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Goodman Conveyor

Idler Selection Procedure


Determine conveyor capacity of material to be handled in tons per hour (TPH). Determine material and its characteristics. Choose troughing angle. Determine minimum belt width based on lump size. Select a suitable belt speed. Select required belt width. Determine actual troughing (carrying) idler load and idler spacing. Select troughing (carrying) idler series. Determine return idler load and idler spacing. Select return idler series. Determine idler bearing L10 life correction. Determine potential idler life. Determine Goodman Conveyor idler specification and model numbers. See Pages 28 and 29 for regreaseable and sealed for life option for series C, D, and E idlers.

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10 Step 11 Step 12 Step 13 Step 14

Step 1 Determine Conveyor Capacity


Conveyor capacity in tons per hour (TPH) should be peak or surge volume rather than average volume.

The angle of repose of a material is the angle which the surface of a normal, freely formed pile makes to the horizontal. The angle of surcharge of a material is the angle to the horizontal which the surface of the material assumes while the material is at rest on a moving conveyor belt. This angle usually is 5' to 15" less than the angle of repose. The flowability of a material, as measured by angle of repose and angle of surcharge, determines the cross section of the material load which can be carried safely on a belt. It is also an index of the safe angle of incline of the belt conveyor.

Step 2

Determine Material Characteristics


Table 1 lists major characteristics for most common materials capable of being handled by belt conveyor. Table 2 lists material class description. Table 3 lists flowability, angle of surcharge, and angle of repose. These important characteristics require definition:

4-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Table 1-Material Characteristics and Weight per Cubic Foot


Material Average Weight Lbe. Per Cu. Ft. Material Class Maximum Surcharge Angle Degrees

Acid Phosphate, Pulverized Alum, Lumpy Alum, Pulverized Alumina Aluminum Hydrate Aluminum Oxide Aluminum Sulphate Asbestos, Ground Asbestos, Shredded Asbestos, Solid Ashes, Dry, Loose (Coal) Ashes, Wet, Loose (Coal) Asphalt, Crushed, % lnch & Under Attapulgite Clay Bagasse Bakelite, Powdered Baking Powder Barite Bauxite, Crushed, 3 lnch & Under Beans, Castor, Whole Bones, Crushed Bones, Ground, Dry Borax, Fine, Y2 lnch Screenings Borax, 3 lnch & Under Bran Brewers Grain, Spent, Dry Brewers Grain, Spent, Wet Calcium Carbide, Crushed Carbon, Activate, Dry, Fine Carbon Black, Pelletized Cement Clinker Cement, Portland, Aerated Cement, Portland, Packed Chalk, Crushed Charcoal, Ground Charcoal, Lumps Cinders, Blast Furnace Cinders, Coal, Ashes & Clinker Clay, Dry Lump Clover Seed Coal, Anthracite, R.O.M. Coal, Anthracite, Solid Coal, Bituminous, R.O.M. Coal, Bituminous, Solid Coal, Lignite Coffee, Roasted Beans

* May vary considerably


f

A When handling large lumps at speeds over 400 FPM, do not use a slope greater than 15'

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-5

Table 1 (continued)

Concrete, Cinder Concrete, Mix Copper Ore Copper Sulphate Cork, Ground Cork, Granulated Cottonseed, Dry, Delinted Cottonseed, Meal Cullet, Glass, Average Dolomite, Pulverized Dolomite, Lumpy Earth, Common Loam, Dry Earth, Common Loam, Moist Earth, Mud, Wet, Containing Clay Earth, Diatomaceous Feldspar, % Inch Screenings Feldspar, 1Y2 to 3 Inch Lumps Feldspar, Powdered, 200 Mesh Firebrick (%" x 0") Flaxseed Flint, Pebbles Flour, Wheat Flourspar, '/2 Inch Screenings Flourspar, Lumps, 1%to 3 Inch Fullers Earth, Dry Fullers Earth, Oily Garbage, Average Glass Batch (Wool & Container) Gneiss, Lumps Grain Barley (48 # Bu.) Corn, Shelled (56 # Bu.) Flour, Wheat (196 # Bu.) Oats (32 # Bu.) Rye (56 # Bu.) Wheat: (60 # Bu.) Granite, 1'/2 to 3 Inch Lumps Granite, Broken Gravel, Mixed Sizes Greenstone, Lumps Gypsum, '/2 Inch Screenings Gypsum, 1Yi to 3 Inch Lumps

