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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 187
CHILLING SCENARIO
WORLD PAGE 7 SPORTS PAGE 11
KRATOS IS BACK,
AND HES ANGRY
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
OBAMA WARNS OF ENCLAVE FOR EXTREMISM IN SYRIA
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Could your re-retardant furni-
ture make you sick? State Sen.
Mark Leno thinks so and is chal-
lenging Californias 1975 amma-
bility standard for upholstered fur-
niture with the help of consumer
advocates, physicians, chemists and
Gov. Jerry
Brown.
However, pro-
ponents of the
c h e m i c a l l y
treated materials
say the issue is
being oversim-
plified because
not all flame
retardants are the same and are sub-
ject to scientic review.
The current law established in
1975, called Technical Bulletin
117, requires the interior of
upholstered furniture to be able to
withstand a direct flame for at
least 12 seconds before catching
on fire. TB 117 resulted in the
industrys use of flame retardant
chemicals to treat upholstery.
After 2004, because of growing
awareness of its hazards, polybromi-
nated diphenyl ether was phased out.
Regardless of the sanction, various
re retardant chemicals are still used
in upholstery and baby products
including Tris probable human
carcinogens which were removed
from childrens sleepwear in 1977.
Arlene Blum, a chemist at the
University of California at
Berkeley, published a study con-
cluding 85 percent of couches in
California contain ame-retardant
chemicals correlated to cancer,
infertility, lower IQ levels and neu-
rological problems. A Silent Spring
Furniture safety standards in question
New rules proposed for fire retardants after chemicals called dangerous
Mark Leno
DAVID WONG/DAILY JOURNAL
Above:Mary Stont,right,takes part in a balance class at the Peninsula YMCA.Stont survived breast cancer and said
the Living Strong Living Well program at the YMCA has helped her feel more positive now that she is disease-free.
Below: Brad Friedman, right, said the program gives him structure and community to help him after recovering
from brain cancer.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Those wishing to develop land at
the corner of Industrial Road and
Holly Street in San Carlos would
need approval from the City Council
under a proposed urgency ordinance
that will be discussed Monday.
This proposal comes on the heels
of a developer expressing interest in
building a tness center on three of
ve parcels of land the city had envi-
sioned for a hotel in its general plan.
Under the 45-day plan outlined in
the urgency ordinance, any business
bringing a new use to the commer-
cial/industrial district will require a
conditional use permit meaning
the city will need to sign off. The
city is particularly interested in the
southeast corner of Industrial Road
and Holly Street, the entry into the
city from Highway 101 where a
developer had envisioned the tness
center.
City weighs
gym versus
hotel vision
San Carlos officials to study
uses for industrial area land
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Cute little bunnies are often a
popular new pet adopted by families
around this time of year but the little
hoppers can be more work than
most realize.
Thats the case with little Pip.
A small, white angora bunny with
blue eyes only weighs about 3
pounds but he needs some extra
Rabbit adoptions hopping
PHS bunny events help pair pets with new owners
Rachel Spangler and Pip
See RABBIT, Page 20
See STUDY, Page 20
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Overcoming cancer is difcult,
but recovery doesnt end when the
disease is defeated. Recovery of a
survivors well-being is just begin-
ning.
One avenue of support is Living
Strong Living Well at 10 YMCAs in
the Bay Area including the one
on South Grant Street in San Mateo.
Living Strong Living Well is a 12-
week free program designed by the
YMCA Page Mill in Palo Alto 10
years ago. It is for adult cancer sur-
vivors with atrophied muscles, or
are chronically fatigued from their
treatment and/or disease, said
Youve beaten cancer, now what?
Exercise program helps rebuild bodies recovering frombattle with disease
See YMCA, Page 23
See SAFETY, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actress Keri Russell
is 37.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1913
Five days of heavy rain began falling in
the Ohio River Valley; Dayton, Ohio,
saw catastrophic ooding as the rising
Great Miami River breached its levees.
Hundreds of deaths in the region were
blamed on the weather.
Having only friends would be dull
anyway like eating eggs without salt.
Hedda Hopper, American gossip columnist (1890-1966)
Singer Chaka Khan
is 60.
Gossip blogger
Perez Hilton is 35.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Four-year-old bengal tiger Mulan Jamilaplays with keeper Soleh at Al Khaffah Islamic school in Malang,IndonesiaEast Java
province.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Northeast winds around 5 mph...Becoming
west in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph...Becoming northeast around 5 mph
after midnight.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs around 60.
Northeast winds around 5 mph... Becoming west in the after-
noon.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 40s.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in rst place; Whirl Win, No. 6, in second
place; and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:46.50.
(Answers Monday)
CRAWL MOUND PREFER IMPOSE
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After finishing the 18th hole, they stopped to
eat a ONE-COURSE MEAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LASIA
VONLE
DRYLAH
VABHEE
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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9 7 2
14 27 34 37 41 38
Mega number
March 22 Mega Millions
6 16 17 19 20
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 6 1 9
Daily Four
3 9 5
Daily three evening
In 1775, Patrick Henry delivered an address to the Virginia
Provincial Convention in which he is said to have declared,
Give me liberty, or give me death!
In 1792, Joseph Haydns Symphony No. 94 in G Major (the
Surprise symphony) had its rst public performance in
London.
In 1806, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, hav-
ing reached the Pacic coast, began their journey back east.
In 1919, Benito Mussolini founded his Fascist political move-
ment in Milan, Italy.
In 1933, the German Reichstag adopted the Enabling Act,
which effectively granted Adolf Hitler dictatorial powers.
In 1942, the rst Japanese-Americans evacuated by the U.S.
Army during World War II arrived at the internment camp in
Manzanar, Calif.
In 1965, Americas rst two-person space ight began as
Gemini 3 blasted off with astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and John
W. Young aboard for a nearly 5-hour ight.
In 1973, before sentencing a group of Watergate break-in
defendants, Chief U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica read aloud
a letter to him from James W. McCord Jr. which said there had
been political pressure to plead guilty and remain silent.
In 1983, President Ronald Reagan rst proposed developing
technology to intercept incoming enemy missiles an idea
that came to be known as the Strategic Defense Initiative. Dr.
Barney Clark, recipient of a Jarvik permanent articial heart,
died at the University of Utah Medical Center after 112 days
with the device.
In 1993, scientists announced theyd found the renegade gene
that causes Huntingtons disease.
In 2010, President Barack Obama signed a $938 billion health
care overhaul, declaring a new season in America.
Comedian Marty Allen is 91. Sir Roger Bannister, the runner
who broke the 4-minute mile in 1954, is 84. Movie director Mark
Rydell is 79. Motorsports Hall of Famer Craig Breedlove is 76.
Singer-producer Ric Ocasek is 64. Actress Amanda Plummer is
56. Actress Catherine Keener is 54. Actress Hope Davis is 49.
Comedian John Pinette is 49. Actor Richard Grieco is 48.
Country musician Kevin Grifn (Yankee Grey) is 48. Actress
Marin Hinkle is 47. Rock singer-musician Damon Albarn (Blur)
is 45. Actress-singer Melissa Errico is 43. Rock musician John
Humphrey (The Nixons) is 43. Actress Michelle Monaghan is 37.
Actress Anastasia Grifth is 35. Actress Nicholle Tom is 35.
In the 1970s, the size of the average new
home was 1,400 square feet. Today, the
average size is 2,200 square feet.
***
One-third of the new homes built last
year had four or more bedrooms. In the
1950s, only 1 percent of new homes had
four bedrooms.
***
Ranch, shingle, split level, Tudor, Cape
Cod and bungalow are all styles of archi-
tecture for homes.
***
Single women buy 20 percent of the
homes sold nationwide.
***
At the time of the 2000 census, there
were 260,576 housing units in San
Mateo County.
***
Before being dubbed the White House
by President Roosevelt in 1901, the
mansion was known as Presidents
Palace, the Presidents House and the
Executive Mansion.
***
The White House has 132 rooms on six
levels. The presidential mansion has 412
doors, 28 replaces, eight staircases and
three elevators.
***
Handyman Bob Vila (born 1946) hosted
the television show This Old House
from 1979 to 1989. The show aired on
PBS.
***
This television sitcom was the story of a
macho father of three boys who hosted a
cable show called Tool Time. What
was the name of the sitcom? Can you
name the star of the show? See answer at
end.
***
Mobile homes typically come in two
sizes. Single-wide mobile homes are 16
feet or less in width. Double-wide
mobile homes are 24 feet or larger.
***
Construction started on the Winchester
Mystery House in 1884 and was contin-
uous until owner Sarah Winchesters
death in 1922. The wealthy widow to the
Winchester Rie fortune, Sarah spent
$5.5 million of her $20 million inheri-
tance on constant construction of the
San Jose mansion.
***
There is a life-size replica of the home
of the Simpsons. Based on the prime
time cartoon The Simpsons, the four-
bedroom house in Henderson, Nev. is
painted and decorated to look just like
the cartoon house.
***
The Simpsons home was given away in
a contest in 1997. Barbara Howard, a 63-
year-old retired factory worker from
Kentucky, was the lucky winner.
***
On the long-running family drama
Little House on the Prairie (1974-
1983), the Ingalls family lived in Walnut
Grove, a ctional town in the 19th cen-
tury American West. The television
show was based on the Little House
series of books by Laura Ingalls Wilder
(1867-1957).
***
In 1992, 17-year-old Bryan Berg built
the worlds tallest house of cards. The
tower was 14 feet, 6 inches tall. Berg
broke his own record in 1998 with a 25-
foot tall tower built out of stacked play-
ing cards.
***
The historic Cliff House in San
Francisco is preserved as part of Golden
Gate National Recreation Area.
***
The Cliff House, originally built in
1863, was rebuilt after being destroyed
by re in 1884, then rebuilt again after
being destroyed by the 1906 earthquake.
***
Home on the Range is the state song
of Kansas.
***
Answer: Home Improvement (1991-
1999) starred comedian/actor Tim Allen
(born 1953) as Tim Taylor. The sitcom
was based on Tim Allens standup com-
edy routine.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
8 11 13 22 26 18
Mega number
March 20 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Vandalism. Someone reported several walls
were spray painted on the 100 block of North
Ellsworth Avenue before 6:04 p.m. Monday,
March 18.
Vandalism. Property was vandalized at the
intersection of North Delaware Street and East
Poplar Avenue before 9:19 a.m. Monday,
March 18.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone reported
that their cellphone was hacked into on West
Fifth Avenue before 1:14 p.m. Sunday, March
17.
Petty theft. Someone reported that their white
iPhone 5 was stolen while they were trying on
shoes at the Hillsdale Shopping Center before
5:05 p.m. Saturday, March 16.
BURLINGAME
Theft. An unattended iPhone was stolen on the
1700 block of Rollins Road before 12:18 p.m.
on Thursday, March 14.
Vandalism. A woman reported her daughter
was involved in toilet papering a house on the
1100 block of Trousdale Drive before 6:59
p.m. on Wednesday, March 13.
Solicitation. People were cited after soliciting
donations to restore an airplane, however, they
were actually selling magazines on the 3000
block of Rivera Drive before 12:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 13.
Police reports
Not yeti
A man was caught scaring people on a
trail on the 1600 block of Bayshore
Highway in Burlingame before 1:25 a.m.
on Thursday, March 14.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Placerville sex offender linked by DNA
to the 1986 rape and fatal beating of a 17-
year-old Ben Lomond girl whose body was
discovered down a San Mateo County
embankment pleaded not guilty Friday to
murder charges.
John William Kelley, 50, has pleaded not
guilty to murder during the course of kidnap-
ping and sexually assaulting Annette Thur in
December 1986, said Chief Deputy District
Attorney Karen Guidotti. Kelley will be due
back in court April 3 to set a pretrial confer-
ence and jury trial date.
Sheriffs investigators arrested Kelly in
August after the county crime lab reran DNA
from uids recovered from the crime scene
and hit on him. Kelley, a registered sex
offender who has lived in
Oregon and California,
resided in Ben Lomond at
the time of Thurs death
and, nearly a decade later,
in 1995, was convicted of
rape in Humboldt County.
Thur was last seen early
Dec. 6, 1986 leaving a
party in Boulder Creek
with the intention of hitch-
hiking. Later that day, a
tourist stopping to check out the view from
Skyline Boulevard just north of Alpine Road
spotted her body eight feet down the embank-
ment with a denim jacket over her head and
torso. Investigators determined Thur had been
sexually assaulted, beaten and possibly stran-
gled but were never able to pinpoint a viable
suspect.
Once Kelley was in custody, prosecutors
said they believed he picked Thur up and took
her back to his Ben Lomond home where she
was sexually assaulted. Kelley, then 23 and
married, is accused of strangling or smother-
ing Thur and leaving the body in the ravine.
Prosecutors cannot charge him with rape or
kidnapping because the statute of limitations
has expired. However, the special circum-
stance murder charge still carries the death
penalty or life in prison without parole.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Bomb squad responds to report of
suspicious package at Skyline College
The bomb squad was sent to Skyline
College in San Bruno Friday afternoon to
investigate a suspicious package, according a
San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce spokes-
woman.
Skyline College has posted an announce-
ment on its website stating that school closed
for the day as of 4 p.m. due to the presence of
a suspicious package. Classes will resume on
Saturday, the statement said.
San Bruno police are responding to the inci-
dent but did not return calls seeking further
information.
Dog walker shot with
stun gun sues park service
A California man is suing the National Park
Service and a park ranger who allegedly shot
him with a stun gun for being uncooperative
about his off-leash dog.
In a federal lawsuit led Thursday, 51-year-
old Gary Hesterberg of Montara claims his
constitutional rights were violated and seeks
$500,000 in damages for the Jan. 29, 2012
incident.
The complaint says Hesterberg was running
on a trail in the Golden Gate National
Recreation Area when the ranger warned him
about having one of his dogs off-leash.
The suit says the woman hadnt identied
herself as a park ranger when she red her
Taser stun gun at his back as he tried to leave.
Park Service spokesman Howard Levitt said
Friday the agency cant comment the lawsuit.
The ranger was cleared of wrongdoing.
Report says no motive
for CHP officer killing
Authorities say they will never know what
drove a man to fatally shoot a California
Highway Patrol ofcer during a freeway traf-
c stop.
An investigation by the Contra Costa
County Sheriffs Ofce revealed Thursday
that there was no motive or indication 36-
year-old Christopher Lacy was going to shoot
officer Kenyon Youngstrom after he was
pulled over on Interstate 680 in Alamo in
September.
However, investigators later discovered that
Lacy had suffered a mental breakdown while
attending college and was diagnosed with
bipolar disorder.
They also learned that Lacys behavior had
become increasingly erratic in recent years
and the handgun he used in the shooting was
purchased legally and registered to him.
Lacy shot the 37-year-old Youngstrom who
died in a hospital the next day after being
taken off life support. Lacy was killed by
Youngstroms partner, CHP officer Tyler
Carlton.
Accused murderer pleads not guilty
John Kelley
Local briefs
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4
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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5
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Man convicted for leaving
threatening messages for officer
A Burlingame man who left numerous
threatening voicemails for a Brisbane police
officer following his
arrest on misdemeanor
drunk driving charges last
July was convicted by a
jury of numerous charges
on Thursday, according to
San Mateo County prose-
cutors.
Khalil Jaser, 49, was
convicted of charges
including making threats,
hindering an executive ofcer and making
harassing and threatening phone calls, District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said Friday.
Bail was raised from $300,000 to $750,000
and the case was continued to May 14 for sen-
tencing.
Jaser was rst arrested on July 28, 2012, on
a misdemeanor drunk driving charge, accord-
ing to Wagstaffe.
Between Aug. 29 and Sept. 3, the arresting
ofcer received seven voicemails from Jaser
that included warnings telling him not to go to
work and to be careful on the streets and state-
ments like Boom, youre dead, Wagstaffe
said.
The arresting ofcer spoke with him on
Sept. 5 and told him to stop calling, but
instead Jaser called 152 times over the next
three weeks and left 54 messages, prosecutors
said.
In addition, he made threats and other state-
ments about the ofcer on a Twitter account
that also included a large number of anti-
Semitic statements.
Unemployment rates
rise slightly in Bay Area
Unemployment rates in parts of the Bay
Area saw increases in January while the
statewide rate went unchanged for the month,
according to employment data released
Friday.
The California unemployment rate
remained unchanged from December at 9.8
percent. A year ago at this time, the jobless
rate was at 11 percent, according to the
California Employment Development
Department.
In the Bay Area, the highest jobless rate was
in Solano County at 10 percent in January.
Other counties saw unemployment rates
rise, including San Francisco where
Decembers 6.5 percent rate bumped up to 6.8
percent in January.
The lowest unemployment rates in the Bay
Area and state remain in Marin County at 5.8
percent. However, that rate increased slightly
from 5.5 percent in December.
Local briefs
Khalil Jaser
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
John & Jen (also written as john & jen),
an intimate musical presented by Hillbarn
Theatre, may be seen as an intriguing psycho-
logical study in family dynamics
With just two characters, it covers 38 years
in the life of a woman, Jen (Alicia Teeter),
starting in 1952, when shes 6 years old and
welcoming her newborn brother, John
(William Giammona). On Christmas Eve ve
years later, its apparent that their parents
dont get along and that their father is abusive.
Other transitions follow until Jen is 18 and
goes off to college in 1964, leaving her
despairing brother behind.
In subsequent years, she becomes a hippie
and peacenik, moving to Canada with her
draft-dodging boyfriend, while John becomes
closer to their father. In 1970, when John is
18, he enlists in the Navy and is soon killed in
Vietnam, much to Jens sorrow.
Two years later, Jen has given birth to a son,
whom she names John. Sometime after that,
the boys father leaves. In the meantime, Jen
seems determined to turn her son into her
brothers reincarnation. As he grows older, he
resents those efforts, which impede his ability
to follow his own path. Ultimately, she sees
the light as he heads off to college.
Created by Tom Greenwald and Andrew
Lippa, much of the story is told through
songs. It takes place on an uncluttered set
designed by Robert Broadfoot with lighting
by Aya Matsutomo and sound by Alan
Chang.
The actors are onstage almost the entire two
acts. Transitions are achieved through slight
changes of clothing (costumes by Mae Matos).
Director Jay Manley guides the two with
intelligence and sensitivity. Although Teeter
may seem to have the easier role because shes
the same person in both acts, she has some of
the more demanding songs well sung
and goes on a longer emotional journey.
On the other hand, Giammona has the chal-
lenge of being an adult portraying a child or
teenager. Both actors succeed.
The songs are all pleasant though not par-
ticularly memorable. Sitting on the side with a
cellist and percussionist, Graham Sobelman
serves as musical director and keyboardist.
John & Jen will continue at Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City,
through April 7. For tickets and information
call (650) 349-6411 or visit www.hillbarnthe-
atre.org.
Family dynamics at issue in John & Jen
MARK & TRACEY PHOTOGRAPHY
William Giammona,right,plays John along with Alicia Teeter as Jen in the musical john & jen.
