVE, salamander,
3’ radiant charbroil-
er, 4’ flat top grill,
french fryer, 4’ bain
Marie, 20 qt. mixer.
LP gas All new For
Sale. 570-620-2693
776 Sporting Goods
GOLF CLUBS. Ping,
Taylor and Maxfil.
Putter, bag, driver
and woods. Also
excellent starter
set. Call for all
details. $200
570-18644
POOL TABLE,
(3-in-1) AIR
HOCKEY TABLE,
and PING PONG
TABLE, accessories
included. Great
condition. Asking
for $250.00, nego-
tiable. Call 655-
3089 for details.
778 Stereos/
Accessories
BASS BLASTER,
Road Master, in
box, 200 watts,
mega subwoofer
system. $90.
570-574-0271
780 Televisions/
Accessories
HOME THEATER,
Martin Ash HD
series 6985, 5.1
channel profession-
al, in box, 200-400
watts. Cost $2,299,
asking $250.
570-574-0271
TELEVISION, RCA,
color, 19”, Not a flat
screen. Good condi-
tion. $17.50, firm.
570-430-2311
TELEVISION, Sony,
32” console model,
not HD. $150.
570-883-7007
TV 19” COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
784 Tools
DRIVER/DRILL.
Dewalt 18 volt. Incl.
2 batteries & charg-
er with nut runner
kit. GRINDER Hitachi
4.5” $100 for both
OBO 570-779-7658
FLOOR SANDER,
PRO, drum sander,
runs ok $500. NAIL-
ER, hammerhead
Pneumatic. Excel-
lent. $250
570-650-0804
JACK 6 TON Bottle
Jack. $20.
570-851-4545.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SAW HORSES,
wood, heavy duty.
$25. 674-7692
786 Toys & Games
POOL TABLE. Regu-
lation slate top. Can
be used as pay per
game or play with-
out pay. Good
shape. $100 OBO
570-822-9215
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 15 - $1,595.50
WANTED, Vintage
Baseball Cards.
1960s, 50s, 40s
and earlier.
bob74b@msn.com
708-567-5380
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED:
Miners’ Candle-
sticks and Miners’
Carbide Lamps.
Paying $10-$45,
Plus Postage.
E-Mail, mace837116
@bellsouth.net
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPPIES
ACA registered.
Males & females.
Vet checked.
$650 each.
570-336-6162
570-417-3107
ROTTIES HUSKIES
Yorkies, Chihuahuas
Labs & More
Bloomsburg
389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
FOR SALE, Pure
Breeds with
papers, three girls.
570-436-2762
840 Pet Services
SPRING INTO A
FRESH START
PUPPY & BASIC
OBEDIENCE
CLASSES
Starting 3/23
& Therapy Dog
Training starting
3/17
570-332-4095
for info
845 Pet Supplies
ELECTRIC CLIPPER.
Andis Dog groom-
ing. Hardly used,
Model MBG $20
570-675-0460
*2008 Pulse Research
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LE EE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
What
DoYou
HaveTo
Sell
Today?
Over
47,000
people cite the
The Times
Leader as their
primary source
for shopping
information.
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 11E
8
0
7
4
2
1
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2013 Honda
Civic LX Sedan
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $18,823.90
Per Mo.
Lease
ase 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Per
LLea
* *
• Model #YF4H4DEW • 250-hp (SAE Net),
3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
®
V-6 Engine
• Variable Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4®) • 18-Inch Alloy Wheels
• Power Windows/Locks • Fog Lights
• Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • i-MID with
8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable
Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with
Guidelines • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink
®
• Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System
with Humidity Control and Air Filtration
• Driver’s Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
Including Power Lumbar Support
• 229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7
Speakers, Including Subwoofer • 2-GB CD
Library • Bluetooth
®
Streaming Audio
• USB Audio Interface
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $14,194.70
• Model #CR2F3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection •
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA
®
)
with Traction Control • Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
• 16-Inch Alloy Wheels • Dual-Zone
Automatic Climate Control with
Air-Filtration System • Rearview
Camera with Guidelines • Blu-
etooth
®
HandsFreeLink
®
• Pandora
®
Internet Radio Compatibility • USB
Audio Interface • MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack • i-MID with 8-inch
WQVGA (480x320) Screen and
Customizable Feature Settings
2013 Honda CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/2013.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
‘S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
1.9%
for 36 mos
CIVICS
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 60K ............................NOW $13,500
08 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 28K.................................NOW $13,950
09 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 28K................................NOW $14,500
10 CIVIC EX SDN Gray, 51K.................................NOW $14,950
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 28K ............................NOW $15,250
10 CIVIC LX CPE Gray, 18K..................................NOW $15,950
11 CIVIC EX CPE Red, 20K..................................NOW $16,950
12 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 12K................................NOW $17,950
12 CIVIC EXL Black, 6K..........................................NOW $19,950
CRV 4WD
10 CRV EX Black, 40K...............................................NOW $20,750
10 CRV EX Silver, 40K...............................................NOW $20,750
11 CRV SE Sage, 29K ...............................................NOW $21,250
10 CRV EXL NAVI Titanium, 49K ...........................NOW $21,500
11 CRV SE White, 25K...............................................NOW $21,500
10 CRV EXL Black, 19K............................................NOW $22,900
11 CRV EXL-NAVI Black, 41K...............................NOW $22,975
10 CRV EXL Sage, 30K............................................NOW $22,500
11 CRV EXL Titanium, 21K ........................................NOW $24,500
12 CRV EX Titanium, 19K ...........................................NOW $24,500
11 CRV EXL White, 18K............................................NOW $24,950
Final Winter
Write Down
on Prices!
PILOT 4WD
11 PILOT LX Navy, 23K ...........................................NOW $24,750
10 PILOT EXL DVD Gray, 45K.............................NOW $27,250
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 32K ........................................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 31K .......................................NOW $29,500
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 11K.........................................NOW $30,500
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,445.65
Per Mo.
Lease
PPPPPPPP r PPPPer
LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLea
*
• Model #FB2F5DEW • 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
®
4 Cylinder Engine • 5 Speed Automatic Transmission • Air
Conditioning with Air Filtration System • i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings • Rear View Camera with Guide-
lines • Bluetooth
®
HandsFreeLink
®3
• SMS Text Message Function
4
• Power Windows and Door Locks • Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA
®
) with
Traction Control • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • Cruise Control • Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID
Controls • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • Pandora
®
Internet Radio Compatibility
5
• Bluetooth
®
Streaming Audio
3

USB Audio Interface
6
• MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack • Exterior Temperature Indicator • Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Per Mo.
Lease
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,856.00
• Model #RM4H3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine • Automatic Transmission
• Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
• Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA
®
) with Traction
Control • Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
• Bluetooth
®
HandsFreeLink
• USB Audio Interface
• Remote Entry System
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
• Pandora
®
Radio Compatibility
• Bluetooth
®
Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
*Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
1.9
%
for 36 mos. 2.9
%
for 60 mos.
On All Certified Hondas
*1.9% for 36 mos/ 2.9% for up to 60 mos on Certifed Hondas thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C.
Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
FIT
10 HONDA FIT SPORT Red, 37K......................NOW $14,950
CRZ HYBRID
11 CRZ EX Frost, 5K.................................................NOW $17,500
ELEMENT 4WD
10 ELEMENT EX Gray, 25K...................................NOW $18,950
Gray, 90K, Was $7,950
Now $5,995
05 DODGE
STRATUS CPE R/T
White, 53K, Was $10,950
Now $9,750
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LT SEDAN
Red, 23K, Was $14,950
Now $13,500
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
Blue, 14K, Was $12,950
Now $10,950
08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LX SDN
Gray, 38K, Was $15,750
Now $11,950
10 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS SDN
Red, 47K
Now $14,500
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4WD
Blue 35K
Now $14,950
09 DODGE JOURNEY
SXT 4WD
10 BMW 328Xi AWD SDN
Navy, 41K
Now $22,500
Navy, 25K
Now $10,750
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER LS 4WD
Black, 65K
Now $10,950
08 FORD FUSION
SEL SEDAN
Gold, 81K
Now $12,950
08 TOYOTA
RAV4 4WD
00 LEXUS
RX300 AWD
Gold, 103K
Now $8,750
Silver, 37K
Now $12,500
08 MITSUBISHI
ECLIPSE GS CPE
Blue, 40K
10 MAZDA 3i
SPORT SEDAN
Now $13,950
White, 87K
Now $7,750
99 HONDA
ACCORD EX SDN
Gray, 85K
Now $12,950
04 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
Green, 46K
Now $13,500
JEEP
PATRIOT 4WD
Red, 92K
Now $7,750
02 HONDA CIVIC
LX SEDAN
Dk. Cherry, 103K
Now $8,950
00 MAZDA MIATA
SE CONV.
Silver, 14K
08 CHEVY
COBALT CPE
Now $10,950
Red, 50K
09 SUBARU IMPREZA
AWD SEDAN
Now $14,950
Gray, 29K
Now $18,950
11 SUBARU LEGACY
AWD SDN
Black, 89K
Now $8,950
00 HONDA ACCORD
EX COUPE
05, White, 68K $9,950
HONDA ACCORD
VP SEDAN
07, Silver, 86K $10,950
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Black, 67K
Now $10,950
07 HONDA
CIVIC LX CPE
06 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
EX Silver, 96K $10,950
EX Black, 102K $10,950
SE White, 77K $14,950
White, 5 Spd, 32K
Now $16,500
10 VW JETTA
SEL SDN
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Navy, 11K
Now $16,500
ACCORDS
08 ACCORD EXL SDN Green, 70K.....................NOW $13,950
10 ACCORD LX SDN Red, 28K...........................NOW $15,550
10 ACCORD LX SDN Black, 25K.........................NOW $16,750
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 41K .......................NOW $17,500
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 20K......................NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 20K..........................NOW $18,500
09 HONDA SXL V6 NAV SDN White, 43K......NOW $18,950
11 ACCORD EXL SDN Navy, 20K.......................NOW $19,500
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 24K......................NOW $19,500
PAGE 12E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Wyoming Valley Motors
56D Pierce Street º KinQston, PA
57D-714-9924
www.wyominQvaIIeysubaru.com
(Just over the bridge from the courthouse)
* Plus tax and tags. 36 month lease. 10,000 miles per year with approved credit. 1,500 and fees due at signing. $0 security deposit.
**As low as 0% fnancing with approved credit on select, in-stock Forester models.
$
179
PER MONTH*
36 MONTHS LEASE
$
20,990
- 32 MPG hwy.
- Symmetrlcal All wheel Drlve
- CvT Automatlc Transmlsslon
- Keyless Lntry
- 5 Star Crash Test Pated
- AM/PM/CD wlth 8luetooth
- ||HS Top Ten Safety Plck
20l3 SU8APU
LEGACY
2.5l
#v|N: 83397
MODLL DA8-0l
36 MONTHS LEASE
0% FINANCING
FOR UP TO 63 MONTHS!
**
$
23,995
- 29 MPG hwy.
- Symmetrlcal All wheel Drlve
- 5 Star Crash Test Pated
- Contlnuously varlable Automatlc Transmlsslon
- Keyless Lntry
- AM/PM/CD wlth 8luetooth
- ||HS Top Ten Safety Plck
$
229
PER MONTH*
36 MONTHS LEASE
2.5l
20l3 SU8APU
OUTBACK
36 O S S
#v|N: 83357
MODLL DD8-0l
$
199
PER MONTH*
36 MONTHS LEASE
$
21,648
- 28 MPG hwy.
- Symmetrlcal All wheel Drlve
- Automatlc Transmlsslon
- Keyless Lntry
- Alloys
- AM/PM CD Player
- ||HS Top Ten Safety Plck
20l3 SU8APU
FORESTER
2.5X
#v|N: 83260
MODLL DP8-2l
#v|N: 83260
MODLL DP8-2l
Let your love grow.
An IIHS Top Safety Pick for seven years running (2007–2013)
The most award-winning small SUV
*
Built in a zero-landfill plant
There are a lot of reasons to love spring in a Subaru, including the great deals
you can get on one. Find yours. Now through April 1.
OVER 70 SUBARU MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM!
WE HAVE THE CARS AND WE HAVE THE DEALS! COME IN TODAY!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 13E
The Kia 10-year/100,000-mile warranty program includes various warranties and roadside assistance. Warranties include power train and basic. All warranties and roadside assistance are limited. See retailer for details or go to kia.com. *24-hour Roadside Assistance
is a service plan provided by Kia Motors America, Inc. **Plus tax and tag. Picture may not represent exact trim level. Plus tax & tag, 12k miles per year with 1,500 down & fees due at signing. Kia Soul payment based on 39 month lease with approved credit. Sorento,
Optima and Sportage based on 36 month lease with approved credit.*** Must be a documented deal. Dealer reserves right to buy that vehicle.
WE WILL BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE ONANEW
KIAGUARANTEEDOR WE WILL PAY YOU$1,000!
***
2014 KIASorentoLX
2013 KIA Soul
2013 KIAOptimaLX
2013 KIASportageLX
#K3187
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K3193
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K3199
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
#K4000
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
$186
Per
Month
*
$21,360
**
OR
· /utomatic
· /M/FM CD
· Satèllitè Racio
· Pluètooth & iPoc Rèacy
· Traction Control
· Powèr Vincows
· 6 /irbags
· Kèylèss Entry
· Cruisè Control
· /lloy Vhèèls
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
0%
35
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
$259
Per
Month
*
$24,455
**
OR
· /ll Vhèèl Drivè
· /M/FM/CD
· Satèllitè Racio
· Pluètooth & iPoc Rèacy
· ¹7¨ /lloy Vhèèls
· Rèar Packup Camèra
· UVO Systèm
· Kèylèss Entry
· 6 /irbags
· Cooling Glvè Pox
· 6 Spèèc /uto Transmission
$139
Per
Month
*
$16,990
**
OR
· /utomatic
· 5 Door
· Powèr Packagè
· /M/FM/CD
· USP //uxiliary Jack
· /PS
· Stèèring Vhèèl Mountèc
/ucio Controls
· Kèylèss Entry
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
1.9%
30
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
0.9%
$259
Per
Month
*
$25,975
*
OR
· /ll Vhèèl Drivè
· /lloy Vhèèls
· 6 /irbags
· Satèllitè Racio w. Pluètooth
· Kèylèss Entry
· Cruisè Control
· /ntilock Prakès
· Traction Control
· 6 Spèèc /uto Transmission
24
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
WYOMINGVALLEY MOTORS KIA
560 Pierce Street , Kingston, PA
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
- l0-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted power traln warranty
- 5-year/60,000-mlle llmlted baslc warranty
- 5-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted antl-perforatlon
- 5-year/60,000-mlle 24-hour roadslde asslstance`
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS
1.9%
27
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals!
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR TRADES! COME IN TODAY!