110-150 120-150 75-85 4-5 12-1 5 22-40 35-40 80-120 46 80-100 70-80 85 100-110 11-14 70-85 90-110 100 85 45 105 35-40 85-105 110-120 30-35 60-65 30-50 80-100 96 38-48 45 35-40 26-35 42-46 45-48 85-90 95-100 90-1 00 107 70-80 70-80

D26 *D37 D36 B45MY C45 C35W B35W D37Z 836 D36 B36 836 846 A36MY B36 D36 A37 B25NW A45PN C46 D46 826 826 'E45VW D38Z B25N C25NW A45PN C25M B25N C25N D27 D37 C36 D36

15 20 17 16 22 20 22 20 22 23 18 17 12 21

30-44 31 29 35 30-44 41 30-44 35 45 45 30-44 38 34 30-34 21 45 45 45 23 20-29 30-44 23 21 45 21 23 28 20-29 30-44 38 40 30 20 20 20 30 30 20 20

22 15 10 21 10 8 12 20 21 15

* May vary considerably

6-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Kaolin Clay, 3 Inch & Under Lead Ores Lignite, Air-Dried Lime, Hydrated, Pulverized Lime, Ground, ?4 Inch & Under Lime, Lumps Limestone, Crushed Limestone, Agricultural, ?4 lnch & Under Malt, Dry, Whole Malt, Wet or Green Manganese Ore Marble, Crushed, 1/2 Inch & Under Mica, Ground Milk, Dry, Powder Molybdenite, Powdered Molybdenum Ore Oyster Shells, Ground, Under % Inch Paper Pulp Stock Peanuts, Shelled Phosphate Rock, Broken, Dry Phosphate Rock, Pulverized Phosphate Triple Super, Ground Fertilizer Potash (Muriate), Mine Run Quartz, 1'/z to 3 Inch Lumps Resin, Vinyl Rice, Hulled or Polished Rice, Rough Rock, Crushed Rock, Soft, Excavated With Shovel Rubber, Ground ,Rubber, Pelletized Salt, Common Dry, Coarse Salt, Common Dry, Fine Salt Cake, Dry, Coarse Salt Cake, Dry, Pulverized Sand, Bank, Dry

63 200-270 45-55 32-40 60-65 70-80 85-90 68 27-30 60-65 125-140 80-95 13-15 36 107 107 50-60 40-60 35-45 75-85 60 50-55 75 85-95 25-35 45-48 36 125-145 100-1 10 24 50-55 40-55 70-80 85 60-85 90-1 10

D36 "B36RT "D35 A35MXY B35X C36X B36

19 15
22 23

35 30 30-44 42 43 38 30-44 20-29 45 39 30-44 34 45 40 40 30-44 19 30-44 25-29 40 45 30-44 20-29

20

18

20

C25N C45 *D37 D37 "836 B45P "835 B36


D36T *El 5MV C35Q D26 B36 B45T D37 D27Z B15 B35M D26 D36 D35 C36TU D26TUW B36TW B26NT B37

20 23 25

15 25 30

20 20 30

8
22 22 22 11 21 18
.

19 30-44 20-29 30-44 35 25 36 20-29 35 20 20 20

* May vary considerably

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-7

Table 1 (continued)

90-100 Sand and Gravel, Wet Sandstone, Broken 10-13 Sewage, Screenings, Drained Sewage, Sludge, Raw Shale, Crushed Shot, Steel Silica, Flour Slag, Blast Furnace, Crushed Slag, Furnace, Granular, Dry Slag, Furnace, Granular, Wet Soap Chips Soap Powder Soda Ash, Heavy Soda Ash, Light Soda, Bicarbonate Soy Beans, Cracked Soy Beans, Whole Soy Bean Cake, Over '/2 Inch Soy Bean Flour Soy Bean Meal Steel Turnings Stone, Crushed Sugar Cane, Knifed Sugar, Raw, Cane Sulphur, Lumps, 3 Inches & Under Sulphur, Powdered Taconite Pellets Tanbark, Ground Tobacco Traprock, 1/2 Inch Screenings Tungsten Carbide, Powder White Lead Wood Chips Wood Flour Zinc Ore, Crushed Zinc Oxide, Heavy 40-50 85-90 250 65 80-90 60-65 90-100 5-1 5 20-25 55-65 20-35 50-58 30-40 45-50 40-43 27 40 20-30 85-1 05 15-1 8 55-65 75-85 50-55 115-130 55 15-25 90-105 250 75-100 10-30 20-25 160 30-35