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Democrats who vowed
a crackdown on guns after the horrific
Newtown, Conn., school shooting are touting
prospects for Senate passage of expanded fed-
eral background checks, even as they
acknowledge there isnt enough support to
restore a ban on assault-style weapons.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said
Thursday that a measure likely to be debated
in his chamber next month will include
tougher laws and stiffer sentences for gun traf-
cking and increased school safety grants.
Closing background check loopholes will
be the core of the legislation, just as it was the
cornerstone of President Barack Obamas pro-
posals for stemming gun violence following
the December slayings of
20 first-graders and six
staffers at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in
Connecticut.
Including expanded
checks in the gun legisla-
tion signals that
Democrats feel they can
win bipartisan support for
the measure or are happy
to dare Republicans to reject the entire gun-
control package and face political conse-
quences in next years elections.
Reid, D-Nev., said he hoped a trio of sena-
tors would craft a bipartisan background
check compromise. If not, he said, senators
would consider a stricter version that allows
fewer exemptions approved by the Senate
Judiciary Committee on a party-line vote.
This moves the ball forward on gun safety
in the Senate, said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-
N.Y., one of the senators hunting a back-
ground check deal.
Schumer said he hoped an accord could be
ready when the Senate returns from its
upcoming two-week spring break. Moderate
Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who has an A-
rating from the National Rie Association,
and Mark Kirk, R-Ill., are also involved.
The background check system is aimed at
preventing criminals and others from acquir-
ing rearms. It currently applies only to sales
by federally licensed gun dealers, not private
transactions at gun shows or online.
The fate of the overall legislation remains
uncertain, with Democrats all but sure to need
Republican support for it to survive.
Reid: Background checks will be in Senate gun bill
Harry Reid
6
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Antoinette Toni Bangs
Antoinette Toni Bangs, born Jan. 8, 1922 in Webster,
Mass., died March 14, 2013.
She was a resident of South San
Francisco since 1959, she was a RN at
Mills-Peninsula Hospital for 40 years. She
was married in 1953 to H. Jensen Bangs
and widowed in 1976. She leaves behind
her brothers Carmen (South San
Francisco), Joe and Dick (Massachusetts)
Paglione, her son Jensen Hastings, daugh-
ter-in-law Sandy and granddaughter
Elaine, her daughter Susan Barone, son-in-
law Robert and daughter Karil Fedoroff and son-in-law Steve.
As strong willed in death as she was in life, Toni passed
away on her own terms, peacefully in her sleep with her fam-
ily by her side. She will be remembered for her kind spirit and
caring nature. Shes riding the comets tail and is taking her
grandest adventure ever. Bon voyage, Mom!
Obituaries
M
arie Weinberg Franco, 24,
grew up in Burlingame and
attended Lincoln
Elementary School and Burlingame
Middle School and
graduated with hon-
ors from
Burlingame High
School. She was
also an intern and
Student News
columnist at the
San Mateo Daily
Journal.
She is now grad-
uating with a masters degree in
English literature as a Distinguished
Student from Georgetown
University in Washington, D.C., and
will be entering her Ph.D. program at
Ohio State University where she has
been awarded the Susan L.
Huntington Deans Distinguished
University Fellowship for Doctoral
Studies, one of the youngest recipients
of this distinguished award.
***
San Mateo Middle College High
School, an alternative education pro-
gram for juniors and seniors in the San
Mateo Union High School District, is
accepting applications for fall 2013.
The deadline is March 25.
Students and parents interested in
the program can contact the Middle
College office. Applications are avail-
able online or in the SMUSHD coun-
seling offices and career centers.
Middle College, located at College
of San Mateo, includes 60 students
who take a combination of high
school and college classes. These
classes are intended to help the stu-
dent meet high school graduation
requirements and college general
education requirements.
The students, who prefer not to
attend a traditional high school cam-
pus, demonstrate the potential maturity
to cope with the freedom of the col-
lege environment. Current MCHS
graduates are attending University of
San Francisco, University of
California at Los Angeles, University
of California at Berkeley, San Jose
State, University of California at
Davis and College of San Mateo.
Students are recommended for
admission by parents, teachers, guid-
ance counselors and administrators.
Other application procedures include
student testing, an information meeting
with parents and interviews with stu-
dents and parents.
For more information contact
Principal Greg Quigley at 574-6101
or middlecollege@smuhsd.org or visit
www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/mid-
dlecollege.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
Marie Franco
NATION/WORLD 7
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Police arrest two teens in baby killing
BRUNSWICK A pair of teenagers was
arrested Friday and accused of fatally shoot-
ing a 13-month-old baby in the face and
wounding his mother during their morning
stroll through a leafy, historic neighborhood.
Sherry West had just been to the post ofce
a few blocks from her apartment Thursday
morning and was pushing her son, Antonio, in
his stroller while they walked past gnarled oak
trees and blooming azaleas in the coastal city
of Brunswick.
West said a tall, skinny teenager, accompa-
nied by a smaller boy, asked her for money.
He asked me for money and I said I didnt
have it, she told the Associated Press Friday
from her apartment, which was scattered with
her sons toys and movies.
When you have a baby, you spend all your
money on babies. Theyre expensive. And he
kept asking and I just said I dont have it.
And he said, Do you want me to kill your
baby? And I said, No, dont kill my baby!
One of the teens red four shots, grazing
Wests ear and striking her in the leg, before
he walked around to the stroller and shot the
baby in the face.
North Dakota lawmakers define
life as starting at conception
BISMARCK, N.D. North Dakota didnt
set out to become the abortion debates new
epicenter.
It happened by accident, after a legislative
caucus that once vetted abortion bills lan-
guished, leaving lawmakers to propose a ur-
ry of measures some cribbed from
Wikipedia without roadblocks.
Long dismissed as cold and inconsequen-
tial, North Dakota is now trying to enact the
toughest abortion restrictions in the nation.
The newly oil-rich red state may soon nd
itself in a costly battle over legislation foes
describe as blatantly unconstitutional.
It had to happen some place, said Sen.
John Andrist, a Crosby Republican who has
served in the Legislature for more than two
decades.
Im from the group who hates voting on
abortion issues and who dont like to play
God, said Andrist, who describes himself as
moderately pro-life and has voted for some
but not all of the restrictions North Dakota has
taken up this year. But we have some strong-
willed people in this state who do.
Around the nation
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AMMAN, Jordan President Barack
Obama warned Friday that an enclave for
extremism could ll a leadership void in
war-torn Syria, a chilling scenario for an
already tumultuous region, especially for
Jordan, Syrias neighbor and a nation at the
crossroads of the struggle for stability in the
Middle East.
In a signicant step toward easing regional
tensions, Obama also brokered a phone call
between leaders from Israel and Turkey that
resulted in an extraordinary apology from
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
for a deadly 2010 raid on a Gaza-bound
Turkish otilla. The call marked a diplomatic
victory for the president and a crucial realign-
ment in the region, given Israels and Turkeys
shared interests, in particular the fear that
Syrias civil war could spill over their respec-
tive borders.
Obama said he remains confident that
embattled Syrian leader Bashar Assads gov-
ernment will ultimately collapse. But he
warned that when that happens, Syria would
not be put back together perfectly, and he
said he fears the nation could become a
hotbed for extremists.
I am very concerned about Syria becoming
an enclave for extremism, because extremists
thrive in chaos, Obama said during a joint
news conference with Jordans King Abdullah
II. They thrive in failed states, they thrive in
power vacuums.
More than 70,000 people have been killed
during the two-year conict in Syria, making
it by far the deadliest of the Arab Spring upris-
ings that have roiled the region since 2011.
Longtime autocrats in Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen
and Libya have been ousted, ushering in new
governments that are sometimes at odds with
the Obama administration and its Mideast
allies.
Obamas 24-hour stop in Jordan marked his
rst visit to an Arab nation since the 2011
Mideast protests began. Jordans monarchy
has clung to power in part by enacting politi-
cal reforms, including parliamentary elections
and signicant revisions to the countrys 60-
year-old constitution. Still, tensions continue
to simmer, with the restive population ques-
tioning the speed and seriousness of the
changes.
Obama warns of enclave
for extremism in Syria
REUTERS
Barack Obama walks with Rabbi Israel Meir Lau in the Hall of Remembrance during Obamas
visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem.
By Ian Deitch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM Israel and Turkey agreed
to restore full diplomatic relations on Friday
after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
apologized in a phone call for a deadly naval
raid against a Gaza-bound international otil-
la in a dramatic turnaround partly brokered by
President Barack Obama.
Joint interests between the two countries,
including fears that the Syrian civil war could
spill over their respective borders, and some
cajoling by Obama made the time ripe to
repair the frayed relations after nearly three
years of acrimony over the deaths.
It was a surprising turnaround for Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who had long
rejected calls to apologize. He announced the
breakthrough after a 20-minute phone conver-
sation with his Turkish counterpart, Recep
Tayyip Erdogan. Obama helped broker the
fence-mending while visiting Israel, but the
sides had been reaching out to each other
before.
They agreed to restore normalization
between Israel and Turkey, including the dis-
patch of ambassadors and the cancellation of
legal steps against Israeli soldiers, a state-
ment from Netanyahus office said.
Netanyahu regretted the recent deterioration
of relations between Israel and Turkey and
expressed his commitment to overcoming
their differences in order to advance peace and
stability in the region, it said.
Israel and Turkey agree to restore diplomatic ties
JULIETTE L. GIANNINI
March 21, 2013
96 Years Old
Born in Pescaglia (Lucca) Italy to Giuseppe
and Cesira Lucarotti in 1917, moved to San
Francisco with her family in 1930. Predeceased
by her devoted and enterprising husband of
63 years, Tom. Survived by her children David
(Carolyn), Avraham (Georgette Beainy), Sheila
(Bob Wells) and Leana (Thomas OKeefe). Loved
being with her family, travelling, attending the
San Francisco Opera and going out for meals,
always impeccably dressed.
Adored Mama to grandchildren: David
(Michelle), Thomas (Dawn), Matthew; Beau
(Cooksie), Lisa (Bill), Cara (Andrew), Christian (Megan), Marco (Bere); Carl
(Keala), Jamie (Renee), Juliette (Darren); Cristiana, Elisa and Joey. Juliette also
leaves behind more than 25 great-grandchildren; sisters Jenny and Albina and
brothers Aldo and Louis; cousins in Italia and Argentina; nephews, nieces and
sister-in-law Pina.
Juliette was always passionate about education and the opportunities this
would give to her family. She remained loyal to The Schools of the Sacred Heart
and Santa Clara University.
Thank you to Juliettes caregivers, especially Laaina and family.
Family and friends are invited to a visitation at St. Bartholomews Church, 300
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo, CA 94402 on Monday, March 25, 2013 at 5:00pm
with the Rosary at 6:00pm. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated also at the
church on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 at 11:00am. Interment immediately thereafter
at the Italian Cemetery, Colma, CA.
Interment immediately thereafter at the Italian Cemetery, Colma, CA.
In lieu of owers the family requests that donations be made in Juliettes memory
to Little Sisters of the Poor St. Annes Home, 300 Lake St. San Francisco, CA 94118.
Obituary
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 8
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FREE plush bunny
lor nrst 200 chrldren
Health screenrngs
lor all ages
Meet Mateo the Farr Bear! Goody bags and grveaways
Talk to a
Pharmacrst
Over 35 health-
related vendors
Health &
Wellness Fair
Family Day
Saturday, March 30 9:30-2:30
College ol San Mateo, College Center
1700 West Hrllsdale Blvd., San Mateo
Whrle supplres last. Events subject to change.
For more rnlormatron vrsrt smdarlyjournal.comhealthlarr or call 650.344.5200
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Redwood City Council will
hold a public hearing and waive the
second reading on an ordinance pro-
hibiting the distribution of single-use
carryout plastic bags Monday. The
ordinance follows the county tem-
plate that other cities have followed.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday
at City Hall, 1017 Middleeld Road in Redwood City.
The Millbrae City Council is conducting its annual
recruitment for volunteer adult and high school student rep-
resentatives to serve on its advisory commissions and com-
mittees. A number of vacancies exist on a variety of boards.
Applicants must be Millbrae residents and in most cases a
registered voter. Applications must be submitted by Friday,
May 31. For more information visit www.ci.millbrae.ca.us.
On Monday, the Burlingame Planning Commission
will give the nal approval on a temporary re station a
step toward testing shared re services among four cities.
San Bruno, Millbrae, Burlingame and Hillsborough gave
the go-ahead to continue exploring shared administrative
services in 2011. One of the rst steps was creating a tem-
porary station, which is expected to open this summer. Under
the proposal, stations on Hillside Drive in Burlingame and
Crestview Drive in Millbrae would be closed. A new station
would then be placed somewhere within the three-mile dis-
tance between the two stations. Plans to build such a station
at 1675 Skyline Blvd. in Burlingame were reviewed by the
Planning Commission Monday and will return for approval
March 25.
The project includes a 1,440-square-foot re house build-
ing, 576 square feet of ofce space and a 2,730-square-foot
apparatus building to house two full-size re trucks with
drive-through capacities, according to a staff report. A spe-
cial permit will be required for the apparatus building which
will be 32 feet tall, two feet higher than the 30 foot height
limit in the area.
At the same meeting, the commission will vote to amend a
conditional use permit for Pizzaeria Delna, which plans to
open at 1444 Burlingame Ave.
The commission meets 7 p.m. Monday, March 25 at City
Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
EDUCATION
On Thursday, the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District Board of Trustees approved Mary Kay
Going for the position of assistant superintendent of educa-
tion services effective July 1.
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Senate Democrats
neared approval of their rst budget pro-
posal in four years on Friday, calling for
almost $1 billion in tax increases over the
coming decade while sheltering safety net
programs targeted by House Republicans.
The Democrats also would reverse auto-
matic spending cuts that are beginning to
strike both the Pentagon and domestic
programs.
The nonbinding but politically symbol-
ic measure caters to party stalwarts on the
liberal edge of the spectrum just as the
House GOP measure is crafted to appeal
to more recent Tea Party arrivals.
Approval of the Senate version was
expected to come long after dark after
dozens of votes on amendments, many of
which were offered in hopes of inicting
political damage on Democratic senators
up for re-election in GOP-leaning states
like Alaska and Louisiana.
Some $1 trillion in new revenue would
ow to the government over the coming
decade on top of more than $600 bil-
lion in taxes on upper-income earners
approved in January and would be
coupled with a net $875 billion in spend-
ing cuts. Those reductions would be gen-
erated by modest cuts to federal health
care programs, domestic agencies and the
Pentagon and reduced government bor-
rowing costs. The budget proposes $100
billion in new spending for infrastructure
projects and job training programs.
The president will reveal his own over-
due tax-and-spending plan in two weeks,
a plan that will be judged in part by
whether it offers new, more politically
risky proposals that could form the foun-
dation for a bipartisan agreement between
the two houses.
Senators braced for dozens of votes
during a marathon session running late on
Friday, with some predicting a nal vote
on the Democratic plan in the pre-dawn
hours of Saturday. In early voting Friday
morning, Democrats rejected the latest
attempt to repeal Obamas landmark
health care law by a strictly party-line
vote.
The Senate has already taken several
politically freighted votes, including a
move by Democrats to force a vote on the
Paul Ryan House budget, which was
rejected by a 59-40 vote Thursday night,
with five Republicans joining every
Democratic senator in opposition.
Republicans countered with a move by
Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., putting Democrats
on record in opposition to balancing the
budget by the end of the decade. It failed
on a near party-line vote.
Additional votes on Friday could fea-
ture forays into off-topic subjects like
super-sized soft drinks, domestic drone
strikes, handguns and abortion in addi-
tion to the more traditional subjects of
taxes, spending and debt.
It all concerned a largely symbolic
measure known as a budget resolution,
not binding legislation that could be sent
to the president to become law. The
Senate budget measure and the starkly
different version passed by the House on
Thursday seek to set parameters for fol-
low-up legislation on taxes and spend-
ing.
Senate Dems work to pass budget
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Eleven air trafc
control towers at small airports through-
out California were on the Federal
Aviation Administrations list of nation-
wide facilities to be closed starting next
month due to automatic spending cuts,
according to a list released Friday.
The California closures range from
Executive Airport in Sacramento to
Brown Field in San Diego. They are
among 149 contract towers that are FAA
certied by not staffed by government
employees and will stop operating as the
FAA trims $637 million for the rest of
the scal year as a result of budget cuts.
Also on the list are Castle Airport in
Merced County, Salinas Municipal in
Monterey County, Fullerton Municipal
in Orange County and Oxnard Airport in
Ventura County.
Two control towers in Riverside
County Riverside Municipal and
Ramona were listed, along with con-
trol facilities at Victorvilles Southern
California Logistics Airport in San
Bernardino County, Whiteman Airport
in Los Angeles and Gen. William J. Fox
Aireld in northern Los Angeles County.
The tower closures will not shut down
the airports, but will leave pilots to coor-
dinate departures, arrivals and other
movement among themselves via shared
radio frequencies.
We will work with the airports and
the operators to ensure the procedures
are in place to maintain the high level of
safety at non-towered airports, FAA
Administrator Michael Huerta said in a
statement.
The FAA said it would help efforts by
communities that choose to assume the
cost of air trafc control services at their
airports.
FAA to close 11 control towers at California airports
OPINION 9
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Political arrogance at its best
Editor,
At the risk of sounding anti City
Hall, allow me to offer my opinion on
the subject of bailing our Sams Italian
Sandwich Company.
1.) Why is the city in the real estate
business?
2.) When was it OK for the city to
bailout a suffering retail business?
3.) There are a lot of businesses in
San Mateo County that do not get sym-
pathy from greedy landlords.
4.) Why should the general public
give in to a failing business that smacks
of quiet socialism?
I believe the city of Burlingame has
opened a can of worms. There are a lot
of businesses that need nancial help.
Bear in mind, free enterprise is risky.
Armand Sanzio
Burlingame
Large soda sizes
contribute to obesity
Editor,
After reading your article, (Judge
strikes down New York City ban on
super-sized sodas from the March 12
edition of the Daily Journal) I was very
proud to see that cities in America are
willing to change, but I was very disap-
pointed to see that the judge had struck
it down.
Having one of the biggest cities in
the United States make such a big,
healthy decision would really lead
other cities to follow. In the article, I
completely disagree with the fact that
people think this is a way of the gov-
ernment dictating our choices. Even
though it may seem that way, in the
end its just enforcing what the people
asked for, what we asked for. Society
makes it OK for us to walk around with
these 32-ounce drinks and go check-
ing-in at various fast-food restaurants;
when in reality we should be shaking
our heads and disapproving of such
behavior. Along with limiting the soda
size, I think vendors should limit the
amount of sweeteners allowed for cof-
fee and tea.
Two-thirds of America is either over-
weight or obese and people get mad at
the government for wanting to help
save lives? As Americans, we need to
face the cold hard truth, demand more
of this positive change and stop ignor-
ing this obesity crisis. We need to act
fast because obesity is quickly becom-
ing the number one killer in America.
Grecia Martinez
San Jose
Parents have a right
to protect their children
Editor,
Parents do have the right to protect
their children, even from government
schools.