PAGE 14E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
4
Tax, Documentation Fee and Registration Fee are extra. Chrysler Group retains the right to change incentives/rebates without prior notice. Lease Bonus Rebate is for eligible customers currently leasing
a Chrysler Group Vehicle or returning from a Chrysler Group Vehicle Lease, Restrictions Apply. Military Rebates are for Military Members currently serving or retired Military Members with 20 years
of prior service. Rebates are in lieu of low finance options such as 0% Ally (except on select models, see sales consultant). All prior sales offered excluded. All rebates have been applied to prices.
Ally/Chase Rebates require financing thru Ally or Chase. All Subject to prior sales. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purpose only. Exp. Date 3-21-13. Some restrictions apply.
888-323-6924
TUNKHANNOCK AUTO MART
2013 CHRYSLER 200
TOURING SEDAN
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate
and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment
is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee.
No Security Deposit.
2013 JEEP COMPASS
LATITUDE 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest
Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per
year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and
documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate
and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is
plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No
Security Deposit.
9 200’S
IN STOCK
• Front & Side
Airbags
• U Connect Voice
Command
w/Bluetooth
Includes $3,000 Rebate, $1,000 Conquest Rebate, $500 Military
NEW 2013 JEEP PATRIOT
OSCAR MIKE 4X4
Stk# 1355009 Stk# 1373002
STK# 1374023
Price includes 2500 Rebate and 750 Bonus Cash. Additional Rebates may apply (Military, Lease,
Conquest ect..) see Sales Consultant for details.
Stk# 1382005
MSRP $23,275
NOW AS
LOW AS
$
19,436
2013 DODGE
JOURNEY R/T RALLYE
AWD
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease,
10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No
Security Deposit.
Stk# 1347002
• Rear DVD
• Leather Seating
• GPS Navigation
• Power Sunroof
4 RT’S
AVAILABLE
AT SIMILAR
PRICE
$
341/36mo*
Lease
For
• Heavy Duty Snow
Plow
Prep Pkg.
• Limited Slip Rear
• U-Connect Voice
Command
w/ Bluetooth
2012 RAM 2500
CUMMINS DIESEL 4X4
Stk# 1286246
MSRP $44,235
NOW AS
LOW AS $36,220
2013 RAM 1500
EXPRESS QUAD CAB 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500
Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495
due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1386010
Price include $1,250 rebate, $1,000 Truck Month Bonus Rebate,
$1,000 Truck Trade in Rebate.
NOW AS
LOW AS $
24,300
Stk# 1386009
• 5.7 V8 Hemi MDS
• 20 inch alum chrome wheels
• Class IV Receiver hitch
• Trailer Brake Control
• Keyless Entry
• Sirius XM Satellite Radio
• Fog Lamps
• 5.7 V8 Hemi w/MDS
• Automatic
Transmission
• Sirius XM Satellite
Radio
• Remote Keyless Entry
• Pwindows • Plocks
5 AVAILABLE
AT THIS PRICE
MSRP $30,190
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CHALLENGER SXT PLUS
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military
Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus
license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk#1348001
PWR.
SUNROOF, GPS
NAVIGATION,
BLUETOOTH, 5
SPD AUTOMATIC
N
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2013 CHRYSLER 300 AWD
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery
plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1351007
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE,
GARMIN NAV.,
REAR BACKUP
CAMERA
27 HWY MPG
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W
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N
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45 RAMS
AVAILABLE
N
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Don’t risk paying too much somewhere else, truck
loads of vehicles will be sold at this event!
www.TunkAutoMart.com
HOLD EVERYTHING!
It’s Worth
the Drive to
Tunkhannock
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at
delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
2013 DODGE DART SXT
Stk#1360011
17 DARTS AVAILABLE
AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
Lease For
$152/36 mo.*
2013 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per
year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1320059
AIR
CONDITIONING
$
312/36mo*
Lease For
2013 RAM 1500
TRADESMAN 4X4
2013 CHRYSLER TOWN
& COUNTRY TOURING - L
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at
delivery plus license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
Stk# 1357006
Driver Convenience Group - Includes Keyless
Enter-N-Go, Remote Proximity Keyless
Entry, Heated Front Seats, Heated Second
Row Seats, Bright Door Handles, Heated
Steering Wheel, Power Adjustable Pedals,
Entertainment Group #2 - Includes Single
Disc DVD Player, 3rd Row Overhead 9’ Video
Screen, 2nd Row Overhead 9’ Video Screen..
$
295/36mo*
Lease
For
2013 DODGE AVENGER SE
BEST PART ABOUT
LEFTOVERS IS THE PRICE!
$
298/36mo
Lease
For
AS LOW AS
# 1382005 N
E
W 013 DODGE AVENGGGGGGGGGGGGEEEEEEEERR SE
Prices include all factory rebates, bonus rebates, loyalty rebates, and military rebates. Call or email or stop in for details.
N
2013 DODGE JOURNEY
SXT AWD
*Includes Factory rebate including $1,000 Lease Loyalty.Conquest Rebate and $500 Military
Rebate. 36 month lease, 10,000 miles per year. Payment is plus tax. $2,495 due at delivery plus
license, title and documentation fee. No Security Deposit.
• V6- 6 Spd. Auto.
• All Wheel Drive
• 3rd Row Seating
• Remote Start
• U-Connect Voice
Command
w/Bluetooth
Stk# 1347004 N
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New 2012 Jeep Compass Latitude 4x4 Remote Start, Bluetooth, Automatic Now as Low as .................. $20,200
New 2012 Jeep Wrangler 4x4 Hardtop, Automatic, Limited Edition, Now as Low as ............................. $28,100
New 2012 Ram 1500 Crew Cab Tradesman 4x4 stk#1286154 MSRP $37,820 ...................... Now as low as $29,900
New 2012 Chrysler 200 S Sunroof, Stk#1273010 MSRP $28,975 ................................... Now as low as $23,880
New 2012 Chrysler 200 S Sunroof & Leather, Stk#1273014 MSRP $29,170 ........................... Now as low as $24,065
New 2012 Chrysler Town & Country Touring-L Leather seats, BluetoothStk# 1257019 MSRP $34,230 . Now as low as $29,016
SOLD
“Whether
you are
looking to change
your oil or change
your car....we are
driven by you!”
NOW THRU THURSDAY NIGHT WE ARE OFFERING
INCREDIBLE SAVINGS ON OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY.
$
355/36mo*
Lease For
• AutoStick
• Automatic Transmission
• 3.6-Liter V6
• SiriusXM Satellite Radio
• Uconnect Voice Command with Bluetooth
Power Value Group - Includes Power
Heated Fold-Away Mirrors, Keyless
Entry, Power Driver 1-Touch Windows,
Speed Sensitive Power Locks,
Supplemental Front Seat Side Air Bags,
Air Conditioning, UConnect Voice
Command w/Bluetooth
$
248/36mo*
Lease For
UConnect Voice Command w/
Bluetooth - Includes Rear View
Auto Dim Mirror w/Microphone,
Bluetooth Streaming Audio,
Remote USB Port
$
333/36mo*
Lease For
EPA 28 MPG
HWY/22 MPG CITY!
$
233/36mo*
Lease
For
$
217/36mo*
Lease For
$
283/36mo*
Lease
For
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 15E
Find Your Dream Home
#1 in Home Sales in Luzerne County
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Office
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
Two-story
New Construction
Townhomes
• 1st floor master
• Formal Dining Room
• Eat-in Kitchen
• Loft
• Valuted Ceilings
• Front Porch
• Garage
• Garden Area
Pure Indulgence...
Luxury
Condominiums
nestled in a quiet
corner of Northeast
Pennsylvania
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!
Waypoint
In Luzerne
Contact one of our
Luzerne County
Real Estate
Professionals at
570.403.3000
Watch this Community come to life by
becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere
has never been a better time to join us…
Prices Starting in the $140’s
Find us in our convenient Location:
Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn
onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.
2
6
3
4
9
0
Se Habla
Espanol
~
415 JONES ST.
NANTICOKE 12-3267
Comfort awaits in this very
nice 4-BR, 1.5 bath, 2-story
home. This great starter home
features family room, rear
deck, 2-car garage, and more.
MAKE AN OFFER!
CALL JACK 878-6225 $109,000
DIR: From Wilkes-Barre, take
Middle Road past Birchwood
Nursing Home. Turn left on
Espy St, left on Bliss St, left
on Center St, right on Jones
St. Home on right.
Open House - Motivated Seller!
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271 CHARLES STREET
LUZERNE 12-2583
Discover the versatility of this
charming 3-bedroom residence!
Ideal offerings include modern
kitchen, freshly painted interior,
mud room, newer carpeting,
and main-level laundry. Home
warranty included with this
excellent buy. MOTIVATED
SELLER WANTS YOUR OFFER!
CALL FLO 371-2881 $90,000
DIR: Wyoming Ave to W. Bennett
St. Turn right on Charles St.
Home is on right.
Open House!
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109 CARPENTER ST.
LUZERNE 12-4412
Life is enhanced in this
3-bedroom two-story in
s u p e r b condition.
Among i t s features
are mud room, new
windows, a n d just-
painted interior. New
kitchen and new roof.
Value and comfort at
the right price!
CALL FLO 371-2881 $87,900
DIR: From Rt 11/Wyoming Ave, turn onto W. Bennett St. Turn left
onto Carpenter St. House is on left.
Open House!
2
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837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
LOWER DEMUNDS RD.,
DALLAS
Like new! This 2,500 sq.ft. home
features 4 bedrooms; new kitch-
en; 2 1/2 new baths; new hard-
wood fooring; new heating sys-
tem; new plumbing; newly fnished
lower level. MLS#11-4504
JOE MOORE $169,000
61 FOURTH STREET,
LARKSVILLE
Quality new construction! 2,400
sq.ft. of living space features fex-
ible, open foor plan. 4 bedrooms;
2 1/2 baths.Vaulted ceilings; hard-
wood fooring. 2-zoned gas forced air
heat with central air. Lower level fam-
ily room(37’ x 12’6’’). 30-year roof. 1
year builder’s warranty. MLS#13-182
JOE MOORE $167,500
3 MERCEDES DRIVE,
BARNEY FARMS, WILKES-BARRE
Impressive 2-story with a contem-
porary interior. 9 rooms including a
large living room; formal dining room;
FR (21 x 19) w/ marble FP; modern
kitchen w/dining area; 3 bedrooms;
2 full & 2 half-baths. Finished lower
level. Covered patio overlooking in-
ground pool. Well-landscaped lot w/
circular drive. MLS#13-899
JOE MOORE $293,500
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We Sell Happiness!
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
FEATURED HOME
100 MAPLE LANE,
PITTSTON
Stately three bedroom home on
fenced corner property with large
deck and concrete patio for out-
door living. Spacious family room
with gas freplace and vaulted
ceilings, Master bedroom with
bath and walk in closet, hardwood
foors, 2 car garage.
Call Bill 362-4158. MLS #13-748.
For more information and photos
visit www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
$299,000
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#12-4610 $280,000
Louise Laine 283-9100 x20
Spectacular custombuilt 2-sty.
on3acres inBlue Ridge golf
course community. 2-story foyer
&family roomwithfireplace.
Formal LR&DRwithhard-
woodflrs., oversizedoak eat-in
kitchen, master withsitting area,
3-seasonporch, in-grd. pool.
#13-806 $575,000
Gail &Paul Pukatch696-6559
OPENHOUSETODAY
12:00-2:00
Custombuilt 4BRhome w/4BA
lots of closets, many amenities.
Close to the Country Club&
Hanover Ind. Park. DIR: San
Souci Pkwy., LonSt. Marys, Ron
Sively, LonMarkHill, LonVanessa
Looking for move-incondition?
Howabout this better thannew
2-story withtons of builder
upgrades. 4bedrooms, 3baths
on1/2acre inWoodberryManor.
Crownmolding, granite counter
tops, hardwoodthroughout
first floor, spacious master.
#12-2077 $399,900
DJ Wojciechowski 283-9100
#13-712 $195,000
Carole Poggi 283-9100 x19
Modular ranch home with
attached 2-car garage on 13
acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
living roomwith fireplace.
Additional 60x72 butler style
building (new) with(3) 14’
overhead doors, plus additional
8x8 door and concrete deck.
Sweet Valley-Modular
$AVINGS OF THE GREEN BEGINS HERE! CALL US TODAY!
Mountain Top-Move-In! 291VanessaDr. Hanover Twp. Mountain Top-Spectacular!
©2013 BRER Afliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Afliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and
its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential Equal Housing Opportunity.
Y LLLLLLLLLLLL k
REDUCED! JUST LISTED!
29 ular! odul uu arrr
JUST LISTED!
www.gordonlong.com
3138 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
NANTICOKE - EAST
DEVELOPMENT
*Marvelous* 4
Bedroom 3 Bath Ranch
- Great open floor plan.
Asking $179,900
Listing #12-3193
Call Richard direct
570-406-2438
Mountain Top home offers elegance and amenities
Photos and Story by Hartt Lang
Advertising Projects Writer
This picture-perfect custom built
home is located in the Blue Ridge
golf course community in Mountain
Top. It is minutes away from State
Route 3010 and Interstate 81.
Listed by Gail and Paul
Pukatch of Prudential Poggi and
Jones Realtors for $575,000, this
home offers 4,500 square feet of
space. Some amenities include a 3
season porch, walk-up attic, ceiling
fans, central vacuum system,
hardwood floors, Whirlpool tub,
master bedroom with master
bathroom, patio, in ground pool,
security system, skylights, and a wet
bar.
The exterior of the home is
brick and vinyl. A paved driveway
wraps around an attractive front yard
and leads to the front and side of the
home. A 3 car garage is attached to
the left side where additional parking
is also available.
The front door opens to a
breathtaking 2 story foyer. Elegant
light fixtures hang from the ceiling,
bringing extra luminance to the
space. Natural light pours in
through large windows above the
main entrance.
Adjacent to the foyer, is an
18x13.6 living room. This room has
hardwood floors, ivory walls, and
natural crown molding. Attached to
the living room is a wet bar, perfect
for entertaining.
Through the wet bar area is
a 13x13 study/library. This room has
tan carpeting and dark green walls.
Built-in wooden shelves are available
for storage. French doors lead to a 12
x 16 sunroom/3 season porch that is
connected to the rear deck and patio
area.
Across from the living room
is a 13.6x16 formal dining room.
This room has hardwood floors and
natural crown molding. Charming
white columns accent the openings of
the living room and dining room.
A cozy 2 story family room
measures 19.6x14.6. This room has
hardwood floors and ivory walls.
Large windows with wooden trim are
above doors that lead to the rear
patio. A brick fireplace with a white
surrounding mantle sits between
wooden built-in shelves.
Through the living room is a
modern 29x15 eat-in kitchen. The
kitchen is tiled throughout, has floral
wall paper, recessed lighting, and
hanging light fixtures.