B27

"B35 E25TW C36 A27 C27 B47 C35Q B25X B36 A36Y A45Y C36NW C27NW D35W C25Y 835 E45V B46TX 18 21 D37Q D45Y C37 A36MR E45WY 15 20-29 39 25 25 45 30 32 37 42 35 21-28 32 32-37 45 45 30-44 30-44 30-44 45 30-44 30-44 45 38 45-55 20

20 5 20 30 20 20

27

30

*
A45X

22

* May vary considerably

8 - B E L T CONVEYOR I D L E R S

Using Tables 2 and 3, select and record:


A) Weight of material in pounds per cubic foot B) Surcharge angle and flowability C) Abrasiveness of the material D) Corrosiveness of the material

Table 2-Materi 11 Class Description


Material Characteristics
- -

Code

Very fine-100 mesh and under Fine-% inch and under Granular-under 1/2 inch Lumpy-containing lumps over 1/2 inch Irregular-stringy, interlocking, mats together

I
I

Flowabilityand Angle of Repose

Very free-flowing-angle of repose less than 19" Free-flowing-angle of repose 20" to 29" Average flowing-angle of repose 30" to 39' Sluggish-angle of repose 40" and over Nonabrasive Abrasive Very abrasive Very sharp-cuts or gouges belt covers Very dusty Aerates and develops fluid characteristics Contains explosive dust Contaminable, affecting use or saleability Degradable, affecting use or saleability Gives off harmful fumes or dust Highly corrosive Mildly corrosive Hygroscopic Interlocks or mats Oils or chemical present-may affect rubber products Packs under pressure Very light and fluffy-may be wind-swept Elevated temperature

Abrasiveness

Misceilaneous Characteristics (Sometimes more than one of these characteristics

Example: A very fine material that is free-flowing, abrasive, and contains explosive dust would be designated: Class A26N.

Table 3-Flowability, Angle of Surcharge, Angle of Repose

coal, cottonseed

* Code designations conform to bulk material characteristics chart, Table 2. Note: Use this table to obtain surcharge angle, if not listed in Table 1.

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-9

Step 3 Select Troughing Angle of Carrying Idlers


As the capacities in Table 7 indicate, idlers with end rolls set at 35' and 45" angles give greater carrying capacity for a given width. These steeper troughing angles necessitate a greater transverse flexibility in the conveyor belt. However, improvements in belt carcass design and materials have contributed to wider acceptance and greater use of 35" and 45O troughing idlers. Final selection will be dependent upon material characteristics and conveyor belting. However, for most materials we recommend 35' be selected based on economy. 45" troughing idlers are widely used when conveying grain or other free-flowing, nonabrasive materials. When using steeper troughing angles, follow recommendations for minimum transition distances for idler adjacent to terminal pulleys. See Table 4.

. .
- ,
.

.
Terminal Pulley
'

p pi^ ltm.nsit34n distq Terminal pulley.6 1,or ne


112 trough depth
.
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. ,

. . . .
4.

..

.,,

" , -

.. .
,

Minimum transition distance

Table $-Recommended Minimum Transition Distances


Idler Angle

% Rated Tension

20"

Over 90 60 to 90 Less than 60 Over 90 60 to 90 Less than 60 Over 90 60 to 90 Lessthan60

Fabric Belts Steel Cable Belts - .. . , --. ' % T~<cI~~I&$I ' $%$fc@&h7@&h y4@&fgh~~@tb - . . ~ig!:~~b.~~hpe~tk , . * ' , , ., . 2Rb. &Ski T%&, , . . ..-. t .- i . k ! b ,, , .I.& .' . - 1.5-b . . -, 1#0b,, ,. .. -, 3&6-. 1 ,?.a,, .- ai@b,*% .e -w

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,,

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F

A ?