I remember when I read that a judge
told parents the moment your child
walks into a school, you are no longer
in control of your child. That was a
few years ago and it made my blood
boil. The parents highly objected to the
school nurse who stripped the girls and
searched them to see if they were sexu-
ally active ... this was in a junior high.
The schools have taken upon them-
selves to escort girls to have an abor-
tion, all without parent consent. Where
is the outrage?
Parents are the only guardians of
their children and unfortunately most
parents have no idea what their chil-
dren are being taught. We have let the
educational system take control of our
children and teach them whatever they
want to teach them. Parents assume the
children are not being indoctrinated
into what is so-called socially correct
morality, morality that may be very
different from what parents teach their
children at home. No wonder our
schools are failing to educate when the
force behind the new education system
is to indoctrinate. Parents need to speak
out, read the textbooks and curriculum
and make sure their children are not
becoming victims. Thank goodness one
parent stood up for her children. More
parents need to do the same thing.
Karen Kennedy
San Mateo
Traffic lights in
downtown San Mateo
Editor,
I recently witnessed the fact that all
the downtown San Mateo trafc lights
on Fourth Avenue from the railroad
tracks all the way to El Camino were
red. That indicates that there is no syn-
chronization and that means the ow of
trafc is not optimized, just as if we did
not really know that.
Come to think of it, why does the
city of San Mateo not implement a
well-designed one-way system down-
town or at the very least make some
intersections right turn only? Is that too
difcult, you think? Even the city of
San Jose could do it.
Harry Roussard
Foster City
Letters to the editor
Houston Chronicle
W
eve all seen the headlines.
Theyre as gruesome and
disturbing as any in the
world, and theyre all the more disturb-
ing because theyre relatively close to
home:
Twenty-two bodies found in Mexico
City over a recent weekend. Thirty-ve
bodies dumped like yesterdays trash
along the side of a busy Veracruz high-
way. The bodies of 17 musicians and
crew members of a band found in an
abandoned well near Monterrey.
Mexicos narco-fueled terror rampage
has become so commonplace that the
horror stories barely rate as news. ...
For these reasons and others, the
Obama administration needs to make
sure that its focus on the Middle East
and other trouble spots around the
world doesnt blind it to the mutual
opportunities of close neighborly ties.
With President Enrique Pena Nieto in
the early weeks of his presidency, its
an opportune time.
Writing in a recent issue of Foreign
Affairs, Shannon K. ONeil, a Latin
American expert at the Council on
Foreign Relations, points out that it also
is time for this country to start seeing
Mexico as a partner instead of a prob-
lem.
She noted in a recent interview with
the Chronicle that Mexico is now the
second-largest export destination for
U.S. goods, after Canada and twice
as much as China and that Mexico is
both Texas and Houstons biggest trad-
ing partner.
More than a billion dollars worth of
legal goods cross the U.S.-Mexican
border into this country each day. An
estimated 6 million U.S. jobs depend
on U.S-Mexico trade.
Approximately 40 percent of the
products made in Mexico have parts
that come from this country.
Mexico still has challenges, certainly,
but the vital signs are strong. Whatever
Mexicos future holds, the United
States will be affected.
U.S. should not view Mexico as a problem
By Ted J. Hannig
W
ith all the current discussion about marriage
equality rights, there is a terrible wrong in our
country. I have the solution to set us straight.
Now is the time to act as our Supreme Court focuses on con-
stitutional rights surrounding marriage. As I recently viewed
our countrys original founding documents in the National
Archives, I was inspired to express my views about rights.
My modest proposal is a constitutional ban prohibiting cer-
tain persons from marrying, and dening marriage in our
Constitution to be solely between what
constitutes 90 percent of our population.
Ten percent of our population claims to
be born with a condition they say is not a
matter of choice, but of genetics. Twice
as many men as women are affected. The
Bible and our Constitution tell us its evil
and wrong. That regrettable condition is
left-handedness. Geneticists now tell us
that the handedness gene has been
identied. The good news is that by preventing marriage of
left-handers, we can stop handedness deviation from putting
us all at greater risk.
For those few who think I am being heavy right-handed,
let me explain: Statistics show left-handedness can be dan-
gerous. From soldiers to pilots to surgeons, we all need them
to be of the same hand when using tools, instruments and
making decisions. Statistically, left-handers have more acci-
dents, are prone to more disease and have a higher suicide
rate. Hundreds of years ago, the Catholic Church declared
left-handed people to be associated with the devil. In the
Arab world, the right hand is used to touch parts of the body
above the waist, while the left hand is used for below the
belt. Naturally, then, left-handers go below the belt them-
selves in argument, falsely claiming to be equal in the eyes
of God, our country and among family because, they assert,
all of us are born equal.
God is not on their leftist side; for He warned in the Bible
of a city where residents were so sinful they could not dis-
cern between their right hand and their left hand, meaning
they could not tell the difference between good (right) or evil
(left). In Matthew 6:3, Jesus instructed his followers that
when they do charitable things, to not let thy left hand
know what thy right hand doeth. However, as compelling as
the religious argument is, consideration need not end with
religion, for there are heathens among us.
Our Founding Fathers created not a Bill of Lefts but our
Bill of Rights. Your own mother knew to refer to the uncon-
sumed remnants of a meal as not rightovers but leftovers.
By refusing marriage rights to the lefties among us, we
can minimize the genetic potential that new lefties might be
conceived and born. The genetic probability for two right-
handed parents having a left-handed child is just 2 percent.
But the probability for two left-handed (homo-handed) par-
ents having a left-handed child is a whopping 46 percent.
Statistics dont lie. Our rst order of business is stopping
lefties from procreating.
But also we need to fear the mere exposure of lefties to
our impressionable youth who might be tempted to try left-
handedness. Certainly we should keep lefties away from
leadership positions such as scouting and teaching as such
exposure could lead to experimentation with ambidextrous
behavior.
While Lady Gaga and lady genetics might try to tell us
lefties were born this way, it need not mean they have to
accept their condition. We can make them choose, for if they
just ignore their genetics and choose to become right-handed
they can be accorded all the rights of marriage. If lefties are
denied marriage rights but choose right-handedness
lifestyles, they need not worry about discrimination with
taxes, jobs, housing or even at hospitals when they want to
see their loved one but cannot because they are not legally
married.
Join us at the national level People Obsessed Over
Handedness (POOH), and at the local level Citizens
Right-handed Advocacy Program (CRAP). Your donation
can make sure that POOH continues to be spread throughout
our country and CRAP is taught in our schools. We must
block groups seeking to ban discrimination based on birth
characteristics, particularly groups such as Never Oppose
Human Attributes and Teach Equality (NOHATE). For the
NOHATERs would have us consider marriage equality a
civil right emanating from our Bill of Rights. What is next.
... the radical proposition that all persons are created equal?
Ted J. Hannig was born and raised on the Peninsula where he
raised his own family; he is a published author, attorney,
entrepreneur, managing partner of a law rm and CEO of a
community foundation. He has served on numerous nonprot
boards (including the NoH8 Campaign).
Other voices
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Guest perspective
Marriage rights:
A modest proposal
BUSINESS 10
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,512.03 +0.63% 10-Yr Bond 1.915 -0.88%
Nasdaq3,245.00 +0.70% Oil (per barrel) 93.90
S&P 500 1,556.89 +0.72% Gold 1,607.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Nike Inc., up $5.93 at $59.53
The athletic shoe and clothing company said that its third-quarter net
income rose 55 percent thanks to growth in North America.
AK Steel Holding Corp., down 16 cents at $3.31
The steel company projected a larger-than-expected rst-quarter loss,
saying a rise in demand hasnt materialized.
Tiffany & Co., up $1.32 at $69.23
The jewelry company said its fourth-quarter earnings edged up less than
1 percent, but its results still beat analysts expectations.
Supervalu Inc., up 27 cents at $4.95
Shares of the supermarket operator continued to rise, a day after it
completed a deal to sell ve of its grocery chains.
Tibco Software Inc., down $2.18 at $20.99
The business software company reported its scal rst-quarter prot fell
by more than 50 percent on disappointing revenue.
Nasdaq
Micron Technology Inc., up 97 cents at $10.04
The maker of memory chips posted a loss in its scal second quarter,
but revenue beat Wall Street estimates.
Informatica Corp., down $1.71 at $34.15
A Nomura analyst downgraded the software company, saying that the
risk versus the reward is not as compelling as it used to be.
Anacor Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $1.24 at $6.08
The drug developer reported strong data from a mid-stage study of a
potential treatment for atopic dermatitis, a type of chronic rash.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Strong company earnings boosted
stocks on Wall Street Friday. Investors
also saw a chance to add to their hold-
ings after declines earlier in the week.
Nike reported a surge in quarterly
prot, sending its stock price to a record.
Tiffany topped earnings predictions,
boosted by demand from customers in
Asia.
Investors were also drawn by a pause
in the markets big run-up. The Standard
& Poors 500 index logged its second
weekly decline of the year, despite
Fridays gains.
The damper on U.S. stock markets
was caused by another worrisome chap-
ter in Europes debt crisis, and some dis-
appointing corporate news.
The Mediterranean island nation of
Cyprus, a banking haven, is struggling to
devise a plan to avoid nancial collapse.
Stocks were also weighed down on
Thursday by weak sales from Oracle.
That news brought down technology
stocks.
FedEx ended the week 10 percent
lower after it reported a drop in quarter-
ly prot and cut its annual earnings fore-
cast on Wednesday. The company is a
gauge of the economy because so many
shoppers and businesses use its shipping
services.
On Friday, investors took advantage of
the markets down week and ramped up
their stock buying.
A resilient global economy has
encouraged investors to pick up stocks
on any dips, said Ron Florance, manag-
ing director of investment strategy at
Wells Fargo Private Bank.
We still have an astonishing amount
of money sitting on the sidelines, said
Florance.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
90.54 points, or 0.6 percent, to
14,512.03 Friday. The Standard &
Poors 500 index rose 11.09 points, or
0.7 percent, to 1,556.89. The Nasdaq
composite gained 22.40 points, or 0.7
percent, to 3,245.
Nike shares hit an all-time high, rising
$5.93, or 11 percent, to $59.53 after the
company reported a 55 percent spike in
quarterly net income. Tiffany rose $1.32,
or 1.9 percent, to $69.23 after its strong
fourth-quarter earnings.
Stocks rise on Wall Street aided by earnings
REUTERS
Traders work on the oor at the New York Stock Exchange.
Techie fired after
Tweeting about mens comments
SAN JOSE A female technology developer has been
red after tweeting about a group of men she said were mak-
ing sexual comments at a Silicon Valley technology confer-
ence.
Adria Richards wrote on her blog, butyouragirl.com, that
she was seated in a ballroom at the Santa Clara conference
Sunday when the men behind her started talking about big
dongles.
A dongle is a device that plugs into a computer, but Richards
tweeted that the men made the comment in a sexual way.
After hearing their remarks, Richards turned around, took a
photo of the men and posted it on Twitter with their alleged
comments.
The men were escorted from the room by conference staff
after Richards spoke to them about the mens behavior and the
staff saw her tweets. The conference, PyCon 2013, was for
people working on Python programming language.
Richards worked for SendGrid, a technology company with
ofces in Orange County and Colorado. CEO Jim Franklin
wrote on the companys website that SendGrid agreed with
Richards right to report the incident to Pycon staff, but not the
way she reported it.
Her decision to tweet the comments and photographs of the
people who made the comments crossed the line, Franklin
wrote in a blog post on the site. Publicly shaming the offend-
ers and bystanders was not the appropriate way to han-
dle the situation.
Franklin said Richards put the companys business in dan-
ger, divided the developer community and could no longer be
effective at the company.
Tiffany 4Q net income rises less than 1 percent
NEW YORK Tiffany says its fourth-quarter net income
edged up less than 1 percent, but still beat Wall Street predic-
tions as strong customer demand in Asia for its pricey baubles
offset weakness in the U.S.
The upscale jewelry company also offered an annual sales
outlook that topped analysts estimates, and its shares rose
nearly 2 percent Friday.
The results, which include the critical holiday season, show
Tiffanys resilience even as it faces challenges in the U.S. and
a scal crisis in Europe.
For the quarter ended Jan. 31, Tiffany earned $179.6 million,
or $1.40 per share. Revenue rose 4 percent to $1.24 billion.
Marin Software rises in debut on the NYSE
NEW YORK Shares of Marin Software climbed nearly
27 percent in their rst day as a publicly traded company.
The software companys stock rose $3.76, or 26.9 percent,
to $17.76 in morning trading.
Marin Software Inc. raised $105 million in the initial public
offering. The San Francisco company priced the IPO at $14
per share, above the expected price range of $11 to $13 a
piece.
The size of the IPO increased to 7.5 million shares from 7
million shares.
The underwriters are getting a 30-day option to buy up to an
additional 1.1 million shares at the IPO price.
Business briefs
By Matthew Perrone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A federal appeals
court has sided with the Food and Drug
Administration in a case brought by
medical device maker Cytori, ruling that
the agency was correct to reject fast-
track approval for two company devices
used to process adult stem cells.
Cytori Therapeutics Inc. makes the
Celution and StemSource devices which
separate adult stem cells from fat tissue
using a combination of spinning motions
and chemical reactions. The company is
studying the technology for a variety of
medical uses, including breast recon-
struction, burn healing and treating dam-
aged heart tissue. The technology has
even been adopted by some plastic sur-
geons, who claim adult stem cells can be
injected into the face, breast and other
areas to create a younger look.
Medical devices cannot be marketed
in the U.S. without prior approval by the
FDA.
Cytori asked the FDA in 2011 to
approve the Celution and StemSource
devices using a fast-track pathway
reserved for devices that are similar to
products already on the market. Cytori
argued that its technology is similar to
that used to process cells from blood and
bone marrow.
The FDA rejected that argument and
told the company it would need to apply
through a more rigorous process that
involves large studies with human par-
ticipants.
A three-judge panel backed that deci-
sion in a ruling issued Friday.
FDA concluded and explained that
fat is not blood and that the difference
matters. A court is ill-equipped to sec-
ond-guess that kind of agency scientic
judgment, states the opinion, written by
Judge Brett Kavanaugh. After careful
review, we nd FDAs assessment both
reasonable and reasonably explained.
The ruling was signed by fellow
Judges Janice Rogers Brown and David
Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia.
Judges side with FDA in
rejecting stem cell device
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Ka-ching! The cash
register may be on its nal sale.
Stores across the country are ditching
the old-fashioned, clunky machines and
having salespeople and even shop-
pers themselves ring up sales on
smartphones and tablet computers.
Barneys New York, a luxury retailer,
this year plans to use iPads or iPod
Touch devices for credit and debit card
purchases in seven of its nearly two
dozen regular-price stores. Urban
Outtters, a teen clothing chain, ordered
its last traditional register last fall and
plans to go completely mobile one day.
And Wal-Mart, the worlds largest
retailer, is testing a Scan & Go app
that lets customers scan their items as
they shop.
The traditional cash register is head-
ing toward obsolescence, said Danielle
Vitale, chief operating ofcer of Barneys
New York.
That the cash register is getting the
boot is no surprise. The writing has been
on the wall for a long time for the iconic
machine, which was created in the late
1800s.
The cash register rings its last sale
<< The Madness continues, page 12
No. 1 Indiana and No. 2 Duke dominate
Wisconsin and NC State shocked
Weekend, March 23-24, 2013
NOT TOUGH ENOUGH: MIXED MARTIAL ARTS FIGHTERS FAKES OWN DEATH, ACCORDING TO PROMOTERS >>> PAGE 13
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
During a press conference prior to
the start of the 2013 College of San
Mateo softball season, head coach
Nicole Borg mentioned the name
Talisa Fiame and almost immediate-
ly a smile appeared on her face.
The same happened when star ace
pitcher Michelle Pilster brought up
her second baseman.
She been a pleasant surprise,
Borg said. Shell do things on the
eld where you go where did that
come from?
Thirty-one games into the CSM
season and apparently Fiame ceases
to amaze her CSM coaches and
teammates with her game.
Fiame had a perfect day at the
plate in CSMs latest win, an 11-2
shelling of the No. 6 ranked West
Valley Vikings.
The five-inning win keeps the
Bulldogs as the states top-ranked
softball team.
Fiame, a second baseman out of
Pacicas Terra Nova High School,
had seven RBIs, including two
homers one a grand slam in the
second inning and went 4-for-4
from the dish. She also had two sin-
gles and scored three runs.
Her second homer was a two-run,
walk-off shot over the left center-
eld fence in the fth that sent
everyone home via the mercy rule.
All this from a player who told
reporters after the game she never
hit a home run in high school.
CSM lineup
sparked by
Fiames bat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. It was a
bad day for Rockies pitchers.
In Scottsdale, Christian Friedrich
made his rst start of spring training
and allowed two of San Franciscos
ve home runs as a Colorado split
squad lost 11-6 to the Giants.
More troublesome, though, was
the news out of Rockies camp that
opening day starter Jhoulys Chacin
was scratched from his start against
the Texas Rangers because of back
spasms.
Chacin pitched for Venezuela in
the World Baseball Classic and has
been limited to 4 1-3 innings in
three Cactus League starts this
spring. He reported the back prob-
lems on Thursday and the Rockies
decided to start Tyler Chatwood
against the Rangers on Friday.
He felt them come on yesterday
so were just being cautious, man-
ager Walt Weiss said. It doesnt
look like anything serious but there
is no reason to run him out there 24
hours later to have him make his
Belts bat
is red hot,
Giants win
See CSM, Page 14
Rosati adds offense to dominant D
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
You could feel it every single time the
Woodside High School girls soccer team
earned a dead-ball restart deep in their
opponents territory.
It was a cold chill. A heightening of the
soccer senses. Like in the first Jaws
movie when the da-rum, da-rum started
and you knew something dangerous was
lurking.
As all 21 players scrambled to their
positions anticipating the restart, all eyes
shifted and locked onto one player jog-
ging her way up to the offensive end from
deep outside her sweeper position.
The shark in the water was Woodsides
Giana Rosati.
And when the referee blew his whistle
to restart the game, the Wildcat world
held their collective breath every single
time in 2012-13 because there was a
chance goal-scoring magic was about to
happen.
See ROSATI, Page 13
See GIANTS, Page 14
12
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NCAA Capsules
EASTREGIONAL
INDIANA83, JAMESMADISON62
DAYTON,Ohio Freshman Yogi Ferrell scored
14 points in the rst six minutes as top-seeded
Indiana slam dunked its way past James Madi-
son.
Not taking any chances with a No. 16 seed, the
Hoosiers (28-6) started fast and built a 33-point
lead in the second half over the Dukes (21-15)
andopenedthetourneywithastatement they
intend to be around for a while.
Looking every bit like a team capable of cut-
ting down the nets in Atlanta next month,
Indianawill playTempleinthesecondroundon
Sunday.
TEMPLE76, NORTHCAROLINASTATE72
DAYTON,OhioKhalifWyatt scored31points,
nishing the game with an injured left thumb
that had him grimacing before his clinching
free throws, and Temple broke with its one-
and-done NCAA tournament trend.
