Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 5

Nikki Christen IS565 Digital Libraries August 3, 2012

Digitization of Student Media Mission The digital services program of Tennessee Tech University is dedicated to building, maintaining, and promoting the universitys open-access digital repository for use by the community, students, and scholars interested in the universitys and communitys history. Summary The digital services program will collaborate with the university library and academic departments to create a digital library containing collections of the student run newspaper The Oracle, university yearbook The Eagle, and local newspaper The Herald Citizen. The collections will be built by a collaborative effort between the university library, select academic departments, and digital services. Unqualified Dublin Core will be utilized as the metadata schema and the open source software Omeka will be used to create the digital libraries. The libraries will be illustrated to academic and public communities through in-class sessions, library classes, and demonstrations at the local public library. The marketing plan for the collections includes ads on campus and local radio and television, paper pamphlets to the community and Friends of the Library, and university and library social media. Benefits Digital projects will add historical and cultural value for the universitys students, professors, and community members. The proposed projects will provide essential hands-on experience to contribute to successful job placement and career building for students. The proposed digital material will become a key teaching and reference tool for the universitys professors, especially those in Journalism, English, and Communication. The universitys community and alumni will receive the added value of having their community and universitys historical and cultural events and information preserved and made widely available. These concepts directly support Tennessee Techs devotion to leadership, academic scholarship, and community support. Collections The digitization of The Oracle Archives will be the pilot collection for the digital services program. The Oracle is the student run newspaper for the university and is published during the fall and spring semesters. There are nine issues printed in a semester and each contains approximately twelve to eighteen articles. They cover topics and events related to the people of the university and community, including social activities, current political aspects, and local and national sports. The Journalism Department holds primary ownership of the newspaper and has granted the digital services program full authorization and access to the print collection. They have requested an initial digital set of twenty-five years of The Oracle. This will allow them to use the collection for university and community relations and as a departmental teaching tool.

Nikki Christen IS565 Digital Libraries August 3, 2012

The Eagle Archives will be the second project for the digital services program. The Eagle is the universitys official yearbook. It contains additional information on student life, academics, sports, people, groups, and university photography that will be an excellent supplement The Oracle Archives collection. The Journalism Department also holds all rights to The Eagle and has granted permission for its use in the project. The yearbook was printed yearly from the universitys creation until 2004. After 2004, it has been only printed digitally. An initial digitization of the last twenty-five years has been requested to compliment the items from The Oracles digital set. The Herald Citizen Archives will also supplement The Oracles articles in university and community activities. The Herald Citizen is the local newspaper for the universitys region. It contains a significant amount of information related to the university and community. The newspaper is staff-written and has other selected articles that provide additional and follow-up information to many of The Oracles articles. The newspaper has a digital archive of all weekly additions from 1998 until the current edition. At this time, permission and access has been granted to their digital collection, but limited to the events already listed in The Oracle. Negotiations will continue as the project proceeds and may require monetary obligations to The Herald Citizen for its continued or broader use. Resources and Partnerships The project will consist of collaborative teams from the university library, academic departments, and project services. The library team members include the Cataloging Librarian and Electronic Resources Librarian. An IT specialist and the Director of Journalism will compose the academic departments team. Project services team will be represented by the Project Manager and the student workers assigned to the project. The projects equipment will be supplied by the library, Journalism Department, and the Project Manager. The Cataloging and Electronic Resources Librarians are pre-existing positions at the university. Each will devote approximately ten percent of their time to the project over the next year. The Cataloging Librarian creates necessary metadata schemas for the digital content to provide compatibility with existing library standards. The data will be forwarded to the Electronic Resource librarian. He or she will transfer the data and information from the Cataloging Librarian to the project database and website and completes preservation and recovery system for the projects master files. The Director of Journalism and IT specialist are pre-existing positions at the university and will devote approximately five percent of their time to the project over the next year. The Director of Journalism will provide guidance on the departments needs in the collection and serve as a primary community contact for the collection. These responsibilities also include serving as the contact for the local newspaper The Herald Citizen and the qualification of articles needed for retrieval from that archive. If the project has to enter in a contract that requires monetary obligations to the department, the Director has agreed to fund the initial cost to get the project started. This responsibility may be revisited later and the funds pulled from a different