, ,

35"

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-

3.2b : * . 3;ab .. 1 . . .i.6b, 1 j-:.. f: ":-{~l;%.Y,qj . P ,-; , - ;JI;K~~J, -1 l,.B&-C- ; "$ 2:&izg3&;+,ai2r--L.

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45 O

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32.5 2.4b

3.26. 2:3b.

b ; 4 @

.,%.

'

4.4b

b = Belt width (transition distance will be in the same units as those used for b).

10-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

II

step 4. Determine Minimum Belt Width Based On Lump Size


Use Table 5, which is based on a 20' angle of surcharge. For a 30" angle of surcharge, limit lump size to 50% of those listed in table. Lump size will influence the belt specifications and choice of carrying idlers.

Table 5-Maximum Lump Sizes


In Inches

Sized

Unsized Material (Mixed With


Not Over 10% O f Whole 20" Surcharge

Of Whole 20" Surcharge

14
16 18 20 24 30 36

3 3 4 4

5
6

7
8 10 12 14 16 18

5
6

7
8 10 11

42 48
54

; ; j
96 19

in
28
32

Table 6-Recommended Maximum Belt S ~ e e d s

Select a Suitable Belt Speed For Required Capacity

Grain or other free-flowing, nonabrasive material

Use Table 6 as a guide. Coal, damp clay, soft ores, overburden and earth, finecrushed stone Heavy, hard, sharp-edged ore, coarse-crushed stone Foundry sand, prepared or damp; shakeout sand with small cores, with or without small castings (not hot enough to harm belting) Prepared foundry sand and similar damp (or dry abrasive) materials discharged from belt by rubberedged plows Nonabrasive materials discharged from belt by means of plows 350 500
18 24-36 Over 36

Under favorable loading and transfer conditions for troughed belts wider than 30 inches, speeds in excess of those specified in Table 6 are occasionally used for fine materials, damp sand, coal, earth with no large lumps, and crushed stone. An increase in belt speed permits decreases in belt width and tension. However, these benefits must be weighed against the disadvantages of increased belt wear, material degradation, lump impact on carrying idlers, and generally reduced life of all conveyor components. Design of the loading area and the discharge of the material over the head pulley must be considered .when selecting the belt speed. The belt speed also has a significant affect on idler life. This is discussed in step 11.

600
350

Any width

200

Any width

200, except for wood pulp, where 300 to 400 is oreferable

Any width

I
NOTE: Select maximum belt speed for use in completing Step 6. Belt speed can be finalized after completing Step 6.

Feeder belts, flat or troughed, for feeding fine, nonabrasive, or mildly abrasive materials from ~ O D D and ~ ~ bins S Belts with trippers

Any width

400'

Any width

*For speeds over 400 FPM, special design consideration must be given to tripper chute design and tripper drive, Tripper propelled (driven) by belt alone is not recommended. BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-11

Step 6 Select Required Belt Width


A) Make selection based on peak or surge load (TPH) being 80% of the full cross-sectional load area of the belt. Note: This 80% factor may vary depending on design practice, conditions, preference, etc.
B) Either of two methods can be used to select belt width (BW).

Method 1 a) Convert the desired TPH to be conveyed to the equivalent in cubic feet per hour (FT3/HR).

,. ...f-7dy r 2-, ,,. y$gJ

'

'

--

'

m a =

TPH x 2080 LES/TON FT3/HR = Material Density (LBS/FT3) x 80%

?c&y4Fs9.wa2
'*-

.--

7
2
7%

, .. in

b) Convert the desired capacity in cubic feet per hour to the equivalent capacity at a belt speed of 100 FPM.

c) Using Table 7, find correct surcharge angle and troughing angle, then select a belt width. Check this selection against minimum belt width selected in Step 4. d) Determine final or design belt speed (FPM).

Method 2 a) Determine cross section of load (sq. ft.) required, using the following formula:

b) Using Table 7, find correct surcharge angle and troughing angle, then select a belt width. Check this selection against minimum belt width selected in Step 4. c) Determine final or design belt speed (FPM).

sr*

'''

TPH x TOO0 LBS/TOR SeIecIed BY Crnss Setti.