— Continued
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Nanticoke
Well cared 3 bedroom, 1
bath with 1380 sq ft on a
double lot with a detached
2 car garage in move-in
condition. Large room sizes
and ample closet space
make this a great home in a
convenient location close to
parks and schools.
Call Darren Snyder
570-825-2468
$79,500
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
SUNDAY,MARCH 17 ,2013
PAGE 16E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
This space is lined with an abundance of
custom oak cabinets. The kitchen table area is
surrounded by large windows that overlook the
backyard. A door in the kitchen leads to the rear deck
that opens to a patio and an in ground, heated kidney
shaped pool.
Also on the first floor are two half baths
measuring 3.6x8.6 and 5.6x4. The laundry room is
12.6x8.6 has a door that leads to the garage.
Carpeted stairs lead to the second floor. A
balcony overlooks the front entry of the foyer and
family room. Here you will find a master bedroom with
master bath, 3 additional bedrooms, recreation room,
full bath, 3/4 bath, and access to a walk-up attic.
The master bedroom measures 25x15 and has
a large walk-in closet, sitting area, and a cathedral
ceiling. An abundance of windows brighten the room,
along with recessed lighting and a unique ceiling fan/
light fixture. A spacious 25x16 modern master
bathroom is attached and has a whirlpool, skylight, and
double vanity. The bathroom has tiled floors and the
walls are elegantly styled with ivory and tan vertical
stripes.
The second bedroom measures 13.6x13.6. It
has cathedral ceilings, a ceiling fan, and a private full
bath that measures 7x10. The bedroom is carpeted
throughout and has a closet tucked behind double bi-
fold closet doors. The private bathroom is modern and
has tiled floors. Nearby is a 15.6x4.7 recreation room
that is wired for surround sound, carpeted, and has a
skylight.
The third bedroom measures 13.6x13.6 and
has a walk-in closet. The fourth bedroom measures
13.6x13 and has double closets for storage. These
bedrooms are connected by a 4.6x8 modern Jack and
Jill style bathroom with a private changing area and
sliding pocket doors for added privacy.
This home has a private well and sewer is on-
site. Heat fuel type and hot water heater are electric
and there is central air conditioning.
For more information or to schedule a
showing please call Gail or Paul Pukatch at (570) 696-
6559.
Specifications:
Type of home: 2 Story
Price: $575,000
Square Footage: 4,500
Bedrooms: 4
Bathrooms: 5
Listing Agents: Gail and Paul Pukatch
Realtor: Prudential Poggi & Jones Realtors
Agent Phone: (570) 696-6559
Office Phone: (570) 696-2600
Mountain Top
Continued from front page
We have a great newranch for sale in River Shores that we can also build in Eagle View. The home features one
floor living with great family room, 18 foot high vaulted ceilings, fire place, hardwood floor, two or three bedrooms,
large master and master bath suite and walk in closet. Laundry room, two car garage. Hardwood floors through out
with tile baths. Kitchen features a great appliance package and granite counters. “On-Demand” tankless hot water,
gas heat, and an extra large lot that is nicely landscaped all in a small upscale gated community. This home comes
with finished lower level with pool room, home theater, bedroomand full bath and a bar/kitchenette ……
Priced to sell fromthe mid to low$300,000s
OR
BuildYOUR version of this beauty in Jenkins Township at Eagle View. Great views fromall three lots that we have
remaining (they won’t last long). Large lots, and a custombuilt home that over looks the river and valley.
Views that will take your breath away!!!!!!
Priced COMPLETE including lot, home, gutters, driveway, patio, landscaping, etc…..
OR
Take a look at our NEWMODEL coming out of the ground at Eagle View….. foundation finished and framing to
begin. 3000 square feet of pure luxury with covered porch/entertainment areas with outstanding views…….
This will be the nicest home in the valley.
River Shores at the corner of Erie St and Susquehanna Ave inWest Pittston OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 123
Eagle Viewturn toward the river off of Main Street, Pittston (near the old hospital) on Brady or Delaney St,
then left two blocks to the site. Call 881-2144 for a showing on any lot or home.
River Shores Ranch Views at Eagle View
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 123
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
• Title Insurance
• Rapid Title Search & Closing
• Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283 9500
3
4
1
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 17E
Eric’s Career Highlights & Afliations
- Nationally Recognized Top Producing Loan Omcer
- More than 3,000 Northeast Pa. Families Served
- Mortgage Industry Veteran with More Tan 20 Years Experience
- Branch Team with more than 200 Years Combined Experience!
- Past President & Board of Governors Member - Mortgage
Bankers Association
- Seasoned Professional in FHA, PHFA, VA, & USDA Loan Products¯
- Greater Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Association of Realtors -
Amliate Member
Navigating today's mortgage approval process is challenging and requires the advice of an
experienced Mortgage Professional. Eric McCabe, a life-long resident of Northeast, PA, has
built his career helping area families realize their dream of homeownership. If you would
like to see exactly what it takes to own a new home for your family, Eric is ready
and eager to help.
When it comes to getting you Home...
EXPERIENCE COUNTS!
Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319. Individual NMLS# 139699. Licensed by the Pennsylvania Banking Department. Guaranteed Rate, Inc. is a private corporation organized under the laws of the
State of Delaware. It has no affiliation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any other government agency.
o: 570.714.4200 x24 c: 570.954.6145
www.mccabemortgagegroup.com
Eric McCabe
Branch Manager
400 Tird Avenue, Suite 100 - Kingston, PA 18704
When it comes to getting you Home...
Navigating today's mortgage approval process is challenging and requires the advice of an
experienced Mortgage Professional. Eric McCabe, a life-long resident of Northeast, PA, has
built his career helping area families realize their dream of homeownership. If you would
like to see exactly what it takes to own a new home for your family, Eric is ready
and eager to help.
EXPERIENCE
COUNTS!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DALLAS
4 bedroom home,
new construction,
with deck & patio.
Public water &
sewer, 2 car gar-
age. $223,900.
Lots Available
Build To Suit
Call 822-1139
or 829-0897
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
$59,900
902 William St.
Corner lot in
Pittston Twp., 2
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, move in con-
dition. Newer gas
furnace and hot
water heater, new
w/w carpet in dining
room & living room.
Large yard.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-767
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
DALLAS
Newberry Estate -
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo
with view of ponds
& golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2
floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2
car garage & more.
$449,900.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
BERWICK
VICTORIAN
Beautiful details
throughout include
exquisite wood-
work, hardwood
floors, stained
glass. Open stair-
case, 3 bedrooms,
2 full baths, 2 half
baths. Second floor
office, finished 3rd
floor, in-ground pool
& 3 car garage.
MLS#12-698
$207,000
Call Patsy
570-204-0983
570-759-3300
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
FORTY FORT
SINGLE HOME
3 bedroom.
Corner lot.
Carport & 1.5 car
detached garage.
Gas heat, vinyl
siding, 1.5 baths.
Enclosed side
porch. $79,900
570-779-5438
Leave Message.
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Beautiful home in a
lovely setting in the
Village of Orange. 2
or 3 bedrooms, 1st
floor bedroom,
hardwood flooring,
large eat in kitchen,
1st floor laundry,
2nd floor cedar
closet. Detached
garage, barn style
shed with loft, many
upgrades. New fur-
nace, kitchen floor &
recently drilled pri-
vate well & PIX
plumbing. Don’t
wait, make this
home yours & enjoy
serenity on the back
deck. $119,900
MLS# 13-283
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or
Tony Wasco
855-2424
570-901-1020
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HUNLOCK CREEK
OWNER FINANCING
Newly remodeled
mobile home on
beautiful private
land. 2 bedroom
with a 30’ x 10’
addition. $4,990
Down, We Finance
Balance. Call
570-332-8922
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING
Freshly painted
ranch. Hardwood
floors, new roof, fin-
ished basement.
1st floor laundry
room, covered rear
patio. Level lot,
1 car garage plus
2 car carport.
MLS#13-557
$139,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
DALLAS
Nestled in the trees
on a 1.5 acre corner
lot. 4 bedroom, 2
bath home in Glen-
dalough.
MOS# 13-693
$249,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
PAGE 18E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design
• Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
• Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Officenter–250
250 Pierce Street
Officenter–270
270 Pierce Street
Park Office Building
400 Third Ave.
Officenter–220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
KINGSTON CLARKS SUMMIT NORTH POCONO TUNKHANNOCK POCONO MOUNTAINS
*CLOSEDSALES BASEDONCOMPANYWIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERNPAFROM1/1/2011 to 12/31/2011
*Ranking as of Jan. 2012
NEPA’S #1 Real Estate Website!
Steve Farrell
Owner/Broker
OVER 880 SALES IN2011*
KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700
Top 500 Largest
Brokers in the U.S.
570-718-4959
WEST WYOMING
2BR/1.5BA Ranch
MLS#13-799
$129,900
Call Steve S 570-793-9449
New Listing
PLAINS TWP – RIVER MIST
3BR/2.5BATownhouse
MLS#13-768
$191,900
Call Carol 570-407-2314
New Listing
SHAVERTOWN
3BR/1.5BA Ranch
MLS#13-845
$199,000
Call Gayle 570-466-5500
New Listing
SWOYERSVILLE
1BR/1BA Ranch
MLS#13-811
$59,900
Call Whitney 570-417-1216
New Listing
HUNLOCK CREEK
4BR/3.5BATwo Story, 20 Acres
MLS#12-3520
$399,900
Call Michelle 570-371-1567
Reduced
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
Multi-Family Duplex
MLS#13-95
$79,000
Call Eddie 570-814-6129
Reduced
SUSQUEHANNA
MODULAR HOMES
BUILD THIS SPRING!
Less than half the time to complete project!
Call us for
your consultation.
We’ll work with you!
Proud builder
of affordable
handicapped
accessible
housing.
Rear 913 Wyoming Ave, Wyoming, PA
(Behind McDonald’s) • 1-866-823-8880
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
LL
Buying? Selling?Experience Counts!
Call Lisa Joseph 570.715.9335
55 Greystone Drive,
Mountaintop
Wonderful features in this 4BR home
in lovely Greystone Manor! Flat lot
on .77acres having berry bushes &
walking trails nearby!
MLS# 13-633
$354,900
Directions: Rte 309S to L on
Kirby Ave. (by Rite-Aid), turn L on
Greystone Drive (entering Greystone
Manor). Home on R.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:30-2:00PM
Brenda Suder
REALTOR
®
(Cell) 570.332.8924
(Office) 570.824.9800
(Fax) 570.824.9801
bsuder@remax.net
Nobody Sells More Real Estate Than RE/MAX
®
229 Nicholson St.
@ Route 309 • Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Phone (570) 824-9800 Fax (570) 824-9801
www.RPPNEPA.com
MLS#13-678
MLS#12-4181
1102 Pierce St., Scranton
Precision Properties
$160,000
MLS#12-2764
295 W. Broadway St., Larksville
$49,900
$209,900
81 Mara Ln., Plains
ELEGANT HOMES, LLC.
51 Sterling Avenue, Dallas PA 18612
(570) 675 • 9880
www.eleganthomesinc.net
New Construction! $198,900
* Approx 2100 Sq. Ft.
* 2 Car Garage
with Storage Area
* 2 Story Great Room
* Cherry Kitchen
with Granite
* Fenced in Yard
with Patio
* Gas Heat/AC
Directions: From Wyo-
ming Ave. take Pringle
St. to the End, take left on
Grove St. Twins on left -
267 Grove St. Kingston
Luxurious Twins in Kingston
Open House Today • 1:00-3:00PM
DON MARSH
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
Shavertown - 358 S. Memorial Hwy. 696-1195
CALL DON AT (570) 814-5072
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:00-2:00PM
105 BLUEBERRY DRIVE,
DURYEA
Stunning 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home
in beautiful Blueberry Hills. Ultra
modern kitchen, granite in all baths,
bonus room off master bedroom,
master bath has whirlpool tub. Family
room w/freplace. 2 car garage. Large
unfnished basement. Composite
deck w/hot tub. Much more !
Directions: North on Main St. Pittston
to Duryea. R on Phoenix, R into Blue-
berry Hills, take R on Blackberry, turn
R on Blueberry, property on R.
Asking $314,900
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Priced to sell on
West Center Hill Rd.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with finished
basement.
MLS 13-770
$134,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
Real Estate
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
DALLAS TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
Sun, Mar. 17, 12-2
2691 Carpenter Rd.
Magnificent raised
ranch on estate set-
ting. Total finished
four bedroom, 2
bath home. This
house features
hardwood floors
throughout. Finished
basement with
working fireplace.
Large deck with
swimming pool, two
car detached gar-
age set on 2.4
acres.
MLS# 12-3158
$298,000
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico Real
Estate, Inc.
826-1600
DUPONT
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
$72,000
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
$339,900
316 Raspberry
Rd.
Blueberry Hills
Like new 2 story
home with first
floor master
bedroom and
bath. Inground
pool on nice
corner lot with
fenced in yard.
Sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 2
car garage, full
unfinished
basement
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-610
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
$79,00
AFFORDABLE REN-
OVATED HOME!
You’ll enjoy the
space of the living
room/dining room
open floor plan with
hardwood floors.
Large trendy
kitchen with new
appliances. Spa-
cious 2 bedrooms
and bath with tiled
jetted tub for relax-
ing. Peace of mind
with new furnace,
hot water heater &
electrical box. Plen-
ty of parking and
nice yard.
MLS 13-96
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
DURYEA
534 Phoenix St.
Reduced to
$79,900
Newer Handicap
accessible one
story home in great
location. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath on
double lot. Off
street parking.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4490
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remod-
eled two bed-
room home.
Kitchen is very
nice with granite
counters and tile
floor, bathroom
is modern with
tub surround,
tile floor and
granite vanity.
New vinyl win-
dows through-
out. Off street
parking for 2
cars. MLS #12-
3966 For more
information and
photos visit
www. atlasreal-
t y i n c . c o m .
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Line up a place to live
in classified!
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100’
x 125’. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
Nice 3 bedroom
single family home
with open floor plan
& completely en-
closed back yard.
Close to shopping
& public
transportation.
MLS #13-278
$47,000
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
EXETER
$149,000
126 Mason St.
Charming 2 story
home with 2 bed-
rooms and 2 baths,
has it all! Profes-
sionally designed
and remodeled with
ultra modern
kitchen and baths
with granite, mar-
ble, hardwood,
stainless appli-
ances. Large lot
with detached
bonus cottage, gar-
den shed and off
street parking.
Everything is new
including plumbing,
electrical, furnace
and central air.
WWW.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4156
Angie
570-885-4896
Terry
570-885-3041
WEST PITTSTON
Split level, stone
exterior, multi-tiered
deck, bluestone
patio, flood dam-
aged, being sold as
is condition.