Nikki Christen IS565 Digital Libraries August 3, 2012

source, such as a grant. The IT specialist will be the primary contact in university IT department for the project. He or she will help resolve any issues with the projects digital content and files and maintenance in relation to the university server and system. The Project Manager/Scanner will receive class and practicum credit for the project over the next year and complete no less than 10 hours a week for the project as required for the practicum. The Manager will select the materials for digitizing, serve as primary scanner for materials, and create basic metadata for the records. Once this is completed, coordination with the Cataloging and Electronic Resource librarians to ensure creation of metadata and a clean transfer of data and files to the projects database and website and preserved in accordance to library and university policy and procedures will be completed. The Manager will also be the primary contact for the IT specialist, retrieve the approved articles from The Herald Citizen archive, and supervise and train student workers assigned to project by the Director of Journalism. The project equipment will consist of university and personal equipment. The library has agreed to provide a scanner, computer with basic photo editing software, microfiche and related computer and software, and additional access to bound print copies of The Oracle and The Eagle. An additional or back-up scanner and photocopier with scanner and email capabilities will be provided by the Journalism Department in addition to access to The Oracle and The Eagle. The Project Manager will provide their personal computer and a local test installation of Omeka digital collections software. The computer also has photo editing and programming software to assist in the creation of the collection. Best Practices The Unqualified Dublin Core format will be used to create the metadata schema for the artifacts. Its simplicity and basic granularity will suffice for the needs of the project. The schema provides the greatest inter-department opportunities. It would be simple enough for members of the Journalism Department to recognize and use if they continue use and data entry for the project. It can also be extended through Qualified Dublin Core or potentially be crosswalked/exchanged with MARC records if the library needs to create a different set of metadata for the files. There could be some inconsistency in this process, but it would be minimal compared to other researched options. If the situation changes between the library and the department, other options can be considered. The open source software Omeka was chosen by the Project Manager for the project. The software is free to acquire and has assistance from a large support base. The Unqualified Dublin Core is also its default metadata schema and should be efficient enough for the intended operators and audience. The information architecture of system designed for multi-levels of experience. Administrators and users will find this system easy to use, create an entry or template, and logically organize while being visually appealing. The use of additional plug-ins and add-ons will allow more personalization for the site and extended user aspects through web 2.0 concepts. These would greatly increase the value and experience with the site and collection.

Nikki Christen IS565 Digital Libraries August 3, 2012

Preservation will be a collaborative effort between project teams. The IT specialist will ensure that the data and information will be copied and protected through the universitys server and back-up system. The Electronic Resource Librarian will also provide preservation locally at the library through their databases and system. All information and software will also be preserved on the Project Managers personal back-up hard drives and computer. Assessment and Enhancement Online traffic will be the primary evaluation tool for the project. The higher the amount of traffic, the more use and purpose the project will have. An online program, such as Google Analytics, will provide a visualization of how many page views, unique visits, and return visits the site receives. The program will also allow show how many have used collection options, such as screencasts, and the location of sites users. Also, as a supplement data source, surveys will be sent via email, site module, and postal mail to attempt to get users first hand information for the use and improvement of the project. Once sufficient data has been collected the program can be adjusted as needed. Data formats can be changed to another that would provide a better design for the user, library, or system. If the traffic to the site is low, marketing tactics can be amped to provide more exposure for the collection. Education Plan Academia will receive exposure to the collection via classroom and library demonstrations. The Journalism Department has asked for in-class demonstrations and sessions on the system to instruct the students. It will include how this information and tools will be of use to them and how to use the tools efficiently and effectively. This will also introduce many of them to research methods and techniques and citations. The university library will hold sessions for the academic community to illustrate its use and purpose to faculty and staff as well. The community tends to look to the local library for this type of instruction more than the university library. The local public library has offered to collaborate with the university to offer these sessions and assist in their promotion. They will host smaller, more specific sessions that will be included with other events going on in the public library. Follow-up with for the academic sessions will primarily consist of return visits to the classrooms and probably online communication between instructor, students, and faculty. For the community, the interest and effectiveness of the sessions with their patrons will be evaluated by the public library and university library. A decision on future events will be made at after completion of this evaluation. Marketing Plan The goal of the marketing plan is to reach the intended audiences in academia and the community and raise awareness of the project and digital services program. Many people do not know that these resources are available at all, let alone that they are going digital. This will

Nikki Christen IS565 Digital Libraries August 3, 2012

hopefully invite new people in to enjoy the collections and learn the benefits of using technology to do so. The idea is that the university and public communities will be able to use this collection academically and personally on a regular basis. This use would provide a basis for more projects like it. The trend in the university and public community is currently what most would consider old school or old-fashioned. They still have many of the same elements that they have always had, but are slowly testing and migrating towards key digital aspects. Reliance on digital mechanisms for marketing would be preferable, but due to these circumstances traditional methods will also have to be incorporated. This will provide for the broadest reach to the intended audiences. Traditional methods include the paper pamphlets to community, alumni, and Friends of the Library, an ad with the campus television station, radio, and newspaper, and advertising on local television and radio if resources allow it. New digital methods will include posts and follow-up posts with library and university Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and various blogs. Email notifications will be provided through listservs and the digital version of The Oracle. Resource Request The resources needed for the project include software and hardware upgrades and manpower to make it more efficient and completion quicker. The software and hardware currently in the library and Journalism Department are several years old. The project can commence as is, but it will be a tedious process with the current available technology. Higher power computers, scanners, etc with relevant software would make the project more fluid. Also, the addition of more student workers or volunteers would enable the project to be completed in a shorter time frame. A senior student worker assigned in a supervisory capacity could assist in training and supervision of the additional help. This would allow the Project Manager to have more time for other aspects of the project, a quicker evaluation of the project, and then possible continuation on to other projects.