11 M[So

x Murial Density [LEm3] x 60 M N / H R x 80%@


C

12-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Table 7-Capacities and Areas of Troughed Belt Idlers-Equal Length Rolls -

m - 7 .7!9!,%1 ..
L ? -

Belt Trough Widtt Angle

Cross Section of Load ISq. Ft. Surcha


!

Capacity in Cu. Ft. >er Hour at 100 FP Surchal je Angle

22BEii
.081 .I12 147 188 .283 .462 .684 .950 1.260 1.613 2.009 2.449 2.933 4.030 5.302

"$.gr?'; ;-.
560 760 1000 1280 1920 3140 4640 6450 8540 10930 13620 16600 19880 27309 35921 700 970 1270 1620 2440 3970 5880 8170 10820 13850 17260 21030 25180 34597 45506 760 1050 1380 1750 2640 4300 6360 8820 11690 14960 18630 22700 27170 37322 49081

@ i : :

14 16 18 20 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 84 96

630 860 1130 1430 2150 3510 5200 7210 9550 12220 15220 18550 22210 30511 40128 770 1050 1380 1760 2640 4300 6360 8830 11700 14970 18640 22720 27200 37360 49134 820 1120 1470 1870 2810 4580 6770 9400 12440 15920 19820 24150 28910 39706 52210

Note: The data shown in Table 4 is based on standard edge distance = 0.055b b = Belt Width in Inches For good conveyor design, size belt to handle 80% of peak tonnage. Refer to Tables 1 and 3 for surcharge angles.

+ 0.9 inch.

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-13

Step 7 Determine Troughing (Carrying) ldler Load and Spacing


Calculated ldler Load (Ibs.) + (WM x KI)) . . =ICIL = ((WB .. ., x SI) + IML~ Where: WB = Belt weight (Ibs./ft.) use actual or estimate from Table 8 WM = Material weight (Ibs./ft.) x 2000) l ( 6 0 x FPM)~ TPH = Quantity of material conveyed (Tons per hour) FPM = Design belt speed (Feet per minute) SI = Spacing of idlers (ft.) see below and Table 9 K1 = Lump adjustment factor (see Table 11) Note: Actual weight of lump should be compared with WM value. In situations, it may be necessary to use actual lump weight as WM.
I

=I(TPH

IML = ldler misalignment load (Ibs.) due to idler height deviation and belt tension = [(D x T) / (6 x SI) ~ h e r e : l D = Misalignment (inches) T = Belt tension (Ibs.) SI = ldler spacing (feet)

When an idler is higher than adjacent idler, a component of belt tension will add load to that idler. The amount of height deviation can vary with the installation and type of idler, especially when training idlers are used. CEMA publication on conveyor installation standarts (Appendix D, Belt Convevors for Bulk Material, fifth edition or later) list recommendations on structure misalignment).

Spacing of Idlers:
Factors to be considered when selecting idler spacing are belt weight, material weight, idler rating, belt sag, idler life, belt rating and belt tension. Table 9 lists suggested normal troughing idler spacing for use in general engineering practice. Conveyor systems can be designed utilizing extended idler spacing andlor graduated idler spacing. Extended idler spacing is simply greater than normal spacing. Graduated idler spacing is greater than normal spacing at higher tension portions of the belt. Advantages may be lower idler cost (fewer used) and better belt training. For general conveyor design and selection, limit belt sag to 2% of idler spacing (Table 10). If other than normal idler spacing is used, care should be taken not to exceed idler rating and sag limits during starting and stopping. For a detailed engineering analysis on belt tensions, sag and extended idler spacing, use CEMA handbook "Belt Conveyors For Bulk Materials."

14-BELT CONVEYOR

IDLERS

'able 8-Estimated Average lelt Weight, Multiple-and {educed-Ply Belts, Lbs./ Ft.
lnches (b) rial Carried, 75-129

Table 10-Spacing for 2% Belt Sag

3.1 3.6 4 4.5 5.5


7

IN FEET = SI

Example: Wm = 85 LB/FT Wb = 15 LB/FT Si = 4 F T To = 2500 LBS Steel cable belts-increase above value by 50%. Actual belt weights vary with different constructions, manufacturers, cover gauges, etc. Use the above values for estimating. Obtain actual values from the belt manufacturer whenever possible.