$73,500
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$69,900
1156 Wyoming Ave.
Large home with 4
bedrooms, yard
with detached 2 car
garage, private
yard. Home needs
a little updating but
a great place to
start! www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-865
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EXETER
$89,900
25 Washington
St.
Neat little Cape
Cod in nice
location. Very
well cared for 2
bedroom home
with gas heat,
good size lot
with driveway.
Beats a Town-
house any day
for this price.
www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-231
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
NANTICOKE
For Sale by
Owner, two rental
properties, side
by side, close to
schools & LCCC.
Great income
potential, currently
rented, recently
remodeled.
252 and 254 East
Grand Street.
Buy now, interest
rates low. Low
taxes. Must See!
$150,000 for both.
Contact Vince
570-258-2450
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY,
INC.
570-829-7200
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
FORTY FORT
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 2-4
Immaculate, attrac-
tive & spacious 3
bedroom, 2 story.
Freshly painted,
new carpet, well
insulated. New
energy efficient
hybrid water heater.
Charming back
yard, mature trees
& landscaping.
Off street parking.
MLS# 12-3421
$119,900
Call Marie Montante
570-881-0103
288-9371
NANTICOKE
BIG PRICE
REDUCTION!
Nice home in great
area. New Kitchen
with many updates.
great starter home!
MLS#12-3870
$45,000
Dave Rubbico, Sr
881-7877
Rubbico Realty
826-1600
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
REDUCED TO
$249,900
Brick fronted
rancher situated on
a 1.23 acre parcel
in Liberty Hills,
Hanover Township.
Excellent condition
describes this
2900SF, 10 room, 4
bedroom home.
Elevated covered
rear deck overlooks
the kidney shaped
in-ground pool, full
finished lower level,
2-car garage, hard-
wood floors, central
air conditioning,
plus wood burning
fireplace.
#12-2904
$259,900
Ted Poggi 283-9100
x25
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Three bedroom
town house ready
for new owners.
Nice level, over
sized yard & con-
venient location.
New hardwood
floors in some
rooms. Almost new
washer & dryer are
included. Large
patio off dining
room.
MLS #13-403
$113,900
Call Paul for
appointment
760-8143
696-2600
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 2
story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situ-
ated on a generous
lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st
floor family room, 2
car garage, deck
and soooo much
more!
MLS #11-2429
$274,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Custom built colo-
nial two-story. 4
bedrooms, 4 baths,
two vehicle garage.
View of the Wyo-
ming Valley. Located
on a dead end, pri-
vate street, just
minutes from the
Wyoming Valley
Country Club, Han-
over Industrial Park,
& public transporta-
tion. Sun room, fam-
ily room with wood
burning fireplace,
hardwood floors on
1st & 2nd floors, 1st
floor laundry room &
bathroom. Central
cooling fan. Lower
level recreation
room with bar, lots
of closets & stor-
age, coal/wood
stove, office/5th
bedroom & bath.
MLS #12-4610
$280,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
283-9100
To place your
ad call...829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 19E
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
SELLER SAYS
“MAKE ME
AN OFFER”
Come tour this well-
maintained 2-story
at 10 Rowe St. This
1 owner, brick &
vinyl home, in a
great neighborhood,
is in move-in condi-
tion. Large living
room, formal dining
room, large eat-in
kitchen with tile
floor, counter &
backsplash. 3 bed-
rooms & modern
bath with a tile tub/
shower. Finished
lower level 21’ x 15’
family room with
built-in storage, a
2nd full bath & laun-
dry area/utility
room. A “B-Dry”
System, freshly
painted & new car-
peting on 1st & 2nd
floors. Central air &
new electric serv-
ice. Attached 1 car
garage with work-
shop or storage.
Screened-in patio
overlooks a large,
level private back
yard. For more in-
formation & to view
photos online, go to:
www. pr udent i al
realestate.com &
enter PRU7W7A3 in
the Home Search.
PRICE REDUCED TO
$132,900.
MLS#12-3160.
Call Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
or Walter Belchick
696-2600, Ext. 301
696-2600
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
$84,500
64 CENTER ST.
Large 4 bed-
room with mas-
ter bedroom
and bath on 1st
floor. New gas
furnace and
water heater
with updated
electrical panel.
Large lot with 1
car garage, nice
location.
www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
Must be sold to
settle estate
MLS 13-294
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$198,900
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential in
quiet neighborhood.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
NEW LISTING!
Quality home in con-
venient location.
Move in ready. Nice
size rooms, finished
room in basement
used as 4th bed-
room or office. Gas
heat, off street
parking. Three sea-
son porch.
MLS#13-560
$115,500
Call Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
171 Third Avenue.
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR
YOUR MONEY!
Modern 3 bedroom
town house with 2
1/2 baths (master
bath). Central air
conditioning, family
room, security sys-
tem. Very low gas
heating cost. Deck
and patio, fenced
yard, garage,
Extras!
MLS # 12-3011.
(PHFA financing:
$3,500 down, $557
month, 4.375%
interest, 30 years).
$115,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
SWOYERSVILLE
317 Kossack St.
First floor laundry,
new carpet, lami-
nate flooring and a
great 3 season
porch to entertain
in. Lots of potential!
MLS 12-4408
$72,500
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
177 Third Avenue
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR YOUR
MONEY! Modern 3
bedroom end unit
townhouse, with 2
1/2 baths (master
bath). Central air.
Family room, foyer,
deck with canopy,
patio, fenced yard,
garage. Extras!
PHFA financing:
$3,500 down; $557
month, 4.375%
interest, 30 years.
$115,000.
MLS # 12-3012
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
LAFLIN
$129,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in
Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage
and large corner
lot. Lots of space
for the large or
growing family.
www. atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LAFLIN
$389,900
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18’
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
MOOSIC
$99,900
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAINTOP
46 Farmhouse Road
Large, fabulous
ranch with vinyl sid-
ing and stone front,
central air, gas heat,
modern kitchen &
baths. Two car
garage, gas fire-
place, finished lower
level, deck & securi-
ty system. A must
see home.
MLS #12-1359
$265,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
MOUNTAINTOP
This one acre set-
ting features a nice
1 bedroom home
with good sized
rooms that needs
updating. 1 car
garage. Enclosed
back porch. Shed.
Partially finished
basement with 2nd
kitchen (for can-
ning). Coal burner in
basement.
MLS# 13-185
$99,900
Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP/
GLEN SUMMIT
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for hik-
ing & biking. This
home boasts per-
ennial gardens &
mature landscaping,
fenced rear yard
enclosing a 20x40
heated in-ground
pool, raised garden,
custom dog house
& run. Entertain &
dine on the wrap-
around porch with
mahogany flooring
& electric hurricane
shutters. The resi-
dence features
hardwood flooring,
French doors, cher-
ry kitchen, 3-4 bed-
rooms, updated
heating/air. Emer-
gency generator for
inclement weather.
MLS# 12-1647
$410,000.
696-2600 ext. 210.
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
$125,000
WOW. Modern
Ranch! King size
brick Ranch located
on the outskirts of
Nanticoke, You’ll fall
in love with the
open floor plan.
Sunny, large sunken
living room, tiled
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
3 bedrooms. Bath
with tiled garden
tub & glass shower.
Additional amenity,
finished lower level
with fireplace. 3/4
bath with laundry
area.
MLS 12-4107
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
Roomy 2 bedroom
with office, large
deck & off street
parking for up to 4
cars. New electri-
cal, plumbing, re-
placement windows
& roof. Across the
street from large
park.
Motivated Seller!
MLS #13-714
$45,000
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
NANTICOKE
Motivated Seller!
Roomy 4 bedroom
in central location.
New furnace,
plumbing & electri-
cal. Fenced yard
with patio & shed.
MLS #13-718
$45,000
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. New roof
installed 11/17/12.
This home also has
a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4
bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car
detached garage.
This home features
a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, fur-
nace, hot water
heater, replacement
windows, fenced
yard and large
covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-7846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
260-262
E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking
with paved back
alley. Close to
LCCC. New roof
installed in 2007
along with a kitchen
& bath update
in #260.
MLS #13-694
$65,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
YATESVILLE
TOTALLY
RENOVATED,
MODERN, OPEN
FLOOR PLAN
TOWNHOUSE.
Great Location,
convenient to
Wilkes-Barre &
Scranton. 2 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
single car attached
garage, kitchen,
dining & living
rooms, deck.
Stainless steel
appliances, Corian
countertops, no
HOA. $159,900
570-654-1964
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$179,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
NANTICOKE
24 S. Prospect St.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION!
Former firehouse
uniquely designed
for multipurpose.
Building includes a
clubhouse in base-
ment with bar and
restrooms. Huge
office, computer
training room, large
carpeted exercise/
utility room, garage
and central air. Two
(2) newer 150,00
BTU Modine over-
head heaters. Off-
street parking
behind building. This
is a very solid struc-
ture located in a
prime business area
in Nanticoke!
DON’T MISS
THIS FANTASTIC
INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY!
$86,000
MLS# 12-1666
Call Ron
570-817-1362
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
PITTSTON
$119,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home
with Victorial fea-
tures, large eat in
kitchen with laun-
dry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath
with claw foot tub,
lots of closet
space. Move in
ready, off street
parking in rear.
MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
$124,900
67 Carroll St.
The WOW factor!
Move right in and
enjoy this renovat-
ed home with no
worries! 3 bed-
rooms with lots of
closet space. 2 full
baths including a 4
piece master bath
with custom tile
work, open floor
plan with modern
kitchen with island,
corner lot with off
street parking and
nice yard. Come
and take a look!
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-863
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
Amazing Property!!!
Five bedrooms, 4
with private bath.
spectacular master
suite with sitting
room + 3 room clos-
et. Four fireplaces
All hardwood floors.
Gazebo style ceiling
in library. 3 car
garage. Resort-like
yard with in-ground
pool with cabana &
outside bath. Adult
amenities, full fin-
ished basement.
PREQUALIFIED
BUYERS ONLY
MLS# 12-1091
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
Room for all your
needs! 4 bedroom
home offers living
& dining rooms
AND an extra room
for whatever you
need. Separate
laundry room on 1st
floor, new carpeting
in 3 bedrooms, new
water heater in
2010, new Bath
Fitter tub/shower.
Recently re-grav-
eled driveway, nice
sized outdoor stor-
age shed & plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #13-360
$95,000
Call/text Donna at
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED
$39,900
514 Main St.
Grand older home
being sold as-is.
Four bedrooms,
large kitchen, hard-
wood floors on first
floor, vinyl sided,
some newer win-
dows. Needs work
but makes a great
winter project. MLS
#12-2873. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
$139,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
$64,900
9 rooms, aluminum
sided, new
windows & wrap
around porch.
Kitchen with all
appliances, w/w
carpet, laundry
room with washer
& dryer, nicely
painted. Gas heat,
walk up attic on
50 x 150 lot with
shed.
Call Joe, 613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 12-2
32 Brian’s Place
Townhouse in pris-
tine condition. Move
right in! Has location
& view. Tastefully
finished with two
large bedrooms,
two full baths and
over sized closets.
Living room with
corner fireplace.
Custom kitchen with
hardwood floors.
Well manicured
lawns with privacy
walls. 2,400 sq. ft.
Recreation & multi-
use room. A must
see!! MLS#12-3622
$210,000
David Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level
townhome features
2 car garage, 3
bedrooms, 3.5
baths, lower level
patio and upper
level deck, gas fire-
place, central air
and vac and stereo
system www.atlas-
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS TWP.
$67,900
This 2 story, 3 Bed-
room Home located
close to Solomon
School is move-in
r eady. Feat ur es
include the fenced
backyard, above-
ground pool, large
deck, off-street
parking & 1st floor
laundry. Call Today!
MLS #13-144
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
PLAINS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 12-2
Great 3 bedroom, 1
bath with a large eat
in kitchen & finished
basement with a dry
bar. Large fenced
yard & extra lot
included for addi-
tional parking. With-
in walking distance
of Wyoming Valley
Mall!
$134,900
MLS# 12-2479
Dave Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny Lake!
4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Two
car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, above
ground pool, dock &
100' lake frontage.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Call Kenneth
Williams
570-542-2141
Five
Mountains
Realty
SWOYERSVILLE
$124,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in
this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable
neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen
with new flooring.
Finished basement
with theater/rec
room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Totally Redone! This
cozy Cape Cod has
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Modern kitchen with
granite countertops,
ceramic tile back-
splash and floor, all
new hardwood
throughout, new
furnace, new wiring,
new windows, duct
work in place for
central air, much
more! Vinyl siding,
large unfinished
basement, deck,
Off street parking.
24 hour notice to
show.
Asking $135,000.
Call Don at
814-5072
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
Large, move-in con-
dition 10 room, 4
bedroom, 3 bath, 2-
story home with off-
street parking near
Barney Farms. This
is a well maintained
home with a large
eat-in kitchen, map-
le cabinets & par-
quet floor. The fur-
nace/central air
conditioning is only
2 years old. Buy this
home & enjoy your
summer days &
nights in your large
screened in rear
porch or in the
fenced yard with a
black top patio/bas-
ketball court.
MLS#13-69
$169,900
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x28
696-2600
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
Beautifully updated
home in convenient
Wyoming location.
New foyer, updated
kitchen, bathroom,
walls & flooring.
Nice size deck &
front porch. Hard-
wood floors &
stained glass win-
dow make the foyer
a stunning entrance.
Open floor plan be-
tween living room &
dining room gives
the rooms a larger
feel. Great neigh-
borhood & schools.
#12-3852
REDUCED TO
$139,000
Chris Jones
696-6558
696-2600
WEST PITTSTON
128 LINDEN ST.
Motivated Seller!
Beautiful Cape
Cod. 3+ bed-
rooms, 2 full
baths. Ultra-mod-
ern kitchen with
granite counter-
tops, tile floors &
laundry area. Din-
ing room has
French doors,
with laminated
floors. Plenty of
closet space. 2nd
floor master bed-
room & adjoining
den. New win-
dows, water
heater, electric,
gas furnace.
Three season
porch, mudroom
& fenced yard.
$125,900.
570-883-9943
570-212-8684
WEST PITTSTON
112 Clear Springs
Court
NEW PRICE
$164,000
Ledgeview Estates
Updates, Updates,
Updates – New
hardwood floors,
granite counter
tops in kitchen, new
granite vanities, tile
floor, finished, walk-
out basement with
gas fireplace.
Call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES BARRE
$44,900
70 N. Meade
3BR, 1 bath in move
in condition with
new electric box,
water heater, and
plumbing. Off
street parking in
rear for 3 cars,
good credit and
your house, taxes &
insurance would be
under $400/month.
MLS #12-3900. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
$54,000
735 N. Washington
Street
Spacious 2 story, 3
bedrooms with 2 ca
detached garage,
good starter home,
needs TLC. MLS #12
3887. For more
information and pho
tos visit www.atlasre
altyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
$69,900
253 Parrish St.
Spacious home,
ready to move into.