The ninth-seeded Owls (24-9) opened a 17-
point lead before Wyatt the Atlantic 10s
player of the year and top scorer hurt his left
thumbandleft thegamebriey,returningwith
black tape on the non-shooting hand.
Every shot was an adventure, but he made
enough including six painful but perfect
free throws in the nal 32 seconds to keep
Temple around for more than one game. The
Owls had lost their opener in four of their last
ve NCAA trips.
MIAMI 78, PACIFIC49
AUSTIN, Texas Durand Scott had 21 points
and Miami had a triumphant return to the
NCAA tournament.
The Hurricanes (28-6),who may be even better
thantheir No.2seedintheEast Regional would
indicate, put the game out of reach with a 14-
0 run midway through the rst half of their rst
NCAA tourney game in ve years.
Pacic (22-13), the California team that played
its last game for retiring longtime coach Bob
Thomason,was no match for the Atlantic Coast
Conferences regular season and tournament
champions.
LLINOIS57, COLORADO49
AUSTIN,TexasBrandonPaul andD.J.Richard-
sonmadeconsecutive3-pointerstogiveIllinois
back the lead with 6 minutes left and the sev-
enth-seeded Illini pulled out a tough win over
Colorado.
Illinois led by 16 at halftime only to watch Col-
orado rip off a 21-2 run in the second to grab
the lead. The Illini looked desperate until Paul
and Richardson coolly knocked down their
shots to put Illinois ahead 48-44.
Four free throws by Paul eventually put the
game away for the Illini (23-12).
Paul led Illinois with 17 points.
MIDWESTREGIONAL
DUKE73, ALBANY61
PHILADELPHIA Seth Curry scored 26 points,
Mason Plumlee had 23 and second-seeded
Duke beat Albany.
TheBlueDevils(28-5) will meet seventh-seeded
Creighton in the third round Sunday.
Duke shot 58.7 percent (27 of 46), just off its
season-beat 60.8 percent against Florida State.
The Blue Devils,who lost 75-70 to 15th-seeded
Lehigh in the second round last year, never re-
ally pulled away from the Great Danes (24-11),
who got as close as eight points with 4:40 to
play.
Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski extended his all-
time lead with his 80th career victory in the
tournament that he has won four times.
CREIGHTON67, CINCINNATI 63
PHILADELPHIA Doug McDermott had 27
points and 11 rebounds, and Gregory
Echenique scored 13 points to help Creighton
hold on.
Ethan Wragge added 12 for the Bluejays, who
won their NCAA tournament opener for the
second straight year.
McDermott,the two-time Missouri Valley Con-
ference player of the year and 2012
All-American, made all 11 free throws.
Cuse prepares for upset-minded Cal
By Josh Dubow
The Associated Press
SAN JOSE Jim Boeheims
teams at Syracuse have thrived on
their zone defense for decades,
using long, athletic players to dis-
rupt opposing offenses to the tune of
more than 900 wins and a national
title.
California coach Mike
Montgomery has been more of a
proponent of man-to-man defense
during his stellar coaching career,
using the zone more as an occasion-
al changeup than a base defense.
Montgomery has even jokingly
mocked his friend, Boeheim, over
the years for his reliance on the 2-3
zone.
So Boeheim got a piece of vindi-
cation when he saw the 12th-seeded
Golden Bears (21-11) stay almost
exclusively in a zone defense in a
win over UNLV that set up a
matchup with No. 4 seed Syracuse
(27-9) in the third round of the
NCAA tournament Saturday.
Hes a man-to-man coach, he
always has been, Boeheim said
Friday. But Ive always said if you
dont have some zone just in your
pocket, I dont think youre smart.
For a long time there were a lot of
coaches that werent very smart. But
now most of them I guess are
because pretty much everybody has
some zone.
Few teams have played it better
over the years than the Orange.
Boeheim recruits big, athletic wing
players who can close out quickly
on shooters and the players are so
well-versed in the defense because
they rarely play, or practice, any-
thing else.
This years squad has been one of
Boeheims best defensively, with
the Orange ranking third in the
nation in eld goal defense (37 per-
cent) and 10th in 3-point defense
(29 percent).
They know exactly what theyre
trying to do, Montgomery said.
They know exactly what the rules
are as far as where theyre not going
to let the ball go and why. It makes
it very effective. When you do
something 35 times a year, 40 min-
utes a game for 30 years, somebody
has got it gured out. And theyve
been successful with it.
The defense has been a staple all
season for the Orange, who over-
came a rough patch in February
against a brutal Big East schedule to
play perhaps their best basketball of
the season during the tournaments
in March.
With James Southerland, C.J. Fair
and Brandon Triche nding their
stroke from the outside, Syracuse
has gotten back on track after losing
four of ve games to end the regular
season. The losses all came to teams
Louisville, Georgetown (twice)
and Marquette that got top-three
seeds in the NCAA tournament after
sharing the Big East regular-season
crown.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Kansas
State coach Bruce Weber challenged
his team at halftime to show some
emotion.
It overflowed once the final
buzzer sounded.
The fourth-seeded Wildcats had
frantically rallied from an 18-point
decit against No. 13 seed La Salle,
even taking the lead late in the
game. But a sudden cold streak at
the worst of times, along with three
critical foul shots by the Explorers
Jerrell Wright, left Kansas State
stinging from a 63-61 loss in the
second round of the NCAA tourna-
ment.
I asked them at halftime to com-
pete, and they said, Coach, we want
to win, said Weber, his own voice
cracking. We didnt make it. Its
sad, sad for our guys.
Wright, who scored a game-high
21 points for La Salle (22-9), made
the rst of his two clutch free throws
to take a 62-61 lead with 30 seconds
left in the game.
Kansas States Jordan Henriquez
missed in the paint at the other end,
and Wright was quickly fouled,
making the rst of two more foul
shots with 9.6 seconds to go.
The Wildcats (27-8) raced down
court, looking for a tying basket, but
guard Angel Rodriguez got hung up
in the corner near the Kansas State
bench. His off-balance shot over the
corner of the backboard missed
everything, and the Explorers
jumped off their bench to celebrate.
They made the plays down the
stretch and we didnt, said Weber,
who decided to let his guys free-
lance on the nal possession rather
than calling a timeout and designing
a play.
As soon as Rodriguez got boxed
in, Weber said he tried to get that
timeout but the referees couldnt
hear him over the roar of the crowd.
I guess its my fault, he said. I
waited too long.
Ramon Galloway scored 15 of his
19 points in the rst half, and Sam
Mills added 10 points for La Salle,
which beat Boise State in one of the
First Four games just to reach
Kansas City, and now has won two
games in the NCAA tournament for
the rst time since 1955.
No. 13 seed La Salle
beats No. 4 K-State
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Wisconsins vaunted defense did its
job, holding Mississippi to its low-
est point total of the year.
It was the suspect offense that
failed. The Badgers put up 59 shots
against Ole Miss on Friday but
made only 15 of them. So Bo
Ryans team headed home after a
57-46 loss that snapped a six-year
string of rst-game wins for one of
the NCAAs most consistently suc-
cessful programs of the past 15
years.
A lot of times with a good team
like that, things will spiral away
from you, said Sam Dekker, who
had 14 points and was the only
Badger in double gures. They just
outworked us in the last 8 or 9 min-
utes, really took it to us, and we did-
nt know how to handle it.
M a r s h a l l H e n d e r s o n ,
Mississippis flamboyant guard,
missed 12 of his first 13 shots and
was 0 for 6 from 3-point land when
he finally connected for a long 3-
pointer. Then he remained unusual-
ly stoic and businesslike while
scoring 17 of his 19 points in the
second half and leading the Rebels
to a 57-46 victory.
We knew Henderson was going
to get going, said Dekker. I
thought we did a good job on him in
the rst half making him hit tough
shots. He got hot, did what he does.
I think that was part of the differ-
ence.
To Ryan, it was a season-like
weakness catching up with the
Badgers.
We won a lot of close games,
beat a lot of good teams, said Ryan.
But again, its not a team that real-
ly shot the ball well all year. It hap-
pened again.
Marshall had a simple explanation
for why he remained so stoic and
businesslike, keeping under wraps
the on-the-court antics hes become
famous for.
You cant go a little crazy when
you go one for your rst 17, said
Marshall, the leading scorer in the
Southeastern Conference. I know
what I can do and what I cant do,
and thats not the time, no.
Hendersons futility reached its
zenith with about 12 minutes to go
when he fumbled the ball in the
Wisconsin back court.
No. 5 Wisconsin goes ice cold,
falls 57-46 to No. 12 Ole Miss
SPORTS 13
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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It was a completely different story just a
year ago when Woodside was absolutely zero
threat from the corner kick or a set piece.
Head coach Jose Navarette said the Wildcats
did not score in those kinds of situations at all.
And that was the case for a variety of reasons
mostly, it was because the 6-4 Rosati was
the one sending the ball into the box on the
restarts.
We decided to invest more time with that
to try and take advantage of Gianas size,
Navarette said. People dont realize shes
more athletic than she looks. She has better
foot skill than people give her credit for. So I
said, we need to take advantage of that. That
needs to be something that should work in our
favor, not just once, but every game.
Fortunately, things panned out for us.
Pan out? With the programs rst Central
Coast Section title since 1977 sitting cozily in
the schools trophy case, wed say it more that
just panned out.
The added element of Rosati on the set
piece made Woodside the most dangerous
and feared team in the Peninsula Athletic
League maybe one of the most in the CCS.
The added element of Rosati on the corner
kick made the leagues best defensive player
and sweeper its most lethal nisher at least
as matters of the head are concerned.
And today, the added element of Rosati on
offense makes her the San Mateo Daily
Journal Girls Soccer Player of the Year.
Something just clicked, Rosati said. Just
one day I realized, hey, I head the ball all the
time on defense. I win balls all the time in the
air on my side of the eld. Why cant I do it
on the offensive side of eld? So, I think I
just set my mind to know that I could do it. I
didnt focus on the players. I didnt have to
worry about anything, just getting my head on
the ball.
A year after zero header goals for Rosati,
No. 25 nished 14 goals in 2012-13 (second
on the team) all of which game via the set
piece. Its an impressive tally considering that
Rosati spent most of the time away from the
offensive end of the eld managing a defense
that allowed only 11 girls (in 23 games) this
season.
I dont know of another player that has
been that big of a factor in deciding games in
a season, Navarette said. This kid really
believes in herself. I do, but wow, its a level
that she just believes so much in her abilities
because she believes she can outwork any-
body. Shes a competitor. Shes very tena-
cious. Her composure in those situations is
amazing.
It wasnt just the bulk of Rosatis goals.
More often than not, No. 25 was involved in
equalizing games or putting Woodside ahead
nine to be exact ensuring her team n-
ished the year at 19-0-4, the only unbeaten
team in CCS.
I have condence but I dont know if I felt
like I could score every time, Rosati said. I
was always hoping to get the opportunity.
Thats all I wanted because I knew I could
help my team if I could go up for a set piece.
I would just do my best when I got up there to
score.
And while we speak of Rosatis offensive
game like shes a seasoned striker, her set-
piece game is still very much a work in
progress. Plus, she accomplished all her
offensive success while anchoring a rock-
solid defense good enough to go the year with
allowing more than one goal only twice (both
times in the CCS playoffs) and collecting 15
shutouts.
I felt like I denitely improved defensive-
ly, but, when you have such a great rst line of
defense (the mideld), I didnt get to see a ton
of action, as much as I would see if I wasnt
playing sweeper, Rosati said. We played
really tough competition, so I do think I
improved defensively.
I felt like I had a big responsibility for
keeping everything organized. And also, I
took a lot of responsibility for keeping my
team modest and focused. I feel like that was
one of my largest roles keeping everyone
calm and focused on playing soccer and not
caught up in the excitement of how well we
were doing.
Continued from page 11
ROSATI
Sports briefs
Raiders sign LB Kaelin Burnett
ALAMEDA The Oakland Raiders have
re-signed linebacker Kaelin Burnett to an
exclusive-rights deal.
The team announced the deal on Friday.
Burnett played six games for Oakland last
season, mostly appearing on special teams. He
had one tackle on the season.
The Raiders recently signed Burnetts older
brother, Kevin, to a free-agent contract to play
linebacker for the team.
Rose stays in front at Bay Hill
ORLANDO, Fla. Bill Haas wanted to
atone for the way he nished his opening
round. He did that and more Friday and was
tied for the lead in the Arnold Palmer
Invitational.
That sure wasnt the case for Tiger Woods.
One shot out of the lead with three holes to
play, Woods closed with three sloppy bogeys
to fall four shots behind going into the week-
end. That makes the chore a little more dif-
cult in his bid to defend his title at Bay Hill
and return to No. 1 in the world.
The good news is weve got 36 holes to
go, Woods said. Weve got a long way to go.
And certainly four shots can be made up.
Haas not only kept bogeys off his card, his
longest putt for par was no more than 4 feet in
a clean round of 6-under 66.
He was tied with Justin Rose, who was
poised to take the outright lead until he was
fooled by the speed of the greens after late
afternoon showers and nished with a three-
putt bogey for a 70.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT Mixed martial arts promoters
Christo Piliafas and Scott DiPonio were
shocked to learn that one of their ghters was
a suspect in the holdup of a Michigan gun
shop this week.
After all, it was only two weeks ago that
they raised more than $1,000 to help the ama-
teur heavyweights family pay for his funeral.
Charles Rowan, 25, didnt die in a February
car wreck while en route to his fth bout, as
his girlfriend, Rosalinda Martinez, claimed
that night, according to DiPonio. The couple
and a friend, Michael Bowman, were in a
Gladwin courtroom on Friday to hear the
charges against them: armed robbery and
assault with intent to murder. Each requested
a court-appointed attorney.
DiPonio, who owns the Diamond D ght
team, said he realized they had been duped
when he saw Rowans mug shot on television
identifying him a person of interest in the
Monday robbery of Guns and Stuff, about 100
miles southeast of Traverse City. The stores
owner, Richard Robinette, was severely beat-
en and remained in serious but stable condi-
tion Friday in a Flint hospital.
I almost passed out. It was literally that
bad. My girlfriend looked at me and immedi-
ately just started crying, he said. I was in
disbelief. ... It took me literally an hour until I
could actually focus and think again. It was
just unbelievable.
Piliafas, who ghts professionally as The
Mad Greek in addition to running promo-
tional company Caged Aggression, said he
had just returned from a bout in Poland when
an associate texted him a link to the mug shot.
It made me sick to my stomach. I was furi-
ous. I was livid, he said. Its not so much
about the money. Its just how many people
were involved in this scam. ... The little bit
that I knew (about) this kid, I never would
have thought that hed try to pull some
Machiavelli crap like that.
DiPonio said Rowan approached him at a
show a year-and-a-half ago and said hed like
to give MMA a shot. The results were mixed
the 200-plus-pound heavyweight recorded
a 1-3 record as an amateur but DiPonio
said his work ethic and attitude were strong.
Promoters: Mixed martial arts fighter faked death
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, Iowa Wrestling has two
shots left at a return to the Olympic program,
and neither will be easy.
But U.S. wrestling ofcials appeared to
have settled on which one they think is the
best bet.
Former world champion Bill Scherr, the
chairman of a committee of top American
wrestling gures, said Friday that he thinks
the sports best chance to remain an Olympic
sport is to beat out the likes of squash, roller
sports and karate for re-inclusion as a provi-
sional sport in the 2020 Olympics.
Perhaps our better avenue to stay in the
Games is to win the competition against the
provisional sports, Scherr said. We need to
canvass those 15 IOC executive board mem-
bers to make sure we get on that short list.
Though the International Olympic
Committee recommended in February to
remove wrestling from the 2020 Olympics,
that move is far from nal.
Wrestling will compete with seven other
sports for a provisional spot in the 2020
Games in a vote in May.
But ofcials also will lobby the 114-mem-
ber IOC General Session in September in
hopes it will overturn the executive boards
recommendation by a simple majority vote.
The rst step for U.S. ofcials following
what Scherr called a bombshell decision by
the IOC was to organize the Committee to
Preserve Olympic Wrestling ahead of the May
vote in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Scherr joined wrestling great Dan Gable,
2012 Olympic champion Jordan Burroughs
and Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), a two-time
NCAA champion for Wisconsin, at the NCAA
championships in Des Moines to discuss the
committees progress.
Wrestling hopes for provisional Olympic status
start. The plan is to give him a couple of
innings (Saturday), but we wont stretch him
out.
Chacin, 23-31 with a 3.68 ERA in 82 career
games (67 starts), was named the starter for
Colorados April 1 opener in Milwaukee by
Weiss on Tuesday. He was 3-5 with a 4.43
ERA in 2012, a season that was shortened by
a pectoral muscle injury.
Fredrich, who is coming back from his own
back problems that have hampered his spring
and likely cost him a shot at the starting rota-
tion, allowed ve hits home runs to Hunter
Pence and Brandon Belt in three innings.
Miguel Batista also allowed four runs in two
innings.
Belt raised his spring average to.439 with
two homers, a ground-rule double, and a sin-
gle while driving in four runs.
This is the time of year, getting closer to
opening day, that you want to stay as
locked in as possible. Im seeing the ball
well, feeling good and ready to get start-
ed, said Belt, who had seven home runs
last season but has six this spring, the most
of any player in the Cactus League.
Belt hit .275 last year and at 25, feels he is
ready to take the next step in his career.
Im not the same play-
er I was, from a mental
aspect and everything
else, he said. I know
what to expect going out
there. I know there will be
some bumps in the road,
but I also know that I can
come out on the other
side. Im going in with a
lot more condence this
year.
Belt had three hits against lefties, another
area hes work hard to improve on.
Its something to take personally as a left-
handed hitter, that you cant hit left-handed
pitchers, he said. I want to show them that I
can.
Belt was a triple shy of the cycle in the sev-
enth when he sent a drive to left-center. It
cleared the fence.
I thought I hit it pretty good. If I had hit
one down the line, I was denitely going for
the cycle, he said.
Nick Noonan and Mark Minicozzi also
homered for the Giants, who had 15 hits.
Carlos Gonazlez had a two-run homer for the
Rockies in the rst inning.
SPORTS 14
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Fiame was an All-PAL Bay Division second
teamer who is adapting incredibly well to the
junior college game. Fiame now has six
homers, seven doubles and 36 RBIs while bat-
ting .394.
Fiame said the big, night-and-day improve-
ment to her offensive game comes because of
the coaching staff at CSM. And while the
credit should indeed go to Borg and her staff,
Fiames breakthrough season is incredible
considering its out of nowhere nature.
Fiame has slowly moved up the CSM line-
up and Borg said putting the former Tiger into
the four slot of the lineup was a conscious
move. While it may only look like one spot on
top of her accustomed fth place in the order,
the power position in the CSM lineup is one
full of added weight, pressure and responsi-
bility especially in a program ripe with
talent like CSMs. Fiame has taken the pro-
motion in stride.
Pilster (Capuchino) won her state-leading
21st game, striking out six to increase her
state lead in that category to 137. Her won-
loss record is now 21-2 after the West Valley
victory.