'able 9-Suggested Normal Spacing in :eet of Belt Idlers (SI) ,/ ".=-: - .2:%&&&afiffi-di%&&&<ff: ,,:~.&k..:&~*$<~~?q ,', &2L-,..

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Belt Width Weight of MaterialHandled, Lbs. Per Cu. Ft. ~ e t u r * Inches 30 50 75 100 150 200 . Idlersf

1,

3.5 3.5

3.5 3.5

3.0 3.0

2.5 2.5

2.5 2.0

2.0 2.0

8 .O 8.0

Spacing may be limited by load rating of idler. See idler load ratings in tables. These spacings do not restrict the amount of belt sag to any specific percentage. See Table 4 for spacing of idlers adjacent to terminal pulleys. Recommendedspacing at loading points is half normal spacing listed unless impact forces indicate a smaller spacing.

Belt tension for 2% sag To = 6.25 x SI x (Wm + Wb)

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-1 5

Table 11-K, Lump Adjustment Factor

Step 8 Select Troughing (Carrying) ldler Series


Use CIL, belt width and troughing angle determined from previous steps and select the required idler series from Tables 12 thru 15. B) CIL should be equal to or less than idler load rating selected. C) See table 16 for idler roll recommendations. D) The troughing idler selection procedure for calculated idler load (CIL) does not include the following: 1. Impact force on idler at conveyor loading points. 2. Effect of belt transitions (head and tail pulley) on idler load. 3. Loads imposed on idlers located within vertical curve areas. Contact Goodman Conveyor Co. for any required assistance for these load conditions.
A)

Step 9 Determine Return ldler Load and Spacing.


Calculated ldler Load (Ibs.) =ICIL, = (WB x SI) + IML ( Refer to Step 7 for nomenclature. Belt sag between idlers should be limited to approximalely 2% of return idler spacing. If extended return idler spacing is used, belt sag should be investigated thoroughly.

Step 10 Select Return ldler Series.


A)
Use CIL, and belt width determined from previous steps and select the required idler series from tables 12 thru 15. B) CIL, should be equal to or less than idler load rating selected. C ) For long-center belt conveyors the use of Vee return idlers should be considered. D) Roll diameter and roll type for return idlers may be different from troughing side if desired. The return belt contacts the dirty side of the belt, resulting in abrasive wear of the idler roll surface. Materials build up on the roll and increase its effective diameter. Because the buildup is never uniform, and usually is less at the belt edges, the clean sections of the roll travel at a slower surface speed than that of the belt. This results in a relative slippage, there by accelerating wear of both the belt cover and the surface of the roll. Thus the life of the roll shell is usually shorter on return belt idlers than on carrying idlers. E) See Table 16 for idler roll recommendations.

16-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

hIF; ;

Table 12-Load Ratings for Series B Idlers, LBS (Riaid Frame)

Table 1%Load Ratings for Series C Idlers. LBS (Riaid Frame)

Trough Angle

Single Roll Return

Belt Width (Inches)

Trough Angle

200 350 450

Return

Return

(Inches)

200 350 450

18

900 900 900

475

18 24 30 36 42

410 410 410 410 410 410 410410410 410410396 390 363 351

220 190 165 155 140

RATINGS BASED ON MIN. LOF 30.000 HOURS A T 500 RPM

RATINGS BASED ON MIN. L* OF 60,000 HOURS AT 500 RPM FOR C AND CSL SERIES WlTH TAPERED ROLLER BEARING. BC SERIES WlTH BALL BEARING HOURS. HAS L,, OF 30,000 'USE CEMA D RETURN IDLER.

Table 14-Load Ratings for Series D Idlers, LBS (Rigid Frame)

Table 15-Load Ratings for Series E Idlers, LBS (Rigid Frame and Catenary Where Applicable)

I (Inches) 1 20" 1 350 1 450 (

Return

Return

78

850

1
102

RATINGS BASED ON MIN. L , OF 60,WO HOURS AT 500 RPM

250

1300

RATINGS BASED ON MIN. LOF 60.000 HOURSAT 500 RPM

NOTES:
1. 2.

3.
4.