Large open floor
plan offers a great
layout for all your
needs. Three bed-
rooms, plus lower
level family room.
Modern bath and
open kitchen.
Shared driveway
gives you off street
parking for a couple
of cars,detached
garage. MLS #12-
3628. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES BARRE
REDUCED
$39,900
61 Puritan Lane
Are you spending
more than $400/mo
on rent?? Owning
this home could
cost you less! With
3 bedrooms and a
fenced in yard, this
home makes a per-
fect place to start
your homeowner-
ship experience.
Ask me how!
MLS #12-1823. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES- BARRE
$112,000
43 Richmont Ave.
Worth more than
listed price, this 3
bedroom, 2 bath
Cape Cod home
has central air,
hardwood floors,
fenced yard, above
ground pool, mod-
ern kitchen and
baths. www.atlasre-
altyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
T I M E S L E A D E R
(570) 474-9801
If you are buying or selling anywhere
in the county, I can help you!
Only if you call!
Direct Line - Jim (570) 715-9323
Jim Graham
Associate Broker
Spacious 4BR, 2.5 bath, LL
FR w/bar, LR, DR, oversized
2 car garage, in-ground pool
& cabana, fenced yard.
Priced to sell!
MLS# 12-4305 $179,500
All brick 4BR, 3 bath Split-
level, HW foors, lower level
FR w/FP. Corner lot/stream
frontage. Very good room
sizes. MLS# 12-3563
$189,000
HANOVER TWP. MOUNTAINTOP
ERA1.com
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
Mountaintop
(
570
)
403-3000
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
Sunita Arora
Broker/Owner
Accredited Buyer Representative
Certified Residential Broker, E-Pro
Graduate Realtors Institute
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
OVER $100 MILLION
SOLD IN 2012*
We will get you to the end of the rainbow
BRINGING THE LUCK O’ THE IRISH TO
THE NEPA REGION FOR OVER A DECADE
* = Based on adjusted year end statistics from Greater Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pike/Wayne, Carbon County and Pocono Mountain Board of Realtors.
Conditions and limitations apply; including but not limited to seller and house must meet specific qualifications, and purchase price will be determined solely by ERA Franchise Systems LLC, based upon a discount of the home’s appraised value.
Additionally, a second home must be purchased through a broker designated by ERA Franchise Systems LLC. Call your local participating ERA® professional to review details. Not available in all areas.
©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.
HARVEYS LAKE
Luxury Lakefront Estate
$1,475,000 MLS#12-2045
CRYSTAL LAKE
Johnson & Johnson Mansion
$1,395,000 MLS#13-797
CLARKS SUMMIT
Contemporary Healing Home
$599,900 MLS#13-419
DRUMS
Beech Mountain Lakes
$265,000 MLS#13-670
POCONO PINES
Walk to Lake
$262,500 MLS#11-3584
DURYEA
Blueberrys Hill Estates
$259,900 MLS#13-764
POCONO LAKE
4 Bedroom Cape Cod
$232,500 MLS#11-3264
HAZLETON
Office space + 1 acre
$199,999 MLS#12-3156
SHAVERTOWN
Finished LL + fireplace
$179,000 MLS#13-684
EAST STROUDSBURG
Move right in!
$155,500 MLS#10-4759
EAST STROUDSBURG
Well maintained traditional
$154,900 MLS#11-1182
BUSHKILL
Well maintained 4BR
$119,900 MLS#11-115
WILKESBARRE
Huge double block
$118,000 MLS#12-3753
WHITE HAVEN
New Construction Townhomes
$115,000 MLS#12-3105
EXETER
Mother-in-law Suite
$114,900 MLS#12-4492
LAFLIN
Remodeled 4BR Ranch
$129,000 MLS#13-931
DURYEA
Remodeled 2-unit
$104,900 MLS#12-4278
DURYEA
Great income potential
$95,900 MLS#12-4246
PLAINS
Large yard, garage.
$94,000 MLS#13-519
DURYEA
Renovated, finished LL
$78,500 MLS#13-929
TOBYHANNA
Pocono Country Place
$75,000 MLS#13-445
PITTSTON
Large eat-in kitchen
$67,500 MLS#12-4279
EDWARDSVILLE
Off street parking
$66,000 MLS#11-1607
WILKESBARRE
Wrapped deck, screen porch
$57,900 MLS#13-236
WILKESBARRE
3-three season rooms
$55,000 MLS#11-1779
WILKESBARRE
Two 2 Bedrooms
$49,900 MLS#12-3922
NANTICOKE
Motivated Seller!
$43,000 MLS#12-4329
WILKESBARRE
Updated 4BR home
$39,000 MLS#12-4553
WILKESBARRE
Double converted to Single
$38,000 MLS#13-831
COMMERCIAL
MULTIFAMILY
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
MULTIFAMILY
MULTIFAMILY
MULTIFAMILY MULTIFAMILY
J
U
S
T
L
IS
T
E
D
J
U
S
T
L
IS
T
E
D
PITTSTON
3- story, 3 bedroom
$120,000 MLS#12-4289
Lewith &Freeman Real Estate
(570) 696-3801 • (570) 696-0883 Direct
metcalf@epix.net
Looking for a quality home.. then head on over to this gorgeous 5,000+ sq. ft. 2
story traditional home cradled on 1.28 acres, built in 2010. Tis home offers ultra
modern kitchen w/breakfast area, 4 BRs, 5 BTHs, formal LR, DR, office, 2 story
family room w/floor to ceiling FP w/accent windows, rec room & exercise room. Te
oversized master BR & bath leaves nothing to be desired. Radiant heated tiles in
1st & 2nd floor baths as well as kitchen. 1st floor has cherry HW floors throughout
+ numerous upgrades. Custom landscaping w/pond, blue stone walkways and large
patio. MLS#13-833 Offered at $750,000
New Listing - Shavertown
1755 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY, SHAVERTOWN, PA18708
Lot 1 Woodberry Dr., Mountaintop
Preview this 4BR, 3bath 2 story
model w/ lots of HW & tile. Gran-
ite counters in kit, MSTR Suite
w/2 walk-in closets & tiled bath
w/ dbl vanities, shower & whirl-
pool. Home/lot packages avail-
able. TERRY D. 715-9317
Dir: 309S. to Right on S Main, Right on
Nuangola, RIght on Fairwood Blvd. to
end. Straight into Woodberry Manor. 1st
house on left.
DALLAS
10 DAKOTA DRIVE
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BR’s, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
app’ls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208
RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
DIR: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods
MOUNTAINTOP SHAVERTOWN PITTSTON KINGSTON
OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-3:00 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 1:00-2:30 PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY • 12:30-2:00 PM PLAINS KINGSTON
55 GREYSTONE DRIVE
MOUNTAINTOP Wonderful features in this 4BR home in lovely
Greystone Manor! Flat lot on .77acres having berry bashes &
walking trails nearby! MLS# 13-633
LISA 715-9335 $354,900
DIR: Rte 309S to L on Kirby Ave. (by Rite-Aid), turn L on Grey-
stone Drive (entering Greystone Manor). Home on R.
KINGSTON Inviting 4BR, 3.5 bath home w/huge LR w/stone
FP, display shelves lead to elegant offce. Kitchen & FR share
granite counters. Wonderful yard. MLS# 13-724
RHEA 696-6677 $325,000
KINGSTON Gracious 4BR, 2.5 bath home on corner lot on
beautiful tree-lined street - Inviting rooms w/HW foors, detailed
molding, stained glass windows - Large bright eat-in kitchen
overlooks great pool, Large patio & wonderful, professionally
landscaped, enclosed yard. MLS# 12-4060
MARGY 696-0891 $340,000
MOUNTAINTOP Beautiful 4BR, 3 bath Split Level w/vaulted
ceilings, skylights, 2FPs. Kit has granite countertops & tile
backsplash. LL FR w/FP & dry bar. Situated on a lg lot w/in-
ground pool & privacy fence. Great for entertaining! 1 yr Buyers
Home Warranty. MLS# 12-4508
DEB R. 714-5802 $249,900
SHAVERTOWN Woodbridge II - 2yrs old open foor plan. HW
foors, FR w/2story FP, LL fnished w/wet bar, movie theatre,
exercise room. Breathtaking views. Upgraded landscaping with
3 waterfalls. MLS# 12-4215
GERI 696-0888 $599,000
PITTSTON TWP. Beautiful 3BR, 4 bath Ranch on over 1acre -
Handicap accessible - Land can be subdivided into 2 large or 4
smaller lots. MLS# 13-867
SHIRLEY 714-9272 $259,900
PLAINS Beautifully updated 2-story house in quiet neighbor-
hood. 1st foor MBR w/FP, 3+BRs on 2nd level, 2 car garage &
shed. MLS# 13-837
ANDREA 714-9244 $259,900
PITTSTON/NORTH & SURROUNDS
Jenkins Twp Insignia Point Courtyards 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman
Wyoming 171 Susquehanna Ave 12-1:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Forty Fort 35 Center St 2-4PM Lewith & Freeman
Wyoming 68 W 6th St 2-3:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Duryea 105 Blueberry Drive 12-2PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan
KINGSTON/WEST SIDE & SURROUNDS
Luzerne 271 Charles St 1-2:30PM Century 21 Signature Properties
Luzerne 109 Carpenter St 2:30-4PM Century 21 Signature Properties
BACK MOUNTAIN & SURROUNDS
Dallas 10 Dakota Drive 1-2:30PM Lewith & Freeman
Dallas 1547 Old 115 1-3PM Remax Precision Properties
Dallas 2217 W. 8th St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan
MOUNTAINTOP & SURROUNDS
Mountaintop 426 Ice Harvest Dr 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan
Mountaintop 55 Greystone Dr 12:30-2PM Lewith & Freeman
HANOVER/ASHLEY/NANTICOKE & SURROUNDS
Hanover Twp 291 Vanessa Dr 12-2PM Prudential Poggi & Jones
Hanover Twp 30 East St 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan
Nanticoke 415 Jones St 12-2PM Century 21 Signature Properties
HAZLETON & SURROUNDS
Drums 108 Fairway Dr/Showcase Home 12-5PM Tuskes Homes
WILKES-BARRE & SURROUNDS
Plains 32 Brians Pl 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estat
Plains 220 Bear Creek Blvd 12-2PM Realty World Rubbico Real Estat
Wilkes-Barre 46 Custer ST 1-3PM Century 21 Smith Hourigan
OPEN HOUSES - SUNDAY, MARCH 17TH, 2013
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PAGE 22E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
$72,900
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but
move right in! This
home has every-
thing you need...3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced
in yard, screened in
porch, off street
parking, quiet
neighborhood.
Home recently
remodeled inside &
out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Three bedroom
ranch on corner lot,
convenient to
Wilkes-Barre Blvd.
& Rt. 81. Living
room, dining room
& modern kitchen.
Enclosed porch with
large deck and hot
tub, full basement, 1
car garage, shed
and carport. All
electric.
Maintenance Free.
$99,900
Leave Message
570-824-8245
WYOMING
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
PRICED TO
SELL $179,000
570-885-6848
YATESVILLE
$174,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit
townhouse, no
fees. 2 bedrooms,
3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathe-
dral ceiling with
skylights. Large
family room with
propane stove and
it’s own ductless
air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
$39,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
HANOVER TWP.
COMMERCIAL
LEASE
8,500 sq. ft. building
$4,000/month, ten-
ant pays utilities.
Building Ready for
many uses. Owner
will build to suit.
Custom Leases
Available. Property
has 5 garage bays,
office space & plen-
ty of parking and
fenced side yards.
Heated with rest-
rooms. unlimited
potential.
MLS #13-63
Call Today!
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
KINGSTON
Great opportunity
for this 2,900 sq. ft.
professional office
building in high traf-
fic area. Currently
used as a veterinary
clinic but is easily
adapted for other
uses. See how this
space can be used
for you! Open
entry space, individ-
ual offices, full base-
ment for storage,
central air, and gas
heat. Parking for 12
cars.
MLS-12-416
$339,000
Call Rhea for
details
570-696-6677
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Route #11 Two Bay
Garage in high traf-
fic location. 250
frontage ideal for
contractor, auto
repair, small busi-
ness. priced to sell
at $95,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
KINGSTON
341 Wyoming Ave.
3 story Victorian
home located in a
high exposure area.
Has all the lovely
signature wood-
work of a grand
VIctorian of yester-
year! Can be
restored for use as
a residential home
or a landlord invest-
ment. Currently
subdivided into mul-
tiple office spaces
and 2 apartments.
MLS 12-617
$149,000
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
Newly remodeled,
immaculate office
building. 1,600 sq.
ft., central air, plenty
of parking, abun-
dant storage areas,
handicapped acc-
essible.
MLS#13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
105 S. Market St.
Superb, brick com-
mercial building with
second floor apart-
ment. Well main-
tained. Ideal for
beauty salon, start-
up small business.
Call for details.
Priced to sell at
$125,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON
Completely remod-
eled with new addi-
tion in prime loca-
tion. 2 separate
Main Street ent-
rances. Can be
used as one office
or two. Handicap-
ped accessible,
security system,
garage, 2 kitchens,
2 baths, newer roof
and heating system.
MLS# 13-9
A Must See!
$289,000.
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
PITTSTON
$115,000
142-144 Carroll St.
Well maintained,
fully rented 4 unit
investment property
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Owner took
good care of this
property. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-4514
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON
$129,900
224 William St.
Are you a hair-
dresser or barber?
Need a space for
an in home busi-
ness? This might be
just what you’re
looking for. Well
maintained 4 bed-
room home with
salon (previously a
barber shop for 60
years). Very well
established, high
visibility location
and additional home
with 3 bedrooms
currently rented to
a tenant. Must be
sold as one pack-
age. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-216
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
68 William St.
Great investment
property with 3
units and separate
utilities. Each unit
has 2 entrances
and washer hook
up. Roof is 5 years
old. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
UNION TWP
Great Old 80 Acre
Farm, Location Next
to Northwest High
School with approx.
35 acres of fields &
45 acres wooded.
Small pond, barn,
old farmhouse with
out buildings(in poor
condition - little or
no value) plenty of
road frontage.
MLS #13-807
$359,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
SWEET VALLEY
3.8 acres, zoned B2
with home & pond.
Priced for quick
sale. High traffic
area Located at the
intersection of
Rt. 118 & Main Road.
$89,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a
2 car garage, all
rented. Off street
parking for 8 cars.
Great investment.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
WEST SIDE
Well established
Italian Restaurant
on the West Side
with seating for 75.
Business only
includes good will,
all furniture and fix-
tures, all kitchen
equipment and
delivery van for
$150,000. Building
sold separately.