Selina Rodriquez (El Camino) went 3-for-4,
had an RBI and scored three runs. Mikayla
Conlin went 3-for-3 with a run and an RBI.
Natalie Saucedo (Burlingame) and Jamie
Navarro (Capuchino) each had two hits and
scored runs as part of a 16-hit barrage.
CSM, the states winningest team is now
28-3, 7-2 in Coast North play leading
Foothill College (19-10, 7-3) by a half game.
West Valley is 22-5-1, 4-4 in Coast South.
The Vikings are ranked No. 3 in Northern
California and No. 6 in the state. CSM is No.
1 in both polls, including a unanimous choice
as the top team in the north.
Taking the loss for West Valley was Ellie
Kristensen (18-4), who trails only Pilster in
wins among the states 85 teams. She gave up
16 hits and 11 earned runs and failed to strike-
out any San Mateo player.
The states top four pitchers in total victo-
ries are all from the very tough Coast
Conference.
CSM TRACK
At the De Anza Invitational, CSM sopho-
more Roman Skovronski ran the No. 2 time in
the state in the 400 meter hurdles, 53.40, and
freshman Kevin Kutchera had the No. 4 time,
54.18. Kutchera also has the No. 9 time in the
110 meter high hurdles, 15.14, posted the pre-
vious week.
Sophomore Evan McDaniel threw the dis-
cus 156-7 for the third best mark in the state.
He continues to lead the state in the shot put
(54-10).
Freshman Moreen Pahulu improved her
state ranking in both the discus throw, No. 21
at 117-1, and the shot put, No. 34 at 33-10.
Continued from page 11
CSM
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
Brandon Belt
By Rob Maadi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUNEDIN, Fla. Jose Reyes
bounced around the clubhouse
exuding his usual energy and joked
with a few teammates before putting
on his Toronto Blue Jays uniform.
Back from helping the Dominican
Republic win the World Baseball
Classic, Reyes is eager to help his
new team contend in a tough AL
East. Theres no WBC hangover for
the four-time All-Star shortstop.
I dont want to play down. I want
to play the same way I played in the
WBC because the season is right
around the corner, Reyes said
Friday. Im going to continue to
work on my game and be ready to
go.
Reyes was back in the leadoff
spot in Torontos lineup for the rst
time since March 2. He went 0 for 1
with two walks in a 1-0 win over
Boston. Blue Jays designated hitter
Edwin Encarnacion also returned to
the team after playing for the
Dominican Republic. He didnt start
against the Red Sox because of a
nger injury.
The laid-back atmosphere at
spring training doesnt compare to
the intensity level of the WBC
games where theres so much pride
at stake playing for your country.
While Reyes doesnt need much
motivation, other players could take
a little time to adjust.
Im sure itll be a little bit of a
letdown, Blue Jays manager John
Gibbons said. Im sure theyre glad
to be back with their team. A guy
like Reyes, hes enthusiastic about
everything he does.
Robinson Cano, the MVP of the
WBC, returned to the New York
Yankees on Thursday, and picked up
their only hit in a loss to Minnesota
on Thursday night. The four-time
All-Star second baseman is even
more important to the Yankees now
that theyre missing Alex
Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira and
Curtis Granderson, and Derek
Jeters status is uncertain.
I want to play the game the same
way with the same intensity, he
said. Its a different mindset in
spring training than playing in the
WBC. You dont want to overdo it.
You have to go out there and play
hard and prepare for the season.
Tony Pena, the Yankees bench
coach, managed the Dominican
Republic to the island nations rst
international title in its third try. He
stressed to his players the impor-
tance of working hard and carrying
their success over into the regular
season with their major league
teams.
We talked about them keeping
the intensity, Pena said. In the
WBC, they played with so much
emotion. Hopefully they continue
the same thing.
The Minnesota Twins had 13
players compete in the WBC, tied
with Milwaukee for most in the
majors. Manager Ron Gardenhire
hasnt noticed his guys lacking
focus or playing with any less ener-
gy since returning.
SPORTS 15
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
@Wild
11a.m.
CSN-CAL
3/23

4/3
@Oilers
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/20

4/1
vs.Detroit
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/28
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/30
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/25
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/27
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/30
@Hornets
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/18
@Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/20
vs.Wizards
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
3/23
@Ducks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/25
vs. Ducks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/27
vs. Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
3/23
@Houston
5:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
3/30
vs.Vancouver
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/6
@Portland
7:30p.m.
NBCSPORTS
4/14
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-New York 41 26 .612
x-Brooklyn 40 28 .588 1 1/2
Boston 36 32 .529 5 1/2
Philadelphia 26 42 .382 15 1/2
Toronto 26 43 .377 16
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 54 14 .794
Atlanta 38 31 .551 16 1/2
Washington 24 43 .358 29 1/2
Orlando 18 52 .257 37
Charlotte 16 52 .235 38
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 43 26 .623
Chicago 36 31 .537 6
Milwaukee 34 34 .500 8 1/2
Detroit 23 47 .329 20 1/2
Cleveland 22 47 .319 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 53 16 .768
Memphis 46 22 .676 6 1/2
Houston 38 31 .551 15
Dallas 33 36 .478 20
New Orleans 24 46 .343 29 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 51 19 .729
x-Denver 48 22 .686 3
Utah 34 35 .493 16 1/2
Portland 33 36 .478 17 1/2
Minnesota 23 43 .348 26
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Clippers 47 22 .681
Golden State 39 31 .557 8 1/2
L.A. Lakers 36 33 .522 11
Sacramento 25 44 .362 22
Phoenix 23 46 .333 24
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
ThursdaysGames
Portland 99, Chicago 89
Denver 101, Philadelphia 100
Sacramento 101, Minnesota 98
FridaysGames
New York 99,Toronto 94
Indiana 102, Milwaukee 78
Oklahoma City 97, Orlando 89
Portland 104, Atlanta 93
NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 32 24 8 0 48 114 83
New Jersey 31 14 11 6 34 78 85
N.Y. Rangers 30 15 13 2 32 71 73
N.Y. Islanders 31 13 15 3 29 90 105
Philadelphia 30 13 16 1 27 81 92
Northeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 30 20 5 5 45 97 75
Boston 29 20 6 3 43 84 61
Ottawa 31 16 9 6 38 78 67
Toronto 31 16 12 3 35 94 90
Buffalo 31 12 15 4 28 84 99
Southeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Winnipeg 32 16 14 2 34 81 96
Carolina 30 15 13 2 32 85 86
Washington 31 14 16 1 29 89 88
Tampa Bay 30 13 16 1 27 98 90
Florida 31 9 16 6 24 77 111
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 30 24 3 3 51 102 66
St. Louis 29 16 11 2 34 87 83
Detroit 30 14 11 5 33 80 79
Columbus 31 13 12 6 32 73 80
Nashville 31 12 13 6 30 75 84
Northwest Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 29 17 10 2 36 77 71
Vancouver 30 15 9 6 36 83 83
Edmonton 29 11 11 7 29 72 85
Calgary 29 11 14 4 26 82 101
Colorado 29 11 14 4 26 75 92
PacicDivision
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 29 22 3 4 48 99 71
Los Angeles 30 17 11 2 36 88 75
San Jose 29 13 10 6 32 71 77
Dallas 30 14 13 3 31 78 88
Phoenix 31 13 14 4 30 80 87
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
ThursdaysGames
Buffalo 5,Toronto 4, SO
Montreal 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
Florida 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
New Jersey 4, Carolina 1
FridaysGames
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Columbus 5, Calgary 1
Washington 6,Winnipeg 1
Detroit at Anaheim, late
NHL GLANCE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 18 6 .750
Baltimore 15 6 .714
Seattle 17 7 .708
Cleveland 15 9 .625
Tampa Bay 14 10 .583
Detroit 14 11 .560
Boston 14 12 .538
Chicago 11 10 .524
Minnesota 12 12 .500
Texas 12 12 .500
Oakland 10 12 .455
Houston 10 13 .435
Toronto 10 14 .417
New York 10 16 .385
Los Angeles 6 13 .316
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Atlanta 16 11 .593
Colorado 11 10 .524
St. Louis 12 11 .522
San Diego 13 14 .481
Arizona 12 13 .480
Washington 11 12 .478
San Francisco 10 11 .476
Philadelphia 11 13 .458
Miami 10 12 .455
New York 9 11 .450
Chicago 12 15 .444
Los Angeles 10 14 .417
Pittsburgh 10 14 .417
Milwaukee 9 13 .409
Cincinnati 8 15 .348
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings;
games against non-major league teams do not.
WednesdaysGames
Toronto 3,Tampa Bay 1
St. Louis 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Milwaukee 3
Oakland 10, Cincinnati 9
L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs (ss) 4
Cleveland 5, Arizona 4
Houston 7, Detroit 2
Atlanta 4,Washington 3
Boston 6, Philadelphia 1
Baltimore 0, Pittsburgh 0, tie, 10 innings
Minnesota 6, N.Y.Yankees 1
FridaysGames
Baltimore vs.Tampa Bay (ss) at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
10:05 a.m.
Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
10:05 a.m.
Boston vs.Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
MLB SPRING TRAINING
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
HOUSTONASTROS Optioned INF Jake Elmore
to Oklahoma City (PCL).
MINNESOTATWINSPlacedLHPScott Diamond
and RHP Anthony Swarzak on the 15-day DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS Optioned OF Carlos
Peguero to Tacoma (PCL). Reassigned RHP Carson
Smith and INF Nick Franklin to their minor league
camp.
TEXASRANGERS Optioned RHP Justin Grimm
to Round Rock (PCL).
TORONTOBLUEJAYS Claimed RHP Todd Red-
mond off waivers from Baltimore and optioned
him to Buffalo (IL).
National League
CHICAGOCUBS Optioned LHP Chris Rusin to
their minor league camp.Assigned RHP Drew Car-
penter, Jaye Chapman, RHP Casey Coleman, RHP
Jensen Lewis, RHP Blake Parker, INF Edwin
Maysonet,INF Brad Nelson,OF Brian Bogusevic,OF
Johermyn Chavez and OF Darnell McDonald to
their minor league camp.
CINCINNATI REDS Reassigned RHP Armando
Galarraga to their minor league camp.
FLORIDAMARLINS Re-assigned OF Christian
Yelich,RHP Jonathan Albaladejo and C Jake Jeffries
to their minor league camp. Optioned RHP Tom
Koehler to New Orleans (PCL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned RHP Bryan
Morris to Indianapolis (IL).Reassigned INF Ivan De-
Jesus Jr. and INF Jared Goedert to their minor
league camp.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Released RHP
Ramon Ramirez and INF Wilson Valdez.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned RHP
Cole Kimball to Syracuse (IL). Re-assigned RHP Je-
remy Accardo to their minor league camp.Agreed
to terms with LHP J.C. Romero on a minor league
contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MIAMI HEATSignedFJuwanHowardfor there-
mainder of the season.
WomensNational Basketball Association
NEWYORKLIBERTY Named Barbara Farris,Taj
McWilliams-Franklin assistant coaches and Teresa
Weatherspoon and Tamika Whitmore associate
coaches.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGOBEARS Agreed to terms with LB D.J.
Williams on a one-year contract.
CLEVELANDBROWNS Signed TE Kellen Davis
and DB Chris Owens to one-year contracts.
HOUSTONTEXANS Signed S Ed Reed.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
CAROLINAHURRICANES Reassigned C Riley
Nash to Charlotte (AHL).
DALLAS STARS Assigned F Alex Chiasson to
Texas (AHL).
MONTREALCANADIENSRecalledFMikeBlun-
den from Hamilton (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Assigned F Craig
Smith to Milwaukee (AHL) on a conditioning as-
signment.
PHOENIXCOYOTESAssignedDChrisSummers
to Portland (AHL).
ST.LOUISBLUES Traded F Matt DAgostini and
aconditional 2015seventh-rounddraft picktoNew
Jersey for a conditional 2015 fth-round draft pick.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Assigned G Mark
Owuya from Toronto (AHL) to Reading (AHL).
SOCCER
Major LeagueSoccer
NEWYORKREDBULLS Signed G Kevin Hart-
man.
TRANSACTIONS
World Baseball Classic players look to sustain success
16
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
468 Grand St.
Redwood City
650 366-5892
www.redeemerministries.org
WORLD 17
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
OUTDOOR SUNRISE SERVICE
6 AM COYOTE PT PARK
EUCALYPTUS SITE 2
CHURCH SERVICES WITH
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FREE CHILD CARE
By Menlaos Hadjicostis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NICOSIA, Cyprus
Lawmakers in Cyprus approved
three key bills Friday that aim to
raise enough money to qualify the
country for a broader bailout pack-
age and help it avoid financial ruin
in mere days.
A total of nine bills were
approved, including a key one on
restructuring the countrys ailing
banks, which lost billions on bad
Greek debt; one on restricting
financial transactions in times of
crisis; and one that sets up a sol-
idarity fund into which invest-
ments and contributions will
flow.
More bills to meet the total target
of 5.8 billion euros ($7.5 billion)
Cyprus needs to secure an interna-
tional bailout will be brought for a
vote over the weekend.
They include a crucial one that
would impose a tax of less than 1
percent on all bank deposits, said
Averof Neophytou, deputy head of
the governing DISY party.
We are voting for the least
worst option, Neophytou said in a
speech. We owe an apology to the
Cypriot people because we all
share in the responsibility of
bringing this place to this state.
Approval of the tax would come
just days after Parliament decisive-
ly turned down a plan that would
have seized up to 10 percent of
peoples bank deposits. The plan
triggered an outcry from people
who condemned it as an unfair
grab of their life savings, while
politicians saw it as causing
irreparable damage to the coun-
trys financial center status.
Nonetheless, ordinary Cypriots
have said they would willingly
sacrifice a portion of their savings
to save the country just as long
as somebody doesnt impose it on
them.
If we have Europes support so
our banks wont collapse, I would-
nt have a problem with a deposit
tax, said pensioner Demetrakis
Papanicolaou, 64. But we need to
hear this not only from our govern-
ment, but from the Europeans.
Cyprus lawmakers approve key bills for bailout
18
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Institute study found flame-retardant chemi-
cals in household dust samples and Blums
report showed children and domestic pets
could have higher levels of retardants in
their systems.
Were concerned that these toxic chemi-
cals have been added to furniture in our
homes, in our community ... there are effects
to our health, said Ana Mascarenas, policy
and communications director for Physicians
for Social Responsibility.
Based on continuing research and growing
concern, the governor instructed the Bureau
of Electronic and Appliance Repair, Home
Furnishings and Thermal Insulation to
assess the antiquated standard. In February,
the bureau returned a proposed update now
known as TB 117-2013.
The update changes the requirements of
upholstered furniture to withstand smolder-
ing instead of an open flame. Materials
would undergo exposure to a lit cigarette as
an ignition source. A specimen passes the
test if smoldering ceases after a cigarette
burns its full length, a char doesnt radiate
more than 1.8 inches from the cigarette and
the smoldering doesnt turn into an open
flame.
I think anyone could clearly see the wis-
dom in moving from the current fire safety
standard, said Leno, D-San Francisco.
Leno has authored several bills relating to
Californias flammability standard. In 2011,
Lenos Senate Bill 147 would have allowed
consumers to opt out of purchasing furniture
and baby products that contain toxic chemi-
cal fire retardants.
Leno faced opposition from the flame
retardant industry and claims powerful lob-
byists are using tactics dating back to the
tobacco industry. Operating under the guise
of the Californians for Fire Safety Institute,
these out-of-state advocates were made up
by three major chemical companies;
Albermarle Corp., Chemtura Corp. and ICL
Industrial Products. Their fear tactics
included graphic images of burning children
and led the public to withdraw in fear, Leno
said.
They spent $6 million in radio, televi-
sion, full page color ads in newspapers,
mailers [and] robo-calls to constituents
telling them to contact their legislature and
vote no on our bill, Leno said.
CFSI allegedly paid expert witnesses to lie
during testimony in Sacramento by citing
purportedly related deaths that never
occurred, Leno said.
In 2012, CFSI elected to conduct their
advocacy efforts through the American
Chemistry Councils North American Flame
Retardant Alliance. NAFRA members con-
tinue to be comprised of leading chemical
manufacturers; however, NAFRA could not
comment on the previous actions of the
CFSI.
Californias Proposition 65 requires busi-
nesses to label items that contain, in any
amount, chemicals known to cause cancer,
birth defects or other reproductive harm.
This is a motivating factor of the current
debate, said Jackson Morrill, NAFRA panel
manager. Advancements in testing have
allowed detection of these chemicals in very
low amounts; what should be taken into con-
sideration is the amount a person can be
exposed to without suffering significant risk,
Morrill said.
The issue has been oversimplified; not all
flame retardants are the same and each
needs to be addressed independently, Morrill
said.
It is important to remember that flame
retardants are subject to review by scientists
at regulatory agencies, Morrill said.
Based on a Tulchin Research 2012 tele-
phone poll of likely voters, Morrill believes
the flame retardants role in fire safety is
critical to the public. Of the 800 polled, 79
percent believed flame retardants used in
household products improve public safety
and 54 percent opposed changing the fire
safety standards to a smolder-only test. It is
unclear as to whether the toxicity of the
chemicals was taken into consideration.
Fire safety is getting lost in the discus-
sion. Fire standards should be designed to
keep people safe from fire. But, in this
instance, they are being misused in an
attempt to regulate chemicals, Morrill said.
Firefighters who already face danger in
the pursuit of public safety have high expo-
sure rates and are dying in exponential num-
bers due to the toxic fumes these chemicals
emit when burned, Leno said. These are
aspects to be considered with fire safety pro-
tocol, Leno said.
Banning the use of certain chemicals
should be the work of the Department of
Toxic Substances Control, not the bureaus
fire science division, said John McCormack,
a fire safety consultant for NAFRA and a
retired bureau employee. A consumers
health and the need for fire safety are not
incompatible and McCormack hopes the
hearing on TB 117-2013 will not be a detri-
ment to fire safety.
Still, both Leno and Mascarenas support
the revised standards and hope the public is
better armed to combat the outdated TB 117
for the good of future generations.
Weve put known or potential carcino-
gens in our homes and are exposing our chil-
dren during critical windows of develop-
ment, Mascarenas said.
They point to evidence that shows these
chemicals have been found in breast milk
and in toddlers. The update extends exemp-
tions to include infant mattresses, high
chairs, booster and car seats, strollers, infant
carriers and nursing pillows.
These chemicals are bio-pervasive and
bio-accumulative and considered a global
pollutant with high levels found in marine
life. Fire safety measures that lead to chem-
ical requirements should consider the infil-
tration into soil and water, update propo-
nents said.
Studies have been done that show theses
toxic flame retardants in fact not only dont
protect us from the fire, but are causing great
health and environmental damage, Leno
said.
Leno is hopeful for the revision and
expects the analysis will conclude in
August. He will ask the regulation to be
placed into state law; unable to be dismissed
under future administrations.