TROUGHING IDLER LOAD RATINGS (TABLES 12 THRU 15) ARE FOR THREE EQUAL LENGTH ROLLS. LOAD RATINGS ALSO APPLY FOR IMPACT ROLLS. TROUGHING IDLER LOAD RATINGS ARE BASED ON A LOAD DISTRIBUTIONOF 70% ON CENTER ROLL AND 15% ON EACH END ROLL FOR ALL TROUGH ANGLES. UNEQUAL LENGTH ROLLS OR PICKING IDLERS ARE NOT COVERED BY THESE TABLES.

IDLER LIFE
Idler life is determined by a combination of many factors, such as seals, bearings, shell thickness, belt speed, lump sizelmaterial density, maintenance, environment, temperature and the proper series of idler to handle the maximum calculated idler load. While bearing life is often used as an indicator of idler life it must be recognized that the effect of other variables (e.g., seal effectiveness) may be more important in determining idler life than the bearings. Nevertheless, since bearing rating is the only variable for which laboratory tests have provided standard values, bearing L , life is used as a guide for establishing idler ratings. See page 28 for details on Goodman's exclusealing system. This time tested and field proven design is the best seal on sive PERMASEAL IImnon-purgeable the market.
BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-1 7

The definition of L,, for belt conveyor idlers: The basic rated life (number of operating hours at 500 RPM) based on a 90 percent statistical model which is expressed as the total number of revolutions 90 percent of the bearings in an apparently identical group of bearings subjected to identical operating conditions will attain or exceed before a defined area of material fatigue (flaking, spalling) occurs on one of its rings or rolling elements. The L,, life is also associated with 90 percent reliability for a single bearing under a certain load. Tables 12 thru 15 show load ratings for series B, C, D, and E idlers. These load ratings are based on the following: Series B load rating based on minimum L , of 30,000 hours at 500 RPM. Series BC (Ball Bearing) load rating based on minimum L , of 30,000 hours at 500 RPM. Series C (Tapered Roller Bearing) load rating based on minimum L,, of 60,000 hours at 500 RPM. Series D load rating based on minimum L , of 60,000 hours at 500 RPM. , of 60,000 hours at 500 RPM. Series E load rating based on minimum L These loads and L,, life ratings are minimum ratings for Goodman idlers. Actual values for load ratings and L,, life for specific series and belt sizes may be higher. In some cases the idler frame , life being a higher value. design is the limiting factor for load with L

Step 11 Determine idler bearing L,, life correction

IL,

(CORRECTED) = L,, (RATING) x K2 x K3A x K3B (IF APPLICABLE)]

A) Effect of Load on Predicted Bearing L , Life (K2 Factor) When calculated idler load (CIL) is less than load rating of series idler selected, the bearing L , life will increase. Figure 1 shows this relationship for either a tapered roller bearing or a ball bearing idler design. This chart can be used in conjunction with the type of service or life expectancy of the conveyor system. If the specified design life of the conveyor system exceeds the L,, life rating at rated load it may still meet specification based on percent of rated idler load vs calculated idler load (CIL).
Figure 1
10.0

K2 = Effect of Load on Predicted Bearing L,, LIFE

8
8

8.0 6 . 0 4.0 2 . 0
1 .o

SERIES B & BC BALL BEARING SERIES C, D & E TAPERED ROLLER BEARING

CIL (Calculated Idler Load) 1 Idler Load Rating (ILR)

B) Effect of belt speed on predicted bearing L,, life (K3A Factor)


.J

Goodman L,, life ratings are based on 500 RPM. Slower speeds increase life and faster speeds decrease life. Figure 2 shows this relationship.
18-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Figure 2
-.C

K3a = Effect of Belt Speed on Predicted Bearing L,, Life


I I

8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0

500 rpm K3A = Actual rpm


I

Roll Speed (RPM)


RPM = Belt Speed (FPM) x 12 Roll Diameter (in.) x 7c

The following table list belt speed at 500 RPM for standard roll diameters.

Roll Diameter (in.)

Belt Speed (FPM)

C) Effect of roll diameter on predicted bearing Llolife. (K3B Factor)

For a given belt speed, using larger diameter rolls will increase idler Llolife. Figure 3 depicts Llo life adjustments for various roll diameters using 4" diameter as a value of 1.Om Percent life increase can be calculated for each roll diameter increase. NOTE: Factor K3B is an optional step showing advantage of using larger diameter rolls. It can be used as a multiplier to save repeating step 11C if a larger diameter roll is used.