Restaurant on 1st
floor and 2 bed-
room luxury apart-
ment on 2nd floor
for $250,000.
www.atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
WILKES-BARRE
302 HAZLE STREET
Duplex. Each unit
has 2 bedrooms,
kitchens, living
rooms, basement
storage, gas heat.
Big back yard, off
street parking.
$60,000, negotiable
570-760-7378
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
Scenic level 2 acre
building lot is perked
& surveyed & ready
for your dream
home! Owner is sell-
ing for $95,000 but
will discount to
$70,000 if you con-
sider building a
green energy effi-
cient type home on
lot. Privately owned
& located on Lake
Louise Rd within 1/2
mile of Twin Oaks
Golf Club. For more
info 570-288-9050
after 5 pm Serious
inquiries only.
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
Bear Creek Blvd.
Wonderful opportu-
nity! Beautiful 3.45
acre wooded build-
ing lot for your new
home. 200' front-
age.
MLS #13-157
$39,900
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
DALLAS
Commercial -
Vacant Land
2.12 acres of
commercial land
in a prime Back
Mountain location.
Ideal spot to build
an office or profes-
sional building.
Corner wooded lot.
Water,electric &
gas available to be
run to site. Call
Rhea for details
MLS#12-4281
570-696-6677
$249,900
DALLAS
Memorial Highway
3.65 acre B-2 com-
mercial parcel with
488’ of prime
frontage on busy
Rt. 415. Ideal for
retail/office devel-
opment, bank,
restaurant. The
possibilities are
endless. Property
has a 30x40 Pole
Barn with concrete
floor.
MLS 12-4396
$425,000
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about
5,000’ roadfront on
2 roads. All Wood-
ed. $385,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
EARTH CONSERVANCY
Land For Sale
• 61 +/- Acres
Nuangola $95,000
• 46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$79,000
• Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
•Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Acreage Zoned
R-3
• Sugar Notch Lot
$13,500
See Additional
Land for Sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot
with utilities avail-
able. Ideal home
site. Affordable at
$12,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY RE CO
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Hughestown Boro
LAND
1/2 acre of land for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 92’ road
frontage & over
300’ deep. Public
sewer, water, &
gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts. on Division
St. $55,000.
17,000 sq. ft. lot for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 118’ road
frontage x 137’
deep. Back proper-
ty line is 132’ wide.
Public sewer, water,
& gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts on North
View Drive. $35,000
570-760-7326
KINGSTON
HUGE PRICE
REDUCTION!
302-304 Wyoming
Avenue
One of the only
commercial building
lots available on
Wyoming Ave.
Make this extremely
busy site the next
address of your
business.
MLS 08-1872
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman
Outlet Road. 470’
front, over 1,000’
deep. Wooded.
$125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of
wooded land and
farmland with barn
in good condition
and a nice travel
trailer. Well on
property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
912 Lots & Acreage
MOOSIC
BUILDING LOT
REDUCED
$28,500
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100’
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 ‘ frontage
158’ deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
PLAINS
39 acres of wooded
& cleared property,
ideal for your cus-
tom dream home &
country estate.
MLS #13-732
$299,900
Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
PLAINS TWP.
VACANT LAND
KING OF THE
MOUNTAIN!
Truly a 360 degree
view from the high-
est point of this
property. 48.49
acres to be sold as
one parcel. Build
your dream house
here or buy and
sub-divide. Will
require well and
septic system. Just
minutes from High-
way 315, near the
Casino but very pri-
vate. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4142
Only $149,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre
building lot located
in established back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Buy now and
start building your
dream home in the
spring. Lot has
underground utili-
ties, public sewer
and private well.
MLS #13-137
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHICKSHINNY
26 acres of mostly
open land for
a beautiful
homesite near
Shickshinny Lake.
MLS #12-3394
$130,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Location, Location,
Location
A most unique &
desirable lakefront
property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a
centrally situated
lot with an
unmatched view of
this beautiful lake.
If you are looking
for that special
building site, this is
it! MLS# 11-1269
$169,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains
Realty
570-256-3343
915 Manufactured
Homes
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
mobile home locat-
ed in a park on a
rented lot along a
quiet, dead end
road. Covered car-
port and shed. In
good condition, but
needs updating
$8000. OBO. Please
call 570-829-3476
or 570-994-6308
SHICKSHINNY
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Immaculate double
wide on one rural
acre. Not in flood
zone. $75,000.
Call Jackie at
570-925-6427
924 Out of State
Properties
NY LAKE SALE. 5
acres Salmon River
Lake $29,000. 7
acres 100’ on bass
lake $39,900. 8
acres waterfront
home $99,900.
Local financing
available.
LandFirstNY.com
886-683-2626
Line up a place to live
in classified!
938 Apartments/
Furnished
SHICKSHINNY
1 bedroom no smok-
ing, heat water,
parking. 542-4187
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
AVAILABLE NOW
2nd floor, modern
living room &
kitchen. 2 bed-
rooms & bath. Off
street parking.
Washer/dryer hook-
up. Appliances. Bus
stop at the door.
Water Included.
$575 + utilities &
security. No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
AVOCA
3 rooms includes
heat, hot water,
water, garbage &
sewer + appliances,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. Security. No
pets. $490/month.
570-655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
2nd floor.
NON SMOKING
Spacious 2 bed-
room. Modern kit-
chen, separate liv-
ing & dining rooms.
Includes: heat, hot
water, cable & gar-
age. $800/month,
no pets, references,
1 month security.
570-675-4128
BACK
MOUNTAIN
Large 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen
with appliances,
tiled bath, deck.
No Pets. $425.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry *Elevator.
*Video Surveilence
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-675-5944
8a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-675-6936,
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DALLAS
Municipal Rd. 1st
floor 2 bedroom,
Living room, dining
room, kitchen, bath.
Forced air propane
heat, carport. $595.
Call 570-332-3562
DRUMS
Enjoy peace & quiet
in the country at
Mira Val Apts near
highways 80 & 81. 2
bedrooms, private
garage. Call for
more details & an
appointment. $850/
mo + utilities. No
pets. Non smoking.
570-788-3441
EXETER
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor apartment.
Modern with
enclosed porch &
patio, one car
garage with
remote. Washer &
dryer hookup. 1
year lease and
security. $495
No Pets.
Call Charlie
570-829-1578
EXETER
Beautiful 1st floor. 1
bedroom 1/2 duplex.
Eat-in kitchen, appli-
ances included
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, &
washer / dryer
hook-up. No pets.
$720/ mo + security
heat, hot water &
sewage included.
570-301-7247
EXETER
TOWNHOUSE
Wildflower Village
Like New! 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
living room, large
dining/kitchen area.
Deck. $695/mo +
utilities. No Pets.
570-696-4393
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, Wyoming
Avenue, 2 bedroom
wall to wall carpet,
tile bath, stove &
fridge furnished,
washer/dryer hook
up. Heat, public
water, sewer & re-
cycling furnished by
landlord. Use of
attic, yard & porch-
es. Good location,
off street parking.
No pets. 1 year
lease & security.
$675 570-655-0530
LUZERNE
ONE-OF-A-KIND
Beautiful brick
trimmed Colo-
nial, 2nd floor 2
bedroom unit
with wood pan-
eled loft. Remod-
eled completely,
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
gorgeous en-
closed porch,
covered carport,
gas fireplace,
more! $800 +
utilities. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT
LEASE, NO PETS
/ SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor apt. Living
room, kitchen, full
bath, background
check & references
required. $575
month + security.
heat included. Ten-
ant pays electric.
201-304-3469
GLEN LYON
1st floor 4 room apt.
Electric & propane
gas heat. Off street
parking. Washer
/dryer hookup, ref-
rigerator, garbage
included. No dogs.
$400/month refer-
ences required, 1
year lease + 1 month
security.
570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK
APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
GLEN LYON
Remodeled 3 bed-
room apartments.
Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook
up. Rent based on
30% of income.
Application, security
required.
Luzerne County
Housing Authority
Equal Housing
Opportunity.
570-287-9661, #229
HANOVER
Newly remodeled, 5
rooms, new appli-
ances, w/d hookup,
w/w carpet, off
street parking, BBQ
area. No pets, no
smoking. $625 in-
cludes water. Secu-
rity & credit check.
570-650-7083
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3029 South Main St
1st floor, 3 bed-
rooms, wall to
wall carpeting and
freshly painted,
central air, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances. Off street
parking. Laundry
room with bonus
washer and dryer.
Heat & cooking
gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric &
water. $640 +
security. No Pets.
Call 570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New kitchen,
bath & carpeting.
Fresh paint, off
street parking. No
pets or smoking.
One year lease.
$625/month
+ security. Heat,
hot water &
garbage included.
570-825-6720
570-430-9836
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
GRACE LUXURY
APARTMENTS
has an opening. It is
our largest unit. 3
bedrooms, 2 & 1/2
baths. Hardwood
floors, granite coun-
ters, extra large
kitchen, stainless
appliances, gas
heat, central air,
washer/dryer.
Beautiful grounds
with plenty of park-
ing. Property main-
tenance & garbage
included. Apart-
ment only 1 year old.
Rock St. $1,500.
570-760-7326
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
2 bedrooms. Hot &
cold water included.
$595/month.
NO PETS.
Section 8 OK.
570-817-3332
KINGSTON
28 East Vaughn St.
Beautiful 1 bedroom
apartment in nice
neighborhood.
Hardwood floors,
French doors, natu-
ral woodwork,
includes refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer, garbage
disposal, washer &
dryer. $450/month
plus utilities & secu-
rity. Off street park-
ing. No pets / No
Smoking, Available
April 1st. Please call
570-287-4047
for appointment
KINGSTON
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room, living & dining
rooms. Large kit-
chen with enclos-
ed back porch, new
appliances. Heat &
water included. No
pets/smoking. $625
/month & security.
570-714-3332
KINGSTON
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment, features
a fireplace, built-in
bookcases, large
living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen,
sun room & much
more! $525 +
utilities. Available
April 1st. Please call
570-714-8568
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted. Security
system, garage
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No pets.
References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $730.
month. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Modern 2nd floor.
Spacious 3 bed-
room, hardwood
floors, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, laundry in
unit. Electric heat.
Small dog accept-
able. No Smoking.
$800 month plus
utilities & $800.
security deposit.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
Newly renovated
duplex, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
new gas furnace
with central air,
all new
appliances and
carpeting. Garbage
included off-street
parking, $750 plus
security and
utilities/per month.
Call (570)288-1561
KINGSTON
SECOND FLOOR
Efficiency
Apartment
Refrigerator and
stove provided. All
utilities included.
Nice neighbor-
hood. $475 per
month. Lease, first
& security deposit.
R e f e r e n c e s
required. No pets.
570-288-5569
KINGSTON
Near Kingston Cor-
ners, 2nd floor,
totally remodeled.
clean & bright. One
bedroom, living
room, office/den,
laundry room off
large kitchen. Gas
range, oak cabinets,
modern bath, walk
up attic, ceiling fans
in each room. New
flooring, mini-blinds,
2 air conditioners,
yard parking, water
& sewer included.
No pets, smoking.,
$600/month + utili-
ties, lease & securi-
ty. 570-288-9843
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin laun-
dry, water, sewer &
garbage included.
$495/month +
security & lease.
HUD accepted.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
276 Bennett St.
2nd floor, large,
2 bedroom, large
living room, den,
dining room, tiled
bath, kitchen with
stove and refrig-
erator, washer
and dryer hook
up, off street
parking. Water
and sewer includ-
ed. $600 plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets or smok-
ing. References.
Call
570-288-7309
Leave Message
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
3 rooms & bath on
2nd floor. Washer,
dryer, range &
refrigerator. Off
street parking, no
pets or smoking.
$450/month + utili-
ties & security.
. 570-696-1763
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 4 rooms.
Washer/dryer hook
up, stove & refrig-
erator. Newly reno-
vated. No pets. Non
smoking. Heat &
hot water included.
$555/month.
570-287-4700
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, full
kitchen, large clos-
ets. No pets/smok-
ing. Sewer & trash
included. $475.
Call 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom
non smoking. Water
& sewer refuge
included. No pets. 1
year lease + refer-
ences. $400/month
+ security & utilities.
Call
570-735-3719
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking,
$595/month + utili-
ties, security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON LEXINGTON
VILLAGE VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments.
Refrigerator,
stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Open House,
March 16 and 17
10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
231 West Noble St.
Very nice, first floor,
two bedrooms,
remodeled,
includes,
washer/dryer
hookup, range and
refrigerator.
$500/ month
plus utilities.
NO PETS.
Call: 570-760-3637
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water & garbage
fees included.
Washer/dryer avail-
able, stove, refrig-
erator, air condi-
tioning. No pets/no
smoking. $525 +
security.
Call 570-542-5610
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1
bedroom apart-
ment. Newly reno-
vated, off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up.
SPRINGTIME
SPECIAL!
$725/month, all
utilities included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
One & two bed-
room apartments.
1st & 2nd floor.
Newly painted.
$500/month + secu-
rity. Includes range
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook
up & sewage. Off
street parking.
Call Bernie
570-655-4815
ROTHSTEIN INC.
REALTORS
288-7594
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
3rd floor, 3 bed-
room. $600 +
security. Sewer &
garbage included.
570-574-4380
PLAINS
One bedroom, 2nd
floor. Recently reno-
vated. Bath with
shower, eat in
kitchen, stove &
refrigerator. Living
room, large bed-
room, air, plenty of
closet space. 2
entrances. Wash-
er/dryer hook up in
basement. 1 off
street parking
space. $450 + secu-
rity & application.,
Call (570)823-0372
PLYMOUTH
2 ROOM
EFFICIENCY
All appliances, no
pets/no smoking.
Utilities paid. Back-
ground check & ref-
erences required.
Near bus stop.
$475/month + 1
month security.
(570)592-2902
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 23E
1112 Memorial Hwy,
Shavertown Pa 18708
Office: 570-901-1020
Fax: 877-202-2103
E-mail: wesellfast@yahoo.com
www.WeichertTradeMark.com
CAREER NIGHT
Is your current position less
than flexible?
Whatever your job lacks,
you could find it in a career
in real estate
Every Tuesday 6 pm
Call Elena for details
570-902-9990
Please call our office to confirm
your reservation at 570-901-1020
NEW LISTING! $169,900
NEW LISTING! $229,000
SHAVERTOWN
Searching for the perfect home? You have to see this
house. Large 4 Bed, 2 Bath, beautiful HW foors,
formal DR, large fnished basement, garage, fenced
yard, nice backyard with deck overlooking a water
fountain, most of all affordable.
Call Elena Katarsky 570-902-9990. MLS#13-913
PLAINS
Dream no more. Everything you hoped for is here.
End Unit,Very large living room with open foor plan,
HW fooring, recessed lighting & freplace. Modern
kitchen, fnished basement, 2 car garage and most
of all ready to move in.