But there are lasting effects. Even if TB
117-2013 passes, there is the fact that all of
this furniture is already in our homes and
offices it will be hard to get rid of, Leno
said.
It may be difficult and more expensive to
find furniture without flame-retardant chem-
icals at first; but if TB 117-2013 passes,
manufacturers will quickly change the way
they produce their furniture, Leno said.
And this isnt just an issue in California.
Many manufacturers follow Californias
guidelines nationwide because it doesnt
make sense to produce furniture exclusively
for the state.
Just as the California market exacerbated
the problem with the current TB 117, prolif-
erating these chemicals everywhere, the
opposite will be true with this new regula-
tion, Leno said.
The public hearing concerning TB 117-
2013 will take place 10 a.m. March 26 on
1625 North Market Blvd., in Sacramento.
Continued from page 1
SAFETY
By Chloee Weiner
S
enioritis is a prevalent disease
amongst students in the second
semester of their nal year of high
school. With college apps turned in and the
end of high school in sight, many seniors nd
it difcult to maintain their focus. At my high
school, the administration has tried to combat
this so-called senioritis
with a mandatory semes-
ter-long assignment
called senior projects.
Seniors are given from
January to May to work
on a project of their
choice under the guid-
ance of a member of the
Crystal Springs Uplands
School faculty. Aside from a few check-ins
with mentors and mandatory journal entries,
however, students are almost completely
responsible for sticking to their own timeline
to ensure their project is complete on time.
Although projects are introduced as a way for
students to leave their legacy to the school,
they often have little to do with school.
Topics often range from practicing yoga to
telescope-building and students are allowed
to pursue their individual interests as long as
the project proposal is feasible and well
thought-out. While some slightly duplicitous
seniors in the past have tried to get away with
pretending to learn instruments at which they
were already procient or pass off playing
their favorite video game as a viable project,
most seniors take the projects as an opportu-
nity to learn about something they havent
been taught in school. One student just get-
ting started on a volunteer project is happy to
nally be able to explore their interests
rather than focus only on classroom-based
learning.
While Im just getting started on my proj-
ect, a docudrama Im attempting to write and
lm, some of my peers have been developing
Fighting
senioritis
Veronica Mars
Films campaign
rattles movie industry
SEE PAGE 20
Learn about U.S. Immigration
Free immigration seminar series presented
by U.S. immigration ofcers includes
explanation of new immigrant services,
how to apply for U.S. citizenship, how to
avoid immigration scams and an
immigration interview module.The session
will be given in both English and Chinese
(both Mandarin and Cantonese).The
seminar takes place 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at the Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave., in Millbrae. 697-7607. Free.
Weigand Gallerys
Opening Reception
Weigand Gallerys Opening Reception for
Hank Pitcher Paintings: A 40-Year Survey.
The reception takes place 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday at the Weigand Gallery, Notre
Dame de Namur University, 1500 Ralston
Ave., in Belmont.The gallery is open
Tuesday to Saturday, noon to 4 p.m.The
exhibit runs until April 20.
www.wiegandgallery.org. Free.
Music and Dance
A Family Concert with the Berkeley Ballet.
The concert takes place 3:30 p.m. Sunday
at the College of San Mateo Theater, 1700
W. Hillsdale Blvd., Building 3, in San Mateo.
(415) 692-3367. Free.
Best bets
See STUDENT, Page 22
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kratos is angry.
Thats all you need to know
about the motivation of the
durable protagonist of Sonys
God of War series. Yes, the
Spartan warrior got tricked
into murdering his wife and
daughter, but hes been ram-
paging across ancient Greece
for ve games now. Given the
thousands of corpses hes left
behind, youd think hed have
sated his thirst for vengeance.
Instead, God of War:
Ascension (for the
PlayStation 3, $59.99) brings
back the old grouch for anoth-
er round of bone-crunching,
head-splitting mayhem. A
prequel to 2005s original
God, the new adventure
begins with Kratos chained to
a rock and tormented by
Furies. Once he escapes, he
resumes his bloodthirsty cam-
Kratos is angry
See KRATOS, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK After years
of hope, stalled efforts and stu-
dio frustration, Veronica
Mars creator Rob Thomas
watched a long-held dream
come to fruition in a sudden
digital rush.
There were a few minutes of
nothing happening, he says.
Then in an hour, watching that
ticker go was mesmerizing. I had an
attention span of, like, four seconds
because everything on my computer
screen I wanted to look at at the
same time. The Twitter feed was
going crazy, the emails were going
crazy and then watching that
Kickstarter total go up.
Thomas last week launched a
Kickstarter campaign to fund a
movie of his cult TV show, which
was canceled after three seasons in
2007. It met its stated goal of raising
$2 million in less than 11 hours,
meaning it would be greenlit to
begin shooting this summer. Its sur-
passed $3.7 million with more than
two weeks still to go.
The resounding, immediate suc-
cess of the crowd-funding campaign
sent shockwaves through the movie
business. Films had found much-
needed financial support on
Kickstarter before, but Veronica
Mars is different. Its a studio proj-
ect, owned by Warner Bros., which
produced the show.
The money given by the fervent
fans of Veronica Mars, which
starred Kristen Bell as a teenage pri-
vate eye, will go not to a lmmaker
operating on his own, but one with
the distribution and marketing mus-
cle of a very large corporation
just one that hadnt previously been
convinced to bankroll a Veronica
Mars lm.
Were donating fans spurring a
goliath to action, or its unwitting
pawns?
The wide majority of Veronica
Mars fans couldnt care less. They
will get the movie they craved, as
well as the proud feeling of having
played an essential role in the
shows resurrection. Maryland fan
Matt Clipp typied the eager con-
tributors, writing: I am MORE than
happy to donate $100 to this project.
This movie has been a dream of
mine ever since the series ended
back in 2007. ... LETS GET THIS
THING MADE, VERONICA
MARS FANS!
While the emotional side is surely
the biggest motivation for most
donors, theyre also paying for tan-
gible goods. Rewards range from an
emailed copy of the script ($10 con-
tributions), all the way up to a
speaking part in the lm as a waiter
who says, Your check, sir, (a sin-
gle $10,000 donation). All money is
refunded if for any reason the lm
doesnt get made.
Most of the people who are
pledging are getting in at the $35
and $50 range where theyre getting
a download of the movie, a T-shirt, a
copy of the script at $35, and all of
that plus the DVD and the making-
of documentary at the $50 price
point, says Thomas. So I dont
think anyones being taken advan-
tage of. I feel like the rewards are
worth it.
Typically in lm nancing, any
investor has the chance to earn his
money back and potentially share in
the profits. Slate claimed the
Veronica Mars project sets a ter-
rible precedent.
Joss Whedon, whose devoted fan-
boy following is similar, if larger,
than Thomas, said that he reacted in
unfettered joy at the Veronica
Mars Kickstarter campaign.
Veronica Mars campaign rattles movie industry
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
GARRY WINOGRAND RETROSPEC-
TIVE AT SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF
MODERN ART. The rst major touring exhi-
bition in 25 years of work by artist Garry
Winogrand (1928-1984) photographer of New
York City and of American Life from the 1950s
through the early 1980s brings together
Winogrands most iconic images with newly
printed photographs from the never seen archive
of his later work. The 300 images now on dis-
play at the San Francisco Museum of Modern
Art show every aspect of human life and include
photographs from Winogrands travels around
the United States as well as his better known
New York City images. Exhibition guest curator
Leo Rubinen said, Winogrand was an artistic
descendent of Walker Evans and Robert Frank,
but differed sharply from them. He admired
Franks The Americans, but felt the work
missed the main story of its time, which in his
mind was the emergence of suburban prosperity
and isolation. The hope and buoyancy of mid-
dle-class life in postwar America is half of the
emotional heart of Winogrands work. The other
half is the sense of undoing. The tension
between these qualities gives his work its dis-
tinctive character.
Toward the end of Winogrands life, he spoke
of reviewing and re-editing all of his photo-
graphs, but he was unable to accomplish this
and left behind more that 2,500 rolls of exposed
but underdeveloped lm and an additional 4,100
rolls that he had processed but never seen an
estimated total of 250,000 images that have
remained virtually unknown. SFMOMA
Assistant Curator of Photography Erin OToole
said, One reason that Winogrand is only now
receiving the full retrospective treatment
already devoted to peers of his era, including
Diana Arbus, Lee Friedander and Robert Frank,
is that any truly comprehensive consideration of
his lifes work requires contending with the
practical and ethical issues surrounding the vast
archive he left behind. In the absence of explic-
it instructions from him regarding how he want-
ed his work to be handled after he was gone, its
posthumous treatment has been the subject of
ongoing debate and raises provocative questions
about the creative process and its relationship to
issues specic to the medium. Curator OToole
speaks about the artists work at noon April 2 in
SFMOMAs Phyllis Wattis Theater. Program
admission is free.
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is
located at 151 Third St., near the Moscone
Center. A free gallery tour at 1:30 p.m. daily
focuses on this exhibition. A free mobile tour
the uses archival audio of the artist and inter-
views with curators is available daily in the
Haas Atrium with the deposit of a drivers
license or state ID. For more information call
(415) 357-4000 or visit www.sfmoma.org.
Garry Winogrand runs through June 2.
***
A TRIPTYCH OF TAPESTRIES. De
Young Artist Fellows Andy Diaz Hope and
Laurel Roth exhibit their triptych of tapestries,
The Conicts, completed during their year-long
fellowship at the museum. Inspired by the
famous Unicorn Tapestries at The Cloisters in
New York, the work is structured on the three
fundamental conicts in literature: human ver-
sus nature, human versus himself/herself and
human versus human. The Kimball Education
Gallery is open for viewing Tuesdays to
Sundays, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Fridays until 8:45
p.m. Information about talks related to the tap-
estries can be found at deyoungmuseum.org.
The de Young Museum is located at
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive in San
Franciscos Golden Gate Park.
***
GET REEL APRIL 4 WITH NIGHTLIFE
AT THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Every
Thursday from 6 p.m to 10 p.m., adults ages 21
and up gather at the Academy of Sciences in
Golden Gate Park for an evening of music, cut-
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE UM
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Chatting at the March 6 press preview at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Arts Garry
Winogrand exhibit are Guest Curator and Photographer Leo Rubinen, left, and SFMOMA
Assistant Curator of Photography Erin OToole.
See MUSEUM, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
paign against the capricious Greek
deities.
That means more of the brutal combat
for which this franchise is known, with
Kratos wielding his Blades of Chaos,
twin knives attached to his arms with
retractable chains. The game occasionally
drops limited-use weapons, like clubs or
javelins, in your path, but the Blades
which can be tipped with re, ice, light-
ing or the soul of Hades are usually
enough to get the job done.
Most of the melees in Ascension
begin with Kratos suddenly surrounded
by swarms of low-level monsters that can
be easily dispatched. The big lug is sur-
prisingly graceful, and once you get into
a rhythm of attacking, dodging and leap-
ing, the combat is as smooth as ever.
It starts feeling creaky, though, when
you get to the bombastic boss battles.
These typically involve beasts many
times Kratos size, so you just have to
keep hacking away until you soften them
up. Then the action shifts to quick-time
events, in which you have to press but-
tons to match onscreen prompts a
technique that short-circuits your rhythm
and effectively takes control away from
you.
The carnage is occasionally interrupted
by gigantic spaces in which you have to
gure out how to get Kratos to the exit.
Most of these puzzle rooms are fairly
trite, requiring an all-too-familiar formula
of block pushing, switch pulling and wall
climbing, although they get more interest-
ing toward the end after Kratos has found
some magic artifacts.
The story here is the series weakest
yet. Six games in, the creators have pret-
ty much used up all the cool Greek gods
Kratos has already killed Zeus, Ares,
Poseidon, Hades and a few dozen more
so were left with third-stringers like
the Scribe of Hecatonchires. And the
writers dont do themselves any favors by
telling the story of Ascension as a series
of ashbacks and ash-forwards. The
result is an incoherent mess thats proba-
bly more satisfying if you forget about the
plot and just enjoy it as a series of am-
boyant set pieces.
Ascension nally introduces online
action to the franchise, so if youve been
dying to see a bunch of Kratos-like meat-
heads beating on each other, youre in
luck. There are the standard multiplayer
contests deathmatch, capture-the-ag
and a co-op mode in which you ght
waves of increasingly powerful beasts
but theyre livened up by occasional
interference by the gods themselves.
The latest God of War is as gory as
ever. If you dont know the meaning of
visceral, you will after youve disem-
boweled a centaur. And it suffers from a
lack of humor, treating Kratos travails
and torments with an unwarranted degree
of gravity. Theres the occasional
glimpse of camp say, when Kratos
rides a giant snake through a tunnel, but
even then I wasnt sure the designers
realized how ridiculous the story is.
Frankly, the tormented Spartan seems
more exhausted than bloodthirsty, and its
time Sony gave him a rest. Two stars out
of four.
Continued from page 19
KRATOS
their ideas from the rst day of the
school year in a new class called the
Ideas Fellowship. Ideas Fellows start an
entrepreneurial project during their rst
semester and stick with it through the
rest of the year. Along the way, they
learn how to gain investments, evaluate
others work and also hear from guest
speakers with years of experience as
venture capitalists at startups in the
Silicon Valley and Bay Area. Recently
the co-founder of the popular website
Reddit, Steve Huffman, came and spoke
not only to the Ideas Fellows, but all
other interested students. He urged his
audience of students to take advantage
of the entrepreneurial spirit of the Bay
Area and its surroundings. With expo-
sure to Huffman and independent proj-
ects, second semester senior year has
offered opportunity for more practical
learning than the usual textbooks and
assessments. One CSUS student partic-
ularly values the independence of sen-
ior projects, explaining that the projects
require time management without the
structure of set deadlines and due
dates. Most students also agree that
exploring areas outside of core subjects
taught in high school gives them a
chance to narrow down what they might
want to pursue after graduation.
While senior projects are assigned in
January, most students realistically do
the bulk of the work during May when
they are no longer required to attend
classes. The projects, in past years,
have been successful in keeping seniors
engaged in school in their last months
before graduation without enforcing
strict guidelines especially because
they are graded as pass-fail rather than
by percentages or letter-grades. The
projects and introduction to learning
that isnt based on a lesson plan gives
students the opportunity to get a taste of
their futures, making the projects feel
less like a requirement and more like
valuable preparation for the future. As
one senior puts it, they only wish that
assignments like these projects had
been introduced earlier in their academ-
ic careers to give students an inde-
pendent academic experience that more
accurately mirrors their adult lives.
Chloee Weiner is a senior at Crystal Springs
Uplands School. Student News appears in
the weekend edition. You can email Student
News at news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
ting-edge science, food and cocktails.
April 4 is Reel to Real NightLife with a
peek at the magic of lmmaking with cin-
ematic goodies curated by the San
Francisco Film Society in advance of its
56th Annual International Film Festival.
Hear a live table reading of the play
Beasts of the Southern Wild and join a
discussion about the Oscar-nominated
lms production process and a special
Q&A moderated by Zoetrope. See The
Love Competition, a short documentary
about measuring different kinds of love,
and then try out various love-testing
devices for yourself. Watch the short ani-
mated puppet lm The Cicada Princess,
and see the hand-made sets and puppets
portrayed in the lm, along with cicadas
from the Academys research collections.
In the coral reef, see Sue Costabile com-
pose a live cinematic program from
images and sounds before your very eyes.
Then enjoy screenings of the Prelinger
Archives favorite campy educational sci-
ence lms. Topping it off are the VJ
stylings of Peanut Butter WolfDJ, hip-
hop producer, and the founder of hip-hop
label Stones Throw Records. California
Academy of Sciences, 55 Music
Concourse Drive, Golden Gate Park, San
Francisco. $12 per person ($10 for
Academy members). Tickets available at
the door or online at https://tickets.cala-
cademy.org/store/?storeName=nightLife.
Details Available at
www.calacademy.org/nightlife.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susanci-
tyscene.
Continued from page 21
MUSEUM
ABCs This Week 8 a.m.
Jim Messina, manager of President Barack Obamas re-
election campaign; Republican consultant Karl Rove.
NBCs Meet the Press 8 a.m.
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg; Wayne LaPierre,
executive vice president of the National Rie Association;
David Boies, one of the lawyers challenging Californias
Proposition 8, which bans same-sex marriage, before the
Supreme Court.
CBS Face the Nation 8:30 a.m.
Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich.; Evan Wolfson, president of
Freedom to Marry;Tony Perkins, president of Family
Research Council; Austin Nimocks, senior counsel at
Alliance Defending Freedom; Baltimore Ravens linebacker
Brendan Ayanbadejo, an advocate of same-sex marriage.
CNNs State of the Union 3 p.m.
Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki; Gov. John
Hickenlooper, D-Colo.; California Attorney General Kamala
Harris; Peter Gaytan, executive director of the American
Legion;Tom Tarantino, chief policy ofcer for Iraq and
Afghanistan Veterans of America.
Fox News Sunday 8 a.m.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.; Gary Bauer, president of American
Values.
Sunday news shows
Official: New York tax
breaks would apply to Tonight
ALBANY, N.Y. If New York isnt trying hard to lure The
Tonight Show back to Manhattan, its doing a pretty good
impression.
A Cuomo administration ofcial said Thursday that New York
is trying to lure TV shows from California with a proposed tax
credit program and the Tonight show would qualify if it
decides to move back to Manhattan. The show moved to
Burbank in 1972 when Johnny Carson was host.
But there is no deal with NBC or the Tonight show, and the
ofcial wouldnt say if the state is trying to attract the show. The
person wasnt authorized to comment on any potential deals and
spoke to the Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.
Still, a bill in Gov. Andrew Cuomos pending budget looks
like its all about Tonight, without ever mentioning the iconic
show that began broadcasting in the 1950s from Manhattan and
has featured a series of popular hosts Jack Parr, Steve Allen,
Carson, and the current Jay Leno.
The bill expected to be voted into law in coming days would
provide a 30 percent tax credit for a relocated television pro-
duction. Past and current tax credits have gone to new produc-
tions starting in New York, such as Law & Order.
People in the news
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Todd McCarthy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES In a week when North Korea posted a
homemade video showing the U.S. Capitol building being
destroyed by a missile, what more logical response could
Hollywood offer than a macho thriller about a Secret Service
agent who takes on North Korean terrorists who attack the
White House? The rst of two similarly themed action dramas
set for this year (White House Down arrives in June),
Olympus Has Fallen will put to the test the question of
whether American audiences are ready, 12 years after 9-11, to
watch, strictly as disposable popcorn entertainment, a lm in
which the United States and some of its most prominent land-
marks are devastated by foreign terrorists.
The answer almost undoubtedly will be yes, as the tough-
guy former agent played by Gerard Butler gets to kick a whole
lot of badass butt while trying to rescue the president.
Although this is the sort of lm in which the fate of the world
hinges, when all is said and done, on the outcome of a one-on-
one martial arts contest, director Antoine Fuquas notably
bloody child of Die Hard still generates a fair amount of ten-
sion and produces the kind of nationalistic outrage that rock-
ribbed Americans will feel in their guts. Foreign revenue
should be hefty as well, especially in countries where many
viewers will get a thrill watching Washington get the sort of
treatment usually reserved for places like Baghdad and Kabul.