Figure 3
1.75

K3B = Effect of Roll Diameter on Predicted Bearing L , ,Life (Based on same belt speed)

b7 , 0 5 . l
LL
c

1.25 1.00
4

! /
5

Roll Diameter (in.)

Example: .5for 6" diameter = 1 -20 or 20% increase in L,. life. 1.25 for 5 diameter NOTE: In addition to increased predicted bearing Llo life, larger diameter rolls can increase idler wear life.

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-19

Step 12

Determine potential Idler Life due to effect of Environmental, Maintenance and Temperature. Factors K4A (Fig. 4), K4B (Fig. 5) and K4C (Fig. 6)

Hostile environmental conditions and the level of commitment to the belt conveyor installation and maintenance will affect idler life. THESE CONDITIONS ARE INDEPENDENT OF IDLER LOAD, L,, LIFE AND IDLER CLASS but can cause idler failure before obtaining predicted L , life rating. These conditions do not have an exact mathematical basis and therefore can be very subjective. Goodman Conveyor Co. has vast application and belt conveyor idler design experience which can be used to identify the idler life condition for the application and then arrive at solutions to obtain maximum idler life for that application. Expected or potential idler life may also be limited by shell wear. Shell wear can vary considerably with each installation. In addition to conveyed material characteristics, environmental and maintenance factors, idler alignment and belt cleaning can have a significant affect on shell wear and idler life. Table 16 may assist in idler roll selection. Contact your Goodman Conveyor Co. representative for assistance and recommendations.

Figure 4
1 .o

K4A = Effect of Maintenance on Potential Idler Life

GOOD

FAIR

POOR

Qpe of Maintenance

20-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Figure 5

K4B = Effect of Environmental Conditions on


Potential Idler Life

Environmental Conditions

Figure 6

K4C = Effect of Operating Temperature on Potential Idler Life

Temperature (degrees F)

Table 16 - Idler Roll Recommendations

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-21

Step 13 Determine Goodman Conveyor ldler Specification and Model Numbers from Table and Guide Below Table 17 - ldler Specification Information - -, ; .. - , -<., ~orme$&xj&k Series $&yl$$e~i& 'F&SCGE~A Sieries &:~i.bk.. Type of Servick
.-2

.*

'

'

.::'

L.

B BC C D E MDG E (Catenary)

BB

B C C D E None None

II None Ill & IV None V&VI None None

4&5 inch

Light Duty Medium Duty Medium Duty Medium to Heavy Duty Heavy Duty Medium Duty Heavy to Extra Heavy Duty

None MD MDS HD Same HD

4,5&6 inch 4,5&6 inch 5&6 inch 6&7 inch 5&6 inch 6, 6 k, 7 & 7% inch

ldler ldentification Guide (Examples)


36-C36A352-WB

Belt Width (36" Wide'

TTTTTT

d r Shell Gau

Belt Widt.. (36" Wide)

Idler Gage (Wide Base)

ldler Series (SeriesC)


No. of Rolls (2 oils)

Idler .Style (Training)

Roll Dia.

Abbreviations
Prefix (Series) B, BC, C, D, and E-(See Above) SL-Sealed For Life X-Special Feature MDG-Medium Duty Grain Internal A-Impact T-Training SQ-Scale Quality SS-Scale Service Suffix D-Rubber Disc E-Elastomer (Urethane) L-Live Shaft M-Massed End WB-Wide Base CQR-Catenary Quick Release CC-Catenary Chain CRK-Catenary Rod & Key CEH-Catenary Eye Hook

22-BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS

Note: Standard Base is furnished unless Wide Base (WB) is specified.

Appendix
Table 18-1 Troughing
ge Weight (L 3s.) of Rotating Pa ts-Steel Rolls

Table 19-Average Weight (Lbs.) of Return Idler Rotating Parts-Steel Rolls

Table 20-WK2(Lb.-ln.2) Average for Three Equal Roll Troughing Idlers

Table 21 -WK2(Lb.-ln.2) Average for Single Steel Return Idlers

BELT CONVEYOR IDLERS-23