Call Elena Katarsky 570-902-9990. MLS#13-843
NE NE NE NE
NEW!
NE NNE NE NE
Call Ca Elen
NEW!
NEW LISTING! $490,000
MOUNTAIN TOP
27.5 Acres Prime Location - Acess to 309,
All Utilities Available on 309.
Call George Sailus 570-407-4300. MLS#13-744
NEW LISTING! $650,000
HAZLETON
Great Investment Opportunity! Zoned Residential and
Commercial. 7 Apartments fully occupied. Operational
resturant with Liquor license included. Large parking
lot. Close to all major local businesses and shopping.
Call Ignacio Beato 570-497-9094. MLS#13-347
NEW LISTING! $99,900
EAST STROUDSBURG
Reduced! Large two story home with large backyard and
plenty of off street parking. Newer home in need for some
cosmetics but could be a good investment. Convenient
location for the commuters to NYC or NJ,one car garage,
large living room with freplace, and so much more.
Call Elena Katarsky 570-902-9990. MLS#12-4585.
REDUCED! $144,900
BLAKESLEE
Large immaculate colonial style home. 4 bed, 2.5 bath, HW
foors, Large LR, formal DR, FR, freplace, large modern kitchen
, large master bedroom with Jacuzzi tub, separate shower &
master closet and so much more.
Call Elena Katarsky 570-902-9990. MLS#13-806
R
NEW LISTING! $99,400
LARKSVILLE
Large 3 Bedroom home needs rehab. Full unfnished
basement. plenty of parking space, 1 car garage &
private driveway. Short sale with fast approval.
Call Brenda Sharp 570-991-5452. MLS#13-859
NEW LISTING! $309,000
SUGARLOAF
Beautiful home in a beautiful location. Cape Cod that was
custom built in 2003 offers 4.89 acres all cleared. Heated
in ground pool, 3 full baths, 1st foor master bedroom, 1st
foor laundry and an updated kitchen. There is also a 2
car attached garage with a bonus room above. Close to
Humboldt Industrial Park and Eagle Rock Resort.
Call Tony Wasco 570-855-2424 or
Donna Cain 570-947-3824. MLS#13-894
NEW!
Call Bre
NNNE NNNNE NNNNE NNNNE
BB ttif l h
NEW!
Do
NEW!
NE
NEW!
g
N
NEW!
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941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor. Bus stops
at door. 5 rooms.
Range, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. Wall
to wall carpet.
Newly remodeled.
Utilities by tenant.
$495/month + sec-
unity. no pets.
570-574-1276 or
570-288-4860
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SCRANTON
GREEN RIDGE SECTION
Large 1 bedroom.
Heat included.
Bathroom, eat in
kitchen, living room.
Off street parking.
$625/month
(631) 821-8600 x103
SHICKSHINNY
(1 mile north of
Shickshinny) 1 open
efficiency, on Route
11, Includes heat,
air, garbage, satel-
lite TV, & water.
Tenant pays elec-
tric. $575/month +
security. New stove
& refrigerator
included. Plenty
of parking. Truckers
Welcome!
570-793-9530
SWOYERSVILLE
Must see! 1st floor,
3 bedroom apart-
ment. large living
room, stove &
refrigerator. washer
& dryer, laundry
room, air, heat, wall
to wall carpeting.
Hardwood floors.
Off street parking,
large back yard. All
utilities paid, except
electric. $1075/
month + security.
570-287-3646
WEST PITTSTON
1 room apt. 2nd
floor. Full kitchen,
full bath, hardwood,
washer/dryer heat
included, pets neg.
$550.
267-745-8616.
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other
utilities by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances including
washer & dryer.
Gas heat. No pets.
$575/month
+ utilities, security.
570-881-3359
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom apart-
ment. 1 bath. Eat in
kitchen. Closed in
terrace. Full usable
attic. $625 + utilities
& security.
Call: 718-809-3338
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, living
room, kitchen, fin-
ished attic off street
parking. 1st & last
months rent + secu-
rity. Leave message
570-817-0601
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St.
1.5 bedrooms, new-
ly renovated build-
ing. Washer & dryer
available. $650/mo.
includes heat, hot
water & parking.
570-855-4744
646-712-1286
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
1 bedroom - $450.
2 bedroom - $550.
Water & sewer paid
1 month security
deposit. Email
obscuroknows@
hotmail.com or Call
570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to
schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
HEIGHTS
Townhouse type
apartments. 2
bedrooms, stove,
fridge, washer/
dryer hookup.
Off-street parking.
Utilities by tenant.
No pets or smok-
ing. $495/month.
570-825-8355
6 to 8 pm ONLY
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Heights, Very nice 2
bedrooms, wall to
wall, off street park-
ing, ceiling fans,
porch. $420 a
month plus utilities,
security and refer-
ences. No Pets.
(570)868-7020
(570)678-5455
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included.
1 Bedroom$550
2 Bedroom$650.
Call Jazmin
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 + tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 2nd Floor
$540 + utilities.
Security, Refer-
ences, Background
check.
570-332-8792
WI L KE S - BA RRE
RENTALS
Two, 3, & 4 bed-
rooms. $650-$900.
613-9090
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 bedroom
water included
Š2 bedroom
water included
Š3 bedroom
single
HANOVER
Š2 bedroom 1/2
double.
Š4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
Š2 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
ŠLarge 1 bed
room water
included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
944 Commercial
Properties
CLARKS SUMMIT
Beautiful 2,000
square foot com-
mercial building
available, within
Main Clark Summit
area. Will lease first
and second floors
separately or
together. More
than adequate
parking with rental.
Professional
inquiries only.
Call:
570-499-6409
570-587-5048
For information.
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
FORTY FORT
Modern space avail-
able in a nice Forty-
Fort location, high
traffic area, was
used as dental
office with reception
area. $700/month
plus utilities.
Cathy Tkaczyk
696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
GLEN LYON GARAGE
1,200 sq.ft.
New roof & door.
$395/month.
Please call
570-881-0320
GLEN LYON
STOREFRONT
Unique opportunity
at 61-63 East Main
St. High Traffic
Area. 570-881-0320
LAFLIN
GYM FOR RENT
Set up as a full
court basketball
court with hard-
wood floors, men’s
& ladies room and
changing room.
Could be put to any
related use ie: fit-
ness gym, basket-
ball camp or any-
thing that requires a
large open space.
Lots of free parking,
heat and utilities
are included. Rent
is is $3,000 per
month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
5,000 square feet.
Suitable for many
businesses. Park-
ing for 100 cars.
$600/month + secu-
rity. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for
rent on the Pittston
By-Pass. Highly vis-
ible location with
plenty of parking.
$1,800 sq. ft. of
beautifully finished
space can be used
for any type office
use. $1,750/ mo.
plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SCHOOL FOR RENT
Finished basement
with classrooms, 1st
floor contains bas-
ketball court, stage
area & kitchen area,
second floor is fin-
ished with class-
rooms. Parking for
25+ vehicles. Prop-
erty maintenance
included. $2,500.
570-760-7326
944 Commercial
Properties
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
WILKES-BARRE
WAREHOUSE/
OFFICE SPACE
5,000 sq. ft. with
parking lot. Office,
1,000 sq. ft.
Off I-81, EXIT 165
Call 570-823-1719
Mon. Through Fri.
7 am TO 3 pm.
WILKES-BARRE
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES YOU’LL
EVER SEE!
Warehouse, light
manufacturing. Gas
heat, sprinklers,
overhead doors,
parking for 30 cars.
Yes, that $1 sq.ft.
lease!
We have 9,000
sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 32,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing
this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
WILKES-BARRE
Great Location to
have a business.
Excellent access.
Building has many
spaces of computer
access. Configura-
tion may permit
multi-use of building
$185,000
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
947 Garages
ASHLEY
4,200 sq. ft.
building with two
overhead garage
doors. $300/month.
Option to buy,
leave a message.
570-592-3575
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
3 bedrooms, laun-
dry room on main
floor. Newly reno-
vated. Fenced in
yard. Hanover
School District.
$670. plus utilities.
570-851-2929
leave message
HEIGHTS
3 bedrooms, gas
heat, no pets, $549
/mo. + utilities.
570-824-8786.
2 or 3 persons total
income of $500 a
week helps.
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
1/2 double. Living
room, dining room,
eat-kitchen off
street parking. No
smoking, no pets. 1
year lease. $800.
month + security.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
3/1 Bath. Freshly
painted, newer
carpeting, modern
kitchen with
appliances.
$635.00 + utilities
570-239-3887
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom. Washer
dryer hookup. $600
+ utilities. Call
570-954-7919
PLAINS
Spacious, modern 2
bedroom. Wall to
wall carpeting,
bath, living room,
kitchen with all
appliances, off
street parking.
$600 + utilities, 1st
& last month’s rent
& security.
Absolutely no pets
or smoking!
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, wall to
wall carpet. Security
and lease. No pets.
$650 month plus
utilities.
570-675-4424
953Houses for Rent
BACK MTN. AREA
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
3 garage stalls on
approximately 3
acres. Lawncare &
snow plowing in-
cluded. Tunkhan-
nock School District.
$1,200/month. Call
Richard Long
570-406-2438
570-675-4400
DALLAS
Modern, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath con-
temporary. $895 +
utilities, security &
lease. No smokers.
570-696-5417.
JENKINS TWP.
Small 2 bedroom
single family house
for rent. $500 a
month. Security
deposit required.
Background check.
Some appliances
included. NO PETS.
Call 570-466-2233
for details.
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS BOROUGH
1,700 square feet
bi-level, living room
with hardwoods,
oak kitchen, with
granite counter
tops, three bed-
room, and full bath,
14’ by 16’ deck all
upstairs. Family
room, bedroom or
office, full bath, 1
car garage and
patio all downstairs.
100’ by 150’ lot.
Rent, $1,450 month
plus utilities
no pets.
Call Kevin Smith,
696-5420.
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
DALLAS
PERFECT 2 BEDROOM
2 bath, 1 car
garage on 1 acre
cared for by
Landlord. All brand
new appliances
included. 1st Floor
laundry, full base-
ment for storage,
Great view, patio.
$1100/mo plus utili-
ties.
570-762-8481
FORTY FORT
45 Butler Street
2 huge bedrooms,
brand new carpet-
ing, refrigerator &
stove, washer/dryer
hook up. Off street
parking. Beautiful!
No pets. $650/
month & security.
570-479-5092
570-417-4180
HANOVER TWP.
34 Allenberry Dr.
End Unit! Many
windows make this
2 bedroom, 2 bath
Townhouse bright
and pleasant.
Please contact
David at
570-235-7599
KINGSTON
Fully remodeled. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath.
close to schools &
shopping. All new
appliances. Front &
rear porches, full
basement & attic.
Off street parking.
$850/month +
utilities, security &
lease.
Call 570-824-7598
LUZERNE
374 Miller Street
Lovely, remodeled,
two huge bed-
rooms, 4 oversized
closets, ceiling fans.
Full bath on each
floor. Huge living
room, hardwood
floor. Laundry room
off large kitchen.
Many oak cabinets,
gas range, dish-
washer. Enclosed
porches, concrete
patio, full basement
with exit. New gas
baseboard heat,
wiring, plumbing,
flooring. Large
shed & yard. Park-
ing for 3 cars. No
pets, smokers.
Lease & security.
$850/month + utili-
ties. 570-288-9843.
MOUNTAINTOP
Private setting, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home. Hardwood
floors, area rugs,
large kitchen, dish-
washer, stove &
fridge and gas fire-
place. Office &
second floor bonus
areas. Laundry
hook up in base-
ment. Enjoy this
beautiful setting
with an enclosed
front and back
porch. Sewer &
water included.
No Smoking. No
Pets. $1,350/month
+ security, lease &
background check.
available mid/late
April.
570-678-5850
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
1 bedroom, large
kitchen, living room,
one bathroom,
refrigerator, stove,
washer/dryer, air
conditioner. Base-
ment, yard, off
street parking and
deck. No smoking
no pets. $1,000
Security, $595 a
month plus utilities.
Call (570) 586-3015
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile . Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
SYLVAN LAKE
1 bedroom house
on Sylvan Lake,
$515/month, plus
utilities & one
month security.
Available April 1.
Call 570-256-7535
PAGE 24E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 25E
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
941 Apartments
Unfurnishe
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call
570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen
acres.com
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
•Equipped Kitchen
•Free Cable
•Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Winter Specials!
$500 OFF
1ST MONTHS RENT
FEATURING
‹ Washer & Dryer
‹ Central Air
‹ Fitness Center
‹ Pet Friendly
‹ Easy Access to
I-81
Newly Renovated
Sundeck Pool
Mon – Fri. 9 –5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
Call for a special
appointment
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
10+ Prime
Commercial Acres
w/200+ff on RT 315 &
500+ff on Fox Hill Rd.
Surrounded on 3 sides by
Mohegan Sun Casino &
Race Track. Easy access
to RT 81 & PA Turnpike,
(RT 476) MLS#12-3849
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
State of
the art 34,000 SF office
bldg w/open floor plan.
Features 1000 SF data
center, 8000 SF warehouse
space & parking for 165
cars. Zoned C-4 Heavy
Commercial. MLS#12-3565
JUDY RICE 714-9230 OR
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
High visibility
for this 3.2 acre parcel! It
is ideal for franchise,
developer or retail use.
Parcel has access from 2
roads and can
accommodate several
buildings MLS#12-2535
JUDY 714-9230 OR
CHRISTIAN 585-0614
Great Investment
Opportunity! Price reduced $905,000 from
original list price. Currently priced below
appraisal. MLS#11-1346
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Commercial opportunity awaits
your business.1st flr 10,000 SF w/offices.
2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres.
MLS#10-1110
JUDY 714-9230
Outstanding brick
bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars.
MLS#08-2790
PEG 714-9247
Large Commercial Warehouse
& Office space. Over 3.5 acres overlooking
the river & mountains. Developers need to
see! Perfect for Townhouses! MLS#13-737
ANDY 714-9225
Retail, Office, Medical -
Whatever your need - This 4000 SF Bldg can
accommadate it! Parking for 10. NEW PRICE!
MLS#12-276
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Ideal bldg for retail sales
or prof offices. High traffic location on
Route 309S. Zoned Commercial. MLS#12-
1534
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
High traffic location. 2900 SF
professional office space w/basement
storage. Pkg for at least 12 cars. MLS#12-
416
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
3 BR, Ranch w/gar+
attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal
for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367
RAE 714-9234
6000+ SF furniture
store, plus apt. & lots more space.
High traffic area. MLS#11-3865
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
Large 8000 SF building looking
for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial.
MLS#11-4058
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117
This 2400 SF bldg
features offices & garage w/overhead door.
Across from Hollenback Golf Course.