Either due to incredible clairvoyance on the parts of rst-
time screenwriters Creighton Rothenberger and Katrin
Benedikt or just through one of those twists of fate, the lm
arrives just as North Korea has made anti-U.S. saber-rattling
an almost daily exercise. So it seems uncannily timely that the
brilliant bad guy here is a (supposedly) rogue North Korean
who leads a bunch of skilled commandos on a raid of the
White House that nets them the president and several key
members of his staff as hostages. No doubt bootleg copies of
the lm will make their way to Kim Jong Un, who might be
simultaneously offended and delighted at the opportunity to
further rouse his subjects by showing them how much the
enemy hates them.
At its core, however, Olympus is like an 80s or 90s genre
item in which Clint Eastwood, Bruce Willis or Mel Gibson
outwitted and outmuscled shrewd, more formidably armed
opponents. Like Eastwood in In the Line of Fire, Butler
(who also produced) plays a disgraced presidential agent side-
lined and haunted by a uky failure (detailed in a 10-minute
prologue) who suddenly and inadvertently nds himself back
in the thick of a crisis.
Farahnaz Morshedzadeh, Peninsula YMCA staff member and
liaison; and Joyce Hanna, program director and associate
director of Stanford School of Medicines Health
Improvement Program.
The program is funded through YMCA members, staff and
corporate donations, Morshedzadeh said.
Hanna, an exercise physiologist, got the idea after attending
a conference at the Cooper Center in Dallas on physical activ-
ity and cancer. With the encouragement of others, she started
an exercise program for cancer survivors at the Stanford
Health Improvement program, she said.
We have now had 1,700 participants come throughout pro-
gram, Hanna wrote in an email.
At that point, there were few exercise programs for cancer
survivors because people thought cancer survivors should just
rest not exercise, Hanna said.
Previously, people in the health eld ... felt that since can-
cer wore down the immune system, exercise would wear it
down even more. They also questioned why you would exer-
cise someone who was already fatigued. Wouldnt that make
them even more fatigued? Hanna said. But this was kind of
a myth. Now research suggests that moderate exercise, not rest
with some exceptions, of course is just what cancer
patients need.
On the rst day of the program, participants come and get to
know each other and share their experiences with cancer and
then the staff show them the facility, Morshedzadeh said.
One group in particular formed a tight-knit bond after the 12
weeks and now attends regular classes together Linda
Ferrando, Brad Friedman, Mary Spont and Judy LaRoisa.
On several days, Ferrando nds it difcult to get into her car,
drive to the YMCA and attend classes. One of the reasons she
goes is because she texts Friedman to check in on whether he
will go to class, along with Stont and LaRoisa.
I started the program after being in bed for almost a year, I
had Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma stage IV, so it was in my bones
mainly bilateral hips, so I could barely walk, Ferrando
said.
After suffering a back injury when she was rst participat-
ing in the program to recover from cancer in her hip, Ferrando
came back to Living Strong Living Well later and regained her
strength.
She said she felt like a different person than she was in the
program last year.
When we rst started and I started riding the (stationary)
bike, it wouldnt register because I was riding so slow, because
my hips were recovering (from cancer) and then by the end of
the (program) I could do three miles, Ferrando said.
One of the things with cancer is that when you have it, you
really dont have control over your body ... its kind of crazy
but, with exercise and by coming here, I felt I was gaining con-
trol back, LaRoisa said.
The intention of the program is to help patients increase
muscle mass, strength, exibility, endurance and functional
ability; eventually assisting participants in developing their
own physical tness program so they can continue to practice
their preferred lifestyle.
On the third to fourth visit ... we do a tness check to see
where the baseline is and after that we show them the cardio
machines (and) get them to do a weight routine. ... In their last
15 minutes, we get together and stretch, Morshedzadeh said.
They have a full membership to the YMCA and can come at
any other time during the 12 weeks and afterwards they have
one month of free membership after the program ends.
Friedman said he was diagnosed with a brain tumor in his
sarabellum and the radiation treatment he received has hin-
dered his ability to create structure and organization.
This program gave me exactly (what I wanted): it gave a
me schedule, it gave me a structure and community ... which
maintained and increased my health, Friedman said. (The
YMCA is) sort of like having the catchers mitt and saying
Well catch that ball and take on that role.
Mary Spont had breast cancer and was encouraged to learn
more about Living Strong Living Well through her doctor.
(The program) has just been a lifesaver ... it just makes you
feel more positive, Spont said.
The patients in the program have formed a camaraderie
through their shared experiences and the humor they nd after
recovering from cancer. Living Strong Living Well is enabling
to its participants because it helps mitigate the fatigue felt
from cancer and cancer treatment through exercise, Friedman
said.
Its night and day for me ... on my own I do pretty much
nothing, Friedman said, but here Im not on my own at all.
For more information about the program go to
www.ymcasf.org/peninsula/what_we_offer/for_adults/living_s
trong_living_well.
Olympus is tense yet generic
A Bite of Old Time
San Francisco
For Easter
The Authentic Blums
Coffee Crunch Cake
10% off Special with this Ad
Open Easter Sunday Morning 8 to 9:30 am for pickup
CALL Kathys Kreative Kakes
(650) 348-5253
631 South B Street San Mateo
(open Christmas Eve for pick up)
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
THE
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Continued from page 1
YMCA
WEEKEND JOURNAL
24
Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, MARCH 23
Turn Conflict Into Opportunity.
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. South San
Francisco High School, 400 B St.,
South San Francisco. The workshop
will provide tools to move from
conflict to cooperation, to diffuse
tense situations and move from
anger to understanding. Donations
starting at $35 requested. For more
information or to register call 513-
0330, ext. 312.
Relay for Life Survivor and
Caregiver Breakfast. 9 a.m. 251 City
Park Way, San Bruno. Free for
caregivers and survivors. This event
is limited to caregivers and survivors
only. For more information go to
www.relayforlife.org/sanbrunoca.
Free Princeton Review ACT
Practice Test. 9 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information call 591-8286.
Real Estate 2013 Reality Check for
Buyers and Sellers: Ask a Lender,
Ask a Realtor. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Redwood Shores Library, 399 Marine
Parkway. Learn what is most
important to your credit profile to
receive the best loan rates, the
importance of your pre-approval
letter to purchase and more. Free. For
more information call 208-2544.
Backyard Composting Workshop.
10 a.m. to noon. South San Francisco
Scavenger, 500 E. Jaime Court, South
San Francisco. For more information
email info@recycleworks.org.
Elder Care Resource Fair. 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. San Carlos Adult Community
Center, 601 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
for more information call 802-4112.
2013 Youth Art Show. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. South San Francisco Municipal
Services Building, 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. Visual art
will be featured by youth from the
South San Francisco Unified School
District. For more information call
829-3800.
Belmont Sidewalk Fine Arts
Festival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Carlmont
Village Shopping Center, Ralston
Avenue at Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
visit www.pacificfinearts.com.
Easter Bunny at Hillsdale
Shopping Center. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, Macys
Center Court. 60 31st Ave., San
Mateo. The starting price of photo
sheets is $16.55. Children of all ages
are invited to meet the bunny and
have their photos taken in a garden
of fresh flowers, silk butterflies, cherry
blossoms and more. For more
information call 345-8222.
Easter Bunny at Serramonte
Center. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Serramonte
Center, Interstate 280 and
Serramonte Boulevard, Daly City. The
Easter Bunny hops in for two weeks
of festive fun before the Easter
holiday. Locals are invited to meet
the bunny and have their photo
taken. Additionally, children will
receive a free Easter treat for visiting
the bunny, as well as a special gift
with any purchased photo package.
For more information email
shelbi@spinpr.com.
Ukulele Story time. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Join Kayla and
her ukulele for some fun books and
songs for all ages. For more
information call 591-8286.
Celebrating Delights by Lisa
Bakerys One Year Anniversary.
Noon to 4 p.m. Delights by Lisa
Bakery, 25 W. 25th Ave. No. 6, San
Mateo. We will have music, samples
and raffles. For more information
email Delightsbylisa@aol.com.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are three for $1, hardbacks are $2 and
up. There will be a large supply of
CDs at low prices. All proceeds will
benefit the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
The San Mateo County History
Museum Presents: A Conversation
with Rose Jacobs Gibson. 1 p.m.
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. $5 for
adults and $3 for seniors and
students. Jacobs Gibson was the first
African-American member of the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors,
and she will participate in a question
and answer session. For more
information go to
www.historysmc.org.
Learn about U.S. Immigration. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave. Free immigration
seminar series presented by U.S.
immigration officers. It includes new
immigrant services, applying for U.S.
citizenship, how to avoid
immigration scams and an
immigration interview module. The
session will be given in both English
and Chinese (both Mandarin and
Cantonese). For more information
call 697-7607.
The Fabulous Goldrush Sisters.
2:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
Join for an interactive ride through
Californias Gold Rush country in the
late 1850s with colorful stories and
songs. For more information call 591-
8286.
Sports Memorabilia Auction. 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. 1718 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. Enjoy this sports
Memorabilia auction and fundraiser
to support Mz. Shirliz Transitional
Centre, dedicated to helping folks get
back on their feet. For more
information call 261-1075.
The Laramie Project. 7 p.m. Aragon
High School Theater, 900 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. Aragon High
School Performing Arts proudly
presents The Laramie Project, a play
by Moises Kaufman and members of
the Tectonic Theater Project about
the reaction to the 1998 murder of
Matthew Shepard, a gay University
of Wyoming student. Final
performance on Sunday, March 24 at
2 p.m. Tickets available online $15 for
adults, $10 for students and seniors.
Tickets sold at the theater $17 for
adults, $10 for students and seniors.
Tickets available through
www.aragondrama.com. For more
information email joyfay@gmail.com.
Burlingame Intermediate School
presents West Side Story. 7 p.m.
BIS Auditorium, 1715 Quesada Way,
Burlingame. Burlingame
Intermediate students take on the
sophisticated music and the complex
choreography of the American
musical classic West Side Story. To
purchase tickets visit
http://tinyurl.com/BISWestSideStory.
Burlingame High Schools Spring
Musical: The Boy Friend. 8 p.m. $15
general admission, $10 students,
seniors and children. Set in the 1920s
against the backdrop of the French
Riviera, this upbeat production
features a happy ending and
charming dance numbers. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 558-2854.
Hillbarn Theater Presents john &
jen. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Tickets are
$28-38. For tickets and more
information go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
Ragazzi Boys Chorus Presents:
Mass of the Children. 8 p.m.
Carlmont Performing Arts Center,
1400 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. $10 to $25. Ragazzi Boys
Chorus and Masterworks Chorale of
San Mateo will collaborate to present
John Rutters Mass of the Children,
featuring soprano and baritone
soloists. For more information and to
purchase tickets call 342-8785.
Crestmont Conservatory of Musics
Gourmet Concert Series. 8 p.m.
Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. Brian
Connor, faculty pianist, will perform
works by Beethoven, Schumann and
more. $15 for general admission, $10
for seniors and students (16 and
under).
SUNDAY, MARCH 24
Palm Sunday Service. 9:30 a.m. First
Presbyterian Church San Mateo, 194
W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Children
with palm branches and a choir
processional proclaiming Jesus
triumphant arrival into Jerusalem,
plus the Lords Supper. Free. For more
information call 345-1633.
Belmont Sidewalk Fine Arts
Festival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Carlmont
Village Shopping Center, Ralston
Avenue at Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
visit www.pacificfinearts.com.
Palm Sunday Service. 10:30 a.m.
Calvary Lutheran Church, 401 Santa
Lucia Ave., Millbrae. Free. All Christian
denominations are welcome. For
more information call 588-2840.
Holy Week at Congregational
Church of Belmont. 10:30 a.m. 751
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
A parade of palms and the sanctuary
choir will start the worship on Palm
Sunday. There will be a service at 7:30
p.m., as well as 10:30 a.m. on March
31. For more information call 593-
4547.
Easter Bunny at Hillsdale
Shopping Center. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, Macys
Center Court. 60 31st Ave., San
Mateo. The starting price of photo
sheets is $16.55. Children of all ages
are invited to meet the bunny and
have their photos taken in a garden
of fresh flowers, silk butterflies, cherry
blossoms and more. For more
information call 345-8222.
Easter Bunny at Serramonte
Center. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Serramonte
Center, Highway 280 and Serramonte
Blvd., Daly City. The Easter Bunny
hops in for two weeks of festive fun
before the Easter holiday. Locals are
invited to meet the bunny and have
their photo taken. Additionally,
children will receive a free Easter
treat for visiting the bunny, as well as
a special gift with any purchased
photo package. For more information
email shelbi@spinpr.com.
Burlingame Intermediate School
presents West Side Story. 1 p.m.
BIS Auditorium, 1715 Quesada Way,
Burlingame. Burlingame
Intermediate students take on the
sophisticated music and the complex
choreography of the American
musical classic West Side Story. To
purchase tickets visit
http://tinyurl.com/BISWestSideStory.
Burlingame High Schools Spring
Musical: The Boy Friend. 2 p.m. $15
general admission, $10 students,
seniors and children. Set in the 1920s
against the backdrop of the French
Riviera, this upbeat production
features a happy ending and
charming dance numbers. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 558-2854.
Hillbarn Theater Presents john &
jen. 2 p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Tickets are
$28-38. For tickets and more
information go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
The Laramie Project. 2 p.m. Aragon
High School Theater, 900 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. Aragon High
School Performing Arts proudly
presents The Laramie Project, a play
by Moises Kaufman and members of
the Tectonic Theater Project about
the reaction to the 1998 murder of
Matthew Shepard, a gay University
of Wyoming student. Tickets
available online $15 for adults, $10
for students and seniors. Tickets sold
at the theater $17 for adults, $10 for
students and seniors. Tickets
available through
www.aragondrama.com. For more
information email joyfay@gmail.com.
Weigand Gallerys Opening
Reception for Hank Pitcher
Paintings: A 40-Year Survey. 2 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Weigand Gallery, Notre
Dame de Namur University, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Free admission
to the gallery. The exhibit will run
from March 15 to April 20. The gallery
is open Tuesday to Saturday noon to
4 p.m. For more information go to
www.wiegandgallery.org.
Music and Dance: A Family Concert
with the Berkeley Ballet. 3:30 p.m.
College of San Mateo Theater, 1700
W. Hillsdale Blvd., Building 3, San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call (415) 692-3367.
Ragazzi Boys Chorus Presents:
Mass of the Children. 4 p.m.
Carlmont Performing Arts Center,
1400 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. $10-25. Ragazzi Boys
Chorus and Masterworks Chorale of
San Mateo will collaborate to present
John Rutters Mass of the Children,
featuring soprano and baritone
soloists. For more information and to
purchase tickets call 342-8785.
Documentary Film Crisis in the
Congo: Uncovering the truth. 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Unitarian Universalists
of San Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave.,
San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 342-8244.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
love. His long hair needs to be cared for often;
brushed daily or every other day. Its easy to
see the mess that could come from not keep-
ing up with the brushing the little ones hair as
he sat on Rachel Spanglers lap Wednesday
afternoon. Spangler, who lives in Belmont,
adopted Pip earlier this month. The journey
for Pip was a long one.
Pip was found off the side of State Route 92
near the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge late last
year. His long hair was quite matted when a
passerby stopped, picked up the bunny and
dropped it off in the after-hours area with a
note, said PHS/SPCA spokesman Scott
Delucchi.
Little did Pip know, a good home was just a
short distance away.
Spangler and her boyfriend got their rst
rabbit, Benny about six years ago. Benny
needed a friend, which is why they got Marie.
Spangler used to buy pellets for the rabbits at
the Half Moon Bay Feed and Fuel where
someone had dropped off a black rabbit. It was
the rst rescue the couple took in and then
named Buddy. Buddy had a friend too, a res-
cue rabbit named Calyx, who unfortunately
passed away. It was for that reason that
Spangler took public transportation to the
Peninsula Humane Society and SPCA for a
recent bunny event. She needed a new friend
for Buddy.
Spangler had another request a long-
haired bunny. Fur from an angora bunny can
be spun and used in knitting a hobby
Spangler recently took up. Pip was adopted
shortly after Spangler shared her story with
the PHS/SPCA staff. Now Pip is getting
accustomed to his new apartment surround-
ings and regular brushings.
Pips story showcases the responsibility of
pet ownership. Around Easter, theres often a
spike in adoptions of bunnies.
If people have done their homework or if
they are willing to allow our counselors to
explain responsible rabbit ownership, we
would love to have as many people as possible
leave our shelter with a bunny, said
PHS/SPCA Customer Service Director Dan
Hanley. For those people fully prepared, we
want them to know they can save a life and
adopt a rabbit they dont need to buy one.
PHS/SPCA currently has close to two dozen
rabbits available for adoption, including a
variety of sizes, colors and types. But
PHS/SPCA also educates people to avoid
impulse adoptions that too often end up in the
rabbits being brought back to the shelter a few
months later once the novelty has worn off.
The two biggest misconceptions the shelter
staff reports about rabbits involve their com-
patibility with young children and their hous-
ing. The delicate companion animals require
gentle handling and thrive when they receive
as much attention as dogs, according to
PHS/SPCA.
Rabbits should never be conned to our out-
door hutch, where they are susceptible to
extreme temperatures and to local wildlife,
like raccoons. Instead, bunnies should have
caging inside the home and daily exercise and
socialization time outside of their cage.
Education and outreach efforts from the
shelter, rescue groups and online has resulted
in a drop in neglected rabbits.
In 1990, PHS/SPCA received 750 stray or
owner-surrendered rabbits, and euthanized 80
percent. Over the past two years, the shelter
has averaged 164 incoming rabbits (132 in
2011 and 197 in 2012) per year and did not
euthanize any healthy rabbits, Delucchi said.
To help with the issues, PHS/SPCA makes
arrangements to spay or neuter all adopted
rabbits. A mature rabbit can have up to nine
babies every month. When well cared for, rab-
bits can live eight to 10 years. Many people
like to adopt pairs of rabbits so they have com-
panionship.
Those interested in adopting a bunny can
call 340-7022, ext. 700 or visit www.phs-
spca.org. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 7
p.m., Monday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. on the weekends. PHS/SPCA is closed
Easter Sunday.
Continued from page 1
RABBIT
Mayor Bob Grassilli said the urgency ordi-
nance will add an additional layer of input for
the city to nd the best use for the space.
Grassilli recognizes that the free market dic-
tates what will ultimately go into the space.
However, by adding an extra step, the council
will have the chance to be sure the best plan
moves forward.
Under the proposed urgency ordinance, any
new use or change of a use that is different
from what exists at a location now would
require a conditional use permit. Applying for
a permit requires a public hearing before the
Planning Commission which would assess the
merits of the new use, according to a staff
report. The ve parcels located at the south
corner of Holly Street, Industrial Road and the
Highway 101 ramp is known as the Landmark
Hotel Site in the general plan, which includes
plans for securing a hotel for the space,
according to the staff report.