MLS#11-4561
JUDY RICE 714-9230
3235 SF Building on .816
acre. Renovated in 2001. Perfect for truck
repair, lanscaper, contractor, etc. MLS#12-
1376
ANDY CISNEY 714-9225
2-Story masonry bldg on
96x180 lot w/pkg for 36 cars. Ideal for apts
or small mfg business. MLS#12-1758
MIKE 970-1100 or MARGY 696-0891
5 Unit building w/private
parking. Well kept - fully rented w/long
term tenants. MLS#10-3866
TERRY DONNELLY 715-9317
PRIME LOCATION - Vacant land
with Penn Dot access already in place. Close
to everything! MLS#12-2517
DAVID 970-1117 or SANDY 970-1110
Warehouse w/office area.
28,000 SF w/overhead door. Ample parking.
Easy access to Rte 81. Motivated Seller!
MLS#12-2947
JUDY RICE 714-9230
5100 SF Masonry building
zoned for lumber yard, machine shop, heavy
equip, etc. Over an acre w/parking.
MLS#12-3216
DEANNA 696-0894
Priced to sell! Former store perfect
for a small business or offices! Plus 3 modern
apartments for addtional income. Detached garage,
OSP. High traffic area & convenient location! Don’t
miss this one! MLS#12-3805
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
Great opportunity! an
operating US Post Office, plus a 3 bedroom
apartment and 1 bedroom apartment on
Main Rd. Priced to sell! MLS#12-4400
BOB 970-1107
2 Parcels sold as 1. Many uses for
your new business! Plenty of parking on a
busy street make this an ideal location!
MLS#12-4522
MARY 479-0302
Flood damaged property-
1st floor gutted & ready to remodel! Prime
location. Successful business location for
years. MLS#12-4560
MARK N 696-0724
Former restaurant close
proximity to turn pike, secluded location
could be used as office. MLS#13-108
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
Bank owned Warehouse with
loading dock, offices, 3 bathrooms.
Additional pole building offers more space.
Over 1 acre. MLS#13-355
TRACY 696-6674
Currently being used as 1 story
residential home - zoned highway
commercial. Being sold ’’as is’’. Additional
commercial land MLS#13-602
PATTY ARMELLINO 715-9332
Former bar with 2 apartments,
liquor license & equipment included, no
kitchen in bar, osp for 12 cars. Let
apartments pay the mortgage! MLS#13-784
ANDY 714-9225
Currently set up for a
business on 1st floor with 3BR apartment on
2nd floor. Rear is a large garage with storage
above. MLS#13-735
ANDY 714-9225
Former automotive repair/gas station
w/tanks removed on .481 acre corner lot. High
visibility, high traffic flow, easy access on/off Cross
Valley, 2 rest rooms, 2 garage bays, parking for 30.
MLS#13-917
CLYDETTE 696-0897
Prime Location -
1900SF - 12 pkg spaces. MLS#09-
3085
MARGY 696-0891
32,000SF,
30+ parking, including trailer spaces
MLS#08-1305
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Spacious building in
high traffic location with ample parking.
Adaptable to many uses. MLS#12-3786
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
Located in Central City - on site
parking with loading docks, record storage
space, climate controlled, secure building, metal
racks available for organized storage. MLS#
VIRGINIA ROSE
It’s a clean slate! Owner will
fit-out for your use. Ideal for Daycare,
Professional or Medical Office, Salon, etc.
MLS#12-4244
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Office or Store front in high
traffic location. 1100SF nicely appointed
w/office, open area, kitchen & restroom.
MLS#12-4265
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Prime space on corner of Market
& Franklin Streets. Currently FNCB Bank. Ideal for
Bank or Credit Union. Additional 1500SF on 2nd
floor available. Parking in rear. MLS#13-904
JUDY RICE 714-9230
953Houses for Rent
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
45 minutes west of
the Gap. Large,
4 bedrooms, 3.5
baths, community
pool, all appliances,
garage, no pets.
$900/month +
utilities, 2 months
security. Must have
good references.
718-916-9872
WEST PITTSTON
1/2 double, 7 rooms
& bath, hardwood
floors, natural wood
work, garage. Great
neighborhood. Non-
smokers. No pets.
Call 570-655-2195
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
All appliances
including washer &
dryer. Small fenced
yard. 1st floor hard-
wood. Large
kitchen. No pets
$650/month +
utilities & security
570-881-3359
953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bedroom
townhome features
hardwood floors on
main floor, finished
basement, large
master suite, pri-
vate outdoor deck
and back yard, off
street parking,
granite countertops,
stainless steel appli-
ances, DirecTV,
high-speed internet
(all other utilities
NOT included),
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with brand
new furnace, cen-
tral air conditioning
with brand new
compressor, (all
other utilities NOT
included), brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all bed-
rooms, extra closet
space, large base-
ment storage room,
wood blinds in ALL
rooms, all yard
maintenance and
snow plowing
included. This is an
end unit with only
one other unit
attached. Rent is
$1,500. per month &
requires $2,000.
security deposit.
Minimum one year
lease required.
Must fill out credit
application.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
953Houses for Rent
WEST WYOMING
Beautiful brick ranch
home for rent. 2
bedrooms, 2 large
full baths, gas heat,
central air, washer
/dryer, extra large
kitchen, huge two
car garage. Great
quiet location .
Property mainte-
nance & garbage
included. $1,200.
570-760-7326
WILKES-BARRE
4 bedroom, 2.5
baths. Off street
parking. $800 + util-
ities & security. No
pets. 570-820-7861
Leave Message.
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 5 room
2 bedroom, car-
peting, hookups,
yard, electric heat.
$525 + utilities.
No pets. 868-4444
959 Mobile Homes
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Affordable New &
Used Homes For
Sale & Rental
Homes Available.
HEATHER HIGHLANDS
MHC 109 Main St
Inkerman, PA
570-655-9643
962 Rooms
WEST PITTSTON
Gorgeous, furnished
room for rent in Vic-
torian home. Every-
thing included. Only
$150/week + securi-
ty. 570-430-3100
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WYOMING
Sleeping room.
Private entrance &
bath. Non smoking,
drug free. Subject
to background
check. $100 weekly
+ $200 security.
570-239-3997
Leave Message!
968 Storage
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Zoned M-3 for
manufacturing,
warehouse storage.
Electric, gas heat,
sprinkler. HE light-
ing, 21’ ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided.
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
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PAGE 26E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
All prices plus tax and tags. Payments based on specified term with $1,995 cash down or equal trade. Payments may vary based on credit worthiness with approved credit. Plus tax and tags please see dealer for details.
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2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
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Silver Metallic w/ Off Black Leather, 7
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2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
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Caper Green Metallic w/ Sand Leather,
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$
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Willow Green w/ Sand Leather, Power
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2008 VOLVO XC70 3.2 AWD
$
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72 MONTHS
Black w/ Sand Leather, Power Glass
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2008 VOLVO S80 T6 AWD
$
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Black w/ Off Black Leather, Power
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2007 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
265
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72 MONTHS
Shadow Blue w/ Sand Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, 7 Passenger, Heated Seats, Built
in Child Boosters, 1-Ower, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
OR
2007 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
249
PER
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72 MONTHS
Silver Metallic w/ Off Black Leather, Power
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Serviced at Santo
OR
2008 VOLVO V70 2.5T WAGON
$
279
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72 MONTHS
Titanium Grey w/ Off Black Leather,
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1-Owner, Low Low Mileage, Bought
and Services at Santo
OR
2009 VOLVO XC90 3.2 AWD
$
329
PER
MONTH
72 MONTHS
Ice White w/ Sand Leather, Power Glass
Moonroof, Heated Seats, Built in Child Boosters,
Rear A/C, Blind Spot Monitoring, Bought and
Serviced at Santo
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2007 VOLVO S80 3.2
$
172
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72 MONTHS
Shimmer Gold w/ Sand Leather,
Moonroof, Heated Seats, Sport Pkg.,
1-Owner
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2013 VOLVO S60 T5 AWD
$
32,490
$
462
PER
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72 MONTHS
Flamenco Red w/ Sand Leather,
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
1-Owner, Only 4,300 miles
WAS $34,900
WAS $34,990
OR
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$
31,980
$
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72 MONTHS
Flamenco Red w/ Sand Leather,
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1-Owner, Only 7,800 miles
OR
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$
25,990
$
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72 MONTHS
Silver Metallic w/ Graphite
Leather, Moonroof, Heated Seats,
1-Owner, Only 30,000 miles
WAS $26,990
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$
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72 MONTHS
Ember Black w/ Black Leather,
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589
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Ice White w/ Calcite Leather, Navigation,
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Stk#12137
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WAS $26,990
IS NOW
Stk#12087
$
22,990
WAS $25,990
IS NOW
Stk#12043
$
20,990
WAS $21,990
IS NOW
Stk#11329
Stk#12101
$
20,990
WAS $21,990
IS NOW
Stk#12006
$
19,990
WAS $20,990
IS NOW
Stk#12068
$
18,990
WAS $19,990
IS NOW
Stk#11316
$
18,990
WAS $19,990
IS NOW
$
17,990
WAS $18,990
IS NOW
$
12,880
WAS $14,990
IS NOW
$
18,488
WAS $19,488
IS NOW
IS NOW
IS NOW
IS NOW
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 PAGE 27E
4under$200
*2013 Tiguan 2.0T S, auto transmission. $199 per month lease. MSRP $25,835. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,999 due at signing. $750 regular VCI bonus enhancement. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Passat 2.5L S with appear-
ance, auto transmission. MSRP $23,740. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Jetta 2.0L S, manual transmission. MSRP $17,470. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $159
per month with $1,999 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Beetle 2.5L, manual transmission. MSRP $20,790. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW
credit approval. Offer expires 04/01/2013. The Volkswagen Carefree Maintenance Program covers the vehicles scheduled maintenance for three years or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, on all new 2009 or newer models. Coverage is during the term of new vehicle warranty at no additional charge. Some limitations
apply. The Toureg 2 TDI program covers the vehicle’s 5k, 15k, 25k and 35k AdBlue refills. The Routan program covers 6k, 12k, 18k, 24k, 30k, and 36k scheduled maintenance. Does not include routine wear and tear on parts such as breaks, tires, wipers, blades, light bulbs, etc.
See dealer or vehicle maintenance program booklet for details.***All MPG estimates are EPA highway estimates.
Wyoming Valley Motors
126 Narrows Rd. Larksville, PA
570-288-7411
wyomingvalleymotorsvw.com
#3VW1K7AJ4DM256656 #3VWJP7AT1DM618526
26
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Tiguan 2.0TS
2
# WVGAV3AX6DW597950
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
34
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Jetta2.0L S
4
Lease for Only
$159*
PER
MONTH
32
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Passat 2.5L S
3
#1VWAP7A38DC058490
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
31
MPG
***
The 2013Volkswagen Beetle 2.5L
5
Lease for Only
$199*
PER
MONTH
PAGE 28E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
WAS......................................$17,090
FORD REBATE.........................$1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE....................$500
FMCC REBATE............................$500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$500
$
14,999
$
14,999
Automatic, Air Conditioning, Pwr. Mirrors, Advance Trac with
Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains, Sirius Satellite, CD, Pwr.
Locks, Tilt Wheels, SYNC, Cruise Control, Remote Keyless Entry
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$20,185
FORD REBATE.........................$2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE....................$500
FMCC REBATE............................$500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$686
$
16,499
$
16,499
Auto, CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air Bags, 16” Steel Wheels,
Tilt Wheel, AC, Instrument Cluster, Message Center, PW, PL, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad, Pwr. Side Mirrors, Fog Lamps, MyKey, SYNC
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$22,495
FORD REBATE.........................$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$496
M
O
S.
$
19,499
$
19,499
2.5L., Auto., CD, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Side
Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Message
Center, Cruise Control, Keyless Entry, SYNC, Auto. Headlamps
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$23,660
FORD REBATE.........................$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE.........................$1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$661
$
19,499
$
19,499
2.5L Engine, Auto., Remote Keyless Entry, PL, CD, PW,
17” Steel Wheels, SYNC, Cruise Control, Advance Trac
w/Roll Stability Control, Personal Safety Sys.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$27,751
FORD REBATE.........................$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE.........................$1,000
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT........$45
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$916
$
23,299
$
23,299
All Wheel Drive, SE 1.6 EcoBoost Engine, Auto., Keyless Entry
with Keypad, PL, PW, Auto. Headlamps, 17” Alloy Wheels, SYNC,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Perimeter Alarm, Tonneau Cover
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$30,995
FORD REBATE.........................$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. $1,000
$
27,495
$
27,495
Titanium, 2.0L EcoBoost Engine, 18” Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Pwr. Leather Heated
Seats, Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Appearance Pkg., SYNC, Rear Spoiler, Rear Camera
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$29,795
FORD REBATE.........................$2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE.........................$1,500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$796
M
O
S.
$
24,499
$
24,499
Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, CD, Advance Trac with Roll Stability
Control, Remote Keyless Entry w/Keypad, MyFord, Convenience
Group, Auto Headlamps, Reverse Sensing Sys.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$32,155
“3 PAYMENTS ON US” REBATE. .$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE............................$500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$456
$
28,699
$
28,699
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L Engine, MyFord Display, PM,
Auto. Climate, 17” Steel Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry,
3rd Row Seat, MyKey, Cruise Control, PW
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$25,995
FORD REBATE............................$750
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...$246
$
22,999
$
22,999
HYBRID, Auto., Speed Control, Dual Zone Auto., Temp
Control, 17” Alum. Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry, Rear Spoiler,
Electronic Traction Control, 1st & 2nd Row Air Curtains
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$32,995
FORD REBATE.........................$1,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. $1,000
$
29,495
$
29,495
All Wheel Drive, Titanium, 2.0L EcoBoost Engine, 18” Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Pwr.
Leather Heated Seats, Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry with Keypad, Appearance Pkg., Rear Spoiler, Rear Camera, SYNC
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$29,595
FORD REBATE.........................$3,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE.........................$1,500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. $1,096
M
O
S.
$
22,999
$
22,999
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, CD, Keyless Entry with Keypad, PW,
PDL, 18” Alum. Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Dual Climate Contro, Remote Start
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
WAS......................................$37,275
FORD REBATE.........................$2,500
OFF LEASE REBATE.................$1,000
FMCC REBATE.........................$1,000
5.0 LITER REBATE...................$1,500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT. .$1,500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. $1,776
$
27,999
$
27,999
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates including off lease rebate
applied. **Lease payments based on 39 month lease 34,125 allowable miles.
$0 due at delivery. Sale ends 3/31/13.
M
O
S.
M
O
S. M
O
S.
M
O
S.
STX, 5.0L V6, CD, Auto., Air, 18” Alum. Wheels, Cloth Seat,
40/20/40 Split Seat, Decor Pkg., Pwr. Equipment Group,
ABS, Chrome Step Bar, Cruise, Trailer Tow
M
O
S.
FORD
LINCOLN
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
M
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