Recently, a developer approached the city
expressing an intention to purchase three of
those ve parcels on which a large tness cen-
ter would be built. Such a use, according to the
staff report, would diminish the opportunity
for a future hotel and would generate little to
no retail sales tax for the city. However, cur-
rent zoning would allow for such a use with-
out additional city review.
Community Development Director Al
Savay said the urgency ordinance would allow
the city to study uses in that industrial area and
reevaluate the rules. Savay said that while the
ordinance could be extended, the hope is to
nish the evaluation quickly.
The council meets 7 p.m. Monday, March 25
at City Hall, 600 Elm St.
Continued from page 1
STUDY
COMICS/GAMES
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Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


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top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
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15 QED part
16 Made ripples
18 Most sensible
20 Certain poker holdings
21 Excuse me!
22 Sighs of distress
23 Cheap wheels
26 Ear cleaner
30 Crumpet companion
33 Football feld
34 Bellow
35 Tall fower
37 Heavy hydrogen
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39 Clique
40 Druid
41 Brain messenger
43 Festive night
45 Dash
48 Buying frenzy
51 Famed sci-f writer
53 Without reservation (2
wds.)
56 Bay
57 Visa and passport
58 Old Norse poem
59 Keogh relatives
60 Mao -- -tung
61 Not barefoot
62 Kind of pilot
down
1 Snowballed
2 Courtyards
3 Pet owners buy
4 Admire
5 Mosquito, to us
6 Rascal
7 Zilch
8 Visual aid
9 Post-kindergarten
10 Transvaal settler
11 Physiques, slangily
17 Full of back talk
19 Dirty air
22 More unusual
24 Lop off branches
25 Dublins land
27 NBA coach -- Unseld
28 Pub pint
29 Quick lunch
30 Muscle spasm
31 Prior to
32 Feel crummy
36 Car metal
38 First name in fashion
42 Draw out
44 Goes off course
46 Love in a gondola
47 Exploding stars
48 Hot Lips actress
49 Most profs
50 Many-petaled fower
51 Like prime steak
52 Unisex garment
54 Bewildered response
55 Lennons wife
diLBErT Crossword PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHoCk
PEarLs BEforE swinE
GET fUZZy
Monday, MarCH 25, 2013
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Because youre likely
to be more motivated to win than your competition,
you will be the one coming out ahead. Dont let up.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Try to take a
recreational break, even though the week is just
beginning. Its a healthy way of keeping unwanted
tension from building up.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- You might not be able
to get everything that you want done, but trying
to do so should enable you to fnalize at least two
important matters to your satisfaction.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Not only are you
extremely curious about everything, youll also be
a quick study. Because there isnt much that will
escape your attention, it equips you to impart what
you learn.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although fnancial matters
could be tricky, youll still be able to handle things
quite well, mostly because youll be a dab hand at
improvisation.
VirGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It behooves you to
keep yourself as busy as possible, because a heavy
workload will boost your productivity. Slow down
only when life does.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Keep a low profle
today if you fnd yourself involved in a commercial
situation that has lots of competition. Itll help you
from tipping your hand on your tactics or methods.
sCorPio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Youll be more
comfortable participating in activities with friends
who dont take life too seriously than you would be
with pals who dont know how to relax.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Enormous
personal satisfaction will be gained from
developments in which you have to use your mental
abilities to circumvent tough challenges.
CaPriCorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Usually it isnt
advisable to offer unsolicited advice, even to a
close friend. Today, however, if you have some
constructive thoughts, express yourself.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- One of your greatest
attributes is the ability to solve seemingly impossible
problems. Youll be able to see what everyone else
misses.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You might have to
make a decision between several alternatives that
appear to be of equal value. However, if you study
each, youll discover that one is slightly better.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 25
THE DAILY JOURNAL
26
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104 Training
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than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
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110 Employment
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110 Employment
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This position will provide valuable
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110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
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Please send a cover letter describing
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and three recent clips. Before you ap-
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with our publication. Our Web site:
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Send your information via e-mail to
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ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
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120 Child Care Services
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127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254662
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Amcadia International Group, 2)
Amcadia Consulting & Recruiting, 455
Hickey Blvd., #525, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Bryken Company, LLC, WY.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Maymar Lim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254639
The following person is doing business
as: Atherton Endoscopy Center, 3351 El
Camino Real, Ste. 220, ATHERTON, CA
94027 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Pacific Endoscopy, LLC, TN.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/22/2013 .
/s/ Daivd W. Holst /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254577
The following person is doing business
as: Clearly Stated, 1425 Sunnyslope
Ave., BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Cherie
Patterson, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013 .
/s/ Cherie Patterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254666
The following person is doing business
as: Perfect Nails, 325 Sharon Park Dr.,
Ste B5 MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nhi T. Hoang, 1124 Sunny Ct., San
Jose, CA 95116. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Nhi T. Hoang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254393
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Telecenter Appliances TV-Vid-
eo, 1830 S. Delaware St., SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the
following owners: Jeffrey Stern, 1465
Rhode Island St., San Francisco, CA
94107, Jack Stern, 10 Carriage Ln.,
Cherry, Hills Village, CO 80121. The
business is conducted by a Trust. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 12/17/2012.
/s/ Jeffrey Stern /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
27 Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254623
The following person is doing business
as: CityBlow, 1111 Howard Ave, Ste. A,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Christine
S. Woodward, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Christine Woodward /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254438
The following person is doing business
as: Soundlink (DBA Sugo Music Group),
634 Isabella Rd., EL GRANADA, CA
94018 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Stevan Pasero, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Stevan Pasero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254411
The following person is doing business
as: K & M Services, 3047 Del Monte St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Melissa
Hanson, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/07/2013.
/s/ Melissa Hanson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/02/13, 03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254784
The following person is doing business
as: Royalty Creek, 570 El Camino Real,
#150 Ste. 324, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Canveesi, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Montserrat Vega /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254800
The following person is doing business
as: Hyundai Serramonte, 1500 Collins
Ave., COLMA, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Price-
Simms Serramonte, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Anne Stewart /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254644
The following person is doing business
as: Lizzys Sweets, 27 Belford Dr., DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Nilar E. Kay, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Nilar E. Kay /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254383
The following person is doing business
as: Brian J. La Paglla, 45 Delican Ln.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Brian
J. La Paglla, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Brian J. La Paglla /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254807
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Hearing Services, 533 Air-
port Blvd., Ste. 400, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John Felmar, 4213 Admiralty
Ln., Foster City, CA 94404. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ John Felmar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254762
The following person is doing business
as: Westbay Commercial Real Estate
Group, Inc., DBA, Coldwell Banker Com-
mercial., 1575 Bayshore Hwy., #100,
Burlingame, CA 94010 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Westbay
Commercial Real Estate Group, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/10/2004.
/s/ Andrew Peceiment /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254940
The following person is doing business
as: Pangea LED, 221 Poinsettia Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Christopher
Boily, and Laura Boily, same address.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
04/01/2013.
/s/ Christopher Boily /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254812
The following person is doing business
as: Five Star Auto Detailing and Recon-
ditioning, 1805 East Bayshore Rd.
#1106, EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Orlando L. Payton, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Orlando Payton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/16/13, 03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255074
The following person is doing business
as: KMBKOUTURE, 603 Woodside Way,
#1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Kristin-
na Fonua, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Kristinna Fonua /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255084
The following person is doing business
as: Canyon House, 16 Cafeman Pl.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sliver
Point Plaza, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Ivah Vanessa Ringo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255084
The following person is doing business
as: Woodside Farmers Market, 3195
Woodside Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Maggie Foard, 265 Portola State Park
Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/07/2013.
/s/ Maggie Foard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254828
The following person is doing business
as: U-Staffing Services, Inc, 1151 Com-
pass Ln., Apt. 109, FOSTER CITY, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: U-Staffing Services, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kathleen Ng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255075
The following person is doing business
as: Native Cre8ive, 23 Thomas Ct., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Clyde Smith,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Clyde Smith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255078
The following person is doing business
as: Vamp Media, 100 Irene Ct., #10,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: LaDonrick
Powell, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ LaDonrick Powell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254814
The following person is doing business
as: The Rose Pepper Group, 1131
Grand St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sean Head, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Sean Head /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 04/06/13, 04/13/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Feb. 14, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Laura Patricia Campos
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1123 Burlingame Ave.
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
March 16, 23, 30, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-253643
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Athe-
rton Endoscopy Center, 3351 El Camino
Real, Ste. 220, ATHERTON, CA 94027.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on
12/18/2012. The business was conduct-
ed by: Pacific Endoscopy Services, INC,
TN.
/s/ James Torosis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 02/26/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/02/13,
03/09/13, 03/16/13, 03/23/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Noreen Salley Ahern, aka Noreen
Ahern, aka Noreen S. ahern
Case Number: 123134
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Noreen Salley Ahern,
aka Noreen Ahern, aka Noreen S. Ahern.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Spencer Crowl. in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Spenc-
er Crowl. be appointed as personal rep-
resentative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedents
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
203 Public Notices
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 8, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Elaine Ercolini (State Bar # 130866)
Law Offices of James D. Krupka
509 Orchard St.
SANTA ROSA, CA 95404
(707)542-4349
Dated: March 4, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 9, 16, 23, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Elaine Chang
Case Number: 123187
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Elaine Chang. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Stanley
Chang in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Stanley Chang
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 3, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Jeffery A. Jaech 076876
Baker Manock & Jensen, PC
5260 N. Palm Ave., Ste. 421
FRESNO, CA 93704
(559)432-5400
Dated: March 19, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 23, 30, April 6, 2013.
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
WILMA LOUISE MILES
Case Number: 123182
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: WILMA LOUISE MILES.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
Matilda OToole in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Paul
Kraft be appointed as personal represen-
tative to administer the estate of the de-
cedent.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 19, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
David C. Becker 111010
Becker, Runkle, Laurie, Mahoney & Day
263 Main St., Level 2
PLACERVILLE, CA 95667
(530)295-6400
Dated: March 18, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 23, 30, April 6, 2013.
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF
CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE
COUNTY OF MONTEREY
CITATION FOR HEARING ON
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF ALLEGED FATHER
RICARDO RICKY RIVERA
(Family Code 7662)
(No filing fee. Family Code 7670)
Case No.: A-4974
In Re: BABY GIRL F., a Minor.
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALI-
FORNIA, to respondent alleged father
RICARDO RICKY RIVERA of Redwood
City, California,
Greetings:
YOU ARE HEREBY advised that you are
required to appear in the Superior Court
of the State of California, for the County
of Monterey, at the Court Room of De-
partment thereof, located at 1200 Aguaji-
to Road, Monterey, CA 93940, (831)
647-5800, Monterey, California, County
of Monterey, State of California, on April
19, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. of that day, then
and there to show cause, if any, why
your parental rights to MINOR BABY
GIRL F. (MINOR), as an alleged father,
should not be terminated in accordance
with California Family Code section 7665
for the purpose of placement of MINOR
for adoption as prayed for in the petition
on file herein.
You are advised that at the time and
place above stated the Judge may read
the petition and if requested may explain
the effect of the granting of the petition
and if requested the Judge shall explain
any term or allegation contained therein
and the nature of the proceeding, its pro-
cedures and possible consequences and
may continue the matter for the appoint-
ment of counsel or to give counsel time
to prepare.
If you wish to seek the advice of an at-
torney in this matter, you should do
so promptly so that your pleading, if
any, may be filed on time.
DATED: MARCH 4, 2013
Clerk of the Superior Court
SIgned by: J. Cedillo
Attorney for Petitioners:
David C. Laredo, CSBN 66532
Heidi A. Quinn, CSBN 180880
Alex J. Lorca, CSBN 266444
DeLAY & LAREDO
606 Forest Avenue
Pacific Grove, CA 93950
(831)646-1502
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV513881
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): COUNTY OF SAN MATEO;
All Persons Unknown Claiming Any Le-
gal or Equitable Right , Title, Estate,
Lien, or Intrest in the Property Described
in the Complaint Adverse to Plaintiffs Ti-
tle or Any Cloud on Plaintiffs Title There-
to; and Does 1-25 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): LEE STE-
VEN ENGDAHL, an individual, ANNE
GRANNIS, an individual
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Charles S. Bronitsky (SBN 124332
Law Offices of Charles S. Bronitsky
28
Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Brought to ruin
10 Appointment in
Samarra novelist
15 Is this being
broadcast?
16 Baking apples
17 Succeeded, in a
way
18 Hands it to the
performer?
19 Award estab. by
King George V
20 Jeu de mots
21 Water wheel
component
22 Subterranean
storage units,
perhaps
24 Its __ turn
27 Toot
28 Keep dreaming
29 Kin of -ian
30 Quest
31 Sports figures
33 High-scoring ball
games
35 Trysting place
37 Like most light
bulbs
40 Brewer Frederick
44 Ending with tele-
45 Slammer
46 Car registration
datum
47 Dallas
quarterback after
Bledsoe
48 Spitting nails, so
to speak
50 __ chance!
51 Stumped
53 Scent word
55 Org. with many
schedules
56 Born Yesterday
playwright
57 Contests with no
ultimate winner,
hopefully
60 Spitzer who
succeeded Pataki
as New York
governor
61 Mac-based
multimedia player
62 __ list
63 Up for it
DOWN
1 Filled Asian
appetizers
2 Foreign Service
Officer to the
Middle East, say
3 Fictional Amelia
who turns 50 in
2013
4 Be light
5 Fills in
6 Bonds manager
after Baker
7 Weasley with a
crush on Harry
Potter
8 Big night
9 Actress Susan
10 Seal threat
11 Counter order
12 Play about rival
composers
13 Tuck into a new
bed
14 Sets forth
21 Topping whose
name means
please
23 Inclined to believe
25 Engine hose
26 Reversal of policy
32 Promulgate
33 Haggadah-
reading ritual
34 Metrosexual
36 Hardly
enthusiastic
37 Buttered up
38 Luthers A
Mighty Fortress,
e.g.
39 Cluj is its second-
most populous
city
41 Del Toro of Che
42 Riviera city with
an annual music
festival
43 Plaited
49 Step down
50 Designing
Women actress
52 Strep throat-
treating docs
54 Moe who founded
Folkways Records
57 EPA measure of
concern to
asthma sufferers
58 Head up
59 Source of
rectangular
lettuce?
By Joe DiPietro
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
03/23/13
03/23/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
203 Public Notices
2501 Park Blvd., 2nd Flr.
PALO ALTO, CA 94306
(650)918-5760
Date: (Fecha) May 16, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
R. Kril, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
March 23, 30, April 6, 13, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5 AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
L6 WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
296 Appliances
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. SOLD!
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
298 Collectibles
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17 Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, SOLD!
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDRENS VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy, SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
FREE TV - 27" Sony TV SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1920S BANQUET TABLE - Solid wal-
nut, horsehair chairs, matching buffet,
$450. obo, (650)283-5582
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
304 Furniture
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER 6 Drawers 4 wide $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5x2 $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42H, 27 W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60 x 40 tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8 BY 11 CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy $3700.00. Will sell
for $600, (650)349-5003
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
29 Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CEILING FAN - 42, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
310 Misc. For Sale
SHOWER STOOL, round, 14" diameter,
revolves, and locks in place (never used)
$40 (650)344-2254
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, SOLD!
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
SOLD!
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31 x 70 and (1) 29 x 69,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand,
SOLD!
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COAT - Size 6/8, Ladies, Red, Jones
New York, cute, like new, polyester,
warm above knee length, $35.,
(650)34 5-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
Reversible. Outside: weatherproof tan
color. Inside: Navy plush. Zipper clo-
sure, elastic cuffs. $15 (650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
316 Clothes
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor label.
Excellent condition. $18.00
(650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., SOLD!
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, SOLD!
GOLF CART (bag boy express model) 3
wheeler, dual brakes, SOLD!
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
BURLINGAME
1611 Ralston Ave.
(x-st. Occidental)
Sat. & Sun.
March 23 & 24
8:30 am - 5:30 pm
Furniture, clothing, col-
lectables and other cool
items
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K.
(650)888-9906
430 Rentals
2 ARTIST STUDIOS for rent in Down-
town RWC. $310 & $327 monthly. Con-
tact Tom at (650)369-1823 Mon-Fri 9am-
4pm
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2009 INFINITY FX 35 Silver, 16,800k,
Low Jack, lots of extras, $32,000
(650)742-6776
93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUVs
CHEVY 03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$17,000. obo, SOLD!
DODGE 06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
BAY AREA UPHOLSTERY
(650)583-5143
Specializing in: Trucks, Autos,
Boats & Furniture.
40+ years in trade
615 Airport Blvd., SSF
Bayareaupholstery.org
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
318 Sports Equipment
381 Homes for Sale
Dr. Sami r Nanj apa DDS
Dr. I nsi ya Saboowal a DDS
I had not been to the dentist in 20 years! For good reason,
they are scary! However, I nally bit the bullet and through a
friend found Dr Nanjapa. Wow... - Julie H.
He does a great teeth cleaning, is very attentive and not once
got impatient amid all my questions... - Vince E.
I highly, highly recommend him. - C.B.
He did a super job. I love his gentle touch - Hardial A.
5/5 Stars on ratemds.com
5/5 Stars on healthgrades.com
REVI EWS:
Dr. Nanjapas dental degree is from MAHE, India
(1997) and a Masters in Dental Biomaterials at
the Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (1999)
He began private practice while teaching as
Assist. Clinical Professor at College of Dentistry,
Chicago. In 2007 he moved to San Francisco for
private practice and continued teaching at UC
San Francisco Dental School. He opened his San
Mateo ofce in 2010.
Dr. Saboowala trained in India and has 4 years of
clinical experience with a DDS degree from Uni-
versity of Illinois at Chicago. She brings top notch
experience including pediatric dental care, complex
extractions & root canal treatment to our practice.
6 5 0 - 4 7 7 - 6 9 2 0 | 3 2 0 N . S a n M a t e o D r . S u i t e 2 , S a n M a t e o
$60 New Patient Special!!!
We Also Speak Cantonese, Mandarin and Hindi!
30
Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
REYNAS HOUSE
CLEANING/JANITORIAL
SERVICE
Best Price in Town
Free Estimates
Honest Good References
Move ins and Move Outs, etc.
(650)458-1302
Concrete
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry Drywall Tile
Painting Exterior/Interior
Small Job Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FREE DUMPING
Bricks, Blocks
&Trees
(650)873-8025
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)518-1173
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
All kinds of Concrete
Retaining Wall Tree Service
Roofing Fencing
New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
31 Weekend Mar. 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & DIVORCE
Attorney Fees Reduced
For New March Clients.
HarrisZelnigherLaw.com
Ira Harris: (650)342-3777
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
COMING SOON!
AMAZING MASSAGE
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
Opening in March!
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Home Care
PROVIDING
CAREGIVING
Care Giver services
Hillsborough, Burlingame areas.
Several years experience,
friendly, compassionate care.
Ask for Paula.
email: johnspanek@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO HOME LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
32 Weekend March 23-24, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/13
WEBUY
$0 $0
OFF
Established 1979